You are on page 1of 104

760.7? R M4-M.

v.

Libraries-Claremont Colleges

Digitized by the Internet Archive


in

2011

http://www.archive.org/details/musicaldictationOOritt

LIFE OF MOZART
BY

OTTO JAHN.
Translated from the German by Pauline D. Townsend.
With

five Portraits,

and Preface by George Grove, D.C.L.

Three Volumes, Cloth, price 1 us. 6d.

THE TIMES.
"Mr. Grove, in his brief and able preface, calls the publication in an English dress of Otto
Jahn's famous biography of Mozart an event in our musical history,' and his statement cannot be
considered an exaggeration.
The English public is to be congratulated upon a translation of
his monumental effort which may without exaggeration be called excellent.
Miss Townsend has
done her work with skill and conscientiousness, and we doubt whether a much more careful
comparison with the original than we have thought it necessary to undertake would discover many,
or any, serious blunders."
'

DAILY NEWS.

"

He

(Jahn) has made admirable use of Nissen, with his laborious compilation, and of all other
authorities, and he has succeeded in producing a work which is complete without being confusing
through excess of detail, and in which the interest of the narrative is not broken by undue reference
to other writers who, treating of the same points, have treated them differently and often
incorrectly."

" It

is

THE ATHEN^UM.

with great pleasure that

we

manner

are able to speak in terms of the highest praise of the

which Miss Townsend has acquitted heiself of the by no means easy task of translation. In
so voluminous a work as the present it is almost inevitable that a few slips should be found;
but those we have noted are not only extremely rare, but mostly of slight importance.
We
have done inadeo.uate justice in this review to one of the most important works in the wholf
domain of musical literature
our excuse must be the absolute impossibility of dealing fully
with it within reasonable bounds. We conclude by most cordially recommending it to all who are
interested in music, and need only add that the printing and general appearance of the volumes
are worthy alike of their contents and of the reputation of the firm which publishes them."

in

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH


His

Work and

Influence on the Music of Germany, 1685-1750.

BY

PHILIPP SPITTA.
TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN BY

CLARA BELL AND

J.

A.

FULLER -MAITLAND.

Three Volumes, Price

2s.

THE ATHEN^UM.
Of the translation we can speak most
very faithful to the original, but it is
Bterling work which ought to be on the
translators and the publishers on having
it in an English dress."
'

it,

Not only is it, so far as we have compared


thoroughly readable.
Nevertheless, his book is a
shelves of every musician;, and we congratulate the
successfully completed the arduous task of presenting

favourably.

SUNDAY TIMES.

"Criticism on such a stupendous effort would be impertinent unless far more comprehensive
than that which could be bestowed in the space at my disposal. It must suffice, therefore, to say
that the work of translation has, so far, been accomplished by Miss Clara Bell and Mr. FullerMaitland in a manner that commands the highest praise, and that the volume is brought out in the
handsome and faultless style for which Messrs. Novello's publications are deservedly famous."

DAILY CHRONICLE.
" Herr Spitta dwells with the most minute and loving interest upon every point that can by any
possibility help the full understanding of Bach's character. His parents, his home, and his
contemporaries are studied, and the musical works of the latter analysed so as to show their
influence upon the mind of his pupil. . . . The work is ably translated."

LONDON & NEW YORK: NOVELLO, EWER

& CO

Novellas Original Octavo Editions of

ORATORIOS, CANTATAS, MASSES,


&c.

FRANZ ABT.
The

Fays' Frolic (Female Voices)


Springtime
(ditto)
Summer
(ditto)
The Golden City
(ditto)
The Wishing Stone
(ditto)
The Water Fairies
(DITTO)
(DITTO)
The Silver Cloud
Minster Bells
(DITTO)

W.
Mass

in

s.

d.

2
2
2
2

6
6
6

St.

The Legend of

J.

BRADFORD.

W.

A Song of Destiny

Endymion

J.

C.

BRIDGE.

J.

F.

BRIDGE.

Daniel

ASTORGA.
Stabat Mater

Rock of Ages (Latin and English) (Sol-fa,


Mount Moriah

BACH.
in B minor
Missa Brevis in A

J.

The Light of Asia

Out of the Deep (Psalm

Supplication

GEORGE CARTER.
Sinfonia Cantata (Psalm

116)

WILLIAM CARTER.
Placida

CHERUBINI.

2s.)

6
6

Requiem Mass, C minor (Latin and English)


Second Mass in D minor
Third Mass (Coronation)
Fourth Mass in C
E. T.

2
1

CHIPP.

Job

Naomi

FREDERICK CORDER.

The Praise of Music


the Wilderness

CARNELL.

F. D.

BARNETT.

in

,.

Jephthah

BEETHOVEN.
Ruins of Athens
J.ngedi; or, David

130)

CARISSIMI.

97)

The Ancient Mariner (Sol-fa,


The Raising of Lazarus

EDWARD BUNNETT.

BARNBY.

F.

3
2

DUDLEY BUCK.

Matthew)

John)
Christmas Oratorio
Magnificat
God goeth up with shouting
God so loved the world
God's time is the best
My Spirit was in heaviness
light Everlasting
Bide with us
A. Stronghold sure
Be not afraid (Sol-fa, 4d.)
Blessing, Glory, and Wisdom
1 wrestle and pray (Sol-fa, 2d.)
Thou Guide of Israel
Jesu, Priceless Treasure
When will God recall my spirit
J.

4d.)

Boadicea

Mass

Rebekah (Sol-fa, gd.)


is King (Psalm

BRAHMS.

J.

ASPA.
1

The Lord

BRADSHAW.

F.

Gaspar Becerra

Gipsies

(S.
(S.

Praise the Lord

Hezekiah
John the Evangelist

The Passion
The Passion

Israel Restored

ARMES.

E.

BEXFIELD.

R.

St.

The

is. 6d.)

The May Queen (Sol-fa, is.)


The Woman of Samaria (Sol-fa, is.)
International Exhibition Ode (1862)

W.

THOMAS ANDERTON.
P.

St. Cecilia (Sol-fa,

STERNDALE BENNETT.

SIR W.

Yule Tide
The Norman Baron
Wreck of the Hesperus

Peter

CROWTHER-ALWYN.

s
...

SIR JULIUS BENEDICT.

6
6
6

F (Latin and English)

WILFRED BENDALL.
The Lady of Shalott (Female Voices)

The Bridal of Triermain


...

SIR

Mount of Olives
Mass in C
Communion Service in C
Mass in D
The Choral Symphony
(the Vocal Portion)
Ditto
The Choral Fantasia
A Calm Sea and a Prosperous Voyage ...
Meek, as Thou livedst, hast Thou Departed

(Sol-fa,

is.)

...

MICHAEL COSTA.

The Dream
F.

H.

COWEN.

Ruth
Sleeping Beauty (Sol-fa,

is. 6d.)

<*

W. CRESER.
Eudora (A Dramatic

Idyl)

./
NOVELLO,

EWER AND

CO.'S

MUSIC PRIMERS.

Edited by Dr. STAINER.

MUSICAL DICTATION
A PRACTICAL GUIDE

FOR MUSICAL STUDENTS


BY

FREDERIC LOUIS RITTER,


Mus. Doc,

Author of

America," " Music in England," " History


of Music," " Manual of Musical History," etc.
"

Music

in

TWO

IN

PARTS. PART

I.

Price, in paper cover, 50 Cents.


\

"

,,<

'paper,

boards, 75

Cents'.

LONDON' &-NW' YORK

/NOVELLO, EWER AND


Entered according

to

Act of Congress in the year 1887,

CO.

^ Novello, Ewer & Co.

in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at

Washington.

NOVELLO, EWER AND

CO.,

TYPOGRAPHICAL MUSIC AND GENERAL PRINTERS


I, BURNERS STREET, LONDON (\V.)

RITTER, F
MUSICAL D
ICTATION
*********
HON/MUDD
LIBRARY

MT
35

R61
PT.

HON/
MUDD

TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page

Introductory Remarks

EXERCISE

I.

Arrangements of Notes and Rests into Measures


The Tie Signature of Time ...

The Dot

EXERCISE
The Interval

of

the Second

II.

Motives

Metre

Rhythm

Accent

22

EXERCISE

III.

Phrases; The Interval of the Third

EXERCISE
The Interval of the
Phrases
Beating Time

26

IV.

Fourth

The Up-beat

31

EXERCISE

V.

Phrases; The Interval of the Fifth; Syncopation

Phrases

The Interval

36'

EXERCISE VI.
of the Sixth Triplets

40

EXERCISE

VII.

Phrases; The Interval of the Seventh

...

44

Phrases; The Interval of the Octave; Diatonic Scale;


Signature of Key

48

EXERCISE

VIII.

EXERCISE

IX.

Phrases; Chromatic Signs or Accidentals

EXERCISE
Phrases

in

Chromatic Scale

53

X.

Major and Minor Keys; Minor Scale

58

EXERCISE XL
Sections; Periods; Sequence

...

EXERCISE

...

62

XII.

Phrases, Sections, and Periods extracted from the Works


of Classical and Modern Composers; Motion; Transition

72

MUSICAL DICTATION
INTRODUCTORY REMARKS.
Every musician who has had classes in harmony under his
charge has, no doubt, made the experience that students, when
even endowed with only an average degree of talent and application, can be taught to harmonize with a good deal of correctness
either a given bass or a melody
making, at the right places, use
of modulations, suspensions, passing notes, etc.
Nay, some
even will become able to master with a certain facility the
different species of simple counterpoint in two, three and four
parts.
But in all these tasks they can hang on the leading
;

strings of certain fixed rules.

The case becomes, however, quite different when those leading


strings are loosened, and students thrown on their own resources,
that is, obliged to invent a melody with a suitable harmony.
Although most of them may have acquired facility in working
out their examples in harmony away from the pianoforte, they
now, in order to find a simple melodic motive, become the slaves
of the keyboard
and it also causes them the greatest trouble to
write down correctly the melody they have picked out on the
keyboard.
But the trouble increases when such a melody has to
be provided with a suitable natural harmony.
All that they had
previously learned about harmony seems to desert them now at
once they find themselves utterly at sea.
I have almost invariably found that even able pianoforte or
vocal students, well-grounded in the rudiments of music, when
asked to write down from memory the melodic passage of the
first bar only of the simple piece or song they have just been
playing or singing for me correctly by heart, can absolutely not
do it
to fix the respective pitch of the different notes of the
melodic passage, and especially the division of time, presents
;

unsurmountable obstacles to them.


