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VII SEMESTER

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY ENGINEERING


Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours

: 4 (L)
: 52

Credits : 4.0
CIE Marks : 50

Total Tutorial Hours

SEE Marks : 50

Sub. Code

: 7CH01

Course Outcomes: Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:
1. Illustrate and familiarize the basic concepts scope of environmental safety.
2. Understand the standards of professional conduct that are published by professional safety
organizations and certification bodies.
3. Explain the ways in which environmental health problems have risen due to air and water
pollution.
4. Illustrate the role of hazardous waste management and use of critical thinking to identify and
assess environmental health risks.
5. Discuss concepts of measurement of emissions and design emission measurement devices.
Unit I
Introduction: Safety programs, engineering ethics, acceptable risk, inherent safety, seven significant
disasters.
4 Hrs
Toxicology: Entry, elimination, and effects of toxicants on organisms, toxicological studies, dose
versus response, relative toxicity, and threshold limit values.
4 Hrs
Unit II
Industrial Hygiene: Laws and regulations, OSHA, EPA, DHS, Material Safety Data Sheets.
Identification, evaluation, and control of industrial hygiene.
8 Hrs
Unit III
Fires and Explosions: The fire triangle, distinction between fires and explosions, definitions,
flammability characteristics of liquids and vapors. Limiting oxygen concentration and inerting,
flammability diagram, ignition energy, auto-ignition, auto-oxidation, adiabatic compression, ignition
sources, sprays and mists, explosions.
9 Hrs
Prevention of Fires and Explosions: Inerting, static electricity, explosion-proof equipment and
instruments, ventilation, and sprinkler systems.
5 Hrs
Unit IV
Chemical Reactivity: Identification, characterization, and control of reactive chemical hazards.
Reliefs: Concepts, definitions, location, types, and characteristics. Relief systems.
Hazards Identification: Process hazards checklists, hazards surveys, hazards and operability studies
(HAZOP), safety reviews, personnel protective equipment (PPE).
9 Hrs
Unit V
Risk Assessment: Review of probability theory, event trees, fault trees, quantitative risk analysis
(QRA), layers of protection analysis (LOPA).
4 Hrs
Safety Procedures and Designs: Process safety hierarchy and strategies, managing safety, operating
procedures, permit procedures, safety reviews and accident investigations. Designs for process safety,
fires and explosions, runaway reactions, and handling dusts, disaster management plan (DMP).
9 Hrs

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 1 of 25

TEXTBOOK
1. Crowl, D. A. and Louvar, J. F, Chemical Process Safety (2011) (Ed.3): Fundamentals with
Applications, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Speegle, M (2013) , Safety, Health, and Environmental Concepts for the Process Industry,
Delmar/Cengage Learning, Clifton Park, NY
2. Sanders, R. E (2005) (ED.3), Chemical Process Safety: Learning from Case Histories
Elsevier, Burlington, MA

TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
Contact Hours/ Week

: 4 (L) + 1 (T)

Total Lecture Hours


Total Tutorial Hours

: 52
: 13

Sub. Code

: 7CH02

Credits : 4.5
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: At the end of the course the student will have the knowledge to
Utilize information obtained from solutions of the balance equations to obtain engineering
quantities of interest;
Recognize and apply analogies among momentum, heat and mass transfer;
Understand relevance of transport principles in diverse applications of chemical, biological,
and materials science and engineering
Unit I
Viscosity And The Mechanism Of Momentum Transport: Newtons law of viscosity (NLV),
Newtonian and non - Newtonian fluids, effect of temperature and pressure on viscosity of fluids.
Numerical problems on the application of Newtons law of viscosity.
4 Hrs
Velocity Distribution in Laminar Flow: Steady state shell momentum balance, general boundary
conditions applicable to momentum transport problems of Chemical Engineering. The flow situations
for a) flow over a flat inclined plate, b) flow through a circular tube, c) flow through annulus, d) flow
between parallel plate and through a slit for laminar flow are required. Simple numerical problems
using the equations derived in the above fluid flow situations
.
8 Hrs
Unit II
Thermal Conductivity and Mechanism of Energy Transport: Fourier law of heat conduction.
Temperature and pressure dependence on thermal conductivity of solids and fluids. Numerical
problems on the application of Fouriers law of heat conduction.
5 Hrs
Temperature Distribution in Solids and in Laminar Flow: Steady state shell energy balances. General
boundary conditions applicable to the heat conduction problems of Chemical Engineering for, a) heat
conduction with internal generation by electrical, nuclear, viscous b) heat conduction through
compound walls, overall heat transfer coefficient, c) heat conduction in a cooling fin: Forced and Free
conduction heat transfer problems (only derivations).
7 Hrs
Unit III
Diffusivity and Mechanism of Mass Transport: Ficks law of diffusion, Effect of temperature and
pressure on diffusivity in liquid and gases.
3 Hrs
Concentration Distributions In Solids And In Laminar Flow: Steady state shell mass balance, General
boundary conditions applicable to the mass transport problems of chemical engineering, on a)
Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur
Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

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Diffusion through stagnant gas and liquid film b) Equimolar counter diffusion c) Diffusion with
homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction d) Diffusion into falling film-forced convection mass
transfer.
9 Hrs
(Note: In all above one-dimensional problems only to be considered)
Unit IV
Analogies between Momentum, Heat and Mass Transport: Numerical problems using analogies. a)
Reynolds analogy b) Prandtls analogy c) Chilton and Colburn analogy & d) Martinnellis analogy.
8 Hrs
Unit V
Equations of Change: Equation of continuity, equation of motion and Navier-Stokes equation,
Application of this equation in solving simple steady problems previously solved.
8 Hrs
TEXT BOOKS
1. Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot (2005) (Ed.2), Transport Phenomena, John Wiley
2. Wilke, Wikcs and Watson (Ed.5)(2007), Momentum, Heat and Mass Transport, John Wiley

