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CUSTOMER SER VICE INFORMATION

NORTH AMERICA CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER


24 HOURS PER DAY, 7 DAYS PER WEEK

PHONE
888-252-2832 (Canada/US)
or
613-784-6100 (World)

The ALCATEL call center (888) 252-2832 is available 24 hours per day, seven days
per week (including holidays) for helping the customer. This single-point contact for
assistance reaches out to all areas of customer support, including:
After-hour emergencies
Phone Technical support. Click here for details.
On-site Technical support
Module repair
Installation and test
Software and hardware upgrades
Technical training
Registration for Update Notification by e-mail
Registered customers have access to online support documentation (i.e., product
bulletins and documentation update notifications) at the following Website:
http://www.usa.alcatel.com
For registration information, contact your Alcatel representative.

ALCATEL-LUCENTS PRIMARY MISSION IS


SATISFYING OUR CUSTOMERS' QUALITY EXPECTATIONS.

CTAC
Telephone Technical Support
Telephone Assistance, Normal Working Hours (CST 8am 5pm M-F)
TAC supports all Alcatel North America Microwave products. This includes routine questions and
emergency service.
Telephone Assistance, Emergency After-Hours
Defined as loss of traffic, standby equipment, or network visibility on traffic-bearing systems.
Available through our Customer Service Agents (CSA).

Call (888) 252-2832. Ask for the Microwave (MW) or the Network Management for Radio (NMR)
emergency duty engineer.

Creating a TAC Service Request (SR)


Caller should provide the following information to the Customer Service Agent (CSA):

Company name
First and last name (Please spell it for us!!)
Telephone number
City and state. Street address if applicable
Equipment type number
A brief description of the problem affecting their equipment
TL-9000 Severity (see table below).
Priority: High, Medium, or Low.

TL-9000 Severity
Critical

Problems severely affecting service, traffic, capacity, or network


management. They require immediate corrective action. (Ex.
Loss of network management capability, loss of traffic imminent
or existing).

Major

Conditions seriously affecting system operation. They require


immediate attention. (Ex. processor outage, loss of standby
equipment, loss of remote access, or network managers).

Minor

Problems not classified as critical or major.

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Introduction

Instruction Book Introduction


Front Matter: The front matter includes safety precautions. Safety precautions cover general
considerations. Specific precautions are included where applicable.
glossar y: This section contains the glossary of terms that provides brief defi nitions and
includes acronyms and abbreviations.
Section 1 General: This section contains purpose/function and a general description. Tables
list physical, environmental, and electrical characteristics; equipment supplied; optional
equipment; and equipment required but not supplied.
Section 2 Applications: This section contains information on how to use the radio in various
applications.
Section 3 Functional Description: This section describes operation of the overall equipment,
any subsystems/subfunctions, and the purpose/function of each module/unit.
Section 4 Installation: Instructions are included to install the radio and supporting engineering drawings are referenced.
Section 5 Interconnect: This section gives the location and describes strapping, power connections, signal connections, status and alarm connections, and service channel connections for
the MDR-8000 hot-standby shelf.
Section 6 Initial Turnup: This section contains the procedures to turn-up the DS1/E1, DS3, and
OC3/STM-1 radios after installation. Instructions are included for initial test procedures in
Appendix E.
Section 7 Operation: This section provides procedures/information for power turn-on/off, normal operation, use of special features, and emergency operation. All controls, indicators, test
points, and connectors used for installation, operation, and maintenance are explained and
illustrated.
Section 8 User Guide: The section provides descriptions of menu options and screens, and
information on how to view status and configurations, alarms and conditions, performance
monitoring, provisioning, manual controls, administrative, download, and security functions.
Section 9 Maintenance: This section explains the maintenance philosophy and method appli cable to the equipment, lists recommended test equipment, identifies and includes recommended periodic checks, includes troubleshooting/analysis information, identifies actions
required after module replacement, and includes post-repair/replacement check and adjustment procedures.
Section 10 Diagrams: This section contains the engineering drawings to support information
presented in this instruction book.
Appendix A Rack Installation: Instructions are included to install an MDR-8000 rack.
Appendix B Monitor and Control Systems: This appendix describes the purpose and function of
the MCS-11 system. Detailed alarm/control mapping, connector pin-out information, and
supporting engineering drawings are provided.
Intro-1

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Introduction

Issue 3
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Appendix C Alarm and Control Reference Guide: This appendix describes the MCS-11 alarms,
statuses, and controls given in Appendix B.
Appendix D Addressing Guidelines: Instructions are included to install an MDR-8000 rack.
Appendix E MDR-8000 SNMP Alarms: This appendix describes the contents of the SNMP trap/
notification messages.
Appendix F Modem Provisioning: This appendix provides procedures to provision a modem (if
required) to communicate with the USI computer.
Appendix G Over-The-Hop Test Procedures: These procedures provide support for preventive
and corrective maintenance on operational system.
Appendix H COMPACT Indoor Shelf: This appendix describes the differences between the
MDR-8000 hot-standby shelf and the Compact indoor shelf.
Appendix I Compact Outdoor Unit: The MDR-8000 Compact outdoor unit is an outdoor enclosure configuration that allows operators to setup a non-standby terminal or repeater by
attaching the enclosures to a wall, pole, or tower. The Compact outdoor unit consists of the
Compact indoor shelf mounted inside the outdoor enclosure.
Appendix J Ring Radio Troubleshooting: This appendix provides the information to troubleshoot an MDR-8000 radio configured as a ring radio.
Appendix K Ethernet Upgrade Procedure 4 DS1: This appendix provides the procedure to
upgrade an 8 or 16 DS1, DS3, and/or OC3 MDR-8000 radio to Ethernet with up to 4 DS1.
Upgrade kits, containing the modules, subboards, and assemblies required to upgrade, are
available.
Appendix L Ethernet Upgrade Procedure 32 DS1: This appendix provides the procedure to
upgrade DS1, DS3, and/or OC3 MDR-8000 radio to Ethernet with up to 32 DS1. Upgrade kits,
containing the modules, subboards, and assemblies required to upgrade, are available.

Intro-2

3EM20188AAAA
Front Matter

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

While the manufacturer has attempted to detail in this manual all areas of possible danger
to personnel in connection with the use of this equipment, personnel should use caution
when installing, checking out, operating, and servicing this equipment. As with all electronic
equipment, care should be taken to avoid electrical shock in all circuits where substantial
currents or voltages may be present, either through design or short circuit.
Definitions of Danger, Warnings, Cautions, and Notes used throughout this manual are
described below:

DANGER
Possibility of
Injury
to Personnel
An operating procedure, practice, etc., which, if not correctly followed could
result in personal injury or loss of life.

WARNING
Possibility of
Damage
to Equipment
An operating procedure, practice, etc., which, if not strictly observed, could
result in damage to equipment.

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

An operating procedure, practice, etc., which, if not strictly


observed, could result in an interruption of service.

Note
An operating procedure, condition, etc., which is essential to highlight.

FM-1

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Front Matter
ELECTRICAL SAFETY: GENERAL RULES

Carefully observe the specific procedures for installation, turnup, and maintenance where ac
or dc power is present and observe the following general information/rules.
a. Short circuits in low-voltage, low-impedance dc circuits can cause severe arcing that may
result in burns or eye injury. Remove rings, watches, and other metal jewelry while
working with primary circuits. Exercise caution to avoid shorting power input terminals.
b. This equipment is intended for installation in a RESTRICTED ACCESS LOCATION.

LASER PRECAUTIONS

NOTICE:

THIS MODULE IS A LASER PRODUCT


DESIGNED FOR USE SOLELY AS A
COMPONENT OF AN ELECTRONIC SYSTEM.

REFER TO INSTRUCTION MANUAL


PRIOR TO SERVICING

DANGER-INVISIBLE LASER RADIATION


WHEN OPEN.
TO BEAM.

FM-2

AVOID DIRECT EXPOSURE

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Front Matter

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

DANGER
Possibility of
Injury
to Personnel

This system normally operates as a Class I Laser Product (no hazard).


However, during servicing operations, when optical connectors are
being connected, disconnected, or handled without dust covers, it is
possible to be exposed to Class IIIb laser radiation which can cause
eye damage.
The invisible infrared radiation emitted by the fiber-optic transmitter can
cause eye damage. Never look at an optical fiber splice, cable, or connector
unless it is absolutely known that no laser radiation is present in the fiber.
Note that laser radiation may come from a fiber-optic transmitter, an optical
time domain reflectometer (OTDR), or other optical test equipment.
Never look directly into an unterminated optical connector or cable with a
magnifier/microscope unless it is absolutely known that no laser radiation is
being emitted from the connector or cable. A magnifier/ microscope greatly
increases the laser radiation hazard to the eyes.
The necessity to wear laser safety goggles or eye shields can be avoided if the
following work rules are strictly followed.

1. Always remove electrical power from fiber-optic transmitters


prior to disconnecting fiber-optic connectors in the path
between the transmitter and the receiver.
2. Never connect an unterminated optical cable to a fiber-optic
transmitter. Always connect fiber-optic cables to fiber-optic
receiver, test sets, or some other termination first.
If the above work rules can not be followed, it is recommended that
every one, within a 10 foot radius of an unterminated optical fiber or
connector that is connected to a powered transmitter, wear laser safety
goggles or eye shields. Refer to table of required test equipment in
Maintenance section for information on laser safety goggles and eye
shields.

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Front Matter

STATIC ELECTRICITY

CAUTION

ESS

UNIT CONTAINS
ELECTROSTATIC-SENSITIVE ITEMS
MAINTAIN ANTISTATIC PROTECTION

When the above symbol or letters are displayed, observe special precautions.
The discharge of static electricity experienced when taking off a nylon shirt, or upon touching a door handle after sliding across an automobiles synthetic seat cover, produces only a
minor discomfort. However, the voltage discharged in these instances can be 20000 or 30000
volts. Because the energy involved in such discharge is extremely low, the human body experiences only a minor discomfort. An electrostatic-sensitive device can withstand voltage
spikes of 10 to 100 volts only and can be damaged or effectively destroyed by a discharge
that might go unnoticed by a technician. MOS and CMOS have some built-in protection; consequently, a false sense of security often prevails. Unfortunately, the protection is effective
only against the lower levels of static charges.

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

Common plastic, white foam, cellophane and masking adhesive


tapes must not come in contact with ESS devices or their packaging.

Common plastics (synthetic insulating materials), clothing, and paper or cardboard are the
most common sources of static charges.
The following ESS devices fall into this category:
MOS (Metal Oxide Semiconductor) capacitors, transistors, ICs
CMOS (Complementary MOS) transistors, ICs
JFET (Junction Field Effect Transistors) transistors
IGFET (Insulated Gate FET) transistors

FM-4

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Front Matter

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

MODULE HANDLING

The risk of damage to an ESS device is reduced considerably after assembly into a
circuit designed to protect sensitive components; however, certain basic precautions should
be taken to reduce static charges to harmless levels.
a. All modules should be handled as static sensitive devices unless they are known not to
contain static sensitive parts.
Heel straps are only effective while standing on conductive or static dissipative surfaces.
b. Ground straps, either wrist (PN 055-9357-010) or heel (PN 055-9357-020), should be
worn prior to and while touching or handling modules containing ESS devices.
c. Surfaces with resistance to ground in excess of 100 megohms, such as ordinary tile,
should be covered with properly grounded static dissipative runners or waxed with a
static dissipative wax (PN 057-4000-006).
d. Modules should be stored (even temporarily), packed, and shipped in antistatic bags or
containers.
e. Do not handle the circuit board or components unnecessarily. Use plastic handle.
f.

Do not use synthetic bristled brushes or acid brushes to clean modules.

g. Be sure to handle failed modules with same precautions as good modules.


GENERAL

Optical connectors are used in lightwave transmission systems to connect, disconnect, and
reconnect fiber-optic cables with a minimum of loss. The optical connection is made by physically aligning two optical fibers so that one fiber illuminates the other. Loss in the connection is determined by:
a. Separation (Optimum coupling occurs when the two fibers just touch.)
b. Lateral alignment (Lateral misalignment of the optical fibers is the greatest contributor
to connector loss.)
c. Angular alignment (Optical loss due to angular misalignment is minimal in biconic connectors. Nominal angular misalignment is less than 0.2 degrees.)
d. Facing surface condition (The facing surfaces of the optical fibers are highly polished to
prevent reflection and refraction. Scratches on the facing surfaces and/or contamination
of these surfaces by dust, oil from the operators finger, or other foreign matter can cause
excessive loss.)
To maintain the integrity of the system, the polished optical surfaces must be protected from
physical damage and contamination.
CAUTIONS

Observe the precautions described in the general care of optical connectors on the following
sheets.

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Front Matter

PROTECTIVE COVERS
The connectors, both plugs and sleeves, are provided with protective covers that should always be used
when the plugs and sleeves are disconnected for any purpose. After installation, these protective covers
should be stored in a clean plastic bag at the site. This ensures that the covers are available when a cable is
disconnected for maintenance.

CLEANING

Prior to installation, use a pressurized optical duster to blow away dust particles that may
have settled on the connectors. If connectors require a more thorough cleaning, 95% pure
isopropyl alcohol may be applied from a wash bottle and wiped away using lint-free wipes or
swabs.

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

DO NOT use rubbing alcohol to clean optical connectors. Rubbing


alcohol contains water and other contaminants that will cloud the
fiber connection.
After cleaning, use the pressurized optical duster to blow-dry the connector. For detailed
cleaning instructions, refer to the paragraph, Cleaning Instructions.
CONNECTING

The polished surfaces can be scratched when the connectors are mated if the optical fibers
rotate after they touch or if a foreign particle is on one of the optical fibers. To avoid damaging the polished surfaces, always clean the connectors with pressurized optical duster before
mating, and prevent the optical fiber from rotating while the connectors are being mated.
SUMMARY

To preserve the integrity of the optical connectors, always observe the following precautions:
a. Clean optical connectors in accordance with the instructions outlined in the paragraph,
Cleaning Instructions.
b. Never touch the polished optical surface of a connector. Oil from your finger can
degrade the performance of the connector and attract dust particles.
c. Never allow an optical fiber to rotate when optical connectors are being mated. Allowing
the plug on biconic connectors to rotate can scratch the polished surface of the optical
fiber.
d. Always protect optical connectors with protective covers when they are disconnected for
any reason. Before the protective covers are installed, they should be cleaned with optical duster.
e. Store protective covers in a clean container when not in use. Never store the protective
covers in your pocket.

FM-6

3EM20188AAAA
Front Matter

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS FOR OPTICAL CONNECTORS

This document establishes a procedure for the cleaning of optical connectors. Connections
between the modules and the fiber patchcords that interconnect these types of equipment
must be clean to maintain maximum performance and to prevent damage to the delicate
glass core of the optical fiber.
The purpose of the cleaning steps is to remove any foreign material that might get caught
between the mating fibers. Foreign material, such as dust, can shatter the glass fiber. Any
film coating, such as oil from your finger, can attenuate the transmitted signal. To clean connectors, use the following materials:

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

DO NOT use rubbing alcohol to clean optical connectors. Rubbing


alcohol contains water and other contaminants that will cloud the
fiber connection. Only use isopropyl alcohol that is at least 95% pure.
Keep alcohol in a sealed container. When alcohol is exposed to the atmosphere, moisture is
absorbed by the alcohol, and the alcohol is contaminated by water.
a. PSI 70 pressurized optical duster: PN 005-1975-010
b. Lint-free swabs: PN 055-9375-000
c. Chemical grade 95% pure isopropyl alcohol (available from chemical distributors)

DANGER
Possibility of
Injury
to Personnel

Never look at an optical fiber splice, cable, or connector unless it is


absolutely known that no laser radiation is present in the fiber. Note
that laser radiation may come from a fiber-optic transmitter, an optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR), or other optical test equipment.

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

To clean optical patch cord connector, first inspect the connector


face for obvious damage. Connecting a good fiber to a damaged fiber
can destroy the fiber, so inspection is recommended.
Prior to connecting, use the pressurized duster to blow any loose dust particles that may
have settled on the connector. Then take the lint-free swab and dip it into a container of
clean isopropyl alcohol. Use the saturated swab to wipe the end of the connector and, with
the duster, blow dry to remove excess alcohol.
FM-7

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Front Matter

WARRANTY/REPAIR INFORMATION
NOTICE Where the contents of this information conflict with the contract of purchase, the requirements of the contract of purchase shall govern.
GENERAL WARRANTY PROVISIONS

Telecommunications guarantees to repair or replace, or refund the complete purchase price


of any equipment, accessories or parts manufactured by Telecommunications, which are
defective as to workmanship, or material, provided that:
a. Notice of the claimed defect or unsuitability is given in writing to Telecommunications
within the warranty period after delivery, acceptance, or use, whichever is earlier.
b. The defective or unsuitable equipment, accessory, or part is returned to Telecommunications at its factory (transportation prepaid), in accordance with the instructions given in
paragraph 2.
c. An inspection of the returned goods by Telecommunications at its factory indicates that
the defect was not caused by abuse or improper use, maintenance, repair, or alteration by
other than Telecommunications or its authorized service center.
MODULE RETURN
Follow this procedure when returning equipment:

1. With the unit(s) to be repaired, include the following:

Company name, billing and shipping address, phone number, and name of person(s)
to contact in case of questions

Description of all known facts as to the nature of the failure(s)

Purchase order number or requisition number

Type number, part number, description of unit, and quantity to be repaired

Description of any additional repair action requested

2. Call Repair and Return at 1-888-252-2832

Return Authorization (RA) number

Emergency Orders

Advance Replacement

Return Address.

The RA number must be prominently marked on shipping label, the packing list, and any
correspondence regarding the order.

FM-8

glossary
0:1

Pronounced zero for one indicating that the channel tributary interface has no hardware protection. This is used to indicate a single nonstandby radio in a rack.

0:2

Pronounced zero for two. This indicates two non-standby radios in a


rack.

1+1

Pronounced one plus one indicating that the channel tributary interface has hardware backup.

1:N

Pronounced one for N, is designation for a protection architecture


where one protection channel is provided for N working channels. For
this product, the protection is unidirectional and revertive.

10BASE-T

IEEE physical layer specification for 10 Mbps over two pairs of Category 5 or 5E wire.

100BASE-T

IEEE physical layer specification for 100 Mbps over two pairs of Category 5 or 5E wire.

1000BASE-T

IEEE physical layer specification for 1000 Mbps over four pairs of
Category 5 or 5E wire.

A
ACO

Alarm cutoff.

ACK

Acknowledge.

Address

A unique group of binary digits assigned to distinguish a unit/location


from others in a system.

Adapter

Printed circuit board that plugs into a PC to add to capabilities or connectivity to a PC. In a network environment, a network interface card
is the typical adapter that allows the PC or server to connect to the
intranet and/or Internet.

Ad-Hoc Network

An ad-hoc network is a group of computers, each with a wireless


adapter, connected as an independent 802.11 wireless LAN. Ad-hoc
wireless computers operate on a peer-to-peer basis, communicating
directly with each other without the use of an access point. Ad-hoc
mode is also referred to as an Independent Service Set (IBSS) or as a
peer-to-peer mode.

ADR

Address.

AIS

Alarm indication signal. AIS is a useful troubleshooting tool that is


used to isolate faults to a specific radio in a system. When the first radio in the link receives bad data, AIS is inserted and transmitted
downstream to all other radios. This isolates the fault to the radio
supplying the data to the radio inserting AIS.

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3EM20188AAAA
Glossary

Alarm

(ALM) Status indicator which signifies a malfunction or abnormality


within the communications equipment.

ALC

Automatic Level Control, normally associated with the ALC loop, a


control loop that automatically controls the transmitter output level.

Alias Signal

A false signal in telecommunication links from beats between the signal frequency and sampling frequency.

Ancillary Equipment

Equipment associated with, but not considered part of, a microwave


radio, multiplexer, etc.

APC

Automatic power control (See ATPC)

Apple Talk

An Apple Computer networking system that support Apples proprietary local talk.

APS

Automatic protection switching

ASCII

American Standard Code for Information Interchange.

ASE

Automatic slope equalization

ASIC

Application-specific integrated circuit

Asynchronous
(General)

Not timed to any outside clock.

Asynchronous
(MCS-11)

Radio is providing RCV or outgoing clock and data and incoming XMT
clock and data is being provided by an outside source.

ATPC

Automatic Transmit Power Control automatically increases the


transmitter output level by approximately 10 db during fading conditions and then returns to the normal level when conditions return to
normal.

Attenuator

Device or passive network that absorbs or reduces the power of an applied signal.

Audio Service Channel

A party line auxiliary channel used for communication between sites


by maintenance personnel.

Auto-negotiate

To automatically determine correct settings. The term is often used


with communications and networking. For example, Ethernet 10/100
card, hubs, and switches can determine the highest speed of the node
they are connected to and adjust their transmission rate accordingly.

Auto-Negotiation

The function that allows two devices at either end of a link segment
to negotiate common data service functions, such as data speed and
networking modes (FD and HD). The auto-negotiation function automatically connects to the highest technology available without any intervention from a user, manager, or management software.

AUX

Auxiliary

Auxiliary Channel

A channel reserved for monitor, control, fault-alarm, and maintenance traffic.

Glossary-2

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Glossary

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B
Backbone

The part of a network that connects most of the systems and networks
together and handles the most data. The major transmission path of
a network used to connect subnetworks.

Backhaul

The part of a network that sends data back to a central data collection
center. An example of would be the transmission path between an end
user and a central office.

Balanced line

Two-wire line where the signal potential is the difference between the
two lines, neither of which is ground.

Balun

A device used to isolate a load from a grounded source. May also be


used to transform impedances and to provide isolation. Balun = balanced to unbalanced.

Bandwidth

The transmission capacity of a given facility, in terms of how much


data the facility can transmit in a fixed amount of time; expressed in
bits per second bps

Baseband

A composite signal applied to or received from a carrier facility. The


baseband signal may consist of data, video, or voice (message) information.

Battery

Usually, the dc power source located in a central office. Nominally -24


or -48 volts.

Baud

Unit of signaling speed (symbols per second). Also called Symbol Rate
in baseband transmission and Modulation Rate in broadband transmission. Baud Rate (Mb/s) x 7 (nominal number of bits per symbol) =
Bit Rate (Mb/s).

Beacon Interval

A beacon is a packet broadcast by the Access Point to keep the network synchronized. A beacon includes the wireless LAN service area,
the AP address, the Broadcast destination address, a time stamp, Delivery Traffic Indicator Maps, and the Traffic Indicator Message
(TIM).

BER

See bit error rate

Binary

A numbering system using only two values (0 and 1).

Bipolar

A coding in which the logic 1 is an RZ pulse that alternates in polarity,


and a logic 0 is sent as 0 volt.

Bit

Binary digit. Smallest unit of data in a data stream.

Bit error rate

A measure of data integrity, given as the number of bit errors in a digital transmission divided by the number of bits transmitted. Expressed as a power of 10, as in 10-6 or E-6 (a rate of one error in every
one million bits).

Bit interval

Time equal to one period at a specified clock frequency.

Bit stuffing

Process that adds extra bits to a signal to bring all signals up to the
same common level.

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Glossary

Boot

To cause the computer to start executing instructions. PCs contain


built-in instructions in a ROM chip that are automatically executed
on startup. These instructions search for the operating system, load
the operating system, and pass control to the operating system.

BOOTP

Bootstrap Protocol. An Internet protocol that enables a diskless workstation to discover its own IP address, the IP address of a BOOTP
server on the network, and a file to be loaded into memory to boot the
machine. This enables the workstation to boot without requiring a
hard or floppy disk drive. The protocol is defined by RFC 951.

B3ZS

Bipolar with 3-zero substitution. A bipolar coding format in which


three successive zeroes are replaced by B0V or 00V: where B is a bipolar pulse; 0 is a logic 0; and V is a bipolar violation pulse. B0V or
00V is chosen to ensure that an odd number of B pulses occurs between consecutive violation pulses.

B8ZS

Bipolar with Eighth Zero Substitution. This technique substitutes


ones or marks in a DS1 data stream if a string of eight or more zeroes
occur.

Bridge

A circuit with two or more pairs of inputs/outputs. A signal applied to


any one of the inputs appears at all outputs with the exception of its
corresponding output.

Broadband

A data transmission scheme in which multiple signals share the


bandwidth of a medium. This allows the transmission of voice, data,
an video signals over a single medium. Cable television uses broadband techniques to deliver dozens of channels over one cable.

Browser

A browser is an application program that provides a way to look at


and interact with all the information on the World Wide Web or PC.
The word browser originated prior to the Web, as a generic term for
user interfaces that let you browse text files online.

B/S

Bits per second.

BSS

Basic Service Set. An infrastructure network connecting wireless devices to a wired network using a single access point.

Buffer

A buffer is a shared or assigned memory area used by hardware devices or program processes that operate at different speeds or with
different sets of priorities. The buffer allows each device or process to
operate without being held up by the other. A buffer is a midpoint
holding place and exists not so much to accelerate the speed of an activity but to support the coordination of separate activities.

BW

Bandwidth

Byte

A collection of bits (typically 8) operated upon as a unit. Most character sets use one byte per character. The capacity of storage devices is
frequently given in bytes or in K bytes (K meaning 1024 bytes).

Glossary-4

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Glossary

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C
Cable Modem

A device that connects a computer to the cable television network,


which in turn connects to the Internet. Once connected, cable modem
users have a continuous connection to the Internet. Cable modems
feature asymmetric transfer rates: around 36 Mbps downstream
(from the Internet to the computer), and from 200 kbps to 2 Mbps upstream (from the computer to the Internet).

Card Cage

A unit that houses plug-in circuit cards (modules).

Carrier Equipment
(carr)

The common name given to equipment used in the process of signal


multiplexing. The term carrier is applied to equipment rather than
equipment function.

CAT 5

Category 5 of ANSI/EIA (American National Standards Institute/


Electronic Industries Association) Standard 568. ANSI/EIA Standard
568 is one of several standards that specify categories (CAT) of twisted pair cabling systems (wires, junctions, and connectors) in terms of
the data rates that they can sustain. CAT 5 cable has a maximum
throughput of 100 Mbps and is usually utilized for 100Base TX networks.

CAT 5e

The additional cabling performance parameters of return loss and


far-end crosstalk (FEXT) specified for 100BaseT and not specified for
10BaseT and 100BaseTX are related to differences in signaling implementation. 10BaseT and 100BaseTX signaling is unidirectional
(signals are transmitted in one direction on a single wire pair. In contrast, Gigabit Ethernet is bi-directional (signals are transmitted simultaneously in both directions on the same wire pair).

CEPT

Committee of European Post and Telegraph.

Channel
(CHAN, CH)

(1) An allocated bandwidth of the RF spectrum.


(2) A portion of the baseband dedicated to one message.
(3) The equipment in a transmission system associated with one
transmission band.

Channel Density

The number of multiplexed channels to be simultaneously communicated within a single baseband.

Checksum

A binary summation, according to an arbitrary set of rules, of the


number of logic 1s in a transmission.

CIDR

Classless Inter-Domain Routing. A new addressing scheme for the Internet


which allows for more efficient allocation of IP addresses than the old Class
A, B, and C address scheme.

Circulator Function

Device that directs RF power between RF components. Example: circulator to antenna; circulator between XMTRs.

CLA

Common Loss Alarm

CLK

Clock.

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Glossary

CNTR, CNTRL

Control, controller.

CONFIG

Configuration.

COS

Change Of State.

COM

Communication.

Command Path

Communication channel between receive and transmit portions of a


switch.

CPM

Communications Processor Module.

CPU

Central Processor Unit.

CRC

Cyclic Redundancy Check is an error detection scheme in which the


block check character is the remainder after dividing all the serialized bits in a transmission block by a predetermined binary number
or a polynomial based on the transmitted data. This error checking
method is effective in detecting most of the possible error combinations in a data block.

CSMA/CA

Carrier Sense Multiple Access /Collision Avoidance. In local area networking, this is the CSMA technique that combines slotted time-division multiplexing with carrier sense multiple access/collision
detection (CSMA/CD) to avoid having collisions occur a second time.
This works best if the time allocated is short compared to packet
length and if the number of situations is small.

C-Sourced

Powered from a common point of two isolated sources, thereby providing uninterrupted service in the event of one power failure.

CTRL

Control.

CV

Coding Violations

D
DAC

Digital-to-analog converter

DADE

Differential absolute delay equalization. The process of making two


parallel transmission paths carrying the same information exhibit
the same end-to-end propagation delay, to avoid loss of information
when switching from one path to the other at the receive end.

Daisy-chained

Identical circuits of modules interconnected to form a loop.

Data Packet

One frame in a packet-switched message. Most data communications


is based on dividing the transmitted message into packets. For example, an Ethernet packet can be from 64 to 1518 bytes in length.

Data Stream

A serial sequence of bits.

Data word

A predefined sequence of bits.

dB

Decibel. A logarithmic expression of the ratio between two quantities.

dBm

Logarithmic expression of the ratio of a given power level relative to

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1 milliwatt.
DCC

Data Communication Channel

DCCIF

Data Communications Channel Interface

DCE

Data Communications Equipment. Intermediate network devices


that receive and forward frames across the network. DCEs may be either standalone devices such as repeaters, network switches, and
routers, or communications interface units such as interface cards
and modems.

Decibel

See dB.

Default Gateway

The routing device used to forward all traffic that is not addressed to
a station within the local subnet.

Delay

Variation in delay of transmission of a baseband signal as a function


of IF or RF carrier frequency.

Demultiplexer

(DEMUX, DX)
(1) A device that separates two or more signals previously combined
by a compatible multiplexer and transmitted over a single channel.
(2) A circuit that directs information from a single input to one of several outputs at a time, in a sequence that depends on the information
applied to the control inputs.

DGPIO

Discrete General Purpose Inputs and Outputs.

DHCP

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A protocol that lets network


administrators manage centrally and automate the assignment of Internet Protocol (IP) addresses in an organizations network. Using the
Internets set of protocol (TCP/IP), each machine that can connect to
the Internet needs a unique IP address. When an organization sets up
its computer users with a connection to the Internet, an IP address
must be assigned to each machine. Without DHCP, the IP address
must be entered manually at each computer and, if computers move
to another location in another part of the network, a new IP address
must be entered. DHCP lets a network administrator supervise and
distribute IP addresses from a central point and automatically sends
a new IP address when a computer is plugged into a different place in
the network.
DHCP uses the concept of a lease or amount of time that a given IP
address will be valid for a computer. The lease time can vary depending how long a user is likely to require the Internet connection at a
particular location. DHCP is especially useful in education and other
environments where users change frequently. Using very short leases, DHCP can dynamically reconfigure networks in which there are
more computers than there are available IP addresses.
DHCP supports static address for computers containing Web servers
that need a permanent IP address.
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DIAG

Diagnostics.

Dispersive Fade
Margin

Calculation based on measured receiver performance in the presence


of significant multipath distortion.

DMA

Direct Memory Access

DMZ

Demilitarized Zone. Allows one IP address (or computer) to be exposed to the Internet. Some applications require multiple TCP/IP
ports to be open. It is recommended that you set your computer with
a static IP address if you want to use DMZ hosting.

DNS

Domain Name System. DNS is the way that Internet domain names
are located and translated into Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. A domain name is a meaningful and easy-to-remember handle for an Internet address.

Domain

A subnetwork comprised of a group of clients and servers under the


control of one security database. Dividing LANs into domains improves performance and security.

Download

To receive a file transmitted over a network. In a communications


session, download means receive, upload means transmit.

DSL

Digital Subscriber Line. A technology that dramatically increases the


digital capacity of ordinary telephone lines into the home or office,
and, by employing unused bandwidth, still allows for normal phone
usage. DSL provides always on operation, eliminating the need to
dial in to the service.

Downstream

The following hop(s) in the direction of transmission over a microwave link.

DRAM

Dynamic Random Access Memory.

DRO

Dielectric Resonant Oscillator.

Drop

The process and equipment that removes baseband or DS3 signal


from one or more channels for use or rerouting at a point other than
a terminal.

DS1,2,3

Bell System compatible digital signal formats: 1.544 Mb/s for DS1;
6.312 Mb/s for DS2; and, 44.736 Mb/s signal for DS3.

DSX-1,2,3

Bell System compatible digital signal cross-connect points.

DSL

Digital Subscriber Line. A technology that dramatically increases the


digital capacity of ordinary telephone lines into the home or office,
and, by employing unused bandwidth, still allows for normal phone
usage. DSL provides always on operation, eliminating the need to
dial in to the service.

DSSS

Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum. DSSS generates a redundant bit


pattern for all data transmitted. This bit pattern is called a chip (or
chipping) code. Even if one or more bits in the chip are damaged during transmission, statistical techniques embedded in the receiver can
recover the original data without the need for retransmission. To an
unintended receiver, DSSS appears as low power wideband noise and

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is rejected (ignored) by most narrowband receivers. However to an intended receiver (i.e. another wireless LAN end point), the DSSS signal is recognized as the only valid signal, and interference in
inherently rejected (ignored).

DTE

Data Terminal Equipment. Devices that are either the source or the
destination of data frames. DTEs are typically devices such as PCs,
workstations, file servers, or print servers, that, as a group, are all often referred to as end stations.

DTIM

Delivery Traffic Indication Message. A DTIM field is a countdown


field informing clients of the next window for listening to broadcast
and multicast messages. When the AP has buffered broadcast or multicast messages for associated clients, it sends the next DTM with a
DTM Interval value. AP Clients hear the beacons and awaken to receive the broadcast and multicast messages.