Having had ample opportunity to make the closest observations regarding all those shortcomings on the part of musical
students, and being desirous to help in removing them, I have
concluded, after practically testing
this

method

of musical dictation.

usefulness, to work out


became convinced that in

its
I

MUSICAL DICTATION.

order to strengthen the musical memory in the right direction,


and teach students to think musically, they ought to possess the
faculty of writing down correctly all they are able to play or sing
and this faculty can be acquired by means
correctly by heart
in this way the musical sense becomes
of musical dictation
sharpened, the more delicate shades of time, rhythm, the cut of
the melodic motive and its expansion into phrases and periods
will be impressed upon the mind more vividly and more distinctly.
The melody, which now lingers in the mind like an indistinct
shadow of divers sounds, will by means of this method, when
well mastered, take definite shape, and at the desire of the
musical student can be fixed upon paper in visible characters.
I am convinced of the fact that this course of musical dictation,
when closely and rationally connected with the general course of
musical education, will also help to form more intelligent, more
appreciative listeners
a wealth of characteristic beauties, contained in a fine composition and which formerly escaped them
entirely, will now be revealed to them, for they have acquired tin
art of listening in the right manner.
This surely will be a great
gain.
I have worked out this method with a double purpose
Firstly,
to teach musical students to become able to write down correctly,
after hearing once, any melodic phrase or period of vocal or
instrumental music
or, if required, the entire piece they are
able to play or sing by heart, and especially to enable them to
fix their own melodic thoughts.
Secondly, to teach the general
laws that lie at the foundation of all musical forms, to show the
formation of motives and their expansion into periods, and also
in this way to excite those especially gifted with melodic talent
to self-production.
Anyone who has had experience as an
instructor of harmony and composition knows, no doubt, how
difficult it is to initiate students into the complex melodic and
harmonic forms of instruction of a musical composition, or to
teach them how to analyse rightly such forms.
I believe that by means of this method of dictation, not only
students in composition, but also pianoforte players, to whom
the formal construction of pieces is on the whole a terra incognita, can be taught to gain the power of seeing into the principles that govern the construction of a musical work, small or
;

I have divided this course into


two Parts the first consists of
monodic, or single-voiced exercises
the second, of exercises
based on harmony. Each Part is calculated to occupy one school:

year's time.
1 he first Part may be taken up by any instrumental or vocal
student who is well acquainted with the value of the notes and

Anyone who will devote to these dictations only ten


minutes of each of the regular two weekly lessons, will soon

rests.

MUSICAL DICTATION.

become aware of their advantages. While, on one hand, this


course of study will serve as a welcome recapitulation of things
learned in former lessons, making clear that which the often
slovenly manner of committing to memory failed to do
it will,
on the other hand, afford students an interesting and intellectual
;

recreation.
I have written the greater number of the exercises of this first
part within a moderate compass, suitable to an average voice if
required.
I endeavoured to proceed gradually, from simple forms
to more difficult ones.
I have also limited the length of the
exercises up to No.
to phrases of two bars.
I found that
it would tax the receptive powers of students too much by presenting additional new matter in too extended examples.
The necessary explanatory directions and theoretical definitions
are given in connection with each separate exercise on which
they bear.
I have endeavoured, as far as it lay in my power, to
give of each subject contained in this part as clear and concise a
theoretical definition as possible.
Students when facing new
things are not yet prepared to take in with complete understanding
learned theoretical dissertations the matter must be presented
to them in a simple, lucid, manner.
Although I am aware of the fact that a certain form of musical
dictation is used in connection with vocal instruction in the
Paris Conservatoire and in some other institutions, I am sure
that the matter has never yet been worked out into such a
systematic course of instruction as I have done here
and I
trust that in this form it will prove interesting and instructive to
those students who may seek enlightenment on the subject of

XL

which

this

work

treats.

Vassar College, June,

Note.

This

Work

1886.

can be advantageously used by two fellow students

dictating alternately to each other in the absence of a teacher.

MUSICAL DICTATION.

PART

EXERCISE

I.

ARRANGEMENT OF NOTES AND RESTS INTO MEASURES; THE


DOT; THE TIE OR BIND.

[Note. In this Work the notes are named after their value, thus whole
note (semibreve), half-note (minim), quarter-note (crotchet), etc.
The corresponding rests are similarly named.]
:

Direction. It is not necessary to write the different notes


and rests included in a measure in exactly the same order as
given here other combinations being in many cases possible.
Division of time, presenting to students great difficulties, must
be well mastered. These preparatory exercises do not need to be
played they may be written on any degree of the scale.
;

Definition. The dot signifies that the value of the note or


rest preceding it is increased by its half; the dot after a dot
lengthens the first dot half its value.
The tie or bind is a sign
that connects two notes of the same pitch, of which the first one
only is sounded.

Those small sections of a musical composition, indicated on


the staff by perpendicular bars, are called measures or bars. The
metrical contents (see Exercise II.) of each bar or measure is
indicated by the time signature, placed at the beginning of the
staff, right after the clef*
A.
i.

2.
3.

4.
5.
6.

7.
8.

9.

Duple Measure.
One note.

Write in one measure

A dotted note and a rest.


Two rests and a quarter-note on the third beat.
Two rests and a half-note on the second beat.
A dotted note and two eighth notes.
Two notes and a dotted rest.
Two notes of two kinds, one dotted, and a rest on
Three notes of three kinds, a dot, and a tie.
Two rests and two notes, close with a half-note.

last beat.

MUSICAL DICTATION.

10
10.

ii.
12.
13.

Two

notes of two kinds and a rest on third beat.


Four notes and two dots.
A rest and two notes of equal value.
Three notes of two kinds, two rests, one of them dotted,

close with a quarter-note.


14. Four notes of two kinds, two rests, and two ties.
15. Two rests of two kinds and two notes of two kinds, close
with a quarter-note.
16. Two notes of two kinds and three rests of two kinds,
commence with a rest.
17. Two notes and two rests of equal value.
18. Three notes of two kinds and two rests, commence and
close with a rest.
19. Three notes of two kinds, a tie, and a rest to begin with.
20. Four notes of two kinds, begin with an eighth rest and
close with another rest.

B.

%:-

i.

One

2.

Two

3.
4.

5.
6.

7.

8.

note.
notes.

Three notes of two kinds.


Two notes of two kinds and a dot.
Three notes of two kinds and a tie. *
Four notes of two kinds and two dots.
Two notes of two kinds and an eighth rest at the beginning.
Two notes of two kinds and two rests of two kinds, close

with a sixteenth note.


9. One note on the second beat and two rests of two kinds.
10. Two rests and two notes of equal value.
1 1.
Three notes of two kinds and a rest.
12. Four notes of two kinds and two rests, begin and close
with a rest.
13. Four notes of two kinds and two dots.
14. Four notes of two kinds and two sixteenth rests.
15. Three notes of two kinds and a rest on second beat.
16. Six notes of two kinds.
17. Six notes of two kinds and two rests, begin with an
eighth rest.
18. Two rests of two kinds and two notes.
19. Two rests of two kinds and three notes, begin with quarterrest.

20.

Two

C.

Measure
2
dotted note.
Three notes of two kinds, a
Four notes of two kinds.
Four notes and two rests.

1.

2.
3.

4.

rests

Triple

One

and one note

to stand

on second beat.

tie,

and a

dot.

MUSICAL DICTATION.
Five notes of two kinds and a dot.
Quarter-rest and two notes of two kinds.
7. Three notes of three kinds and a rest.
8. A rest, four notes of two kinds, and a clot,

II

5.

6.

commence with

a rest.
9.

10.
11.
12.

A rest and two quarter-notes.


Three notes of two kinds and a rest on second beat.
One note and two rests, commence with a rest.
Five notes of two kinds, tie the first two notes and close

with a

rest.

Five notes of three kinds and two rests,

13.

commence with

a rest.

Six notes of two kinds and half-rest.


of two kinds and an eighth rest at the beginning.
16. Three notes with corresponding rests, commence with
14.

Four notes

15.

a rest.
17.
18.
19.

20.

Four notes of two kinds, a dot after the first note.


Six notes of two kinds and three dots.
Seven notes of three kinds, tie the first two notes.
Three notes of two kinds, a dot, and a rest on the second

beat.

n
1.

2.
3.
4.

with a

Two
Two
Two
Two

notes.

notes and a rest on the second beat.


notes of two kinds, a rest, and a dot.
notes of two kinds with corresponding rests, close

rest.

5.

6.

Three

rest,

and two notes for the last beat.


two kinds and two notes, commence and

rests of

close with a rest.


7.

Two

rests

Two

notes of two kinds with corresponding rests,


close with a note.

and three notes of two kinds, commence with

a rest.
8.

mence and
9.

Four notes and two

com-

rests.

notes of two kinds, and a tie.


11. Three notes of two kinds and a dot.
12. Three notes of two kinds and an eighth rest on the second
10.

rest, three

beat.

an eighth rest, and three notes of two kinds.


Five notes of three kinds and an eighth rest after second

13. Quarter-rest,

14.

beat.
15. Five notes of three kinds, a dot. and a sixteenth rest at
the beginning.
16. Three notes and two rests of two kinds.
17. One rest and one note.

MUSICAL DICTATION.

12

18. Three notes of two kinds and a tie, the shortest notes
occupy one beat.
19. Four notes of three kinds, one note double-dotted.
20. A double-dotted rest and two notes of two kinds.

E.
1.

2.
3.

4.
5.

6.
7.
8.

9.
10.

11.

12.
13.

3
8

to

Two

notes.

Four notes, a dot after the first one.


Two notes and a rest at the beginning.
A rest and four notes, one of them dotted.
A rest and a note on the last beat.
Two rests, and a note forming part of the last
Three notes and a dot.
Three notes and a sixteenth rest.

beat.

Five notes.

Two notes and a sixteenth rest


A dotted rest and three notes.
Two kinds of rests.
Two kinds of rests, a dot, and

on the

first

beat.

a thirty-second note at the

end.
14.

Three

rests of

two kinds and two notes, commence with

a rest.
15.

16.

Three notes and a rest at the close.


Three notes and two rests of two kinds, commence with

a note.
17. Six notes and three dots.
18. Five notes of two kinds and two rests, close with a rest.
19. Two rests of two kinds, three notes of three kinds, a tie,
begin and close with a rest.
20. Five notes of two kinds and a tie, place four notes on the
last beat.

F.
1.

2.
3.

4.

Quadruple Measure
One note.

Three notes.
Three notes of two kinds, the first one dotted.
Two rests and quarter-note on the third beat.

5.

One

6.

Two

7.

rest.

two kinds, and two notes on the


and two notes of two kinds.
Three notes of three kinds, and an eighth

One

rests of

last beat.

rest

8.
rest at the
beginning.
9. Six notes of two kinds.
10. Five notes of two kinds.
1 1.
Two rests and three notes of two kinds.
12. Three notes of three kinds, one of them dotted.
13. Three notes of two kinds and two rests, an eighth rest to
stand on the second beat.


MUSICAL DICTATION.
14.

13

Five notes of three kinds and two sixteenth

com-

rests,

mence with an eighth

note.
15. Three rests of three kinds and three notes of two kinds.
16. Nine notes of three kinds, close with quarter-note.
17. Six notes of two kinds, three rests, commence and close

with a

rest.

19.
20.

Four notes of three kinds, tie the first two.


Three rests of two kinds, two notes, and a tie.
Two rests, four notes and two ties, open with a

G.

|:-

18.

2.

One
One

3.

Two

i.

4.

5.
6.
7.
8.

9.
10.

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

rest.

note.
rest

and two notes.

notes and two rests.


Three notes and two rests.
A dotted rest and two notes of two kinds.
Two notes, the first one double-dotted.
Two rests and two sixteenth notes.
Three notes of two kinds and two rests.
Three notes of two kinds, one of them double-dotted.
One-sixteenth note and three rests.
Two notes and three rests.
Three notes of two kinds, a dot, and a tie.

One

rest.

Two
Two

rests of

rests

two kinds and one note.


and three notes of two kinds, open with an

eighth rest.
16.
17.
18.

Four notes and two rests.