REFERENCE BOOK
1. Robert S. Brodley and Henry C. Heshes
Approach

(2003) Vol.2, Transport Phenomena Unified

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS AND MODELLING IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


Contact Hours/ Week

: 4 (L) +1 (T)

Credits : 4.5

Total Lecture Hours

: 52

CIE Marks : 50

Total Tutorial Hours

: 13

SEE Marks : 50

Sub. Code

: 7CH03

Course Outcome: by the end of the Course the students will be able to
Develop the program for some of the chemical engineering application if the field of
reaction eng, heat and mass transfer, momentum transfer, etc
Develop the mathematical models for some of the chemical process and also obtain the
solution for the model developed.
Unit I
Numerical Techniques: (Algorithm and C program)
Simultaneous linear algebraic equation- Gauss Jordan (material balance for distillation and mixing),
Non-linear algebraic equation-Newton Raphson (Specific volume of binary mixture using real gas
equations) Ordinary Differential Equation- R-K Method (dCA/dt= K Ca2)
Numerical Integration-Simpsons 1/3 Rule (Batch Reactor to find time) Curve Fitting- Least Square
(Arrhenius)
8 Hrs
Unit - II
Applications: (Algorithm and C program)
P X, Y and T X, Y evaluation
Calculation of Bubble Point and Dew Point for Ideal multi-component system
Flash Vaporization for multi-component system
Design of Adiabatic Batch Reactor, PFR, CSTR
Adiabatic Flame Temperature
14 Hrs
Unit - III
Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur
Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 3 of 25

Design: (Algorithm and C Program)


Double pipe Heat Exchanger (Area, Length and Pressure drop)
Shell Tube Heat Exchanger (Area, Number of tubes, Pressure drop)
Distillation Column (Bubble cap- Stage wise calculation for binary mixture)

8 Hrs

Unit - IV
Modelling:
Models and model building, principles of model formulations, precautions in model building,
Fundamental laws: Review of shell balance approach, continuity equation, energy equation, equation
of motion, transport equation of state equilibrium and Kinetics, classification of mathematical models.
8 Hrs
Unit V
Mathematical Modeling and Solutions to the Following:
Basic tank model -Level V/s time
Multi component flash drum
Batch Distillation -Vapor composition with time
Batch Reactor
Three CSTR in series
Heat Exchanger (co-current and counter current) - Steady state Energy Balance
14 Hrs
TEXT BOOKS
1. M Shanthakumar (1987) (Ed.1), Computer based Numerical Analysis, KPS publisher,1987
2. Myers, A.L and Seider. W.D (1976) Introduction to Chemical Engineering and Computer
Calculations ,Prentice Hall
3. William. L. Luyben (1990)Process Modeling Simulation and Control for Chemical
Engineers 2e, McGraw Hill
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. H. Scott Fogler, Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, 2e, Prentice Hall, 2001.
2. Smith J.M and H. C. Vanness (1996) Introduction to Chemical Engg. Thermodynamics 5e, MGH
CHEMICAL EQUIPMENT DESIGN II
Contact Hours/ Week

: 3 (L) + 2

Credits : 4.0

Total Lecture Hours

: 39

CIE Marks : 50

Total Practice Hours


Sub. Code

: 13
: 7CH04

SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: At the end of the course the student will be able to
Differentiate between different types of heat exchangers
Know the different components of HE
Do detailed design and drawing of DPHE, STHE and condenser
Know the function of evaporator, Learn about boiling point elevation, different components of
evaporator
Design and draw the evaporator
Differentiate between bubble cap distillation column and packed bed distillation column
Design and draw the bubble cap distillation column
Design and draw the absorption column
Design the functional requirement of the rotary drier.

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 4 of 25

Unit-I
Detailed Chemical Engineering Process Design of the following equipment. Necessary aspects
studied in Chemical Equipment Design are to be applied for mechanical design. Use of standard
code books to be taught. The detailed dimensional drawings shall include sectional front view, Full
Top/Side view depending on equipment and Major component drawing with dimensioning and Part
Template.
Shell & Tube Heat Exchanger.

Evaporator Single Effect

Bubble Cap Distillation Column

Packed Bed Absorption Column

8 Hrs
Unit-II
8 Hrs
Unit-III
8 Hrs
Unit-IV
8 Hrs
Unit V

Rotary Dryer.

7 Hrs

NOTE: The question paper to contain two full design problems (100 Marks each) for the equipment
from the above list and student to answer any One.
Perrys Chemical Engineers Handbook shall be allowed in the examination as reference.
IS Code 4503 for Heat Exchangers (if required) shall be permitted?
The answer shall include detailed process design steps using the data given in the problem,
mechanical design for component dimensions and drawing (Sectional Front View, Top/Side View and
major Component Drawings with Part Template)
TEXT BOOKS
1. R. H. Perry & D. W. Green, Chemical Engineers Handbook -, 7e, McGraw Hill, 1998.
2. Donald Q. Kern, Process Heat Transfer, McGraw Hill, 1997.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Rober E Treybal, Mass Transfer Operations , McGraw Hill, 1981


J. M. Coulson & J. F. Richardson, Chemical Engineering , Vol 6, Pregman Press, 1993
Brownell & Young, Process Equipment Design Vessel Design, John Willey, 1951.
M. V. Joshi, Process Equipment Design, Macmillan & Co. India, Delhi, 3e,reprint 1998.
S. D. Dawande, Process Design of Equipment Vol II, Central Techno Publications. 3e.
2003.
6. IS Code Shell & Tube Heat Exchanger. IS 4503, B.I.S., New Delhi, 1969
PROCESS CONTROL LAB
Lab Hours/ Week

:3

Sub. Code

: 7CHL1

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Credits : 1.5
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Page 5 of 25