Dynamic IP Address

An IP address that is automatically assigned to a client station in a


TCP/IP network, typically by a DHCP server. Network devices that
serve multiple users, such as servers and printers, are usually assigned static IP addresses.

DTMF

Dual-tone multifrequency. An encoding format which selects certain


audio frequencies, two at a time, to represent numbers. Pushbutton
telephones use this application.

Duplex

Simultaneous communication in both directions between two locations.

Dynamic Routing

The ability for a router to forward data via a different route based on
current conditions of the communications circuits. For example, it can
adjust for overloaded traffic or failing lines and is much more flexible
than static routing, which uses a fixed forwarding path.

E
E1

CEPT digital signal format (2.048 Mb/s) per CCITT specification G.704.

E2A

An AT&T alarm and control interface specification.

E3

CEPT digital signal format (34.368 Mb/s) per CCITT specification


G.751 and G.753.

E&M Signaling

Ear and mouth signaling, controlled by the application of ground or bat tery to leads so labeled. The ground/battery condition normally results
from receiver off-hook and/or an activated CALL pushbutton.

East-West; E-W

Arbitrary directions chosen to distinguish between two different but


not necessarily opposite directions of transmission or reception of radio signals.

ECL

Emitter-coupled logic

EEPROM

Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory


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ENC

E-lead normally closed

Encryption

A security method that applies a specific algorithm to data in order to


alter the datas appearance and prevent other devices from reading
the information.

End-to-End

Refers to terminal input at one end of the system to terminal output


at the other end.

ENO

E-lead normally open

EPLD

Electronic programmable logic device

Errored Seconds

An errored second is a second during which at least one of the following has occurred: coding violations, slips, and/or out-of-frame alarm.
An important reason for counting errored seconds is the quality of
statements in data service tariffs are generally given in terms of percent error free seconds. In addition, by combining the count of errored
seconds and the effective BER, a measure of the error distribution can
be obtained. Distinguishing between bursty and randomly distributed errors can be important in diagnosing a facility problem. An errored second may commence with the detection of a coding violation
and end one second later (synchronous errored second) or the one second interval may be timed independ-ently of the errors (asynchronous
errored second). Errored seconds are measured only when service is
available.

Equalizer

Network which corrects amplitude response and group delay distortions in a transmission path.

ETH

Ethernet.

Ethernet

The local area network technology that transports information between computers at speeds of 10, 100, and 1000 million bits per second (Mb/s). Currently the most widely used version of Ethernet
technology is the 10 Mb/s twisted-pair variety. The most recent ethernet standard defines the 100 Mb/s Fast ethernet system which operates over twisted-pair and fiber optic media.

ES

Errored seconds

ESCC

Enhanced serial communication controller

ESS

Extended Service Set. A set of more than two or more BSSs (multiple
access points) forming a single network.

Express Orderwire

See orderwire, express.

F
Fade

Condition of weakening of a carrier signal reaching a receiver, caused


by a gradual change in the transmission medium, to the point of interference in communication.

Fade Margin

Measure of the difference between the normal received signal level


and the receiver threshold.

Fast Ethernet

A 100 Mbps technology based on the 10BaseT Ethernet CSMA/CD

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network access method.


Fault Alarm

(FA) A signal indicating equipment fault(s) and/or failure(s); sent


by an auxiliary channel to indicating equipment in a maintenance
center.

FD

Full Duplex. A type of networking which supports simultaneous reception and transmission

FEC

Forward error correction

FET

Field-effect transistor

FHSS

Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum. FHSS continuously changes


the carrier frequency of a conventional carrier several times per second according to a pseudo-random set of channels. Because a fixed
frequency is not used, and only the transmitter and receiver know the
hop patterns, interception of FHSS is extremely difficult.

Finger

A UNIX command widely used on the Internet to find out information


about a particular user, such as telephone number, whether currently
logged on, or the last time logged on. The person being fingered
must have placed his or her profile on the system. Fingering requires
entering the full user@domain address.

Firewall

A firewall is a set of related programs, located at a network gateway server,


that protects the resources of a network from users from other networks.
(The term also implies the security policy that is used with the programs.)
An enterprise with an intranet that allows its workers access to the wider
Internet installs a firewall to prevent outsiders from accessing its own private data resources and for controlling what outside resources to which its
own users have access.

Firmware

Code that is written onto read-only memory (ROM) or programmable


ROM (PROM). Once firmware has been written onto the ROM/
PROM, it is retained even when the device is turned off.

Four-Wire Line

Four wires; two are used for transmission and two are used for reception in voice-operated equipment.

FPGA

Field-programmable gate array

Fragmentation

Breaking a packet into smaller units when transporting over a network medium that cannot support the original size of the packet.

Frame

One cycle of a recurring number of pulses that includes a single synchronizing signal; an array of binary digits.

Frequency Diversity
(FD)

A protection method in which two transmitters and receivers operate


at different RF frequencies but convey the same intelligence. The better of the two receiver outputs is selected by switching for application
to associated equipment.

FTP

File Transfer Protocol. A protocol used to transfer files over a TCP/IP


network (Internet, UNIX, etc.). For example, after developing the
HTML pages for a Website on a local machine, they are typically uploaded to the Web server using FTP.
FTP include functions to log onto the network, list directories, and
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copy files. It can also convert between the ASCII and EBCDIC character codes. FTP operations can be performed by typing commands at
a command prompt or via an FTP utility running under a graphical
interface such as Windows. FTP transfers can also be initiated from
within a Web browser by entering the URL preceded with ftp://.
Unlike e-mail programs in which graphics and program files have to
be attached, FTP is designed to handle binary files directly and does
not add the overhead of encoding and decoding the data.
Full Duplex

Independent, simultaneous communication in both directions between two locations.

G
Gateway

A device that interconnects networks with different, incompatible


communications protocols.

GFP

Generic Framing Procedure

GigE

1000BASE-T

Gnd

Ground.

GUI

Graphical Users Interface. A generic term for the graphical displays


on PC screens.

H
Half Duplex

Communication in both directions between two stations, but in only


one direction at a time.

Hardware

Hardware is the physical aspect of computers, telecommunications


and other information technology devices. The term arose as a way to
distinguish the box and the electronic circuitry and components of a
computer from the program you put into it to make it do things. The
program came to be known as the software.

HCI

HDLC Communication Interface. See HDLC.

HD

Half Duplex. A type of networking which supports both reception and


transmission, but not simultaneously.

HDB3

High density bipolar coding format.

HDLC

High-level Data Link Control format.

Hitless Switch

A transfer between channels without losing bit count integrity.

Hop

The link between two network nodes.

Hot-Standby

(HS) The practice of having two identical transmitters operational at


all times. If a failure occurs within one unit, the identical standby
unit continues service. In analog transmitters, the two outputs are
usually arranged to alternate between antenna and dummy load. In
digital transmitters, the two outputs are phase-adjusted and merged
in a combiner, with a simple reduction in power (and alarm signal) if
one unit fails.

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HTTP

HyperText Transport Protocol. The communications protocol used to


connect to servers on the World Wide Web. Its primary function is to
establish a connection with a web server and transmit HTML pages
to a client browser.

Hub

The device that serves as the central location for attaching wires from
workstations. Can be passive, where there is no amplification of the
signals; or active where the hubs are used like repeaters to provide an
extension of the cable that connects to a workstation.

I
ICQ

A conferencing program for the internet that provides interactive


chat, e-mail, and file transfer and can alert you when someone on
your predefined list has also come on line.

IDMA

Independent Direct Memory Access.

IEEE

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The IEEE describes


itself as the worlds largest technical professional society, promoting
the development and application of electrotechnology and allied sciences for the benefit of humanity, the advancement of the profession,
and the well being of our members.
The IEEE fosters the development of standards that often become national and international standards. The organization publishes a
number of journals, has many local chapters, and several large societies in special areas, such as the IEEE Computer Society.

IIC

Inter Integrated Circuit. See I2C.

Infrastructure
Network

An infrastructure network is a group of computers or other devices,


each with a wireless adapter, connected as an 802.11 wireless LAN.
In infrastructure mode, the wireless devices communicate with each
other and to a wired network by first going through an access point.
An infrastructure wireless network connected to a wired network is
referred to as a Basic Service Set (BSS). A set of two or more BSS in
a single network is referred to as an Extended Service Set (ESS). Infrastructure mode is useful at a corporation scale, or when it is necessary to connect the wired and wireless networks.

ILAN

Internal local area network

Increments

Number of card slots occupied by a module.

In-Service
Instruction set

Designation for equipment/channel that is carrying traffic. A predetermined sequence of logic functions performed in response to a given
command or set of commands.

Interface

A connector or module that provides necessary connections/functions


between units.

I2 C

Inter-Integrated Circuit, normally associated with serial data bus


used to transfer module revision history to a central controller.

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I/O

Input/output.

IP Address

In the most widely installed level of the Internet protocol, an IP address is a 32-binary digit number that identifies each sender or receiver of information that is sent in packet across the Internet. When
you request an HTML page or send e-mail, the Internet Protocol part
of TCP/IP includes your IP address in the message (actually, in each
of the packets if more than one is required) and sends it to the IP address that is obtained by looking up the domain name in the Uniform
Resource Locator (URL) you requested or in the e-mail address youre
sending a note to. At the other end, the recipient can see the IP address of the web page requester or the e-mail sender and can respond
by sending another message using the IP address it received.

IPSec

Internet Protocol Security. A suite of protocols used to implement


secure exchange of packets at the IP layer. IPSec supports two basic
modes: Transport and tunnel. Transport encrypts the payload of
each packet, leaving the header untouched, while Tunnel mode encrypts both the header and the payload and is therefore more secure.
IPSec must be supported on both XMTR and RCVR and must share
a public key. Tunnel mode is widely deployed in VPNs (Virtual Private Networks).

IPCONFIG

A windows NT or 2000 utility that provides for querying, defining,


and managing IP addresses within a network. A commonly used utility for configuring networks with static IP addresses.

IPX

Internet Packet Exchange. A NetWare communications protocol used


to route messages from one node to another. IPX packets include network addresses and can be routed from one network to another.

IS

In service (state)

ISM Band

Industrial, Scientific, and Medical Band. The FCC and their counterparts outside the US have set aside bandwidth for unlicensed use in
the ISM band. Spectrum in the vicinity of 2.4 GHz, in particular, is
being made available worldwide. This presents a truly revolutionary
opportunity to place convenient high-speed wireless capabilities in
the hands of users around the globe.

ISP

Internet Service Provider. A company that provides individuals and


companies access to the Internet and other related services such as
Web site building and virtual hosting.

Isolator

Device that allows an RF signal to pass through in only one direction.


Absorbs signal in opposite direction. Device provides good impedance
matching over wide frequency range.

J
Jitter

Instability of a signal in either its amplitude, its phase, or both. May


be random or periodic.

Junction Station

A station in a communications system with more than two inbound/


outbound transmission paths.

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K
Kbyte

1024 bytes (210).

Kilo

(k) One thousand (103).

L
LAN

Local Area Network. A LAN is a group of computers and associated


devices that share a common communications line and typically share
the resources of a single processor or server within a small geographic
area (for example, within an office building).

Latency

Measurement of delay in transmission of data. Latency is bandwidth


independent.

LBO

Line buildout; simulates a length of cable.

LC3

Line carrier 3. Identifies 155 mb/s electrical or optical signal between


switch and radio. Signal contains overhead and payload.

LCN

Local communications network

LDCC

Line data communications channel

LED

Light-emitting diode.

Limited Eye Signal

An analog signal detected by using set thresholds and limited by amplification. This produces a quasi-digital signal with no associated
clock.

LIM

Line Interface Module.

Line

The bi-directional connection between a switch shelf channel and an


unprotected radio channel. The concept of line as used with multiline
switches is different than the SONET concept. All SONET line functionality is supported by this product but is described in the radio
manuals.

Line-of-Sight

An unobstructed direct path between two points.

LLMan

Lower Layers Manager-An Alcatel applications software program


installed on a users PC/Laptop that creates a network connection to
the TMN Interface module via the pcs COM port using the Virtual
Ethernet Adapter Card and the Craft Port of the TMN Interface

LNA

Low-noise amplifier

LO

Local oscillator

Local Orderwire

See ORDERWIRE, LOCAL.

LOF

Loss of frame

LOS

Loss of signal

LSB

Least significant bit.

LSB

Lower sideband

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M
MA

Manual (state)

MAC

Media Access Control address. A unique number assigned by the


manufacturer to any Ethernet networking device, such as a network
adapter, that allows the network to identify it at the hardware level.

Master Station

A station in a monitor and control system equipped to originate poll


words, and to monitor alarms from remote stations.

Mbps

Megabits per second. One million bits per second ; unit of measurement for data transmission.

MCS

Monitor-control system.

MDI

Medium Dependent Interface

MDI-X

Medium Dependent Interface Crossover

MIB

Management Information Base. A set of database objects (such as a


group of radios). This set contains information about a specific device
for utilizing SNMP.

mIRC

A program that runs under Windows and provides a graphical interface for logging onto IRC servers and listing, joining, and leaving
channels.

Modem

Modulator-demodulator.

Module

An electrical assembly mechanically mounted to form a single detachable unit. A plug-in module has connectors that mate with connectors,
usually at the rear of a module shelf or card cage.

MON

Monitor.

MPU

Microprocessor unit.

MSB

Most significant bit.

MT

Maintenance (state)

Muldem

Multiplexer-demultiplexer.

12 Muldem

Digital multiplexer and demultiplexer that converts between DS1


(1.544 Mb/s) and DS2 (6.312 Mb/s) formats.

E12 Muldem

Digital multiplexer and demultiplexer that converts between E1


(2.048 Mb/s) and DS2 (6.312 Mb/s) formats.

Multicasting

Sending data to a group of nodes instead of a single destination.

Multiline

A protection method that provides switching of any one of several


working channels (video or message) to a standby channel when increased noise or loss of continuity pilot is sensed on the regular channel. (Working refers to a dedicated channel, not to the operational
status.)

Multimode

Related to multiple paths a light beam may travel down an optical fiber cable.

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Multiplex (MUX,
MX)

A method of transmitting two or more signals over the same medium.


In frequency division multiplexing, the total baseband spectrum is divided into message channels, each occupying a specific frequency
range. In time division multiplexing, the data stream is time-frame
divided to provide required outputs.

N
NAT

Network Address Translation. The translation of an Internet Protocol


address (IP address) used within one network to a different IP address known within another network. One network is designated the
inside network and the other is designated the outside network.

NE

Network element

Network

A system that transmits any combination of voice, video, and/or data


between users.

Nibble

The first or last half (4-bits) of an 8-bit byte. Also called a quartet.

NLT

Not less than.

NMT

Not more than.

NNTP

Network News Transfer Protocol. The protocol used to connect to


Usenet groups on the Internet. Usenet newsreaders support the
NNTP protocol.

Node

A network junction or connection point, typically a computer or


workstation.

NRZ data

Nonreturn-to-zero. A serial sequence of data bits in which the represented logic level is constant for the entire bit interval.

O
OC-N

Optical carrier level N (N = number)

OCM

Optical carrier module (e.g., OCM101)

Off-Hook

(O/H) A signal that indicates a unit is ready to transmit.

Office Alarm

An alerting signal indicating an abnormal condition in a central


office.

Orderwire

A voice-frequency circuit, normally party line, that terminates at


each station; used primarily for maintenance and control.

Orderwire, Express

Voice frequency circuit to a few stations or terminals.

Orderwire, Local

Voice frequency circuit to numerous stations normally within the


maintenance area of a district.

OSI

Open System Interconnection

OSPF

Open Shortest Path First routing protocol

OSS

Office Surveillance System

Out-of-Lock

(OOL) Implies phase-locked loop is not in phase with the input signal.

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Out-of-Service

(OOS) Equipment or channel not carrying traffic.

Overhead

A signal or series of signals assigned and transported with the payload until the payload is demultiplexed. It is used for functions that
are necessary to transport the payload.

Overhead bit

a non-data bit used in addressing, control, error detection, error control, or synchronization; contrast with information bit.

OWDT

Orderwire data

P
Packet

A unit of data routed between an origin and a destination in a


network.

Parity

A method of checking the accuracy of digital data transmission. A parity bit is transmitted as either a logic 1 or a logic 0, indicating whether
the total number of logic 1s in the transmission is odd or even.

Passphrase

Used much like a password, a passphrase simplifies the WEP encryption process by automatically generating WEP encryption keys.

Payload

Data to be transmitted.

Payload Envelope

Structure containing the path overhead and actual data to be


transmitted.

PC

Personal computer

PCA

Protect channel access

PCB

Parallel communications bus

PC Card

A credit-card sized removable module that contains memory, I/O, or


a hard disk.

PCS

Peripheral chip select

PDU

Power distribution unit

PECL

Positive emitter-coupled logic

PERF

Performance

Phase Lock

Relation between two signals, whereby one signal frequency is an exact integral multiple of the other signal frequency, and the phase angle between the two signals does not vary.

Ping

Packet internet grouper. An Internet utility used to determine whether a particular IP address is online. It is used to test and debug a network by sending out a packet and waiting for a response.

PLL

Phase-locked loop

Plug-and-Play

The ability of a computer system to configure expansion boards and


other devices automatically without requiring the user to turn off the
system during installation.

Poll Word

A predefined sequence of bits transmitted from an MCS master station to all remote stations.

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Port

A pathway into and out of the computer or network device, such as a


switch or router. For example, the serial or parallel ports on a PC are
external sockets for plugging in communication lines, modems, and
printers.

PPP

Point-to-Point Protocol. On the TMN Interface, the PPP port is


mapped to the TMN_ RF port on the PQ/ECRC subboard.

PPPoE

Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet. PPPoE is a method for the encapsulation of Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) packets over Ethernet
frames from the user to the ISP over the Internet. One reason PPPoE
is preferred by ISPs is because it provides authentication (user name
and password) in addition to data transport. A PPPoE session can be
initiated by either a client application residing on a PC or by a client
firmware residing on a modem or router.

PPTP

Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol. A protocol that allows corporations to extend their own corporate network through private tunnels over the public Internet. Effectively, a corporation uses a widearea network (WAN) as a single large local area network (LAN). A
company no longer needs to lease its own lines for wide-area communication, but can securely use the public networks. This kind of interconnection is known as the Virtual Private Network (VPN).

PQ/ECRC

Power Quick/Equipment Controller Radio Controller. Subboard attached to main board on AE-37AA TMN Interface module.

PRBS

Pseudo-random bit sequence.

PREV

Previous.

Protection Channel

The channel that carries traffic through a switching system after a


working channel fails.

Protocol

Set of communication rules. In the context of data networking, a protocol is a formal set of rules and conventions that governs how computers exchange information over a network medium.

PROV

Provision, provisioning.

Q
QAM

Quadrature amplitude modulation.

QUICC

Quad Integrated Communication Controller.

R
Rack

An assembly of subsystems/shelves within a standard set of vertical


mounting posts or rails (called rack channels).

RAM

Random Access Memory.

Random Noise

A signal having a random (and therefore unpredictable) instantaneous amplitude. It contains no periodic frequency components, and
its spectrum is continuous.

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RAS

Remote analog scanner

RCP

Radio control processor

RCV, RCVR

Receive, receiver.

RCVR Threshold

Measurement of radio performance. Level set for RSL, below which


an alarm is asserted. The receive signal level that is used to set off the
alarm is typically determined by measuring bit errors (10-6 BER).
When the receive signal level falls low enough to cause one error in
every 1,000,000 bits received, an alarm is asserted. That level at
which the alarm occurs is the RCV threshold level.

RDS

Remote detail scanner

Regulator

Device which maintains a constant output voltage or current under


varying input voltage and output load conditions.

Repeater

(RPTR) A configuration consisting of back-to-back radios (receiver to


transmitter) in a microwave link to relay microwave signals. The repeater provides a through IF path (IF heterodyne) without baseband
access to/from multiplex equipment. There may or may not be access
to baseband to/from service channel and subbaseband equipment.

RF

Radio frequency. The signal actually intended for transmission from


an antenna (as opposed to IF or baseband).

RIP

Routing Information Protocol. A simple routing protocol that is part


of the TCP/IP protocol suite. It determines a route based on the smallest hop count between source and destination. RIP is a distance vector
protocol that routinely broadcasts routing information to its neighboring routers.

RJ-45

Registered Jack 45. A connector similar to a telephone connector that


holds up to eight wires used for connecting Ethernet devices.

Roaming

In an infrastructure mode wireless network, this refers to the ability


to move out of one access points range and into another and transparently reassociate and re authenticate to the new access point. The re
association and re authentication should occur without user intervention and ideally without interruption to network connectivity. A typical scenario would be a location with multiple access points, where
users can physically relocate from one area to another and easily
maintain connectivity.

Router

Protocol dependent device that connects subnetworks together. Routers are useful in breaking down a very large network into smaller
subnetworks. However, routers typically introduce longer delays and
typically have much lower throughput rates than bridges.

RSC

Remote station scanner

RSL

Receive signal level

RSS

Remote station scanner, remote switching system.

RTS

Request To Send. An RS232 signal sent from the transmitting station


to the receiving station requesting permission to transmit.

Glossary-20

3EM20188AAAA
Glossary

RZ

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Return-to-zero. A data stream format in which data logic 1s are at one


value during the first part of a data interval and at the opposite value
during the remainder.

S
SAW

Shelf assembly, wired. A rack mounted card cage, with backplane and
connectors in place and wired.

SBF

Sideband select filter

Scanner

A remote MCS station unit which accepts several parallel inputs, and
generates a serial data word which includes information regarding
the status or condition of each input.

SCC

Serial Communications Controller

SCI

Serial Communications Interface

SDCC

Section Data Communications Channel

Server

Any computer whose function in a network is to provide user access


to files, printing, communications, and other services.

Service channel

Orderwire plus supervisory signals; nonrevenue-bearing channel provided as part of a transmission system for operation, maintenance,
monitoring, and control of the system.

SES

Severely errored seconds

Severely Errored
Second

Severely errored second is a second which contains more than N coding violations. The value of N will vary with frame size and bit rate
and is chosen to correspond to a bit error ratio of approximately 103, assuming errors are randomly distributed. This count may be
used to determine problems for particular types of services. It may
be used as a measure of facility outage duration. In conjunction with
errored seconds and effective BER, the severely errored second
count yields additional information on error distribution. Like errored second, severely errored seconds should be measured only
when service is available.

SF

Superframe

SFP

Small Form-factor Pluggable. A compact optical transceiver

SIBDL

Standard Image Binary Download Program

SICA

SONET input conditioner array

Simplex

A method of operation of a communication circuit in which transmission is in only one direction.

Single Mode

Related to the single path a light beam may travel down an optical fiber cable.

SMC

Serial Management Controller

SMCRA

SONET Media Converting Regenerator Array

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3EM20188AAAA
Glossary

SMTP

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol. The standard e-mail protocol on the


Internet. It is a TCP/IP protocol that defines the message format
and the message transfer agent (MTA), which stores and forwards
the mail.

SNMP

Simple Network Management Protocol. An application layer protocol


that facilitates the exchange of management information between
network devices. It is part of the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) suite. SNMP enables network administrators to
manage network performance, find and solve network problems, and
plan for network growth.
Data is passed from SNMP agents, which are hardware and/or software processes reporting activity in each network device (hub, router,
bridge, radio, etc.) to the workstation console used to oversee the network. The agents return information contained in a Management Information Base (MIB), which is a data structure that defines what
status and alarms are obtainable from the device and what can be
controlled (turned on, off, etc.).

SOCA

SONET output conditioner array

Software

Instructions for the computer. Software tells the hardware how to


process the data. A series of instructions that performs a particular
task is called a program. The two major categories of software are
system software and application software. System software is
made up of control programs such as the operating system and database management systems (DBMS). Application software is any program that processes data for the user, such as the User System
Interface (USI) program.

SOH

Section Overhead

SONET

Synchronous Optical Network

Space Diversity

A method of reception that uses two receivers receiving the same information on the same frequency, but by different paths, by means of
two (usually vertically) spaced antennas. The better of the two outputs is selected by switching for application to associated equipment.

Spare

Equipment either on the shelf or in a cold (nonpowered up) status


available for service after power-up.

SPE

Synchronous payload envelope

SPI

Stateful Packet Inspection. A firewall technology that monitors the


state of the transaction so that it can verify that the destination of an
inbound packet matches the source of a previous outbound request. It
examines not just the headers of the packet, but also the contents, to
determine more about the packet than just its source and destination
information. It is called stateful because it verifies that the stated
destination computer has previously requested the current communication. In this way, it verifies that all communications are initiated

Glossary-22

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Glossary

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

by the recipient computer and are taking place only with resources
that are known and trusted from previous transactions. In addition to
being a more rigorous inspection, stateful packet inspection closes off
ports until connection to the specific port is requested. This allows an
added layer of protection from the threat of port scanning.
SPI

Serial peripheral interface

Splitter

A network or waveguide device which separates an input signal into


two or more signals of lesser power.

Spread Spectrum

Spread spectrum technology is a wideband radio frequency technique


developed by the military for use in reliable, secure, mission-critical
communications systems. It is designed to trade off bandwidth efficiency for reliability, integrity, and security. In other words, more
bandwidth is consumed than in the case of narrowband transmission,
but the trade off produces a signal that is, in effect, louder and thus
easier to detect, provided that the RCVR knows the parameters of the
spread-spectrum signal being broadcast. If a RCVR is not tuned to the
right frequency, a spread-spectrum signal looks like background
noise. There are two main alternatives; Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) and Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS).

SSID

Service Set Identifier. A unique name shared among all points in a


wireless network. The SSID must be identical for each point in the
wireless network and is case sensitive.

Standby

A powered-up, operating, monitored system available for service either on an automatic switch or manual patch basis.

Static IP Address

A permanent IP address that is assigned to a node in an IP or a TCP/


IP network.

Static Routing

Forwarding data in a network via a fixed path. Static routing cannot


adjust to changing line conditions as can dynamic routing.

Station

A given configuration of microwave and ancillary equipment located


at a given site and functionally related to a particular transmission
system.

STM-N

International equivalent of OC-N

Subnet Mask

The method used for splitting IP networks into a series of subgroups, or subnets. The mask is a binary pattern that is matched up
with the IP address to turn part of the host ID address field into a
field for subnets.

Switch (data)

A data switch connects computing devices to host computers, allowing


a large number of devices to share a limited number of ports.

Synchronous
(General)

Timed to a clock.

Synchronous
(MCS-11)

Radio is providing RCV clock and data and XMT clock and data.

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3EM20188AAAA
Glossary

T
T&R

Tip and ring

TCM

Trellis code modulation

TBOS

Telemetry byte oriented serial protocol

TCA

Threshold crossing alert

TCM

Trellis code modulation

TCP

Transmission Control Protocol. A method (protocol) used along with


the Internet Protocol (IP) to send data in the form of message units
(datagram) between network devices over a LAN or WAN, while IP
takes care of keeping track of the individual units of data (packets)
that a message is divided into for efficient delivery over the network.
TCP is known as a connection oriented protocol due to requiring the
receiver of a packet to return an acknowledgment of receipt to the
sender of the packet resulting in transmission control.

TCP/IP

Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. Developed specifically for the Internet, TCP/IP is the basic communication language or
set of protocols for communications over a network. TCP/IP defines a
suite or group of protocols and not only TCP/IP.

TDE

Time domain equalizer

TEO

Trailing edge overshoot

Telnet

A terminal emulation protocol commonly used on the Internet and


TCP/IP-based networks. It allows a user at a terminal or computer to
log onto a remote device and run a program.

Terminal

A station in a system that originates or terminates the transmission


of data.

TFTP

Trivial File Transfer Protocol. A version of the TCP/IP FTP protocol


that has no directory or password capability.

Throughput

The amount of data moved successfully from one place to another in


a given time period.

TID

Target identification

Tilt

The vertical difference between two points on an oscilloscope trace.

TMN

Telecommunications Management Network

TOH

Transport overhead

Traminer

An Electrically Programmable Logic Device (EPLD). An integrated


circuit composed of an array of programmable logic devices programmed as an I/O interface for the PQ/ECRC sub-board.

Trap

Autonomously generated notification from an SNMP management


device.

Tributary

Abbreviated TRIB, is the bi-directional connection between the


switch channel and customer terminating equipment.

Glossary-24

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Glossary

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TTL

Transistor-to-transistor logic

TWT

Traveling-wave tube

TX Rate

Transmission Rate.

U
UAS

Unassigned (state)

UDP

User Datagram Protocol. A method (protocol) used along with the IP


to send data in the form of message units (datagram) between network devices over a LAN or WAN. While IP takes care of handling the
actual delivery of the data (routing), UDP takes care of keeping track
of the individual units of data (packets) that a message is divided into
for efficient delivery over the network. UDP is known as a connection-less protocol due to not requiring the receiver of a packet to return an acknowledgement of receipt to the sender of the packet (as
opposed to TCP).

Upgrade

To replace existing software or firmware with a newer version.

Uplink

Term that usually refers to uplink ports on SNMP devices, routers,


and network switches. Uplink ports allow expansion of networks
through hubs and other expansion devices.
Link compatibility requires that XMTRS at one end of the link be connected to RCVRs at the other end of the link. Since connectors at both
ends of the link are keyed the same, the conductors must cross over
at some point to ensure that XMTR outputs are connected to RCVR
inputs. Uplink ports are internally crosswired.

Upload

To transmit a file over a network. In a communication session, upload


means transmit; download means receive.

Upstream

The preceding hop(s) in the direction of transmission over a microwave link.

URL

Uniform Resource Locator. The address that defines the route to a file
on the Web or any other Internet facility. URLs are typed into the
browser to access Web pages, and URLs are embedded within the
pages themselves to provide the hypertext link to other pages.

USB

Upper sideband

USC

Universal serial controller

USI

User system interface

UTP

Unshielded Twisted Pair. The most common kind of copper telephone


wiring. Twisted pair is the ordinary copper wire that connects home
and many business computers to the telephone company. To reduce
crosstalk or electromagnetic induction between pairs of wires, two insulated copper wires are twisted around each other. Each signal on
twisted pair requires both wires. Since some telephone sets or desktop locations require multiple connections, twisted pair is sometimes
installed in two or more pairs, all within a single cable.
Glossary-25

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3EM20188AAAA
Glossary

V
VCO

Voltage-controlled oscillator

VCXO

Voltage controlled crystal oscillator

Virtual Ethernet
Adapter

The Alcatel network card for lower layers is a software component


used by Alcatel Lower Layers Manager to manage TCP/IP packets
through the serial port. The card configuration procedure is the same
as for a conventional Network Card (NIC).

VLSM

Variable Length Subnet Mask. A means of allocating IP addressing


resources to subnets according to their individual needs rather than
some general network-wide rule.

VPN

Virtual Private Network. A technique that allows two or more LANs


to be extended over public communication channels by creating private communication subchannels (tunnels). Effectively, these LANs
can use a WAN as a single large virtually private LAN. This removes the need to use leased lines for WAN communications
through secure use of a publicly available WAN (such as the Internet). Examples of VPN technology are: PPTP (Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol), L2TP (Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol), and IPSec
(Internet Protocol Security).

W
WAN

Wide Area Network. A communications Network that covers a relatively large geographic area, consisting of two or more LAN. Broadband communication over the WAN is often through public networks,
such as the telephone (DSL) or cable systems, or through leased lines
or satellites. In its most basic definition, the Internet could be considered a WAN.

WEP

Wired Equivalent Privacy. A data privacy mechanism base on a 64bit or 128-bit shared key algorithm, as described in the IEEE 802.11
standard.

WINIPCFG

Configuration utility based on the Win32 API for querying, defining,


and managing IP addresses within a network. It is commonly used
utility for configuring networks with static IP addresses.

X
XMT, XMTR

Transmit, transmitter.

X,Y

Two data lines (rails) from path indicated by subscript.

Glossary-26

CONNECTION SCENARIO 1

3
PWR IN

PWR OUT

PWR OUT
CONNECTION SCENARIO 2

PWR IN
2
1

PWR OUT
CONNECTION SCENARIO 3

3
CONNECTION SCENARIO 2
1

Typical
Application
TYPICAL APPLICATION

Note: Nominal Pwr IN-To-PWR OUT loss = 0.1 db WAVEGUIDE


0.3 db COAX
Figure A
10/04/06

Glossar y Illustration -1 Circulator Function


1

3
XMT

RCV
2

XMT
Filter
F1

XMT
Filter
F3

XMT
Filter
F4

F1 F4
Energy Bounces
off Filter

XMT
Filter
F2

XMT
Filter
F1

XMT
Filter
F2

XMT
Filter
F3

XMT
Filter
F4

TERM

TERM
FIG B
10/01/06

Glossar y Illustration -1 Typical Application


2

ZERO
INSERTION
LOSS

IN

OUT

OUT
IN

SIGNAL
ABSORBED

NOMINAL 25dB INSERTION LOSS


SIGNAL ABSORBED IN DEVICE

Figure C
10/04/06

Typical Application

Glossary Illustration -2 Isolator


3

TERM
3

2
RF FROM
B XMTR

CIRCULATOR

RF
SWITCH

XMT
PORT
ON DIPLEXER

RF
FROM
A XMTR
(ON LINE)

ISOLATOR
3

TERM

NOTE: CIRCULATORS WITH PORT 3 TERMINATED BECOME ISOLATORS


Figure D
10/04/06

Glossar y Illustration -2 Isolator


4

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

GENERAL

INTRODUCTION
The MDR-8000 series Microwave Digital Radios consists of:
1.1

Solid-state, licensed and unlicensed, digital radios that provide transport for DS1, E1,
DS3, OC3, STM-1, and Ethernet in 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, and 11 GHz RF bands.

