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EVENING SALE

MUMBAI | LIVE
24 FEBRUARY 2016

EVENING SALE
MUMBAI

LIVE

24 FEBRUARY 2016

saffronart.com

Saffronart | Evening Sale

CONTENTS
6

SALES AND ENQUIRIES

12

THE AUCTION CATALOGUE

172

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

175

CONDITIONS FOR SALE

181

ABSENTEE/PROXY BID FORM

183 INDEX

Cover (Detail)
Lot 11

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Back cover
Lot 39

Inside front cover


Lot 46

Inside back cover


Lot 68

Facing page (Detail)


Lot 73

INTERNATIONAL SALES TEAM

AUCTION
Wednesday, 24 February 2016
Registration: 6.30 pm
Auction: 7.30 pm
Industry Manor, Ground Floor, Appasaheb Marathe Marg, Prabhadevi, Mumbai 400025

HUGO WEIHE

MINAL VAZIRANI

DINESH VAZIRANI

Chief Executive Officer

Co-founder

Co-founder

VIEWINGS AND PREVIEWS


NEW DELHI
Preview and cocktails
Thursday, 28 January 2016
7 pm onwards

MUMBAI

PUNYA NAGPAL

DHANASHREE WAIKAR SHAHEEN VIRANI

AASHISH DUBEY

DEEPIKA SHAH

Senior Vice President


Client Relations

Associate Vice President


Client Relations

Senior Manager
Client Relations

Manager
Client Relations

LONDON

NEW YORK

Associate Vice President


Client Relations

DELHI

AMIT KUMAR JAIN

SNEHA SIKAND

AMIT KAPOOR

ABHA HOUSEGO

ANU NANAVATI

Associate Vice President


Client Relations

Senior Manager
Client Relations

Senior Manager
Jewellery

Vice President
International

Vice President
International

The Drawing Room


The Oberoi, Dr. Zakir Hussain Marg
New Delhi 110003, India

Saffronart
The Drawing Room, The Oberoi
Dr. Zakir Hussain Marg, New Delhi 110003, India

MUMBAI
Preview and cocktails
Wednesday, 17 February 2016
7 pm onwards

Viewings and Appointments


15 - 24 February 2016
10.30 am - 7 pm, Monday to Saturday
10.30 am - 3 pm, on day of sale
Sunday by appointment

Saffronart
Industry Manor, Ground floor
Appasaheb Marathe Marg, Prabhadevi
Mumbai 400025, India

Saffronart
Industry Manor, Ground floor
Appasaheb Marathe Marg, Prabhadevi
Mumbai 400025, India

AUCTION ENQUIRIES

AUCTIONEERS

Mumbai

DINESH VAZIRANI
HUGO WEIHE

Email: auction@saffronart.com
Tel: +91 22 2432 2898 / 2436 4113 extension 203/209/205 | Fax: +91 22 2432 1187

Viewings and Appointments


28 January - 6 February 2016
10.30 am - 7 pm, Monday to Saturday
Sunday by appointment

New Delhi Email: delhi@saffronart.com | Tel: +91 11 2430 4458/ 2436 9415 | Fax: +91 11 2436 9416
USA

Email: newyork@saffronart.com | Tel: +1 212 627 5006 | Fax: +1 212 627 5008

UK

Email: london@saffronart.com | Tel: +44 20 7409 7974 | Fax: +44 20 7409 2854

ADDRESS
EDITORIAL TEAM: Meera Godbole-Krishnamurthy, Rashmi Rajgopal, Eesha Patkar, Lani McGuinness and Rohan Khanna
FINANCE ENQUIRIES: Vinay Bhate and Anjali Ghatge
SHIPPING AND LOGISTICS ENQUIRIES: Haresh Jiandani and Gaurav Yadav
DESIGN: Alka Samant, Jatin Lad and Gaurav Sharma

Saffronart | Evening Sale

Mumbai
New Delhi
New York
London

Industry Manor, Ground and 3rd Floor, Appasaheb Marathe Marg, Prabhadevi, Mumbai 400025
The Oberoi, Dr. Zakir Hussain Marg, New Delhi 110003
The Fuller Building, 595 Madison Avenue, Suite 900, New York, NY 10022
73 New Bond Street, 1st Floor, London, W1S 1RS
7

Artists dont make objects. Artists


make mythologies.
ANISH KAPOOR

Life is like a circus. Behind the garish make-up, there is


pain hidden somewhere. Deep within.
MANJIT BAWA

If one is fortunate, painting


continually happens within oneself.
V S GAITONDE

The face of art is somewhat


like that of the sun. It does
not communicate but gives.
J SWAMINATHAN

It is the intangible which is


now my goal.
JEHANGIR SABAVALA

When all the paths in all the directions are closed,


the only path left is that of painting and by Gods
grace it is always open.
PRABHAKAR BARWE

I paint because I derive pleasure from painting


and I try to give pleasure to others. That is my
philosophy of art.
N S BENDRE

I have interpreted the universe in


terms of five primary colours: black,
white, red, blue and yellow.
S H RAZA

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In Art, man reveals himself and not his objects.


RABINDRANATH TAGORE

From left to right: Tyeb Mehta, Krishen Khanna, M F Husain, S H Raza, and K K Hebbar in Mumbai

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Dinodia Photos/Alamy Stock Photo


11

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF


LT. GENERAL DAYARAM THAPAR

K H ARA

(1914 - 1985)

Untitled
Signed ARA (lower left); bearing Chemould label
on the stretcher (on the reverse)
Oil on canvas
23 x 18 in (58.5 x 45.5 cm)
Rs 3,00,000 - 5,00,000
$ 4,415 - 7,355
PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF THIS LOT WILL BENEFIT
THE INDORE CANCER FOUNDATION CHARITABLE TRUST

Aras skilled use of thickly layered paint to create an


impression of light and shadow is evident in this rare
landscape painting. The architectural elements and
tree emerge from the textured layers of paint against a
comparatively flat blue sky.
Nudes and still-lifes were Aras main themes, and
landscape paintings were a ...deviation in his choice of
subject [that] comes as a pleasant surprise. (Kishore
Singh ed., Manifestations 5: 20th Century Indian Art, New
Delhi: Delhi Art Gallery, 2011, p. 23) The Tata Institute of
Fundamental Research houses a significant collection of
rare landscape paintings by the artist.

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Saffronart | Evening Sale

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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF


LT. GENERAL DAYARAM THAPAR

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT


PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW DELHI

K H ARA

(1914 - 1985)

Untitled
Signed K H ARA (lower right); bearing Chemould
label on the stretcher (on the reverse)
Oil on canvas
23.25 x 18.25 in (59 x 46.3 cm)
Rs 3,00,000 - 5,00,000
$ 4,415 - 7,355
PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF THIS LOT WILL BENEFIT
THE INDORE CANCER FOUNDATION CHARITABLE TRUST

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Saffronart | Evening Sale

K H ARA

(1914 - 1985)

Untitled
Signed ARA (lower left)
Watercolour on paper
30 x 22 in (76.4 x 55.6 cm)
Rs 6,00,000 - 8,00,000
$ 8,825 - 11,765

15

F N SOUZA

(1924 - 2002)

Untitled (Portrait of a Man)


Signed and dated Souza 56 (upper left)
1956
Pen and watercolour on paper
9.5 x 7.5 in (24.3 x 19.3 cm)
Rs 4,00,000 - 6,00,000
$ 5,885 - 8,825
PROVENANCE:
Collection of Nicholas Treadwell from the 1960s
Private Collection, North India

F N SOUZA

(1924 - 2002)

Untitled (Woman in Profile)


Signed and dated Souza 1952 (lower right)
1952
Charcoal and pencil on paper pasted on paper
15 x 22.25 in (38.2 x 56.4 cm)
Rs 10,00,000 - 15,00,000
$ 14,710 - 22,060
PROVENANCE:
Formerly from the Collection of Julian Sherrier
Christies, New York, 12 September 2012, lot 341
Private Collection, New Delhi

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17

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Untitled
Signed in Devnagari (lower right)
Oil on canvas pasted on board
13.5 x 9.5 in (34.2 x 24.1 cm)
Rs 18,00,000 - 22,00,000
$ 26,475 - 32,355

Jyoti Bhatt

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Saffronart | Evening Sale

PROVENANCE:
Saffronart, 19-20 September 2012, lot 75
From a Private International Collection

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF


AN EMINENT FAMILY, MUMBAI

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT


PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW DELHI

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Sindhu of Gaja Gaamini


Signed Husain and inscribed Sindhu of Gaja Gaamini (lower right)
Watercolour, ink and sketchpen on paper
14.5 x 21 in (36.7 x 53.6 cm)

Untitled
Signed Husain (upper right) and in Devnagari (upper left)
Mixed media on paper pasted on board
29.75 x 21.75 in (75.4 x 55.2 cm)

Rs 5,00,000 - 7,00,000
$ 7,355 - 10,295

Rs 15,00,000 - 20,00,000
$ 22,060 - 29,415
PROVENANCE:
An Important Private Collection, Japan
Saffronart, 21 July 2011, lot 31

Our stories are short


We always begin at the end
There in the distant villages,
Women sit in groups,
like far-flung tin roofs,
telling stories unknown to themselves.
M F HUSAIN

The central concern of Husains art, and its dominant


motif, is woman... In Husains work, woman has the gift of
eagerness... like those in ancient Jain miniature paintings,
and an inward attentiveness, as if she were listening to
the life coursing within her. (Richard Bartholomew and
Shiv S Kapur, Husain, New York: Harry N Abrams, Inc.,
1971, p. 46)
In this rare painting from 1965, Husain depicts two
women enclosed in embryo-like cocoons. The body of
the woman in blue is turned towards the viewer but
her face is in profile. Her right hand is raised in a mudra.
The woman enclosed in brown, in contrast, is seated
with her back to the viewer, her face and raised right
hand not quite defined. Husain uses two very different
techniques to paint the women: while the lady in blue is
moulded like clay, the figure next to her appears brittle
and fragmented.
Husains depictions of women are deeply rooted in
Indian sculpture and miniature painting. Between 1948
and 1952, he travelled extensively across India and
encountered Jain and Basohli miniature paintings and
Mathura sculptures. The female forms in his paintings
take their cues from the energy and dynamism of the
female figure in Mathura sculptures. Aspects of Jain
miniature painting techniques also seep into his work, as
seen by the compartmentalisation of the two figures in
this painting.
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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF AN


EMINENT FAMILY, MUMBAI

M F HUSAIN (1913 - 2011)


Untitled
Signed in Devnagari and Urdu and
dated 1 IX 1965 (lower right)
1965
Oil on canvas
34.75 x 48.25 in (88.2 x 122.3 cm)
Rs 90,00,000 - 1,20,00,000
$ 132,355 - 176,475
PROVENANCE:
Acquired directly from the artist in the 1960s

After many long years of


thinking and working,
I find the mysteries are
so great, so beyond
human comprehension
that they defy the
order of logic. So that
I wonder if a system
of logic exists, at all.
Reasoning, order, logic.
These are there at the
beginning. These are the
fundamental, elemental
inquiries, which are
indispensible. Thereafter
you go to other levels
where logic is left behind.
S H RAZA

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S H RAZA

(B. 1922)

La Source
Signed and dated RAZA 60 (lower right);
signed and dated again RAZA P_278 60
and inscribed La Source (on the reverse)
1960
Acrylic on canvas
29 x 19 in (73.7 x 48.3 cm)
Rs 35,00,000 - 45,00,000
$ 51,475 - 66,180

S H Raza

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Saffronart | Evening Sale

PROVENANCE:
Saffronart, 4-6 May 2004, lot 21
Private Collection, UK

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Manjit Bawa, New Delhi, 6 January 1993.


Source: The Times of India Group. BCCL. All Rights Reserved.

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This image was used by the Delhi-based NGO Sahmat to


promote secular values

The central figure in this classic Bawa painting, set against


a flat, monochromatic background bears a strong
resemblance to Lord Krishna, who is often portrayed
as a blue-skinned cowherd sporting a peacock feather
on his head, playing a flute and surrounded by cattle.
Blue-bodied but without the peacock feather, and
surrounded by dogs rather than cows, Bawas figure
might also be Ranjha, from the tragic-romance of
Punjabi literature, Heer-Ranjha. Bawa, who was deeply
influenced by Indian mythology, miniature paintings,
and Sufism, meant for his painting to have multiple
interpretations.
In a 1996 interview with Marcella C Sirhandi, associate
professor in art history at Oklahoma State University,
Bawa is ambiguous on the identification when he says,
It is not Krishna... It is Ranja [sic]... Even if it is Krishna,
it doesnt matter Ranja is also a flute player, and Ranja
was a divine lover, more than Krishna, because Ranja gave
everything for love. (Interview with Marcella C Sirhandi,
Manipulating Cultural Idioms, Art Journal, Vol. 58,
No. 3, College Art Association, Autumn 1999, pp. 40-47,
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Venugopala under a Kadamba Tree with Sakhis, Tanjore School,


mid-20th century
Saffronart Online Auction of Tanjore Paintings, 21-22 January 2016,
lot 3

accessed through JSTOR) Bawa draws the connection


between Krishna as Venugopala and Ranjha, both flute
players who epitomise true love.
In the same interview, Bawa ascribes another layer
of meaning to the present lot. Shaken by the violent
communal riots that followed the demolition of the
Babri Masjid in 1992, he describes the dogs in this
painting as representations of secular creatures who are
not defined by a religious identity. The fundamentalists
are breaking my culture. So I do paintings like Ranja
with dogs... The dog is anti-Hindu and anti-Muslim
both. Showing the dog is antireligion. (Interview with
Marcella C Sirhandi)
Beyond the multi-layered meaning and symbolism,
Bawas Ranjha is striking for the interplay of colours
the deep maroon background, the blue skin and yellow
dhoti of the central figure and the white, pastel shades
of the dogs. Both, human and animals are rendered with
equal care and delineation, and they seem to exist in an
undisturbed world of understanding and communion.

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF A DISTINGUISHED LADY, MUMBAI

11

MANJIT BAWA

(1941 - 2008)

Untitled
Signed and dated Manjit 92 (on the reverse)
1992
Oil on canvas
59.25 x 68.5 in (150.5 x 174 cm)
Rs 2,00,00,000 - 3,00,00,000
$ 294,120 - 441,180
PUBLISHED:
Marcella C Sirhandi, Manipulating Cultural Idioms, Art Journal, Vol. 58, No. 3,
College Art Association, Autumn1999, pp. 40-47 (illustrated)
Amrita Jhaveri, A Guide to 101 Indian Contemporary Artists, Mumbai: India Book
House, 2005, p. 16 (illustrated)

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Nobody would listen to my


flute; Ill play for the dogs.
SUFI POET

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PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW DELHI

12

MANJIT BAWA

(1941 - 2008)

Untitled
Signed and dated Manjit Bawa 98 (lower right); bearing Vadehra Art
Gallery label on the hardboard (on the reverse)
1998
Ink on paper
14.5 x 21.25 in (36.8 x 53.9 cm)
Rs 7,00,000 - 9,00,000
$ 10,295 - 13,240
PROVENANCE:
Vadehra Art Gallery

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The theme of Krishna as the flute player recurs


in this signed pencil drawing by Bawa. A seated
figure similar to the one in the previous lot plays
his flute to a group of dogs. The clean, flowing
lines of the study capture the thought process and
compositional clarity of Bawas finished canvases.
Bawas paintings usually take shape around a
single figure or a group... [He] pares down the icon
to its essence, aiming, he has said, to create a sense
of pure aesthetics, so simple that even a child can
respond to the image... Besides large oils, Bawa has
worked in the miniature format and on a series of
drawings, which are mostly preparatory. (Amrita
Jhaveri, A Guide to 101 Modern and Contemporary
Indian Artists, Mumbai: India Book House Pvt.
Ltd., 2005, p. 16)

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MANJIT BAWA

(1941 - 2008)

Untitled
Signed and dated Manjit 2003 (on the reverse)
2003
Oil on canvas
26.25 x 19.25 in (66.5 x 48.6 cm)
Rs 40,00,000 - 60,00,000
$ 58,825 - 88,240

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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF


MALTI GILANI, NEW DELHI

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N S BENDRE

(1910 - 1992)

Untitled
Signed and dated in Devnagari (lower right)
1970
Oil on canvas
34 x 40 in (86.3 x 101.6 cm)
Rs 30,00,000 - 40,00,000
$ 44,120 - 58,825
PROVENANCE
Acquired directly from the artist

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Saffronart | Evening Sale

N S Bendre painted the subtle, yet highly textured present lot at a time
of great creativity when he settled in Mumbai in 1966, after extensive
travels through India and Europe. The exposure made him more attuned
to aspects beyond his immediate experience, of total perception in
which his mind or emotion played a significant part. (Ram Chatterji,
Bendre: The Painter and the Person, Toronto: The Bendre Foundation
for Art and Culture & Indus Corporation, 1990, p. 60) The two birds
are the only points of focus in an otherwise soothing, meditative sea
of beige leaves.
Bendres artistic career began at the State School of Art in Indore in
1929. Over six decades, he experimented with Cubism, Expressionism
and Pointillism to express Indian themes such as birds and animals,
figures, and landscapes of Indian villages. In the latter half of his career,
he gives prime importance to his visual experience, but he does not
resort to naturalistic representation. He interprets it on his canvas in his
own terms and offers what he has seen and enjoyed... (Chatterji, p. 61)
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In terms of spirit, these paintings are detached,


calm contemplations. Ram Kumar expresses
himself through colour, mass, structure, movement.
And in these and with all these Ram Kumar creates
his magnificent paintings works, statements,
allusions, observations, inferences on nature. They
appear to be effortless and inevitable in their
compositions.
RICHARD BARTHOLOMEW

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RAM KUMAR

16
(B. 1924)

Untitled
Signed and dated Ram Kumar 2004
(on the reverse)
2004
Acrylic on canvas
42 x 70 in (106.4 x 177.8 cm)
Rs 40,00,000 - 60,00,000
$ 58,825 - 88,240
PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, North India

RAM KUMAR

(B. 1924)

Untitled
Signed and dated in Devnagari (lower right)
1977
Pen and ink on paper pasted on mountboard
11 x 15 in (28 x 38.2 cm)
Rs 2,00,000 - 3,00,000
$ 2,945 - 4,415
PROVENANCE:
An Important Private Collection, New Delhi

