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Focus Plan

Texarkana Independent School District


With instructions for writers

Grading
Period:

Plan Code:

Writer:

Refer to Scope and


Sequence
Barbara Fugitt

Course/subject:

Math

Grade(s):

Third grade

Time allotted for


instruction:

3 or 4 60 minute class
periods

Title:

Compare and Order

Lesson Topic:

Using place value to compare and order whole numbers.

TAKS Objective:

Objective 1: The students will demonstrate an


understanding of numbers, operations, and quantitative
reasoning.
(3.1) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning.
The student uses place value to communicate about
increasingly large whole numbers in verbal and written
form, including money.
The student is expected to:

FoCUS TEKS and Student


Expectation:

Supporting TEKS and


Student Expectations:

(B) use place value to compare and order whole numbers


through 9,999.
(3.1) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning.
The student uses place value to communicate about
increasingly large whole numbers in verbal and written
form, including money.
The student is expected to:
(A) use place value to read, write (in symbols and words),
and describe the value of whole numbers through 999,999.

Division of Curriculum and Instruction School Improvement Department Texarkana Independent School District

Concepts

Digits

Place Value

Enduring Understandings/Generalizations/Principles
The student will understand that

Any one of the tens symbols 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or 9 used


to write numbers.

The value of a place of a digit in a number.

Greater Than (>)

A symbol used to compare two numbers, with the greater


number given first. Example: 8 > 6

Less Than (<)

A symbol used to compare two numbers, with the lesser


number given first. Example: 6 < 8

Equal (=)

Two numbers or number sentences being alike in value on


either side.

Compare

To examine 2 or more objects or people to find out how they


are alike and how they are different.

Ordering

To put numbers or objects in a specific order. Example: listing


from greatest to least or least to greatest.

Division of Curriculum and Instruction School Improvement Department Texarkana Independent School District

I.

Sequence of Activities (Instructional Strategies)


A.

Focus/connections/anticipatory set
1.
Begin the lesson by writing the word compare on the board. Ask students to tell
you what the word compare means. (To examine 2 or more objects or people to
find out how they are alike and how they are different.)
2.
Ask students some ways to compare the students in the classroom. (They could
say by male or female, height, age, hair color, and so on.)

B.

Instructional activities
1.
Objectives: Students will review place value and begin comparing and ordering
numbers.
2.
Procedures: The teacher will review place value and model comparing and
ordering numbers to 9,999.
3.
Modeling: The teacher will use PowerPoint, numbers printed on cardstock and
cut out, and overhead or Elmo.

C.

Guided activity or strategy


Day 1 Use the PowerPoint to introduce vocabulary and concepts (you will only use part
of the PowerPoint). Make sure to review Place Value with the students. You will
need the numbers for this activity. For now just one set for you will be fine. You
will also need Transparency 1 to record your number. Have a student draw a
number and ask them in what place value to put the number they drew. For
example, if they drew a 6, the student might tell you to put the 6 in the tens place.
Continue this until you have two numbers. Show students how to compare,
starting in the hundreds place. (We will move to the thousands place with the
next numbers.) For example, if your numbers are 365 and 244, the students
should start comparing the 3 and 2. Then write that 365 > 244 on the board. (I
always tell the students that the greater than and less than signs are an alligator
and the alligator is greedy. He will only eat the largest number.) Begin having
students draw numbers again. (You can decide whether to compare another
number that only goes to the hundreds place or you can add the thousands place
to this.) You can do as many examples as you need until you feel that your
students have this down. After doing several examples, have students work in
pairs to play this game further.
Day 2 Begin the lesson by reviewing place value and comparing numbers. Finish the
PowerPoint by introducing ordering numbers. Students need to be able to order
numbers from least to greatest or greatest to least. Use the numbers from Day 1
activity. Put students in groups and have them make numbers to the hundreds
place at first. They are allowed to put the number you draw in any place value
spot. Once you draw 3 numbers, have one student from each group write their
number on the board. Have the class work together and put the numbers in order
from least to greatest or greatest to least. When listing them on the board, list
them in several different ways. For example, if your numbers were 265, 956, and
437. List them in order from least to greatest (265; 437; 956), list them from
greatest to least (956; 437; 265). Also, show it using the inequality symbols (265
< 437 < 956). Do this a couple of times to ensure that students grasp the
concept. Once they have a good grasp to the hundreds place, add the thousands
place to this. If you feel your students are ready, you can extend this to the ten
thousands and hundred thousands place.