The following capacities and modulation schemes are available:


MDR-8000 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 North American Standard DS1 channels at either 32 or 128
TCM or 1, 2, or 3 North American Standard DS3 channels with 1, 2, or 3 wayside DS1
channels at 64 QAM
MDR-8000E low and high capacity IP/packet data transport with up to 32 DS1

Low Capacity 8, 12, 16, 24 Mb/s data at 32 TCM; 12 and 24 Mb/s data at 128 TCM
High Capacity 50 and 150 Mb/s data at 128 TCM
MDR-8000i 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 CCITT E1 channels at either 32 or 128 TCM
MDR-8000s OC3/STM-1 (3 North American Standard STS1 channels with 3 wayside
DS1 channels) or 1 STS1 channel with one wayside DS1 at 128 TCM
MDR-8000u 2, 4, 8, or 16 North American Standard DS1 channels at 32 TCM
or 1 North American Standard DS3 channel with 1 wayside DS1 channel at 64 QAM.

SHELF CONFIGURATIONS
The MDR-8000 is available in two shelf configurations: hot-standby shelf and Compact indoor
shelf. The hot-standby shelf mounts in a rack. The Compact indoor shelf can be mounted in a
rack or in an outdoor enclosure to form the Compact outdoor unit.
1.2

Hot Standby Shelf


See Figure 1 - 1. The MDR-8000 hot-standby shelf is wired hot-standby and can be configured
non-standby, where only the A-side is populated, or hot-standby, where both the A- and the Bsides are populated. The hot-standby shelf fits into a standard 19 in. (483 mm) rack and occupies seven vertical rack increments. Up to four fully equipped hot-standby radios can be
mounted in a standard 7 ft. rack. The radio is front accessible and can be mounted against a
wall or back-to-back against other equipment.
1.2.1

Compact Indoor Shelf


See Figure 1 - 2. The Compact indoor shelf is wired and configured non-standby only. The
indoor shelf fits into a standard 19 in. (483 mm) rack and occupies four vertical rack increments (7 in.). The radio is front accessible and can be mounted against a wall or back-to-back
against other equipment. Refer to the Applications Section and Appendix H for details.
1.2.2

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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Figure 1 - 1 Typical MDR-8000 Series Hot-Standby Shelf

Figure 1 - 2 Typical MDR-8000 Series Compact Indoor Shelf


1-2

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General Section

Issue 3
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Compact Outdoor Unit


See Figure 1 - 3. The Compact 0utdoor unit is a pole-mountable outdoor enclosure. The Compact outdoor unit consists of the Compact indoor shelf, rotated 90 degrees counterclockwise
and placed inside an environmentally protected enclosure. Refer to the Applications Section
and the Appendix I for features, applications, and details.
1.2.3

Figure 1 - 3 Typical MDR-8000 Series Compact Outdoor Unit


STANDARD FEATURES
Standard features include:
1.3

Frequency bands from 2 to 11 GHz


Committee of European Post and Telegraph (CEPT)/Federal Communications Commission (FCC) applications
DS1, E1, DS3, OC3, STM-1, and Ethernet Traffic capacities
Ethernet low and high data capacities
Ethernet electrical and optical interfaces
International Telecommunications Union (ITU)/ETSI/FCC compliant
Five configuration options
Upstream management compatibility
User-friendly Personal Computer (PC) monitor and control
Automatic Transmitter Power Control (ATPC)
Adaptive Time Domain Equalization (TDE)
Extended Link Monitor Channel (ELMC)
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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

MCS-11, Telemetry Byte Oriented Serial (TBOS), and TMN (SNMP) Alarm/Control
Interface
Two independent PCM audio channels

NAMING CONVENTION
The MDR-8000 series radio naming conventions are as follows:
1.4

LINE CAPACITY:

MDR-8XXXX-XXX

8
12
(ETHERNET/DATA)
16
24
50
150

=
=
=
=
=
=

8 Mb/s
12 Mb/s
16 Mb/s
24 Mb/s
50 Mb/s
150 Mb/s

LINE CAPACITY:

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

2 DS1/E1s
4 DS1/E1s
8 DS1/E1s
12 DS1/E1s
16 DS1/E1s
1 DS3
OC3/STM-1 (1 STS1)
2 DS3
3 DS3
OC3/STM-1 (3 STS1)

(DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/
STM-1 DATA)

E=
i =
s=
u=

2
4
8
12
16
45
52
90
135
155

ETHERNET
INTERNATIONAL DATA RATE
SONET
UNLICENSED

FREQUENCY BAND: 02
04
05
06
07
08
10
11

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

2 GHz*
4 GHx
5 GHz
6 GHz
7 GHz
8 GHz
10 GHz
11 GHz

MODEM OPTION: 5 = 32 TCM


6 = 64 QAM
7 = 128 TCM

GENERATION

* Extra naming convention is required for the equipment identifier labels in the 2 GHz band.
See System Application Rules drawing 3EM142470000BGZZA for details.
LMW-3121F
12/14/06

1-4

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General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

ORDERING INFORMATION
The radio is shipped as a complete unit; therefore, ordering information must specify the
following:
1.5

System capacity:

2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 DS1
2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 E1
1, 2, or 3 DS3 with/without wayside DS1
OC3/STM-1 (1 or 3 STS-1 channels with/without wayside DS1)
Ethernet DS1 capacity
Ethernet data capacity
System configuration: non-standby, non-standby/space diversity, hot-standby, hotstandby/space diversity, frequency diversity

Transmit and receive frequency


Transmit power level
Fault alarm requirements
Service channel requirements
DS1/E1 interface connector requirements
Alarm interface connector requirements
Alarm relay requirements
SNMP requirements
Remote provisioning/Wayside DS1 requirements

SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS
The MDR-8000 radio can be provisioned as a terminal, synchronous repeater, ring terminal, or
ring repeater.
1.6

1.7

RADIO CONFIGURATIONS

Basic Configurations
The MDR-8000 supports the three basic configurations:
1.7.1

Non-standby available in all frequency bands stand alone transmitter/receiver combination


Hot-standby available in all frequency bands pair of transmitters and receivers, both
pairs operating on the same set of go and return frequencies.
Frequency diversity available in all frequency bands except 2 GHz and 5 GHz (unlicensed) pair of transmitters and receivers, each pair operating on a different set of go
and return frequencies.
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General Section

Ring
Non-standby radios are typically used in ring systems where the radios are protected by the
ring architecture.
1.7.2

Space Diversity Add-On


Space diversity can be added to any of the three basic configurations and ring systems.
1.7.3

Optical Configurations
Two configurations are available: 2 or 4 fiber configuration and 2 x 4 fiber configuration. The 2
or 4 fiber configuration provides direct connection on a non-standby shelf with customers 2fiber equipment or on a hot-standby shelf with customers 4-fiber equipment. The 2 x 4 fiber
configuration provides connection between the four fibers on a hot-standby shelf and customers 2-fiber equipment.
1.7.4

FEATURES AND OPTIONS


Features and options for the MDR-8000 series of microwave digital radios are described in the
following paragraphs.
1.8

Primary Power
The MDR-8000 series radios operate from 20.5 to 60 Vdc primary power with positive or negative ground.
1.8.1

Transmit Power Level Options


The radio is provided without a power amplifier (PA) module for low-power applications. The
optional PA module is available for high-power requirements. There are different levels for the
different frequency bands. Refer to Para. 1.10 for specific levels.
1.8.2

Differential Absolute Delay Equalization (DADE)


DADEing adjusts the differential absolute delay between the main and diversity signals in a
space diversity configuration. DADEing is an automatic function within the DS1/E1 and OC3/
STM-1 MDR-8000 receivers, reducing the time required for initial turn-up and test.
1.8.3

Trellis Encoding and Time Domain Equalization (TDE)


Trellis encoding (DS1/E1/OC3/STM-1) ensures that even with the most severe multipath, only
the correct digital data is demodulated. TDE further reduces the disruptive effects of multipath distortion.
1.8.4

MCS-11 Alarm/Control Interface


MCS-11 is standard in the MDR-8000. The MDR-8000 can interface with any alarm system
that is based on the MCS-11 protocol. MCS-11 can be used with the TSM series network
management systems to develop a central access point to monitor and control the transmission system.
1.8.5

Foreign Alarm Interface


This provisioning option provides serial alarm/status reporting for the Telemetry Byte Oriented Serial (TBOS) protocol. A wire-wrap adapter is provided to mate to connector J305 on
the backplane.
1.8.6

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TMN Interface
The AE-37AA Telecommunications Management Network (TMN) Interface module, Alcatel
part number 3EM13462AA provides Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) support for the MDR-8000 family of radios along with a low speed general TCP/IP Transport
intended for network management traffic. The TMN Interface module provides data, service
channel interfaces, runs SNMP Agent Code, and collects alarm information from the MDR8000 controller (reference Functional Description Section). The TMN interface module provides a built-in five-port router, an internal 10BASE-T Ethernet repeating HUB supplying
three Local Area Network (LAN) ports, provides a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) port, and a
craft interface port. Transport of TCP/IP traffic is provided via one of the radio overhead service channels.
1.8.7

1.8.7.1

Features

The TMN interface module has the following features:


Hybrid MCS-11 and SNMP Networks
Upgrades existing MCS-11 networks with SNMP capable equipment
Access to SNMP channel via LAN or serial I/O interface
Built-in 10BaseT Repeater Hub with three local Ethernet ports on RJ-45

Interconnect other SNMP equipment


Junction interconnect
Uplink port
RS-422 Point-to-Point interconnect (serial I/O port) on RJ-45

External equipment access


Additional link to interconnect systems at junctions
Synchronous connection to data channel or leased line for backhaul, 56-256 kb/s
DB-9 serial Craft port for 1320CT connection

Relay Interface Option


The optional AE-27AF Relay Interface unit provides relay closure indications of radio alarms
and status. The relay interface also provides up to 16 station alarm inputs and six relay closure control outputs.
1.8.8

Extended Link Monitor Channel


ELMC is standard and performance monitoring, alarm and status information, and remote
controls are accessible through the ELMC channel, independent of network management
interfaces.
1.8.9

Optional remote provisioning and downloading capability is provided via an ELMC option key
that is mounted on the controller module.

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General Section

1.8.10 Automatic Transmitter Power Control Provisioning Option

Automatic Transmitter Power Control (ATPC) is a standard feature that can be enabled or
disabled using the USI provisioning screens. When ATPC is disabled, transmitter power is
fixed at the recommended maximum level. When ATPC is enabled, transmitter power may
be reduced up to 10 dB from the maximum power level when the far end RSL is above a minimum level. When ATPC is enabled with timeout, transmitter ATPC activity is limited to a
maximum time without returning to minimum transmit power. After five minutes of activity, the transmit power is forced to minimum until the far end RSL returns to normal levels.
1.8.11 Service Channels Provisioning Options

The MDR-8000 provides a 256 kb/s auxiliary channel for servicing the radio. This is an overhead channel and is independent of the traffic channels. The 256 kb/s service channel contains four 64 kb/s service channels. Three of the four 64 kb/s channels (Service Channel 1, 2,
and 3) can be provisioned on the USI for a specific use. Service channel 0 is dedicated to radio
commands and ELMC. Service channel 0 is not provisionable. Only 16 kb/s out of the 64 kb/s
in this channel are used.

Note
Service channels at both ends of a hop (and end-to-end in a link) must be
provisioned the same. One service channel must be provisioned Audio 1
in order to use the 2 wire audio handset.
Service channel provisioning is interactive. When an option is selected for any service channel,
that option is excluded from selections on the other applicable service channels. Provisioning
options for Service Channels 1, 2, and 3 are listed:
Service Channel 1 (64 kb/s channel) can be used to carry 4-wire audio, RS-232 data, or
MCS-11/SNMP fault alarm information.

AUDIO 1 and 2 Two audio provisioning options (AUDIO 1 and AUDIO 2) are provided for Service Channel 1. Each audio channel is a 4-wire audio channel that provides off-hook detection, level control, and E and M-lead signaling. AUDIO 1 also has
DTMF decoding that allows a specific station to be dialed. External connection to
AUDIO 1 is J316. External connection to AUDIO 2 is J317.
AUDIO 1 also contains the circuits to support the 2-wire audio handset. One of the
three service channels must be provisioned Audio 1 in order for the handset to be operational.
RS-232-1 RS-232 Channel 1 is an RS-232 formatted data channel that can provide
interface to an external computer/modem. External connection to RS-232-1 is J312.
MCS-11 The MCS-11 channel is an RS-422 formatted data that provides an interface
to an external MCS-11 Monitor Control System or TSM system, used to control multiple MCS-11 systems. External connections to the MCS-11 include J307, J308, J309
and J310.

1-8

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General Section

Issue 3
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Service channel 2 (64 kb/s channel) - can be used to carry 4-wire audio, RS-232 data, or
MCS-11 fault alarm information.

AUDIO-1 and -2 Same as Service Channel 1


RS-232-2 RS-232 Channel 2 is an RS-232 formatted data channel that can provide
interface to an external computer/modem. External connection to RS-232-1 is J313
(J312 on Compact).
MCS-11/SNMP Same as Service Channel 1.
Service Channel 3 (64 kb/s channel) - can be used to carry 4-wire audio, or MCS-11 fault
alarm information.

AUDIO 1 and 2 Same as Service Channel 1


MCS-11/SNMP Same as Service Channel 1.
1.8.12 Mechanical Options

Refer to Equipping Option Drawing 3DH031770000BJZZA in the Diagrams section for


mechanical options.
1.8.13 Power Distribution Unit (PDU)

Two PDUs are available for use with the MDR-8000: Power Distribution Unit PN 695-6200001/002 and Power Distribution Unit PN 3EM13317AA (Fuse Panel).
1.8.13.1 PDU PN 695-6200-001/002

This PDU is currently used for MDR-4000 series radios and has been replaced by PDU
PN 3EM13317AA. This PDU requires two rack increments. It provides enough power for
two MDR-8000 shelves at 24 vdc battery and three MDR-8000 shelves at 48 vdc battery.
1.8.13.2 PDU PN 3EM13317AA (Fuse Panel)

This is the preferred PDU for MDR-8000 applications. This PDU requires three rack increments. The unit itself requires two increments. One increment above the PDU is required
for heat dissipation. The fuse panel provides fuses for up to four MDR-8000 shelves (sixteen
20 Amp fuses; two A and B + and two A and B - per shelf) and two AUX shelves (eight 10
Amp fuses). Battery input voltage can be 20.5 to 60 Vdc. An optional relay card is available
that provides eight Form-C relay outputs for radio major and minor alarms. A front panel
alarm LED is provided to indicate a blown fuse. No rack or shelf alarms are provided on the
fuse panel.
1.8.14 Capacity Upgrade

The number of maximum DS1/E1 lines can be expanded from 2 to 4 to 8 to 12 to 16 lines to


meet expanding system needs. DS3 lines can be expanded from 1 to 3. The OC3/STM-1 radio
can be expanded from 1 STS1 to 3 STS1 data rates. The number of available DS1/E1/DS3/
OC3/STM-1 lines is determined by printed circuit boards (capacity keys). Identical capacity
keys plug onto the transmitter and receiver modules. Changing the number of DS1/E1/DS3/
OC3/STM-1 lines requires changing capacity keys. DS1 to DS1, DS3 to DS3, and/or OC3/
STM-1 to OC3/STM-1 capacity upgrades can be performed in-service on protected systems
with minimal traffic interruption. In non-protected radios, traffic will be interrupted for the
duration of the procedure.
1-9

Issue 3
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General Section

1.8.15 Bandwidth Upgrade

Assuming no frequency or band change, DS1 to DS3 conversion can be accomplished by changing out the I/O interface modules, LBO board, and capacity keys and installing DS3 software.
Electrical DS3 to optical OC3/STM-1 conversion can be accomplished by changing out the I/O
interface modules, exchanging the LBO board with the OC3/STM-1 AUX Interface, and changing capacity keys and installing OC3/STM-1 software. Changing out the LBO or AUX board
requires interrupting traffic for the duration of the procedure.
1.8.16 Conversion to Ethernet

Conversion to Ethernet is an out-of-service procedure. When converting a DS1/DS3/OC3 radio


to Ethernet with up to 32 DS1, the DS1/DS3 LBO/OC3 AUX INTFC must be replaced with a
ETH/T1 line interface, the DS1/DS3/OC3 I/O interface modules must be replaced by ETH/T1 I/
O interface modules, capacity keys on XMTR and RCVR modules must be replaced, and software must be changed. The ELMC option key on the controller module may have to be
changed. Cabling changes that have to be made depend on the radio/system/site requirements.
USER SYSTEM INTERFACE (USI)
A personal computer (PC) is required to access provisioning, status and alarm information,
and maintenance control functions (on-line maintenance and troubleshooting) within the
radio. The PC is not supplied with the radio and must be provided by the user. These functions
are performed via the Alcatel USI maintenance program software (Table 1 - 1). The PC must be
IBM compatible. PC guidelines are addressed in Table 1 - 2.
1.9

Note
Refer to System Document Mapping drawing in Diagrams Section for
software compatibility information.
Table 1 - 1 Software
CD ROM

PART NUMBER

DS1/E1

695-9406-021*

DS3

695-9406-022*

OC3/STM-1

695-9406-023*

DS1/E1, DS3, and OC3/STM-1 (Universal)

695-9406-030

Ethernet

695-9406-024

Universal USI with Internet

3EM19579AAAA

TMN

3EM14629AAAA

*Manufacture discontinued. Replaced by 695-9406-030

1-10

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Table 1 - 2 PC Guidelines
ITEM

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

CPU

Pentium

Speed

300 MHz or greater

RAM

256 Mbytes, minimum

Graphics

VGA

Display

Color

Hard Disk

Required

Free Disk Space

100 Mbytes

CD ROM Drive

Required

Mouse

Optional

Operating System

Windows 98, NT, 2000 or XP

Serial Port

2400 b/s

Internet USI
The universal User System Interface (USI) with Internet feature allows USI clients to monitor
and control remote MDR-8000 radios anywhere in the world using Internet Protocol (IP). See
Figure 1 - 4. The USI server connects to a radio in the network via an RS-232 cable and communicates with one or more remote USI clients through the Internet. The client polls the
server for radio status and alarms. The radio connected to the server polls other radios in the
network using the Extended Link Monitor control (ELMC).
1.9.1

USI server and client


communicate through
Internet (IP)

R-232 Cable

Alcatel MDR-8000
USI Server

USI Client

USI server communicates with MDR-8000 through R-232 and forwards the data to USI Client
what it requests through Internet Protocol (IP).

MDR-1176F
06/27/06

Figure 1 - 4 Universal USI With Internet Feature


1-11

Issue 3
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1.9.1.1

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Client-To-Server Communication Requirements

The client must know the IP address of the server in order to communicate with the server.
1.9.1.2

Server/Client Security Management

See Figure 1 - 5. The USI with Internet requires an administrator password and a regular
user password to operate. The administrator has access to any and all USI functions and
controls the regular users access. The admin user can also modify client and server configurations. The regular user has access to all USI screens and functions except downloading
software. The regular user is not allowed to modify server configuration.

Client

Password

At the Client, password is


encrypted before sent to
the server.

Password

Server

At the Server, password is


decrypted and verified before
it lets the client log in.

MDR-1175F
06/27/06
06/13/05-orig

Figure 1 - 5 Server/Client Password Protection


1-12

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General Section

Issue 3
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RADIO CHARACTERISTICS
Physical, environmental, and electrical characteristics are provided for each radio listed.
1.10

Radio List
MDR-8X02 1755-1850 MHz Licensed Microwave Transport
MDR-8X02 2.4 GHz Licensed and Unlicensed Microwave Transport
MDR-8X02 WCS Band 2.305 2.360 GHz Licensed Microwave Transport
MDR-8X04 4.400-5.000 GHz Radios
MDR-8X05u 5.8 GHz Unlicensed Radios
MDR-8X05ui 5.8 GHz Unlicensed Radios
MDR-8X06 6 GHz Low-Capacity Radios
MDR-8X08 7/8 GHz Low-Capacity Radios
MDR-8X10 10 GHz Low-Capacity Radios
MDR-8000 CommPak Low-Profile Shelf with Outdoor Enclosure
MDR-8000 Ethernet Radio
SNMP Management for Alcatel MDR-8000
MDR-8606-45, Alcatel MDR-8506-90
MDR-8606 6 GHz High-Capacity Radios
MDR-8608 7/8 GHz High-Capacity Radios
MDR-8611 11 GHz High-Capacity Radios
MDR-8706s 6 GHz High-Capacity Synchronous Radio
MDR-8708s 7/8 GHz High-Capacity Synchronous Radio
MDR-8711s 11 GHz High-Capacity Synchronous Radio

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Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

EXTERNAL INTERFACE REQUIREMENTS


Refer to Table 1 - 3 for Operational Support System (OSS) external interface requirements.
1.11

Table 1 - 3 OSS External Interface Requirements


ITEM

CHARACTERISTICS
TMN INTERFACE

Type

Three front access Ethernet ports, one front access


PPP port, Front panel Craft interface port

Front access Ethernet Ports


Front access PPP Port

802.3 10Base-T Standard

Signals
Logic Levels
Clock Rates
Internal
External
Termination
Front panel Craft interface Port
Input Signals
TTL
Logic 1
Logic 0
RS-422
Logic 1
Logic 0
Difference Voltage
RS-232
Logic 1
Logic 0
Output Signals
TTL
Logic 1
Logic 0
Differential RS-422
Voc
Difference Voltage
Load Impedance
RS-232
Logic 1
Logic 0
Output Impedance

1-14

Differential XMT Clock, RCV Clock, XMT Data, and


RCV Data
RS-422 Compatible
64, 128, 192, 256, 384, and 512 kHz Selectable
56 to 512 kHz
100 ohms Nominal
TTL, RS-422, and RS-232
2.0 to 5.0 Vdc
0.0 to 0.8 Vdc
2.0 to 5.0 Vdc
0.0 to 0.8 Vdc
-0.2 to 0.2 Vdc
3.0 to 25.0 Vdc
-25.0 to 0.4 Vdc
TTL, Differential RS-422, and RS-232
5.0 to 5.5 Vdc
-5.0 to -5.5 Vdc
3.0 Vdc Maximum
2.0 Vdc
300 ohms Nominal
5.0 to 5.5 Vdc
-5.0 to -5.5 Vdc
300 ohms Nominal

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
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Table 1 - 3 OSS External Interface Requirements (Cont.)


ITEM

CHARACTERISTICS
MCS-11

Type

RS-422-compatible on backplane. Interfaces to 15pin D-style connectors (J307 and J310 terminated
only). Interfaces to 15-pin D-style ribbon connectors
J308 and J309 (mode dependent).

Receiver
Logic 1

0.2 to 6.0 Vdc, 2.3 mA maximum

Logic 0

-6.0 to -0.2 Vdc, 2.8 mA maximum

Common Mode Range

-7.0 to 7.0 Vdc

Input Impedance

Nominal 120 ohms terminated. NLT 4 kilohms, balanced (bridged)

Input Clock Rate

NMT 68 kHz

Transmitter
Driver Differential Output Voltage

+6 Vdc maximum, +150 mA maximum


+2 Vdc minimum, +150 mA maximum

Output Impedance

108 to 130 ohms

Output Clock Rate

64 kHz 500 Hz, internal clock


300 Hz to 68 kHz, external clock
TBOS

Type

RS-422-compatible on backplane. Interfaces to four


pins (13-16) on 50-pin SCSI connector (J305).

Receiver
Logic 1

0.2 to 6.0 Vdc, 2.3 mA maximum

Logic 0

-6.0 to -0.2 Vdc, 2.8 mA maximum

Common Mode Range

-7.0 to 7.0 Vdc

Input Impedance

Nominal 120 ohms terminated 2400 Hz 120 Hz

Input Clock Rate

2400 Hz 120 Hz

Transmitter
Driver Differential Output Voltage

+6 Vdc maximum, +150 mA maximum


+2 Vdc minimum, +150 mA maximum

Output Impedance

108 to 130 ohms

Output Clock Rate

2400 Hz 10 Hz

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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Table 1 - 3 OSS External Interface Requirements (Cont.)


ITEM

CHARACTERISTICS
AUDIO HANDSET

Type

RJ-11, 4-wire modular jack on AE-37Y Controller

Frequency

300-3400 Hz

Level

0 dBm in/ -2 dBm out

Impedance

220 ohms

Off-hook

Microphone current greater than 15 mA indicates


handset is off hook.
Maximum microphone current is 40 mA.
RS-232

Type

9-pin D-style ribbon (J312 and J313)

Data Rate

14.4 kb/s

Input Levels
Logic 0

3.0 to 30 Vdc, input resistance 3 to 7 kilohms

Logic 1

-30 to 0.5 Vdc, input resistance 3 to 7 kilohms

Output Levels
Logic 0

8.0 to 12.0 Vdc, not less than 300 ohms output


resistance

Logic 1

-12.0 to -8.0 Vdc, not less than 300 ohms output


resistance
4-WIRE AUDIO

Type Connector

9-pin D-style (J316 and J317)

Levels
Input

0 or -16 dBm, 600 ohms balanced

Output

0 or +7 dBm, 600 ohms balanced

E-lead

Single form-A contact to ground or -12 Vdc when off


hook.

M-lead

Normally open; voltage more negative than -9 V


indicates input is off hook.
CONTROLS/ALARMS/STATUS

Interface

AE-27AF Relay Interface module

Connector

50-pin SCSI (J305)

1-16

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General Section

Issue 3
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Table 1 - 3 OSS External Interface Requirements (Cont.)


ITEM

CHARACTERISTICS
CONTROL INPUTS

Number of Inputs

Input Voltage

0 to 5 Vdc, diode protected

Current Limiting Resistor

10 kohm

Pull-Up Resistor

100 kohm
ALARM/STATUS INPUTS

Number of Inputs

16 (12 through 16 are not available if TBOS is used)

Input Voltage

0 to 5 Vdc, diode protected

Current Limiting Resistor

10 kohm

Pull-Up Resistor

100 kohm

Alarm State

Logic 0

Non-Alarm State

Logic 1
RELAY ALARM/STATUS OUTPUTS

Note: All relays default to open if card power is lost, except power supply alarms, which default to ground.
Number of Alarm Outputs

Number of Status Outputs

Activated State

Closure to ground

Maximum Contact Rating

0.5 A, 100 V

Relay Control Outputs

All relays default to open if card power is lost.

Number of Outputs

Activated State

Closure to ground

Maximum Contact Rating

0.5 A, 100 V
CONTROL STATUS INPUTS

Number of Inputs

Input Voltage

0 to 5 Vdc, diode protected

Current Limiting Resistor

10 kohm

Pull-Up Resistor

100 kohm

1-17

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

EQUIPMENT LISTING
The following paragraphs and tables describe and list equipment supplied and optional equipment for the MDR-8000 series radio.
1.12

Parts required to order a fully functional MDR-8000 hot-standby shelf are separated into kits
for manufacturing. Separate kits are provided for the hot-standby shelf, the Compact indoor
shelf, and the unlicensed band radio. Kit contents, indented to indicate referral/hierarchy, are
listed on engineering drawings in volumes 2 and 3 of this instruction book as follows:
Hot-Standby Shelf:
Refer to Equipping Option Drawing 3DH031770000BJZZA (Crystal Oscillator crystals are
listed on drawing 3DH031770000BHZZA).
Common Radio Kits 3DH041220000UDZZA
Common Shelf Kits 3EM135950000UDZZA
Compact Indoor Shelf:
Refer to Equipping Option Drawing 3EM142470000BJZZA, 3DH031770000BJZZA (Crystal
Oscillator crystals are listed on drawing 3DH031770000BHZZA).
Common Shelf Kits 3EM150450000UDZZA
Unlicensed Band Radio
Refer to Equipping Option Drawing 3EM142470001BJZZA
Common Shelf Kits 3EM116970000UDZZA
Sub-level Shelf Kits 3EM135950000UDZZA
Frequency Agility Kits 3EM115760000UDZZA

1-18

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General Section

Issue 3
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Table 1 - 4 Supplied and Optional Equipment


Unit/Module

Part Number

Remarks

AE-37Y( ) Controller:
AE-37Y-1 5v Controller
AE-37Y-2 3v Controller

Software Dependent
3DH03155AA
3DH03155AB

One supplied per shelf


Forward Compatible
Requires following software versions, or later:
DS1-R1.07
DS3-R1.08
OC3/STM-1-R2.01

Application and capacity


dependent. Refer to
Table 1 - 5

Optional. Required for remote provisioning and


downloading on DS1/E1 radios, and DS3, OC3/
STM-1, and Ethernet radios without wayside DS1.
Subboard is installed on controller (if equipped).

Application Dependent

One supplied per single T/R shelf. Two supplied per


dual T/R shelf. Functionally the same, physically different

Power Supply

3DH03164AA

Hot-Standby Shelf

Power Supply

3DH03164AB

Hot-Standby Shelf or Compact radio

Fuse

264-0928-130

3 ea. 20A fast-blow fuses.


(Two operational and one spare)

Capacity and
Application Dependent
Refer to Table 1 - 6

One supplied per single T/R shelf. Two supplied per


dual T/R shelf.

UD-35( ) Transmitter:

Application and
Frequency Dependent
Refer to Table 1 - 7

One supplied per single T/R shelf. Two supplied per


dual T/R shelf.

UM-62AX Crystal Oscillator Subboard

3DH04123AX
Frequency Dependent

One supplied per XMTR. The crystal oscillator subboard and crystal part numbers define this unit. The
crystal is soldered to the oscillator subboard and
factory tuned to the customers requirements.
See drawing 3DH031770000BJZZA in the Diagrams Section.

Capacity Key

Modulation and
Capacity Dependent
Refer to Table 1 - 10

One supplied per XMTR.

UD-51( ) Power Amplifier

Frequency and Output


Power Dependent.
Refer to Table 1 - 8

Optional. One supplied per single T/R shelf


(if equipped). Two supplied per dual T/R shelf
(if equipped).

ELMC Option Key

CE-16BB Power Supply

DX-35( ) I/O Interface:

1-19

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Table 1 - 4 Supplied and Optional Equipment (Cont.)


Unit/Module

Part Number

Remarks

Hot-Standby Shelf Fan


Assembly

Configuration Dependent
Refer to Para 1.14.

A fan assembly is required for any of the following


conditions/configurations:
1.Shelf is equipped with dual RCVRs
2.Shelf is equipped with single RCVRs and
PAs and the PA output power at the top of
the stack is:
+33 dBm for 2 and 4 GHz
+31 or +33 dBm for 6 GHz
+30 dBm for 7 and 8 GHz
+29 dBm for 10 and 11 GHz
3.Stacking multiple shelves in a rack

Heat Deflector

3EM03390AA

Manufacturing discontinued. No action is necessary


for customers that already have heat deflectors in
service that are mounted properly.

DX-40R Compact Fan


Card

3EM14510AB or AC

One supplied per compact shelf

Compact Indoor Shelf Fan


Assembly

3EM11901AB

Fan assembly is always required for the following


configurations:
Frequency
6 GHz
7-8 GHz
10-11 GHz

Power Out
+31 dBm
+30 dBm
+27 and +29 dBm

UD-36( ) Receiver

Application and Frequency Dependent


Refer to Table 1 - 9

One supplied per single T/R shelf. Two supplied per


dual T/R shelf.

UM-62AX Crystal Oscillator Subboard

3DH04123AX
Frequency Dependent

One supplied per RCVR. The crystal oscillator subboard and crystal part numbers define this unit. The
crystal is soldered to the oscillator subboard and
factory tuned to the customers requirements.
See drawing 3DH031770000BJZZA in the Diagrams section.

1-20

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
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Table 1 - 4 Supplied and Optional Equipment (Cont.)


Unit/Module

Part Number

Remarks

Capacity Key

Modulation and Capacity Dependent


Refer to Table 1 - 10

One supplied per RCVR.

Line Buildout (LBO)/


OC3/STM-1 AUX Interface

Application and Distance


Dependent
Refer to Table 1 - 11

One supplied per shelf.

AE-37AA TMN Interface

3EM13462AA

Optional for SNMP operation.

AE-27AF Relay Interface

3DH03219AA

Optional.

Fiber Management Panel

Configuration dependent.
Refer to Para 1.16

Optional.

Single-mode Splitter/
Combiner

1AB123320023

Single-mode fiber interface. One per radio shelf


required. (2 x 4 configuration only).

Multi-mode Splitter/
Combiner

1AB123320022

Multi-mode fiber interface. One per radio shelf


required. (2 x 4 configuration only).

Handset Kit

3EM11996AA

Optional. Refer to Para 1.15.

Diplexer Filter Kit

Frequency Dependent

Refer to drawing 3DH031770000BJZZA in the Diagrams section for list.

Waveguide Iso-Adapters

Frequency, Waveguide,
and Configuration Dependent

Optional.
Refer to drawing 3DH031770000BJZZA in the Diagrams section.

NOTE: Refer to System Document Mapping drawing in Diagrams Section for module forward and backward compatibility.