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16

Ram Kumar finds the perfect middle ground between


the representational landscape and the abstracted one,
with room for rumination. The present lot is created
through the layered application of earth tones on canvas
to reveal the rocky landscape found within nature.
Hints of cooler tones underneath warmer ones suggest
Kumars devotion to revealing the reality of these spaces
for reflection. When speaking of his process Ram Kumar
has stated, There is an enigmatic mystery about the
inner life of a colour applied on canvas. It stands out by
itself in the beginning but slowly it starts building up
relationships with other areas, other colours, and forms.
This continues. There is a pause, a silence, an accident and
in the end some sort of harmony. (Gagan Gill ed., From
Ram Kumars Notebooks, Ram Kumar: A Journey Within,
New Delhi: Vadehra Art Gallery, 1966, p. 202) The present
lot embodies Kumars talent for taking apart a landscape
and then putting it back together in a way where the
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tones of colour create a discourse which inspires both


memory and emotion.
Moved by the setting and landscapes he encountered
on a trip to Banaras in the 1960s, Kumar abandoned his
previously figurative paintings. He embarked on a new
direction in his oeuvre, in an attempt to express the
emotions evoked by landscapes. His abstract landscapes
capture the true essence of place without the use of
overt symbolism. Richard Bartholomew has stated,
Whenever I see a Ram Kumar painting, and a landscape,
I get the feeling that Ive been there before. The manner
in which memory functions through deliberate recall
and association. The very forms of composition suggest
that. The hard and soft, the tangible and the elusive, the
structure and sensation. The structure of what lies before
the eyes and the sensation of what lies behind. This is the
link between the painters self and our own. (Gill, p. 124)
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Manisha Gera Baswani

Padamsee began painting his Metascape series in 1970


and coined the term Metascape to describe landscapes
stripped of all geographic and chronologic specificity.
Im not interested in location or landscape. My general
theme is nature mountains, trees, water, the elements,
and obviously one is influenced by the environment, but
Im not interested in painting Rajasthan or the desert of
whatever. When I paint a tree, a mountain, or a river, I
am really interested in the river, the mountain, the tree.
The paintings are neither abstract nor representational.
(as quoted in Eunice DSouza, Akbar Padamsees
Metascapes, The Economic Times, 30 November 1975)
Transcending the limitations of conventional geography,
the present lot challenges conventional notions of
time and space. The abstract landscape is composed of
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... brilliantly choreographed planes of light and dark made


in thick impasto which evoke mountains, field, sky and
water. The controlled cadence of the colors breaks into
a throbbing intensity as the artist in his most masterly
works, evokes infinite time and space. (Yashodhara
Dalmia, Indian Contemporary Art Post Independence,
New Delhi: Vadehra Art Gallery, 1997, p. 17)
Padamsees Metascapes include both a truly
detached and analytical approach and a fascination for
tautological rules. In the paintings the image prods the
exercise, form being distilled to reveal the core. Curiously
the endeavour is as old as it is modern: the artistic pursuit
of a philosophical intent. (Mala Marwah, Lalit Kala
Contemporary 23, New Delhi: Lalit Kala Akademi, 1979,
p. 36)

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, MUMBAI

17

AKBAR PADAMSEE

(B. 1928)

Untitled
Signed and dated PADAMSEE 2005 (upper right)
2005
Oil on canvas
35.25 x 53.5 in (89.8 x 135.7 cm)
Rs 90,00,000 - 1,20,00,000
$ 132,355 - 176,475
PROVENANCE:
Acquired directly from the artist

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Preliminary sketch made by Sabavala. The artist maintained sketchbooks to


plan his paintings.
Courtesy, The Trustees, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, Mumbai

Page from the artists sketchbook.


Courtesy, The Trustees, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, Mumbai

With special thanks to Shirin Sabavala for her generosity in providing us access
to her personal archives.

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The expansive, panoramic view of Indias western coastline


in The Green Cape reveals the wondrous beauty that
Jehangir Sabavala finds within nature. Sabavala creates
quiet, solitary landscapes with transcendent scenes that
offer space for contemplation. At the level of immediate
sensation, we are struck by the obvious physical beauty
of the painting as a product, process and parallel reality.
And as we enter Sabavalas spaces, with trepidation, to
inhabit them, we apprehend their disquieting tranquillity;
the paradox underscores the artists uncertainty about his
place in the universe, his nostalgia for the infinite. (Ranjit
Hoskote, Pilgrim, Exile, Sorcerer: The Painterly Evolution of
Jehangir Sabavala, Bombay: Eminence Designs Pvt. Ltd.,
1998, p. 101)
The present lot suggests a mystical bond between the
individual and the cosmos. Sabavalas figures are often
described as pilgrims, or lost souls, yearning through
serene terrains, making their way to the receding horizon.
This sense of seeking is achieved through the subtle
interpretation of Cubism which he studied in England and
Paris in the 1960s. The carefully constructed, geometric
colour planes, combined with his subtle palette create a
sense of luminosity. Sabavala states, I have been seduced
by a palette of broken tones... by a visible search for a
more distilled essence. I think that so much more can
be said by the half-tone than by the blatancy of primary
colour... I prefer to haunt a mysterious world of veiled
lights and sudden discoveries. (Hoskote, p. 101)
Sabavalas work is aesthetically sublime and is also
intrinsically laced with philosophical thought. He was
very interested in the writings of the French philosophers,
including Albert Camus, who explored notions of spiritual
estrangement. Sabavalas paintings have preserved an
introspective, melancholy lyricism, as well as the ache of
the Sublime. These paintings are tinted with nostalgia,
as for moments once possessed, for homelands once
known and now forever beyond the horizon of what can
be known. (Hoskote, p. 99)

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF AN IMPORTANT FAMILY, NEW DELHI

18

JEHANGIR SABAVALA

(1922 - 2011)

The Green Cape


Signed and dated Sabavala 74 (lower right); dated
and inscribed The Green Cape 74 (on the reverse)
1974
Oil on canvas
29.5 x 49.5 in (75 x 126 cm)
Rs 2,50,00,000 - 3,50,00,000
$ 367,650 - 514,710
PROVENANCE:
Property of a Distinguished Lady
EXHIBITED:
Jehangir Sabavala, Mumbai: Gallery Chemould at Jehangir Art Gallery, 19-25 March 1976
Jehangir Sabavala, New Delhi: Black Partridge Gallery, 16-26 April 1976

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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF


AN IMPORTANT FAMILY, NEW DELHI

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JEHANGIR SABAVALA

(1922 - 2011)

Untitled
Signed and dated London 46 Sabavala (lower right)
1946
Pencil on paper pasted on mountboard
13 x 8 in (32.9 x 20.1 cm)
Rs 5,00,000 - 7,00,000
$ 7,355 - 10,295
PROVENANCE:
Saffronart, 21-22 April 2011, lot 62
An Important Private Collection, New Delhi

Image courtesy of Shirin Sabavala

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PUBLISHED:
Mulk Raj Anand, Sabavala, Sadanga Series, Mumbai: Vakil, Feffer &
Simon, 1966, p. 12 (illustrated)

This figure study demonstrates Sabavalas command


over line and form. The artist does not merely render the
figure with anatomical accuracy, he shows the viewer
the beauty and sensuality of the model. The defined leg
muscles and the soft modelling of the torso reveal the
artists concentrated engagement with the rendering of
his subject.
This study was made in 1946 when Sabavala had enrolled
at the Heatherley School of Art in London. During his
two years there, he developed his artistic skills and forged
long-lasting relations with people who were to form an
important part of his life. It was here that he met and
developed his companionship with Shirin Dastur, whom
he married two years later.
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JAMINI ROY

(1887 - 1972)

Untitled (Three Drummers)


Signed in Bengali (lower right)
Gouache on card paper
13 x 19.25 in (33.2 x 48.8 cm)
Rs 10,00,000 - 15,00,000
$ 14,710 - 22,060
NON-EXPORTABLE NATIONAL ART TREASURE
PROVENANCE:
Private American Collection, Brunswick
Private Collection, New Delhi

20

JAMINI ROY

(1887 - 1972)

Untitled
Signed in Bengali (lower right)
Tempera on paper pasted on board
15.75 x 19.75 in (40 x 50 cm)
Rs 12,00,000 - 15,00,000
$ 17,650 - 22,060
NON-EXPORTABLE NATIONAL ART TREASURE
PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, UK
Private Collection, New Delhi

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PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN, NEW DELHI

22

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Arrival
Inscribed ARRIVAL (on the reverse)
Acrylic on canvas
35.5 x 25.5 in (90 x 64.8 cm)
Rs 70,00,000 - 90,00,000
$ 102,945 - 132,355
PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, UK
Christies, New York, 20 September 2006, lot 143

The current lot embodies some of the most characteristic


elements of M F Husains style: earthy yellows, oranges and
browns, and bold reds and greens assimilate with strong
lines, clear spatial division and sculpturesque figures, all
of which serve to create strong contrasts between the
different elements of the painting. The female body-type
in Husains work evolved from his study of ancient Indian
sculpture, and his recognisable approach to the female
form first appeared in his work in 1950. To him, the
high-breasted, taut forms represented the principle of
energy and dynamism. Masks also feature in many of his
works as an instrument of transformation, and a bridge
between two planes of reality. The use of masks imbues
works such as the present lot with ritualistic meaning
and suggests the divided nature of human identity. With
figures contained within figures, this work is obviously
modern, yet at the same time it remains uniquely Indian
in nature. Husains inimitable style resulted in ancient
icons taking on new meanings related to modern India.
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Relief of Alasa Kanya at Vaital Deul, Bhubaneswar


Source: Shiladityaa, via Wikimedia Commons

55

23

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Untitled (Women In Yellow)


Signed in Devnagari and dated 70 (lower right)
1970
Oil on canvas
53 x 29 in (134.6 x 73.7 cm)
Rs 1,20,00,000 - 1,80,00,000
$ 176,475 - 264,710
PROVENANCE:
Acquired from Dhoomimal Gallery, New Delhi, in the early 1970s
Sothebys, New York, 17 September 2009, lot 25
Private Collection, USA
EXHIBITED:
Husain at hundred: Masterworks celebrating the 100th Birthday of
Indias most iconic artist, New York: Aicon Gallery,
17 September - 24 October 2015

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57

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT


PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW DELHI

24

ARPITA SINGH

(1937)

Untitled
Signed and dated ARPITA SINGH 91 (upper right)
1991
Silver and gold paint on fabric
83.75 x 39 in (213 x 99 cm)
Rs 35,00,000 - 45,00,000
$ 51,475 - 66,180

The present lot, painted on black silk,


demonstrates Arpita Singhs abiding interest in
textiles, and specifically, the traditional Kantha
embroidery of her native Bengal, spawned by
her time designing textiles at the Weavers
Service Centres in Calcutta and New Delhi
in the mid-1960s. Her work is influenced by
folk art, miniature painting and references
to history and mythology, often featuring
gravity-defying figures and objects set against
complex backgrounds.
Paris-based historian Deepak Ananth, in his
book Arpita Singh, published in 2015 writes:
...the proliferation of floral or vegetal or avian
motifs... all these traits of many different mtiers
of weaving and quilting and needlework are
also distinctive features that come into play in
the representational strategies adopted by the
painter from the 1980s... (Quoted in Soumitra
Das, Her Playful Perversity, telegraph.com,
5 July 2015)
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26

SAKTI BURMAN

(B. 1935)

Untitled
Signed SAKTI BURMAN (lower right)
1970s
Oil on canvas
25 x 19 in (63.4 x 48 cm)
Rs 16,00,000 - 18,00,000
$ 23,530 - 26,475
PROVENANCE:
Acquired from a Private European Collector

25

SAKTI BURMAN

(B. 1935)

The Faraway Song


Signed SAKTI BURMAN (lower centre);
inscribed SAKTI BURMAN THE FARAWAY
SONG 2006 (on the reverse)
2006
Oil on canvas
34.5 x 45 in (87.5 x 114.5 cm)
Rs 50,00,000 - 70,00,000
$ 73,530 - 102,945
PROVENANCE:
Acquired directly from the artist
Private Collection, New Delhi
EXHIBITED:
Manifestations XI: 75 Artists 20th Century Indian Art,
New Delhi: Delhi Art Gallery,
15 October - 15 November 2014
PUBLISHED:
Kishore Singh ed., Manifestations XI: 75 Artists 20th
Century Indian Art New Delhi: Delhi Art Gallery
exhibition catalogue, 2014, p. 108 (illustrated)

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The Faraway Song is comprised of five distinct scenes depicting


mythology and other iconographies, which can be viewed separately
or together as a composition. Inspired by his own dreams, as well as
the poetry of Rabindranath Tagore and Charles Baudelaire, Burmans
paintings create a romantic world of grace and harmony. His unique
marbling technique is seen here in a combination of hues which
divide the canvas into multiple narratives creating an overall discourse
between figures and form.
The impact is not much unlike a surrealist inwardness ensured by
a mechanism of aesthetic ordering of a topsy-turvy pictorial world...
there are often clearly marked areas of smooth and textured passages
of paint, played off one against the other, as a chequered colour
groundwork for the image to convey a pure imaginative experience of
strong visual sensation. The motifs that enact this experience are, often
in fragmented shape, humans and animals; mythical birds and beasts;
heads and torsos of what looks like sculpted female nudes; trees and
groves in luxuriant growth and elegant architectural forms. (Manasij
Majumder, Sakti Burman: Dreamer on the Arc, Bombay: Pundole Art
Gallery, 2001, pp. 128-129)
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PROPERTY FROM AN EMINENT PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW DELHI

27

F N SOUZA

(1924 - 2002)

Untitled
Signed and dated Souza 63 (upper left)
1963
Charcoal and oil on canvas
34 x 40 in (86.4 x 101.4 cm)
Rs 70,00,000 - 90,00,000
$ 102,945 - 132,355
PROVENANCE:
An Important Private Collection, Japan
Saffronart, 9-11 September 2009, lot 84

This large scale charcoal and oil on canvas by Souza has


the detailing and mastery over line which is evident in
his works on paper. Souzas characteristic line-work is
used to both delineate and decorate each feature in
the present lot. Set against a simple, monochromatic
background, each object in the still-life is endowed with
the depth and intensity of the artists trademark crosshatching technique.
As a child in Goa, Souza was fascinated by the pomp
and pageantry of Roman Catholicism. Its rituals, and the
ornate objects associated with them, played a large role
in shaping this awe. As he explains, the Church had a
tremendous influence over me, not its dogmas but its
grand architecture and the splendour of its services
The smell of incense. (Francis Newton Souza, Words and
Lines, London: Villiers Publication Ltd., 1959, p. 10)
Over time Souza found this religious atmosphere
repressive, and its puritanical tenets hypocritical. Souzas
unresolved relationship of wonder and contempt for
Catholicism infiltrated every genre of his work. In his
still-lifes, he critically interrogated the notion of divine
sanction, and its various interpretations and vehicles.
In some of his still-life paintings Souza painted objects
including the Ciborium, Chalice and Paten that were
clearly ecclesiastical. In others, such as the present lot,
Souza presents everyday vessels in a religious context,
almost as if they stand on an altar awaiting their part in
some liturgical ritual.
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Valldemosa takes its name from the scenic village in Mallorca, Spain. Souza
captures the essence of the distinct townscape of houses and monasteries
clustered against the Tramuntana range in the background. At the centre
of the painting is the iconic 14th century Carthusian monastery, the Real
Cartuja de Valldemossa, recognisable from its steeple. Souza created
this painting a year after he was awarded a scholarship by the Italian
Government to visit Italy and travel to countries in Europe, including Spain.
The townscapes he created during this period were markedly different from
his earlier, darker landscapes of the 1950s. The present lot, with its crisp,
black lines and smooth planes of colour, was created in 1961 when, for the
first time, Souza used acrylics or polyvinyl acetate emulsion, a thin glue-like
binder for pigments. Departing from painting on board, he had turned to
canvas painting in this brief, experimental period. Souzas canvas is divided
into cool and warm colour planes. The pale yellow and white architecture
complements the earthy brown of the ground, the muted green of the
mountains, and the halcyon blue of the sky. With its luminescent quality,
Valldemosa is a rare work that marks a significant phase in the artists career.
Souzas choice of painting the village of Valldemossa gains further
significance in its association with legendary musicians, artists and writers.
The Real Cartuja had served as inspiration to composer Frdric Chopin,
who lived there in 1838-39 with French writer Aurore Dupin. Immortalised
by his stay, Valldemossa continues to attract visitors from around the world.

The painting has been published in the artists


monograph, Edwin Mullins, Souza, on p. 97 as
Spanish Landscape.

Valldemossa, Spain
Source: Wikipedia. CC BY-SA 3.0

28

F N SOUZA

(1924 - 2002)

Valldemosa
Signed and dated Souza 61 (lower left); inscribed F.N.Souza Valldemosa
1961, bearing Gallery One label on the stretcher (on the reverse)
1961
Oil and polyvinyl acetate on canvas
28.5 x 44.75 in (72.4 x 113.7 cm)
Rs 1,00,00,000 - 1,50,00,000
$ 147,060 - 220,590
PROVENANCE:
Gallery One, London
Saffronart, 6-8 December 2005, lot 47
Private Collection, UK
PUBLISHED:
Edwin Mullins, Souza, London: Anthony Blond Ltd., 1962,
p. 59 (illustrated)

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29

SANKHO CHAUDHURI

(B. 1916)

Untitled (Standing Figure)


Circa 1950s
Wood
Height: 39.25 in (100 cm)
Rs 5,00,000 - 7,00,000
$ 7,355 - 10,295
PROVENANCE:
Galerie Palette, Zrich
Roland, Browse and Delbano, London
Acquired from the above by Eugene and Penelope Rosenberg,
28 December 1959
Private Collection, North India

restricted to one school of expression. He constantly


strove to experiment and innovate with material, style
and technique. At 100 cm in height, the present lot is an
unusually large work which retains the smooth rhythm
and elongated line that Chaudhuri is known for.
The present lot was formerly in the collection of Eugene
and Penelope Rosenberg. Eugene Rosenberg was one
of the leading exponents of modernist architecture
in Post-war Britain. He was known for fostering a close
relationship between art and architecture, and believed
that buildings provided ideal spaces in which to house

art and sculpture for daily enjoyment. Rosenberg worked


with Le Corbusier in Paris before setting up the firm
Yorke, Rosenberg and Mardall in Britain with F R S Yorke
and C S Mardall. They were responsible for some of the
most original architectural projects of the time, including
Gatwick Airport, the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford,
and Manchester Magistrates Court. In 1992 Eugene
Rosenburgs book Architects Choice: Art in Architecture
in Great Britain since 1945 was published by Thames &
Hudson, which he hoped would continue to inspire
alliances between architects and artists.

Chaudhuri is considered one of the stalwarts of Modern Indian


sculpture, whose work is significant in the evolution of Indian
sculpture away from the academic style based on mid-Victorian
ideals of naturalism that had developed under the British Raj.
In the 1940s, new styles and media were explored by sculptors,
with a strong leaning towards abstraction. Chaudhuri was a
student of Ramkinkar Baij, who was himself a key figure in this
early emancipation from the mainstream British style. Though he
was profoundly influenced by Baij, Chaudhuri was by no means

C S Mardall, F R S Yorke and Eugene Rosenberg.