Six notes of two kinds.
Six notes and two rests, one of these

dotted,

open with

a thirty-second rest.
19. Five notes of two kinds, two rests, and a tie from the first
to the second note.
20. Four notes of two kinds, and a dotted rest on the second
beat.

Compound Duple Measure

H.
1.

2.

3.

the

Two

notes with dots.


Four notes and a tie.
Three notes of two kinds and two rests, a quarter-rest on

first beat.

4.

One

rest

and one note, the note having the greatest value

of the two.
5.

Four notes of three kinds, a

tie,

a dot, and a quarter-rest

at the beginning.
6.

Five notes of three kinds, dot the

first,

and

tie

it

to the

second.
7.

Three notes of three kinds, dot the


two kinds.

rests of

last,

and open with two

MUSICAL DICTATION.

14

rest, three notes of three kinds, and a dot.


Four notes of three kinds, one of them double-dotted.
Two rests, one of them dotted, and close with a quarter-

8.
9.

10.

note.

Five notes of two kinds and a rest.


Three notes of two kinds and two rests.
13. Five notes, one of them dotted, and a rest at the beginning.
14. A quarter-note, a dotted eighth note, and three rests of
two kinds, commence with a rest and close with a sixteenth note.
15. Six notes of three kinds, and an eighth rest at the begin11.

12.

ning.

Six notes of two kinds, a dot, and quarter-rest on the fourth

16.

beat.

Two

17.

notes of two kinds with corresponding rests, com-

mence and close with a rest.


18. Nine notes of three kinds, two

dots,

and close with a quarter-

rest.

19.

Five rests of three kinds and two notes.

20.

Two
6
8

I.

notes.

4.

Three
Three
Three
Three

5.

Two

i.

2.
3.

notes and a dot.


notes and two eighth rests.
notes, a dot, and a tie.
notes, a dot, and an eighth rest at the beginning.
eighth notes and three rests, begin and close with

a rest.
6.

7.

Three rests and an eighth at the close.


Four notes of three kinds, a dot, and an eighth

rest at

the beginning.
8. Five notes of three kinds, a dot, and an eighth rest on
the fifth beat.
9. Four notes of two kinds, and three rests, begin with a rest.
10. Two rests, one note, and a dot.
II. Eight notes of two kinds, a dot, and a tie.
12. Four notes of three kinds, a sixteenth rest, and an eighth
rest at the close.
13. Four notes, a dot, and a tie.
14. Two notes, and three rests of three kinds, commence with
a sixteenth rest.
15. A sixteenth note, a quarter-note, and three rests.
16. Six notes of two kinds, and three rests of two kinds.
17. Four notes of three kinds, a tie, and two rests, commence
with a rest.
18. Six notes of two kinds, and two rests.
19. Five notes of three kinds, two dots, and a tie.
20. Four notes of two kinds, two rests, and a dot, begin with
a rest.


MUSICAL DICTATION.

J.
1.

2.

3.

15

Compound Triple Measure


Four notes, two dots, and a tie.
Four notes and two eighth rests.
Three notes of two kinds, a dot, and an eighth
:

rest at the

beginning.
4. Five notes of two kinds, a dot, and a quarter-rest at the
beginning.
5. Three rests of two kinds, two notes of two kinds, and a dot.
6. A dotted rest and three notes.
7. Six notes of three kinds, a dot, and a tie.
8. Three notes of two kinds, four rests, and a dot.
9. Five notes, a dot, a tie, and an eighth rest at the close.
10. Four notes of two kinds, a dot, and a tie.
11. Four notes of three kinds, two eighth rests, and a tie,
begin with a rest.
12. Six notes of three kinds and two dots.
13. Five notes, four rests and a tie.
14. Two notes, a dot, and four rests of two kinds.
15. Four notes of three kinds, a tie, and four rests of two
kinds, commence and close with a rest.
16. Seven notes and three rests, begin and close with an
eighth rest.
17. Five notes of three kinds and four rests of three kinds.
18. Three dotted notes and two ties.
19. Three rests of two kinds, a dot, and an eighth note on
seventh beat.
20. Six notes and four rests, commence and close with a rest.

K.
1.

2.

two

Compound Quadruple Measure

Three dotted notes and a tie,


Two notes of two kinds, three

rests' of

two kinds and

dots.
3.

4.
5.

with a

Four notes of three kinds, one rest and three dots.


Seven notes of three kinds, three of them dotted.
Six notes, two eighth rests, a tie and a dot, commence
rest.

Four notes of two

kinds, a dot, and two rests of two kinds,


close with a rest.
7. One rest and one dot.
8. Five notes of three kinds, a dot and five rests.
9. Four rests of two kinds, four notes of two kinds and a dot.
10. Four rests of two kinds, one dotted note, rests at the
6.

beginning and close.


11. Nine notes of three kinds, a dot, a tie, and two rests of
two kinds.
12. Four notes of three kinds, a dot, a tie, a dotted rest, and
an eighth rest at the beginning.

MUSICAL DICTATION.

iG
13.

two

Eight notes of two kinds, two eighth

rests, a

dot,

and

ties.

Five notes of three kinds, two eighth rests, and a tie.


Six notes of two kinds, a dot, and four notes of two kinds,
commence with an eighth note.
14.

15.

One dotted note.


Six notes of three kinds, a dot, a tie, a sixteenth rest after
the first note, and two eighth rests at the close.
18 Six notes of three kinds, two dots, and a tie, commence
with dotted eighth rest.
19. Seven notes of three kinds, a dot, a tie, and two rests.
20. Five notes of three kinds, a tie, and two dots.
16.

17.

EXERCISES.
DUPLE MEASURE.
A.

J-

tc

-m
m m

m-

10

SE

=3:

-m

B.

*<=>'

E^

jiHz
l
2

|1^

**=>*

16

gj
i-

ir.

3
I

LV-J-

u^_

20

19

18

17

12

15

m -mm

L #- 1 -m

m-m

-W>

E=E:E^E33iE3

14

13

m-2

g*

11

G>

-<S>

on.

1.

i
-

gE

SX3-XtE

E^aB^S

^^^in^^^=3Ei^=gM=n

^^^

S^^^^-JTr-^g^^
10

11

12

^TPl

15

MUSICAL DICTATION.

13

14

II

18

pj ^&

:||

20

19

=3: -0

* S m-

*7

^-:
^j-j=R
:

-g_J_5

II

TRIPLE MEASURE.
4

5
-^9

J
-/{&
ft)

\y

0 J -

s>--

<4-

rri

'

17

r**-

m---0-

H=Np-

..

-^

'00

'

18

\ \

3^

=*=

16

15
tf

13

F^

S^
'

12

11

14

'

P^
r^

-p

s^

~\

m!. m-G

s>

2
'

'

19

0-

*t

Sb^
20

ML'SICAL DICTATION.
3

ipsiju^^g

10

12

11

f*

16

15

14

13

s
3^3

17

20

19

18

SB

*i-

+ m * *

QUADRUPLE MEASURE.
3

x>

-e>

14

'

<s

'

FF?g=9=1^^^ai

16

15

20

19

18

17

*=st

jj^jteJEggggfr^-rB^g
**zz*

|B^|

N ^

>h

f3

l^i

/^it

N=^-

* ^ B

^g^^

MUSICAL DICTATION.
10

14

19
12

11

13

16

15

17

COMPOUND DUPLE MEASURE.


H.

W=z

i4

i^

33

j;

J-

'

<G

-o

,_

*-

'

JJ i =d l3E5^
10

g^J_jz^^
12

3
_

11

^Sl
14

13

&

-F

'

16

17

20

19

->

|)jj.

^ tJzs^^ll^^ffT^T^-fl
I

|-r^r 3--iifr
<

G-

=
i r

HH

J-p j

MUSICAL DICTATION.

20

10

11

17

16

15

COMPOUND TRIPLE MEASURE.


3

feS*

-m

+m-

II

L=Z=TTT^\v

iEES
<

10

i #

13

4=C

12

11

3-J
*+0

r-H

3-

'

^gg^SiJBj^sp ^J14

15

16

19

17

20

L^fefe 5

18

^_!1_rL

MUSICAL DICTATION.

21

COMPOUND QUADRUPLE MEASURE.


K.

sm^^^=^^m^
2

3S

7
jj

r^Hb^

3 J J

r-il

*i

"i

i^J73JI

14

s nm

IS

-#

'

'

3S

0-1
16

15

^B**f *-=

<s>

<S>

J J

T T"T

17

^^JbRTTOr^ 5

MUSICAL DICTATION,

22

EXERCISE

II.

THE INTERVAL OF THE SECOND; MOTIVES; METRE;


RHYTHM; ACCENT.
Definition. An Interval is the distance between any two
notes.
I have limited myself in the exercises of this first part of
dictation to the naming of the intervals as found in their general
fundamental alphabetical order within the scale, viz: the second,
the third, the fourth, the fifth, the sixth, the seventh, and the
octave.
A more exact classification of all the different measured
intervals, resulting from alterations of the above fundamental
intervals, will be given in the second Part.

Motive, germ of musical development, is a group of notes


it may occupy a
arranged according to a certain fixed rhythm
whole bar or part of a bar.
Metre, in music, signifies the peculiar arrangement of fixed
sounds into measures, distinguished by natural dynamic accents,
called grammatical accents.
Rhythm is the motion of fixed sounds within the measure.
Metre is represented by the figures i, 2
1, 2, 3
1, 2, 3, 4;
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, etc., indicating the kind of measure or time in
each case.
Rhythm is represented by a number of notes regulated by metrical
;

accent, viz.: Duple time,

\;

quadruple time,

compound duple

triple time,

time.

0'

compound

triple

I,

or

/I

time

The metrical accent, in a general sense, governs the measure


Hauptmann calls positive
the rhythmical accent the motive.
accent the first beat, down beat, at the beginning of a piece,
;

m
9

and negative accent the one

following the

up-beat,

(See Exercise IV).

Directions. Play (dictate) these exercises rather slowly, and


observe the natural metrical accent belonging to each kind of
The effect of the different rests must be strictly
measure.
observed.
Write the exercises in the treble clef.
Dictate each example once, and then let the student write it
down in the best manner possible afterwards play the writtendown examples slowly and distinctly, and write after it the model
;


MUSICAL DICTATION.

23

example as dictated, in order to give the student an opportunity


to compare his or her own writing with the version of the model
example, and to correct possible mistakes.
This practice, while
teaching students to examine their own work with critical attention, will also promote a sense of accuracy.
Instead of playing these dictations invariably on the pianoforte,
sing them sometimes to the syllable la
or play them on the
;

violin, or

on any other suitable instrument that

may

be handy.

All such varieties of tone production will help to foster


student's faculty of perceiving tones of different colour.

the

have written the examples up to Exercise XI. in the key of


It will be good practice to dictate some of them transposed
into other keys in order to test student's sense of pitch.
Students ought to make efforts to memorize the effect of the
sounds of the different intervals as gradually introduced here in
each successive exercise.
Pick them out on the keyboard and
learn to sing them in your mind.
Such private practice will
help greatly to promote understanding and progress regarding
our task.
I

C.

Indicate at

first

the time of each example to be dictated.

EXERCISES.