EQUIPMENT REQUIRED BUT NOT SUPPLIED


Equipment required but not supplied is configuration/application dependent. Refer to the
Diagrams Section section for system interconnect requirements.
1.13

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Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

SELECT A3 AND B3
I/O INTFC MODULES
BY DATA RATE

AE-37AA
TMN INTFC
I/O INTFC
I/O INTFC
OR BLANK C3
AE37Y
A3
B3
UD51( )
UD51( )
UD36A( )
CONTROLLER
PWR AMP
PWR AMP
RCVR
C1
B5
A5
B2
AE27AF
CE16BB
CE16BB
RELAY
UD36A( )
POWER
POWER
UD35A( )
UD35A( )
INTFC
RCVR
SUPPLY
SUPPLY
XMTR
XMTR
OR BLANK
A2
A1
B1
A4
B4
C2

ALM
INSVC
WYSD
ON

XMT
AUX
SC
ALM
RCVR
ON
RAD
LOF
ALM

WYSD
DS1

ON
LINE

WYSD
ALM

WYSD
ALM
OC3
IN
OC3
ALM
OC3
OUT

LBO AUX/LINE INTFC

SYNC
ALM
ALM

ALM
INSVC
WYSD
ON

ON
LINE
COMMON
LOSS
ALM

WYSD
ALM
ETH
IN
ETH
ALM

SELECT DS1 OR DS3 LBO,


OC3/ETH AUX INTFC,
OR ETH/T1 LINE INTFC
TO MATCH I/O INTFC
(DATA RATE)

ETH
OUT

DS1/E1 LBO

DS3 LBO
DX-35P
OC3/STM-1

DX-35N
DS3

OC3/STM-1 AUX INTFC


(ALSO USED ON ETHERNET)
DX-35M
DS1/EI

DX-35R/S
Ethernet

ETH/T1 LINE INTFC


MDR-1305
07/05/07

Figure 1 - 6 Typical MDR-8000 Hot-Standby Shelf Component Locations and Options (Sheet 1 of 3)
1-22

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007
)

AE37Y
CONTROLLER
C1
CE16BB
POWER
SUPPLY
A1

I/O INTFC
B3
UD51( )
UD51( )
UD36A( )
PWR AMP
PWR AMP
RCVR
A5
B5
B2
AE27AF
CE16BB
RELAY
POWER
UD35A( )
UD35A( )
INTFC
SUPPLY
XMTR
XMTR
C2
B1
A4
B4

I/O INTFC
A3

UD36A( )
RCVR
A2

LBO/OC3 AUX INTFC

SELECT XTAL
OSCILLATOR
SUBBOARD BY
CRYSTAL
FREQUENCY.

SELECT CAPACITY
KEY BY DATA RATE.

OC3/
S T M- 1
DS3

DS1/E1

SELECT OC3/STM-1 CAPACITY KEY BY


NUMBER OF STS1 LINES 1 OR 3 LINES.

SELECT DS3 CAPACITY KEY BY


NUMBER OF LINES 1, 2, OR 3 LINES.

SELECT DS1/E1 CAPACITY KEY BY


CAPACITY AND MODULATION SCHEME
2, 4, 8, 12, 16 DS1/E1 AND 32 OR 128 TCM.

LMW-9051-SM
02/15/04

Figure 1 - 6 Typical MDR-8000 Hot-Standby Shelf Component Locations and Options (Sheet 2 of 3)
1-23

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

HEAT
SINK

RF
SWITCH

ISOLATORS

A
RCV

ANT
XMT

B
RCV

B-SIDE
POWER

RF SWITCH

DIPLEXER
FILTER

A-SIDE
POWER
DIPLEXER
FILTER
MOUNTING
BRACKET

ISOLATOR

REAR VIEW
(TYPICAL HOT-STANDBY 1:10 COUPLER
SINGLE ANTENNA CONFIGURATION)

Note
Location of A and B RCV ports on diplexer filter varies,
depending on RF frequency. For some frequencies, A and
B ports reverse location.

LMW-7211-SM
06/08/04

Figure 1 - 6 Typical MDR-8000 Hot-Standby Shelf Component Locations, and Options (Sheet 3 of 3)
1-24

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
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Table 1 - 5 Controller Option Keys


Option Key

Radio Type

Capacity

Wayside
DS1

Remote Provisioning
Downloading

695-5647-018

DS1/E1
DS3
OC3/STM-1
ETH

2, 4, 8, 12, 16 DS1
1, 2, 3 DS3
1
10/100/1000Mb

N/A
No
No
N/A

Yes

695-5647-019

DS1/E1
DS3
OC3/STM-1
ETH

2, 4, 8, 12, 16 DS1
1, 2, 3 DS3
1
10/100/1000Mb

N/A
Yes
Yes
N/A

No

695-5647-020

DS1/E1
DS3
OC3/STM-1
ETH

2, 4, 8, 12, 16 DS1
1, 2, 3 DS3
1
10/100/1000Mb

N/A
Yes
Yes
N/A

Yes

695-5647-021

DS1

N/A

Yes

695-5647-022

ETH/T1

10/100/1000Mb
+ 1-16 T1

N/A

Yes

695-5647-023

ETH/T1

10/100/1000Mb
+ 1-32 T1

N/A

Yes

2, 4, 8, 12, 16 DS1

1-25

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Table 1 - 6 I/O Interface Options


TYPE NO.

PART NUMBER

CAPACITY/APPLICATIONS

DX-35M-1

3DH03131AA

DS1/Domestic

DX-35M-2

3DH03131AB

E1/International

DX-35N-1

3DH03169AA

DS3 (1 or 3 DS3 Lines + DS1 Wayside) Replaced by DX-35N-3


3DH03169AG

DX-35N-2

3DH03169AB

DS3 (1 or 3 DS3 Lines + DS1 Wayside) Replaced by DX-35N-3


3DH03169AG

DX-35N-3

3DH03169AG

DS3 (1 or 3 DS3 Lines + DS1 Wayside) Replaced by DX-35N-4


3DH03169AH

DX-35N-4

3DH03169AH

DS3 (1 or 3 DS3 Lines 64 QAM + DS1 Wayside per DS3) Replaced by


DX-35N-6 3DH03169AK or DX-35N-8 3DH03169AM

DX-35N-5

3DH03169AJ

DS3 (2 DS3 Lines 32 TCM + DS1 Wayside per DS3) Replaced by


DX-35N-7 3DH03169AL or DX-35N-9 3DH03169AN

DX-35N-6

3DH03169AK

DS3 (1 or 3 DS3 Lines 64 QAM + DS1 Wayside per DS3, Auto Line
DADE, With Front Panel Controls) Replaced by DX-35N-10 3DH03169AP

DX-35N-7

3DH03169AL

DS3 (2 DS3 Lines 32 TCM + DS1 Wayside per DS3, Auto Line DADE,
With Front Panel Controls) Replaced by DX-35N-11 3DH03169AQ

DX-35N-8

3DH03169AM

DS3 (1 or 3 DS3 Lines 64 QAM + DS1 Wayside per DS3, Auto Line
DADE, No Front Panel Controls) Replaced by DX-35N-12 3DH03169AR

DX-35N-9

3DH03169AN

DS3 (2 DS3 Lines 32 TCM + DS1 Wayside per DS3, Auto Line DADE, No
Front Panel Controls) Replaced by DX-35N-13 3DH03169AS

DX-35N-10

3DH03169AP

DS3 (1 or 3 DS3 Lines 64 QAM + DS1 Wayside per DS3, Auto Line
DADE With DS3 Line Loopback, With Front Panel Controls)

DX-35N-11

3DH03169AQ

DS3 (2 DS3 Lines 32 TCM + DS1 Wayside per DS3, Auto Line DADE
With DS3 Line Loopback, With Front Panel Controls)

DX-35N-12

3DH03169AR

DS3 (1 or 3 DS3 Lines 64 QAM + DS1 Wayside per DS3, Auto Line
DADE With DS3 Line Loopback, No Front Panel Controls)

DX-35N-13

3DH03169AS

DS3 (2 DS3 Lines 32 TCM + DS1 Wayside per DS3, Auto Line DADE,
With DS3 Line Loopback, Front Panel Controls)

DX-35P-1

3EM03134AA

OC3/STM-1 (3 STS1 Lines + DS1 Wayside per STS1, Multi-mode and Single Mode) Replaced by DX-35P-2 3EM03134AC (future)

DX-35P-2

3EM03134AB

OC3/STM-1 (1 or 3 STS1 Lines + DS1 Wayside per STS1, Multi-mode


and Single Mode) Replaced by DX-35P-3 3EM03134AC (future)

DX-35P-3

3EM03134AC

OC3/STM-1 (1 or 3 STS1 Lines + DS1 Wayside per STS1, Multi-mode


and Single Mode)

DX-35R-1

3EM16610AA

Ethernet (With RJ-45 Connector)

DX-35R-2

3EM16610AB

Ethernet (With RJ-45 and Optical SFP XCVR Receptacle)

DX-35S-1

3EM16169AA

Ethernet (With RJ-45 and Optical SFP XCVR Receptacle) (32T1)

1-26

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

XMTR Crystals are soldered and tuned up on an oscillator assembly board at the factory.
Table 1 - 7 XMTR Options
Type No.

Part Number

Applications/Frequency/Remarks

UD-35AN-1*

3DH03137AA

DS1/E1 6400-6525 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AN-4 3DH03137AD or
UD-35AN-7 3DH03137AG

UD-35AN-2*

3DH03137AB

DS1/E1 6525-6875 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AN-5 3DH03137AE or
UD-35AN-8 3DH03137AH

UD-35AN-3*

3DH03137AC

DS1/E1 6875-7125 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AN-6 3DH03137AF or
UD-35AN-9 3DH03137AJ

UD-35AN-4**

3DH03137AD

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6400-6525 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AN-7 3DH03137AG***

UD-35AN-5**

3DH03137AE

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6525-6875 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AN-8 3DH03137AH***

UD-35AN-6**

3DH03137AF

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6875-7125 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AN-9 3DH03137AJ***

UD-35AN-7

3DH03137AG

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6400-6525 MHz

UD-35AN-8

3DH03137AH

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6525-6875 MHz

UD-35AN-9

3DH03137AJ

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6875-7125 MHz

UD-35AQ-1*

3DH03236AA

DS1/E1 5850-5925 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AQ-3 3DH03236AC or
UD-35AQ-6 3DH03236AF

UD-35AQ-2*

3DH03236AB

DS1/E1 5925-6425 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AQ-6 3DH03236AF

UD-35AQ-3**

3DH03236AC

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 5850-5925 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AQ-6 3DH03236AF***

1-27

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Table 1 - 7 XMTR Options (Cont.)


Type No.

Part Number

Applications/Frequency/Remarks

UD-35AQ-4**

3DH03236AD

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 5925-6425 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AQ-6 3DH03236AF***

UD-35AQ-5**

3DH03236AE

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 5725-6425 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AQ-6 3DH03236AF

UD-35AQ-6**

3DH03236AF

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 5725-6475 MHz

UD-35AP-1*

3DH03228AA

DS1/E1 10400-10700 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AP-4 3DH032228AD or UD35AP-7 3DH032228AG

UD-35AP-2*

3DH03228AB

DS1/E1 10700-11200 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AP-5 3DH032228AE or UD35AP-8 3DH032228AH

UD-35AP-3*

3DH03228AC

DS1/E1 11200-11700 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AP-6 3DH032228AF or UD35AP-9 3DH032228AJ

UD-35AP-4

3DH03228AD

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 10400-10700 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AP-7 3DH032228AG

UD-35AP-5

3DH03228AE

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 10700-11200 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AP-8 3DH032228AH

UD-35AP-6

3DH03228AF

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 11200-11700 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AP-9 3DH032228AJ

UD-35AP-6

3DH03228AF

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 11200-11700 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AP-9 3DH032228AJ

UD-35AP-7

3DH03228AG

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 10000-10700 MHz

1-28

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Table 1 - 7 XMTR Options (Cont.)


Type No.

Part Number

Applications/Frequency/Remarks

UD-35AP-8

3DH03228AH

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 10700-11200 MHz

UD-35AP-9

3DH03228AJ

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 11200-11700 MHz

UD-35AR-1**

3DH04170AA

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 7125-7750 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AR-3 3DH04170AC

UD-35AR-2**

3DH04170AB

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 7700-8500 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AR-4 3DH04170AD

UD-35AR-3

3DH04170AC

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 7125-7750
MHz***

UD-35AR-4

3DH04170AD

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1*** 7700-8500
MHz

UD-35AS-1**

3EM09626AA

DS1/DS3 2025-2290 MHz


Replaced by UD-35AS-4 3EM09626AD

UD-35AS-2

3EM09626AB

DS1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 1850-1910 MHz

UD-35AS-3

3EM09626AC

DS1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 1930-1990 MHz

UD-35AS-4

3EM09626AD

DS1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 2025-2290 MHz

UD-35AS-5

3EM09626AE

DS1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 2400-2483.5 MHz

UD-35AS-6

3EM09626AF

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 2305-2360 MHz

UD-35AS-7

3EM09626AG

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 1755-1850 MHz

UD-35AT-1

3EM15365AA

DS1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 4400-5000 MHz

UD-35AT-2

3EM15365AB

DS1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 4400-4670 MHz

*
Obsolete. Have been replaced with DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 XMTR.
** Obsolete.
*** Modules have a digital filter with different time delay characteristics that affects frequency diversity configurations. A mix of old and new modules in the same shelf is acceptable for configurations other than
frequency diversity.

1-29

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Table 1 - 8 PA Options
TYPE NO.

PART NUMBER

FREQUENCY/TOP OF STACK
POWER

CONFIGURATION
USED ON

UD-51Z-1

3DH03218AA

5725-6425 MHz, +23dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51Z-2

3DH03218AB

6425-7125 MHz, +23dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51Z-3

3DH03218AC

5725-6425 MHz, +29 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51Z-4

3DH03218AD

6425-7125 MHz, +29 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51Z-5

3DH03218AE

5850-6425 MHz, +31 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51Z-6

3DH03218AF

6425-7125 MHz, +31 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51Z-7

3DH03218AG

5850-6425 MHz, +33 dBm

HSS

UD-51Z-8

3DH03218AH

6425-7125 MHz, +33 dBm

HSS

UD-51AA-1

3DH04136AA

10440-10700 MHz, +27 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AA-2

3DH04136AB

10700-11200 MHz, +27 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AA-3

3DH04136AC

11200-11700 MHz, +27 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AA-4

3DH04136AD

10440-10700 MHz, +23 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AA-5

3DH04136AE

10700-11200 MHz, +23 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AA-6

3DH04136AF

11200-11700 MHz, +23 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AA-7

3DH04136AG

10440-10700 MHz, +29 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AA-8

3DH04136AH

10700-11200 MHz, +29 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AA-9

3DH04136AJ

11200-11700 MHz, +29 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AA-10

3DH04136AK

10000-10700 MHz, +29 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AB-1

3EM04070AA

7125-7750 MHz, +28 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AB-2

3EM04070AB

7700-8500 MHz, +28 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AB-3

3EM04070AC

7125-7750 MHz, +30 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AB-4

3EM04070AD

7700-8500 MHz, +30 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

UD-51AB-5

3EM04070AE

7125-7750 MHz, +32 dBm

HSS and CIS

UD-51AB-6

3EM04070AF

7700-8500 MHz, +32 dBm

HSS and CIS

UD-51AC-1

3EM09037AA

2025-2290 MHz, +32 dBm

HSS

UD-51AC-2

3EM09037AB

1850-1990 MHz, +33 dBm

HSS

UD-51AC-3

3EM09037AC

2305-2483 MHz +33 dBm

HSS

UD-51AC-4

3EM09037AD

1755-1850 MHz +30 dBm

HSS

UD-51AD-1

3EM15140AA

4400-5000 MHz +33 dBm

HSS

UD-51AD-2

3EM15140AB

4400-5001 MHz +29 dBm

HSS, CIS, and COU

Legend:
HSS - Hot_Standby Shelf
CIS - Compact Indoor Shelf
COU - Compact Outdoor Unit

1-30

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

RCVR Crystals are soldered and tuned up on an oscillator assembly board at the factory.
Table 1 - 9 RCVR Options
TYPE NO.

PART NUMBER

APPLICATIONS/FREQUENCY/REMARKS

UD-36AN-1*

3DH03132AA

DS1/E1 6400-6525 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AN-10 3DH03132AK or UD-36AN-14 3DH03132AP

UD-36AN-2*

3DH03132AB

DS1/E1 6525-6875 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AN-11 3DH03132AL or UD-36AN-15 3DH03132AQ

UD-36AN-3*

3DH03132AC

DS1/E1 6875-7125 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AN-12 3DH03132AF or UD-36AN-16 3DH03132AR

UD-36AN-4*

3DH03132AD

DS3 6400-6525 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AN-7 3DH03132AG or UD-36AN-14 3DH03132AP

UD-36AN-5*

3DH03132AE

DS3 6525-6875 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AN-8 3DH03132AQ or UD-36AN-15 3DH03132AQ

UD-36AN-6*

3DH03132AF

DS3 6875-7125 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AN-9 3DH03132AR or UD-36AN-16 3DH03132AR

UD-36AN-7*

3DH03132AG

OC3/STM-1 6400-6525 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AN-10 3DH03132AP or UD-36AN-14 3DH03132AP

UD-36AN-8*

3DH03132AH

DS3/OC3/STM-1 6525-6875 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AN-11 3DH03132AQ or UD-36AN-15 3DH03132AQ

UD-36AN-9*

3DH03132AJ

DS3/OC3/STM-1 6875-7125 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AN-12 3DH03132AR or UD-36AN-16 3DH03132AR

UD-36AN-10*

3DH03132AK

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6400-6525 Replaced by


UD-36AN-14 3DH03132AP

UD-36AN-11*

3DH03132AL

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6525-6875 Replaced by


UD-36AN-15 3DH03132AQ

UD-36AN-12*

3DH03132AM

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6875-7125 Replaced by


UD-36AN-16 3DH03132AR

UD-36AN-13

3DH03132AN

2 DS3 6875-7125 MHz

UD-36AN-14

3DH03132AP

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6400-6525
1-31

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Table 1 - 9 RCVR Options (Cont.)


TYPE NO.

PART NUMBER

APPLICATIONS/FREQUENCY/REMARKS

UD-36AN-15

3DH03132AQ

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6525-6875

UD-36AN-16

3DH03132AR

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 6875-7125

UD-36AP-1*

3DH03231AA

DS1/E1 10400-10700 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-10 3DH03231AK or UD-36AP-13 3DH03231AN

UD-36AP-2*

3DH03231AB

DS1/E1 10700-11200 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-11 3DH03231AL or UD-36AP-13 3DH03231AN

UD-36AP-3*

3DH03231AC

DS1/E1 11200-11700 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-12 3DH03231AM or UD-36AP-13 3DH03231AN

UD-36AP-4*

3DH03231AD

DS3 10400-10700 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-7 3DH03231AG or UD-36AP-13 3DH03231AN

UD-36AP-5*

3DH03231AE

DS3 10700-11200 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-8 3DH03231AH or UD-36AP-13 3DH03231AN

UD-36AP-6*

3DH03231AF

DS3 11200-11700 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-9 3DH03231AJ or UD-36AP-13 3DH03231AN

UD-36AP-7**

DH03231AG

DS3/OC3/STM-1 10400-10700 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-13 3DH03231AN

UD-36AP-8**

3DH03231AH

DS3/OC3/STM-1 10700-11200 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-14 3DH03231AP

UD-36AP-9**

3DH03231AJ

DS3/OC3/STM-1 11200-11700 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-15 3DH03231AQ

UD-36AP-10*

3DH03231AK

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 10400-10700 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-13 3DH03231AN

UD-36AP-11*

3DH03231AL

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 10700-11200 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AP-14 3DH03231AP

UD-36AP-12*

3DH03231AM

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 11200-11700 Replaced by


UD-36AP-15 3DH03231AQ

UD-36AP-13

3DH03231AN

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 10000-10700 MHz

UD-36AP-14

3DH03231AP

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 10700-11200 MHz

UD-36AP-15

3DH03231AQ

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 11200-11700 MHz

UD-36AQ-1*

3DH03239AA

DS1/E1 5850-5925 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AQ-12 3DH03239AM

1-32

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Table 1 - 9 RCVR Options (Cont.)


TYPE NO.

PART NUMBER

APPLICATIONS/FREQUENCY/REMARKS

UD-36AQ-2*

3DH03239AB

DS1/E1 5925-6425 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AQ-12 3DH03239AM

UD-36AQ-3*

3DH03239AC

DS3 5850-5925 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AQ-12 3DH03239AM

UD-36AQ-4*

3DH03239AD

DS3 5925-6425 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AQ-12 3DH03239AM

UD-36AQ-5*

3DH03239AE

DS3/OC3/STM-1 5850-5925 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AQ-12 3DH03239AM

UD-36AQ-6*

3DH03239AF

DS3/OC3/STM-1 5925-6425 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AQ-12 UD 3DH03239AM

UD-36AQ-7*

3DH03239AG

DS1/E1 5725-6425 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AR-12 3DH03239AM

UD-36AQ-8*

3DH03239AH

DS3/OC3/STM-1 5725-6425 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AQ-12 3DH03239AM

UD-36AQ-9**

3DH03239AJ

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 5850-5925 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AQ-12 3DH03239AM

UD-36AQ-10**

3DH03239AK

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 5925-6425 MHz


Replaced by UD-36AQ-12 3DH03239AM

UD-36AQ-11

3DH03239AL

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 5725-6425 MHz

UD-36AQ-12

3DH03239AM

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 5725-6425 MHz

UD-36AR-1**

3DH04175AA

DS1/E1 7125-7750 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AR-7 3DH04175AG or UD-36AR-9 3DH04175AJ

UD-36AR-2**

3DH04175AB

DS1/E1 7700-8500 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AR-8 3DH04175AH or UD-36AR-10 3DH04175AK

UD-36AR-3*

3DH04175AC

DS3 7125-7750 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AR-5 3DH04175AE or UD-36AR-9 3DH04175AJ

UD-36AR-5**

3DH04175AE

DS3/OC3/STM-1 7125-7750 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AR-7 3DH04175AG or UD-36AR-9 3DH04175AJ

UD-36AR-6**

3DH04175AF

DS3/OC3/STM-1 7700-8500 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AR-8 3DH04175AH or UD-36AR-10 3DH04175AK

UD-36AR-7**

3DH04175AG

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 7125-7750 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AR-9 3DH04175AJ

1-33

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Table 1 - 9 RCVR Options (Cont.)


TYPE NO.

PART NUMBER

APPLICATIONS/FREQUENCY/REMARKS

UD-36AR-8**

3DH04175AH

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 7700-8500 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AR-10 3DH04175AK

UD-36AR-9

3DH04175AJ

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 7125-7750 MHz

UD-36AR-10

3DH04175AK

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 7700-8500 MHz

UD-36AS-1*

3EM09628AA

DS1 2025-2290 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AS-7 3DH09628AG

UD-36AS-2*

3EM09628AB

DS3/OC3/STM-1 2025-2290 MHz Replaced by


UD-36AS-7 3DH09628AG

UD-36AS-3

3EM09628AC

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 2025-2290 MHz


Replaced by UD-36AS-7 3DH09628AG

UD-36AS-4

3EM09628AD

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 1850-1910 MHz

UD-36AS-5

3EM09628AE

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 1930-1990 MHz

UD-36AS-6

3EM09628AF

DS1/E1/DS3 2400-2485 MHz

UD-36AS-7

3EM09628AG

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 2025-2290 MHz

UD-36AS-8

3EM09628AH

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 2305-2360 MHz

UD-36AS-9

3EM09628AJ

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 1755-1850 MHz

UD-36AT-1

3EM06561AA

Dual, DS3/OC3/STM-1 5725-6425 MHz

UD-36AU-1

3EM14046AA

Dual, DS3/OC3/STM-1 6400-6525 MHz

UD-36AU-2

3EM14046AB

Dual, DS3/OC3/STM-1 6525-6875 MHz

UD-36AU-3

3EM14046AC

Dual, DS3/OC3/STM-1 6875-7125 MHz

UD-36AW-1

3EM15056AA

Dual, DS3/OC3/STM-1 7125-7750 MHz

UD-36AY-1

3EM15057AA

Dual, DS3/OC3/STM-1 7700-8500 MHz

UD-36AZ-1

3EM15366AA

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 4400-5000 MHz

UD-36AZ-2

3EM15366AB

DS1/E1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 4400-4600 MHz

UD-36BA-1

3EM17800AA

Dual DS3/OC3/STM-1 4400-5000 MHz

*
Obsolete. Have been replaced with DS1/DS3/OC3/STM-1 Integrated RCVR.
** Obsolete.

1-34

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Table 1 - 10 Capacity Keys For Transmitter And Receiver Modules


CAPACITY KEY

TCM/QAM

RADIO TYPE

CONFIGURATION

967-1609-001

32 TCM

MDR-85XX-2

2 DS1

967-1609-002

32 TCM

MDR-85XX-4

4 DS1

967-1609-003

32 TCM

MDR-85XX-8

8 DS & Ethernet 12 MB/S

967-1609-004

32 TCM

MDR-85XX-12

2 DS1

967-1609-005

32 TCM

MDR-85XX-16

16 DS1 & Ethernet 24 MB/S

967-1609-006

128 TCM

MDR-87XX-2

2 DS1

967-1609-007

128 TCM

MDR-87XX-4

4 DS1

967-1609-008

128 TCM

MDR-87XX-8

8 DS1& Ethernet 12 Mb/s

967-1609-009

128 TCM

MDR-87XX-12

2 DS1

967-1609-010

128 TCM

MDR-87XX-16

16 DS1 & Ethernet 24 Mb/s

967-1609-011

32 TCM

MDR-85XXi-2

2 E1

967-1609-012

32 TCM

MDR-85XXi-4

4 E1

967-1609-013

32 TCM

MDR-85XXi-8

8 E1

967-1609-014

32 TCM

MDR-85XXi-12

12 E1

967-1609-015

32 TCM

MDR-85XXi-16

16 E1

967-1609-016

128 TCM

MDR-87XXi-2

2 E1

967-1609-017

128 TCM

MDR-87XXi-4

4 E1

967-1609-018

128 TCM

MDR-87XXi-8

8 E1

967-1609-019

128 TCM

MDR-87XXi-12

2 E1

967-1609-020

128 TCM

MDR-87XXi-16

16 E1

3EM01583AA

64 QAM

MDR-86XX-45

1 DS3

3EM12115AB

32 TCM

MDR-85XX-90

2 DS3

3EM01583AB

64 QAM

MDR-86XX-135

3 DS3

3EM04177AA

128 TCM

MDR-87XX-52

OC3/STM-1 (1 STS1)
& Ethernet 50 Mb/s

3EM04177AB

128 TCM

MDR-87XX-155

OC3/STM-1 (3 STS1)
& Ethernet 150 Mb/s

3EM1609-023

32 TCM

MDR-85XXE-8

Ethernet 8 Mb/s

3EM1609-025

32 TCM

MDR-85XXE-16

Ethernet 16 Mb/s

*One capacity key is required for each UD-35( ) Transmitter and for each UD-36( ) Receiver.

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Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Table 1 - 11 LBO/OC3/STM-1 AUX Interface Options


MODULE/DESCRIPTION

PART NUMBER

APPLICATIONS

DS1 LBO (Domestic) 0-330 ft. (Near)

3DH03144AA

Linear/Ring

DS1 LBO (Domestic) 330-660 ft. (Far)

3DH03144AB

Linear/Ring

E1 LBO (International)

3DH03144AC

Linear/Ring

DS3 LBO

3DH03173AK

Hot Standby/ Frequency


Diversity, Linear/Ring

OC3/STM-1 AUX Interface

3EM03367AA

DX-40M-1 DS1 LBO (Domestic) 0-330 ft (Near)

3EM13662AB

Compact, Linear/Ring

DX-40P-1 OC3/STM-1 Aux Interface

3EM13693AA

Compact, Linear/Ring
OC3 and Ethernet (4 DS1)

ETH/T1 Line Interface

3EM16300AA

Linear/Ring, Ethernet (32 T1)

Table 1 - 12 Fan Assembly/Laptop Tray Options


DESCRIPTION

PART NUMBER

REMARKS

Fan Assy

3EM14098AA

Contains four fans that can be replaced individually.


Slots are available for eight fans, but only four are used.
A front panel alarm LED illuminates if a fan fails.
Required for Dual RCVR operation and can be used for
all hot-standby shelf configurations requiring a fan assy.
Replaces 967-0500-00X series fan assemblies.

Fan Assy

967-0500-001

Contains four fans that can be replaced individually.


A front panel alarm illuminates if a fan fails.
Manufacture Discontinued. Replaced by Fan Assy
3EM14098AA for all configurations requiring a fan
assembly.

Fan Assy With Laptop Tray

967-0500-002

Contains a pullout tray to place a laptop computer and


four fans that can be replaced individually. A front panel
alarm illuminates if a fan fails.
Manufacture Discontinued. Replaced by Fan Assy
3EM14098AA for all configurations requiring a fan
assembly.

Compact Radio Fan Assy

3EM11901AB

Contains four fans that can be replaced individually.


A front panel alarm illuminates if a fan fails.

Laptop Tray

967-0500-003

Contains a pullout tray to place a laptop computer.

Compact Fan Assy

3EM11901AB

Required for various high power options

1-36

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

1.13.1 Diplexer Filter Kits

Each kit contains diplexer, RF switch assembly, and cables for a specific configuration.
The RF switch assembly (PN 978-0490-001, 002, 003 consist of isolators/circulators that are
frequency dependent. For DS1 diplexer kit options, refer to Integral LM drawing
(3DH041220000UDZZA) in the Diagrams Section. For DS3 and OC3/STM-1 diplexer kit
options, refer to Integral LM drawing (3DH041580000UDZZA) in the Diagrams Section.
1.13.2 Standard Filter Kits

Each standard filter kit contains filter, isolators, circulators, and cables for a specific configuration. See Equipping Option Drawing (3DH031770000BJZZA) in the Diagrams Section for
information.
1.13.3 Cable Drop Kit Option

The cable drop kit option is available for all radio configurations. This option replaces
waveguide with coaxial cable. Refer to engineering drawing 967-1665-XXX in the
Diagrams Section for list of kit parts.
FAN ASSEMBLY
See Figure 1-7 and Figure 1-8. The Fan Assembly fits into a standard 19 in. (483 mm) rack
and occupies two vertical rack increments. Four options are available for hot standby shelf and
1 option for Compact shelf. Refer to Table 1-12 for details.
1.14

FAN (4 EA)

FAN ALARM CARD

FRONT
OF FAN ASSEMBLY

LAPTOP TRAY
ALM LED

LMW-7031-sm
07/28/02

Figure 1-7 Fan Assembly


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3EM20188AAAA
General Section

When equipped with fans, the fan assembly mounts directly below the radio and plugs into
connector J302 on the MDR-8000 backplane. The four fans provide air flow to help dissipate
heat. Power is provided by the backplane. When not equipped with fans, the assembly can be
mounted in any rack location.

LAPTOP TRAY
EXTENDED
LMW-7032-sm
07/28/02

Figure 1 - 8 Fan Assembly With Laptop Tray Fully Extended

FAN (4 EA)
SLOTS AVAILABLE
FOR 8 FANS
(4 UNUSED)

FAN ALARM CARD

FRONT
OF FAN ASSEMBLY
ALM LED

Figure 1 - 9 Fan Assembly (PN 3EM14098AA)


1-38

LMW-9077-sm
02/15/04

3EM20188AAAA
General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

MDR-1025
06/12/04

Figure 1 - 10 Compact Radio Fan Assembly (PN 3EM11901AB)


HANDSET KIT
See Figure 1 - 11. The handset kit consists of a handset, telephone cord, and handset holder.
The handset is a push button multi-frequency type handset. The handset cord supplied with
the handset contains an RJ11 connector on each end. The handset holder attaches to any flat
surface with double-sided tape.
1.15

TONE/PULSE (FV/DC)
MODE SWITCH SET
TO FV FOR TONES

HANDSET

HANDSET
HOLDER

LMW-7034-sm
07/28/02

Figure 1 - 11 Handset Kit


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General Section

FIBER MANAGEMENT PANEL


There is a fiber management panel available for 2 or 4 fiber configurations (PN 3EM09257AB) and
a fiber management panel available for 2x4-fiber switched configurations (PN 3EM09257AA).
1.16

1.16.1 2 or 4 Fiber Management Panel

See Figure 1 - 12. The 2 or 4 fiber management panel provides a direct interface with customers 2 or 4 fiber equipment. The two fibers on a non-standby radio or four fibers on a hotstandby radio connect to the two or four fibers from the customers equipment. The 2 or 4 fiber
configuration requires the duplex adapter panel to route the fiber to/from the I/O interface
modules. One duplex adapter panel can accommodate two radio shelves. Customer fiber must
have SC type connectors.

FIBER CLIP

SC DUPLEX
ADAPTER BRACKET

BEND RADIUS CLIP

FIBER CLIP

FIBER CLIP

LMW-6040-SM
07/28/02

FIBER CLIP
BEND RADIUS CLIP

Figure 1 - 12 2 or 4 Fiber Management Panel


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General Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

1.16.2 2x4 Fiber Switched Management Panel

See Figure 1 - 13. The 2x4 fiber management panel interfaces the four fibers on a hot-standby
shelf with customers 2-fiber equipment. The 2x4 fiber configuration requires combiner splitter
units to route the fiber to/from the I/O interface modules. One combiner/splitter unit per radio
shelf is required. The 2x4-fiber management panel has cutouts for two combiner/splitter units
and can accommodate two radio shelves.