Course Outcome: Control the various process variables such as pressure, flow, pH, temperature etc.
1. Interacting tanks
2. Non Interacting tanks
3. Thermometer
4. Manometer
5. Single tank system
6. Characteristics of transducers [Pressure]
7. Characteristics of transducers [Temperature]
8. Flow Process Controller [On and Off, P, PD, PI, PID]
9. Pressure process controller [On and Off, P, PD, PI, PID]
10. pH controller
11. Liquid level controller (P, PI, On & Off)
12. Liquid level controller (PD & PID)
NOTE: Minimum of 10 experiments from the above are to be conducted.
NOTE: Evaluation marks at the end of each experiment should be displayed in the notice board

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 6 of 25

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS AND SIMULATION LAB


Lab Hours/ Week

:3

Sub. Code

: 7CHL2

Credits : 1.5
CIE Marks : 50

SEE Marks : 50
Course Outcome: By the end of the Course the students will be able to
Solve some of the problems related to chemical engineering using C program
Understand the functioning and use of simulation software.
PART- A
Numerical methods and Computer Applications
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

20 marks

Non-linear algebraic equation-Newton Raphson(Specific volume of binary mixture)


Ordinary Differential Equation- R-K Method (dCA/dt= K Ca2)
Numerical Integration-Simpsons 1/3 Rule (Batch Reactor to find time)
Curve Fitting- Least Square (Nre V/s f )
Calculation of Bubble Point and Dew Point for Ideal multi-component system
Flash Vaporization for multi-component system
Design of Adiabatic Batch Reactor, PFR
Adiabatic Flame Temperature
Double pipe Heat Exchanger (Area, Length and Pressure drop)
Distillation Column (Bubble cap)
PART B

Simulation

30 Marks

Introduction to suggested software available (flow sheeting)


Simulation Studies of flash drum, Distillation Column, CSTR, PFR, Heat Exchanger
Simulation Studies of pump, compressor, cyclone, heater
Process simulation study involving mixing, reactor, Distillation, Heat Exchanger, any of the following
process:
a) Ethylene Glycol from Ethylene oxide
b) Atmospheric distillation of crude oil
c) Phthalic anhydride process
d) Aromatic stripper with recycle stream.(Benzene, Toluene,Xylene)
e) Styrene from Ethyl Benzene
NOTE:
One question from PART A Excluding Numerical Techniques - 20 marks
One Question from PART B (Simulation of any above process) 30 marks
SOFTWARES SUGGESTED:
1) HYSYS 2) CHEMCAD 3) DESIGN-II 4) PROSIM
NOTE: Evaluation marks at the end of each experiment should be displayed in the notice board

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 7 of 25

Major Project
Lab Hours/ Week

:2

Credits : 2.0

Sub. Code

: 7CHMP1

CIE Marks : 100


SEE Marks : 0

The project can be taken by group of 4 students and major project can be carried out in the
dept. under a guide or outside the department in institute/ company with a guide from the dept. and co
guide from the institute/ company.
Major project is evaluated over 2 semesters (VII & VIII). No credit in the VII sem., major
project is evaluated for 100 marks in VII semester.
Relevance of topic

10 marks

Report

20 marks

Evaluation by

25 marks

guide
Presentation

30 marks

Viva

15 marks

TOTAL

100 marks

Industrial Training
Lab Hours/ Week
Sub. Code

:2
: 7CHIT1

Credits : 0.0
CIE Marks : 0
SEE Marks : 0

Students have to undergo for a period of 6 weeks minimum during the vacation between even and odd
semesters of II or III year. Those students who are unable to complete during these period will have to
undergo training after VIII semester and the VIII semester results will be announced only after the
successful completion of Industrial Training.
Evaluation by DSEC is for 100 marks. This is a mandatory subject and carries ZERO credit. Student
has to get a minimum of 40 % marks for a pass. If a student fails, then the training has to be repeated
in its entirety.
Evaluation by the supervisor of the

25 marks

industry
Evaluation by DSEC
1.Relevance of training programme

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

10 marks

Page 8 of 25

2.Report

25 marks

Evaluation of training by DSEC

40 marks

TOTAL

100 marks

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 9 of 25

VIII SEMESTER
BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CH 01

Credits : 3.0
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: At the end of the course the student will be able to
Understanding of Microbiology and Biochemistry basics.
Understanding the basics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and cell culture.
Understanding basic bioprocess design and operation.
Ability to choose a right bioreactor for a given bioprocess.
Knowledge of downstream processing operations.
UNIT I
Microbiology: Scope, structure of cells: Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic, characterization and
classification of microorganisms Taxonomy, environmental and industrial microbiology, and
control of microorganisms.
6Hrs
UNIT II
Biochemistry: Chemicals of life Lipids, sugars and polysaccharides; amino acids, proteins and
enzymes; vitamins, biopolymers, nucleic acids (RNA, DNA) and their derivatives.
7 Hrs
UNIT III
Enzyme Catalyzed Reactions: Mechanism and kinetics using various models, evaluation of kinetic
parameters, factors affecting enzyme activity: Effect of inhibitors, temperature, pH etc. Determination
of kinetic parameters for various types of inhibitions, Dixon method, types and application of enzyme
immobilization, enzyme Nomenclature.
9Hrs
UNIT - IV
Biomass Production in Cell Cultures: Ideal reactors for kinetic measurements Batch and
continuous reactors, Monod growth kinetics and other forms of growth, death Kinetics, growth cycles,
phases for batch cultivation.
7Hrs
UNIT V
Fermentation Technology: Ideal bioreactors, medium formulation, operation and maintenance of
typical aseptic aerobic fermentation processes, alternate bioreactor configurations, design of
sterilization Equipment. Downstream Processing: Steps involved in product recovery operations,
typical operations involved filtration, centrifugation, sedimentation, chromatography and emerging
technologies including membrane separation techniques
10Hrs
TEXT BOOK
1. Shuler, M. L. and Kargi, F., Bioprocess Engineering Basic Concepts, Second Edition,
Prentice-Hall, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2002.
2. Casid Bailey, J. E. and Ollis, D. F., Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals, Second
Edition, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Singapore, 1986.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Rao, D. G., Introduction to Biochemical Engineering, Second Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill
Education Private Limited, New Delhi, 2010.