RIBA Collections, 2016

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Jyoti Bhatt

71

Seen here third row (left to right) are Jeram


Patel, Himmat Shah, Jyoti Bhatt. In the middle
row, (left to right) are J Swaminathan, Rajesh
Mehra, Raghav Kaneria (hiding behind
the leaf); In front row are Balkrishna Patel,
Ambadas, G Sheikh (in glasses) and S G Nikam

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Image courtesy of DAG MODERN Archive

73

Manisha Gera Baswani

Himmat Shahs bronze and terracotta sculptures have


a monumental presence. Himmats favoured material
is terracotta, a material that reflects Indias longstanding
village economies, supported by the cycle of birth
and rebirth of the essential material, clay. Only some
terracotta objects pass into history, many do not bear
the imprint of the artist, and all speak of the early
wonder of man mimicking nature. It is entirely possible
that Himmats response to clay, which needs the other
elements of water and fire to gain form, is at the level of
the philosophical, as much as of the material. (Gayatri
Sinha, An Unreasoned Act of Being, Ahmedabad: Mapin
Publishing Pvt. Ltd., 2007, p. 38) Shah uses terracotta
to create a continuum between the past and present
by offering a commentary about man and the mark he
makes on the earth.
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Shahs heads speak of a disquieting humanity as his


cubist forms are anti-classical and have a more powerful
depiction. He creates markings and cross-hatching on
the clay to suggest the destructive forces that come
into play with mans existence. His background in
painting and drawing is reflected in his use of the line
to create texture on the clay. Having shown himself as
a multi-disciplinary artist, Shah immersed himself in
many mediums before coming to the realisation that
he was most passionate about his sculptural practice.
In a sense, his works are portraits, but their locus draws
from past and present, generic and individual man. The
patina, furrows and the sharp cleavages of long years of
human experience are visible, as Himmat invites us to
share in a monumental quietude and fraternity of being
human. (Sinha, p. 51)

30

HIMMAT SHAH

(B. 1933)

a) Untitled
Signed and dated Himmat 95 (on the inside of the hollow)
1995
Terracotta
Height: 6.25 in (16.4 cm)
b) Untitled
Signed Himmat (lower left)
Pencil, pen and ink on paper pasted on board
8.25 x 5.75 in (21 x 14.7 cm)
Rs 4,00,000 - 6,00,000
$ 5,885 - 8,825
(Set of two)

b
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PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW DELHI

31

JAGDISH SWAMINATHAN

(1928 - 1994)

Untitled
Signed and dated in Devnagari (lower right)
1970
Oil on canvas
49.5 x 68.5 in (125.5 x 174 cm)
Rs 50,00,000 - 70,00,000
$ 73,530 - 102,945

"The introduction of the representational


context in terms of colour geometry gives
birth to psycho-symbolic connotations. Thus
a mountain remains not a mountain but
becomes the abode of Shiva. It becomes a
totem capable of exercising its magical eternal
influence on those who come within its field of
vision."
J SWAMINATHAN

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77

Jyoti Bhatt

Jagdish Swaminathans art was informed by his profound


interest in the folk and tribal art of Central India. Born in
Simla in 1928, it was not until the 1950s that Swaminathan
began to paint full-time. At this time he questioned, and
rejected, the notion that Indian modernism developed
from encounters with the West. In 1962 he, along with
some others, formed Group 1890, which was vehemently
opposed to both the idealism of the Bengal School
and the mannerism of European Modernism. Instead,
Swaminathan strove to find the roots of a truly Indian
Modern art in the foundations of Indian art as traced
through tribal traditions.

32

JAGDISH SWAMINATHAN

(1928 - 1994)

Untitled
1990
Oil on canvas
32 x 46.5 in (81.3 x 118.1 cm)
Rs 40,00,000 - 50,00,000
$ 58,825 - 73,530
Also included with this lot is a copy of the book Chirai ri tu kya jane
by Sitakant Mahapatra.
PROVENANCE:
Centre for Contemporary Art, New Delhi
Private Collection, Denmark
PUBLISHED:
Sitakant Mahapatra, Chirai ri tu kya jane, New Delhi: National
Publishing House, 1992 (illustrated on cover)

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Sitakant Mahapatra, Chirai ri tu kya jane,


New Delhi: National Publishing House, 1992

During this period, Swaminathan experimented with


totemic symbols from early societies in a constant
quest to simplify, to find the origins, to return to purity.
Although his practice eventually segued into the Bird,
Mountain and Tree series that he is well-known for, he
returned to and refined his earlier obsession with tribal
and folk arts in the 1980s, following his founding of the
Roopanker Museum of Art at Bharat Bhavan, Bhopal at

the invitation of the government of Madhya Pradesh.


Exploring what he himself described as his natural
bent for the primeval (J Swaminathan, The Cygan: An
Auto-bio note, New Delhi: Lalit Kala Contemporary
40, March 1995, p. 13), the artist experimented with a
primitive system of communications, adopting ancient
symbology as a tool to reconnect modern Indian art with
its indigenous precursors.
Works from this later period of Swaminathans life, such
as the present lot, make real the artists desire to establish
a continuum between folk, tribal and modern art, and
his belief that the philosophical underpinnings of Indian
art have a place in contemporary art practice. The
deliberately unstructured manner in which Swaminathan
arranges his forms and symbols on the canvas echo the
manner in which the same symbols were used in folk art.
Swaminathans work embodies the meaningful message
that Modernism can incorporate a visual language that is
at once ancient, modern, and entirely Indian.

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PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW DELHI

33

34

GULAMMOHAMMED SHEIKH (B. 1937)

GULAMMOHAMMED SHEIKH

Untitled
Signed and dated in Gujarati (lower right)
1993
Charcoal and conte on paper pasted on
cloth stretched over plywood
45 x 67 in (114.3 x 170.1 cm)

Tree over Mountains


Signed, dated and inscribed G. M. Sheikh Tree over Mountains
1970 (on the reverse)
1970
Oil on canvas
36 x 23.5 in (91.3 x 60 cm)

Rs 12,00,000 - 18,00,000
$ 17,650 - 26,475

Rs 30,00,000 - 40,00,000
$ 44,120 - 58,825

(B. 1937)

EXHIBITED
Modern Masters, Bangalore: Apparao Galleries, 11-30 September 2011
PUBLISHED:
Harish Meenashru, A Tree With Thousand Wings, Vallabh Vidyanagar:
Lajja Communications, 2008 (illustrated on cover)

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34

The painting on the cover of A


Tree With Thousand Wings: Poems
by Harish Meenashru.
Reproduced with kind permission from
Lajja Communications

Gulammohammed Sheikh has often used the tree as a symbol to explore political
and spiritual issues close to the artist. In Sheikhs Tree of Life, an enormous tree has
sprouted from the valleys, growing ceaselessly upwards and disappearing from the
frame of the canvas. In its looming shadow, snow-capped peaks and forests appear
diminutive. The verticality of the canvas lends this titular tree a monumentality
that cannot be contained. The ochre and deep green tones imbue the scene with
richness and fertility that signifies and celebrates life.
81

PROPERTY OF A DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN, NEW DELHI

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF AN IMPORTANT FAMILY, NEW DELHI

35

36

S H RAZA

(B. 1922)

Tree of Life
Signed and dated RAZA 92 (lower right); signed, dated and
inscribed RAZA 1992 TREE OF LIFE (on the reverse)
1992
Acrylic on canvas
15.5 x 7.75 in (39.6 x 19.7 cm)
Rs 10,00,000 - 15,00,000
$ 14,710 - 22,060

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S H RAZA

(B. 1922)

Untitled
Signed and dated RAZA 1981/82 (on the reverse)
1981-82
Oil on canvas
9.5 x 7.5 in (24 x 19 cm)
Rs 12,00,000 - 15,00,000
$ 17,650 - 22,060
PROVENANCE:
Chester and Davida Herwitz Collection
Aicon Gallery, New York

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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF AN IMPORTANT FAMILY, NEW DELHI

38

37

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Untitled
Signed Husain (lower right)
Watercolour, oil and ink on paper
12 x 11.5 in (30.3 x 29.2 cm)
Rs 18,00,000 - 22,00,000
$ 26,475 - 32,355
PROVENANCE:
Acquired from a gallery in New Delhi at the Asian Conference of the Non-Aligned Countries in 1949
Artcurial, Paris, 22 March 2011, lot 307

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V S GAITONDE

(1924 - 2001)

Untitled
Signed in Devnagari and dated 87 (lower right)
1987
Pen and ink on paper
14 x 8 in (35.4 x 20.6 cm)
Rs 18,00,000 - 24,00,000
$ 26,475 - 35,295
PROVENANCE:
An Important Private Collection, New Delhi

85

Every painting has a seed which germinates in the next painting.


A painting is not limited to one canvas. I go on adding an element
and thats how it evolves.
V S GAITONDE

Gaitonde at work in his studio at the Chelsea Hotel, New York, 1965
Bruce Frisch

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PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT ASIAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

39

V S GAITONDE

(1924 - 2001)

Untitled
Signed and dated V.S. GAITONDE 71;
signed again in Devnagari (on the reverse)
1971
Oil on canvas
60 x 40 in (152.4 x 101.6 cm)
Rs 6,00,00,000 - 8,00,00,000
$ 882,355 - 1,176,480
PROVENANCE:
Christies, New York, 23 March 2010, lot 59
Saffronart, 19-20 June 2012, lot 38

Vasudeo Santu Gaitonde has always stood apart from


his contemporaries, whether in his personality which
demanded isolation, or in his aesthetic vision that
increasingly exhibited a strong sense of meditative
introspection. Although he was loath to calling himself
an abstract artist and disliked being slotted into any
known genres, Gaitonde is today known as one of the
foremost Modern abstract expressionists of India. Even
when he painted figurations in his early career, he was
moving steadily towards abstraction, evident through his
works which displayed a vividness throbbing with life.
(Dnyaneshwar Nadkarni, Gaitonde, New Delhi: Lalit Kala
Akademi, 1983, unpaginated)
Growing up in the Girgaon area of Mumbai, Gaitonde
graduated from the J J School of Art in 1948, and was
invited to join the Bombay Progressives in the early 1950s.
In the decade that followed, Gaitonde experimented
with various forms of figurations, space and abstraction
that was informed by traditional painting in India,
which historically consisted of mural painting, illustrated
manuscripts (on palm leaf or paper folios), and cloth
painting. (Sandhini Poddar, Polyphonic Modernisms
and Gaitondes Interiorized Worldview, V.S. Gaitonde:
Painting as Process, Painting as Life, New York: The
Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, 2014, p. 20)
Departing almost completely from figuration, Gaitonde
began utilising a non-objective mode of expression.
...Gaitonde was also working with painting itself. The
creation of texture in an unconventional way, the use
of thick lugubrious pigment, the evocation of light and,
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finally, the subtle balancing of the image on canvas as if it


were undulating on water and gradually surfacing in the
lightall these attainments of a time when the individual
canvases themselves may not be far too distinctive. The
need to establish a meaningful relationship between line
and painted surface remains with Gaitonde for quite some
timebefore his art takes the first turn towards the period
of his major achievement. (Nadkarni, unpaginated)
Gaitondes canvases from the 1960s onwards displayed a
monochromatic palette, which he achieved through the
use of rollers and palette knives, instead of brushes. The
results of this stage of experimentationaccompanied by
calligraphic strokes and hieroglyphs in inkwere by and
large an extension of his personal engagement with Zen
Buddhist philosophy. In 1964, Gaitonde was granted the
John D Rockefeller III fellowship to live and work in New
York, where he had a solo exhibition at the Willard Gallery
the following year.
A testament to Gaitondes meticulous process, the
present lot illustrates his precise control over the medium,
and his masterful ability to achieve a subtle balance
between earthiness and a sense of the ephemeral. The
surface is built with subtly graded, translucent layers of
orange, rust and umber, running from a darker and more
heavily layered lower band, which anchors the image,
to its almost fluid centre, where a few intense points of
pigment have been allowed to punctuate the layers and
escape to the surface.
Around 1968, one notices a shift from the early horizontal
canvases to the dominating format of the verticals, which
the artist continued to utilize until his last works from
1997-98. (Poddar, p. 28) The present lot, painted in 1971,
belongs to this vertical format phase of the artists career. A
similar 1970 painting, in variations of rust, forms part of Dr.
Homi Bhabhas TIFR collection of early Gaitonde works. A
precursor to the present lot, this collection bears witness
to the next major phase in Gaitondes career... (Mortimer
Chatterjee and Tara Lal, The TIFR Art Collection, Mumbai:
Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 2010, p. 94)
Gaitonde achieved several accolades in his time. A year
after he created this painting, he received the Padma Shri.
This, in tandem with his permanent move to New Delhi,
marked a new phase of artistic growth and achievement,
cementing his position in the history of Indian art.
89

This is the only seascape that Akbar Padamsee ever


painted. This vast canvas of a stormy sea was originally
commissioned from the artist by Naval Vakil, a
prominent lawyer in Mumbai, who was an important
collector and patron to many Indian Modernists. Vakil
once called Padamsee to his Napean Sea Road home
and asked him to paint the sea as seen from his window.
Painted in 1970, this seascape marks the beginning of
a landmark decade in the artists career and yet recalls
the broad panoramic scale of his monochromatic Grey
Works from the early 1960s. Padamsee captures the
turbulence of the sea through variations of blue, black
and brown. Brushstrokes change direction capturing
the fluidity and movement of the ocean, simulating
the churning of waves. The disquieting swatches of
black and blue mirror the night sky and echo the dark
depths of the ocean. This work stands poised between
Padamsees exploration of nature as an objective
phenomenon, and his depiction of space to transcend
realism and physicality, as he does in his Metascape
series of the 1970s.
Art critic Geeta Kapur elaborates on the emotional
content of Padamseespaintings. Anything that is worth
contemplating is possessed of a solitude and indeed

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91

Akbars landscapes are immensely solitary. Giorgio de


Chirico, an artist whom Akbar has always admired, speaks
of two kinds of solitude in works of art: plastic solitude
which is the contemplative beatitude offered to us by the
artists genius of construction or formal combination; and
metaphysical solitude in which the artist, presumably
treating space as an extended field of his unconscious,
projects signs into the infinite and invests it with
meaning. (Akbar Padamsee: the other side of solitude,
Contemporary Indian Artists, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing
House Pvt. Ltd., 1978, accessed online) Padamsees
interpretation of the sea in the present lot offers a plastic
solitude... an aesthetic forma contemplative beatitude.
(Kapur, accessed online)

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION,


NEW DELHI

Image courtesy of Bhanumati Padamsee

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW DELHI

40

AKBAR PADAMSEE

Untitled
Signed and dated PADAMSEE 70 (upper left)
1970
Oil on canvas
61.75 x 107.75 in (157 x 273.7 cm)
Rs 1,80,00,000 - 2,40,00,000
$ 264,710 - 352,945

92

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41

(B. 1928)

K H ARA

Akbar with Cityscape at the Grey show, Jehangir Art Gallery, Bombay, 1960
Padamsees monochromatic grey works from the early 1960s echo the vast
scale and monochromy of the present lot.

(1914 - 1985)

Untitled (Nude)
Signed ARA (lower left)
Watercolour and ink on paper pasted on board
29.5 x 21.5 in (74.9 x 54.6 cm)
Rs 6,00,000 - 8,00,000
$ 8,825 - 11,765

Aras nudes were ...massive bodies, usually with


their backs to the viewer. The folds of flesh rarely
arouse any tenderness or even titillation. Indeed,
if anything, they create a feeling of a spreading
largeness that can take over the entire pictorial
space. (Yashodhara Dalmia, The Stillness of Life:
Krishnaji Howlaji Ara, The Making of Modern
Indian Art: The Progressives, New Delhi: Oxford
University Press, 2001, p. 135)
93

In the 1950s and 60s, M F Husain painted


a series of canvases including the present
lot, featuring a solitary woman against a
muted or monochromatic background.
In these paintings, Husains women
are monumental in their fortitude and
yet humble and ordinary in a duality
that Husain expresses effortlessly
(Yashodhara Dalmia, The Making of
Modern Indian Art: The Progressives,
New Delhi: Oxford University Press,
2001, p. 101)
The female figure has persisted as one
of the leitmotifs in Husains body of
work since his earliest experiments with
paint. Reflecting his upbringing and
early experiences of loss, these figures,
including the one in the present lot are
enshrouded in an invisible veil, the
simplicity of their form countered by
their inaccessibilityThey could well
be women from his own childhood in a
Muslim household, where the feminine
presence alternates between the
secretive and the visible. The suppressed
yearning could be for his mother, who
died when he was only two years old,
leaving him feeling permanently bereft.
(Dalmia, p. 111).

42

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Lady
Signed in Devnagari (upper right); bearing Chemould label
on the stretcher (on the reverse)
Oil on canvas
55 x 33 in (139.7 x 83.8 cm)
Rs 1,00,00,000 - 1,50,00,000
$ 147,060 - 220,590
PROVENANCE:
Christies, New York, 25 March 2004, lot 216
Saffronart, 6-8 December 2005, lot 17
Private Collection, UK

94

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95

44

43

Anjolie Ela Menon is one of India's foremost women


Modernists. In the present lot, Menon uses the window
frame to allude literally to the act of watching. The woman
enclosed within the window is both the observer and
the observed. Menon began exploring the possibilities
of form and composition using windows in the 1970s.
This prompted her to search for old windows and doors

96

Saffronart | Evening Sale

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF


AN EMINENT FAMILY, MUMBAI

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF


AN EMINENT FAMILY, MUMBAI

43

44

ANJOLIE ELA MENON


in Mumbai's Lakkar Bazaar, where she collected ornate
windows that once belonged in Parsi mansions. She
integrates the wooden frames into her work such that
the painting is contained and defined by it. The curtains
in the present lot are painted to fit exactly into the frame,
as the subject stands gazing calmly through it.