SPLITTER/COMBINER
UNIT 1

BEND RADIUS
CLIP
FIBER CLIP

SPLITTER/COMBINER
UNIT 2

FIBER CLIP

FIBER CLIP
BEND RADIUS
CLIP

LMW-6041-SM
07/28/02

Figure 1 - 13 2x4 - Fiber Management Panel


1-41

1-42

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SFP XCVR
Options
(With LC Connector)
P/N

Ethernet SFP Modules

Fiber Length Max

3EM20277AA

850 NM Multimode

550 Meter

3EM20277AB

1310 NM Singlemode

10 Kilometers

3EM20277AC

1310 NM Singlemode

40 Kilometer

3EM20277AD

1550 NM Singlemode

80 Kilometer

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

APPLICATIONS

2.1
INTRODUCTION
The MDR-8000 family of microwave radios is specifically designed to satisfy the evolving
needs of public, private, government, and international networks. Each DS1/E1 radio offers
the flexibility of 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 DS1s or E1s to meet the need for low capacity domestic or international systems. Each DS3 radio offers up to three DS3s with equal number of wayside DS1s
to meet domestic high capacity system requirements. Each OC3/STM-1 radio offers one or
three STS1s with equal number of wayside DS1s or E1s to meet domestic or international
Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) system requirements. The MDR-8000E Ethernet
radio provides transport for IP/packet data in licensed and unlicensed frequency bands. The
radio supports 10baseT, 100baseT, and 1000baseT interface rates with auto-negotiation and
can be configured to transport low and high capacity data at RF frequencies in the 2, 4, 5, 6, 7/
8, and 10/11 GHz bands.
The number of channels transmitted and the RF channel bandwidth depend on the capacity
keys installed in the transmitter and receiver modules. The modulation formats are 32 or 128
TCM (DS1/E1), 64 QAM (DS3), and 128 TCM (OC3/STM-1). Growth in DS1/E1 system capacity can be performed in service and requires only exchanging capacity keys. Growth from DS1/
E1 to DS3 system capacity is an out-of-service procedure and requires exchanging modules
and capacity keys. Changing to OC3/STM-1 system capacity is performed out-of-service and
requires exchanging modules, and capacity keys.
All radios are available in 1:0 non-standby (NS) and 1:1 hot-standby (HS) and frequency diversity (FD). The HS version allows for troubleshooting and module replacement, on an in-service
basis. Space diversity can be added to any of the three basic configurations. In addition to the
three basic configurations, the OC3/STM-1 radio is available with a 0:2 dual channel (no protection) equipment configuration and the protected OC3/STM-1 radio is also available in a 2 X
4-fiber or 4-fiber cable configuration.
2.2
TYPICAL USERS
Because of unique flexibility in both frequency and capacity, the MDR-8000/i/s can be used for
a variety of voice, data, and video applications, for many types of users, some of which are
listed as follows:
Personal Communication Systems (PCS)
Cellular Operators
Common Carriers
Alternate Access and Competitive Access Providers (CAP)
Private Networks
Educational Institutions
State, Local, and Federal Government Systems
International Users.

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Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.3
UNLICENSED RADIO
The MDR-8X05u/8X02u (unlicensed) radio provides fast deployment of service with microwave
radio No license and small antennas (no FCC requirements) allow immediate turnup. After the
license is received, the unlicensed radio can be easily converted to the lower 6 GHz licensed
band.
Refer to drawing 3DH031770001BJZZA for configurations and equipping options.
The MDR-8X05u radio operates in the 5725-5850 and 2400-2483.5 Information, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) band in accordance with FCC Part 15.247. This unlicensed radio, although operating in
the same band as a spread spectrum radio, operates using narrower bandwidths than spread spectrum. Advantages, disadvantages, and antenna recommendations for the unlicensed radio follow:
2.3.1

Advantages
Fast installation and turnup
2, 4, 8, 16 DS1, DS3, and OC3/STM-1 capacities
Field convertible to lower 6 GHz licensed band
Field expandable to higher capacities.
Common network management with licensed radios.
Common spares and training with licensed radios

2.3.2

Disadvantages
No interference protection
Operating restrictions
5.725 to 5.850 GHz band/2.4 to 2.4835 GHz
Performance could deteriorate due to interference as the frequency band becomes
congested.

2.3.3

Antenna Recommendations
Frequency 5.8 GHz/2.4 GHz
Size and Type 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 foot parabolic; 1 or 2 foot flat panel.
Gain and Beamwidth (3 dB)

2-2

5.8 GHz

2.4 GHz

2 ft parabolic 29 dB/6

2 ft parabolic 20 dB/13.8

4 ft parabolic 35 dB/3

4 ft parabolic 27 dB/6.9

6 ft parabolic 38 dB/2

6 ft parabolic 30.5 dB/4.6

8 ft parabolic 41 dB/1.5

8 ft parabolic 33.3 dB/3.5

10 ft parabolic 42.5 dB/1.2

10 ft parabolic 35.2 dB/2.8

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3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

Note
When using a 1 ft flat panel antenna with a 1 watt (+30 dBm) output power,
the antenna must be located in an area that does not allow the general population access to within 5 feet (5.8 Ghz) or 6.5 feet (2.4 Ghz) of the antenna.
5.8 GHz

2.4 GHz

1 ft flat panel 23 dB/9

1 ft flat panel 18 dB/30

2 ft flat panel 28 dB/3.5

2.4
Compact RADIO
The MDR-8000 Compact radio extends the applicability of the MDR-8000 radio product line
and provides a means of quick and efficient deployment using one of two configurations; the
Compact Indoor Shelf or the Compact Outdoor Unit.
2.4.1

Features
Space efficient chassis for non-standby configurations
Indoor shelf = 4 rack increments tall
Supports entire range of capacities and frequency bands for MDR-8000 family
Capacity:2-16 DS11-3 DS3 with 1-3 wayside DS1OC3/STM-1 with 3 wayside DS1
Frequency Bands:

2 GHz 5.8 GHz (unlicensed)


6 GHz 7/8 GHz
10.5 GHz
11 GHz
Retains all performance and overhead features of conventional MDR-8000 Hotstandby shelf:

Same RF performance
USI craft interface with ELMC
SNMP, MCS-11, and TBOS telemetry
Module interchangeability with entire MDR-8000 product line
Configurations supported:

Non-standby
Non-standby with space diversity
Ring or loop terminal
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Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.4.2 Compact Indoor Shelf


The MDR-8000 Compact Indoor Unit is a reduced-size package for non-standby radio configurations. The reduced size of the Compact Indoor Unit fills the need for indoor rack installations at sites that lack the space for traditional indoor installations.
2.4.2.1

2.4.2.2

Similarities To Traditional Hot-Standby Shelf

Same application software

Same USI

Same modules except LBO (LBO was re-packaged)

Same non-standby functions

Differences From Traditional Hot-Standby Shelf

Physical size

Different backplane

Non-standby only

Different LBO/OC3/STM-1 AUX Interface board

2.4.3 Compact Outdoor Unit


The Compact Outdoor Unit is a pole-mountable outdoor enclosure. This enclosure configuration allows operators to setup a microwave terminal by attaching the outdoor enclosure to an
available pole or wall or a 4 1/2 in. pole set into the ground.
2.4.3.1

2.4.3.2

2-4

Typical Non-Standby Applications

Low-density microwave routes with less than eight T1s

Backup for other wireline facilities

Networks with ring protection switching

Similarities To Compact Indoor Shelf

Same application software

Same USI

Same cardcage

Same backplane

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

2.4.3.3

Same modules

Same connectors

Same non-standby functions

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

Differences From Compact Indoor Shelf

Physical size

Physical configuration

Mounting

2.5
ETHERNET RADIO
Ethernet is a Local Area Network (LAN) technology that transmits information between computers at speeds of 10, 100, and 1000 million bits per second (Mbps).
2.5.1 Ethernet Standards
IEEE 802.3 is the hardware standard for Ethernet cards and cables. All Ethernet equipment
manufacturers after 1985 conform to this standard. The IEEE standard has been adopted by
the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), making it a world-wide networking standard.
2.5.2 Ethernet Protocol
Ethernet uses Carrier Sense, Multiple Access, Collision Detect (CSMACD) protocol. The Multiple Access part means that every station is connected to a single copper wire or single data
path (multiple wires connected to form a single data path). The Carrier Sense port checks the
wire to see if any other station is transmitting data before starting transmission. The Collision
Detect part shuts down communication between stations when a collision (caused by two stations transmitting at the same time) is detected.
2.5.3 Ethernet Media
The MDR-8000E Ethernet radio uses the 10/100/1000BaseT Ethernet media. The IEEE short
hand identifier 10/100/1000BaseT includes three pieces of information. The first item 10/100/
1000 stands for the media speed in Mbps. The word Base stands for baseband, meaning only
Ethernet signals are carried over the media. The third part of the identifier T indicates
twisted pair is used for the segment type.
2.6
TYPICAL APPLICATIONS
See Figure 2 - 1 for a typical application diagram. In this typical application, the MDR-8000E
Ethernet radio replaces the DS3 leased line.

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Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

TIER 1
ISP

LAN

TIER 2
ISP

LEASED
LINE
OR
ETHERNET

LAN

ETHERNET

10/100/1000Base T

MDR-8000E
RADIO

MDR-8000E
RADIO

10/100/1000Base T

MDR-1079F
05/24/05

Figure 2 - 1 Typical MDR-8000 Ethernet Radio Application Diagram

2.7
EXPANDING NETWORKS
Each port of a repeater hub inks individual Ethernet media segments together to create a
larger network that operates as a single Ethernet LAN.
Each part of a packet switching hub provides a connection to an Ethernet media system that
operates as a separate Ethernet LAN.
2.8
TRANSMISSION GUIDELINES
Ease of implementation and operation are key elements for communication systems of this
type. The basic requirements of MDR-8000/i/s systems are:
A line of sight must exist between the two antenna locations points
The path length must meet the generally acceptable guideline for applicable 6, 7,
8, 10, and 11 GHz application.
Path lengths can vary significantly between geographic areas. Parameters such as signal
availability requirements, antenna sizes, length of waveguide runs, climatic conditions, and so
on, must be considered to determine acceptable path lengths. Figure 2 - 2 illustrates the typical
achievable path lengths as a function of radio transmitter power and Figure 2 - 3 shows the
Crane Rain model which defines the seven different Rain regions of the United States and
Canada.

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Applications Section

Figure 2 - 2 Maximum Path Length


2-7

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Figure 2 - 3 Crane Rain Model


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Applications Section

2.9
FEATURES
MDR-8000/i/s features include the following:
Trellis Coded Modulation and Digital Filtering (DS1/E1 and OC3/STM-1)
Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) and Digital Filtering (DS3)
Frequency agility
Capacity agility
Wayside DS1 availability (DS3 and OC3/STM-1)
Configuration agility
System gain agility
In-service capacity upgrade capability
Forward error correction and adaptive time domain equalization
Errorless receiver switching
Extended link monitor channel
Automatic transmit power control (enable/disable)
Monitor-control interfaces:
Relay contact closures (parallel) (optional)
MCS-11 high-speed serial performance monitoring
E2A/TBOS serial
Three 64 kb/s service channels
Two audio service channels
Seamless interface with the MDR-8000/i and existing MDR-4000e/i, 5606,
6000/i, and 7000 digital radio product lines.
Seamless interface with the MDR-8000s and existing MDR-4000s SONET
radio.
Easy installation and turnup
These features are described in the following paragraphs.
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2.10

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

MODULATION AND DIGITAL FILTERING

2.10.1 Low Capacity Radios


Two Trellis Coded Modulation (TCM) choices (32 and 128 TCM) are available in the low-capacity radios. The 32 TCM provides maximum system gain for longer paths, higher availability,
and smaller sized antennas. The 128 TCM provides maximum spectral efficiency for use at
congested nodal sites requiring numerous paths or where only limited RF bandwidths are
available. A simple capacity key change converts the radio from one type of modulation to the
other, offering the user the maximum benefit depending on capacity, path length, and availability requirements. This flexibility also provides radio users the most alternatives in frequency congested areas.
A narrow transmitter spectrum with very little wasted out-of-band energy is characteristic of
TCM. The resulting spectrums are easily coordinated into the most congested frequency bands
because they dont interfere with existing users.
2.10.2 High Capacity Radios
The DS3 radio uses a 64 Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) scheme. The OC3/STM-1
radio uses the 128 TCM modulation scheme.
2.10.3 High and Low Capacity Radios
The MDR-8000 employs digital filtering in the transmitter to further reduce out-of-band emissions and digital filtering in the receiver to reject nearby interfering signals. Digital filtering
also allows optimum filter partitioning between the transmitter and receiver to produce the
greatest system gain attainable for a given modulation technique. Improved filter consistency,
repeatability and reliability are additional benefits of digital filters that result in lower user
cost by reducing maintenance and replacement part expenses.
2.10.4 Electrical Differences
The major differences between the radios within each RF band are the number and type of
input signals that each radio will accept and the bandwidth efficiency. Table 2 - 1 summarizes
the major electrical differences between these radios.
2.11
FREQUENCY AGILITY
The MDR-8000 uses a factory tuned crystal oscillator subboard, on both the transmitter and
receiver modules. The subboard is easily removed and replaced by a factory replacement,
tuned to the new frequency.
2.11.1 Frequency Bands And Spacings
Refer to engineering drawing 3DH 03177 0001 BGZZA in the Diagrams section.
2.11.2 Frequency Plans
Refer to Figure 2 - 4 through Figure 2 - 9 for the North America (FCC Part 101) 2 GHz, lower 5
GHz, upper 5 GHz, lower 6 GHz, upper 6 GHz, 10 GHz, and 11 GHz channel plans.

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Applications Section

Table 2 - 1 MDR-8000 Radio Types


RADIO TYPE

CAPACITY (MBPS)

MDR-85xx-2
MDR-85xx-4
MDR-85xx-8
MDR-85xx-12
MDR-85xx-16

2
4
8
12
16

X
X
X
X
X

1.544
1.544
1.544
1.544
1.544

MODULATION
32
32
32
32
32

TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM

RF BANDWIDTH
REQUIREMENT
1.25
2.50
3.75
5.50
7.50

MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz

(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)

MDR-8505u-2
MDR-8505u-4
MDR-8505u-8
MDR-8505u-16

2
4
8
16

X
X
X
X

1.544
1.544
1.544
1.544

32
32
32
32

TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM

1.25
2.50
3.75
7.00

MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz

(1)

MDR-87xx-2
MDR-87xx-4
MDR-87xx-8
MDR-87xx-12
MDR-87xx-16

2
4
8
12
16

X
X
X
X
X

1.544
1.544
1.544
1.544
1.544

128
128
128
128
128

TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM

0.80
1.25
2.50
3.75
5.00

MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz

(1)

1.25
2.50
5.00
7.00
9.00

MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz

(2)

0.80
1.50
3.00
5.00
7.00

MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz

(2)

MDR-85xxi-2
MDR-85xxi-4
MDR-85xxi-8
MDR-85xxi-12
MDR-85xxi-16
MDR-87xxi-2
MDR-87xxi-4
MDR-87xxi-8
MDR-87xxi-12
MDR-87xxi-16

2
4
8
12
16
2
4
8
12
16

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

2.048
2.048
2.048
2.048
2.048
2.048
2.048
2.048
2.048
2.048

32
32
32
32
32
128
128
128
128
128

TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM

MDR-86xx-45
MDR-86xx-135

1 X 44.736
3 X 44.736

64 QAM
64 QAM

10 MHz
30 MHz

MDR-8605u-45

1 X 44.736

64 QAM

10 MHz

MDR-87xx-52
MDR-87xx-155

1 X 51.840
3 X 51.840

MDR-85XXE-8
MDR-85XXE-16
MDR-87XXE-12
MDR-87XXE-24
MDR-87XXE-50
MDR-87XXE-150

128 TCM
128 TCM

10 MHz
30 MHz

Up to 8 Mb/s
Up to 16 Mb/s

32 TCM
32 TCM

2.5 MHz
5.0 MHz

Up
Up
Up
Up

128
128
128
128

2.5 MHz
5.0 MHz
10.0 MHz
30.0 MHz

to
to
to
to

12 Mb/s
24 Mb/s
50 Mb/s
150 Mb/s

(1)

FCC channel bandwidth

(2)

99% power bandwidth

TCM
TCM
TCM
TCM

(1)
(1)
(1)

(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

2-11

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

GO CHANNELS

5
02

0
2.5

MH

MH

20

A1

20

A2

B1

B3

C3

C8

MH

B7

C9

20

MH

C12

MH

10
21

B10

C13

C14

MH

10 MHz
(A)

A8

B9

C11

0
2.5

21

A7

B8

C10

0
2.5

A6

B6

C7

0
2.5

20

A5

B5

C6

MH

20

A4

C5

0
2.5

MH

20

B4

C4

0
2.5

C15

B11

7.5 MHz
(B)

C16

5.0 MHz
(C)
2.5 MHz
(D)
1.25 MHz
(E)

E1

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10 D11 D12 D13 D14 D15 C16 D17 D18 D19 D20 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30 D31D32 D33
E2
E3
E4
E5
E6
E7
E8
E9
E10
E11
E12
E13
E14
E15
E16
E17
E18
E19
E20
E21
E22
E23
E24
E25
E26
E27
E28
E29
E30
E31
E32
E33
E34
E35
E36
E37
E38
E39
E40
E41
E42
E43
E44
E45
E46
E47
E48
E49
E50
E51
E52
E53
E54
E55
E56
E57
E58
E59
E60
E61
E62
E63
E64
E65
E66

C2

MH

A3

B2

C1

0
2.5

20

0
2.5

MH

RETURN CHANNELS

22

H
0M

17

H
0M

27

H
0M

37

47

H
0M

H
0M

67

77

22

22

22

22

22

22

22

22

A1'

A2'

A3'

A4'

A5'

A6'

A7'

A8'

B1'

C2'

B3'

C3'

C4'

B4'

C5'

B5'

C6'

C7'

B6'

C8'

B7'

C9'

C10'

B8'

C11'

C12'

B9'

C13'

B10'

C14'

C15'

MH

22

10 MHz
(A')
B11'

7.5 MHz
(B')

C16'

5.0 MHz
(C')
2.5 MHz
(D')
1.25 MHz
(E')

E1'

D1' D2' D3' D4' D5' D6' D7' D8' D9' D10' D11' D12' D13' D14' D15' C16' D17' D18' D19' D20' D21' D22' D23' D24' D25' D26' D27' D28' D29' D30' D31' D32' D33'

LMW-7081
08/02/02

NOTE
FREQUENCY SEPARATION BETWEEN GO
AND RETURN RF CHANNELS IS 175 MHz

Figure 2 - 4 2 GHz Channel Plan


2-12

0
5.5

E2'
E3'
E4'
E5'
E6'
E7'
E8'
E9'
E10'
E11'
E12'
E13'
E14'
E15'
E16'
E17'
E18'
E19'
E20'
E21'
E22'
E23'
E24'
E25'
E26'
E27'
E28'
E29'
E30'
E31'
E32'
E33'
E34'
E35'
E36'
E37'
E38'
E39'
E40'
E41'
E42'
E43'
E44'
E45'
E46'
E47'
E48'
E49'
E50'
E51'
E52'
E53'
E54'
E55'
E56'
E57'
E58'
E59'
E60'
E61'
E62'
E63'
E64'
E65'
E66'

C1'

B2'

H
0M

.5

.5

.5

57

H
0M

.5

.5

.5

.5

.5

07

H
0M

H
0M

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

5725

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

5755

5785 5790

5820

5850

Frequency (MHz)

(LOWER)

5725

5755

5790

5820

5850

(UPPER)

5725

5755

5785

5820

5850
LMW-7074
07/30/02

Figure 2 - 5 Unlicensed Band Channel Plan


2-13

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

Figure 2 - 6 Lower 6 GHz Channel Plan


2-14

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

6525 MHz

6710 MHz

LOW BAND

10 MHz (D)
5.0 MHz (E)
3.75 MHz (F)
2.5 MHz (G)
1.25 MHz (H)

J1

J2

D17

12 34

J3

J4

D1

D2

D3

D18

J6

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

D5

E1

E2

E3

E4

E5

E6

E7

E8

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

5 6 7 89 1 111 1 1 11 1 1 222 2 22 2 2 2
0 123 4 5 67 8 9 012 3 45 6 7 8

J5

D4

D6

D7

D15

E9 E10 E11 E
F9

F10

F11

D16

E28 E29 E30 E31

F28 F29 F30

F31

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

60 61 62 63 64 65 66

2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 45 55 5 5 555
9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 90 12 3 4 567

111 1111 11 11 1 1 1
122 2222 22 22 33 3
901 2345 6 7 89 01 2

800 kHz (J)


400 kHz (K)

6710 MHz

6875 MHz

HIGH BAND

D1

D2

E1 E31 E3
F1

66 4

F31

D3

D5

E2

E5

E4

E6

E7

E8

F2

F5

F4

F6

F7

F8

F3

3 14 8 9

D4

D6

D7

E9 E10 E11 E
F9

F10

F11

7 12 13 10 11 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

1 17 8 9 1 5 6 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 23 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 55 5 5 555
3 3
0
7 8 5 6 7 8 1 23 4 3 4 5 6 9 0 1 21 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 12 3 4 567
1 2

D16

10 MHz (D)

E25 E26 E27 E28 E29 E30

5.0 MHz (E)

F25 F26 F27 F28 F29 F30

3.75 MHz (F)

D14

D15

54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 15 1 2

1 1 1 11 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 11 1 1 1 2 3 12 3 4
0 0 0 11 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 2 2 22 2 2 22 2 2 3 9 0
7 8 9 01 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 0 1 23 4 5 6 7 8 9 0

800 kHz (J)


MW21100481
052198

400 kHz (K)

J1

J2

J3

J4

2.5 MHz (G)


1.25 MHz (H)

J5

J6

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Figure 2 - 7 Upper 6 GHz Channel Plan


2-15

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

LOW BAND

10550 MHz

10615 MHz


E1

5 MHz (E)
3.75 MHz (F)

E2

F1

2.5 MHz (G)

G1

E3

F2

G2

G3

E4

F3

G4

E5

F4

G5 G6

G7

E6

F5

E7

F6

E8

F7

E9

F8

E10

F9

E11

F10

F11

G8 G9 G10 G11 G12 G13 G14 G15 G16 G17 G18 G19 G20 G21 G22 G23 G24 G25 G26

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4

1.25 MHz (H)

4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5
5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2

NARROW BAND

J1

800 kHz (J)

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

J7

J8

J9

J10 J11 J12

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4

400 kHz (K)

HIGH BAND

10615 MHz

E1

E2

F1

G1

G2

F2

G3

G4

E3

E4

F3

G5 G6

F4

G7

E5

F5

E6

E7

F6

10680 MHz

E8

F7

E9

F8

E10

F9

E11

F10

5 MHz (E)
3.75 MHz (F)

F11

G8 G9 G10 G11 G12 G13 G14 G15 G16 G17 G18 G19 G20 G21 G22 G23 G24 G25 G26

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4

4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5
5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2

2.5 MHz (G)


1.25 MHz (H)

NARROW BAND

800 kHz (J)


400 kHz (K)

J1

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

J7

J8

J9

J10 J11 J12

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4

MW21100491
052098

Figure 2 - 8 10 GHz Channel Plan


2-16

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

LOW BAND

10700 MHz



A1

40 MHz (A)
30 MHz (B)
10 MHz (D)

B1

A3

A2

B2

B3

A5

A4

B4

A7

A6

B5

B6

A8

B7

B8

A10

A9

B9

B10

11200 MHz

A11

B11

A12

B12

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4

B13

4 4 4 4 4 5
5 6 7 8 9 0

NARROW BAND

5.0 MHz (E)


3.75 MHz (F)
2.5 MHz (G)
1.25 MHz (H)

11200 MHz

40 MHz (A)
30 MHz (B)
10 MHz (D)

A1
B1

E1

E2

E3

E4

E5

E6

E7

E8

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

E9 E10 E11 E12 E13 E14


F9

F10

F11

F12 F13

F14

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 91 111 1 111 1 1 22 2 2 22 2 222 3 3 33 3 3 3 33 3 444 4 4 4 4 4 445 5 5 5 5 5 5


0 123 4 567 8 9 01 2 3 45 6 789 0 1 23 4 5 6 78 9 012 3 4 5 6 7 890 1 2 3 4 5 6



HIGH BAND

A3

A2

B2

B3

A5

A4

B4

B5

A7

A6

B6

11700 MHz

A8

B7

B8

A10

A9

B9

B10

A11

B11

A12

B12

B13

1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 5
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 0

NARROW BAND

5.0 MHz (E)


3.75 MHz (F)
2.5 MHz (G)
1.25 MHz (H)

E1

E2

E3

E4

E5

E6

E7

E8

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

E9 E10 E11 E12 E13 E14


F9

F10

F11

F12 F13

F14

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 91 111 1 111 1 1 22 2 2 22 2 222 3 3 33 3 3 3 33 3 444 4 4 4 4 4 445 5 5 5 5 5 5


0 123 4 567 8 9 01 2 3 45 6 789 0 1 23 4 5 6 78 9 012 3 4 5 6 7 890 1 2 3 4 5 6

MW21100501
052098

Figure 2 - 9 11 GHz Channel Plan


2-17

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

2.12

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

CAPACITY AGILITY

2.12.1 Low Capacity Radios


A small sub-board, called a capacity key, is used to change the maximum capacity from 2 to 4
to 8 to 12 or 16 DS1, making it easy to add two or more DS1/E1 lines, up to the maximum
capacity allowed by the capacity key, as the system grows.
2.12.2 High Capacity Radios
DS3 capacity keys, are used to change the maximum capacity from one to three DS3, making
it easy to add two more DS3 lines as the system grows. OC3/STM-1 capacity keys, are used to
change the maximum capacity from one to three STS1, for future growth.
2.12.2.1 Wayside DS1
Wayside DS1 is an option in the MDR-8000 high capacity radios. This option provides 1 DS1
for each DS3 or STS-1 equipped. To activate the wayside channels requires a small ELMC
option key that plugs onto the controller module. The protection of the waysides follows the
protection scheme of the radio configuration. In other words, if the radio is hot-standby the
wayside channels are hot-standby. The channels are point to point just as the payload traffic
is. They are independent of the traffic and reside in the overhead channels. The advantage of
the wayside DS1 is the ability to drop at a site 1 to 3 DS1s without having to add a 1:3 muldem or SONET add/drop multiplexer to access the payload traffic.
2.12.3 Configuration Agility
The basic MDR-8000 series radio consists of a transmitter and a receiver. The radio can be
configured as a terminal, a back-to-back repeater, or a rail repeater. The transmit function
consists of a line buildout (LBO) module (DS1/E1/DS3) or an AUX backplane (OC3/STM-1),
an I/O interface module, a transmitter module, and an optional power amplifier. The receive
function consists of a receiver module and an I/O interface module. The receive function
shares the LBO module/AUX backplane with the transmit function. Available configurations
are as follows:
2.12.4 Non-Standby Transmitter/Non-Standby Receiver
See Figure 2 - 10, Figure 2 - 11, and Figure 2 - 12. This configuration consists of one transmitter
and one receiver with no provision for protecting traffic against radio equipment failure.

2-18

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

I
RPTR
CH

RPTR
CH

I/O
INTERFACE
A

LBO

DS1/E1
1-16

DS1/E1
1-16

XMTR
A

RF

PA

DIPLEXER

RF
IN/OUT

(OPTIONAL)
RX

RS

RF

RCVR
A

LMW-5051
07/24/01

Figure 2 - 10 DS1/E1 Non-Standby Transmitter/Non-Standby Receiver

I
RPTR
CH

XMTR

PA

DIPLEXER
RF
IN/OUT

(OPTIONAL)
DS3
1 OR 3

I/O
INTFC

LBO

I
WAYSIDE DS1
1 OR 3

RCVR
Q
LMW-3124
04/14/00

Figure 2 - 11 DS3 Non-Standby Transmitter/Non-Standby Receiver

I
OC3/ETHERNET
Q

XMTR

PA

RF

DIPLEXER

RF
IN/OUT

(OPTIONAL)
WAYSIDE
DS1/E1

RPTR
CH

OC3/
STM-1
AUX
INTFC

WAYSIDE
DS1/E1

I/O
INTFC
RX

RPTR
CH

Ethernet I/O Interface accepts


electrical or optical signals.

RCVR

RF

RS

LMW-3158F
07/07/06

Figure 2 - 12 OC3/STM-1 and Ethernet Non-Standby Transmitter/Non-Standby Receiver


2-19

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.12.5 Simplex Non-standby Transmitter


See Figure 2 - 13. This configuration consists of one unprotected transmitter in the A-side connected to a single antenna through a standard XMT filter. The I and Q outputs of the I/O interface are bridged to the XMTR and the RCV input to the I/O interface and the I/O loopback
function is automatically enabled. Refer to controls in the Users Guide section for I/O loopback
details.

1 OR 3
DS3

1 OR 3
DS3
FROM
X-CONN

1 OR 3
WAYSIDE DS1

1 OR 3
LBO
WAYSIDE DS1

I
I/O
INTFC

XMTR

RF

PA

FILTER

RF
IN/OUT

Q
(OPTIONAL)

LMW-5058
08/02/01

Figure 2 - 13 DS3 Simplex Non-Standby Transmitter

2.12.6 Simplex Non-standby Receiver


See Figure 2 - 14. This configuration consists of one unprotected receiver in the A-side connected to a single antenna through a standard RCVR filter.

1 OR 3
DS3

1 OR 3
DS3
TO
X-CONN

LBO
1 OR 3
WAYSIDE DS1

1 OR 3
WAYSIDE DS1

I
I/O
INTFC

RCVR

RF

FILTER

RF
IN/OUT

LMW-5057F
08/08/01

Figure 2 - 14 DS3 Simplex Non-Standby Receiver


2-20

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2.13
NON-STANDBY TRANSMITTER/SPACE DIVERSITY RECEIVERS
See Figure 2 - 15, Figure 2 - 16, and Figure 2 - 17. This configuration consists of one nonprotected transmitter and one receiver on the main antenna, and one receiver on the diversity
antenna. The non-standby transmitter with space diversity receivers configuration provides
both equipment and path (space diversity) protection with errorless receiver switching.

I
RPTR
CH

RPTR
CH

I/O
INTERFACE
A

LBO

DS1/E1
1-16

DS1/E1
1-16

RF

PA
(OPTIONAL)

XMT
SW

DIPLEXER

RF
IN/OUT

RX

RS

I/O
INTERFACE
B

XMTR
A

RF

RCVR
A

RX

RS

RF
IN

RCV
FILTER

RF

RCVR
B

FROM
SECOND
ANTENNA
LMW-5050F
07/24/01

Figure 2 - 15 DS1/E1 Non-Standby Transmitter/Space Diversity Receivers

LBO
2ND MDR-8000
SHELF (RPTR)
X-CONN (TERM)
OR
2ND MDR-8000
SHELF (RPTR)

SC/SYNC

XMTR
A

WAYSIDE DS1

DIPLEXER

RF
IN/OUT

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
A

DS3

PA

RF

I
Q

SC

RCVR
A

SYNC

SPLITTER (XMT)
COMBINER (RCV)
I/O
INTFC
B

I
Q

RCVR
B

RF

RCV
FILTER

RF
IN
FROM
DIVERSITY
ANTENNA LMW-3125F
08/10/01

Figure 2 - 16 DS3 Non-Standby Transmitter/Space Diversity Receivers


2-21

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

I
OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET

WAYSIDE
DS1/E1

RPTR
CH

OC3/
STM-1
AUX
INTFC

XMTR
A

PA

RF

DIPLEXER

RF
IN/OUT

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
A
RX
RS

RF

RCVR
A

SONET

I/O
INTFC
B
RX
OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET

RS

Ethernet I/O Interface accepts


electrical or optical signals.