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 10 of 25

ADVANCED PETROLEUM ENGINEERING


Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP821

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: A graduate of this course can:


Apply the knowledge of petroleum engineering to the design of wells and production
facilities to optimise hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs in a safe, clean and
efficient manner
Approach engineering problems in a logical way and be able to formulate an optimum
solution
Determine and evaluate relevant data from a range of sources to optimise the decision making
process
Work clearly and concisely, and be able to communicate engineering findings in a variety of
ways via written, verbal or electronic communications
Use technological resources to effectively collect production and exploration
information and communicate findings to others
Develop an understanding of the use of knowledge, and how it can be used for
personal development to enhance the engineer's future career
Recognise the global nature of the oil and gas industry and its relationship to and
impact on world energy supply and demand issues
Demonstrate an awareness and understanding of cultural perspectives and practices
affected by oil and gas production
Apply lessons learnt in a professional manner in all areas of engineering design,
demonstrating leadership and ethical behavior at all times
Unit I
Treatment Techniques: Types of impurities present and various desulphur ization
processes. Production and treatment of LPG: LNG Technology: Sweetening operations
for gases including mer ox, Ethanolamine, copper chlor ide, Stratford etc. Catalytic
desulphur ization. Treatment of ker osene: Dearomatisation and mer ox Treatment of
Diesel, Naphtha: Desulphurization by hydr ogen and catalysts Treatment of lubes:
Sulphuric acid, clay treatment. Solvent treatment - Phenol, Furfural, Duosol. Wax and
Purification: Dew axing - chilling and pr essing Solvent Dew axing Propane deasphalt
8 Hrs
Unit II
Ther mal Processes: Ther mal cracking r eactions -Theory of ther mal cracking properties
of cracked mater ials and factors influencing the properties of cracked mater ials.
Visbr eaking, Dubbs two coil crac king process
6 Hrs
Unit III
Catalytic cracking: Comparison of ther mal and catalytic cracking
carbonium
Ion
chemistry. Feedstock r equirements. Cracking conditions Commercial cracking catalysts
Various catalytic cracking pr oces ses Fixed bed crackers Moving bed cracker s
Fluid Catalytic Cracking, Flexi Cracking Orthoflow r eactor
8 Hrs
Unit - IV
Coking Theor y of coking various types of coking process. Delayed coking, Fluid
coking, Contact coking, Flexi coking N aphtha Cracking: Naphtha cracking for ethylene
gas feed stock selection and gas yield. Hydro-cracking: T heor y of Hydr o-cracking,
Catalysts for hydr o-cracking. Various types of hydro -cracking processes:-lsomax,
LIOP, Two stage. Single stage moving bed.
8 Hrs
Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur
Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 11 of 25

Unit V
Catalytic Refor ming: Theory of refor ming, factors influencing r efor ming, refor ming
catalysts, feedstock r equir ements: Plat for ming, Isoplus Hondri for ming, Refining
for ming, Power for ming, Flexi for ming etc. Alkylation Process: - T heory and processes
H2S04 Alkylation, HF alkylation pr ocess. Isomerisation Theor y Aluminium chloride
Process. Asphalt Technology: - Chemical structure of asphalt, types of asphalt. Air
blowing of bitumen. Sulfur Recover y: - Catalytic {CLAUS} and Non catalytic process
for recover y of sulfur from gases.
9 Hrs
TEXT BOOK
1. Nelson WL(Ed.4)(1958), Petroleum Refinery Engineering, , Mc. Graw Hill
2. B K Bhaskara Rao(2007) (Ed.5), Modern Petroleum Refining processes 5e,
Oxford & IBH
REFERENCE BOOK
1. Delmom, Hydrotr eatment and Hydr o-Cracking of is fractions, Allied publishers
2. Hobson, G.P and Paul.W, Modem Petr oleum Technology, John Wiley, 1973
3. Frick.T.C, Petroleum Production, Hand Book, Vols. I and 2, McGraw Hi ll, 1962.
DESIGN OF POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENTS
Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP822

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: By the end of the course student will be able to:
Develop an understanding of the legislation that is used to govern environmental risks and
issues within Victoria;
Develop improved understanding of the principles and application of environmental
management tools including legislation and regulation,
Develop improved research, problem-solving and analytical skills;
Have experience in real-world problem solving through a research project for an external
client;
Develop skills in communicating and working with a client and other team members;
Develop insight as to how different environmental tools are used in a range of different
industries to provide better environmental outcomes; and
Develop skills in preparing a sound business case for environmental change
Unit I
Introduction: Chemical Engineering Fundamentals - Units and Dimensions, Conservation Law for
Mass, Conservation Law for Energy, Conservation Law for Momentum, Stoichiometry. Chemical
Engineering Principles - Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, Mass Transfer Operations, Thermodynamics,
Chemical Kinetics, Process Control and Process Design.
6 Hrs
Unit II
Air Pollution Control Equipment: Fluid Particle Dynamics, Mechanical Collectors, Electrostatic
Precipitators, Venturi Scrubbers, Absorption and Adsorption.
9 Hrs

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 12 of 25

Unit III
Water Quality and Wastewater Treatment: Regulations, Characteristics, Water Chemistry,
Physical Treatment, Biological Treatment, Chemical Treatment, Sludge Handling and Water Quality
Analysis
9 Hrs
Unit - IV
Solid Waste: Regulations, Characteristics, Nuclear/Radioactive Waste, Superfund, Municipal Waste,
Hazardous Waste Incineration and Hospital/Medical Waste.
9 Hrs
Unit V
Pollution Prevention, Health, Safety Management: Source Reduction, Recycle/Reuse, Ultimate
Disposal, Domestic Applications, Health Risk Analysis, Hazard Risk Assessment, Industrial
Applications, Indoor Air Quality and ISO 14000
6 Hrs
TEXT BOOKS
1. Metcalf & Eddy )2003, Wastewater engineering Treatment and Reuse, Tata McGraw-Hill
Edition
2. N. De. Nevers (1995), Air Pollution Control Engineering, McGraw Hill
3. J. Jeffrey Peirce (1997), Environmental Pollution and Control, 4th edition, Elsevier Science &
Technology Books
REFERENCE BOOK
1. Joseph P. Reynolds John S. Jeris, Louis Theodore (2002), Handbook of Chemical and
Environmental engineering calculations, A John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Publication
FERMENTATION TECHNOLOGY
Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP823