(B. 1940)

Untitled
Signed Anjolie Ela Menon (lower right)
Oil on masonite board
35.75 x 20.25 in (91.1 x 51.7 cm)

BADRI NARAYAN

(1929 - 2013)

Rs 12,00,000 - 15,00,000
$ 17,650 - 22,060

The Magician
Initialed in Devnagari (lower right); inscribed The Magician
by Badri Narayan and dated 5th June, 1986 (on the reverse)
1986
Watercolour on paper
21.25 x 21.25 in (53.7 x 53.7 cm)

The frame is part of the artwork

Rs 6,00,000 - 8,00,000
$ 8,825 - 11,765

97

45

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Untitled
Signed Husain (lower right)
Oil on canvas
36 x 48 in (91.4 x 121.9 cm)
Rs 80,00,000 - 1,00,00,000
$ 117,650 - 147,060
PROVENANCE:
Gifted by the artist to the previous owner, Mumbai, 1983
Private Collection, New Delhi

Husain was exposed to music from an early age, having


spent his childhood in Indore, an important cultural
centre for Indian classical music. He painted works such
as the present lot which are imbued with the sounds
of different ragas in classical music. His love for music
inspired him to create his well-known series of Ragamala
paintings in the 1960s.
Husain believed that true art is a combination of all
the art forms. It would be incorrect to treat them as
paintings of musicians and dancers: not only are they
not representational but Husains purpose in painting
them was clearly to render the spirit of those arts in
visual images. This approach accords with the Indian
belief in the interdependence of art forms. (Richard
Bartholomew and Shiv S Kapur, Husain, New York: Harry
N Abrams, Inc., 1971, p. 42)

98

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99

A painting grows gradually,


organically. The bija, the seed, is
the beginning of human life. This
miniscule point which is energy
condensed can grow from its
embryonic form to give birth
to a whole series of paintings.
S H RAZA

S H Raza

100

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The present lot, titled Germination, shares the name with


an important series of paintings done by Raza, in which
he explores the idea of birth and growth. Germination
is the process of a seed growing into a plant. This theme
is discussed in theological texts and teachings, of both
of Hindu and Christian origins, which Raza re-immersed
himself in after marrying Janine Mongillat, and moving
to the rural town of Gorbio in the south of France.
Every morning Raza would stop by the ancient church
in this village, spending ten to fifteen minutes alone in
meditation; a process akin to emptying the mind. (Geeti
Sen, Bindu: Space and Time in Razas Vision, New Delhi:
Media Transasia Ltd., 1997, p. 113) Razas signature bindu
is present as a representation of both the seed from
which nature is created, as well as the embryo in which
human life is begun. This duality unites the relationship
of man with nature and the bindu now becomes charged
with emotion and vitality, where birth and the beginning
of life are emphasised.
101

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF AN IMPORTANT


FAMILY, NEW DELHI

46

S H RAZA

(B. 1922)

Germination
Signed and dated RAZA 87 (lower right); signed and dated
again RAZA 1987 and inscribed GERMINATION RAZA
(on the reverse)
1987
Acrylic on canvas
39.25 x 39.25 in (100 x 100 cm)
Rs 2,50,00,000 - 3,50,00,000
$ 367,650 - 514,710
EXHIBITED:
Modern Art, Mumbai: The Arts Trust, 2010

102

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Surrounding the bindu are triangles framed within a horizontal


plane which focuses attention to the centre of the painting
to create a horizon line, comprised of shades of brown to
represent the earth. Underneath the bindu are a series of
inverted triangles which symbolise prakriti, or the female
kinetic energy moving down towards the bottom of the
painting. This suggests the process of germination in both the
seed and the embryo. Within the backdrop of the painting
there are other triangles which represent the purush or the
male energy. When combined with the prakriti these figures
provide the fertilization of the embryo or Bindu, leading to
germination.
This painting was created in 1987, during a period in Razas life
when he was drawn to his homeland and visited India more
frequently. The dominant earth tones of black and brown
are reminiscent of the forested village of Kakaiya, from Razas
childhood and reveal his bond to his roots.
103

Triangles, composed of a sea of warm triangles


of varying transparencies is among Razas most
successful experimentations with shape and
colour. Over one hundred triangles are enclosed
within a bright red border. Almost all the triangles
pointing down are in colours that have been
painted over in black while the triangles pointing
up are comprised of Razas signature warm
colours. This creates a dichotomy present in much
of Razas work from the period, where structures
move both out and in. The darker triangles direct
the viewers eye down the painting while the
brighter triangles move the eye up, creating a
timeless meditative space where inner and outer
worlds converge. It is this juxtaposition of cubist
formalities and transparencies of colour which
give the painting a comprehensive sense of depth.
As in most of Razas work from this period, his
signature Bindu is present within the geometric
structure of his triangles.
The present lot, painted in 2000, was created
almost exactly twenty years after Raza abandoned
gestural abstraction for a more spiritual art created
through formal abstractions which emulate
nature. It was also during this time that Raza began
to look towards Indian theology and spirituality to
embed more significant meaning in his work. Raza
manipulates the formal elements of art to place
the viewer in a space which is orchestrated by the
intensity of his vision of Nature. Razas continuing
concern has been with Nature: with the elements
of nature which govern time and space and infuse
order into the universe. To express this concept,
he resorts to the principals which govern pictorial
language and which, in their turn, infuse order into
the canvas. The vocabulary of the point, line, and
diagonal, of the square, circle, and triangle become
the essential components of his work. (Geeti Sen,
Bindu: Space and Time in Razas Vision, New Delhi:
Media Transasia Ltd., 1997, p. 137)
104

Saffronart | Evening Sale

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF A DISTINGUISHED FAMILY, NEW DELHI

47

S H RAZA

(B. 1922)

Triangles
Signed and dated RAZA 2000 (lower centre); signed and dated again
RAZA 2000 and inscribed Triangles (on the reverse)
2000
Acrylic on canvas
39.25 x 39.25 in (100 x 100 cm)
Rs 1,20,00,000 - 1,50,00,000
$ 176,475 - 220,590
PROVENANCE:
Acquired directly from the artist

105

48

F N SOUZA

(1924 - 2002)

Mutation
Signed and dated Souza 68 (upper left); inscribed F. N.
SOUZA MUTATION (on the reverse)
1968
Oil on board
48 x 36 in (122 x 91.3 cm)
Rs 70,00,000 - 90,00,000
$ 102,945 - 132,355
PROVENANCE:
Estate of F N Souza
Private Collection, North India
EXHIBITED:
Picasso Souza, New Delhi: Grosvenor Vadehra at Vadehra Art Gallery,
17 December 2011 - 14 January 2012
PUBLISHED:
Aveek Sen, A Critics Eye, New Delhi: Photoink and Sepia International;
Mumbai: Chatterjee & Lal, 2009 (illustrated)

It is in depicting heads that Souza introduced his most


inventive features that bring to the fore his whole painterly
arsenal. His use of colour is conventional with thick, rigid
strokes of paint squeezed straight from the tube on to
the canvas. Their burnished quality is reminiscent of the
old masters, its expressive content not fully exploited and
not in cohesion with the radical quality of the subject.
(Yashodhara Dalmia, A Passion for the Human Figure,
The Making of Modern Indian Art, New Delhi: Oxford
University Press, 2001, p. 93)
Souzas heads and human forms first appeared in the
late 1940s, undergoing gradual transformations over
time from the cross-hatching technique that became
the hallmark of his early works, to loops, whorls and
squiggles delineating the distorted visages of his subjects.
Souza was inventive in his figurations; the iconic line of
his rigid heads, reminiscent of Romanesque art, gave way
to tubular forms, as seen in the present lot. The circular
spots scattered on the head and around it, resembling
pockmarks, had begun to appear in some of his works
during the 1960s. The alien-like tentacles extending from
the face would become a more prominent feature as he
continued to experiment, well into the 1980s.

49

F N SOUZA

(1924 - 2002)

Untitled
Signed and dated Souza 96 (upper left)
1996
Acrylic on board
22.75 x 17.75 in (58.1 x 45.3 cm)
Rs 8,00,000 - 10,00,000
$ 11,765 - 14,710
PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, North India

48

106

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107

Bawas work which explores the complex, non-verbal


relationship between man and animal has evolved with
subtlety over the decades. In the 1970s, his paintings ...
present man as a brute a conqueror with sword and
shield... Over time, Bawa paints the two in harmony,
coming together as if in a trance, the focus on their
interlocking bodies. (Amrita Jhaveri, A Guide to 101
Modern & Contemporary Indian Artists, Mumbai: India
Book House Pvt. Ltd., 2005, p. 16) The present lot achieves
a subtle balance between man as conqueror of, and man
in harmony with, an animal.
The interaction between man and beast forms a vital
undercurrent in all [of] Bawas paintings. It is significant
that the meditational form in his canvas could be an
animal, as much as it could be a human form or deity.
(Geeti Sen quoted in Ina Puri, Lets Paint the Sky Red:
Manjit Bawa, New Delhi: Vadehra Art Gallery exhibition
catalogue, 2011, p. 77)
The present lot presents a lyrical composition of the
man and the dog, a harmony in the way both leap
forward. Both are modelled in a similar fashion that
makes them seem rubbery and boneless. The dogs rear
limb, for example, forms a single closed shape with his
tail, suggesting the fantastical. Commenting on Bawas
technique, Krishen Khanna says: The balloon-like shapes
found an easy transition into his human, animal and
plant shapes. He was making a philosophical assertion
in addition to the aesthetic which naturally followed. He
was implying that the same force inhabits all creation.
(Puri, p. 101)
Bawa trained at the College of Art in Delhi, following
which he studied silkscreen printing in London. The
technique he arrived at draws from two distinct
traditions: Pahari miniature painting, whose vocabulary
consisted of a fixed set of images, and silkscreen printing,
made up of smooth and flat colours. His figures, though
supple, rubbery and shaded with soft gradations that
stem from his training in silkscreen painting, possess the
gracefulness of those seen in miniature painting. This
grace carries forward in works such as the present lot,
and is used by the artist to suggest layers of hidden intent
in the actions of his figures.

108

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109

51

MANJIT BAWA

(1941 - 2008)

Untitled
Signed and dated Manjit 95 (lower right); signed again
Manjit and signed in Devnagari (on the reverse)
1995
Oil on canvas
21.5 x 19.25 in (54.5 x 48.8 cm)
Rs 30,00,000 - 40,00,000
$ 44,120 - 58,825

50

MANJIT BAWA

(1941 - 2008)

Untitled
Signed and dated Manjit Bawa 93 (on the reverse)
1993
Oil on canvas
45.75 x 53 in (116.5 x 134.5 cm)
Rs 1,75,00,000 - 2,25,00,000
$ 257,355 - 330,885
PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, Mumbai

110

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111

This rare, early work by Tyeb Mehta is one of the few


gestural expressionist paintings he made before his
trip to America in 1968 on a Rockefeller Foundation
Fellowship, where he embarked on his investigation
into colour field painting. Composed of brown and
red hues, the seated figures would blend into the hazy
background, were it not for the animated gestures of
the man on the left. His face, with its expressive features,
is the focal point of the canvas. In 1966, Mehta made
a series of drawings for Ebrahim Alkazis adaptation of
Euripides The Trojan Women (see reference image),
and it is likely that the present lot stems from Mehtas
interactions with the director at the National School
of Drama in New Delhi. The sombre tones and draped
robes are similar to those used in the play. A solo show
at the Kumar Gallery in New Delhi in 1966 highlighted
similar works from that period, demonstrating a strong
preoccupation with the subject.
112

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113

53

TYEB MEHTA

(B. 1925)

Head
Signed and dated Tyeb 89 (lower left); bearing
Vadehra Art Gallery label on the frame (on the reverse)
1989
Pencil on paper
9.75 x 6.75 in (24.7 x 17.3 cm)

Rs 18,00,000 - 22,00,000
$ 26,475 - 32,355
PROVENANCE:
Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi
EXHIBITED:
Yashodhara Dalmia, Tyeb Mehta: Triumph of Vision,
New Delhi: Vadehra Art Gallery,
15 January - 18 February 2011

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN, NEW DELHI

52

TYEB MEHTA (B. 1925)


Untitled
1966
Oil on canvas
48.5 x 58 in (123.5 x 147.5 cm)
Rs 4,00,00,000 - 5,00,00,000
$ 588,240 - 735,295
PUBLISHED:
Hoskote, Gandhi et al., Tyeb Mehta: Ideas Images Exchanges,
New Delhi: Vadehra Art Gallery, 2005, p. 77 (illustrated)

114

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Mehta was known to be a contemplative artist who


mused over his paintings for extended periods of time
before completing them. Making only a few paintings
a year, Mehtas art always holds something thought
provoking. Proceeding by an archaeology of motive
and decision, we may infer that he started with images
that had haunted him, burning themselves deep into his
mental circuitry. We may infer, also, that these obsessional
images, autobiographical in import, gradually gained
in significance as Tyeb externalised them, reflected on
them, and allowed them to shimmer against the wider
canvas of society. (Hoskote, Gandhi et al., Ideas Images
Exchanges, New Delhi: Vadehra Art Gallery, 2005, p. 14)
The present lot already contains the juxtaposition of
emotional intensity and calm fragility which defines the
tension in his later works.

Reproduced from the newly released book Parul Dave-Mukherji ed., Ebrahim Alkazi Directing Art: The Making of a Modern
Indian Art World, Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd., 2016, pp. 56-57.

115

Ganesh Pyne is ...a creator of atmospheres... When he painted through the


night in his room in his shadow-webbed ancestral house during the 1970s
and 1980s, his works would take on the aura of the night, come alive with
nocturnal moods and forms. (Ranjit Hoskote, Ganesh Pyne: A Pilgrim in
the Dominion of Shadows, Kolkata: Gallerie 88 exhibition catalogue, 2005,
p. 16) Painted in 2006, the soft glow of the candle illuminating a pitch dark
room highlights Pynes mastery over colour and technique to evoke light
and shadow.
Pynes signature style is shaped by his own experiences of solitude and
alienation that he had lived through and aided by the pain and horror he
had witnessed in the city of Calcutta during the sixties of the last century.
What surfaced in his art however appear as mysteriously enriched with
moods of tenderness and calm serenity, rich with visual depth in which
every single stroke appear charged with muted eloquence. (Arun Ghose,
Jottings as Paintings of Ganesh Pyne, Agra: Sanchit Art Gallery, 2014, p. 2)

116

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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF AN


IMPORTANT FAMILY, NEW DELHI

54

GANESH PYNE

(1937 - 2013)

The Bones
Signed and dated in Bengali (lower right);
signed, dated in Bengali and inscribed
THE BONES GANESH PYNE on a label,
and bearing a Vadehra Art Gallery label
(on the reverse)
2006
Tempera on canvas
22.5 x 21.75 in (57 x 55 cm)
Rs 30,00,000 - 35,00,000
$ 44,120 - 51,475
EXHIBITED:
A Tribute to Ganesh Pyne, New Delhi: Vadehra
Art Gallery, 13-30 March 2013

117

55

BIKASH BHATTACHARJEE

(1940 - 2006)

Untitled (In his Office)


1975
Conte with a thick lacquer coating on paper pasted on
plywood
35.5 x 29.25 in (90 x 74.6 cm)
Rs 30,00,000 - 40,00,000
$ 44,120 - 58,825
PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, New Delhi
PUBLISHED:
Manasij Majumder, Close to Events: Works of Bikash Bhattacharjee,
New Delhi: Niyogi Offset Pvt. Ltd., 2007, pp. 102, 243 (illustrated)

In the Indian art scenario from the 1960s onwards, the


name Bikash Bhattacharjee stands for a vast body of work
marked by three unmistakable features vivid, almost
photographic realism, human figure as the central motif
and a strong-veined content. (Manasij Majumder, Think
of the Subject First, Close to Events: Works of Bikash
Bhattacharjee, New Delhi: Niyogi Offset Pvt. Ltd., 2007, p.
96) In the present lot, Bikash subverts the central motif by
showing a monkey head suspended from a string. Such
works reflected his private perceptions of the realities of
life, which in the 60s were marked by bitter irony, strident
protest and resentment. (Majumder, p. 118)
Bhattacharjee follows a unique painting process. I try to
achieve volume in my paintings by a process that I think
is not too common in this country. Most of the Indian
artists who use oil as their medium lay on their colours
direct... I prefer to lay on dark colours first and then build
up the lights and highlights. This process has helped me
to give dimension to my pictures, to say what I want to,
and also to give the canvas the textures and the character
that I desire. (The artist in an interview with Arany
Banerjee, Bikash Bhattacharjee, Lalit Kala Contemporary
15, New Delhi: Lalit Kala Akademi, 1973, p. 18)

118

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119

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF AN EMINENT FAMILY, MUMBAI

56

SOMNATH HORE

120

57
(1921 - 2006)

BIKASH BHATTACHARJEE

(1940 - 2006)

Untitled
Initialed S (lower right); signed and dated
Somenath Hore 60 (on the reverse)
1960
Paper collage on paper
10.5 x 14.25 in (26.4 x 36.5 cm)

Untitled
Signed and dated Bikash 92 (lower right); inscribed AND ALAKENDU
BY BIKASH BHATTACHARJEE 1992 (on the reverse)
1992
Oil on canvas
41.75 x 36 in (106 x 91.2 cm)

Rs 3,00,000 - 5,00,000
$ 4,415 - 7,355

Rs 30,00,000 - 40,00,000
$ 44,120 - 58,825

Saffronart | Evening Sale

121

59

SAKTI BURMAN

(B. 1935)

Untitled
Signed SAKTI BURMAN (lower left)
Watercolour on paper
19 x 24.75 in (48 x 63 cm)
Rs 2,00,000 - 3,00,000
$ 2,945 - 4,415

58

K LAXMA GOUD

(B. 1940)

Untitled
Signed in Telugu (lower right)
Acrylic and marker on glass
29.5 x 21.5 in (74.7 x 54.5 cm)
Rs 5,00,000 - 7,00,000
$ 7,355 - 10,295

122

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123

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, MUMBAI

60

KRISHEN KHANNA

(B. 1925)

Pieta
Signed K Khanna (lower right); signed again K Khanna and
inscribed KRISHEN KHANNA PIETA (on the reverse)
Oil on canvas
71.5 x 51.5 in (181.6 x 131 cm)
Rs 70,00,000 - 90,00,000
$ 102,945 - 132,355
EXHIBITED:
Krishen Khanna, London: Royal Academy of Art, 19-24 March 2007
Krishen Khanna: A Retrospective, New Delhi: Rabindra Bhavan, Lalit Kala
Akademi, 23 January - 5 February 2010
PUBLISHED:
Khanna, Lynton, et al., Contemporary Indian Artists Series - Krishen
Khanna: Images In My Time, Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd.,
2007, p. 131 (illustrated)
Krishen Khanna: A Retrospective, Saffronart exhibition catalogue, 2010
(illustrated)

Michelangelo's Piet in St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican.