Division of Curriculum and Instruction School Improvement Department Texarkana Independent School District

Day 3 Review comparing and ordering numbers. Use the PowerPoint as a review.
Complete several examples on the board for students to solve. Use the number
cards and show students how to play Card Trick. (There is an example scorecard
in this lesson.) Students will work in pairs for this activity. Show the students that
they are only allowed to draw three or four number cards (depending on how big
you want the numbers to big). Pick three number cards. Use Transparency 2 to
show students how to fill in the scorecard. Students will then complete this
activity with their partner.
Day 4 Review ordering and comparing numbers to prepare students for the TAKS
formatted assessment.

II.

D.

Accommodations/modifications
See student IEP for modifications.

E.

Enrichment
Students could work on comparing higher numbers. They can do the same activities, just
using the larger numbers.

STUDENT PERFORMANCE
A.

Description
Day 1 Students will work in pairs. Students will continue playing the game. Give each
pair a set of numbers and Activity sheet 1. Monitor to make sure the students are
doing this correctly. When students are finished with the activity, have them
complete Activity Sheet 2.
Day 2 Students play Hi Score with their group. Give each group a Hi Score game
board, number cards, and a marker. Students will take turns drawing a card.
They will need to think carefully about where they are going to place their digit.
They are not allowed to change it later. Each line represents a mathematical
sentence. If the sentence is true, the group earns points. If it isnt correct, they
dont get any points. Example: If the digits are 621 > 423 > 233, then team earns
233 points. If the sentence is incorrect, they get no points. I usually give cub cash
to the team with the most points. You could do this later after you look over the
score cards so each group can work at their own pace. After the groups are
finished, students will complete Activity Sheet 3.
Day 3 Students will play Card Trick with their partner. Once they have played through
the game a couple of times, students will complete Activity Sheet 4, a review over
ordering and comparing numbers.
Day 4 Students will complete the TAKS formatted assessment.

B.

Accommodations/modifications
See student IEP for modifications.

C.

Enrichment
Students could work on comparing higher numbers. They can do the same activities, just
using the larger numbers.

Division of Curriculum and Instruction School Improvement Department Texarkana Independent School District

III.

IV.

Assessment of Activities
A.

Description
The teacher will know the students have begun to master comparing and ordering
numbers when they:
Complete the Day 2 and Day 3 activities with a 70% or higher.
Complete the Comparing and Ordering Assessment with 70% or higher.

B.

Rubrics/grading criteria
Complete all activities with a 70% or higher.

C.

Accommodations/modifications
See student IEP for modifications.

D.

Enrichment
Students could work on comparing higher numbers. They can do the same activities, just
using the larger numbers.

E.

Sample discussion questions


1.
How do you compare numbers? (Begin in the thousands or hundreds place and
determine which number is bigger to find out which number is greater than the
other.)
2.
What digits do you look at to determine how to order numbers? (Look at the first
digit that is different.)

TAKS Preparation
A.

Transition to TAKS context


1. Students will complete a TAKS formatted Assessment.

B.

Sample TAKS questions


The teacher needs to take sample questions from the 2003 and 2004 TAKS released
tests to emphasize how transformations are tested on the TAKS test.
(Use TAKS Transparency)

V.

Key Vocabulary
Place value, digits, greater than, less than, compare, ordering, and equal.

VI.

Resources
A.

Textbook
Harcourt Brace or Other Math Adoption

B.

Supplementary materials/equipment
Transparency: Sample TAKS questions from 2003 and 2004 Released TAKS test.
TAKS Master p. 9-10 (Objective 1 Exercise 3 and 4)
Step Up to TAKS p. 100-109.
Card Trick Scorecards (laminated)
Hi Score game cards
Markers
Numbers

Division of Curriculum and Instruction School Improvement Department Texarkana Independent School District

C.

Vis a Vis pens


Math for Fun: Projects (game ideas came from here)

Technology
Overhead or Elmo
Computer or Laptop
LCD Projector for displaying PowerPoint

VII.

Follow Up Activities
Students will have to practice this skill numerous times. Follow this lesson with rounding
numbers. This lesson plan may take you longer than I have written. This will all depend on your
students.

VIII.

Teacher Notes
Focus plan 3.1A Place Value will need to be taught before completing this lesson.

Division of Curriculum and Instruction School Improvement Department Texarkana Independent School District