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: By the end the course student will be able to understand
Suitable isolation using the selection of the desired characteristics
Select preservation technique to maintain cultures in different conditions
Use different techniques to improve industrial microorganism
Understand the components of the media and suggest a suitable media for industrial
fermentation
Identify the different components and alternatives of sterilization for the fermenter, feeds, and
the air.
Design a filtration apparatus as a part of the sterilization as unit operation in fermentation
process
Be capable of using basic techniques to produce a high concentration of spores for use as an
inoculums in fungal processes
Unit I
Introduction to Fermentation Processes: The range of fermentation Processes: Microbial Biomass,
Enzymes, Metabolites and Transformation Processes; Development of fermentation Industry;
Components of Fermentation Process; Microbial Growth Kinetics A Review: Batch Culture;
Continuous Culture; Fed-batch Culture; Applications;
6 Hrs
Unit II
Isolation, Preservation and Improvement of Industrial Microorganisms:
Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur
Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

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Isolation Methods utilizing the selection of desired characteristics; Isolation Methods not utilizing the
selection of desired characteristics; Preservation Methods: At Low temperature, Dehydration, and
their quality control; The selection and Isolation of induced mutants improving yields of secondary
metabolites; Use of recombinant systems for the improvement of industrial microorganisms;
9 Hrs
Unit III
Media for Industrial fermentations: Typical Media and formulation; Sources of Energy, Carbon,
Nitrogen, Minerals, vitamins, precursors, Oxygen and others; Sterilization of Media: Medium
Sterilization; Design of Batch and Continuous Sterilization; Sterilization of Fermenter, Feed, Air;
Filtration of Air and Design of Filters;
9 Hrs
Unit - IV
Development of Inocula For Industrial Fermentations: The development of Inocula for yeast,
bacterial, fungal and streptomycete processes; Aseptic inoculation of plant Fermenter.
9Hrs
Unit V
Design of a Fermenter: Basic functions of a Fermenter; Body Construction; Aeration and Agitation;
Maintenance of aseptic conditions; Valves; Fermenter types: Packed tower, Tower Fermenter; Wald
of-Fermenter, Acetators and Cavitators, The cyclone column, Cylinder-conical vessels, Airlift
Fermenters, Deep-jet Fermenter, Rotating Disc Fermenter etc. Instrumentation and Control:
Control Systems: Manual, automatic and their combination; Methods of measurement of for Process
Variables: Temperature, Flow of gases and liquids, Pressure, Safety valves, Shaft Power, Rate of
stirring, Foam, Weight, DO, Exit gas, pH, Redox etc.; On-line analysis of other chemical factors;
Application of computers in fermentation industry;
6 Hrs
TEXT BOOK
1. Peter F. Stanbury, Alan Whitaker and Hope (1995), Principles of Fermentation
Technology, Butterworth-Heinemann
REFERENCE BOOK
1. Bailey and Ollis, Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill,
1976.

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 14 of 25

PILOT PLANT AND SCALE UP METHODS


Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP824

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: By the end of this course student will be able to:
Differentiate between pilot plant and model.
Able to develop a prototype (Large scale plant) based on pilot plant studies.
Correlate the performance of geometrically similar paddle, propeller and turbine mixers.
Differentiate similarity and distorted similarity
Differentiate dimensional analysis and differential equation techniques.
Advantages and disadvantages of dimensional analysis technique over differential equation
technique.
Define regime, chemical regime, dynamic regime and mixed regime.
Analyze the effect of temperature and agitation on chemical reaction rates.
Designing a piece of equipment by successive approximation method (Extrapolation).
Able to eliminate boundary effects in various chemical systems.
Scaling up of equipments like heat exchangers, evaporator, and packed towers
Analyze the problems involved in chemical engineering equipments.
Scaling up of equipments like agitated vessel and chemical reactors.
Principal applications of mixing equipment in process industries.
Transfer from batch to continuous operation of chemical reactors.
Unit I
Introduction: pilot plant, prototypes and models.
Principles Of Similarity static, dynamics, kinematics, thermal and chemical similarities criteria and
examples.
8 Hrs
Unit II
Dimensional Analysis: differential equation, Regime concept.

8 Hrs

Unit III
Scale (up / down) equation, extrapolation, boundary effects.

8 Hrs

Unit - IV
Scale up problem on transfer operation, momentum, heat and mass transfer.

8 Hrs

Unit V
Scale up problems on mixing, agitated vessels and chemical reactors.

7 Hrs

TEXT BOOKS
1. Johnstone and Thring (1957), Pilot plants Models and scale up method in Chemical
Engineering.
2. Ibrahim and Kuloor, Pilot Plants and scale up studies.
REFERENCE BOOK
1. Horker and backhunt, Process plant design.