^ 3^m

^^*^3

mmz
10

^^=}=^&
12

11

$ A^:

Pf*
14

13

k H

"1

16

15

m^^mmmmim

ft:

fi

iJJJ j-

"^g-r ^Q^^^FJ
'

22

^-^
r*y-f

20

19

18

17

11

24

23
=t= H

si

MUSICAL DICTATION,

24

^hiiHbg
a

J- J-

J J.

J"

32

'

'

-9-

-- '

-1

m-9-

+J
!

' 1

45

5T-

K %~

Tk

\r P-j-P
-9-

44
9 9

-9-

-9-

46

-9-

48

m
51

54
2

53

56

|-T-H: n

55

57

60

i il

63
-9--9~9--.

59

62

-*--#-

1
-m -*-

-9- -j- -9-

65

J54
-9--9--9-

-M~r

58

61

-9--9--9-

Q-j^-X^

at

T>

feS
_^ C~Q

^-^.^^.^^

* ^=^

-9-

47

50
irzi

52

*^

9-W

49

-9-

-9- -9-

--*-*-*-

43

42

s ^_

m-9- m
41

-d--

^=^1:

<?

-9- -9-

is

' '

j1l

38

40

##Mv

^sL^-W-V-

-*-

37

-9-

34

36

49 99

,j

"^
vVIPifi

j.

"

31

39
-i

33

35

9-'

cr P"

rr

30

29

28

27

26

25

0"

V---J-.

-J-

J"*-*

-#--J-J"

^"

MUSICAL DICTATION.

25

^^--^^^^^^^m
74

73

75

i^^^^^^^fe-^l
^^^^mTfl^^ ^3=5 I
76

78

77

-*-

-#^-

80

79

f==+

v. j^juj-

81

5? \Jt- r-r-r-r-r^&

88

**a*
SW

89

hS>-

< !'

r_iz=

B
n
W^

-O- -^-

-f9>-

93

92

91

izl=^

^-^

99

K^.r^-m ^

100

=f=;


USICAL DICTATION.

20

EXERCISE

III.

PHRASES; THE INTERVAL OF THE THIRD.

Definition. The Phrase is a part of a musical sentence or


It consists generally of two measures, and is formed
period.
The
either of one motive repeated or of two separate ones.
Leitmotive (leading motive), which occupies such a conspicuous
place in Wagner's Music Dramas, has generally the form of a
phrase.
A phrase may consist of three and even four measures.

Direction. Let the student now and then indicate the class
of time to which the dictated example belongs, e.g., whether it is
in duple or triple time
select simple examples for that purpose.
;

EXERCISES.
2

i^gpil
c
I

-0-

I
I

-*- -m- -m-

X= i

e;

i^z

o-

10

P^5j=g^PiP^^

i^g^i^ii^ipp

MUSICAL DICTATION.
18

27

19

25

^=^!

-*-#
^ H
1

26

27

a rei-

fc^-3:
3E^fa-5EEi^5t^^i

28

29

sa
E^UXUil^

#^=^

80

T~r^rrrl-1} 4
=

-]

ft

"F^t

34

33

^J i

irnhn
S
#^

^ -?.

36

35

^ ^m^^

"i

37

S2

31

&

38

n 3E

=$

MUSICAL DICTATION
42

43

is

-ft-3>-

**

^=^

m^^
S^^m^

*=i=3

45

44

iE

II

47

46

gi

5P

49

C C-JTZJ
i^S
i-

50
2:

^J

51

S^^^=
J^^:

^33^

-*

53

52

#^g^-j=3

-*

8
ft-f^-t

#-

54

i=2=+

55

^r

$^=^=*U
56

vy ' *

Vj.ll

57

^g?5

* *

v-

33

"O

<*;

*=r

-/

H J
J. J.

*^--~*v

"

^TO3^

"-^v*

*'

61

5=3^

pH^^f
-1

is-

-*-*-&

:^

MUSICAL DICTATION,
62

2f)

63

^=^5
64

0*

65

^ggpiPPP

1^q=
0^=3
=f
-ct>"" &
r -

66

67

^^

69
*

70

71

2:

sffll

-fl

NI

J.

m *+ m *-

'
l

=1

|- :xz

J^J>J'4 -*Fg

~^

^.

**-

-o-

MUSICAL DICTATION,

30
84

85

fe^^^iip

33

87

86

?3^3

96

-II

fc^i

97

5S3
98

3 ^t

,_^__^_

99
_99

+ -&

100
:

*^*^5t

^^P

MUSICAL DICTATION.

EXERCISE
PHRASES

31

IV.

THE INTERVAL OF THE FOURTH

THE UP-BEAT;

BEATING TIME.

Definition. The up-beat is part of a measure, the unaccented


beat at the beginning of a piece, or part of a piece
it belongs
to the opening motive.
Its name is derived from the modern
manner of beating time, the first beat (Thesis) being distinguished
by the falling of the hand the second, or last beat, as the case
may be (Arsis), by the raising of the hand.
;

The
Two in

different

manners

of beating time are

Three

a Bar.

^ 3

2 Up

in a Bar.

Up

OR

Down

"^"~ Right

Down

Four

in a Bar.

Six in a Bar.

4 UP

1
Doivn

Direction. With the introduction of the fourth, and afterwards with that of every new interval, it will be advisable to
dictate, in the following form, preparatory exercises on intervals
already introduced in previous dictations, in order to test students'
memory, and to afford them an opportunity to learn to measure
by ear, the distance of each one of the different intervals. Such
preliminary exercises do not need to be written down
it will
suffice to play them, and have students fix their names, viz.
;

fe

m ^ H^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

32

EXERCISES.
2

Ppp^^fl^PiP
i%

pBg^B

-P
-&-'

38 -

-+-

12
~

=B=

a +*^*+

o:

15

o
-0

-o^>

10

11

Fp ^
rfifFP^"

^EE

_16

18

17

^^-i^SN

J
Tizri=j4_^b=
J * _J_ *
* *
C^ " .J. J * *
1

-#-

9-^

-*-

w^mm
#%^#^ ^^^^^m
22

24

23

3^jgg^B

3=
26

25

is

^i

-J-

cJ

^J^-JTT^^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

33
28

27

pgi

J J

e#=s
1?3B^

JU

29

i
7

^x

$ 3=

&*-.

^-

30

j..

BE

--*-

31
*'

'

J-

32

33

34

35

40

41

3^3
i & ^TJiJ3^Hr^^

pi

JTT^r

4_

is

'

J-

^^g

&-?*

'

4^4=

* * 4 d

43

42

44

S s-s*J.-^j=s=n=

J~3 JJ^J.jj_46

45

$ B=^==t
:

47

--*-#

li+v-jg

^^

48

3gr^^^i^^LEgEgt^E^^3j!gfl

MUSICAL DICTATION,

34

50

49

3f9

3=^

51

.<*

^r^ ^z

12:
ii ^tzg:
ft

\"1

"1

N>"1 ^

\"1

"1

52

c-^ ,Q
r= O 1.jt-tj
jyjjM

-*-"

54

53

i g^i^; s^i^

-\->-

*--*-?:

*t

56

55

V P
fk

*=*:

ffi^jj'"

1 1

J.

fJ

J>

<i

J>
4 J' !!_*_ '-i-^J-'Cl
1

60

^=T

FT*
S^31
:

-x--

61

=S=^=*=

ZD-J

...


MUSICAL DICTATION.

35

+77T

M*&

72

71

^^
73

*^.

g m
~ m
J
* #
#

I-

-*-

Ip^H^

74
fl

=3:

75

SH=4
ijiJ^J.jL J 3d

a^g^g

^ ^S
a

5:

^
BE->-^-^
* ^~l^
d-

76

-^

>

-?-^ik~uk

*1

xzzjs
tV

-#-'

^ ^*

J-

*+*^T*

J-

78

77

-J

^
t

u_=t

79

g=g

i ^ ' J i^7^!^^

' # '

n-f-r

80

-&
itee
s^=^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

36

EXERCISE

V.

PHRASES; THE INTERVAL OF THE FIFTH; SYNCOPATION.

Definition. Syncopation signifies the union of up-beat and


down-beat (Arsis and Thesis), or an unaccented part with an
accented one by this operation the accent is transferred from
;

the accented part to the unaccented one

>

r3-

pT^

g"

#
I

-j-r

m-

*U*

r
1

-*-

##

f-

11

-*-

EXERCISES.

g^
JPJIP
9

^
#

# ^

g-

=^

10

^__^

P
12

ll

N
=&=^

* J *

'

14

13

3=

r'Jj

'1,J

/j^^

MUSICAL DICTATION,

^S^^p^
15

37

16

18

*
i

^mnm.

20

19

::&

g3

-#p-

21

Pi

J -*--*-s 3
I

22

xsl]iU
24

23

M=flMtg
Pi d
^-7^H^flr^^~^
H

I-

<^

_J_

<^

oi.

'

.J:

3E=it

^r

26

25

28

^-^4Ui^J^p

27
ft

jmi
a
j.- *
29

32

31

__^

30

*~^J
i-^ V jtiJhttW

faj|,-ijy

^r^~*+*

34

33

35

36

itM N

i*i

.11

MUSICAL DICTATION

38

l^fc^^^P^
38

39

^
i

40

41

"i

-#-^-

^^^
5

43

42

46

35
-t^tti*48

47
J-

s^Iil

49

r-'r

s=t

^Pi
--*

50

1^15
---*

MUSICAL DICTATION.

39

59

Z0^

$^txi-j-aJ
60

61

tF

J=E=

63

62

fk-T
23

^^

=3=^=3^
n
--K

-m'-m

FF^

'J

'

Li_^_

*'S

-<9 L

m -0~

-jm=*^u
f y ^ ^
*

66

72

71

S
i?S
^

73

77

<^

#-

3^ s

-^

S^^
74

<^

"
-

78

o-

'

-J-'

MUSICAL DICTATION,

4o

EXERCISE

VI.

PHRASES; THE INTERVAL OF THE SIXTH; TRIPLETS.

The triplet is a group of three notes of equal


value played or sung within the time occupied by two notes of
Definition.

the

same

kind, viz.

?=!=

tnn t

flilg^^

i^g

^5

EXERCISES.
2

tp-fl&l>- m
j

^- j_

j-J

.p-hrfl

r-ftj-i-j

MUSICAL DICTATION.
.

41

16

15

18

17

=lrt

Fz
JP

pi

:*=

*:

fl^ ^"^
22

g TJm-jjmyiij
5^
i

^r-WT"

^
28

30

29

31

j iJjtb

26

25

27

24

23

iE

J"

20

21

&

N=i^

^^ggfej
32

36

37

g-1J.i|dJ4J4-ll

Ba

MUSICAL DICTATION.

42

39

38

40

B^^

^3^--^-^j

3=*

'^^^^m^^^^^m
42

41

'%

-r^S

S m

44

43

$z

^^^S

LIJiL Tg^F^
S P-^T>

^T*

"*

45

^e>-

^1

^g^^^B
^
^^^^N
46

47

.^- i^

'+JT-^

49

48

Bi^h^^^a^^i

50

51

52

=5

i ^=Eflse

is **

^hf^^^^a

ft

-#

58

ij

iT

F5^
*^
"*

#-

MUSICAL DICTATION.
60

59

jjj

43

72

jJ_^Ji-^rr |<;JJJj
|

i
|

JJJJ

MUSICAL DICTATION,

44

EXERCISE

VII.

