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Adamson University

College of Engineering
Electrical Engineering Department

Series/Parallel Circuit
Experiment No. 6

Group No. 5
Tuesday/5:00-8:00 P.M
Date Performed: January 19, 2016
Date Submitted: January 26, 2016
RAZ, John Benedict E.

I.

Procedures and Setup:

1. Insert the Module DL 3155E01 in the console and set the


main switch to ON;
2. Determine the values of the three resistors R1, R2 and R3 on
the SERIES/PARALLEL CIRCUIT circuit block by using the
standard resistor colour code;
3. Write down the values in Tab.6.1;
4. Measure the resistances R1, R2 and R3 with a multimeter
set as ohmmeter set as in Fig.6.2a;
5. Write down the values in Tab.6.1;
6. Connect the two resistances R2 and R3 as in Fig.6.2b and
measure the equivalent resistance Rp of the parallel;
7. Write down the value in Tab.6.2;
8. Move the dotted terminal of the ohmmeter from the
resistance R3 to the resistance R1 and measure the total
resistance Rs and write the value in Tab.6.2;
9. Calculate both Rp and Rs and write the values in Tab.6.2;
10.
Compare the calculated values with the measured
ones and comment on the results;
11.
Set now the circuit as in Fig.6.2c with one multimeter
set as dc ammeter and the other one set as dc voltmeter;
12.
Measure the total current I and write the value in
Tab.6.3;
13.
Measure, with the voltmeter with the dotted terminals,
the voltage drops at the edges of R1, R2 and R3 and write
the values in Tab.6.3;
14.
Verify that UR2 is equal to UR3 and the sum of UR1 and
(UR2 or UR3) equals the source applied voltage;
15.
Use these values (U, Rs) in Ohms law formula to
calculate the total current I and write down the value in
Tab.6.3;
16.
Compare the calculate value I with the measured one
and comment on the results;
17.
Remove in Fig.6.2c one of the two jumper at a time
and observe how the values displayed on the instruments
change, by making the circuit in this way in the Series
Circuit configuration;

18.

Set the circuit as in Fig.6.2d with the two multimeters

set as dc ammeters;
19.
Measure the total current I (ammeter (1)) and the
current IR2 flowing in the resistance R2 (ammeter (2)) and
write down the values in Tab.6.4;
20.
Move the ammeter (2) between the terminals D and E
(by removing the cable) and measure the current I R3 flowing
in the resistance R3, with the terminals (B, C) joined with a
cable and write down the value in Tab.6.4;
21.
Write in Tab.6.4 to the value of the current that flows
in R1;
22.
Verify that the sum of the branch measured current (I R2
and IR3) is equal to the total current (I or IR1);
23.
Calculate the current through each resistor using
Ohms law and write down the values in Tab.6.4;
24.
Verify that the sum of the branch calculated currents
(IR2 and IR3) is equal to the total current IR1;
25.
Compare the measured values with calculated ones
and comment on the results;
Modification insertion
26.
Set the circuit as in Fig.6.2d with the ammeter (2)
inserted between D and E and join the terminals B and C
with a cable;
27.
Verify that the currents I R1 and IR3 are the ones
measured above at steps 20) and 21);
28.
Remove the cover of the Modifications/Faults simulator
and set the switch M4 to the ON position (covered dot);
29.
Observe the new measured values of the currents I R1
(I) and IR3 and write them down in Tab.6.4;
30.
Move the terminals of the ammeter (2) between B and
C and connect with a jumper D and E;
31.
Measure the current IR2 and write the value in Tab.6.4;
32.
Compare the current values with modification and
those with no modification and try to locate the cause of the
modification among the possible following ones:
a. R1 short-circuited