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 15 of 25

PETROCHEMICALS
Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP831

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: By the end of the course student will be able to understand
Will know the complete operation s of Petrochemical Industries
Will acquire basic understanding of reaction & manufacturing methods
Unit I
Definitions of petr ochemical, petrochemicals industries in India, principal raw
mater ials, introduction to chemicals from C 1 , C 2 , C 3 and C 4 compounds. Chemicals
from C 1 compounds - manufactur e of methanol and chlor omethanes. Manufactur e o f
perchlor o ethylene, Trichlor o ethylene
8 Hrs
Unit II
Chemicals fr om C 2 compounds - ethylene and acetylene, ethanol, polyethylene,
ethylene dichloride, acetaldehyde, vinyl chloride, ethylene oxide, ethanol amines vinyl
acetate, acetic acid.
8 Hrs
Unit III
Chemical from C 3 compounds - Isopr opanol, acetone, lumen (isopropyl benzene) ,
acrylonitrile, isoprene, polypr opylene (epichlor o hydrin), and propylene oxide. 8 Hrs
Unit - IV
Chemical fr om C 4 compounds - butadiene dehydr ogenation of butage
(Houdry),
dehydr ogenation of butylene, dehydr ogenation -dehydration ethanol, steam cracking
of hydr ocarbons.
6 Hrs
Unit V
Chemicals from aromatics. Primary raw material Hydroalkylation. Manufacturing of phenol - 5 methods, styr ene - 2 methods, pthalic Anhydr ide (1) maleic anhydr ide,
nitrobenzene, aniline. Manufactur e of industrial dyes based on petroleum feed stocks.
9 Hrs
TEXT BOOKS
1. B.K.B.Rao, Petrochemicals
2. Chem tech II, III and IV Published by chemical engg. Education development
center IIT, Madras.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Dryden and Gopal rao, Out lines of chemical technology - 3 r d edition
2. Shrieve's, Shrieves chemical process industries - 5 t h edition

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 16 of 25

MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS


Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP832

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: By the end of the course student will be able to:
Select and organize information for any environmental systems
Identify assumptions and underlying relationships.
Synthesize information, and draw reasoned inferences.
Formulate an appropriate problem solving strategy.
Evaluate the feasibility of the strategy.
Unit I
Introduction: Scope of Environmental modeling, Mass Balances, Model Calibration and verification.
Transport phenomena Advection, Diffusion/Dispersion, Advection-Dispersion equation, Lake
Dispersion Calculassions, Simple Transport models.
7 Hrs
Unit II
Conventional Pollutants in Rivers: Mass Balance equation Plug Flow system, Streeter-Phelps
equation, Modification to Streeter-Phelps equation, modeling of suspended growth treatment,
Uncertainty Analysis, Monte-carol analysis.
8 Hrs
Unit III
Groundwater Contamination: Darcys law, Flow equations, Contaminant Solut e
Transport equation, sorption, r etardation, and r eactions, Redox r eactions, Remediation,
Numer ical methods.
7 Hrs
Unit IV
Meteorological aspects of Air pollutant dispersion: Elements of atmospher e,
Temperature Lapse rates and stability, Wind Velocity and Turbulence, Plume Behavior,
Dispersion of Air Pollutants, Atmospher ic Dispersion equation.
8 Hrs
Unit V
Air Quality Modeling: Ar ea Source models, Dispersion models the eddy diffusion
model, Gaussian distribution model, Calculation of the effective stack height,
Statistical models, Global carbon Box model.
9 Hrs
TEXT BOOKS
1. N. De. Nevers, Air Pollution Control Engineering, McGraw Hill, 1995
2. Jerald L. Schnoor, Environmental Modeling, Jony Wiley & Sons Limited, 1994
3. Gilbert M. Masters, Wendell P. Ela, Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Science,
Prentice Hall, 2007

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 17 of 25

ENZYME TECHNOLOGY
Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP833

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: At the end of the course the student will be able to
Understanding of enzyme fundamentals, classification, and specificity.
Understanding of multi-substrate enzymatic reaction mechanisms.
Appreciate the role of enzymes in diagnostics and as therapeutic agents.
Knowledge of the biocatalytic role of enzymes.
Unit I
Introduction to enzymes: Nomenclature and classification of enzymes; Chemical nature and
properties of enzymes, factors affecting enzyme activity, active site, allosteric site, coenzymes and
cofactors
7 Hrs
Unit II
Enzyme specificity: Enzyme substrate reactions. Types of enzyme specificities. Derivation of
Michelis-menton constant, line weaver Burk plot. Enzyme kinetics, velocity, rate of reaction, order,
free energy of activation, zero order and first order. Brief mention of pseudo first order and second
order reactions. Mechanism of enzyme action, lock and key model, induced fit model, substrate strain
theory, acid base catalysis, covalent catalysis and entropy effect, enzyme inhibition. Regulation of
enzyme activity
8 Hrs
Unit III
Multi substrate reactions: Ping pong mechanism, sequential mechanism, host guest complexation
chemistry. Enzyme design using steroid templates, remote fictionalization reaction, immobilized
enzymes and its applications
8 Hrs
Unit - IV
Importance of enzymes and isozymes: Importance of enzymes in diagnostics, enzymes as
therapeutic agents. Enzyme pattern in diseases like in myocardial infarctions (SGOT, SGPT & LDH).
Use of isozymes as markers in cancer and other diseases.
8 Hrs
Unit V
Biocatalysts: Basic reaction mechanisms involving co enzymes , enantioelective oxidation,
hydroxylation of steroids, advantages of biocatalysts, isolated enzymes versus whole cell systems,
mechanistic aspects and enzyme sources, biocatalytic application
8 Hrs
TEXT BOOKS
1. Bailey and Ollis, Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals, 2e, McGraw Hill, 1986
2. Shuler M. L. & F. Kargi, Bioprocess Engineering Basic Concepts, 2e, Prentice Hall
(2003)
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Pelczar & Chan, Microbiology Concepts and Applications, 5e, McGraw Hill ,reprint 2001
2. Casida, Industrial microbiology , New Age Intrl, 2003.
3. Aiba et al, Biochemical Engineering, 1e, Academic press (1965)

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 18 of 25

APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


Contact Hours/ Week

: 3 (L)