Image courtesy of Stanislav Traykov, Niabot (cut out), via Wikimedia Commons

124

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Krishen Khannas Pieta is his distinct interpretation


of an iconic image from Christianity, which has been
portrayed by artists all over the world for centuries.
The seated Mother Mary cradling the exhausted
Christ after his descent from the cross is an image
Khanna returns to several times during his career.
The Pieta paintings relate to his concern with the
subject of the dead and the dying, as much as with
the persecuted figure of the Christ ... The Pieta is
among the few maternal figures in Khannas oeuvre,
and his interpretation of the figure varies in its palette,
as well as the reworking of the pyramidal structure.
(Gayatri Sinha, Krishen Khanna: The Embrace of Love,
Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd., 2005, p. 25)
Marys hand to the head is a quintessentially Indian
gesture of grief and desperation. It contrasts with the
stoic Mary in western interpretations. The stark cross
in the background adds to the gravitas of the scene.
Khannas enduring interest in religious symbolism,
particularly Christian imagery, is rooted in a childhood
of summers spent at a vicarage in war-torn England,
and developed by a print of Leonardo da Vincis The
Last Supper, given to him by his father. During the
late 1960s, Khanna worked on a series of paintings
of Christ, from The Last Supper, to Christs Descent
from the Cross. Khannas engagement with biblical
allegory and Hindu myth has served as his instrument
of engagement during troubled periods in Indian
polity. (Sinha, p. 17)
125

61

RAM KUMAR

62
(B. 1924)

Untitled
Signed in Devnagari and dated 76 (lower centre)
1976
Acrylic and ink on paper
8 x 6.5 in (20.3 x 16.5 cm)
Rs 6,00,000 - 8,00,000
$ 8,825 - 11,765

RAM KUMAR

(B. 1924)

Untitled
Signed in Devnagari and dated 71 (lower right); bearing
Pundole Art Gallery label on the stretcher (on the reverse)
1971
Oil on canvas
55 x 33 in (139.7 x 83.8 cm)
Rs 40,00,000 - 50,00,000
$ 58,825 - 73,530
PROVENANCE:
Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai
Private Collection, Malaysia
Private Collection, UK

62
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127

63

S H RAZA

(B. 1922)

Paysage Nocturne
Signed and dated RAZA 60 (lower right); signed, dated and
inscribed RAZA Paysage Nocturne P.288 60 (on the reverse)
1960
Oil on canvas
16.25 x 13 in (41 x 33 cm)
Rs 25,00,000 - 30,00,000
$ 36,765 - 44,120
PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, France
Private Collection, India

128

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64

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Untitled
Signed in Devnagari (upper right)
Circa 1970s
Oil on canvas
50 x 26 in (127 x 66 cm)
Rs 1,00,00,000 - 1,50,00,000
$ 147,060 - 220,590
PROVENANCE:
Purchased from Pundole Art Gallery in the
early 1970s
Private Collection, New Delhi
EXHIBITED:
INDIA MODERN: Narratives from 20th
Century Indian Art, Mumbai: Delhi Art
Gallery, 25 September - 5 December 2015
PUBLISHED:
Kishore Singh ed., INDIA MODERN:
Narratives from 20th Century Indian Art,
New Delhi: Delhi Art Gallery, 2015, p. 190
(illustrated)

Jyoti Bhatt

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65

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Untitled
Signed Husain (lower left)
Mixed media on canvas
60 x 40 in (152.7 x 101.6 cm)
Rs 90,00,000 - 1,20,00,000
$ 132,355 - 176,475
PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, Mumbai

One reason that I went back to the Gupta period of


sculpture was to study the human form when the
British ruled we were taught to draw a figure with the
proportions from Greek and Roman sculpture In the
east the human form is an entirely different structure
the way a woman walks in the village there are three
breaks from the feet, the hips and the shoulder, they
move in rhythm the walk of the European is erect and
archaic.(as quoted in Yashodhara Dalmia,The Making
of Modern Indian Art: The Progressives, New Delhi:
Oxford University Press, 2001, p. 102)

sculpturesque woman dominates the plane, her body in


thetribhangapose that so vividly evokes the movement
and energy of classical Indian dance. A kneeling woman
is engrossed in daily chores, the animals and pots
around her rooting both firmly in an Indian village. And
yet, the accoutrements of Indian village life have been
injected with symbolism. The inclusion of animals hints
at myth animal symbolism is a prominent theme in
Indian lore. Monumental yet simultaneously humble,
works such as this epitomise Husains relationship with
the female form within an Indian setting.

So said Husain, and indeed we see this belief


brought to life on canvas in the present lot. One
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Painted in 1979, the same year that Husain briefly met


Mother Teresa for the first time at Palam Airport, the
present lot is one of the earliest paintings from a series that
would become the focus of his art for a significant period
in later years. He could not find words to express his
feelings in her magnanimous presence. (Rashda Siddiqui,
In Conversation with Husain Paintings, New Delhi: Books
Today, 2001, p. 200) Though Husain had seen Mother
Teresa in Calcutta on an earlier occasion, this meeting was
a monumental point in Husains life. He made a sketch of
her on the spot. She saw it and wrote God bless you on
the sketch and signed. (Siddiqui, p. 200)
Mother Teresa was a true reflection of love for humanity.
She was the greatest soul dedicated to humanity of all
time. She was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979.
After that I began to paint Mother Teresa, for all 25
years. (as quoted in Nirmala Carvalho, Indian Picasso
Dies in Exile. He loved Mother Teresa, AsiaNews.it, 6
October 2011, accessed online) Such was his awe that
Husain went to Italy, to study paintings of saints in order
to advance his representation of her.
Husain saw in her the artists concept of motherhood
hallowed both in Indian and western art... the spiritual
dimension of Mother Teresa was as important to
him as an artist, as her more obvious manifestation of
motherhood. (K Bikram Singh, Husain, New Delhi: Rahul
& Art, 2008, p. 229)
Husain depicts Mother Teresa as formless, in the Islamic
tradition of not representing the divine other than
through symbols, thus the white sari with the blue border.

66

M F HUSAIN

(1913 - 2011)

Untitled
Signed and dated Husain 79 and signed again in Bengali
(lower right); signed and dated Husain Calcutta 79 and
signed again in Bengali (on the reverse)
1979
Oil and acrylic on canvas
48 x 24 in (122 x 61 cm)
Rs 65,00,000 - 85,00,000
$ 95,590 - 125,000
PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, New Delhi

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PROPERTY OF A DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN, NEW DELHI

67

AVINASH CHANDRA

(1931 - 1991)

Untitled
Oil on canvas
37.75 x 99.5 in (95.8 x 253 cm)
Rs 30,00,000 - 40,00,000
$ 44,120 - 58,825
(Diptych)
PROVENANCE:

Formerly from the Collection of Milton Schwartz, New York


Thence by descent
Christies New York, 15 September 2010, lot 335

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Rameshwar Broota creates intensely emotional works


that comment on our humanity, which he fears we
are losing sight of through the process of living in a
highly technological and industrialised world. Ella
Datta examines the present lot, Blast in Silence, stating
that, The painting of an enlarged, exquisitely shaped
ear counterposed with an unrelenting concrete form
crystallises a subtle dialogue between man-made form
and a natural one. The way he evokes the intrinsic
characters of the two different forms is a wonderful
experience. On the one hand, there is the complex
auricular form with its supple skin and delicate,
curvilinear bone structure and on the other, there is
the severe, rigid, phallic, form symbolising an incipient
aggression. (Ella Datta, Rameshwar Broota, New Delhi:
Vadehra Art Gallery, 2005, p. 9)
The formidable presence of man that once loomed
large on Brootas monumental canvases has now been
fragmented and mutated in the wake of mindless
urbanization and mechanization... Now man is
threatened by his own creations. His staying in power
and resilience is pitched against the omnipotence
of his metallic counterparts. (Roobina Karode,

Counterparts: Recent Paintings by Rameshwar Broota,


New Delhi: Vadehra Art Gallery, 2009, p. 5) Brootas
work creates a discourse on the paradox of man,
who is powerful yet exceedingly vulnerable, and is
continuously in search of his place in the universe. The
dark colours add to the sense of despair that Broota
seeks to evoke.
The textured treatment of the canvas adds to the aura
of objects as disembodied from their contexts. Broota
accomplishes tonalities and depth by laying paint on
the canvas with multiple thin layers before scratching
it away with a knife. By 1978 the sharp geometrically
defined spaces and massive figures evaporated under
the insistent scraping and nicking of the blade. On
the brink of a definitive phase in his career, Broota
realised the figure need not be imposed on the canvas.
It could as well be coaxed, revealed or evacuated from
its depths. (Karode, p. 29) Over the years, Broota has
developed and mastered the hand movement and
rhythm needed to create these paintings with precision.
Datta compares Brootas technique of scratching away
at the paint to a form of meditation, in which the artist
loses himself to the process.

Manisha Gera Baswani

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PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN, NEW DELHI

68

RAMESHWAR BROOTA
Blast in Silence
2002
Oil on canvas
54.25 x 108.75 in (137.5 x 276.5 cm)
Rs 2,75,00,000 - 3,50,00,000
$ 404,415 - 514,710
(Diptych)

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(B. 1941)
EXHIBITED:
Rameshwar Broota, New Delhi: Vadehra Art Gallery at Shridharani
Gallery, Triveni Kala Sangam, 7-17 December 2004; Mumbai: National
Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA), 4-12 January 2005
PUBLISHED:
Rameshwar Broota, New Delhi: Vadehra Art Gallery exhibition
catalogue, 2004, pp. 5-6 (illustrated)

141

69

PRABHAKAR BARWE

(1936 - 1995)

Untitled
Enamel on canvas
45 x 36 in (114 x 91.2 cm)
Rs 25,00,000 - 35,00,000
$ 36,765 - 51,475
PROVENANCE:
Formerly from the Estate of Prabhakar Barwe
EXHIBITED:
The Doorstep, Mumbai: Jhaveri Contemporary, 22 April - 13 June 2015

Prabhakar Barwe created a distinctive imagery based on


placing fragmented visual symbols on his canvas early in
his artistic career. The present lot exemplifies this esoteric
arrangement of disparate images the leaf, the blue
cloud and skeletal fish are recurring motifs in his works.
Barwe was known for his affinity to enamel paint, which
he applied in bold, flat patches, in colours that were
deliberately subdued in his later works. The manner in
which he deployed his motifs or symbols, one felt that
Barwe was aggressively making somewhat aphoristic
statements. As they appeared to float in limbo, one was
expected to undertake a sort of game of association
dissociation, trying to weave a loose design out of those
symbols. (Dnyaneshwar Nadkarni, Prabhakar Barwe,
bodhana.org, accessed online)
If we pay more attention, the surface of the work appears
to be shifting, something ambiguous. Its appearance
suggests an empty space, but it gains depth, almost
casually as it were, as if it were leaving room for a cloudy
sky. The surface seems to move in mute agitation: a
wavering light, some projected shadows, an ant passing
by The boxes appear truly empty. Open though they
are, they retain impregnability. The trunks, burning with
colour, lock their secrets within and withhold both storms
and rainbows. So many objects that have weathered the
elements, objects that roll through the climates of the
canvas. Or rather, in a different formulation: these many
objects which express an inner climate, and a stifling
one. An inmost monsoon, but one withheld. (Gyan
Panchal, Curators Note, the doorstep, Mumbai: Jhaveri
Contemporary, 22 April - 13 June 2015, online)

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70

ZARINA HASHMI

(B. 1937)

a) Planted a Garden of Roses from Aligarh: New Delhi 1961 1963


Inscribed New Delhi 1961-1963 (lower centre), signed and
dated Zarina 97 (lower right)
1997
Chine colle on handmade Nepalese paper
13.5 x 12.5 in (34.2 x 31.7 cm)
Seventh from a limited edition of twenty
b) A Room of Four and a Half Tatami: Tokyo 1974
Inscribed Tokyo 1974 (lower centre), signed and dated
Zarina 97 (lower right)
1997
Chine colle on handmade Nepalese paper
13.5 x 12.5 in (34.2 x 31.7 cm)
Seventh from a limited edition of twenty
c) An Uncertain Time: Bonn 1971 - 1972
Inscribed Bonn 1977-1972 (lower centre), signed and
dated Zarina 97 (lower right)
1997
Chine colle on handmade Nepalese paper
13.5 x 12.5 in (34.2 x 31.7 cm)
Seventh from a limited edition of twenty
d) First Home: Bangkok 1958 - 1961
Inscribed Bangkok 1958-1961 (lower centre), signed and
dated Zarina 97 (lower right)
1997
Chine colle on handmade Nepalese paper
13.5 x 12.5 in (34.2 x 31.7 cm)
Seventh from a limited edition of twenty
e) A Space to Hide Forever: New York 1976
Inscribed New York 1976 (lower centre), signed and dated
Zarina 97 (lower right)
1997
Chine colle on handmade Nepalese paper
13.5 x 12.5 in (34.2 x 31.7 cm)
Seventh from a limited edition of twenty
f) Watched the Seine Flow by and Waited for Him to Come
Home: Paris 1963 - 1967
Inscribed Paris 1963-1967 (lower centre), signed and dated
Zarina 97 (lower right)
1997
Chine colle on handmade Nepalese paper
13.5 x 12.5 in (34.2 x 31.7 cm)
Seventh from a limited edition of twenty

g) A Room of my Own: New Delhi 1968 - 1974


Inscribed New Delhi 1968-1974 (lower centre), signed and
dated Zarina 97 (lower right)
1997
Chine colle on handmade Nepalese paper
13.5 x 12.5 in (34.2 x 31.7 cm)
Seventh from a limited edition of twenty
h) Edge of Temporariness: Los Angeles 1975 - 1976
Inscribed Los Angeles 1975-1976 (lower centre), signed
and dated Zarina 97 (lower right)
1997
Chine colle on handmade Nepalese paper
13.5 x 12.5 in (34.2 x 31.7 cm)
Seventh from a limited edition of twenty

i) Horizontal Blue Line: Santa Cruz 1992 - 1997


Inscribed Santa Cruz 1992-1997 (lower centre), signed and
dated Zarina 97 (lower right)
1997
Chine colle on handmade Nepalese paper
13.5 x 12.5 in (34.2 x 31.7 cm)
Seventh from a limited edition of twenty
j) Untitled
1997
Print on Arches Cover paper
5 x 5 in (12.7 x 12.7 cm)
This is an uneditioned cover plate
Rs 12,00,000 - 15,00,000
$ 17,650 - 22,060
(Set of Ten)
EXHIBITED:
Out of India: Contemporary Art of the South Asian Diaspora, New
York: Queens Museum of Art, 1997 (another from the edition)
Zarina: Mapping a Life, 1991-2001, Oakland: Mills College Art
Museum, 2001 (another from the edition)
Zarina: Weaving Memory, 1990-2006, Mumbai: Bodhi Art, 2007
(another from the edition)
The Ten Thousand Things, Paris: Luhring Augustine, 2009 (another
from the edition)
PUBLISHED:
Out of India: Contemporary Art of the South Asian Diaspora,
exhibition catalogue, New York: Queens Museum of Art, 1997
(illustrated) (another from the edition)
Zarina: Mapping a Life, 1991-2001, Oakland: Mills College Art
Museum exhibition catalogue, 2001 (illustrated) (another from the
edition)
Zarina: Weaving Memory, 1990-2006, Mumbai: Bodhi Art exhibition
catalogue, 2007 (illustrated, unpaginated) (another from the edition)

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145

Born in Bombay (now Mumbai) in 1954, Anish Kapoor


travelled all over the country during his childhood. His
father was a hydrographer in the Indian Navy and his
mother belonged to a small Baghdadi Jewish community,
allowing Kapoor access to a heritage whose origins
could be traced back fifteen generations. After his initial
schooling at the Doon School in Dehradun, Kapoor and
one of his brothers, went to Israel in 1970, first to live
on a kibbutz and later to study engineering. Within ten
months he had dropped out of the university to pursue
art. By 1973, Kapoor had moved to London to join the
Hornsey College of Art, and later the Chelsea School of
Art. He had his first show at the New Sculpture group
exhibition at Londons Hayward Gallery in 1978.
The following year, Kapoor returned to India. This trip
was a life-changing experience and fuelled the first of
his major art series, 1000 Names. Struck by the bright
pigmented powders used in temples, in shrines where
worshippers smeared the deity with vermillion, and
arranged in piles throughout local Indian markets,
Kapoor created fantastical geometric sculptures coated
with the same thick powdery substance, in solid colours
of red, yellow, blue, black and white. Their multi-hued
juxtaposition and origins in Kapoors Indian roots were,
according to critic David Anfam, among the most
original catalyst involving homecoming and memory
and addressed the polarities that [Kapoor] realized
were pivotal to its ancient culture. (David Anfam, To
Fathom the Abyss, p. 92)
By 1982, Kapoor was represented by Londons Lisson
Gallery, and subsumed in an emerging movement that
came to be known as New British Sculpture. The same
year he was chosen artist-in-residence by the Walker Art
Gallery in Liverpool. According to New York Times critic
Roberta Smith, Kapoors sensibility, when compared to
the Young British Artists of the 1990s, was ...markedly
different; he greatly prefers gentle seduction to shock
tactics. His sculpture is in many ways one long ode to
the modernist monochrome and its emphasis on purity
and perception, enacted in a three-dimensional space. It
carves, colors and complicates space in different ways,
adding interactive aspects and pushing that purity back
and forth between votive and technological, East and
West. (The Sculptor as Magician, The New York Times,
30 May 2008, pp. E25, E27)

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In the next two decades, Kapoors free-standing sculptures


and grand installations garnered acclaim, particularly for
his interrogation of concepts of matter and void. In his
own words: The void has many presences. Its presence
as fear is towards the loss of self, from a non-object to
non-self. The idea of being consumed by the object, or
in the non-object, in the body, in the cave, in the womb,
etc. I have always been drawn to notion of fear, towards
a sensation of vertigo, of falling, of being pulled inwards.
This is a notion of the sublime which reverses the picture
of union with light. (Homi Bhabha and Anish Kapoor,
A Conversation, Anish Kapoor, Tel Aviv Museum of Art
exhibition catalogue, p. 59)
The notion of the sublime, which dates back to 18th
century philosophers Immanuel Kant and Edmund
Burke, suggests an emotional response, a feeling of
insignificance in the face of natures superior forces and
the immeasurable dimensions of the universe. (Camiel
Van Winkel, On the Sublime in the work of Anish
Kapoor, Anish Kapoor, London: Royal Academy of Arts,
26 September - 11 December 2009, p. 168) The aesthetic
experience of the sublime, according to Burke, contains
not pleasure, but a sort of delightful horror, or sort of
tranquillity tinged with terror when confronted with
beauty. (Edmund Burke, A Philosophical Enquiry into
the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful,
London: Oxford University Press, 1990, p. 123)
The Romantic idea of the sublime, however, is less evident
in Kapoors works. Kapoor aspires to a reversed version
of sublimity, a variant that is not directed so much
upward, towards a divine light, as downward, at the
darkness of prehistoric or prenatal hollow, in which one
is solely dependent on ones own resources... Kapoors
ultimate concern lies not with the effects themselves, but
with bringing about a heightened sensibility on the part
of the viewer, who suddenly becomes aware of losing his
safe distance from the object of his observation. (Van
Winkel, p. 168)
Kapoors preoccupation with the void continued well into
the 1990s and beyond, even as he expanded the material
repertoire of his abstract sculptures, and experimented
with stone, wax and highly reflective surfaces such as
mirrors and stainless steel that created vision-distorting
voids. Created in 2005, the present lot with its concave
shape and highly polished surface is one of Kapoors

147

smaller works in his stainless steel series that challenge


reality and visual perception, while transforming the
space within.
The present lot has its roots in one of Kapoors first large
scale experiments with polished surfaces Sky Mirror, a
six-metre wide concave dish of polished stainless steel,
weighing ten tonnes. Installed in Nottingham in 2001,
this mirrored sculpture is angled upwards to the sky to
reflect its constant, seasonal change. Since then it has
been installed in the Kensington Gardens in London, the
Rockefeller Center in New York, and the football stadium
in Dallas.