b. R2 has increased
c. R3 short-circuited
d. R3 has decreased
33.
Remove the instruments and all the jumpers and
measure both the resistances R1, R2 and R3 and the total
resistance RT and write the values in Tab.6.1;
34.
Comment on the results;
35.
Replace the switch M3 in the Off position;
Fault insertion
36.
Set the circuit as in Fif.6.2b to measure the parallel
resistance Rp and the equivalent resistance Rs;
37.
Set the switch F5 to the OFF (1) position (or press the
Fault button) to insert the Fault F5 in the circuit;;
38.
Measure Rp and Rs and write down the values in
Tab.6.2;
39.
Perform further operations to locate which fault has
been inserted by compiling the squares of the tables tab.6.3
and Tab.6.4, relative to fault F5;
40.
Annotate your comments about the F5 fault insertion:
41.
Replace the Fault switch F5 in the ON position (or
press the Fault button);
42.
Set the circuit as in Fig.6.2b to measure the parallel
resistance Rp and the equivalent resistance Rs;
43.
Set the switch F6 to the ON position (or press the Fault
button) to insert the Fault F6 in the circuit;
44.
Measure Rp and Rs and write down the values in
Tab.6.2;
45.
Perform further operations to locate which fault has
been inserted by compiling the squares of the tables Tab.6.3
and Tab.6.4, relative to fault F6;
46.
Annotate your comments about the F6 fault insertion:
47.
Replace the Fault switch F4 in the ON position (or
press the Fault button) and cover the Faults/Modifications
simulator.

II.

Data and Results:

R1 []

R2 []

R3 []

Measured value
325.6

1205

2394

Table 6.1
Resistance (P)
Resistance (S)
Measured
Calculated
Measured
Calculated
800
801.55
1125
1127.15
Table 6.2
Measured
IT(mA)
13.5

VT(Volt)
15.20

V1
4.38

Calculated
[IT(mA)=VT/RT]
V2
10.80
Table 6.3

V3
10.80

Measured

13.47

Calculated

IT(mA)

I1

I2

I3

I1

I2

I3

13.45

13.45

8.94

4.548

13.45

8.96

4.51

Table 6.4

III.

Analysis:

On the first part of the experiment, we measured the three


different resistor and add them in a parallel and series way. Weve
seen that when adding parallel, it should be added by implying 1 over
the total sum of the reciprocal values of the resistors. While for series
connection, you will just add their individual values. Moreover when
connected in a series, the voltage before and after each resistor adds
up to the total voltage. With the same connection, current before and
after each resistor is the same. However, in a parallel circuit, the
voltage before and after each resistor is the same. The currents
before and after each resistor add up to the total current.

IV.

Conclusion:

The concept of series and parallel circuits shows us the basic


electrical engineering concepts showing the difference of the series
circuit from the parallel circuit and the relationship between the
parameters involved in the Ohms Law. A series circuit is a circuit
having a constant flow of current throughout the path but having a
variable individual voltage that will depend on the number of the
resistors present. We can say that the resistance is directly
proportional to the voltage while maintaining the flow of current
constant. We can also conclude that the resistance is a load when the
amount of load increases the flow of current the voltage must also
increase to keep the flow of electricity. On the other side of the line,
the parallel circuit is a circuit where the total voltage used is equal to
the individual voltage used and the flow of current is varying
depending on the values of the resistors. The total resistance is the
reciprocal of the sum of the reciprocal of the individual resistance. In
this particular circuit we can say that the resistance is indirectly
proportional to the flow of current, as the resistance increases the
individual current decreases. Comparing the two types of basic
circuits we can say that parallel circuit is more convenient and
appropriate to use because it uses different current that is why when
one of the current is zero ampere other current will not be affected
resulting to a continuous flow of electricity.

V.

Recommendation:

This experiment gave the student the basic foundation of


electrical and I suggest to reinforce the experiment like adding more
resistors and somehow make the circuit complex. In these way,
students will enhance their circuit analysis and understanding of
different connections.

VI.

Guide Question:

1. The sum of the voltage through each branch in a series-parallel


circuit:

a. Is less than the applied voltage?


b. Equals the voltage
c. Is greater than the applied voltage
d. None of the above
2. Calculate the equivalent resistance RE (k-Ohm) of the following
circuit:
a. 3.532 k-Ohm
b. 14.13 k-Ohm
c. 7.065 k-Ohm
d. 17.065 k-Ohm
3. Calculate the unknown resistance Rx (k-Ohm) of the following circuit
knowing the total equivalent resistance R:
a. 4 k-Ohm
b. 2 k-Ohm
c. 1 k-Ohm
d. 0.5 k-Ohm