Credits : 3

Total Lecture Hours

: 39

CIE Marks : 50

Total Tutorial Hours

:0

SEE Marks : 50

Sub. Code

: 8CHP834

Course Outcome: At the end of the course the student will be able to
Differentiate physical modeling and mathematical modeling
Analyze the experimental data in the form of equations
Apply and analyze the fundamental laws and principles to construct a model
Solve Numerical solution for ordinary and practical differential equations
Unit I
Introduction: Application of mathematical methods to solve chemical engineering problems.
Treatment of experimental data and interpretation of results. Use of different types of graph papers,
curve fitting methods and empirical laws. Models in chemical engineering, Linear and non-linear
equation and examples
9 Hrs
Unit II
Mathematical Treatment of the Problem: Introduction, presentation of the problem, simple
problems formulation on solvent extraction in single and multiple stages. Radial heat transfer through
a cylindrical conduction. Salt accumulation in stirred tank.
8 Hrs
Unit III
Application to Chemical Engineering: Numerical solutions of ordinary differential equation,
homogeneous non homogeneous ordinary differential equation. Numerical solutions of partial
differential equation. Matrices and their applications, Fourier series and transforms.
8 Hrs
Unit - IV
Rectangular Cartesian Co-ordinate, Cylindrical and Spherical Co-ordinates: Application of
computers in solving chemical engineering problems, generalized flow sheet programs. 7 Hrs
Unit V
Software Packages: Development of software packages for solving differential equations, heat
exchanger and reactor design.
7 Hrs

TEXT BOOKS
1. H.S. Mickley, T. K. Sherwood and C.E. Reed, Applied Mathematics in Chemical
Engineering, Third Edn, Tata McGraw Hill, 1999
2. V.G. Jenson & G.V. Jeggreys., Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering.
3. Prof S. Pushpavanam., Mathematical methods in Chemical Engineering, Eastenno Economy
Edition
REFERENCE BOOK
1. L.M. Rose, Applications of Mathematical Modeling to Process Development and Design,
Applied Science Publishers Ltd., London.

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 19 of 25

CATALYST TECHNOLOGY
Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP841

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: By the end of the course student will be able to understand
Understanding of various catalysts and their role in chemical reactions.
Knowledge of catalyst preparation and characterization methods.
Knowledge of heterogeneous catalytic reactions and their applications in industry.
Understanding of the mechanism and kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions.
Knowledge about selection, testing, and evaluation of catalysts and catalyst deactivation.
Unit I
Introduction: Brief history of catalyst technology development and its Economic importance.
Fundamentals of catalytic phenomena: Definitions, structure of supported catalyst, steps in
heterogenous catalytic reaction- adsorption and desorption, reaction and diffusional resistances,
kinetics of catalytic surface reaction, effect of surface structure on. Catalytic activity.
7 Hrs
Unit II
Catalytic Materials: Make up of a typical heterogenous catalyst, carrier materials, Promoters, active
phases, inhibitors. Role and functions of each, molecular sieve and zeolite catalysts.
8 Hrs
Unit III
Catalyst Characterisation and selection: Definition and objectives of catalyst characterization.
Determination physical properties of catalyst-surface area pore size and pore volume, particle size and
size distribution mechanical strength, density.
Determination of chemical properties: chemical composition chemical structure and
morphology, Dispersion and crystallite size of active spiecies, surface acidity and surface reactivity.
8 Hrs
Unit - IV
Catalyst preparation and forming: Various methods like precipitation, impregnation, mixing
techniques, preparation of finished catalyst by forming methods.
Manufacture of industrial catalysts and details of various equipments for same Reactors, Filters,
dryers, calcinators, activators, impragrators, etc. At least 5 different industrial catalysts manufacture to
be dealt with.
8 Hrs
Unit V
Testing, evaluation of catalysts and scale up: Basic approaches to reactor design, collection of data
from laboratory reactors, choosing reactors for laboratory, rate data analysis and selection of plant
reactors.
Catalyst deactivating: Causes and mechanism of deactivation, poisoning, fouling coking,
thermal degradation, sintering volatilization and Mechanical failure. Prevention and regenerative
treatments, reactor design and operation strategies with deactivation catalysts.
8 Hrs

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 20 of 25

TEXT BOOKS
1. Prof.l.P.MukhIyonov, Catalyst Technology, MIR Publishers
2. Alvin Stoes and Tjepdpre. A koeh Marcell Decker, Catalyst Manufacture
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Thomas & Thomas, Catalysis
2. R.P.Farrauto & C.H.bartholomew, Fundamentals of Industrial catalytic process
CHEMICAL PROCESS INTEGRATION
Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP842

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: By the end of the course student will be able to understand
Evaluate overall mass targets (fresh usage, waste discharge, yield, etc.) for a given process
Manipulate design and operating variables to optimize process performance
Synthesize direct recycle networks
Screen and synthesize networks of mass exchangers
Evaluate targets for minimum heating and cooling utilities
Unit I
INTRODUCTION TO PROCESS INTEGRATION: Categories of Process Integration. Mass
targeting for minimum discharge of waste and minimum purchase of fresh material utilities, mass
integration strategies for attaining targets.
8 Hrs
Unit II
DIRECT-RECYCLE STRATEGIES: Source-Sink mapping diagram, lever-Arm rules, Selection of
Sources, Sinks and recycle routes, direct recycle targets through material recycle pinch diagram,
Design rules from the material recycle Pinch diagram. Algebraic approach to targeting direct recycle.
9 Hrs
Unit III
SYNTHESIS OF MASS EXCHANGE NETWORKS (MENs): Design of Individual mass
exchangers cost Optimization of mass exchangers; Mass exchange Pinch Diagram,
Algebraic approach to the targeting of Mass exchange networ ks Composition Inter val
Diagram (CID), Cascade diagram.
8 Hrs
Unit IV
SYNTHESIS OF HEAT EXCHANGE NETWORKS (HENs): Thermal Pinch Diagram, minimum
utility targeting through an algebraic procedure Temperature Interval Diagram (TID), Cascade
diagram. Screening of multiple utilities using the Grand Composite Representation Grand
Composite Curve (GCC).
7 Hrs
Unit V
COMBINED HEAT AND POWER INTEGRATION: Heat Engines, Heat Pumps, Heat engines
and Thermal Pinch Diagram, Heat pumps and Thermal Pinch Diagram, Cogeneration targeting,
Extractable power cogeneration targeting Pinch diagram.
7 Hrs