PHRASES; THE INTERVAL OF THE SEVENTH.

Intersperse this, as well as Exercise VIII., with


Systematic repetition and
of the previous dictations.
reviewing of former tasks will facilitate the understanding of
new and more difficult matter.

Direction.

some

fedbJ^
7

S-

-*

aeg

-+-

-o-

ww^m

?m

EXERCISES.

<r

^^

I -&+

r&r ^**

E^3S

1 ^ rTll=
,

pL*\ 1
9

JH-^

-=

H^

^feU

10

PSfe
ft~H*+-^
PH|

P^

PJl

12

i^^^^as^^x^^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

45

16

20

19

pi

' * *:

^mm

22

21

^S^

25^

173

c,

p ^**

ttW

-&>-

Sir^

29

tzzrz^zzzi

m^
31

g6

28

27

/,

^5

F=F=f

t=^=

J-^

I 5^ ^

4-1

^p-

30

*P

it

EFE2
S

*-

* J

aE=a

34

33

-3

r g g r # z*=g

32

36

XX
**-*f W0
*}=tt
-+

:=*:

^m

37

'J, J

^3

^=^

^^

T'J. *

h
'

MUSICAL DICTATION.

46

38

39

J$9

~o_

41

40
"^ r

z*

Ie

r Ik

^^EU^UUpJI
43

42

jt^ UJJJ

45

44

HH

z^-sz

^z*^-

cr
3-#-

46

ail

i^^Sf
i

49

48

50

51

'vfl-fSSg^g

HI

52

59

3t^

53

ss t^-Vr^

ff:

-*H-*-

ffig]

60

s^S JLZJL

SICAL DICTATION.
61

47

62

,
,

64

63

i^SKfeSS W-j+P^gft
65

66

as Mr

m?
i

S^S^

:=rzj:*d.

MU--UE ^

67

-i

70

J>

s
g

""

^jt

-d-

'
!

77

76

'

jj.

jjrrn
ss- 4^W-* ^=m
*
'

Ui

79

78

is ^

"i

E^

S?^
80

i ^ ##*

33

Bi=i

Si,

MUSICAL DICTATION.

48

EXERCISE

VIII

PHRASES; THE INTERVAL OF THE OCTAVE


SCALE SIGNATURE OF KEY.

DIATONIC

Definition. The octave is in one sense the close of the succession of tones forming the diatonic scale, and in another, the
beginning of a new series similar in construction to the first. It
is also the repetition eight degrees higher or lower, as the case
may be, of any note.

The diatonic scale commencing with C and ascending on the


white keys of the pianoforte to the next C is the prototype of the
major keys or modes. It is composed of five tones and two
semitones, these latter occurring between the third and fourth
Each one of those twelve
and the seventh and eighth degrees.
keys comprised between C and its octave can be made the fundamental note the keynote or tonic of a major scale, by taking as
model the above construction of the C major scale, using, in
order to get the right succession of tones and semitones, sharps
Those
or flats (see Exercise IX.), as the case may require.
sharps or flats necessary for the construction of each respective
scale are placed at the beginning of the staff, between the clef
and the time signature, and are called the key signature. Sharps,
when used as signatures, are placed in the following order
From F:jt, being the first, descend four degrees in alphabetical
order, then ascend five, descend again four, and ascend five,
when flats are used, commence with Bl^, and proceed in
etc.
the contrary direction to that of the sharps.

The

different degrees of the diatonic scale are also designated

by the following terms


i

st

degree

Tonic.

2nd

Super-tonic.

3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th

Mediant.
Sub-dominant.

Dominant.
Sub-mediant.

Leading note, or sub-tonic.

DlRECTION.- Form major scales on the different tone degrees


found within an octave.

T^^

H^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

49

EXERCISES.
2

^^lEEiypg^EJEEfl
#%^^^f^sas^^^^i
$

^^sn^i^^m

m s^^
AM
P

*= XI

3S

410

^tat^=*=z^

2^
fi^

*-*--

Si
rf*z^:53ffi3:

12

11

^^=^=e

g^Etffi^
rg

fefes
fc
^^-^

^g^g^
14

13

16

15

^s
&

gfe?^^l-r--A^E^
t=*
n#-^
^

3* ^t^

r,

17

18

fe^
*=S?

\-mi

\m

24

23

2=^ r-w~r=z

e*~

MUSICAL DICTATION.

50

m
25

^^
26

^*Wr

27

^S
S^Hes^ ^^
35

g^ga#F^

~r~r,

37

36

mr^f

40

bs^ \ HM nil ?oqc

*2

ft

jz^m
1

-i

42

41

fc^E*

5s G^
j^j,^^^N
43

32

34

Hi

28

31

-^ ^

;g^TTTCiJ

J J

+ *=bfS zz

22

~i*

MUSICAL DICTATION.

51

45

44

ffr^r^^^ ^v~i
7

46

48

#^^ P?l

49

it

jJl

m J^J PF
d#^t

50

a
^^^H

atsti

it

54

^-^li4 Mj^
1

Jl i

< bt

63

-**-

58

4^-f^^

yas^s

ft

57

61

56

atzf

=F

55^

-"

JF=S

53^.

T-

j>"
i

i^s

rr

J<J

J^-

Sffi^ glB

60

59

62

*^
-

T3
I

SE

^^

64

^^ItrrT^^gl


MUSICAL DICTATION

52

66

^^-^

*-

V. v-

68

72

71

PF=t

F3?

i
73

' *

g Hg

V^-*

77

in
78

=t

76

gg

80

-* w

J |t

-*-*

VV

?^|-^

f-*-r

79

iSzfk

j^

^r
'

*
n
gztttfc^

f^BJP

4^0-

74

zz

ii

J * *
*s=z?

3EIZJE

^-^~K

T^=^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

EXERCISE

53

IX.

PHRASES; CHROMATIC SIGNS OR ACCIDENTALS; CHROMATIC


SCALE.

Definition. Accidentals are the sharp J, the double sharp x


the flat b, the double flat b!?, and the natural t(. The $ raises the
the x two semitones
the
note a semitone
lowers it a semitone the l?t? two semitones the tf has two functions that of a
,

I?

flat if

it

takes

away

the sharp, and vice versa

if it

destroys the

flat.

Accidentals are called chromatic signs when they occur in the


course of a piece, altering temporarily the pitch of a note without

changing

its

name.

alphabetical

The chromatic

scale

is

a succession of semitones.

Direction It is customary, when writing the chromatic scale


or chromatic passages ascending, to use sharps or naturals as
the case may require to raise the pitch
and when descending,
flats or naturals to lower the pitch of chromatic notes.
;

EXERCISES.
2

i E:

353$

3F3

b^h ^g^

JuJS t

10

mS

11

12

ii

:{*

I 3e5e$,

PS

MUSICAL DICTATION.

54

14

13

15

t=3=3

PI

fcjfc
17

16

tJ^^ JbJ
fe 7|3
i ^jj^^r
I

ll

li^J^N^-i
=4*
19

18

5=
I

20s
_^

*-9** m

21

22

23

fiat
24

25

s
I

P^*-=^

^5
K-

SiCi:

26

^tM#i^

28

29

^B

27

5SF^F
34

3=

35

S
^^^^^^
^^^f^ ^gB
n

36

37

ICAL

38

:tation.

39

40
t==t

,y

e=a=*=**=s!

2S
i E3f

55

mm

fi^f*

48

47

?2=^

22IH

frw^

J-

^t*

-frg

54

53

Bz^i

$ gj. Ji

^^-

56

a^*:
I

^afr-^-^*

^_^

58

57

PiSri?

52

51

^3
=^

55

*-J

a=2:

MUSICAL DICTATION,

56
59

tvrirP

^^p

60

^^m

&
?*=X=^
J-*d 3=F

#=^

61

p=r=f

Ee3
t=H=4H=:
63

62

^i^^^^gi
tt=P

$=#*

m^P^
^gg
65

64

Si 5^^^^

f^g^M^L^ ^rrnujpa]
66

72

71

aa

^i^^p

^=f

73

IS^^
l=2=p

pcpcp:

- q * j

MUSICAL DICTATION.

57

80

79

P
i re^ss^fltf^srrcrr
^^^

*gg ?=n

81

82

^T^S^gfF

MUSICAL DICTATION.

58

EXERCISE

X.

PHRASES IN MAJOR AND MINOR KEYS; MINOR SCALE.

Definition. From each major scale a minor scale is formed


by lowering the third and the sixth degrees of the major half a
However, cases occur when the sixth of the minor
tone each.
scale ascending to the octave of the keynote is similar to that of
the major scale.
The semitone step from the seventh, the leading tone, to
the octave, is essential both to the minor and major scale.
A passage is called diatonic when it is derived from a diatonic
chromatic when it
scale, i.e., composed of tones and semitones
;

composed of semitones.
Remark. The above manner of construction of the minor
scale will fully answer our present purpose.
Direction. Change major scales, as found in connection
with Exercise VIII., into minor scales notice the characteristic
the third, the sixth, and the
marks of the minor scale, viz.

is

leading-note.

EXERCISES.
2
<}S c,

m+jp &^ai
m s S3

ptJte^&

g^ T^TT *=^=

ii:

E=pr

^^

J=^M~jjj]^^^

jnzrr^.

II

11

iin^a
13

12

WzfTl

J
1

-+

-J^plj^Sg^l

MUSICAL DICTATION.

59

^^^^^A^-J^^U^

16

ttzt

PtgB ^

^^^^^
22

21

S
?-<

*2
T7J

1-

27

n^s^jpgg^p
^

i?^

pi

mljjJ^-H
24

-J

in,^

t=t

26

HE*
28

34

33

36

35

^s

18

ffi
^^^*

23

FF^

=15

^
r ^ r i

f=T

^^

i=t

iL^^^-ti-r^
i

Ctx
I

MUSICAL DICTATION.

6o

38

^*a
41

ttr=
42

^^
i

>

^TrTrT^

44

43

46

45

^^^

hh^t-M
f
*=at

bJ

r>

Rs=^

:o:

48

47

ifr^^ix^^a^^t^^g

49

50
|

52

51

^j

S=^

t=^
^^7*
n
^
:

H:

54

53

EtBgg

57

59

^^

56

55

58

60

*=E

MUSICAL DICTATION.
61

SSS^e^e

63

6l

64
,

65

=SC7^?J

*m
UUP

?|g

66

67

E^

:ifcl2*

ff=t

t=^*M=^

tz

70-

^^

fcr

69

68

a^S^f
^K^^l^
_

72,

73

71
EEL-H^

EH

^^^a

3*S
#5*t
74

__

BS
^Ui4i iJ^^m^=C^

75

^-v

79

nj" M
E^"

B
JMK

80

fr*

s
S^
h*

MUSICAL DICTATION.

62

EXERCISE XL
SECTIONS; PERIODS; SEQUENCE.