RCVR
B

RF

RCV
FILTER

RF
IN
FROM
SECOND
ANTENNA
LMW-5014F
07/24/01

Figure 2 - 17 OC3/STM-1 and Ethernet Non-Standby Transmitter/Space Diversity Receivers


2.13.1 Unidirectional Path Protected Ring
See Figure 2 - 18, Figure 2 - 19, and Figure 2 - 20. A basic system consists of radios connected as
a series of point-to-point RF paths that form a continuous ring. Each radio is defined as a node
in the ring. The main purpose of a ring is circuit protection using route diversity. At the transmit end, signals are simultaneously routed in clockwise and counterclockwise directions. At
the receive end, the better of the two signals is selected. This called a Unidirectional Path
Switched Ring (UPSR).
2.13.1.1 Traffic Signal Flow
In this configuration, traffic data is split and sent in each direction around the ring. Each
node selects which direction will be used to drop the traffic based upon the receive status of
each line. Lines which are not dropped at a node are passed through to continue around the
ring.
2.13.1.1.1 DS1/E1 Repeater Traffic Signal Flow
The DS1/E1 Back-to-Back Repeater or Ring consists of one transmitter and one receiver for
east direction and one transmitter and one receiver for west direction with no provision for
protecting traffic against radio equipment failure. Up to 16 DS1/E1s can be dropped and
inserted in each direction. Through data is transported over the repeater interface via four
x/y rails. In this configuration, the customer equipment determines the best received signal
(from east or west) to drop.
2-22

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2 DS1

2 DS1
DS1 SW

2 DS1

2 DS1
RING
RADIO
0

RF

4 DS1

4 DS1

6 DS1

6 DS1
RING
RADIO
3

DS1
SW
4 DS1

RF

RING
RADIO
1

4 DS1

DS1
SW
6 DS1

RF

6 DS1

RF

RING
RADIO
2
4 DS1

4 DS1
DS1 SW

4 DS1

4 DS1

MW21100461
052298

Figure 2 - 18 Typical DS1 Radio Ring


2-23

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2 DS1

2 DS1
RDI-3100e
RPTR D & I MUX

DS3

DS3

RING
RADIO
0

RF

4 DS1

RING
RADIO
3

RDI-3100e
RPTR D & I MUX

DS3

DS3
RDI-3100e
RPTR D & I MUX

4 DS1

RF

RING
RADIO
1

DS3

DS3

RF

6 DS1

6 DS1

RF

RING
RADIO
2
DS3

DS3
RDI-3100e
RPTR D & I MUX

4 DS1

4 DS1

Figure 2 - 19 Typical DS3 Radio Ring


2-24

LMW-5012
05/10/01

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2 DS1

2 DS1
1603
ADD/DROP
MUX
OC3

RING
RADIO
0
RF

4 DS1

4 DS1

1603
ADD/
DROP
MUX

OC3

RF

RING
RADIO
3

RING
RADIO
1

RF

OC3

1603
ADD/
DROP
MUX

6 DS1

6 DS1

RF
RING
RADIO
2
OC3
1603
ADD/DROP
MUX
4 DS1

4 DS1

LMW-3152
04/26/00

Figure 2 - 20 Typical OC3/STM-1 Radio Ring


2-25

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.13.1.1.2 DS3 Repeater Traffic Signal Flow


The linear or ring DS3 repeater consists of two MDR-8000 non-standby shelves. One shelf is
used to transmit westbound traffic and receive eastbound traffic. The other shelf transmits
eastbound and receives westbound. The three lines of DS3 traffic are interconnected by BNC
cables (out to in) on the DS3 LBOs. The wayside DS1 traffic is interconnected by paired
cables between the out and in connectors on the DS3 LBO. The DS3 and wayside DS1 lines
can be dropped to external mux/switch equipment as required.
2.13.1.1.3 OC3/STM-1 Repeater Traffic Signal Flow
The linear or ring OC3/STM-1 repeater consists of two MDR-8000 non-standby shelves. One
shelf is used to transmit westbound traffic and receive eastbound traffic. The other shelf
transmits eastbound and receives westbound. The two shelves are interconnected by fiber
optic cables (OC3/STM-1 XMT and OC3/STM-1 RCV out to in) on the OC3/STM-1 AUX
interface boards. The wayside DS1 traffic is interconnected by paired cables between the out
and in connectors on the OC3/STM-1 AUX interface boards. The OC3/STM-1 and wayside
DS1 lines can be dropped to external mux/switch equipment as required.
2.13.1.2 Ring Service Channel Protection
Ring software for the service channel protects service channel signal flow. Ring service channels operate differently from the traffic channels, but the same for all ring configurations. In
normal operation, a break in service channel is created in the ring at a predetermined location
by provisioning any one radio as Ring Repeater Master. This blocks service channel transmission from coming back on its own radio, thereby eliminating self induced interference. The RF
transmit and receive service channel data at the break is forced to idle (common loss alarm
and ATPC commands remain active). All other radios are provisioned Ring Repeater Normal
and operate the same as in a point-to-point system with synchronous repeaters. A Ring Broke
alarm anywhere in the ring causes the Ring Repeater Master to function as a Ring Repeater
Normal and the failed radio is what breaks the service channel ring. Any ring failure also
causes a Ring Broke indication on the USI Status and Alarm screen for each ring radio.
2.13.1.2.1 DS1/E1 Repeater Service Channel
Service channel data is carried between shelves on X/Y rail number 1. Local drop and insert is
accomplished using the asynchronous service channel connectors on the backplane.
2.13.1.2.2 DS3 Repeater Service Channel
Service channel through data, data received over the RF, is carried between shelves on the
SC THRU DATA wire. Service channel insert data, data inserted locally, is multiplexed with
the SC THRU DATA. Shelf service channel functions are enabled by the RPTR SYNC signal.
Insert service channel circuits are enabled by the SC INSERT OFF-HOOK signal. Local
drop and insert is accomplished using the asynchronous service channel connectors on the
backplane.
2.13.1.2.3 OC3/STM-1 Repeater Service Channel
Service channel data is carried between shelves on the RPTR DS1 Tip and Ring wires at the
DS1 data rate (1.544 Mb/s). Local drop and insert is accomplished using the asynchronous
service channel connectors on the backplane.

2-26

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

WEST

EAST

RPTR
CABLE
J314

J314
X/Y RAIL 1*
X/Y RAIL 2
X/Y RAIL 3
X/Y RAIL 4
RPTR SYNC

SHELF 1

SHELF 2

ASYNCHRONOUS
SC CONNECTORS
ON BACKPLANE

ASYNCHRONOUS
SC CONNECTORS
ON BACKPLANE

*SC DATA & CLOCKS ARE CARRIED ACROSS RPTR CABLE ON X/Y RAIL 1.

LMW-9092F
09/13/03

Figure 2 - 21 DS1/E1 Repeater (Linear or Ring)


2-27

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

WEST

EAST

J21/22
J23/24
J25/26

DS3 LINE 1

J21/22

DS3 LINE 2

J23/24

DS3 LINE 3

J25/26

WAYSIDE DS1 LINE 1 TIP/RING


J201/J202

WAYSIDE DS1 LINE 2 TIP/RING

J201/J202

WAYSIDE DS1 LINE 3 TIP/RING


RPTR
CABLE
SC THRU DATA
SC INSERT DATA
J401

SC INSERT OFF HOOK

J401

SC 2K SYNC
RPTR SYNC

SHELF 1

SHELF 2

ASYNCHRONOUS
CONNECTORS
ON BACKPLANE

ASYNCHRONOUS
CONNECTORS
ON BACKPLANE
LMW-9093F
09/13/03

Figure 2 - 22 DS3 Repeater (Linear or Ring)


2-28

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

WEST

EAST

OUT
IN

OC3/STM-1 XMT

IN

OC3/STM-1 RCV

OUT

WAYSIDE DS1 LINE 1 TIP/RING


WAYSIDE DS1 LINE 2 TIP/RING

J201/J202

J201/J202

WAYSIDE DS1 LINE 3 TIP/RING


RPTR
CABLE
RPTR DS1 TIP*
J203

J203

RPTR DS1 RING*

SHELF 1

SHELF 2

ASYNCHRONOUS
SC CONNECTORS
ON BACKPLANE

ASYNCHRONOUS
SC CONNECTORS
ON BACKPLANE

*SVCE CHANNEL IS CARRIED ACROSS RPTR CABLE ON DS1 LINE AT 1.544 Mb/s
LMW-9094F
09/13/03

Figure 2 - 23 OC3/STM-1 Repeater (Linear or Ring)


2-29

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.13.2 Hot-Standby Transmitters/Hot-Standby Receivers


See Figure 2 - 24, Figure 2 - 25, and Figure 2 - 26. This configuration consists of two switched
transmitters and two receivers using a 1/10 dB diplexer combined on a single transmit/receive
antenna. This configuration protects traffic against radio equipment failure and provides
errorless receiver switching.

I
RPTR
CH

RPTR
CH

I/O
INTERFACE
A

LBO

DS1/E1
1-16

DS1/E1
1-16

XMTR
A

RF

PA
(OPTIONAL)

XMT
SW

RF

DIPLEXER
RF
IN/OUT

RX

RS

RF

RCVR
A

I/O
INTERFACE
B

XMTR
B

PA
(OPTIONAL)

RX

RS

RCVR
B

RF

LMW-5049F
07/24/01

Figure 2 - 24 DS1/E1 Hot-Standby Transmitter/Hot-Standby Receivers


2-30

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

I
RPTR
CH

DS3
1 OR 3

XMTR
A

LBO

PA
(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
A

XMT
SW

DIPLEXER
RF
IN/OUT

I
WAYSIDE DS1
1 OR 3

RCVR
A

I
XMTR
B

PA
(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
B
I
Q

RCVR
B
LMW-3126F
04/14/00

Figure 2 - 25 DS3 Hot-Standby Transmitter/Hot-Standby Receivers


2-31

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

I
OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET

WAYSIDE
DS1/E1

RPTR
CH

OC3/
STM-1
AUX
INTFC

XMTR
A

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
A

XMT
SW

RF

DIPLEXER

RF
IN/OUT

RX
RS

RCVR
A

RF

SONET

I
Q

XMTR
B

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
B
RX
OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET

RS

RCVR
B

RF
LMW-3159F
05/23/01

Ethernet I/O Interface accepts


electrical or optical signals.

Figure 2 - 26 OC3/STM-1 and Ethernet Hot-Standby Transmitter/Hot-Standby Receivers


2-32

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July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2.13.3 Hot-Standby Transmitters/Space Diversity Receivers


See Figure 2 - 27, Figure 2 - 28, and Figure 2 - 29. This configuration consists of two switched
transmitters combined with one receiver on the main antenna and one receiver on the diversity antenna. The two transmitters operate on the same XMT RF frequency and the two
receivers operate on the same RCV RF frequency. The main and diversity receiver outputs are
compared and the better received signal is dropped. This configuration provides both equipment and path protection with errorless receiver switching.

I
RPTR
CH

RPTR
CH

I/O
INTERFACE
A

LBO

DS1/E1
1-16

DS1/E1
1-16

XMTR
A

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)

XMT
SW

RF
IN/OUT

DIPLEXER

RX

RS

RCVR
A

RF

I/O
INTERFACE
B

XMTR
B

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)

RX

RS

RCVR
B

RF

RCV
FILTER

RF
IN
FROM
SECOND
ANTENNA
LMW-5048F
07/24/01

Figure 2 - 27 DS1/E1 Hot-Standby Transmitter/Space Diversity Receivers


2-33

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

I
RPTR
CH

XMTR
A

DS3
1 OR 3

LBO

PA
(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
A

XMT
SW

DIPLEXER
RF
IN/OUT

I
WAYSIDE DS1
1 OR 3

RCVR
A

I
XMTR
B

PA
(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
B

RF
IN

I
Q

RCV
FILTER

RCVR
B

FROM
SECOND
ANTENNA

LMW-3127F
04/14/00

Figure 2 - 28 DS3 Hot-Standby Transmitter/Space Diversity Receivers

I
OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET

WAYSIDE
DS1/E1

RPTR
CH

OC3/
STM-1
AUX
INTFC

XMTR
A

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
A

XMT
SW

RF

DIPLEXER

RF
IN/OUT

RX
RS

RCVR
A

RF

I
Q

XMTR
B

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
B
RX
OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET

Ethernet I/O Interface accepts


electrical or optical signals.

RS

RCVR
B

RF

RCV
FILTER

RF
IN
FROM
SECOND
ANTENNA
LMW-5013F
07/24/01

Figure 2 - 29 OC3/STM-1 and Ethernet Hot-Standby Transmitter/Space Diversity Receivers


2-34

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2.13.4 Hot-Standby Transmitters/Non-Standby Receiver


See Figure 2 - 30. This configuration consists of two switched transmitters combined with one
receiver on one antenna. This configuration provides XMT equipment protection only. On the
B side, the I and Q outputs of the I/O interface are bridged to the XMTR and the RCV input to
the I/O interface and the I/O loopback function is automatically enabled. Refer to Controls in
the Users Guide section for I/O loopback details.

I
LBO

TO/FROM
X-CONN

3
DS3

3
DS3

3
WAYSIDE
DS1

3
WAYSIDE
DS1

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
A

XMT
SW

RF

DIPLEXER

RF
IN/OUT

I
Q

SC

XMTR
A

RF

RCVR
A

SYNC

I
I/O
INTFC
B
SPLITTER (XMT)
COMBINER (RCV)

XMTR
B

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)
LMW-5061F
08/02/01

Figure 2 - 30 DS3 Hot-Standby Transmitter/Non-Standby Receiver


2-35

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.13.5 Simplex Hot-Standby Transmitter


See Figure 2 - 31. This configuration consists of two switched transmitters connected to a single
antenna through a standard XMT filter. This configuration provides equipment protection
only. The I and Q outputs of the I/O interface modules are bridged to the XMTRs and the RCV
input to the I/O interface modules. The I/O loopback function is automatically enabled. Refer
to Controls in the User Guide Section for I/O loopback details.

FROM
X-CONN

1 OR 3
DS3

1 OR 3
DS3

1 OR 3
WAYSIDE
DS1

1 OR 3
WAYSIDE
DS1

LBO

I
I/O
INTFC
A

XMTR
A

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)

XMT
SW

I/O
INTFC
B

RF

FILTER

RF
IN/OUT

I
Q

XMTR
B

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)
LMW-5060F
08/02/01

Figure 2 - 31 DS3 Simplex Hot-Standby Transmitter


2-36

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2.13.6 Simplex Hot-Standby Receiver


See Figure 2 - 32. This configuration consists of two receivers connected to a single antenna
through a diplexer.This configuration provides equipment protection with errorless receiver
switching.

1 OR 3
DS3
TO
X-CONN

1 OR 3
WAYSIDE
DS1

1 OR 3
DS3
LBO

1 OR 3
WAYSIDE
DS1

I
I/O
INTFC
A

RCVR
A

RF

RF
IN/OUT
DIPLEXER

I/O
INTFC
B

I
Q

RCVR
B

RF

LMW-5059F
08/08/01

Figure 2 - 32 DS3 Simplex Hot-Standby Receiver


2-37

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.13.7 Frequency Diversity Transmitters and Receivers


See Figure 2 - 33 and Figure 2 - 34. This configuration consists of two transmitters and two
receivers operating on different frequencies. The receivers are switched on a per-hop basis.
This configuration provides equipment and path (frequency diversity) protection with errorless receiver switching. Terminated circulators on the B transmitter and receiver are
optional and provide the capability to add radios in a multiline system.

I
RPTR
CH

RPTR
CH

I/O
INTERFACE
A

LBO

DS1/E1
1-16

XMTR
A

RF

PA

XMTR
A

CIRCULATOR

CIRCULATOR

RF
IN/OUT

(OPTIONAL)

RX

DS1/E1
1-16

RS

RCVR
A

RCV
FILTER

RF

RF

CIRCULATOR

I/O
INTERFACE
B

XMTR
B

RF

PA

XMT
FILTER

CIRCULATOR

(OPTIONAL)

RX

RS

RCVR
B

RF

RCV
FILTER

RF

CIRCULATOR

LMW-5047F
01/25/02

Figure 2 - 33 DS1/E1 Frequency Diversity Transmitters and Receivers


2-38

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July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

I
RPTR
CH

DS3
1 OR 3

XMTR
A

LBO

PA

XMT
FILTER

CIRCULATOR

CIRCULATOR

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
A

RF
IN/OUT

I
WAYSIDE DS1
1 OR 3

RCVR
A

CIRCULATOR

RCV
FILTER

I
XMTR
B

PA

XMT
FILTER

CIRCULATOR

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTFC
B
I
Q

RCVR
B

RCV
FILTER

CIRCULATOR

LMW-3128F
04/14/00

Figure 2 - 34 DS3 Frequency Diversity Transmitters and Receivers


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July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.13.8 Dual Channel Radio


See Figure 2 - 35. Two transmitters and two receivers operating on different frequencies. This
configuration provides equipment, fiber, and path protection (dual-frequency operation) by
using separate channels. There is no switching of transmitters or receivers. When two nonstandby radios are in a rack, and each radio is used to carry different traffic, the system is
called multi-line.

OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET
MAIN
ANTENNA
I
RPTR
CH

I/O
INTERFACE
A

RPTR
CH

AUX
INTFC
BOARD

F1
XMTR
A

XMTR
A

CIRCULATOR

CIRCULATOR

RCV
FILTER

RF

CIRCULATOR

XMT
FILTER

CIRCULATOR

RCV
FILTER

RF

RF
IN/OUT

(OPTIONAL)
RF

RX
WAYSIDE
DS1

PA

RF

DS1
RS

F3
RCVR
A

F2
XMTR
B

PA

RF

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTERFACE
B
RF
RX
OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET

RS

F4
RCVR
B

Ethernet I/O Interface accepts


electrical or optical signals.

Figure 2 - 35 OC3/STM-1 and Ethernet Dual Channel Radio


2-40

CIRCULATOR

LMW-9035F
07/10/06

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2.13.9 Quad Diversity Radio


See Figure 2 - 36. This configuration consists of two transmitters and two dual receivers operating on different frequencies for frequency diversity operation (F1 through F4). Also the dual
receivers are connected to different antennas (main and diversity) for space diversity operation. The radio controller determines which radio is on-line at any time based on best received
signal properties. The quad diversity configuration combined with the dual receivers presents
the best of both frequency and space diversity for equipment and path protection.

OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET
MAIN
ANTENNA
I
RPTR
CH

RPTR
CH

AUX
INTFC
BOARD

I/O
INTERFACE
A

PA

RF

XMTR
A

CIRCULATOR

CIRCU- IN/OUT
LATOR

(OPTIONAL)
F3

RX
WAYSIDE
DS1

RF

F1
XMTR
A

DS1
RS

DUAL
RCVR
A

RCV
FILTER

RF

F3

F2
XMTR
B

RF

CIRCULATOR

RCV
FILTER

PA

RF

CIRCULATOR

XMT
FILTER

CIRCULATOR

RCV
FILTER

RF

DIVERSITY
ANTENNA
RF
IN

(OPTIONAL)

I/O
INTERFACE
B
F4
RX
OC3/STM-1/ETHERNET
RS

DUAL
RCVR
B

F4

RF

CIRCULATOR

RCV
FILTER

CIRCULATOR

LMW-9035A
07/07/06

Figure 2 - 36 OC3/STM-1 and Ethernet Quad Diversity Radio


2-41

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Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.14
SYSTEM GAIN AGILITY
System gain is by far the most important factor when designing a microwave link, defined as
the margin between the transmit power and receiver sensitivity of the desired radio terminal.
System gain can be calculated using the following formula: System Gain = Transmit Power
(dB) - Receiver Sensitivity (dBm)
Example:
Transmit Power = 30 dB;
Receiver sensitivity (RCVR Threshold) = -70 dBm
System Gain = 30 dB - (-70 dBm) = 100 dB
The larger the system gain, the better the performance of the system will be. The MDR-8000
provides the agility to configure to system gain requirements.
2.14.1 Forward Error Correction
The MDR-8000 series radios contain FEC for low-level errors which result in receive threshold
improvement yielding higher system gain. The FEC system for low capacity radios uses the
Single-Lee-Error Correcting (SLEC) method. The high capacity radios use trellis modulation
and Reed-Solomon coding for FEC. A coding gain of approximately 2 dB at 10-6 error rate is
obtained.
2.14.2 Modulation/Capacity
The capacity key provides not only the ability to easily change to/from 32 from/to 128 TCM
(DS1/E1) or 64 QAM (DS3). By choosing either 32 or 128 TCM or 64 QAM the system gain is
affected for the radio. For lower capacity applications, 32 TCM provides 4 dB in additional system gain over 128 TCM through a lower receiver threshold. 128 TCM provides for maximum
spectral efficiency. For high capacity applications, 64 QAM provides optimum system gain
with maximum spectral efficiency.
2.14.3 Automatic Transmitter Power Control
Automatic Transmitter Power Control (ATPC) improves the ability to coordinate in frequency
congested areas and extends the life of the power amplifier by reducing the current. ATPC
can be enabled or disabled through the USI computer as follows:
Disabled Transmitter power is fixed at the recommended maximum level.
Enabled Transmitter power may be reduced up to 10 db from the maximum power level
when the far end Receive Signal Level (RSL) is above a minimum level.
Enabled T/O ATPC activity is limited to a maximum time without returning to
minimum transmit power. After 5 minutes of activity, the transmit power is forced to
minimum until the far end RSL returns to normal levels.
2.14.4 Optional Power Amplifier
The terminal can be equipped without a Power Amplifier (PA) for low power applications or
with a PA for medium/high-power applications. Refer to the General section for levels.

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3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2.15
ERROR CORRECTION AND TIME DOMAIN EQUALIZATION
The MDR-8000 features encoding/decoding for error correction and Time Domain Equalization (TDE) to ensure that even with the most severe multipath, only the correct digital data
is demodulated. Multipath distortion due to atmospheric conditions is the limiting performance factor for digital radios operating in frequency bands below 11 GHz. Under similar
multipath conditions, a wider spectrum is more severely affected than a narrower spectrum.
The narrow MDR-8000 spectrum is, therefore, less susceptible to multipath distortion than
other less efficient radios with the same capacity but wider spectrum. Additionally, the
MDR-8000 employs an 11-tap digital Time Domain Equalizer (TDE) to further reduce any
disruptive effects. The resulting dispersive fade margins virtually eliminate multipath distortion as a concern. Longer paths, better availability, dense system architectures, smaller
antennas, and lower long-term costs are all benefits of the MDR-8000 design.
2.16
ERRORLESS RECEIVER SWITCHING
On a protected system, the MDR-8000 switches between receivers without generating any bit
errors. This preserves the integrity of the data being carried regardless of any path propagation anomalies that might occur on the system.
2.17
MONITOR/CONTROL INTERFACES
The Office Support System (OSS) function can be configured to use the following alarm reporting systems:
MCS-11 This option allows the radios to interface with an alarm system that is based
on the MCS-11 protocol. The relay interface module provides relay closure indications of
radio alarms and status. This unit also provides 16 station alarm inputs and 6 relay closure control outputs for MCS-11 applications.
TBOS This option provides serial alarm/status reporting for the TBOS protocol.
ELMC This standard feature allows the radio to provide alarm/status reporting
through a proprietary protocol.
TMN The TMN Interface module provides Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
support along with a low speed general TCP/IP transport for network management traffic.
2.17.1 MCS-11
See Figure 2 - 37. Connectors J314 (DS1/E1) and J401 (DS3) provide synchronous connections
between racks 1 and 2 for MCS repeater applications. Connectors J308 and J309 provide asynchronous connections between racks 2 through N in a daisy chain application, such as in a
multiline system. Connector J307 is used to connect various TSM equipment for MCS-11 master station applications. Connector J310 provides an asynchronous port for MCS-11 connections between backbone and spur at junctions.
2.17.1.1 Daisy Chain Considerations
See Figure 2 - 37. Connector J308 on the first radio in the daisy chain must be connected to J308
on the second radio in the chain via a crosswired cable. Crosswired cable part number 695-7837001 through -005 connects XMT and RCV data and clocks on one end to RCV and XMT data and
clocks on the other end. The first radio in the chain must be provisioned J308 Output Clock
under FAULT ALARM provisioning. All other radios in the daisy chain must be connected via a
cable from J309 on one radio to J308 on the following radio using cable part number 695-7837021 through -025. The J309 to J308 cable is wired 1:1. All other radios in the daisy chain must be
provisioned J308 Input Clock under FAULT ALARM provisioning.
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3EM20188AAAA

2.17.2 TBOS
TBOS interface is provided by connector J305. Connector J305 accepts wire-wrap adapter kit
(PN 695-4171-002) and the TBOS lines are designed to be wire wrapped to the adapter.
2.17.3 Extended Link Monitor Channel
See Figure 2 - 38. The Extended Link Monitor Channel (ELMC) provides the convenience of monitoring and controlling both ends of a hop from one location as well as any terminal or contiguous
MDR-7000, 4000e, 5606, or 6000 network. The optional ELMC option key on the controller module adds remote provisioning and downloading capability to the monitor and control functions

SITE C

SITE D
MDR-8000

MDR-8000

B1
TERM.
DS307

B2
RPTR
DS308

J307

J401

MDR-8000

B3
RPTR
DS309
J401

695-4126-007/009/012
REPEATER CABLE
695-7836-001 THRU -005

POLLING ENGINE

MDR-8000

B4
TERM 4
DS310

J308
J310

695-7837-001
THRU -005
CROSSWIRE
STRAIGHT
CABLE
695-7837-025

SITE B

A10

SITE E

J308

B5
TERM
J309 DS303

B6
TERM
DS304

MDR-8000

MDR-8000

A9

TERM

TERM J306

J309
MDR-4000e

J311
MDR-4000e

695-7837-021
THRU -025

SITE F

J308

695-7801-001

J202

MUX

STRAIGHT
CABLE
695-7837-025

B7
TERM
J309 DS301

B8
TERM
DS302

MDR-8000

MDR-8000

SITE G
DMX-3003N

E1A
J310

E2A

RPTR
G7572

J314

TERM
P7572

MDR-6000

MDR-6000

RPTR
CABLE
372-0546-020/050/070

SITE H

E3A

E4A

RPTR
J314
S7341

TERM
T7341

MDR-6000

LEGEND:

XXXX

MCS-11 ADDRESS

YYYY

CONFIGURATION

ZZZZ

ELMC ADDRESS

SITE A
MDR-8000 J308/J309
PROVISIONING NOTES

1. PROVISION RPTR DS309 (FIRST


RADIO IN CHAIN) J308 OUTPUT CLOCK.

DS3ZZ = RADIO CAPACITY (DS3)


AND SHELF NUMBER (DS301 - SHELF 1)

2. PROVISION ALL OTHER RADIOS IN


DAISY CHAIN (TERM DS303 AND TERM
DS301) J308 INPUT CLOCK.
MDR-1023F
06/08/04

Figure 2 - 37 Typical MCS-11 Connections


2-44

MDR-6000

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

SITE A

SITE C

MDR-8000

MDR-8000

B1
TERM.
DS307

B2
RPTR
DS308
J401

SITE G

MDR-8000

B4
TERM 4
DS310

J318
J401

REPEATER CABLE
695-7836-001 THRU -005

SITE B

MDR-8000

B3
RPTR
DS309

SITE H

695-4125-006/013
CROSSWIRE

J315

SITE D

B5
TERM
DS303

J318
MDR-8000

A10

A9

TERM

TERM

MDR-4000E

J102
MDR-4000E

B7
TERM
DS301

PIGTAIL
CABLE
695-4125-008

MDR-8000

SITE E

J314

RPTR
T7572

MDR-6000

MDR-8000

695-4125-006/013
CROSSWIRE

J318

E2A

B6
TERM
DS304

B8 J318
TERM
DS302
MDR-8000

695-4125-006/013
CROSSWIRE

MDR-6000

MDR-8000

MDR-8000

E1A
TERM
G7572

TERM
DS105

TERM
DS106

J309

J318

SITE I

J318

695-4125-006/013
CROSSWIRE

REPEATER
CABLE
372-0456
020/050/070

SITE F

J314

E4A

E3A

RPTR
J309
T7341

TERM
S7341

MDR-6000

MDR-6000

Note
When connecting MDR-8000 radios with Windows USI to radios with DOS USI, check the
DOS USI ELMC address for space, dash, slash, asterisk, or underscore. The Windows USI
cannot recognize a space, dash, slash, asterisk, or underscore. Change the DOS ELMC
address to a 5-character alphanumeric address without the prohibited characters.

MDR-1026F
06/12/04

Figure 2 - 38 Typical ELMC Connections


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2.18
TMN
See Figure 2 - 39 for typical application drawings.
2.19
TMN ETHERNET INTERFACE
There are three front access Ethernet interfaces: ETH1 J1, ETH2 J2, and ETH3 J3, and one
internal Ethernet interface to the PQ/ECRC board. All Ethernet interfaces are interconnected
using the internal Ethernet HUB. The interface standard is 10BaseT. There is also a Point-topoint Protocol (PPP) front panel interface and a Craft front panel interface. See Figure 2 - 39
Sheet 1.
2.19.1 ETH1-Uplink
A typical application is shown that uses the Ethernet 1 uplink port to attach the TMN Interface to an external hub/switch. Since the port is wired as an uplink interface, a standard CAT
5 patch cord may be used.
2.19.2 ETH2 and ETH3
In the application shown, the Ethernet 2 and Ethernet 3 ports are used to interface external
TCP/IP based SNMP equipment. Standard CAT 5 patch cords may be used.
2.19.3 PPP Interface
The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) interface provides an attachment point for the transport of
the TCP/IP management channel through external equipment. The PPP interface connects
between two and only two devices. Although this interface of the TMN Interface card is not
ethernet, a direct interface to another TMN Interface card can be achieved using a standard
CAT5 Ethernet patch cord.
2.19.4 Craft Interface
The Craft port on each TMN Interface is an RS-232 serial interface primarily used for local
provisioning and maintenance. Communication through this port uses TCP/IP over a PPP
link, and can be used to access remote sites through the radio network. Interfacing from a
Windows PC to the TMN Interface requires the use of the Lower Layers Management
(LLMan) application.

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SNMP
MGR
DEVICE

I/O
INTFC
MODULE

U
EP
TL
HI
1N
K

256Kb/s
OVERHEAD

10 BASE T

HUB/
SW

ROUTER

LAN

LAPTOP

CONTROLLER
MODULE

PARALLEL
BUS

TMN
INTFC
MODULE

E
T
H
2

E
T
H
3

P
P
P

C
R
A
F
T

SNMP
MGR
DEVICE

10 BASE T

10 BASE T

RS422
CLK/DATA

RS232
USI

MUX
EQUIP

TO/FROM
EXT EQUIP

LAPTOP

LMW-8046F
12/09/02

Figure 2 - 39 Typical Application (Sheet 1 of 2)


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Figure 2 - 39, Sheet 2 depicts a typical network connection scheme with MDR-9000, MDR8000, MDR-4000s, and MDR-6000 radios. Only the MDR-8000 radios are equipped with the
AE-37AA TMN Interface module. The MDR-9000 radios are equipped with other SNMP circuitry and therefore the MDR-8000 and MDR-9000 radios are the only radios with SNMP
capability. All radios shown, except the MDR-9000 radios are equipped with MCS-11.

SNMP MUX

MDR-8000

MDR-6000

MDR-8000

MCS-11

OTHER
DRY CONTACT

MDR-9000

MDR-8000

MDR-9000

MDR-8000
SNMP
MANAGER

ETH

MDR-8000

RPTR*

MDR-8000

RPTR*

MDR-8000

ETH
MDR-8000

MDR-8000

MCS-11

MDR-8000

MCS-11
MANAGER

MDR-6000

ETH

ROUTER
OR
HUB

CORPORATE
LAN/WAN

ETH

SNMP MUX

MDR-9000

MDR-4000s
CORPORATE
FIREWALL

MCS-11
MANAGER

MDR-9000
MDR-4000s

SNMP EQPT

HUB
INTERNET

SNMP
MANAGER

SNMP
MANAGER

* THE RPTR CABLE CARRIES OVERHEAD FOR TWO DIRECTIONS. MCS-11/TMN


TRANSPORT AUDIO, RS232, AND ELMC ARE CARRIED IN THE OVERHEAD.

Figure 2 - 39 Typical Application (Sheet 2 of 2)


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2.20
TCP/IP WAN AND LAN NETWORKING OVERVIEW
A network of MDR-8000 Radios equipped with TMN Interface cards comprises a Wide Area
Network (WAN). In this presentation, radios equipped with TMN Interface cards are collectively referred to as radios.
The TMN Interface card contains a 5-port router (four PPP ports and one Ethernet port). From
a high level perspective, a network of radios can be considered a collection of routers, each
with an optional attached subnet where the routers are interconnected via Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) links. All connections between radios are routed at OSI Layer 3. See Figure D - 1
and Figure D-2 in Appendix D. A radio service channel provides the transport for the PPP
links between routers. The result is a general purpose TCP/IP network intended for the transport of relatively low bandwidth Network Management and control traffic. This network is
referred to as the radio WAN.
The one Ethernet port of the router is referred to as the LAN interface. It can be used to attach
the radio to existing external networks, or can be used by the router to define an Ethernet subnet at a remote site for the attachment of external TCP/IP equipment. All other ports to the
router are PPP interfaces. These are all defined as WAN interfaces. Access to the radio WAN is
obtained through the LAN or Craft interface by using the radio as a gateway. All TCP/IP traffic between Ethernet subnets is routed at Layer 3 across the PPP links of the WAN. The router
in the radio does not support Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) forwarding.
2.21

ROUTER INTERFACES AND TRANSPORT

2.21.1 The PPP Interfaces


2.21.1.1 Front Access
The Front Access PPP link provides an alternate means for direct radio-to-radio interconnection. This link is normally used at junctions to attach the terminal end of a spur to one of the
other radios at the site, and between radios in back-to-back Terminal configurations. The
Front Access PPP link may be carried through an external channel bank (or similar) to extend
the WAN connections between isolated radio networks. The Front Access PPP port is available
on an RJ-45 connector. The signals are RS-422 logic levels at a 100 ohm nominal impedance
and a 64 kb/s default data rate. The available balanced signals are TX_CLK, TX_DATA,
RX_CLOCK, and RX_DATA and can operate from either external or internal clocks.
Since the PPP interface provides an interface to external equipment a direct interface to
another MDR-8000 TMN Interface module (co-located radio) can be achieved using all four
wiring pairs in a standard CAT 5 Ethernet patch cord, provisioning one TMN Interface as
CROSSOVER (DTE), and the other as NORMAL (DCE). In NORMAL mode, the PPP port
provides clock with TX data and accepts clock with RX data. In CROSSOVER mode, the
PPP port accepts clock from external equipment and uses it to generate a return clock. The
PPP port can also be used to interconnect to other radios, leased lines, etc. (using a custom
cable when needed) to backhaul SNMP traffic outside the radio overhead.
2.21.1.2 RF and Repeater
The RF and Repeater PPP links are carried in the radio service channels which are part of
the radio overhead data stream. The RF PPP router port connects to the RF service channel
interface and provides a link for an RF connection across the radio hop, while the Repeater
PPP router port connects to the Repeater service channel interface and, in the repeater configuration, provides a link for a connection through the repeater cable to the adjacent shelf.
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When a radio is configured as a Terminal, the Repeater interface is disabled, thereby disabling the Repeater PPP link.
2.21.1.3 PPP Signal Transport Latency
The network planner should be aware of signal delays that will be encountered throughout
the WAN when using the PPP links in the overhead service channel or through the Front
Access PPP port. The delays result from the store and forward behavior of the transport
layer at each radio, as each packet will be completely received before the router forwards it
out the next link. The following information provides a means for calculating approximate
delay times.
Since the size of a typical trap varies, but averages around 300 bytes, assume a 300 byte IP
packet (~2400 bits) and a 64 kb/s link. The time required to transfer this packet across a
PPP link is (approximately) 2400/64000 = 37.5 ms. The time required to transfer packets of
other sizes is directly proportional to the size of the packet.
For packets that are forwarded out either an RF or Repeater PPP link, there is an additional
fixed delay of approximately 20ms for the Radio Controller to queue the packet from the
router for insertion into the radio service channel. This makes the total delay for the transfer of a 300 Byte packet between radios across an RF or Repeater link about 58ms. Packets
forwarded out the Front Access PPP port do not experience the additional queuing delay.
For example, the number of PPP links end-to-end along any given path is N-1, where N is
the number of T/Rs. For a 10 hop linear system with 20 T/Rs, the total number of RF and
Repeater PPP links is 19, and the one way end-to-end latency, assuming all packets take the
RF to Repeater links, will be 19 x 58 ms or approximately 1.1 seconds.
2.21.2 Operational Modes
The TMN Interface enhances the MCS-11 Service Channel to support the transport of PPP
traffic between TMN Interface modules. Since this Service Channel is no longer MCS-11 specific, but carries multiple network management protocols, the Service Channel is referred to as
the TMN Service Channel
The TMN Service Channel can be configured in several modes: Traditional MCS-11 Mode and
two PPP compatible modes (Insert and Pass-Through). In the PPP compatible modes all packets are HDLC framed. This allows both PPP and MCS-11 data to be interleaved on the same
channel.
2.21.2.1 Traditional MCS-11 Mode
The Service Channel passes directly through the I/O module while the Radio Controller
monitors the data. When the Radio Controller has MCS-11 data to input onto the Service
Channel, the I/O is placed in the off-hook mode and the local MCS-11 data is inserted into
the channel. After the data has been inserted, the I/O reverts to the on-hook mode. For further details, refer to MCS-11 Monitor and Control System Functional Description in Section
3 of this manual.
2.21.2.2 Insert Mode
This is the most common mode of operation with a TMN Interface module installed. In this
mode, the TMN Service Channel in the I/O module is always off-hook, and all TMN Service
Channel data terminates in either the Radio Controller or the TMN Interface. MCS-11 data
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is dropped and reinserted into the Service Channel using a forwarding buffer in the Radio
Controller, while the TMN Interface module recovers PPP data. The routing tables in the
TMN Interface determine if the PPP packet will be sent to the radio controller for re-insertion into the service Channel or forwarded out through one of the other TMN Interface ports.
In Insert Mode, all PPP data passing through a radio repeater must pass through two routers, one in each radio. See Figure 2 - 40.