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 21 of 25

TEXT BOOKS
1. Mahmoud M., El-Hawlgi (2006), Process Integration, Elsevier
2. Robin Smith(2005), Chemical Process Design and Integration, Wiley
3. Kemp I. C(2006)., Pinch Analysis and Process Integration A user guide on process
integration for efficient use of energy, 2nd edition, Butterworth-Heinneman, 2006.
NOVEL SEPARATION TECHNIQUES
Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP843

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: By the end of this course student will be able to:
Understand equilibrium and rate governed multistage separation processes.
Understand characterization of membranes and separation processes such as reverse osmosis,
dialysis, ultra filtration, and electrodialysis.
Determine the rate of permeate flux for gas permeation through polymeric membranes.
Study chromatographic separation techniques and molecular sieve separation techniques
Unit I
Adsorptive Separations: Review of fundamentals, mathematical modeling of column factors,
pressure swing adsorption, ion-exchange, affinity chromatography, gradient chromatography &
counter current separations etc.,
8 Hrs
Unit II
Membrane Separation Processes: Classification, structure & characteristics of membranes.
Thermodynamic considerations, mass transfer considerations, design of R.O. & UF, per-evaporation,
gaseous separations.
8 Hrs
Unit III
Surfactant Based Separations: Fundamentals of surfactants at surfaces & in solutions. Liquid
membrane permeation, foam separations, Micellar separations.
8 Hrs
Unit - IV
External Field Induced Separations: Electric & magnetic field separations. Centrifugal separations.
7 Hrs
Unit V
Super Critical Fluid Extraction and other separation techniques: Physicochemical principles,
thermodynamics, process synthesis and energy analysis, Separation by thermal diffusion,
electrophoresis and crystallization.
8 Hrs

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 22 of 25

TEXT BOOKS
1. Phillip C Wankat (1990), Rate Controlled Separations, Kluwer Academic Pub
2. R.W.Rousseu (1987), Handbook of separation process technology, John Wiley & Sons.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. S.Sourirajan & T.Matsura (1985), Reverse osmosis and Ultra filtration process principle,
NRC publication Ottawa.
2. T.A.Hatton, Surfactant based separation process, vol 23.
3. MA McHugh & V.J.Krukonis (1985), Supercritical fluid extraction, Butterworth.
PROCESS MODELING AND SIMULATION
Contact Hours/ Week
Total Lecture Hours
Total Tutorial Hours
Sub. Code

: 3 (L)
: 39
:0
: 8CHP844

Credits : 3
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

Course Outcome: By the end of this course student will be able to:
Explain the importance of modeling in chemical process industries
Apply and analyze the fundamental laws to construct a modeling
Apply the various optimization techniques to optimize the process model
Construct, simulate and optimize a model in ASPEN
Unit I
Intr oduction - Models and model building. Principles of model for mulation,
precautions in model building, classification and uses of mathematical models.
7 Hrs
Unit II
For mulation of mathematical models : Fundamentals laws and mass , momentum and
ener gy, r eview of shell balance approach, continuity equation, ener gy equation,
equation of motion, transport equation, equation of state, equilibrium and kinetics.
9 Hrs
Unit III
Batch process: Batch heating of closed kettle, start ing equilibr ium still, batch
heating/cooling of a slab/cylinder, dr ying of a slab.
Steady state flow processes involving non -r eactive systems: Mixing in flow pr ocesses,
continuous heating in stirred tank using jacket and coil, concentration gradient acr oss a
bubble plate, simultaneous heat and mass transfer in a packed tower.
9 Hrs
Unit - IV
Steady state flow pr ocesses involving r eaction systems: laminar flow r eactor, diffusion
with chemical reaction, catalytic reaction in a packed bed r eactor.
7 Hrs
Unit V
Semi - batch processes: Mixing in a stirred tank, semi -batch r eactors
Unsteady state system: Heat Exchanger, gas absorber

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

7 Hrs

Page 23 of 25

TEXT BOOKS
1. William
L.Luyben(1990), Process modelling, simulation and contr ol for
Chem. Engg. 1990, Mc.Graw Hill
2. EdgerTF and Himmelblau D M(1989), Optimization of chemical Process.
McGraw Hill
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Himmelblau DM, Kenneth and Birchoff.B(1968), process analysis
simulation - Deter ministic Systems, John Wiley and s ons
2. Sagar Hussain(1986), Chemical process simulation, Wiley Easter n ltd

Major Project
Lab Hours/ Week
Sub. Code

: 21
: 8CHMP1

and

Credits : 13.0
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 50

The project can be taken by group of 4 students and major project can be carried out in the
dept. under a guide or outside the department in institute/ company with a guide from the dept. and co
guide from the institute/ company.
Major project is evaluated over 2 semesters (VII & VIII). No credit in the VII sem., major
project is evaluated for 100 marks in VII semester.
CIE marks breakup
Seminar on project and

20 marks

demonstration
Report

10 marks

Evaluation by guide

15 marks

Co-curricular activities

5 marks

TOTAL

50 marks
SEE marks breakup

Project report presentation, demonstration and quality of

30 marks

work
Viva

20 marks

TOTAL

50 marks

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 24 of 25

Seminar
Lab Hours/ Week

:2

Sub. Code

: 8CHTS1

Credits : 1.0
CIE Marks : 50
SEE Marks : 0
Seminar marks breakup
Relevance of the topic

5 marks

Report

10 marks

presentation

25 marks

Viva

10 marks

TOTAL

50 marks

Department of Chemical Engg., SIT, Tumkur


Applicable for the academic year 2015 - 16

Page 25 of 25