An installation by Anish Kapoor at the Frieze Art Fair, 2011


Jenny Matthews/Alamy Stock Photo

In 2004, Kapoor was commissioned to create the massive


Cloud Gate to be installed in Chicagos Millennium Park.
The entire project took two years to complete and was
finally unveiled in 2006. Shaped like a curved ellipse of
polished steel also nicknamed The Bean this public
sculpture resembled a giant drop of liquid mercury, and
became an iconic legacy in the artists career.
By dint of a breathtakingly virtuosic command of size
and finish Cloud Gate consists of 168 stainless steel,
hand-rolled, hand-polished, plasma-welded plates that
weigh 110 tonnes and cost around $23 million these
latter-day inversions of the camera obscura bring the
heavens down to earth and catapult us into an airborne
virtual realm. (David Anfam, To Fathom the Abyss, p. 104)
Kapoors contribution to public art continues, with
Turning the World Upside Down, an hourglass shaped
structure of polished steel in Jerusalem in 2010, and
Orbit, a 376-foot tall sculpture at the Olympic Park in
Stratford, London, in 2012. The following year, Kapoor
was granted knighthood by the British government for
his contribution to the field of visual arts.
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An installation by Anish Kapoor at the Frieze Art Fair, 2011

Anish Kapoor, 2012

Jenny Matthews/Alamy Stock Photo

Mark Thomas/Alamy Stock Photo

149

The interesting thing about a polished surface to me is that when


it is really perfect enough something happens it literally ceases to
be physical; it levitates; it does something else, especially on concave
surfaces.
ANISH KAPOOR

71

ANISH KAPOOR (B. 1954)


Untitled
Signed and dated Anish Kapoor 2005 and inscribed For Eckhard
(on the reverse); inscribed ANISH KAPOOR OVAL DISH (on the
iron mount)
2005
Stainless steel
Height: 55 in (140 cm)
Width: 43.25 in (110 cm)
Depth: 11.75 in (30 cm)
Rs 4,00,00,000 - 6,00,00,000
$ 588,240 - 882,355
PROVENANCE:
Gifted by the artist in 2005

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PROPERTY OF AN EMINENT GENTLEMAN, MUMBAI

72

G RAVINDER REDDY

(B. 1956)

Untitled
2007-08
Polyester, resin, fiberglass, painted and gilded
Height: 85 in (215.9 cm)
Width: 55 in (139.7 cm)
Depth: 83 in (210.8 cm)
Rs 1,50,00,000 - 2,00,00,000
$ 220,590 - 294,120
PROVENANCE:
Saffronart, 8-9 September 2010, lot 15
EXHIBITED:
Third Dimension, Mumbai: Sakshi Gallery, 7 June - 9 July 2010

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153

I strive for something iconic and monumental that transcends the


boundaries of culture, nature and geography.
G RAVINDER REDDY

Ravinder Reddys monumental Devi head gazing out


with wide open eyes is both shocking and familiar. It
harkens back to the iconic form of the Goddess, revisited
by Egyptian, Greek and Hindu civilisations since antiquity.
And yet, it fits quite easily into the idiom of contemporary
Pop Art. Taking from the canon of classical Indian
sculpture, the gold and reds are informed by painted
wooden images seen in South Indian temples. Reddys
heads, embellished with vibrant colours on gilded surfaces
and elaborate coiffures accentuated with flowers, as seen
in the present lot, are a striking combination of tradition
and kitsch.
Reddys early works included busts and figures which
were focused on the female form. He began making
monumental heads of women in the mid-1990s and they
reflect the blending of old and new, not just in form but
also in technique. Reddys combination of the traditional
and the new extends to the artists working methods as
well he fashions his models in clay, but his final sculptures
are made of fiberglass, which may easily be embellished
with paints (he prefers car paint) and metallic leafs and
given the look of almost any real material. (Margery King,
Ravinder Reddy, Pittsburgh: The Andy Warhol Museum
exhibition catalogue, 2001, unpaginated)
Reddy was one of the first contemporary Indian artists
to draw critical acclaim in the US following his show
at Deitch Projects in 2001. His works have been shown
widely throughout India and internationally, including
at the Sackler Gallery in Washington DC, the Victoria
& Albert Museum in London, and at the Peabody Essex
Museum in Salem, Massachusetts.
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Manisha Gera Baswani

The bindi is the leitmotif in Bharti Khers works which are usually
composed of surfaces entirely covered in large and small bindis.
For the world at large, the dot on the forehead singles out
women as Indian. But Bharti subverts this exotic symbol and
thereby the outsiders gaze to talk about more pressing womens
issues. For her the paradox lies in the fact that the bindi with its
traditional and spiritual connotations of the third eye, proudly
flashed on a womens forehead, does not in any way empower
her to see her oppression in a largely male dominated society.
Instead, the bindi has been robbed of its bite and rendered a
toothless symbol of consumer fashion or as Kher would put it
a religious token gone secular. (Meera Menezes, Is she Fish or
Fowl, Art India, Q4 2002, p. 52)
73

BHARTI KHER

(B. 1969)

Untitled
Signed and dated Bharti Kher 2006 (on the reverse)
2006
Bindis on fibreglass
95.5 x 47.25 in (242.6 x 120 cm)
Rs 80,00,000 - 1,00,00,000
$ 117,650 - 147,060
PROVENANCE:
Jack Shainman Gallery, New York
Private Collection, Germany

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The present lot has similarities to a series of wall-mounted


panels created by Kher in 2006. Comprised of multi-coloured
bindis like the lot on auction, they were exhibited at the Jack
Shainman Gallery in New York, in 2007. Employing the bindi
as a central motif in her work, Kher uses this tiny object to
transform the surfaces of both her sculptures and her paintings.
Sensual abstract designs created by the bindi swirl together to
form extraordinary textured surfaces... and the visually arresting
compositions of the paintings. (Bharti Kher: An Absence of
Assignable Cause, 15 November 22 December 2007, Jack
Shainman Gallery website)
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PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, MUMBAI

74

ATUL DODIYA

(B. 1959)

Pregnant Father
Signed Atul Dodiya, inscribed and dated ATUL DODIYA
PREGNANT FATHER - 2004 (on the reverse)
2004
Watercolour and charcoal on paper
69.25 x 44.25 in (176 x 112.7 cm)
Rs 25,00,000 - 35,00,000
$ 36,765 - 51,475

Titled Pregnant Father, the present lot features seahorses,


the only creatures where the male gives birth. It signals
the beginnings of Dodiyas shift to the allegorical. This
preference gained momentum in the 1990s when he
...renounced this [photorealistic] idiom in favour of
a metaphorically accomplished approach that was
informed by conceptual questions about art-making and
nourished by dialogue with diverse expressive practices
spanning painting, sculpture, cinema and poetry.
(Gayatri Sinha ed., Atul Dodiya: Between the Baroque
and the Minimal, Voices of Change: 20 Indian Artists,
Mumbai: The Marg Foundation, 2010, p. 114)
Speaking about the influences he integrates in his work,
Dodiya says, I feel strongly about art from the past, and
treasure the sheer joy of seeing art of diverse kinds. I
like everything. Old Masters, abstractionists, drawings,
installation, manuscripts, tapestries, maps, Johns,
Grnewald. When I look at art, whether it is Donald
Judd or Joseph Beuys, I ask: Where does this come from?
How is this done? How to resolve such images visually,
practically? I think I still have a students approach... I
am still like a student moving from one assignment to
another, enjoying each one. (The artist quoted in Sinha
ed., p. 129)
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PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, MUMBAI

75

SUBODH GUPTA

(B. 1964)

Sat Samunder Par (9)


Signed in Devnagari, dated and inscribed 03-04 SUBODH
GUPTA SAAT SAMUNDER PAR (9) (on the reverse)
2003-04
Oil on canvas
65.25 x 89.75 in (165.6 x 227.8 cm)
Rs 70,00,000 - 90,00,000
$ 102,945 - 132,355
PROVENANCE:
Saffronart, 4-31 March 2004, lot 4
EXHIBITED:
Generation - i, Mumbai: Saffronart, 4-31 March 2004, lot 4

The present lot belongs to a series of large-scale works,


titled Saat Samunder Par (Across the Seven Seas), in which
Subodh Gupta captures a mid-migratory point, the nomans-land that is the airport today... An interstitial point
both in space and time, the airport signifies exhilaration
and anxiety, the tedious boredom that accompanies the
most extreme physical dislocation. (Peter Nagy, Transitory
Indecisions and Fluctuating Monuments, Subodh Gupta,
New Delhi: Nature Morte and Mumbai: Sakshi Gallery,
printed in an edition of 2000, p. 6)
Gupta employs a photo-realistic style of painting in this
series of works. The people and backgrounds are rendered
in a blocky, two-dimensional shorthand while only the
objects of Guptas ultimate interest, the trolleys with luggage,
are fleshed out completely, painted in a realistic manner.
As if to say we are nothing more than the commodities
we drag around us: I Pack Therefore I Am. Poised upon a
wheeled trolley are suitcases and packages that represent a
life condensed, the most necessary objects (both in terms
of quotidian function and symbolic strengths) are swaddled
into vinyl boxes or trussed into bulging bundles. (Nagy, p. 7)

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161

Nataraj Sharma ...appears to stand a little off-centre, in the


half-shade, half-light locus of the observer/participant.
Living in Baroda, a university town on the extended
brink of expansion, he negotiates an imagistic world
that pushes for recognition of the phenomenological in
the everyday and the poetic in the quotidian. (Gayatri
Sinha, Stretch 2006, New Delhi: Bodhi Art exhibition
catalogue, 2007, p. 126)
According to critic Grant Watson, Spy in the House
of Love was inspired by a dilapidated mansion in the
artists neighbourhood. The room in which the man is
crouched suggests imprisonment brought on by a sense
of alienation and exclusion. The mans only means of
escape is through the spyhole ...through which he can
see a man and woman engaged in sexual intercourse,
the movement of their bodies becoming a sequence of
shapes from the Kama Sutra, their soft curves seeming
to multiply and mimic architectural details. The mans
act of transgression floods the scene with an erotic
and masturbatory charge, rendering his condition of
imprisonment within this structure irrelevant... (Gayatri
Sinha ed., Voices of Change: 20 Indian Artists, Mumbai:
Marg Publications, 2010, pp. 102-103)
This transgressive gaze, even more explicit from the
viewers perspective, forms the subject matter of this work.
In this unexpected painting the nude figure crouches to
look into copulating figures bathed in the hues of love
making. The effect of the crouching voyeur is manifold.
Through a translucency of effect, he appears to look
into a lantern lit interior; of a house of love, where the
sheath like membrane of rice paper separates the inner
from the outer world. The evocations of the painting are
manifold, not the least of which are the voyeur/artists
own state of dream/reverie, of remembered pleasure...
As the spy looks onto the scene he is eroticized not only
by his own nude form, but by his covert forbidden gaze.
The voyeur figure set up what in Natarajs painting is the
outward/inward gaze, one that does not engage either
the viewer or manifestly with the presences of its own
locus, but appears to gaze outward and beyond. It is this
other state, of recollection or reverie, of the intersticial
space of the past or the future that lends his painting
its gently seductive quality. (Gayatri Sinha, Stretch 2006,
pp. 133-134)

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW DELHI

76

NATARAJ SHARMA

Spy In the House of Love


Signed and dated Nataraj BARODA 2004 and inscribed SPY IN
THE HOUSE OF LOVE Nov 14 03 (on the reverse of each)
2003-04
Oil on canvas
72 x 120 in (182.9 x 304.8 cm)
Rs 30,00,000 - 40,00,000
$ 44,120 - 58,825
(Diptych)

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(B. 1958)

EXHIBITED:
Nataraj Sharma, New York: Bose Pacia,
20 January - 19 February 2005
Home Spun, New Delhi: Devi Art Foundation,
27 August - 27 December 2011
PUBLISHED:
Peter Nagy and Ranjit Hoskote, Nataraj Sharma, New York:
Bose Pacia exhibition catalogue, 20 January - 19 February
2005 (illustrated, unpaginated)
Hoskote and Sinha eds., Stretch, Singapore: Bodhi Art
exhibition catalogue, 2006, p. 134 (illustrated)
Gayatri Sinha ed., Voices of Change: 20 Indian Artists,
Mumbai: Marg Publications, 2010, pl. 7, p. 108 (illustrated)

163

77

T V SANTHOSH

(B. 1968)

Common Wall
Signed T V Santhosh, inscribed and dated T. V. SANTHOSH 2014 COMMON WALL (on the reverse)
2010
Oil on canvas
48 x 72 in (122 x 182.7 cm)
Rs 20,00,000 - 30,00,000
$ 29,415 - 44,120
EXHIBITED:
Common Wall, London: Grosvenor Gallery presented by The Guild,
Mumbai, 8-30 May 2014

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165

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, MUMBAI


78

ANJU DODIYA

(B. 1964)

In Custody
Inscribed ANJU DODIYA 1999 IN CUSTODY and signed Anju (on the reverse)
1999
Watercolour on paper
40 x 69.25 in (101.7 x 175.7 cm)

Rs 15,00,000 - 20,00,000
$ 22,060 - 29,415
EXHIBITED:
Embarkations, Mumbai: Sakshi Art Gallery, 2000
PUBLISHED:
Embarkations, Mumbai: Sakshi Art Gallery exhibition catalogue, 2000

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167

79

NIKHIL CHOPRA

(B. 1974)

a) Untitled
Digital photograph on paper
36.5 x 24.5 in (92.6 x 62.2 cm)
b) Untitled
Digital photograph on paper
31.5 x 45.5 (80.3 x 115 cm)

c) Untitled
Signed and dated Nikhil Chopra 2008 and inscribed Untitled
(from the series Yog Roy Chitrakar: Memory Drawing II) (on
the reverse)
2008
Digital photograph on paper
48.25 x 72 in (122.6 x 183.2 cm)
First from a limited edition of six
d) Untitled
Digital photograph on paper
31.5 x 44.25 in (80 x 112.7 cm)
e) Untitled
Digital photograph on paper
31.5 x 45.5 in (80 x 115.6 cm)

f) Untitled
Digital photograph on paper
48.25 x 72 in (122.6 x 183.2 cm)
g) Untitled
Digital photograph on paper
24.25 x 36.5 in (62.2 x 92.6 cm)
h) Untitled
Digital photograph on paper
36.5 x 24.5 in (92.6 x 62.2 cm)
i) Untitled
Digital photograph on paper
39 x 58.5 in (90.3 x 148.6 cm)

j) Untitled
Digital photograph on paper
39 x 58.5 in (99.1 x 148.8 cm)
Rs 8,00,000 - 12,00,000
$ 11,765 - 17,650
(Set of ten)
EXHIBITED:
Yog Raj Chitrakar: Memory Drawing II, Mumbai: Chatterjee & Lal,
11-14 December 2007

j
169

Manisha Gera Baswani

80

THUKRAL AND TAGRA

(B. 1976)

Somnium Genero 03
2006
Mixed media on canvas
75 x 75 in (190.4 x 190.4 cm)
Rs 20,00,000 - 25,00,000
$ 29,415 - 36,765
PROVENANCE:
Collection of a Distinguished Lady, Mumbai
Private Collection, New Delhi
EXHIBITED:
Vector Classics, Mumbai: Jehangir Nicholson Gallery at National
Centre for Performing Arts (NCPA); New Delhi: Alliance Francaise,
2006
PUBLISHED:
Thukral and Tagra, New Delhi: Gallery Nature Morte; New York: Bose
Pacia, 2007 (illustrated, unpaginated)

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171

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How do I view the lots?


All lots for sale are featured in this auction catalogue. The number
listed next to each image is the lot number and should be used
as a reference during bidding or for any information requests.
The lots in this sale may be viewed through any of the following:


(i) Previews and Viewings Details listed in the Sales
and Enquiries section of the printed catalogue

(ii) The online auction catalogue available on saffronart.
com

(iii) The printed auction catalogue
(iv) The mobile auction catalogue available for
download on your mobile device
What do you mean by Condition of Lots?
All lots will be shipped out in an as is condition, meaning
that the item is sold with all existing faults and imperfections.
Saffronart encourages all potential buyers to inspect each item
carefully before bidding and to not rely on an illustration of any
item given in the catalogue. Condition reports for all lots are
available as a free service, online or upon request by email, fax,
or telephone.
What are special lots?
Lots marked as Art Treasures and/or Antiquities under the
Antiquities and Art Treasures Act, 1972 cannot be exported
outside India. Buyers are solely responsible for meeting the
requirements of the Antiquities and Art Treasures Act, 1972 or
any related state legislation.
What are Price Estimates?
Each lot has a price range listed. These estimates are based
on characteristics of the lot such as condition, quality, rarity,
provenance. These estimates are provided only as a guide for
buyers and do not include buyers premium or applicable taxes.
If applicable there is a link for pricing achieved for similar art
works at auction available next to the lot in the online catalogue.
Price estimates may be subject to revision.
What is a Reserve Price?
Unless stated otherwise, all lots offered in the auction are subject
to a reserve price, which is the minimum price that the lot may
be sold for. No lot will be sold below its reserve price and the
reserve price will not exceed the low price estimate. Reserve
prices are confidential and will not be disclosed.
How do I register to bid?
Bidders are advised to register at least 24 hours in advance of the
sale. Bidders may choose to register online or send in their details
to Saffronart and we will process the details for you. Saffronart
requires the following details from a first time bidder to register
and process an approval to bid:

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(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
(vi)

Name
Address
Telephone Number
Email Address
Know Your Customer (KYC) documents
Credit card information/financial references/deposits

In some cases, Saffronart may request for a bidding limit value


which is a per lotlimitbased onyourcurrentbidvalue.
If you have bid or been approved to bid with us before, please
use your Saffronart login and password to accept the conditions
for sale online. Collecting a paddle in a live auction also implies an
acceptance of the conditions for sale. Please note the invoicing
details provided at the time of registration cannot be changed
after the sale.
How do I Bid?
(i) Bidding in the Room: All approved bidders, including
those who have registered online, will be handed a paddle
to bid in the auction. Please bring a proof of identity to
collect your paddle. Registrations open 30 minutes prior
to the sale.