Definition. The period is a melodic form which, by means


of a certain metrical and rhythmical arrangement of tones, conThe subject-matter of
stitutes a complete musical sentence.
the period is derived from motives growing into phrases, phrases
expanding into sections a section may include two or more
phrases two sections generally form a period. The close of a
period is marked by a return to the fundamental note of the key.
I have limited myself in these exercises to periods of four and
eight bars more complicated ones will find a place in the Second
Part of this work.
;

Remark. There exists still a good deal of confusion regarding


Some writers draw the
the form of construction of a period.
limits of the period at eight bars, and yet there exist distinctly
in such cases
constructed periods consisting of four measures
two phrases are contracted into a short period. If, as is generally
admitted, the close of a period is marked by a perfect cadence,
then the following example, the opening subject of the Larghetto
of Mozart's beautiful Pianoforte Quartet in E flat, must be
No other explanation is possible regardclassed among periods.
ing this and a number of similar constructions. The Andante
of Beethoven's fine Sonata in E flat, Op. 27, is based on short
periods of four bars each.
;

Mozart.

Larghetto.

mrry-rjjf^

Definition. The sequence. The repetition of a model motive


or phrase, on other degrees of the scale, is called a sequence.

The sequence is called real when the repetition follows strictly


the construction of the model, i.e., when the progression of
similar tone-degrees is strictly adhered to
tonal, when the
repetition is merely the general imitation of the rhythmical form
of the model, i.e., the step of a second, etc., may be changed
into that of any other interval.
;

Real.

i^i ij^M^

Tonal.

iac

MUSICAL DICTATION.

63

EXERCISES.

a^gSESgpa

h-4
l=^J=J:
J

-^_

+ -tgzr
-

i4J-^*

'

gj

b = -^grinTQTtf
jjriH^^

B^^

at

wttmi

10

in!

E=ri:

'

^^

#-

-F-ah
12

# r

t==F

a==i!

^2

,WJ

J J

#^-tifj^-feL iiSl TP
t

f-

'

gT

MUSICAL DICTATION.

64
13

B_j

A-T

]/

Jj^J

'

! -1

'

-+^m

t-

>

r
I

77#^

^m

14

1=*

o'

-W-

'

fcfc=

-
^
a^=ix=te^

15

IS

iJlJ

Ti

\i

^zzzzz^z:

16

P n==fce:
f^Tf^

P
^*

ro

iFF^

fc^

'
I

^S

17

plug

^J-U

P=^

^b=t^
18

^?=t
=t=p

-^e

*_f

19

* i *

^^

^J-fMfe

'>

"


MUSICAL DICTATION.
20

^^

r^

65

fczTTr

# *

r*

r~[

21

lii

i =>=asp
-

^'

--

*^

-J
'

22

j^^-J-P^^

I 1

^^

f-t

7^1=3

sp^p^

23

|pg3ddjs|EgfJ^
,

gj-^^^^^^
P^Sip^^

^jgjjjgj^
24

^t

^~^TZ7
25

e^

i=t=t

3==f
I

26

^=N

=r=JS

P==t 22
;tat *-*-&

OL

'

JL. * *

5=P=

H4-nI+
P

After No. 21, periods are formed from former phrases.

r^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

66

27

\&-

fS>

Tf^^-f^

^^ vv

28

* :*^

* +
=

v
*-

^ s^

_29
:

^pn^T^ ffe^ffip
30

S-^

ii=^

pSsPP3^3

31

^<r

rTS-J
^' *

* J

^I

-*

J- *_!_*_

32

33
<

-$

>*J

i-JJ

M+-d
+ d A

JJ

=5=5=?

I-

^a^s

ar^zt

^t^T*
at-3L7T

TPTj

^H^

-h-F-

-*

a^g -4^^
J

MUSICAL DICTATION.

-.

'^^s^m

W~W~~^W
m.

^m

Elf

35

^35

2**

}=*
3=*
^
^f=^^
P^
36
l~'l

J1J >i

'

S ^P^

37

i>

N
3=P=1

V-^-jz:
<^?

j^n^^^i

Pi

& 1

^^

J4-W
^^

38

-^
^^ra^pgE^^J
mr^

JJgEEg

39

-N

fS|

MUSICAL DICTATION,

68

^^

40

_-

41

11

^-^-f

^TFHfTTr^

42

^ ^g
^

g
'

ttf

3=F
s~

s*f

e>-

*-

*-

43

44
J

frfrir

ii

f^a

jJ jiHfiq=g
i

^MrWrTl-^J-^Uif^El^^^^^
pf

46

^^^^^

MUSICAL DICTATION,

69

47

gfr^JthMg

f-T

a~T

ff^ro

4*

48

i EE2

n
S&
^^d7 p==g;
^F-f+f^T^lT^U^
H

i=F=t

49

^Vt-=^^ g^
pi

=F=F

^B?

-ML/

E*
60

n^-pTtrtTr^

fr
4=q
p ^ T^r

ifr21

rppz

51

^7f?^
_

52

#itT^^i^tfXj^r^44^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

70
55

4=T

J?=^

fi^-i

56

ic=^

m ? a

Et

atzstzM:

E3

-#

i^s

gr^rTr^l

57

dM=^ "^ij=j^y=^

'd

=1*L

II

58

^^2

K-i-rf-^L^

nr

^^
V

s=t
1 -"

i JV

fr

,59

*
1

60

o-

r-

32 II

='

3TTTJ
.

61

#^=te^ cM
g

sj

PTfTl

^^g^a

EE^^^g^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

71

^r>^

63

64

_^#

t=s

F=P=^B
M

3=

>

i=t*r

^ ^B

65

teB3
I

vft
t=rti

66

67

&

fc

-e*-^-

^^fe

j^Tin^irg^gCT^^

69

IiS

M,

-'

rrirTr-nr

Jfff^^EEfl

70

m
i ^3 ^^
g-r

te
r

-J&1

t=t

==*

izz^z

&s

MUSICAL DICTATION,

72

EXERCISE

XII.

PHRASES, SECTIONS, AND PERIODS EXTRACTED FROM THE


WORKS OF CLASSICAL COMPOSERS; MOTION; TRANSITION.

Definition.
Motion governs time; every composition is
characterized by a general motion of time indicative of a certain'
state of emotional life and expression.
All the different shades
of this inner emotional life are thus, in a general way, revealed
by sounds regulated by motion hence a great variety of motiongradations.
Each piece or part of a piece is, according to its
emotional character, governed by a certain chief motion. These
different gradations of motion are indicated by Italian words
accepted in musical practice by long tradition.
These words
have a double meaning, viz. time and emotional expression.
;

The

chief gradations of motion are

Very slow.

Largo
Adagio

Slow.
Slow, lingering.

Lento
Larghetto

Rather slow.
Moderately slow.

Andante
Andantino
Moderato

Somewhat

faster.*

Moderate.

Rather

Allegretto

Allegro
Vivace
Presto
Prestissimo
.

lively.

Fast, cheerful.
Lively.
Very quick.
As fast as possible.

There are subdivisions of all those separate grades of motion


these as well as special signs of expression and phrasing will
find a place in the Second Part of this work.
:

Directions. Indicate the key of each of the following exPay attention to


amples, and then let student find the pitch.
When this
the grade of motion governing each fragment.
station of the course of dictation is reached, it will be easy, if
desirable,

to

examples,

viz.

in the works of good composers additional


motives, phrases and periods.

find
:

Students will also find it now very instructive by endeavouring


by themselves, from compositions they are studying,
distinct periods composed of eight or four measures, as the
case may be, and to point out motives, phrases, sections and
sequences.

to pick out

* Some writers take this slower than Andante, but judging from the character
of Mozart's and Beethoven's Andantino, it is decidedly faster than Andante.

MUSICAL DICTATION.

Remark. A passage

73

leading from one period to another

is

called transit ion.

Students will now be prepared to form periods with some


previously dictated simple phrases.
Sure progress and real
understanding will be promoted by the continual exercise of your
own ingenuity governed by rational rules deduced from acknowledged classical compositions.

EXERCISES.
1

Allegrg.

p r^f
JTH^
^

j^-f-HrffrH

a j n;

3 Allegro

vrfir

Allegro.

I jpc.

9 Presto

';

^rfJZ\

p^mmm^
Allegro.

rT^n

^-

il

#%^#jr^i
jlII

Allegretto.

4 >u

\m

J->i

<}

JFe^ U^lEEEfl ^"r,


7,i

Allegro.

5 Adagio.

7 Allegro

10

-*-*-

Adagio.

^a

12 Allegro.

if

Allegretto.

jt

Allegro.
13 Auegro.
Id

14 Andante.

15

And ante.

16 Allegro.

l^^jTrfl

^g^q^

p=

MUSICAL DICTATION,

74
17 Adagio.

18 Prestissimo.

W^L

3^3^*3
S * ~S

~:

M
gfebj^gii

19 Andante.

^fe
20

#*a

21 Andunti

Allegro.

w Si^iffilp

il

il

23

if

Moderato.
22
ZZ Moaeraio.

24

Andante.

Allegro.

s^^

4*

rj-ir-frr
^ ^ 26

28 Not fast.

-#

Ie
r^FTTB
29

Scherzando.
-f

30

Allegro.

I M:
i

33 Andante.

Jtrqt
J

1-

sum
I

^S

32 Andante

31 Andante.

I ^3

rnii

27

Allegretto.

V
*

&*
34

S/ok-

^V*c^'rr,rl^vi tf^^f^r

I!

MUSICAL DICTATION.

75

36

^'"I'JJP

^^g^am

>

arfc

37

^^^

38

b'/r,

39

j_J

figm

r
.,-

E^

40

SE

t^i^S^fr^^^^^
42

43

-y

i
i

_ 47

j.

41.

^^i

4-8

iite

J==^

49 Andante

|*te^7T7T-trl

J-J

J| r

fe^^^g^FF^Fp

tr =t=
* ^

MUSICAL DICTATION.

76
50

Presto.

?^
5

P^

-
1

#-

^^a^^^^

u.

51 Largo.

52

Allegro.

^nH

ez

f^=g
f^^

=3=3

ZZ
53

-i

HI

3=*

Allegro.

i ^5E;

^^^ ^E

2Z

^=y~~p~ T~^

BF

r^rrTrr-ri^
54

ii

Allegro.

^jF"^q^= E 4f4K-f-M E^

^^

55 Andante.

-Bs

^S

^zib*

56 Mcnuetto.

fa*=S^

33

iafctzfczzif

SE2

S=
j

*i

j-j

MUSICAL DICTATION.

77

57 Largu.

SEE^E

^=Tt
E*

J
*

^^^[^^^1

J
>i"-^j

58 Andante.

ms

$=3=

^^
59

^=-T=P-

?=F

Allegro.

=F

-***- stzat

^-J-

pEJEjLsOr^Ej

_^

e?

jUj^

60

*g=gEj

Se
'

FFf

j=t
<*==?

1/

^^

61

fe

EE
62

MT

63

ib

Allegretto.

3E^

w mm

*A\~~*~'

Sj -nt

^samg

m
^^

^^h^^jJ4^-^-

MUSICAL DICTATION.

78
64 Andante.

Ui^
^#-P-

?T^=i

-r-._
*-=

-*-^

H^H

65

grrrr

X7[TJ=j^

J J
i

J.z^^JJj

Pfe^wf^ imu
J

66

zi

r^-I

-Q^p*

te

(P^rag
$

67

Allegretto.

3P^
F^^-Q^
ffTTTTrr^^^sa
*=

?c=p:

P5

68
^tpzqe

69

tai-j
lP
ft -

F-
n in r^f^f

^1
I

* j

u =*

Mi

70

*dz* si

^glU^I

MUSICAL DICTATION.
73

It a

74

M JUia

_*

Vivace.