REPEATER
CABLE
SERVICE CHANNEL
ACCESS ENABLED
A

SERVICE CHANNEL
ACCESS ENABLED

= ROUTER ON TMN INTERFACE


= PPP LINK

LMW-9025F
07/19/05

Figure 2 - 40 PPP With Service Channel enabled In All Radios


2.21.2.3 Pass-Through Mode
To improve performance in larger networks, it is desirable to reduce the number of routers
the PPP data must pass through along the network. In a radio configured for ass-Through
mode, the TMN Service Channel in the I/O module bypasses both the controller and TMN
Interface router. In Pass-Through mode, the I/O module is held in the on-hook state, all
TMN Service Channel data passes directly between the RF and Rptr ports of the radio in
hardware, and no local Service Channel access is permitted. MCS-11 and SNMP access to a
radio in Pass-Through mode is through local connectors only.
Since Pass-Through mode is a hardware feature, it is protocol independent. To use the PassThrough feature at a Repeater, one radio designated the Primary is provisioned for Insert
Mode, and the other radio, designated the Secondary, is provisioned for Pass-Through mode.
The MCS-11 access to the Secondary rack is obtained by connecting an MCS-11 cable
between the Primary and Secondary radios. Similarly, SNMP access is obtained by connecting an Ethernet or PPP front panel connecting cable between the TMN Interface modules in
the Primary and Secondary radios. See Figure 2 - 41.
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REPEATER
CABLE
SERVICE CHANNEL
INSERT ENABLED

MCS-11 CABLE

SERVICE CHANNEL
INSERT DISABLED

P
ETHERNET or PPP CABLE
R

= ROUTER ON TMN INTERFACE


= PPP LINK

= PRIMARY

= SECONDARY

LMW-9026F
07/22/06

Figure 2 - 41 PPP With Some TMN Service Channels Disabled (Pass-Through Mode)
2.21.3 The Ethernet LAN
The Ethernet interface of the router is connected to one port of the TMN Interface card internal four-port hub. The other three ports of the hub are available through front access RJ-45
connectors on the TMN Interface card. One of these three ports is wired as an uplink port. The
hub facilitates the attachment of a small amount of local IP equipment or other radios to the
WAN without requiring an external hub. In most cases, the only types of Ethernet cabling
required are standard CAT-5 patch cords. The internal hub is a 10BASE-T repeating type as
opposed to the switching type. This makes all devices attached to the built-in hub members of
a single collision domain. For devices connected within a single collision domain, there are limits to the number of segments and repeaters in the longest path. Refer to CONNECTING
MDR-8000 RADIO TMN INTERFACE IN AN ETHERNET LAN later in this section for how
these limits may apply when interconnecting radios and external equipment using Ethernet
at a site.
Connecting to the 10BASE-T hub in the radio is normally not an issue since many LAN
devices that support 100BASE-T are actually 10/100BASE-T devices. To connect the radio
with external equipment that supports only 100BASE-T, an external 10/100BASE-T switch is
required.
2.21.4 The Craft Interface
The Craft Interface is an RS-232 interface providing a direct PPP connection to the router.
Interfacing to the Craft port from a Windows PC requires the use of the LLMan software.
LLMan presents a Virtual Ethernet interface to the PC, but uses the PPP protocol to establish
communications with the TMN Interface through a COM port. The LLMan Virtual Ethernet
interface is configured just like any other Network Card, using an IP address, Netmask, and
default gateway. Once an LLMan connecting link to a TMN Interface Craft port is established,
any TCP/IP application can use the link.
2.22
ROUTING
The radio supports both dynamic and static routing.
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2.22.1 Dynamic routing (two types)


2.22.1.1 Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)

The preferred method for routing within the radio WANs.

Uses a simplified OSPF implementation.

Configuration requires only an Area ID and Mask.

Supports redundant WAN paths, allowing linear, tree, ring, mesh and other
WAN topologies. If redundant paths are available, OSPF can reconfigure routes
to work around a failed link.

Dynamically assigns a routing metric to redundant paths based on route cost,


where the route cost is determined by the speed of the interface used and the
hop count to a destination.

Does not perform route aggregation.

Supports a maximum of 250 routes within a single OSPF area.

2.22.1.2 Routing Information Protocol version 2 (RIPv2)

Supported only on the Ethernet interface.

Useful to perform a dynamic routing protocol conversion between OSPF used


on the internal radio network and an external network using RIPv2.

2.22.1.3 Routing Protocol Conversion at Border Routers

When performing a routing protocol conversion between RIPv2 and OSPF at


the border routers, route metrics obtained through one protocol are set to zero
before being advertised through the other protocol.

2.22.2 Static Routing


Usually used at radio WAN border routers to specify a default gateway to:
use for reaching external networks when the external network does not use a supported dynamic routing protocol
control the exchange of dynamic route information between the radio WAN and
the external network.
Static routing only supports provisioning a single route to a given destination at
any radio. Route metrics and redundant routes are not supported. This limits the
useful WAN topologies to linear and tree configurations when using Static Routing.
Maximum of 25 static route entries per radio.

To minimize the number of static route entries required, the radio network
addressing plan should allow for maximum route aggregation.

Static routes directed out the PPP interfaces use the interface name as the
route destination; rf, rptr, or (front) ppp
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2.22.3 Routing Actions After Module Boot


Provisioned static routes are added to the local routing table.
As soon as a PPP link is established, a direct Point-to-Point route to the far-end
IP address of that link is automatically added to the local routing table. Once the
direct route is set, TCP/IP communications to adjacent radios is available, regardless of IP addresses at either end of the link. As long as the PPP link is established and maintained, the link can be used at all times except when duplicate
addresses create an ambiguous destination. This can be the result of unprovisioned or improperly provisioned radios in the network.
To communicate beyond adjacent radios, additional routes must be configured.
If OSPF is enabled, neighboring radios immediately begin exchanging route information. As the dynamic routing tables stabilize, communication within the network becomes available.

2.23
ADDRESSING
Refer to Appendix D, Addressing Guidelines.
2.24
CONNECTING MDR-8000 RADIO TMN INTERFACE IN AN ETHERNET LAN
For more detailed information regarding connection of Ethernet radios in complex LAN configurations, refer to IEEE 802.3, ISO 8802.3, and the publication Ethernet: The Definitive
Guide, by Charles E. Spurgeon. Also refer to Interconnect Section, Para. 5.20.2, Typical Interconnect Scenarios.
2.24.1 Local Area Network
A Local Area Network (LAN) is a network that spans a relatively small area. Most LANs are
confined to a single building or group of buildings. However, one LAN can be connected to
other LANs over any distance via telephone lines and radio waves. A system of LANs connected in this way is called a wide area network (WAN). Our LANs connect Ethernet equipment within the same site. Each node (individual device) in the LAN is able to access data and
devices anywhere on the LAN. There are many different types of LANs, Ethernet being the
most common for Alcatel radios.
The following characteristics differentiate one LAN from another:
Topology: The geometric arrangement of devices on the network. All XBASE-T
LANS are considered to be STAR topology.
Protocols: The rules and encoding specifications for sending data. The protocols
also determine whether the network uses a peer-to-peer or client/server architecture.
Media: Devices can be connected by twisted-pair wire, coaxial cables, or fiber optic
cables.

LANs are capable of transmitting data at very fast rates but the distances are limited, and
there is also a limit on the number of devices that can be attached to a single LAN.

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2.24.2 Network Protocol


Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detection (CSMA/CD)
CSMA/CD is a protocol (set of rules) that determines how network devices respond when two
devices attempt to use a data channel simultaneously (called a collision). Standard Ethernet
networks use CSMA/CD to physically monitor the traffic on the LAN. If no transmission is
taking place at the time, the particular device can transmit. If two devices attempt to transmit
simultaneously, this causes a collision, which is detected by all participating devices. After a
random time interval, the devices that collided attempt to transmit again. If another collision
occurs, the time intervals from which the random waiting time is selected are increased step
by step. This is known as exponential back off. CSMA/CD is a type of contention protocol and is
defined as follows:
Competition for resources. The term is used in networks to describe the situation
where two or more nodes attempt to transmit a message across the same wire at
the same time.
A type of network protocol that allows nodes to contend for network access. That is,
two or more nodes may try to send messages across the network simultaneously.
The contention protocol (CSMA/CD) defines what happens when this occurs.

The CSMA/CD method is internationally standardized in IEEE 802.3 and ISO 8802.3.
2.24.3 Basic Terms, Definitions, and Descriptions For Following Paragraphs.
MAU (Media Attachment Unit): Device used in the Ethernet network to provide
the interface between the port of the device and the common medium of the
Ethernet. MAUs are built into the hubs and also into the PQ/ECRC sub-boards
and perform the conversion of digital data from the Ethernet interface and collision detection
Repeater HUB: This hub is a form of multiple-port repeater for an Ethernet LAN.
When a packet arrives at one port, it is copied to the other ports so that all segments of the LAN can see all packets. When using a hub, all hosts compete for the
same bandwidth. The TMN card hub has three Ethernet ports each of which have
RJ-45 connectors able to accept Ethernet patch cables to connect to other devices.
The RJ-45 connectors are wired in through the hub and connected back to the PQ/
ECRC sub-board (Network Interface Card/NIC). The hubs also have MAU connectors used to connect Ethernet Media. A single hub is only able to connect a group
of devices operating at the same speed (i.e. all equipment connected to a 10BASET hub must operate at 10 Mbps).
Switching HUB or Multiport Switch: A type of hub that forwards packets to the
appropriate port based on the packet's address as opposed to copying packets to
all ports. Switching hubs can be used to break up or isolate collision domains.
Repeater Segment: Repeater segments are the links between MAUs. Any link
between two MAUs is considered a segment. Five segments are the maximum
recommended number to assure optimum performance and reliability on any
path through the LAN.

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Collision Domain: A group of Ethernet devices in a CSMA/CD LAN that are connected by repeaters (hubs) and compete for access on the network. Only one device
in the collision domain may transmit at any one time, and the other devices in the
domain listen to the network in order to avoid data collisions. Excessive collisions
can result in undetected loss of data and/or long delays in data transmission. All
hosts within a collision domain must compete for the same bandwidth.

2.24.4 Device Quantity Limitations


The Ethernet protocol requires that a signal sent out over the LAN reach every part of the
network within a specified length of time. All segments within a given collision domain must
operate at the same speed. The repeater hubs built in the MDR-8000 radio TMN cards
assume that all segments connected to the repeater are operating at the same speed and
have the same round-trip timing constraints. Because of the time delays incurred as a result
of collisions and travel time through concentrators, a maximum number of devices must be
considered to allow for minimum delays and data loss. In the Alcatel radio LANs the longest
Ethernet path in a collision domain should be a maximum of five segments and four repeaters. This is considered desirable for maximum performance and reliability in transmission of
data. Refer to IEEE 802.3 and Spurgeons, Ethernet: The Definitive Guide for detailed
information on segments, repeaters, and collision domains.
2.24.5 Repeater Segment Calculation
See Figure 2 - 42. In the Alcatel Ethernet radio a Telecommunications Management Network
(TMN) interface module is used to connect radios within the LAN. A complete description of
the TMN interface is in the General section of this manual. The three Ethernet ports of the
TMN card are fed from the internal Ethernet port on the PQ/ECRC sub-board which contains
a Network Interface Card (NIC). These ports are used as the input/output connection points
between Ethernet devices.
2.24.6 Configuration Connecting
See Figure 2 - 43. This figure shows typical connecting procedures for various simple LAN
configurations. A single collision domain may contain a number of repeaters, so long as the
longest path through any combination does not exceed five segments and four repeaters. A
network may contain more than one collision domain with each domain separated from the
other by a multiport switch. Additional Ethernet devices may be connected to individual
repeaters without being counted as segmented devices. Refer to Spurgeons' Ethernet: The
Definitive Guide, for detailed information on connecting complex network configurations.

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Radio 2
Internal Segment between PQ/RCRC
Subboard and Repeater Hub only
counted if longest path includes this
radio. Otherwise continue to next
radio.
Total of 3 segments

Radio 1
Internal Segment between PQ/ECRC
Subboard and Repeater Hub

TMN

TMN
Uplink
ETH 1

PQ/ECRC

Uplink
ETH 1

RJMAU 45

MAU

Internal
Segment
(Segment 1)

MAU

ETH 2
RJMAU 45
ETH 3
RJMAU 45

PQ/ECRC

RJ45 MAU

External
Segment
(Segment 2)

ETH 2
RJ45 MAU

MAU

ETH 3
RJ45 MAU

External segment between


radios. Counted only if longest
path includes this radio.

Internal
MAU
Segment
(Segment 3)

Radio 3
Internal segment between PQ/RCRC
Subboard and Repeater Hub only
counted if longest path includes this
radio.
Total of 4 segments

(Segment 3)

TMN
Uplink
ETH 1

RPTR HUB
PQ/ECRC

RJ45 MAU
ETH 2
RJ45 MAU

MAU

ETH 3
RJ45 MAU

Internal
MAU
Segment
(Segment 4)

TMN-1069F
06/29/05

Figure 2 - 42 Repeater Segment Calculation


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3EM20188AAAA

RH

RH

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1
ETH 2

ETH 2

ETH 3

ETH 3

Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1
ETH 2

ETH 2

ETH 3

ETH 3

RH

RH

Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1

ETH 2

OD = Other IP Device
RH = Repeater Hub

RH

ETH 2
ETH 3

OD

ETH 3

OD

Single LAN/Even Number of Repeaters/One Collision Domain

RH

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1

ETH 2

ETH 2
ETH 3

ETH 3

RH

Uplink
ETH 1

ETH 2

ETH 2
ETH 3

OD

RH

ETH 3

RH

ETH 2

ETH 3

ETH 3

RH

ETH 2
ETH 3

ETH 3

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

ETH 2

ETH 2
ETH 3

ETH 3

Single LAN/Even Number of Repeaters/Two Collision Domains

Figure 2 - 43 Configuration Connecting (Sheet 1 of 2)


2-58

Uplink
ETH 1

ETH 2

Uplink
ETH 1

OD

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

RH

OD = Other IP Device
RH = Repeater Hub
SH = Switch Hub

OD

Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1
ETH 2

ETH 3

RH

Uplink
ETH 1

SH

Uplink
ETH 1

ETH 2

ETH 2
ETH 3

RH

OD

TMN-1070F
06/28/05

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RH

RH

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1
ETH 2

ETH 2

ETH 3

ETH 3

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1
ETH 2

ETH 2
ETH 3

ETH 3

RH

OD

Uplink
ETH 1
ETH 2
ETH 3

RH

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

SH

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1

ETH 2

ETH 2

ETH 2

ETH 3

ETH 3

ETH 3

RH

RH

OD

Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1

ETH 2

ETH 2

ETH 3

ETH 3

RH

RH

RH

ETH 2

ETH 3

ETH 3

ETH 2
ETH 3

RH
Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1

ETH 2

OD = Other IP Device
RH = Repeater Hub (Internal)
SH = Switch Hub (External)

OD

RH

Uplink
ETH 1

Uplink
ETH 1

OD

ETH 2

Uplink
ETH 1
ETH 2

ETH 3

OD

ETH 3

OD

Network With Odd Number of Repeaters/Three Collision Domains


TMN-1071F
06/28/05

Figure 2 - 43 Configuration Connecting (Sheet 2 of 2)


2-59

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

2.25

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

TYPICAL JUNCTION INTERCONNECT

See Figure 2 - 44 for a typical synchronous repeater/junction connection scheme.


See Figure 2 - 45 for a typical asynchronous back-to-back terminal/junction connection scheme.
See Figure 2 - 46 for alternate synchronous repeater/junction connection scheme.

PPP

See Figure 2 - 47 for alternate asynchronous back-to-back terminal/junction connection


scheme.

REPEATER CABLE
MDR-8000
RADIO

OTHER RADIOS,
LEASED LINE, OTHER

PPP

MDR-8000
RADIO

ETHERNET
CABLE

ETHERNET CABLE

OTHER TMN
INTFC MODULE/
MODEM/DATA
CKT

REPEATER CABLE
MDR-8000
RADIO

ETHERNET CABLE

MDR-8000
RADIO

LMW-8052F
07/18/06

Figure 2 - 44 Typical Synchronous Repeater/Junction Interconnect Diagram

ETHERNET CABLE

MDR-8000
RADIO
TERMINAL

ETHERNET CABLE

MDR-8000
RADIO
TERMINAL

ETHERNET
CABLE

MDR-8000
RADIO
TERMINAL

MDR-8000
RADIO
TERMINAL

TMN-1065F
07/18/06

Figure 2 - 45 Typical Asynchronous Back-to-Back Terminal/Junction Interconnect Diagram


2-60

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

PPP

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

OTHER TMN
INTFC MODULE/
MODEM/DATA
CKT

OTHER RADIOS,
LEASED LINE, OTHER

PPP

REPEATER CABLE

MDR-8000
RADIO

REPEATER CABLE

MDR-8000
RADIO

PPP

MDR-8000
RADIO

MDR-8000
RADIO

LMW-8052A-F
06/21/06

Figure 2 - 46 Alternate Synchronous Repeater/Junction Interconnect Diagram

PPP

MDR-8000
RADIO
TERMINAL

PPP

MDR-8000
RADIO
TERMINAL

ETHERNET

MDR-8000
RADIO
TERMINAL

MDR-8000
RADIO
TERMINAL

TMN-1065A-F
07/21/06

Figure 2 - 47 Alternate Asynchronous Back-to-Back Terminal/Junction Interconnect Diagram


2-61

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.26
EFFECTIVE AND PROBLEMATIC ROUTING CONNECTIONS
When dealing with OSPF, and adding cables between radios to create protection by redundancy, route costs to a given destination must be considered. Anytime there are two routes
with identical cost to a given destination, OSPF may periodically switch between the two
routes, causing momentary glitches in communication. See Figure 2-48 for examples of effective and problematic connections between radios within a site.

EFFECTIVE
CONNECTIONS

PROBLEMATIC
CONNECTIONS

RPTR

RPTR

ETH

PPP

RPTR

RPTR

ETH

RPTR

PPP

PPP

PPP
ETH

ETH

RPTR

No short loops with equal speed


links and even numbers of radios

PPP

RPTR

RPTR

ETH

ETH

ETH

ETH
ETH

ETH

ETH

No loops with Ethernet


Note: PPP = Interconnection between front access PPP ports

Figure 2-48 Effective and Problematic Radio Connections


2-62

TMN-1074F
07/19/05

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2.27
SERVICE CHANNEL
The service channel is defined as a non-revenue bearing channel provided as part of a transmission system for operation, maintenance, monitoring, and control of the system. The MDR8000 provides three 64 kb/s service channels and one 16 kb/s supervisory channel. Each service channel can carry audio (orderwire), RS-232 data, or MCS-11 data. The 16 kb/s supervisory channel is converted to 64 kb/s to produce a fourth 64 kb/s channel. The four channels are
multiplexed and shifted in and out of registers on the controller using a 256 kHz clock. Refer
to the functional description section for details.
See Figure 2 - 49. There are eight connectors on the MDR-8000 backplane to interface with the
three service channels. The connectors on the backplane interface three functions: audio, RS232, and MCS-11. Each service channel is provisioned for a specific function. Audio and MCS
can be put on any open service channel. RS-232 data can be put on service channel 1 or 2 but
cannot be put on service channel 3.
2.27.1 4-Wire Audio
Two 4-wire ports are provided to interface external 4-wire audio equipment. The Audio 1 and 2
ports (J316 and J317) are provisionable. Refer to the Initial Turnup section for details. These
4-wire audio ports should not be confused with the non-provisionable 2-wire handset.
2.27.1.1 Audio 1
Audio 1 (J316) is a 4-wire function port on the backplane that provides off-hook detection,
level control, E and M lead signaling, and DTMF decoding capabilities. Audio 1 circuitry is
also used to transport audio over the 2-wire audio handset.
2.27.1.2 Audio 2
Audio 2 (J317) is a 4-wire function port on the backplane that provides off-hook detection,
level control, and E and M lead signaling. Audio 2 has no DTMF decoding capabilities. Audio 2
circuitry does not support the 2-wire audio handset.
2.27.2 Handset Jack
The 2-wire port at the TEL connector on AE-37Y Controller accepts the optional handset,
listed under equipment supplied in the General section, or a standard telephone. The 2-wire
port is not provisionable and should not be confused with the 4-wire provisionable ports (Audio
1 and Audio 2), however only Audio 1 circuitry supports the 2-wire audio handset. To use the
handset, the radio must be provisioned for Audio 1.

2-63

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Applications Section
3EM20188AAAA

J316

J316
RADIO

AUDIO
1

TELEPHONE
(4-WIRE)

RADIO

CONTROLLER

J317

AUDIO
1

CONTROLLER

SC1

AUDIO
2

SC
MULDEM

TSM2500

SC
MULDEM

SC2

SC2
OVERHEAD
CHANNELS

MCS

OVERHEAD
CHANNELS

SC3

J307, J310
(BRIDGED)

TSM2500

MCS

SC3

TEL

TEL

J315, J318
(BRIDGED)

J315, J318
(BRIDGED)
SC4

ELMC

J317

SC1

AUDIO
2

J307, J310
(BRIDGED)

TELEPHONE
(4-WIRE)

SC4

ELMC

J312

J312
RS2321

LAPTOP

HANDSET
(2-WIRE)

RS2321

LAPTOP

J313

J313
RS2322

RS2322
LMW-3138F
04/21/04

Figure 2 - 49 MDR-8000/s Service Channel Application


2-64

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Applications Section

2.27.3 Service Channel Provisioning


Service channel provisioning is accomplished using the Service Channel Provisioning screen
on the USI computer. Service channel provisioning options include the following:
Service Channel #1 Select AUDIO-1, AUDIO-2, RS-232-1, or MCS (unless selection has
already been made for service channel 2 or 3).
AUDIO-1 Select AUDIO-1 to interface audio to/from connector J316. Selecting
AUDIO-1 or AUDIO-2 allows the user to choose input/output levels. Select 0/0 dBm or
-16/+7 dBm.
AUDIO-2 Select AUDIO-2 to interface audio to/from connector J317.
RS-232-1 Select RS-232-1 to interface J312. Selecting
RS-232-1 (or RS-232-2) allows the user to enable the RS-232 bridging function. Select
RS-232 BRIDGE ON at a back-to-back repeater to drop and insert data in two directions. Select RS-232 BRIDGE OFF to drop and insert data from the RF direction, only.
Refer to the Theory Section for details.
MCS Select MCS to interface MCS-11 fault alarm data to/from connectors J307,
J308, J309, and J310. Enter the alphanumeric-alpha MCS address.
Service Channel #2 Select AUDIO-1, AUDIO-2, RS-232-2, or MCS (unless selection has
already been made for service channel 1 or 3).
RS-232-2 Select RS-232-2 to interface RS-232 data to/from connector J313. Selecting
RS-232-2 (or RS-232-1) allows the user to enable the RS-232 bridging function. Select
RS-232 BRIDGE ON at a back-to-back repeater to drop and insert data in two directions. Select RS-232 BRIDGE OFF to drop and insert data from the RF direction, only.
Refer to the Theory Section for details.
Service Channel #3 Select AUDIO-1, AUDIO-2, or MCS (unless selection has already
been made for service channel 1 or 2).
2.28
SEAMLESS INTERFACE WITH EXISTING RADIOS
Seamless interface with the existing MDR-4000e, 5600, 6000, and 7000 digital radio product
lines is made possible with cable kits made specifically for that purpose.
2.29
EASY INSTALLATION AND TURNUP
The MDR-8000 is designed for quick installation and turn-up. Mounting flexibility allows the
shelf to be mounted in an existing rack or cabinet or a new rack can be ordered. Standard tools
only are required for installation.

2-65

2-66

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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION

This section presents a functional description of the MDR-8000 series radios. The descriptive
information covers the main functions of the radio, followed by a description of the modules.
Module descriptions are to the functional block level to meet maintenance philosophy requirements. Engineering drawings referenced throughout the text are located in the Diagrams section of this manual. Prior to describing the radio itself, information about a typical MDR
network is described.
3.1
MICROWAVE DIGITAL RADIO NETWORK DESCRIPTION
See Figure 3 - 1. Communication between microwave radio sites is by microwave links. These
links are called hops and numbered sequentially. The link between the first and second site
would be identified as Hop 1. The link between the second and third site would be identified as
Hop 2, and so on. The following description deals with three sites identified as sites. The third
site, site C, is also a terminal radio site comprised of one MDR.
At site A, the MDR comprises one transmitter (XMTR) and one receiver (RCVR). Site A can
communicate with site B via a common RF XMT and RCV antenna in two directions commonly identified as eastbound and westbound traffic (arbitrary directions chosen to distinguish between two different but not necessarily opposite directions of transmission or
reception of radio signals). The RF communication path between site A and site B is Hop 1.
At site B, there are two MDRs each comprising one XMTR and one RCVR. These radios can be
located in the same rack on separate shelves or in separate racks. The radios communicate
with each other, internal to the site, over connecting cable rather than by RF antenna. This
configuration is called a repeater. In a repeater configuration, one MDR communicates with
site A and the other MDR communicates with site C by means of RF XMT and RCV antennas.
Again, the directions of communication are identified as eastbound and westbound traffic. The
RF communication path between site B and site C is Hop 2.
At site C, the MDR comprises one transmitter (XMTR) and one receiver (RCVR). Site C can
communicate with site B over a common RF XMT and RCV antenna in both eastbound and
westbound traffic directions.
It should be noted that input and output to and from site B can also be Drop and/or Insert traffic via customer furnished equipment (CFE) in addition to the normal eastbound/westbound
payload traffic. Drop is the process and/or point at which transmitted information is removed
or diverted from the normal channel path by CFE prior to reaching the terminal site. Insert: is
the process and/or point at which desired information is inserted by CFE as opposed to the
normal XMT or RCV modules for transmission to the next site.
F1, F2, F3, and F4 represent the frequencies transmitted and received by the specific radio
transmitters and receivers.
3.2
MDR-8000 MAIN FUNCTIONS
See Figure 3 - 2 through Figure 3 - 12.
3.2.1 Transmit
In the transmit direction, the MDR-8000 uses a modulation structure where the I and Q baseband signals modulate the in-phase and quadrature phase components of the transmitter.

3-1

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3.2.1.1

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Simplex Non-standby Transmitter Signal Flow

The simplex non-standby configuration consists of one unprotected transmitter connected to


a single antenna through a standard XMT filter. The basic signal path for DS1/E1 and DS3
radios is from the LBO to the I/O Interface to the XMTR to the XMT Filter and out the
Transmit/Receive Antenna. The digital signal input (DS1/E1 or DS3) from the customer
cross-connect equipment, or a wayside source, is fed to the radio LBO. The LBO, comprised of
resistors, inductors, and capacitors, electrically simulates a transmission line length and
achieves impedance matching between the cross-connect equipment and the radio. The digital signals are split into two equal inputs and are transformer coupled to the radio input/
output interface (I/O interface). The I/O interface converts these digital input signals to I
and Q quadrature signals.
In the OC3 radio, optical input signals from the customer cross-connect equipment go
directly to the OC3 I/O interface. This interface converts the optical signals into electrical
baseband I and Q signals.
The I and Q signals of all configurations go to the XMTR module for digital to analog conversion and frequency multiplication. The final output is an RF signal of the desired transmit
frequency. The RF signal goes either to an optional power amplifier or directly to the transmitter filter. From the filter, the RF goes to the antenna or in a split package radio, to the
outdoor unit for further frequency multiplying and then to the antenna for over the air
transmission.
3.2.2 Receive
In the receive direction, the MDR-8000 uses a demodulation conversion structure. The
received TCM or QAM RF signal is fed into a filter followed by a receiver module. The receiver
module directly converts the RF signal to I and Q baseband signals and provides all of the
acquisition loops. The receiver also provides countermeasures to dynamic path distortions.
Clock and digital data are extracted from the analog channels and passed on to the I/O interface. The digital data is processed by the I/O interface module and converted to a DS1/E1 or
DS3 format.

3.2.2.1

Simplex Non-standby Receiver Signal Flow

This configuration consists of one unprotected receiver connected to a single antenna


through a standard RCVR filter. The received RF signal from the antenna is sent to the
receiver filter (in the split package configuration, to the ODU for frequency down-conversion
and then to the receive filter) and on to the receiver module. In the receiver module the RF
signal is frequency down-converted, de-multiplexed into quadrature I and Q baseband signals, and sent to the I/O interface for conversion into DS1/E1 or DS3 signals. The customers
cross connect equipment or to DS1 wayside equipment.
3.2.3 Signal Paths In Other Than Simplex Radios
When dealing with hot-standby, frequency diversity, space-diversity, etc. configurations, the
basic signal flow throughout the radio components is the same. The difference is in the on/off
conditions of the specific transmitter/receiver channels. See descriptions of the different configurations in the following paragraphs of this section.

3-2

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Hop 1
Eastbound

Hop 2
Eastbound

Westbound
RF

Radio

Westbound
RF

Site B
(Repeater)

Radio

Site A
Terminal

Radio

Radio

Site B
(Repeater)

Site C
Terminal

Hop
1

XMTR
F1
RCVR
F2

Hop
2

Eastbound
RF

Westbound
RF

Site A
(Terminal)

RCVR
F3

XMTR
F2

XMTR
F4

Westbound
RF

XMTR
F1

Eastbound
RF

RCVR
F2

Site B
(Repeater)

Traffic Channel
(Payload)

Aux Channel

RCVR
F1

Site C
(Terminal)

Payload &
Aux Channel

East & West Bound RF

XMTR
F1

XMTR
F2
CFE
Insert

Traffic Channel
(Payload)

Aux Channel

Payload &
Aux Channel

RCVR
F2

Site A

RCVR
F1

P/O Site B

CFE
Drop

MDR-1251
06/20/06

Figure 3 - 1 MDR Network Description


3-3

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

3.3
MDR-8000 MAIN FUNCTIONS
See Figure 3 - 2 through Figure 3 - 8. In the transmit direction, the MDR-8000 uses a modulation structure where the I and Q baseband signals modulate the in-phase and quadrature
phase components of the transmitter.
The DS1/E1 I/O interface converts the format of the incoming DS1/E1 data streams to I, Q,
data, and clock. The DS1/E1 I/O interface module uses the DS1/E1 signals to generate 32 or
128 trellis code amplitude modulated (TCM) baseband signals The transmitter processes the
TCM baseband signals to generate the modulated TCM RF signal. The RF signal is then
amplified and applied directly to the antenna branching or further amplified by a solid-state
amplifier (optional) and applied to the antenna branching.
The DS3 I/O interface converts the format of the incoming DS3 and Wayside (WS) DS1 data
streams to I, Q, data, and clock. The I/O interface module uses the DS3 signals to generate 64
Quadrature Amplitude Modulated (QAM) baseband signals. The transmitter processes the
QAM baseband signals to generate the modulated QAM RF signal. The RF signal is then
amplified and applied directly to the antenna branching or further amplified by a solid-state
amplifier (optional) and applied to the antenna branching.
In the receive direction, the MDR-8000 uses a demodulation conversion structure. The
received TCM or QAM RF signal is fed into a filter followed by a receiver module. The receiver
module directly converts the RF signal to I and Q baseband signals and provides all of the
acquisition loops. The receiver also provides countermeasures to dynamic path distortions.
Clock and digital data are extracted from the analog channels and passed on to the I/O interface. The digital data is processed by the I/O interface module and converted to a DS1/E1 or
DS3 format.
The MDR-8000 consists of I/O, transmit, receive, control and monitor, and power distribution
subsystems. An overview of these functions followed by detailed functional descriptions of the
modules that comprise each subsystem follows.