Any new bid must be greater than the current highest bid by a
minimum increment. The next valid bid amount is the current
highest bid plus the minimum increment value. The auctioneer
may vary the increments during the course of the auction at his
or her discretion. Online bids, however, are accepted only at the
next valid bid based on the minimum increment. Please refer to
the bid increments printed at the back of the catalogue (on the
reverse of the Absentee/Proxy Bid Form).
Can a bid be cancelled?
No bid may be cancelled by a bidder. Saffronart reserves the
right to cancel a bid at its discretion if it considers it necessary
to do so.
What is the currency of bidding?
In a live auction in India, the currency of bidding is INR. However,
buyers with an invoicing address outside India are invoiced
in USD at the exchange rate fixed for the sale. Please see the
exchange rate section in our Conditions for Sale online.
What is an Opening/Start Bid?
The opening/start bid is the value at which the auction house
starts the bidding on a particular lot.
When does a lot sell?
The fall of the auctioneers gavel shall mark the close of bidding
on each lot. The final bid announced by the auctioneer is
considered a winning bid in the sale, if the auctioneer announces
the lot as sold.

(ii) Bidding Online: Bidders may view and hear the auction
on their PC or Mac with our real-time online video feed
from the auction room. Online bidders may place a bid
by clicking on the Bid Now button when their lot of
interest is open for bidding. If their bid is accepted by the
auctioneer, it will be recorded.

What is Buyers Premium?


Saffronart charges the buyer a premium on the winning bid
value. TheBuyers Premium is calculated at the rate of 20% of the
winning bid value on each lot up to and including INR 6,00,00,000,
15% of the winning bid value in excess of INR 6,00,00,000, up to
and including INR 10,00,00,000, and 12% of the winning bid value
in excess of INR 10,00,00,000.

(iii) Bidding on the Phone: Saffronart accepts requests


from bidders to place bids on the phone with our staff
depending on availability. To avail of this service, you must
be registered as a bidder. Please note that the number
of telephone lines available for telephone bidding may
be limited and this facility is provided at Saffronarts
discretion.

How will I be invoiced?


If you win a bid, you will be sent an email after the close of the
auction, containing an invoice for the winning bid plus additional
charges (shipping, handling, duties and taxes as applicable) and
the Buyers Premium plus service tax at applicable rates. The
invoicing details provided at the time of registration will used to
raise the invoice and no changes will be accepted after the sale.

(iv) Bidding on the Mobile: Bidders may download a software


application from Saffronart onto their eligible mobile
device and use it to place bids during the sale. To avail of
this service, you must be registered as a bidder.

You may review acceptable modes of payment described in


the section below. If you are the winning bidder, you are legally
bound to purchase the item from Saffronart. Please note that
purchases will not be shipped out until payment has been
received and cleared.

(v) Absentee/Proxy Bids: Bidders may place bids prior to the


sale either online or in writing by submitting the absentee/
proxy bid form. See the Absentee/Proxy Bid Form
available at the back of the printed catalogue. Absentee/
proxy bids shall be accepted upto a certain time prior to
the sale which will be listed online.
What are bid increments?

What are additional charges?


All post-sales expenses, including packing, insurance, shipping
or handling charges, are borne by the buyer. Shipping will be
charged on courier rates and are determined by the value, origin
and destination of the package.
You may choose to make your own arrangements for shipping

and handling. However, all documentation requirements must


be complied with. Please contact us for further details.
What are the Duties and Taxes applicable on my purchase?
All duties and taxes applicable shall be borne by the buyer and
will depend on the value, origin and destination of the package.
(i) Deliveries in India for lots originating in India
Any sale of lots originating from India to an address in
India is subject to a 12.5% VAT on the winning bid value
and a 14.5% Service Tax on the Buyers Premium. A CST
of 2% instead of the 12.5% VAT will be applicable on
the winning bid value only if the purchasing entity is a
business; the delivery location of the lot is outside the
state of the location of the sale as mentioned in the Sales
and Enquiries section of the catalogue and the Buyer
provides the necessary documentation required by the
Sales Tax authorities. The final charges will be determined
at the close of the auction and will be sent by email to the
winning bidder.
(ii) International shipments for lots originating in India
For lots originating from India, a 14.5% Service Tax on
the Buyers Premium is applicable. There may be duties
and taxes levied depending on the delivery destination
which typically will be on the total of the winning bid and
shipping and handling values. Depending on the shipping
address, these duties and taxes vary according to customs
regulations in the destination country. Any shipments
to EU countries will be charged an additional VAT as
applicable. Please contact Saffronart for further details.

For imports, the terms of sale are Delivered Duty Unpaid
(DDU). It is the Buyers responsibility to pay all international
duties, customs charges, taxes and tariffs to the respective
authorities. Normally, the couriers we contract will pay
import duties on behalf of the buyer and get reimbursed
at the time of delivery.
(iii) Shipments and Deliveries for Lots originating outside
India (lots marked with the symbol )
These lots have been imported into India, and in order
to remove the lots from a Free Trade Warehousing Zone
and into Indian free circulation for deliveries within India,
a customs duty at 10.3% will be added to the hammer
price. The applicable VAT/CST as mentioned above will
be charged on the amount inclusive of the hammer price
and the duty.
In the event that the lot is to be shipped internationally,
additional charges for international shipments mentioned
in the above section shall apply.
A 14.5% Service Tax on the Buyers Premium is applicable
on these lots.

Please Note: Lots may require permits for import or
be subject to import restrictions to certain countries.

173

Potential buyers are advised to check import regulations


prior to making a bid decision.

completion of payment formalities will be charged demurrage at


1% per month on the value of the artworks.

How do I make payment?


Buyers will be required to complete payment within a period of
7 business days from the receipt of the invoice via email. If you
have not received your invoice within 48 hours of the close of
the sale please contact us.

What documentation will I receive with my purchases?


Upon confirmation of delivery or receipt of shipment, we will
send you the invoices for your purchases along with any relevant
documentation for the lot that has been mentioned in the lot
details. Please note that Saffronart does not issue any authenticity
certificates and does not provide artist authenticities either.

For Buyers in India


Payment can be made in INR only by the following
acceptable modes of payment:

(i) Cheque/Demand Draft: To be made in favour of
Saffron Art Private Limited

(ii) RTGS/NEFT: Details will be included with the
invoice and available upon request

(iii) Credit card: up to INR 3,40,000
For Buyers outside India
Payment can be made in USD only by the following
acceptable modes of payment

(i) Cheque: To be made in favour of Saffron Art Private
Limited

(ii) Direct wire transfer: Details will be included with
the invoice and available upon request

(iii) Credit card: up to USD 5,000

(iv) Payment from an NRE account: The invoice will be
raised in USD based on the winning bid value, and
the buyer will have to transfer an equivalent INR
amount at the bank exchange rate
When will my purchases be delivered/can I collect my
purchases?
Purchases shipped out within 10 - 15 business days of the
payment being cleared and are insured under the terms of
Saffronarts insurance policy (please note that frames are not
insured). If there is an expected delay in dispatch, the buyer will
be informed of the delay via email, unless the buyer has indicated
an alternative preferred mode of communication.
Buyers may choose to collect their purchases from the Saffronart
office in Mumbai. In such cases, buyers are requested to make an
appointment to collect purchases within 10 - 15 business days
of completion of all payments and documentation formalities.
Buyers who have completed payment formalities and have not
taken delivery of their lots from Saffronart within 30 days of the

What if my shipment reaches damaged?


All purchases from this sale are final. In the unlikely event of
your receiving a damaged product, please notify Saffronart
directly within five days of receipt of the lot. Please call or
email us at any of our locations mentioned in the Sales and
Enquiries section. If Saffronart does not receive any notification
within 7 business days of delivery, it shall be assumed that the
lot has been received in good condition, and no claims will be
entertained.
What are some of the symbols used next to the lots in
auction?
(i) Lots marked with are not situated in India and therefore,
may only be bid for and purchased in USD. Persons
residing in India, wishing to bid in USD must be eligible
under the various foreign exchange regulations to make
payments overseas. Please contact Saffronart for further
details.
(ii) Lots marked with indicate that Saffronart owns the lot
in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot
equivalent to an ownership interest.
(iii) Lots marked with have been imported into India, and in
order to remove the lots from a Free Trade Warehousing
Zone and into Indian free circulation, a customs duty at
10.3% will be added to the hammer price. The applicable
VAT/CST will be charged on the amount inclusive of the
hammer price and the duty.
How do I participate in your next auction?
If you would like to register to bid or consign to any of our
upcoming auctions please contact any of our locations listed in
the Sales and Enquiries section.
If you would like to stay informed of Saffronarts upcoming
events, please register with us online atsaffronart.com

CONDITIONS FOR SALE

These conditions for sale set out the terms on which we offer the
Lots listed in this catalogue for sale on behalf of the seller, and if
you make a successful bid, will form a contract for sale between
you and the seller.
By participating in this auction, you acknowledge that you are
bound by these conditions for sale as listed below and on our
website www.saffronart.com. You will find a glossary at the end
explaining the meanings of the words and expressions which
have been capitalised.
1. Our role as the agent of the Seller:
1.1 We undertake to sell properties through this auction
as agents for and on behalf of sellers. Unless stated
otherwise, we have no ownership interest or any other
financial interest in any of the Lots.
1.2 Making a bid by raising ones hand or paddle in the auction
room, submitting an absentee/proxy bid, communicating
a bid over the telephone to our representative or bidding
on our website and/or through the MobileApp constitutes
an irrevocable offer to purchase a property, and the
acceptance of a bid as the winning bid by us shall result in
an enforceable contract of sale between us, acting solely as
the agent of the seller, and the winning bidder.
2. Catalogue Descriptions and Condition of Property
2.1 We offer all properties for sale at the auction on an as is
basis, meaning that each property is sold with all existing
faults and imperfections. We encourage all potential
buyers to inspect each item carefully before bidding.
2.2 Any statements made by us, including by our
representatives/employees, about any property, whether
orally or in writing, concerning attribution of such property
to, for example, any school of art or craftsmanship,
country or origin, history, provenance or condition, are
only expressions of our opinion or belief. Such opinions or
beliefs have been formed honestly in accordance with the
standard of care expected of an auction house, having due
regard to the estimated value of each property. We have
not carried out any exhaustive research or analysis on any
property to be sold in this auction, and potential buyers
should seek appropriate advice on the condition of each
property from their own professional advisors.
2.3 For the convenience of bidders, we provide condition
reports on properties upon request free of charge. The
report includes our bona fide opinion on the condition
of the property and is not an alternative to viewing
and inspecting a Lot by a bidder, or a bidders duty to
seek independent advice on the property, including its

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description, condition and authenticity.


2.4 The bidders undertake to:

(i) inspect and satisfy themselves prior to the auction
as to the condition and description of the property;

(ii) rely on their own judgment as to whether the
property matches its description; and

(iii) not rely on an illustration of any property given in
the auction catalogue
2.5 Neither we nor any of our affiliates, agents, representatives,
employees or directors shall be liable for errors or
omissions in any of the representations made in the
auction catalogue or otherwise, with respect to the
authenticity, description or condition of any property for
sale through this auction.
3. Viewing the Lots and Bidder Registration
3.1 All Lots for sale are featured in the auction catalogue. The
number listed next to each image is the lot number and
should be used as a reference during bidding, or for any
information requests. The Lots in this sale may be viewed
through any of the following:

(i) previews and viewings details listed on the Sales
and Enquiries section;

(ii) the online auction catalogue;

(iii) the printed auction catalogue; and

(iv) the mobile auction catalogue
3.2 We may withdraw any property before, during, or after the
auction, if we have reasons to believe that the authenticity
of the property or the accuracy of the description of the
property is in doubt, or if there is a breach of our terms of
business, or if we otherwise believe, in our sole discretion,
that it would be improper to include the property in the
auction.
3.3 All properties shall be sold subject to the Reserve Price. If
the winning bid is below the Reserve Price, the property
shall be considered unsold. The Reserve Price on each
property shall be confidential and we shall have no
obligation to disclose the same to any bidder.
3.4 We have the sole and absolute discretion to (i) provide
bidding access, whether in the saleroom, online, via
telephone or through an absentee/proxy bid; (ii) provide
entry to the auction room and assign paddles; (iii) disallow
bidders from entering into the auction room or from
bidding; and (iv) ask bidders to surrender paddles at any
time.
3.5 We may set limits on the value of bids that may be

175

our software application onto their eligible mobile device


and use it to place bids during the auction. To avail of this
service, you must be registered as a bidder in accordance
with paragraph 3 above. We do not accept any liability
in the unlikely event that a mobile bid is not executed or
executed incorrectly.

made by a bidder and/or require payment guarantees or


deposits as a precondition to giving bidding access to a
bidder. Bidders will be informed of their bidding limit, if
any, and will not be allowed to bid further if their bidding
limit has been exhausted.
3.6 All bidders are required to provide complete and accurate
invoicing details to us at the time of registration for the
auction. Invoicing details, once registered, will not be
changed. Winning bidders shall be invoiced based on
details provided at the time of registering for the auction.
3.7 New bidders are advised to register at least 48 hours prior
to the bid. Know-Your-Customer (KYC) documents and/
or financial reference letters are required for individual and
corporate clients and we will not grant bidding access
if the bidder registration and KYC procedures are not
complete.
4. Bidding
4.1 Our auctioneer will accept bids from the bidding room,
from telephone bidders, from online/mobile bidders, and
absentee/proxy bids submitted in advance of the auction,
either online or through a written form. Our auctioneer
has complete discretion on whether to accept an online/
mobile bid, a room bid, a telephone bid or an absentee/
proxy bid at any given time. Bids once placed by a bidder
may not be cancelled. We reserve the right to reject, accept
and/or cancel a bid at our sole and absolute discretion.
4.2 Bidding in the Room: All approved bidders, including
those who have registered online, will be handed a paddle
to bid in the auction. Please bring a proof of identity to
collect your paddle. Registrations will be made open 30
minutes prior to bidding.
4.3 Bidding Online: Bidders may view and hear the auction
on their PC or Mac with our real-time online video feed
from the auction room. Online bidders may place a bid
by clicking on the Bid Now button when their lot of
interest is open for bidding. If their bid is accepted by
our auctioneer, it will be recorded. We do not accept
any liability in the unlikely event that an online bid is not
executed or executed incorrectly.
4.4 Bidding on the Telephone: We accept requests from
bidders to place bids on the telephone with our staff
depending on availability. To avail of this service, you must
be registered as a bidder in accordance with paragraph
3 above. Please note that the number of telephone lines
available for telephone bidding may be limited and this
facility is provided at our sole and absolute discretion.
We do not accept any liability in the unlikely event that a
telephone bid is not executed or executed incorrectly, or
in the event of faulty telephone connections or the bidder
not being reachable.
4.5

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Bidding on the Mobile Application: Bidders may download

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4.6 Absentee/Proxy Bids: Bidders may place bids prior to the


sale either online or in writing by submitting the absentee/
proxy bid form. Absentee/proxy bids may be accepted or
refused at our sole and absolute discretion.
4.7 Currency of Bidding: All bids may only be placed in Indian
Rupees (INR). The foreign currency exchange rate used
on our website for invoicing of non-India based bidders
in United States Dollars (USD), and for all other auctionrelated purposes, has currently been set at 1:68 (USD:INR),
and will be constant during the auction. Before the start of
the auction, we may, at our sole and absolute discretion,
change the exchange rate used, based on fluctuations
in market exchange rates. The estimates for individual
properties have been rounded off for ease of reference
and may not reflect the exact exchange rate used for bid
calculations.
4.8

Technical Downtime: In the unlikely event that our


website or mobile application is inaccessible to bidders
or partially disabled due to Technical Downtime at
any time, the auction will continue in the saleroom,
unless specifically discontinued at our sole and absolute
discretion. Bidders may contact us during such Technical
Downtime to bid by telephone, subject to availability. We
accept no liability for any Technical Downtime. Online
or mobile bids recorded prior to or after any Technical
Downtime may be treated as valid. We shall not be
liable for any loss of information due to the Technical
Downtime. The data logs of our server will determine the
duration of the Technical Downtime. Any determination
made by us in respect of recording of bids shall be final.

4.9 Mobile and Internet Networks: Due to the nature of


mobile and internet traffic, there may be an unpredictable
time-lag between a bidder placing a bid, and that bid
being received by us. We accept no liability for such time
lags owing to mobile and internet networks.
4.10 Bidders are advised to keep their login ID, password
and paddle secure at all times. We will hold the bidder
responsible for all bids placed by using their paddle or
login ID and password, whether via our website, through
the mobile device or in the sale room.
4.11 Our auctioneer may place bids on behalf of sellers either
by placing consecutive bids or by placing bids in response
to other bidders, provided such bids are less than the
Reserve Price. Our auctioneer will not place bids on
behalf of the seller for lots that are offered with no Reserve
Price.

4.12 At the discretion of our auctioneer, proxy bids submitted


on no reserve Lots will be executed at a minimum of
10% of the lower estimate of the relevantLotif there is no
competing bid, and provided that the proxy bid amount
is greater than such minimum value.
4.13 Our employees may not bid in the auction once the auction
has started. They may, however, submit an absentee/proxy
bid for an amount which may be equal to or above the
lower estimate of a Lot before the auction commences.
Once the auction has started, they may not increase their
bid or alter it in any way. Our employees may bid in charity
auctions that are held on our auction platform.
4.14 Sellers are not allowed to bid on the particular Lot(s) they
have consigned otherwise than as permitted under these
conditions for sale.
4.15 A currency converter may be in operation in the saleroom
for the convenience of bidders. We accept no liability for
any malfunction in the currency converter.
4.16 We and our auctioneer (acting on our behalf) have the
right to exercise reasonable discretion in setting bid
increments, accepting and refusing any bid, advancing
the bidding, withdrawing or dividing any Lot, combining
any two or more Lots, and in the case of error or dispute,
during or after the sale, determining the successful bidder,
continuing the bidding, cancelling the sale or reoffering
and reselling the item in dispute. If any dispute arises
after the sale, then, in the absence of any evidence to
the contrary, the sale record maintained by us and our
auctioneer will be conclusive.
4.17 Any new bid will normally be accepted at a value greater
than the current highest bid by a minimum increment,
which applies to each bid value. The next valid bid
amount is the current highest bid plus the minimum
increment value. Our auctioneer may, from time to time,
allow a bid in the saleroom at a lower or higher increment
than the minimum increment. Online and mobile bids
however, are accepted only at the next valid bid based on
the minimum increment.
4.18 Subject to the discretion of our auctioneer, the highest
bidder accepted by our auctioneer will be the winning
bidder and the fall of our auctioneers gavel shall mark
the close of bidding on each Lot. Our auctioneer may,
at his/her discretion, re-open bidding on a Lot after the
fall of the gavel if a higher bid placed prior to closing was
inadvertently not accepted.
4.19 We and our auctioneer (acting on our behalf) may, at our
sole and absolute discretion, choose not to award the
winning bid to the winning bidder with the highest bid, if
we deem it necessary to do so.