^^^

j.

79

ggfpai

^=m:

pgz^a^gi^ ff^^^B

Pas s
75

**

Allegro.

=3

3to3j-i

r-U^ ^

A i^^

<i

m^^^a

i^
i

^^

^^

tfrrrrrfF

Efe

77 Allegro

molto.

^==^^=y=nM^ r^TT^^
-

i&

78 Andantino.

fc=B

gjH^^

^^^a fur

79 Andante.

jj

S^S

g_j

ruv i-^^^Nl

MUSICAL DICTATION.

So
80 Allegro

maestoso.

^-Zl

rMm

E&=tf

iSP^

81 Allegretto.

^=gH
2sgS
*=F

82

Allegro.

%^
*r

ui

?=*=*

rr

m^ag^a^jE^

83

P ^1'-

-f^

.*

ry
s=f

LVrrl

r.rrr^i^gEJl

^N^^^R^r^^^^^l
85 Andante.

pYttt

pis

3^E

#^

=^jt

*iTR=

glifl

MUSICAL DICTATION.

8l

87
1

t-f

gga

^=t

Q-*-

BE

*:_zz2

"4-H=*
1 T-*r-ri

lump

88 ^//^

i^?^^^^^^^
H^-Jf^^^^ T^

E3
89 Andante.

S3
-4-^J
g

rr^=^=^

4nj

pagj^^^J^J
ifa
#ii
pjg^i

#jfe

^^

N=

l^_u-

rrr

'

^^

^H=f

p P r

H^^tH^tx!

fai^g^F^r
92

F^f

Lento.

psm

^H*

r -

mrirlL

Fff^^^T^^
I

'

^Z3t z-p

P-

MUSICAL DICTATION.

82
93

^=^

sg"^?g

m m<
94

z=

m
g

:-

**"

^7-*

rr =g^=g^=---p^rirT
^ w-y--jr-i^

f=J=f

b =g

be

?=^;=pn
^^

J
Jfr

&

s=n
-

^' 1

S
5JLFM-cq

-#

^^
m^m
99

^^

97 Andante.

is

*-

h- ii -t

ar.

*=F

'

"

~~

f-^prgr-^-r^

Allegretto.

i&
3B^

T?

JL.

jfeg
96

<L

P^S
N

^ v+f-r

^e=e

95 Larghetto.

u^

Allegro.

=grE^rrr
i

La Manon."

\
*-4-M- F=P
f-

+-*

MUSICAL DICTATION.

83

i^mm^mt

100

s*

^^mm
^w^^

'
102

$E

f~

-*

0-

3t=M:

F-

.LJ^-T-rjjV^r-M^ll

103

jj.104 Allegretto.

^^^-^-j

fc

^^-rg--g^B

3^

^T=:

*i

!*-0^

^SS^

gjjg^S^Bl
? ^ ^

4=3:

-F
!E*B

S
106

fe

iE^

ffl

^=&
=P=5=

? r

3i *^=?
r

-f-

F=FF

MUSICAL DICTATION.

84
107

*^

r^

-~

t&

^^f=^^^
^^^^^^c^^^^
^^^^^^^^1
=i

108 Andante.

M^N^M

*-

i
109

F^^

2Z

y-

^P^EEEg

eft

110

T>

g^
s

ji.

t=zz

<f^=F=
S

Z^L

-P

10-

^=P=^=^EEg=^^

Vivace.

JS

!'
i

72

ah-f-g*-

112

J.

-e>--

*-

jf

#L

MUSICAL DICTATION.

&-+ zmm

?%*-*-

85

mm

^^^
F=+

i iHtXfJfc fefeEB*
114 Allegro.

iS3E^

^T^mrn

EE #

115

EH
i*

p
P

:s

1-

J^

y-

#-

^z^ ^-r^f-^

lf=*

tlE^E*

2*=* *^

116 Adagio.

j^>

r r lU

^=P=

r-a-r

S*

11

^5=^

117 Moderato.

S3

S^
mmm

-fc

3C

F=f

Zg=BI

118 Allegro.

- p *
=t=

3p ^

SE

-p

^P-*-=i=F

n s^#d
i

*-*-

MUSICAL DICTATION.

86
m

^^^M^g

119 Allegretto.

m^rtfi

*=*

-m-~r

TTTt*^
^ssas

fei^3

H ^
120

i
i^ #
P

H-

T^r-rr

^E ^g^

121
^

J H

#^^

Q
T*~^

*-^#

r-w-*-r -+-?-

zz=^

f^4^fS
p=

122 Larghetto.

pm
ii.

=3:

is ^^
rz3

~[

J- ? -~g=n:-^m

:E

^^

r?--

te

t=F

=3:

jl23

^W"^
124

g-i

r
i

rb
n - zprzns:

HH

:*zzzi

Allegretto.

iti 3*-=1

*e z^zz^zfi
125

^t^ESbtit

^=p:

t=K

gzz^zzlzd:

^zzpzfzpt

Q iir

^^^^^^^^ftrTMt

MUSICAL DICTATION.

WORKS FROM WHICH THE FRAGMENTS

LIST OF

OF EXERCISE
Ex
1.

Title of Wori
Sonata, No. 15

4 Rondo
5-

6.
7-

8.

9-

10.
11.

12.
13.

14.

*516.
*7
18.

Composer.
Mozart.

No. 13
No. 8

2.

3-

...

24.
2526.

27.

...

Haydn.

No. 10

No. 1
Symphony, No. 2
No. 5
No. 6
Sonata, Op. 49
Op. 2, No.

Op. 2, No.
,,
Op. 10

5>
,,
,,

...

,,

...

55

Beethoven.
1...

55

...

No.
No.
No.
No.

,,

31.
32.

Warum, Op.

35- "
36.

Lohengrin

ig...

4344.
4546.
4748.

>;

)i

>>
,

69.

70.

55

55

55
55

Mozart.

...

...

Weber
Gounod
Wagner

...

Schubert
55

,,

...

55

73747576.

Echo
Tambourin
Rigaudon
Sonata

55

in

55

...

...
77- Caprice IV.
78. Sonata, Op. 41

Wolfle.
Miiller,
...

Miiller, A. E.

Andante
Gipsy Sonata
Suite, Op. 31

85.
86. Sonata,

Cramer

Lowe

89.

Tema, Op.

90.

Walzer, Op. 39
55

Clementi
Bach, J. Ch.

...

Bargiel

...

55

91.

A. E.

Steibelt.

Weber.

Op. 39

)5

Bach.

Rameau.
,,

C Minor

Op. 5 ...
Op. 41
87.

88. Jagdlied, Op. 77

55

Handel

55

Bourree

Brahms.
...Rubinstein.
...

Reinecke
Kiel

17...

Brahms

55

92. Serenade, Op. 35


93- Subject of a Fugue

...Jadassohn

Mendelssohn

...Jadassohn
9i- Serenade, Op. 35
Saron
95- Fantasie-Stiick, Op 2
96. Harmonies Poetiques")
Ligzt
et Religieuses)

51

55

,,

55

55

55

55
9798. Fanfare

55

55

99.

55

55

...

Bach.

72.

84.

,,

Minuet

7 1 - Gigue

83-

Wagner.

>

Song

63. Child's

81. Sonata, E|?


82.
Op. 22
,,

55

55

"
37- " Meistersinger
38, 39. " Parsifal"
40. Fugue subject from ~)
the Well-Tempered V
Clavichord
...J

59- Ninth Symphony


60. Gavotte
61. Subject of a Fugue
62.
55
55

55

5 ...

Major

28...

12
"

55- Sonata, Op. 27


56. Sonata, Op. 49
Op. 2, No.
,,
5758. Septet, Op. 20

7980. Caprice

10...

,,

55

55

11...

33- Overture, " Paradise \


and the Peri " J

41.
42.

55

,,

Haydn.
Clementi.
..Beethoven.

...

67. Impromptu
68. Valse ...

55

N0.3...

Haydn.
...Beethoven.
...
Schubert.

No. 5

Rondo

64. " Oberon


.,.
65. "Faust"
"
66. " Tannhauser

55

3...

Mendelssohn.
ohne Worte,
55
Op. 19, No. 4 J
Op, 30, No. 1...
,,
Op. 38, No. 2...

55
Op. 53, No. 1...

,,
Op. 85, No. 5...

15
Album fiir die Jugend 1
Schumann.
Op. 66, No. 1 J

29.
30.

Composer
Mozart.

"

Lied

28.

34-

53-

55

Bagatelle, Op. 33
20. Trio, Op. 1, No. 3
21. Thema, Op. 17

23-

55

54-

Work

Title of

Ex.

,,

,,

Fantasia
Sonata, No. 4
No. 18

String Quartet in
Sonata, No. 7

ARE TAKEN.

XII.

49. Sonata, No. 12


No. 1
50.

5i- Trio, Op. 1


...
5 2 Sonata, Op. 134

,,

19.

22.

87

La Manon

55

55

...

Couperin
,,

88

MUSICAL DICTATION.

Ex.
IOO.
IOI.

Title of Work.

Rondo
Sonata

in

Composer.

Ex.

Bach, Ph. E.

IJ 5-

C Minor

I02. Minuet
...
IO3. Gigue
IO4. Rondo
IO5. Landlicher Tanz
106.
>)
>
IQ75)
>1
108. "The May Queen"
iog.
>
>

no.
in.

Lilliburlero

112.

Rigadoon

"3-

Gavot...

>

...Beethoven.

1
,,

Bennett.W.

114. Sonata

S.

122.

j)
>

...Purcell,

117.
118.

119.
120. Anthem
121. Pieces for the

11

'

,,

...

116.

,,

,,

Title of Work.
Composer
in E Flat
...Novello, E
Short
and
Easy | c
bmart u
Pieces for the Organ J
Postlude
...
...

Gavotte
...
Saint Saens
Allegretto grazioso ... Tours, B

Mass

H.

...

Dr. Blow.

...

Scarlatti.

123.
124.
125.

Macfarren

Organ

Op. 22

Voluntary
Sonata in D Major ...
...
Op. 164
Chorus from the )

"Messiah")

n
tjade
,

Calkin
Schubert.

Handel
,

INDEX OF SUBJECTS TREATED IN THIS PART.


Accent, grammatical.
,,

metrical.
negative.

,,

positive.

Motion.
Motive.

Names

rhythmical.

Accidentals.
Bars.

Period.
Phrase.

Beating Time.
Chromatic Scale.

Section.

Rhythm.
Sequence.

Diatonic Scale.
Dot.
Intervals.
Italian Terms indicating motion.

Keynote.
Leading-note.
Leitmotive,
Major.

Measures.
Metre.
Minor.

of the degrees of the Scale.

Octave.

,,

real
tonal.

Signature of Key.
of Time.
Syncopation.
Time, different kinds of
Tie.

Tonic.
Transition.
Triplet.

Up-beat.

ORATORIOS,
W. CROTCH.
Palestine

s.

d.

W. H. CUMMINGS.
The Fairy Ring

W.

CUSINS.

G.

TeDeum

FELICIEN DAVID.
The Desert (Male Voices)
P.

DIEMER.

H.

DOORLY.

E.

GOUNOD.

CII.
f.t Vita (Latin ok Knci.ish)
Ditto,
Sol-fa (Latin and Knolish)
The REDEMPTION (English Words)
Ditto,
Sol-fa
Ditto
(French Words)

Lazarus

ANTONIN DVORAK.