4.20 We shall retain the right to display the results of the sale
and Lot details sold by us, including catalogue descriptions
and prices on our website at all times, including after the
completion of the sale. We regret that we cannot agree to
requests to remove these details from our website.
5. Completing the Purchase
5.1 We will raise invoices on the winning bidder for the Sale
Price and Buyers Premium, applicable taxes on sale
of properties and other additional charges that may be
incurred by us, if any, including shipping and handling of
the property and additional levies.
5.2 The title to the property shall pass from the seller to us
outside the territory of the United States of America.
The title to the properties purchased shall pass to the
winning bidder at the time that bidding is closed for each
property and such winning bidder shall thereafter assume
full risk and responsibility for such properties. In any event,
the properties purchased will not be released or shipped
out to the winning bidder or his representative until
the winning bidder has fulfilled his payment and other
obligations as described in these conditions for sale.
5.3 In respect of each sale at the auction, we shall charge a
Buyers Premium calculated at the rate of (i) 20% of the
winning bid value of up to and including INR 6,00,00,000,
(ii) 15% of the winning bid value in excess of INR
6,00,00,000 up to and including INR 10,00,00,000, and (iii)
12% of the winning bid value in excess of INR 10,00,00,000.
Service tax applicable on the Buyers Premium shall be
payable by the winning bidder.
5.4 The winning bidder shall be invoiced based on details
provided at the time of registering for the auction.
Winning bidders located in India will be invoiced in INR
and all other winning bidders will be invoiced in USD.
Payments must be made in the currency on the invoice in
any of the following modes of payment.
For INR payments
1. Cheque/Demand Draft
2. RTGS/NEFT
3. Credit card: up to INR 3,40,000
For USD payments
1. Cheque
2. Direct wire transfer
3. Credit card: up to USD 5,000
NOTE: Payments in excess of USD 5,000 (INR 3,40,000)
must be made through a wire transfer or cheque. We and
our affiliates will not be held responsible for any refusal or
failure to accept modes of payment not outlined above.
5.5 No shipment or delivery of the property will be made
if the Sale Price and Buyers Premium (including the

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applicable taxes and other service charges, if any) are


not received by us and until all proper documentation
in connection with the sale of the property has been
completed. We will not accept payments from any parties
other than the winning bidder as recorded on the invoice.
5.6 The winning bidder acknowledges that we will abide by
any export restrictions that may apply in the countries
from where specific properties will be shipped. The
winning bidder shall also be responsible to ensure that the
property(ies) is freely importable into his country or to the
country where the destination for delivery (as specified
by the winning bidder) is located. If the winning bidder
or we become aware of any restrictions to such import
subsequent to the completion of the auction, the winning
bidder shall provide an alternate delivery destination to
us. All costs associated with the process of delivery and
storage (when required) of the property shall be borne
by the winning bidder. The property(ies) shall be handed
over to the winning bidder or his nominee only upon full
payment of all such costs.
5.7

Lots marked as Art Treasures and/or Antiquities under


the Antiquities and Art Treasures Act, 1972 cannot be
exported outside India. If you are the successful bidder
for any such Lot, you agree not to export such Lot
outside of India. Each winning bidder is solely responsible
for meeting the requirements of the Antiquities and Art
Treasures Act, 1972 or any related state legislation. Please
note that the Lots are marked for your convenience only,
and we do not accept any liability for errors or for failing to
mark the Lots.

5.8 Non payment: In case payments are not received within


7 business days of each invoice, we shall treat the same
as a breach of contract of sale by the winning bidder, and
the seller may, in such an event, authorise us to take any
steps (including the institution of legal proceedings), as it
may deem to be appropriate to enforce payment by the
winning bidder. In addition, the winning bidder will be
charged demurrage at 1% of the total value (winning bid
plus Buyers Premium) per month till the date of actual
payment.
5.9 Failure to collect: If the winning bidder informs us that
he/she wishes to collect the property from us in person
and if such property is not collected by the winning
bidder within 30 days of the payment formalities being
completed, we shall arrange for storage of the property
at the winning bidders expense, and shall only release the
property after payment has been made, in full, of the Sale
Price and Buyers Premium, including demurrage at 1%
of the total value (winning bid plus Buyers Premium)
per month (if applicable) and the charges for storage of
the property, if any.
5.10 We shall be entitled to exercise a lien on the property for
payment of any sums due to us from the winning bidder,

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including the Sale Price, Buyers Premium or costs


relating to storage and insurance where they are to be
borne by the winning bidder, in relation to any property
purchased by the winning bidder.
6. Authenticity Guarantee
6.1 Guarantee of properties: We provide a limited guarantee
on the authenticity of the property based on the
characteristics of the property, for a period of one year
from the date of the auction of such property, in the
manner detailed below:

(i) for properties characterised as art work, we
guarantee only the authorship with reference to the
name of the artist till such time that the property is
in our possession. We do not guarantee any other
attribute of such property; and

(ii) for properties characterised as precious objects
(other than artworks), we guarantee characteristics
or features mentioned in all capital letters in the
heading of the Description of the Property in the
auction catalogue (in the case of the MobileApp
auction catalogue, the characteristics or features
mentioned in all capital letters may be displayed
in a position other than the heading) till such time
that the property is in our possession. We do not
guarantee any other attribute of such property.
Further, all coloured stones, unless certified, may or
may not be treated for enhancements.
6.2 In the unlikely event that within one year from the sale
of the property through auction, it is proved by the
winning bidder, to our reasonable satisfaction, that the
property was not authentic and if, in our opinion, bidders
being aware of such error or omission would have bid
significantly less than the actual Sale Price, we shall be
entitled to rescind the sale, and the seller will be liable to
refund to the winning bidder the Sale Price paid for the
property.
6.3 The guarantee above shall be subject to the following
conditions:

(i) the claim is made by the winning bidder as registered
with us (the benefit of the claim is not assignable to
any subsequent owners or others who may acquire
or have an interest in any of the properties);

(ii) the property is returned to us in the same condition
that it was in at the time of delivery of the Property
to the winning bidder; and

(iii) the property is indisputably the same as purchased
through the auction;
Once we obtain the refunded amount from the seller, we
shall forward the same along with the amount charged
by us as the Buyers Premium to the winning bidder. We
shall not be accountable to the winning bidder for any
taxes, shipping, handling or any other charges that may
have been applicable at any time from the sale of the
artwork till the claim.

6.4 All such claims will be handled on a case-by-case basis,


and in the case of an authenticity claim, will require that
examinable proof, which clearly demonstrates that the
property is not authentic, is provided by an established
and acknowledged authority. Our decision in respect of
such claims shall be final and binding.
6.5 In all cases, we retain the right to consult with, at the
expense of the winning bidder, two recognised experts
in the field (such experts being mutually acceptable to us
and the winning bidder), to examine the property under
question before deciding to rescind the sale and offer the
refund under the guarantee set out above. The opinion of
the experts shall not be binding on us.
6.6 In the event of the sellers failure to refund the proceeds
as stated in this paragraph, the winning bidder shall return
the property to us and authorise us as its agent to initiate
legal proceedings against the seller. Any such steps taken
or legal proceedings instituted by us against the seller shall
be to the cost of the winning bidder.
7. Privacy of Personal Information
We will maintain the confidentiality of your personal
information as disclosed to us and undertake to not
disclose such information to any third party, unless
otherwise required by law or a governmental authority.
8. Extent of our Liability
8.1 We have an obligation to refund the Sale Price and Buyers
Premium to the winning bidder only in the circumstances
described above (in paragraph 6). Damages to, or losses
or loss in value of any of the artwork (excluding frames)
incurred during shipping and transit are covered as per
the insurance policy obtained by us. In case the winning
bidder opts out of insurance coverage arranged for by
us, we shall not entertain any claims for damage or loss
during shipping and transit. Subject to the authenticity
guarantee above, neither our suppliers nor us, nor any of
our employees or agents, shall be responsible, either for
the correctness of any statements as to the authorship,
origin, date, age, attributes or genuineness of any property
in the sale, or for any mistakes in the description of the
properties, or for any faults or defects in the properties,
or for any other act or omission whatsoever. We offer no
guarantee or warranty other than the limited guarantee
set out in Clause 6 above.
8.2 The rescission of the sale and the refund of the total Sale
Price paid by the winning bidder is the sole remedy that
may be sought by a winning bidder, and such remedy
is exclusive and in lieu of any other remedy which may
otherwise be available under law. We shall not be liable
for any incidental or consequential damages incurred or
claimed.

(i)

sending an email to the email address disclosed by


the bidder to us; or
(ii) sending a courier to the address disclosed by the
bidder to us.

9.2 Such legal notice shall be deemed to have been properly


served:

(i) in the case of email transmission: on the date of the
transmission; and

(ii) in case of transmission by courier: 2 business days
after the dispatch of the notice by courier.
10. Severability
If any part of these conditions for sale is found by any court
of law to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, that part may be
discounted and the rest of the conditions shall be enforceable to
the fullest extent permissible by law.
11. Governing Law and Jurisdiction
11.1 These conditions for sale are subject to the laws of:

(i) India, in the event that the seller is located in India;
and

(ii) The United States of America, in the event that
the seller is located in any jurisdiction other than in
India.
Such laws shall apply to the construction of the conditions
for sale and to the effect of the provisions thereof.
11.2 All parties are subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of
courts at:

(i) Mumbai, Maharashtra, India, in the event that the
seller is located in India; and

(ii) New York, USA, in the event that the seller is
located in any jurisdiction other than in India.
GLOSSARY
1. Buyers Premium: The amount charged by us from a
winning bidder for services rendered by us, in accordance
with these conditions of sale, in connection with the
purchase of products by the winning bidder.
2. Lot/Lots: An item to be offered at the auction, including
two or more items to be offered at the auction as a group.
3. Reserve Price: The minimum price that a seller has
communicated to us as being acceptable for the sale of a
lot through an auction
4. Sale Price: The price at which a property is sold to
the winning bidder, exclusive of the Buyers Premium,
applicable taxes on sale of properties and other additional
charges that may be incurred by us, if any, including
shipping and handling of the property and additional
levies.
5. Technical Downtime: the time period during which our
server or website or mobile application is not in operation
due to a malfunction.

9. Legal Notices
9.1 We may validly serve a bidder with a legal notice, if
required, by the following means:

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Be in the auction room,


wherever you are
SAFFRONART MOBILEAPP

SAFFRONART LIVE EVENING SALE MUMBAI | 24 FEBRUARY 2016

ABSENTEE/PROXY BID FORM


To enter absentee/proxy bids, please sign the completed form and email it to auction@saffronart.com, or fax it to +91 22 2432 1187.
You may also submit absentee/proxy bids online. For additional information, please refer to our Frequently Asked Questions
(FAQs) section at the back of the catalogue or on the Saffronart website.
I request Saffronart, without legal obligation on its part, to bid on the Lots listed below, up to the maximum price I have specified.
I agree that my Bid will be treated as an offer and is subject to the Conditions for Sale listed in the catalogue and on saffronart.com.
I understand that Saffronart is accepting written Bids for the convenience of clients and I will not hold it liable for failure to record my Bid. I
understand that a maximum Bid, once recorded, may not be cancelled.
Please print clearly in capital letters. Please mention the lot number and description accurately (artist name, title). Bidders are required to provide
all invoicing details prior to the sale. The bidder as registered with Saffronart will be invoiced, and no invoices will be changed after the sale.

Lot No.

Artist/Description

Maximum Bid Amount in INR

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EVENING SALE
MUMBAI | LIVE
24 FEBRUARY 2016

Name: Email:
Address:

City:

Pin/Post Code:

Country:

Tel (mobile):

Tel (office/home):

Saffronart username:

App available on Google Play and iTunes

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Saffronart | Evening Sale

Signature

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BIDDING INCREMENTS
Bidding begins below the lower estimate, and increases in steps, or increments. The next valid bid is based on the increments listed below.
If bidders enter a proxy bid online, the next bid is placed at the minimum incremental value.

INR 10,000 20,000

by INR 1,000

INR 20,000 INR 50,000


by INR 2,000, 5,000, 8,000


(e.g. INR 22,000, 25,000, 28,000)

INR 50,000 INR 1,00,000

by INR 5,000

INR 1,00,000 INR 2,00,000

by INR 10,000

INR 2,00,000 INR 5,00,000


by INR 20,000, 50,000, 80,000


(e.g. INR 2,20,000, 2,50,000, 2,80,000)

INR 5,00,000 INR 10,00,000

by INR 50,000

INR 10,00,000 INR 20,00,000

by INR 1,00,000

INR 20,00,000 INR 50,00,000


by INR 2,00,000, 5,00,000, 8,00,000


(e.g. INR 22,00,000, 25,00,000, 28,00,000)

INR 50,00,000 INR 1,00,00,000

by INR 5,00,000

INR 1,00,00,000 INR 2,00,00,000

by INR 10,00,000

INR 2,00,00,000 INR 5,00,00,000


by INR 20,00,000, 50,00,000, 80,00,000


(e.g. INR 2,20,00,000, 2,50,00,000, 2,80,00,000)

INR 5,00,00,000 INR 10,00,00,000

by INR 50,00,000

Above INR 10,00,00,000

at auctioneers discretion

All bids for this sale will be accepted in INR. Equivalent currency values displayed on our website are for your convenience.
The auctioneer may vary the increments during the course of the auction at his or her discretion.
For overseas bidders participating in this auction, please refer to our Conditions for Sale.

INDEX
K H ARA

Lot 1 p. 12

PRABHAKAR BARWE

Lot 2 p. 14

Lot 3 p. 15

Lot 41 p. 93

Lot 69 p. 142

MANJIT BAWA

Lot 11 p. 31

Lot 12 p. 34

Lot 13 p. 35

Lot 50 p. 110

MANJIT BAWA

N S BENDRE

BIKASH BHATTACHARJEE

Lot 51 p. 111

Lot 14 p. 37

Lot 55 p. 118

RAMESHWAR BROOTA

SAKTI BURMAN

Lot 68 p. 140

Lot 25 p. 62

Lot 57 p. 121

1. I agree and consent to paying the Buyers Premium calculated at the rate of 20% of the winning Bid value on each lot
up to and including INR 6,00,00,000, 15% of the winning Bid value in excess of INR 6,00,00,000 up to and including
INR 10,00,00,000 and 12% of the winning Bid value in excess of INR 10,00,00,000. All applicable duties and taxes, and shipping
and handling charges shall be borne by me.
2. I understand that if Saffronart receives identical absentee/proxy Bids, and if these Bids are the highest on the Lot, Saffronart will
sell the Lot to the Bidder whose Bid it received and accepted first.
3. I understand that absentee/proxy Bids submitted on no reserve Lots will be executed at a minimum of 10% of the lower
estimate (the Minimum Value), if there is no competing Bid, and the absentee/proxy Bid amount is greater than the Minimum
Value.

Lot 26 p. 63

SAKTI BURMAN

AVINASH CHANDRA

SANKHO CHAUDHURI

Lot 59 p. 123

Lot 67 p. 136

Lot 29 p. 70

For New Bidders


If you have not previously registered with Saffronart, please create a username on our website. To participate in this auction,
you will have to pre-register with your login details. When contacted by our representative, please provide a proof of
identity and address document, such as a copy of an official photo identity card (either a PAN Card, National Identity
Card, Passport or Drivers Licence). Once your documents are verified, you will be given access to Bid. You may also call our
auction helpline at +91 22 2432 2898.

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183

NIKHIL CHOPRA

ATUL DODIYA

ANJU DODIYA

ANISH KAPOOR

KRISHEN KHANNA

BHARTI KHER

RAM KUMAR

Lot 79 p. 169

Lot 74 p. 158

Lot 78 p. 167

Lot 71 p. 150

Lot 60 p. 124

Lot 73 p. 157

Lot 15 p. 40

V S GAITONDE

Lot 38 p. 85

Lot 39 p. 88

K LAXMA GOUD

SUBODH GUPTA

RAM KUMAR

Lot 58 p. 122

Lot 75 p. 161

Lot 16 p. 41

ZARINA HASHMI

SOMNATH HORE

M F HUSAIN

Lot 70 p. 144

Lot 56 p. 120

Lot 6 p. 19

Lot 7 p. 20

M F HUSAIN

Lot 8 p. 21

Lot 9 p. 25

Lot 22 p. 54

Lot 23 p. 56

Lot 37 p. 84

M F HUSAIN

Lot 42 p. 94

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Saffronart | Evening Sale

TYEB MEHTA

Lot 61 p. 126

Lot 62 p. 127

Lot 52 p. 114

ANJOLIE ELA MENON

BADRI NARAYAN

AKBAR PADAMSEE

Lot 43 p. 96

Lot 44 p. 97

Lot 17 p. 45

AKBAR PADAMSEE

GANESH PYNE

S H RAZA

Lot 40 p. 92

Lot 54 p. 116

Lot 10 p. 27

S H RAZA

Lot 45 p. 99

Lot 64 p. 131

Lot 65 p. 133

Lot 66 p. 135

Lot 53 p. 115

Lot 36 p. 83

Lot 35 p. 82

G RAVINDER REDDY

Lot 46 p. 103

Lot 47 p. 105

Lot 63 p. 128

Lot 72 p. 153

185

JAMINI ROY

FINE JEWELS AND WATCHES

JEHANGIR SABAVALA

ONLINE AUCTION | APRIL 2016

Lot 20 p. 52

Lot 21 p. 53

Lot 18 p. 49

Lot 19 p. 51

T V SANTHOSH

HIMMAT SHAH

NATARAJ SHARMA

Lot 77 p. 164

Lot 30 p. 75

Lot 76 p. 163

GULAM MOHAMMED SHEIKH

ARPITA SINGH

F N SOUZA

A PAIR OF DIAMOND EAR CLIPS, GAZDAR

Lot 33 p. 80

Lot 34 p. 81

Lot 24 p. 59

Lot 4 p. 16

Property from the Collection of a Distinguished Parsi Family

F N SOUZA

Lot 5 p. 17

Each centering on a round, full-cut diamond, to a stylized


scroll form surmounts set with baguette and old mine cut
diamonds, with baguetters and old-mine cut diamonds weight of
approximately 10.28 carats, mounted in gold, signed Gazdar
Saffronart Autumn Auction of Fine Jewels and Silver, Oct 23-25, 2013

Lot 27 p. 64

JAGDISH SWAMINATHAN

Lot 28 p. 69

Lot 48 p. 106

Lot 49 p. 107

THUKRAL AND TAGRA

NOW ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS


jewels@saffronart.com
Mumbai: 91 22 2436 4113 | New Delhi: 91 11 2436 9415
Lot 31 p. 77

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Saffronart | Evening Sale

Lot 32 p. 78

Lot 80 p. 171

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AN AESTHETES VISION

LIVING TRADITIONS

FURNITURE FROM THE HOUSE OF MAHENDRA DOSHI


ONLINE AUCTION | 15-16 March 2016

ONLINE AUCTION | 16-17 MARCH 2016

FOLK AND TRIBAL ART

PILICHAMUDI
KARNATAKA/KERALA
19TH CENTURY
Brass and Silver

Auction conducted by
COLLECTIBLES ANTIQUES INDIA PVT. LTD.
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