Ditto
(German Words)
Messe Solennelle (St. Cecilia)
Communion Service (Messe Solennelle)...
Troisieme Messe Solennelle
De Proiundis (Psalm 130) (Latin Words).!!
Ditto
(Out of Darknlss)
The Seven Words of Our Saviour
Daughters of Jerusalem
4d.)

C. H. GRAUN.
The Passion of Our Lord (Der Tod
Te Deum
J.

St.

(German and Bohemian Words


A. E.

MYLES

B. FOSTER.
The Angels of the Bells (Female Voices)
The Bonnie Fishwives
(ditto)
The Lady of the Isles

Spring's

is. 6d.)

Message (Sol-fa, 3d.)


Daughter (Sol-fa,

Erl-King's
ZlON

The Crusaders (Sol-fa,


Comala
Christmas Eve (Sol-fa,

gd.)

is.)

4d.)

HENRY GADSBY.
Lord of the Isles (Sol-fa,

is. 6d.)

Alcestis (Male Voices)

Columbus (Male Voices)

G.

4
2

Salamis.

GAUL.
2

FR. GERNSHEIM.
A Triumph Song (Male Voices)
F. E.

GLUCK.
II.

HERMANN GOETZ.
Waters

of Babylon (Psalm

Ncenia

The Water-Lily (Male Voices)

137)

6
6

...

The Triumph of Time and Truth ...


Alexander Balus
Hercules
Athaliah
Esther
Susanna
Theodora
Belshazzar
The Messiah, edited by V. Novello
The Messiah, ditto. Pocket edition
...
The Messiah, edited by W. T. Best
...
Israel in Egypt, edited by Mendelssohn

2
2

Solomon
Jephtha
Joshua

2
2

Deborah
Saul
Chandos Te Deum
Dettingen Te Deum
Utrecht Jubilate
O praise the Lord with one consent
(Sixth Chandos Anthem)
Coronation and Funeral Anthems. Cloth

o
o
o

2
1
1

Or, singly

The King shall

rejoice

o
o

heart is inditing
Let thy hand be strengthened
The ways of Zion
Alexander's Feast
Acis and Galatea
Ditto, New Edition, edited by
Ditto, ditto, Sol-fa

Ode on

St. Cecilia's

J.

Barnuy

8
6
o

o
o
o

Day

L'Allegro

HAYDN.
1

Orpheus (Act

Bt the

2
2

6
6
O

GLADSTONE.

Philippi

My

Joan of Arc (Sol-fa, is.)


Passion Service
Ruth (Sol-fa, gd.)
The Holy City (Sol-fa, is.)

GRIMM.

Zadok the Priest

GARRETT.

The Shunammite

A. R.

O.

Jesu)

Israel in Egypt, edited by V. Novello.


Pocket Edition
Judas Maccabeus (Sol-fa, is.)
Judas Maccabeus. Pocket edition
Samson

NIELS W. GADE.
Psyche (Sol-fa,

H
1

...

B flat (Latin and English)

in

The Passion

HENRY FARMER.
Mass

d.

HANDEL.

DYER.

Salvator Mundi

Semele

Stabat Mater
Patriotic Hymn

Ditto

The Soul's Aspiration

Ludmila
Ditto (German and Bohemian Words)
The Spectre's Bride
Ditto (German and Bohemian Words)

Mors

Gallia (Sol-fa,

Bethany

M.

&c Continued.

The Creation (Sol-fa, is.)


The Creation. Pocket edition
The Seasons (Each Season, singly,
First Mass in B flat (Latin)

2
1

is.)

...

(Latin and English)


Ditto
Second Mass in C (Latin)
Third Mass (Imperial) (Latin and English)
(Latin)
Ditto
Sixteenth Mass (.Latin)
...
The Passion; or, Seven Last Words
Te Deum (English and Latin)
Insan.e et Van^e Cur-e ;Ditto)

o
o

1
1
1

o
o

o
o

2
1

ORATORIOS, &c Continued.


EDWARD HECHT.
Eric the

O may

MENDELSSOHN.

Dane

Elijah (Sol-fa,

the Choir Invisible

join

St.

HENRY

HILES.

HEINRICH HOFMANN.
Fair Melusina

Cinderella
Song of the Norns (Female Voices)

HUMMEL.
First Mass in B flat
Communion Service, ditto
Second Mass in E flat
Communion Service, ditto

Third Mass in D
Communion Service, ditto
Alma Virgo (Latin and English)
Quod in Orbe (ditto)
F. ILIFFE.
St. John the Divine

W. JACKSON.
The Year

Songs

in a

Zion

Sol-fa

Sol-fa

LEONARDO

6
6

6
6

LEO.

Dixit Dominus
2

LLOYD.

DR.

in

Third Moteit

1
1
1
1

6
3

...

...

...

JOHN NAYLOR.
3

The Martyrdom of

Polycarp

St.

R. P.

Great
2

is

the Lord

PALESTRINA.
C. H. H.
Blest Pair of Sirens
Ajax and Ulysses
Prometheus Unbound

DR.

PAINE.

MlSSA ASSUMPTA EST MARIA


MlSSA PAP/E Marcelli

...

MACKENZIE.
2s.)

REV. SIR FREDK. OUSELEY.

The Story of Sayid


Jason
The Bride (Sol-fa, 8d.)
The Rose of Sharon (Sol-fa,
Jubilee Ode

First Motett

The Prodigal Son

G. A. MACFARREN.
a Cornfield (Female Voices)

A. C.

gd.)

Jeremiah

LONGHURST.

May Day
The Soldier's Legacy (Operetta)
Outward Bound

Ditto
Requiem Mass
Ditto
(Latin and English)
Sol-fa
Ditto,
Ditto
altaris (in e flat)
venerabili
lltania de
lltania de venerabili sacramento 'in b

Glory, Honour, Praise.

Alcestis

Songs

(Latin)
(Latin and English) (Sol-fa,

O God, when Thou appea'rest. Ditto


Have mercy, O Lord. Second Moti.tt

Andromeda ...
Hero and Leander
The Song of Balder
The Longbeards' Saga (Male Voices)

W. H.
The Village Fair

Twelfth Mass

Splendi-nte te Deus.

Elizabeth

C. H.

King Thamos
First Mass (Latin and English)
Seventh Mass in B flat
Communion Service in B flat, Ditto

FLAT)

LISZT.

F.
St.

MOZART.

...

H. LESLIE.
The First Christmas Morn

The Legend of

MOLIQUE.

B.

LAHEE.

The Sleeping Beauty (Female Voices)


Ditto,

Abraham

Vineyard (Female Voices)

H.

MEYERBEER.

KINROSS.

Ditto,

Ninety-first Psalm (Xatin)


(English)
Ditto

WARWICK JORDAN.
in

fa, gd.)

Athalie (Sol-fa, is.)


Antigone (Male Voices) (Sol-fa, is.)
Man is Mortal (Eight Voices)
Festgesang (Hymns of Praise)
Ditto (Male Voices)
Christus (Sol-fa, 6d.)
Three Motetts for Female Voices
Son and Stranger (Operetta)
Loreley (Sol-fa, 6d.)
GiDIPUS AT COLONOS (MALE VOICES)
To the Sons of Art (MaleVoicesI
Sol-fa
Ditto,
Judge me, O God (Psalm 43) (Sol-fa, iid.)
Why rage fiercely the Heathen
My God, why, O why hast Thou forsaken
me (Psalm 22)
Sing to the Lord (Psalm 98)
Six Anthems for the Cathedral at Berlin.
For 8 voices, arranged in 4 parts
Ave Maria (Saviour of Sinners). 8 voices

JENSEN.

The Feast of Adonis

J.

...

Ditto,
Sol-fa
(s. solo and chor.)
Sol-fa
Ditto,
Lauda Sion (Praise Jehovah) (Sol-fa, gd ) ...
The First Walpurgis Night (Sol-fa, is.) ...
Midsummer Night's Dream (Female Voices)

Xala and Damayanti


A Song of Victory

C.

is.)

Hear my prayer

FERDINAND HILLER.

Blow ye the trumpet

..,

Not unto us, O Lord (Psalm 115)


Lord, how long wilt Thou forget me

Fayre Pastorel
The Crusaders

A.

is. 4d.)

Praise (Lobgesang) (Sol-fa,


As the Hart pants (Psalm 42)
Come, let us sing (Psalm 95)
When Israel out of Egypt came (Sol.

130)

is. 6d.)

(Sol-fa,

Hymn of

GEORGE HENSCHEL.
Out of Darkness (Psalm

Paul

PARRY.

JOSEPH PARRY.

Nebuchadnezzar (Sol-fa,

is. 6d.)

Date Due
Sep26'47f|
|

jul

b 1941 1

<)

780.77 R514m, v.l

61065

780.77 R514m, v.l

61065

Hitter
AUTHOR

Musical dictation

780.77 R514m, v.l

61065

POMONA COLLEGE LIBRARY

NOVELLO, EWER &

CO.'S

MUSIC PRIMERS
EDITED BY

STAINER.

Dr.
x.

2.

3.

4.

Thb
The
The
The

Pianoforte

(Price 2s.)

Rudiments of Music (Price


Organ (Price 2s.)
Harmonium (Price 2s.) -

Singing

E. Pauer.
H. Cummings.
Dr. Stainer.

King Hall.

W.

is.)

Paper boards, 5s.)


A. Randeggbr.
6. Speech in Song (Singer's Pronouncing
Primer) (Price 2s.) A. J. Ellis, f.r.s.
E. Pauer.
7. Musical Forms (Price 2s.)
8. Harmony (Price 2s.)
Dr. Stainer.

Dr. Bridge.
9. Counterpoint (Price 2s.)

5*

(Price as.

20.

Fugue

11.

Scientific Basis of Music (Price

12.

Double Counterpoint (Price 2s.)


Church Choir Training (Price is.)

13.
14*

15.
16.

,
18.
1.

20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.

James Higgs.

(Price 2s.)
is.)

Dr. Stone.
Dr. Bridgb.

Rev. J. Troutbec ;.
Plain Song (Price 2s.)
Rev. T. Helm rj.
Instrumentation (Price 2s.)
E. Prout.
The Elements of the Beautiful in
E. Pauer.
Music (Price is.)
Berthold Tours.
The Violin (Prices.) Tonic Sol-fa (Price is.)
J. Curw in.
Ja;.ies Greenwood.
Lancashire Sol-fa (Price is.) Dr. Stain e
Composition (Price 2s.) -F.aine and Barrem 4
Musical Terms (Price is.) The Violoncello (Price 2s.)
Julhs de Swert.
Two-part Exercises (396) (Price r?.) Jambs Greenwood.
Franklin Taylor.
Double Scales (Price is.) Mathis Lussy.
Musical Expression (Price 3s.) Solfeggi (Price as. Paper boards, 5s.) - F. A. Marshall.

...

Or, in Three Parts,


Accompaniment (Price

Organ
a& The Cornet (Pruc
.

is.

2s.)

6d. s :ch.
-

2s.)

Dr. Bridge.

H. Brett.

(TO BE CONTINUED.)

Any

of the above

may

be

had strongly bound in boards,

price 6d. each extra,

LONDC, & NEW YORK: NOVELLO, EWER &

CO.