3-4

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

MCS11
USI

RELAY
MODULE

LMC

ASYNC

CONTROL/
STATUS

DS1
116

AE37( )
CONTROLLER

CONTROL/
STATUS

TO/FROM
XCONNECT

LBO

X/Y DATA
BUS 14

DATA/RS232/AUDIO

SYNC

CHANS
116

X/Y DATA
BUS 14

OVHD

DX-35M
DS1/E1
I/O
INTFC

I/Q
DATA

CONTROL/
STATUS

UD-35( )
XMTR

RF

STATUS

UD-51( )
POWER
AMPL
(OPTION)

RF

TO/FROM
ANT W/G
BRANCHING
RAIL
DATA

UD-36( )
RCVR

RF

TO/FROM
RPTR INTFC
POWER
SUPPLY
LMW-3142-SM
04/14/00

Figure 3 - 2 Typical DS1/E1 Non-Standby Radio Functional Block Diagram


3-5

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

MCS11
USI

LMC

CONTROL/
STATUS

RELAY
MODULE

SYNC

LBO

DATA/RS232/AUDIO

AE37( )
CONTROLLER

CONTROL/
STATUS

TO/FROM
XCONNECT
DS3

ASYNC

DS3

WAYSIDE
DS1

WAYSIDE
DS1

P/N DATA

P/N DATA

OVHD

DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC

I/Q
DATA

CONTROL/
STATUS

UD-35( )
XMTR

RF

STATUS

UD-51( )
POWER
AMPL
(OPTION)

RF

TO/FROM
ANT W/G
BRANCHING
I/Q
DATA

UD-36( )
RCVR

RF

TO/FROM
RPTR INTFC
POWER
SUPPLY
LMW-3100
04/14/00

Figure 3 - 3 Typical DS3 Non-Standby Radio Functional Block Diagram


3-6

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

MCS11
USI

RELAY
MODULE

TO/FROM
X-CONNECT

WAYSIDE
DS1

LMC

ASYNC

CONTROL/
STATUS

AE37( )
CONTROLLER
CONTROL/
STATUS

OVHD

WAYSIDE
DS1

DX-35P
OC3
I/O
INTFC

CONTROL/
STATUS

OC3

OC3
AUX
INTFC

SVCE
CHAN

RPTR
DS1

DATA/RS232/AUDIO

SYNC

I/Q
DATA

UD-35( )
XMTR

RF

STATUS

UD-51( )
POWER
AMPL
(OPTION)

RF

TO/FROM
ANT W/G
BRANCHING
I/Q
DATA

UD-36( )
RCVR

RF

TO/FROM
RPTR INTFC
POWER
SUPPLY
LMW-5029-SM
01/07/04

Figure 3 - 4 Typical OC3/STM-1 Non-Standby Radio Functional Block Diagram


3-7

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

MCS11
USI

LMC

DATA/RS232/AUDIO
ASYNC

CONTROL/
STATUS

RELAY
MODULE

SYNC

AE37( )
CONTROLLER

CONTROL/
STATUS

OVHD
CONTROL/
STATUS

10/100/1000 BASE T
ETHERNET

STATUS

ETHERNET DATA

AUX
INTFC

DS1

DS1

DX-35R
I/Q
ETHERNET DATA
I/O
INTFC

UD-35( )
XMTR

RF

UD-51( )
POWER
AMPL
(OPTION)

RF

TO/FROM
ANT W/G
BRANCHING
SVCE
CHAN

RPTR
DS1

RX/RS
DATA

UD-36( )
RCVR

RF

TO/FROM
RPTR INTFC
POWER
SUPPLY

Note
Ethernet interface can be electrical or optical.

Figure 3 - 5 Typical Ethernet Non-Standby Radio Functional Block Diagram


3-8

MDR-1074F
07/23/06

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

MCS11
USI

LMC

DATA/RS232/AUDIO
ASYNC

SYNC

CONTROL/
STATUS

RELAY
MODULE

AE37( )
CONTROLLER

CONTROL/
STATUS

TO/FROM
XCONNECT

DS1
116

CHANS
116

LBO

OVHD

I/Q
DATA

DX-35M
DS1/E1
I/O
INTFC

CONTROL/
STATUS

STATUS

UD-51( )
POWER
AMPL
(OPTION)

RF

UD-35( )
XMTR
A

X/Y DATA
BUS 14

RAIL
DATA

X/Y DATA
BUS 14
A

TO/FROM
RPTR INTFC

RF

TO/FROM
ANT W/G
BRANCHING

RF

UD-36( )
RCVR
A

POWER
SUPPLY
A
B

LMW-3144F
01/07/04

Figure 3 - 6 Typical DS1/E1 Hot-Standby Radio Functional Block Diagram


3-9

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

MCS11
USI

RELAY
MODULE

DATA/RS232/AUDIO
ASYNC

SYNC

CONTROL/
STATUS

AE37( )
CONTROLLER

CONTROL/
STATUS

TO/FROM
XCONNECT

DS3

LMC

DS3

LBO

WAYSIDE
DS1

WAYSIDE
DS1

P/N DATA

P/N DATA

OVHD

I/Q
DATA

DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC

STATUS

UD-51( )
POWER
AMPL
(OPTION)

RF

UD-35( )
XMTR
A

I/Q
DATA

RF

TO/FROM
RPTR INTFC

CONTROL/
STATUS

TO/FROM
ANT W/G
BRANCHING

RF

UD-36( )
RCVR
A

POWER
SUPPLY
A
B

Figure 3 - 7 Typical DS3 Hot-Standby Radio Functional Block Diagram


3-10

LMW-3101F
01/07/04

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

MCS11
USI

RELAY
MODULE

LMC

DATA/RS232/AUDIO
ASYNC

SYNC

CONTROL/
STATUS

AE37( )
CONTROLLER

CONTROL/
STATUS

OVHD
CONTROL/
STATUS

OC3

STATUS

TO/FROM
XCONNECT

WAYSIDE
DS1

OC3
AUX
INTFC

WAYSIDE
DS1

I/Q
DATA

DX-35P
OC3
I/O
INTFC

UD-51( )
POWER
AMPL
(OPTION)

RF

UD-35( )
XMTR
A

I/Q
DATA

SVCE
CHAN

RPTR
DS1

TO/FROM
RPTR INTFC

RF

TO/FROM
ANT W/G
BRANCHING

RF

UD-36( )
RCVR
A

POWER
SUPPLY
A
B

LMW-5028F
05/21/01

Figure 3 - 8 Typical OC3/STM-1 Hot-Standby Radio Functional Block Diagram


3-11

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

MCS11
USI

RELAY
MODULE

LMC

DATA/RS232/AUDIO
ASYNC

SYNC

CONTROL/
STATUS

AE37( )
CONTROLLER

CONTROL/
STATUS

OVHD
CONTROL/
STATUS

10/100/1000BASE-T

STATUS

ETHERNET

WAYSIDE
DS1

OC3
AUX
INTFC

DS1

I/Q
DX-35R
DATA
ETHERNET
I/O
INTFC

UD-51( )
POWER
AMPL
(OPTION)

RF

UD-35( )
XMTR
A

RX/RS
DATA

SVCE
CHAN

RPTR
DS1

TO/FROM
ANT W/G
BRANCHING

RF

UD-36( )
RCVR

TO/FROM
RPTR INTFC

RF

A
B

POWER
SUPPLY

Note

A
B

Ethernet interface can be electrical or optical.

Figure 3 - 9 Typical Ethernet Hot-Standby Radio Functional Block Diagram


3-12

MDR-1199F
07/21/06

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3.4
I/O SUBSYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
See Figure 3 - 10, Figure 3 - 11, Figure 3 - 12 and Figure 3 - 13. The DS1/E1 and DS3 I/O subsystem consists of the DS1/E1 and DS3 LBO and I/O interface modules. The OC3/STM-1 I/O
subsystem consists of the OC3/STM-1 AUX interface board and I/O interface modules. The I/O
subsystem interfaces the XMT and RCV and monitor and control subsystems. The DS1, E1,
and DS3 I/O subsystem converts digital signals into a data stream and multiplexes this data
with overhead data. The OC3/STM-1 I/O subsystem converts OC3/STM-1 optical signals to
digital signals and multiplexes this data with overhead data. Multiplexed data is demultiplexed to separate the overhead data from the data stream.

J303/
J304

DS1
116

LBO

J314

X/Y DATA
BUS 14

I/Q
DATA

DX-35M
DS1/E1
I/O
INTFC
A

RAIL
DATA

TO
XMTR A
FROM
RCVR A

MX/DX
BUS

CHANNEL BUS

DX-35M
DS1/E1
I/O
INTFC
B

I/Q
DATA

RAIL
DATA

TO
XMTR B
FROM
RCVR B

X/Y DATA BUS


LMW-3141F
01/07/04

Figure 3 - 10 DS1/E1 I/O Function Block Diagram


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J1 (IN)/
J2 (OUT)

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

DS3

DX35N
I/O
INTFC
A

LBO
J201 (IN)/
J202 (OUT)

WAYSIDE
DS1

J401

P/N DATA

I/Q
DATA

I/Q
DATA

TO
XMTR A

FROM
RCVR A

MX/DX
BUS

DS3
CHANNEL BUS

DS1
CHANNEL BUS

I/Q
DATA

DX35N
I/O
INTFC
B

I/Q
DATA

TO
XMTR B

FROM
RCVR B

P/N DATA BUS


LMW-3102F
01/07/04

Figure 3 - 11 DS3 I/O Functional Block Diagram

OC3/STM-1

DX-35P
OC3/STM-1
INTFC
A

OC3/STM-1
AUX
INTFC
J201 (IN)/
J202 (OUT)

I/Q
DATA

FROM
RCVR A

MX/DX
BUS

RPTR
DS1

DS1
CHANNEL BUS

DX-35P
OC3/STM-1
INTFC
B

DATA BUS

OC3/STM-1

Figure 3 - 12 OC3/STM-1 I/O Functional Block Diagram


3-14

TO
XMTR A

WAYSIDE
DS1
SVCE
CHANNEL BUS

J203

I/Q
DATA

I/Q
DATA

I/Q
DATA

TO
XMTR B

FROM
RCVR B

LMW-3156F
01/07/04

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

10/100/1000BaseT

DX-35R
Ethernet I/O
INTFC
A

AUX
INTFC
J201 (IN)/
J202 (OUT)

I/Q
DATA

TO
XMTR A

FROM
RCVR A

DS1
MX/DX
BUS

SVCE
CHANNEL BUS

J203

I/Q
DATA

RPTR

DS1
CHANNEL BUS

DX-35R
Ethernet I/O
INTFC
B

DATA BUS

10/100/1000BaseT

I/Q
DATA

I/Q
DATA

TO
XMTR B

FROM
RCVR B

LMW-3156B-F
07/21/06

Figure 3 - 13 Ethernet I/O Functional Block Diagram


3.4.1

3.4.1.1

I/O Transmit Signal Flow

DS1/E1 Radio

Digital signals are routed from the DS1 cross-connect/E1 interface to the LBO. The incoming
DS1/E1 signals are transformer coupled to a splitter/termination. The splitter terminates
the balanced signals and converts them to unbalanced P and N signals. These signals are
connected to the A and B I/O Interface cards. The I/O interface cards multiplex up to 16 DS1/
E1 input signals with overhead into a data stream. If the radio is being used as a repeater
(repeater cable is connected to J314), data on the X/Y data bus is also multiplexed into the
data stream. This data stream is converted into XY rail data and then multiplexed into I/Q
data rails (digital baseband).

3.4.1.2

DS3 Radio

Digital signals are routed from the DS3 cross-connect to the LBO. The incoming DS3 signals
are transformer coupled to a splitter/termination. The splitter terminates the balanced signals and converts them to unbalanced P and N signals. These signals are connected to the A
and B I/O Interface cards. If wayside DS1 is desired, digital signals are routed from the DS1
cross-connect to the LBO. The incoming wayside DS1 signals are transformer coupled to a

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Functional Description Section

DS1 splitter/termination. The DS1 splitter terminates the balanced signals and converts
them to unbalanced P and N signals that are connected to the A and B I/O Interface cards.
The I/O interface cards multiplex one or three DS3 and WS DS1 signals with overhead into a
data stream. If the radio is being used as a repeater (repeater cable is connected to J401),
data on the X/Y data bus is also multiplexed into the data stream. This data stream is converted into XY rail data and then multiplexed into I/Q data rails (digital baseband).

3.4.1.3

OC3/STM-1 Radio

Optical signals are routed from the fiber optic interface to the A and B I/O Interface cards. If
wayside DS1 is desired, digital signals are routed from the DS1 cross-connect to the aux board.
The wayside DS1 signals are connected to the A and B I/O Interface cards. The I/O interface
cards convert the optical signal to digital signal and multiplex the digital signal and WS DS1
signals with overhead into a data stream. If the radio is being used as a repeater (repeater
cable is connected to J401), data on the X/Y data bus is also multiplexed into the data stream.
This data stream is converted into XY rail data and then multiplexed into I/Q data rails (digital baseband).

3.4.1.4

Ethernet Radio

The Ethernet radio I/O subsystem is populated with the OC3 AUX Interface board and one
or two DX-35R-1 or -2 ETH I/O Interface modules for Ethernet software releases prior to
R2.0 and the line interface card and one or two DX-35S-1 ETH/T1 I/O modules for release
following R2.0. The following paragraphs describe both versions of I/O subsystems.
3.4.1.4.1

I/O Prior to R2.0

The DX-35R-1 I/O interface module accepts electrical 10/100/1000 Base-T ETH signals. The
DX-35R-2 I/O Interface module accepts optical or electrical 10/100/1000 Base-T ETH signals.
Optical ETH signals are converted to ETH electrical signals using an SFP (Small Form-factor Pluggable), a compact optical XCVR connected to the fiber optic cable.
In the ETH RCV/Radio XMT direction, the I/O interface module processes and multiplexes
the incoming ETH signals with up to four (4) DS1 and service channel signals to provide an
I/Q baseband data output to the XMTR module(s). The XMTR module(s) convert the digital
baseband signal to a modulated TCM RF signal that can be further amplified by the Power
Amplifier module(s) (if equipped) or applied directly to the antenna.
3.4.1.4.2

I/O After R2.0

The DX-35S-1 ETH/T1 I/O module accepts optical and electrical 10/100/1000 Base-T ETH
signals. Optical ETH signals are converted to ETH electrical signals using an SFP (Small
Form-factor Pluggable), a compact optical XCVR connected to the fiber optic cable.
In the ETH RCV/Radio XMT direction, the ETH/T1 I/O module processes and multiplexes
the incoming ETH signals with up to 32 T1 and service channel signals to provide an I/Q
baseband data output to the XMTR module(s). The XMTR module(s) convert the digital
baseband signal to a modulated TCM RF signal that can be further amplified by the Power
Amplifier module(s) (if equipped) or applied directly to the antenna.

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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

3.4.1.5

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Overhead

The transmitted overhead data consists of three 64 kb/s service channels and one 64 kb/s
extended link monitor channel (ELMC). Each service channel contains multiplexed telephone, ELMC, MCS-11/TBOS alarm and control data, RS-232 serial data, and audio signals.
3.4.2

3.4.2.1

I/O Receive Signal Flow

DS1/E1 Radio

In the I/O interface, the digital rails received from the RCVR are demultiplexed to separate
the overhead data from the traffic. The I/Q rails are demultiplexed to produce an XY rail data
stream that is converted and demultiplexed to provide overhead and up to 16 DS1/E1 outputs.

3.4.2.2

DS3 Radio

In the I/O interface, the digital rails received from the RCVR are demultiplexed to separate
the overhead data from the traffic. The I/Q rails are demultiplexed to produce an XY rail
data stream that is converted and demultiplexed to provide overhead, up to three DS3 outputs and up to three wayside DS1 outputs.

3.4.2.3

OC3/STM-1 Radio

In the I/O interface, the digital rails received from the RCVR are demultiplexed to separate
the overhead data from the traffic. The I/Q rails are demultiplexed to produce an XY rail
data stream that is converted and demultiplexed to provide overhead, OC3/STM-1 optical
output, and up to three wayside DS1 outputs.

3.4.2.4

Ethernet Radio

The Ethernet radio I/O subsystem is populated with the OC3 AUX interface board and one
or two DX-35R-1 or -2 ETH I/O interface modules for Ethernet software releases prior to
R2.0 and the ETH/T1 Line interface card and one or two DX-35S-1 ETH/T1 I/O modules for
releases following R2.0. The following paragraphs describe both versions of I/O subsystems.
3.4.2.4.1 I/O Prior to R2.0
In the Radio RCV/ETH XMT direction, the TCM RF signal from the antenna is converted to
demodulated R and S baseband data in the RCVR module(s) and applied to the I/O interface
module(s). The I/O interface module(s) process and demultiplex the baseband to provide
electrical ETH, DS1, and service channel outputs to the OC3 AUX interface board.
3.4.2.4.2 I/O After R2.0
In the Radio RCV/ETH XMT direction, the TCM RF signal from the antenna is converted to
demodulated R and S baseband data in the RCVR module(s) and applied to the ETH/T1 I/O
module(s). The ETH/T1 I/O module(s) process and demultiplex the baseband to provide electrical ETH, T1, and service channel outputs to the line interface card.

3.4.2.5

Overhead

The overhead data stream is demultiplexed to provide three 64 kb/s service channels and
one 64 kb/s ELMC channel. Each service channel is demultiplexed to provide telephone,
ELMC, MCS-11/TBOS alarm and control data, RS-232 serial data, and audio signals.

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Functional Description Section

3.5
I/O SUBSYSTEM MODULES
Modules are described to the functional block diagram level in the following paragraphs. Modules are described in transmit signal flow order.
3.5.1 DS1/E1 LBO
Refer to Table 3 - 1 for LBO options. The MDR-8000/i/s can be equipped with an XMT LBO to
interface DS1 or E1 data rates. The LBO compensates for the distance to the cross-connect for
DS1 requirements or compensates for 12 dB cable loss (maximum allowed) between the radio
and customer connection point to meet E1 requirements. See Figure 3 - 14 for application
information.

Table 3 - 1 LBO Options


MODULE/DESCRIPTION

PART NUMBER

APPLICATIONS

LBO (domestic) 0-330 ft. (near)

3DH 03144 AA

Linear/Ring

LBO (domestic) 330-650 ft. (far)

3DH 03144 AB

Linear/Ring

LBO (international) (near)

3DH 03144 AC

Linear/Ring

LBO (International) (far)

3DH 03144 AD

Linear/Ring

LBO (domestic) 0-330 ft. (near)

3DH 04164 AA

Back-to-Back Repeater

LBO (domestic) 330-650 ft. (far)

3DH 04164-AB

Back-to-Back Repeater

LBO (international) (near)

3DH 04164 AC

Back-to-Back Repeater

LBO (International) (far)

3DH 04164 AD

Back-to-Back Repeater

3.5.1.1

XMT Circuit (DS1/E1 Line RCVR)

See Figure 3 - 15 for functional block diagram. The transformer couples the DS1/E1 Multiplex Tip/Ring (DS1/E1 MX T/R) signals at J303 to DX-35( ) I/O Interface A (via connector
A3D), and B (via connector B3D) if the system is hot-standby.

3.5.1.2

RCV Circuit (DS1/E1 Line Driver)

The demultiplexed signals from the DX-35( ) I/O Interface module(s) are transformer coupled
to the LBO circuit. The LBO circuit simulates lengths of twisted-pair cable to meet cross-connect requirements. The LBO conditions up to 16 DS1/E1 lines. The balanced output is applied
to the DS1 cross-connect or E1 interface via connector J304.

3.5.1.3

Repeater Signal Distribution

The DS1/E1 LBO distributes repeater data (XMT and RCV X/Y DATA T/F 1-4) between
RPTR connector J314 and the A and B I/O interface modules.

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Functional Description Section

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July 23, 2007

DS1/E1 LBO
A3D

DX X/Y DATA 1-4


DX-35M
I/O
INTFC A

DX X/Y DATA 1-4

DX CLK

DX CLK

DX SYNC

DX SYNC

DX ALIGN

DX ALIGN

DX FRM LOSS

DX FRM LOSS

MX X/Y DATA 1-4

A3

B3D

DX-35M
I/O
INTFC B

MX X/Y DATA 1-4

MX CLK

MX CLK

MX SYNC

MX SYNC

ALL Z CLK

ALL Z CLK

CH SYNC 1-4 A/B

CH SYNC 1-4 A/B

RCV A ON LINE

RCV B DISABLE

I/O A ON LINE

I/O B DISABLE

RCV A DISABLE

RCV B ONLINE

I/O A DISABLE

I/O B ONLINE

B3

MW211-0025-1B-F
07/21/06

Figure 3 - 14 DS1/E1 LBO Interconnect Diagram (Sheet 1 of 2)


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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

DS1/E1 LBO
J314
J314
RPTR
LBO

XMT X/Y DATA T/F 14

A3D

DX35M
I/O
INTFC A

RPTR SYNC T/F

A3
B3D

DX35M
I/O
INTFC B
B3

A3C
DX35M
I/O
INTFC A

RCV X/Y DATA T/F 14


RCV SYNC T/F

J314

J314
RPTR
LBO

A3
B3C
DX35M
I/O
INTFC B
B3
J303
FROM
CROSS
CONNECT/
E1 INTFC

A3D
DS1 MX T/R 116

DS1 MX T/R 116

DX35M
I/O
INTFC A
A3

A3D
DX35M
I/O
INTFC A
A3

B3D
DS1 DX T/R 111
DS1 MX T/R 116
DS1 DX T/R 1216

DX35M
I/O
INTFC B
B3

B3D
J304

DX35M
I/O
INTFC B

DS1 DX T/R 111

B3

DS1 DX T/R 1216

DS1 DX T/R 116

TO
CROSS
CONNECT/
E1 INTFC

MW21100251A
072598

Figure 3 - 14 DS1/E1 LBO Interconnect Diagram (Sheet 2 of 2)


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Functional Description Section

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July 23, 2007

B3D
FROM
DX35M
I/O INTERFACE
B

J304

A3D
DS1/E1 DX T
FROM
DX35M
I/O INTERFACE
A

DS1/E1 DX T

XFMR

TO DS1
CROSS
CONNECT/
E1 INTFC

LBO
DS1/E1 DX R

DS1/E1 DX R

1 OF 16

RCV CIRCUIT

1 OF 16
A3D

J303
DS1/E1 MX T
FROM DS1
CROSS
CONNECT/
E1 INTFC

DS1/E1 MX T
TO
DX35M
I/O INTERFACE
A

XFMR
DS1/E1 MX R

DS1/E1 MX R

B3D

XMT CIRCUIT

TO
DX35M
I/O INTERFACE
B
MW21100261
050698

Figure 3 - 15 DS1/E1 LBO Functional Block Diagram


3.5.2 DS3 LBO
The MDR-8000 is equipped with an XMT LBO to interface DS3 data rates and wayside DS1
data rates. The LBO compensates for the distance to the cross-connect for DS3 requirements.
See Figure 3 - 17 for to/from signal information and application information.
The DS3 LBO functions in non-standby and hot-standby configurations. In non-standby configurations, Only the A-side is used. Sides A and B are used for hot-standby. One side is online. The off-line side remains in standby mode until the on-line side fails.
The DS3 LBO contains three identical XMT and RCV circuits. Only one circuit (line 1) is
shown and described. The functional block diagram and description for lines 2 and 3 are the
same as line 1.

3.5.2.1

Strapping

FAR position straps are provided to bypass the LBO circuits and pass the signals without
delay. NEAR straps are provided to delay the circuit. Straps are changed manually and are
not software controlled.
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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

DS3 XMT Circuit

See Figure 3 - 16 for functional block diagram. The transformer couples the DS3 Multiplex
Tip/Ring (DS3 MX T/R) signals at J2 to DX-35N I/O Interface A (via connector A3C), and B
(via connector B3C) if the system is hot-standby.

3.5.2.3

Wayside DS1 XMT Circuit

The transformer couples the wayside DS1 Multiplex Tip/Ring (WDS1 MX T/R) signals at
J201 to DX-35N DS3 I/O Interface A (via connector A3D), and B (via connector B3D) if the
system is hot-standby.

DS3/E3 LBO
A3D

DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
A

B3D

A TERM SYNC OUT

B TERM SYNC IN

WDS1 DX DATA 1/2

WDS1 DX DATA 1/2

WDS1 DX DATA 3/4

WDS1 DX DATA 3/4

WDS1 DX CLK 1-4

WDS1 DX CLK 1-4

LINE 1-4 SET T/F

LINE 1-4 SET T/F

LINE 1-4 ALIGN T/F

LINE 1-4 ALIGN T/F

WDS1 DX FRM LOSS

WDS1 DX FRM LOSS

WDS1 MX DATA 1-4

A3

WDS1 MX DATA 1-4

WDS1 MX CLK 1-4

WDS1 MX CLK 1-4

WDS1 MX STRQ 1-4

WDS1 MX STRQ 1-4

WDS1 ALL Z CLK

WDS1 ALL Z CLK

WDS1 MX STFR

WDS1 MX STFR

RCV A ON LINE

DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
B

A3C

B3C

RCV B DISABLE

I/O A ON LINE

I/O B DISABLE

RCV A DISABLE

RCV B ONLINE

I/O A DISABLE

I/O B ONLINE

XMT A ON LINE

XMT B DISABLE

XMT A DISABLE

XMT B ON LINE

B3

LMW-3108F
07/21/06

Figure 3 - 16 DS3 LBO Interconnect Diagram (Sheet 1 of 2)


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Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

HOTSTANDBY
DS3 LBO
3C/3D
A E/W RX SC1 DATA T/F
A E/W RX SC1 INSERT T/F
A E/W RX SC1 INSERT O/H T/F

DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
A3

A E/W RX RPTR SYNC T/F


A E/W RX SYNC T/F
A E/W RX SC2 DATA T/F
A E/W RX SC2 INSERT T/F
A E/W RX SC2 INSERT O/H T/F

J401

SERVICE CHAN

J401
RPTR
LBO

B E/W RX SC1 DATA T/F


B E/W RX SC1 INSERT T/F
B E/W RX SC1 INSERT O/H T/F

DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
B3

B E/W RX RPTR SYNC T/F


B E/W RX SYNC T/F
B E/W RX SC2 DATA T/F
B E/W RX SC2 INSERT T/F
B E/W RX SC2 INSERT O/H T/F
3C/3D
A E/W TX SC1 DATA T/F
A E/W TX SC1 INSERT T/F
A E/W TX SC1 INSERT O/H T/F
A E/W TX RPTR SYNC T/F
A E/W TX SYNC T/F
A E/W TX SC2 DATA T/F

DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
A3

A E/W TX SC2 INSERT T/F


A E/W TX SC2 INSERT O/H T/F

J401
RPTR
LBO

SERVICE CHAN

B E/W TX SC1 DATA T/F


B E/W TX SC1 INSERT T/F
B E/W TX SC1 INSERT O/H T/F
B E/W TX RPTR SYNC T/F
B E/W TX SYNC T/F
B E/W TX SC2 DATA T/F

DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
B3

B E/W TX SC2 INSERT T/F


B E/W TX SC2 INSERT O/H T/F
LMW-3110F
01/07/04

Figure 3 - 16 DS3 LBO Interconnect Diagram (Sheet 2 of 2)


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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

A3C
FROM
DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
A

FAR
A DS3 DX LINE 1
J21

XFMR

B3C

A/B

DS3 DX
LINE 1

TO
DS3 CROSSCONNECT

LBO

NEAR

FROM
DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
B

B DS3 DX LINE 1

RCV CIRCUIT

A3D
TO
DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
A

A DS3 MX LINE 1
J22
FROM
DS3 CROSSCONNECT

XFMR

B3D
TO
DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
B

B DS3 MX LINE 1

XMT CIRCUIT

LINE 1 OF 3 (LINES 2 AND 3 ARE IDENTICAL)


LMW-3114F
Sheet 1 of 2
02/22/02

Figure 3 - 17 DS3 LBO Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 1 of 2)


3-24

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

FROM
DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
B

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

B3D
FAR
J202

A3D
WDS1 DX T

FROM
DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
A

WDS1 DX T

XFMR

NEAR

TO DS1
CROSSCONNECT/
E1 INTERFACE

LBO
WDS1 DX R

WDS1 DX R

FAR
RCV CIRCUIT

OPEN = DROP & INSERT


CLOSED = THROUGH
J201

A3D
WDS1 MX T

FROM DS1
CROSSCONNECT/
E1 INTERFACE

WDS1 MX T

TO
DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
A

XFMR
WDS1 MX R

WDS1 MX R

B3D
XMT CIRCUIT

LINE 1 OF 3 LINES (LINES 2 AND 3 ARE IDENTICAL)

TO
DX-35N
DS3
I/O
INTFC
B

LMW-3115F
Sheet 2 of 2
02/22/02

Figure 3 - 17 DS3 LBO Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 2 of 2)


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Functional Description Section

DS3 RCV Circuit

The demultiplexed signals (A/B DS3 DX LINE 1) from the DX-35N DS3 I/O Interface module(s) are transformer coupled to the strapping for the LBO circuit. If the LBO is strapped
for NEAR, the LBO circuit simulates lengths of twisted-pair cable to meet cross-connect
requirements. If the LBO is strapped for FAR, the LBO circuit is bypassed.

3.5.2.5

Wayside DS1 RCV Circuit

The demultiplexed signals (WDS1 DX T/R) from the DX-35N DS3 I/O Interface module(s) are
transformer coupled to the strapping for the LBO circuit. If the LBO is strapped for NEAR,
the LBO circuit simulates lengths of twisted-pair cable to meet cross-connect requirements.
If the LBO is strapped for FAR, the LBO circuit is bypassed.

3.5.2.6

Repeater Signal Distribution

In a hot-standby configuration, the DS3 LBO distributes SC1 and SC2 TX and RX service
channel data, insert data, insert off-hook, and repeater and TX sync to/from RPTR connector
J401 and the A and B I/O interface modules.

3.5.2.7

I/O Interface-to-I/O Interface Data Distribution

The DS3 LBO distributes redundant data between I/O interface A and I/O interface B. I/O
interface A-to-B data is wired directly to connectors A3D and B3D. Receive On-Line and I/O
On-Line are also cross-coupled to provide a make-before-break switch control.
3.5.3 OC3/STM-1 Aux Interface
The MDR-8000 is equipped with an auxiliary (aux) interface to interface wayside DS1 data,
I/O interface-to-I/O interface data and controls, and repeater data. See Figure 3 - 18 for to/from
signal information and application information.

3.5.3.1

Wayside DS1 XMT Circuit

See Figure 3 - 19. Transformers couple the DS1 in tip and ring (DS1 IN T/R) signals at J201
to DX-35P OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface A (via connector A3E), and B (via connector B3E) if the
system is hot-standby.

3.5.3.2

Wayside DS1 RCV Circuit

The demultiplexed signals (DS1 OUT T/R) from the DX-35P OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface module(s) are transformer coupled to the DS1 cross-connect via connector J202.

3.5.3.3

Repeater Signal Distribution

In a hot-standby configuration, the OC3/STM-1 aux interface distributes SC1 TX and RX


service channel data, insert data, insert off-hook, and repeater and TX sync to/ from RPTR
connector J203 and the A and B I/O interface modules. The SC2 service channel is wired but
not used.

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A3E

DX35-P
OC3/STM-1
I/O
INTFC
A

B3E

OT DATA 1-6 IN/OUT T/F

OT DATA 1-6 IN/OUT T/F

SYNT-SYNC IN/OUT

SYNT-SYNC IN/OUT

RGRK IN/OUT T/F

RGRK IN/OUT T/F

OT SYNC IN/OUT T/F

OT SYNC IN/OUT T/F

A3D

B3D

OR DT 0-3 IN/OUT T/F

OR DT 0-3 IN/OUT T/F

OR 39 CLK IN/OUT T/F

OR 39K CLK IN/OUT T/F

OR FRAME IN/OUT T/F

OR FRAME IN/OUT T/F

OR PARITY IN/OUT T/F

OR PARITY IN/OUT T/F

A3E

B WAYSIDE DISABLE

A WAYSIDE DISABLE

B WAYSIDE ONLINE

A RCV AUX ONLINE

B RCV AUX DISABLE

A RCV AUX DISABLE

B RCV AUX ONLINE

A TX AUX ONLINE

B TX AUX DISABLE

A TX AUX DISABLE

B TX AUX ONLINE

A3E

WS DS1 1-3 IN T/R

A WS DS1 1-3 T/R


A RPTR DS1 IN T/R

FROM
2ND SHELF
(RPTR)

RPTR DS1 IN T/R


B3E
B WS DS1 1-3 T/R
B RPTR DS1 T/R

A WS DS1 1-3 T/R


A RPTR DS1 T/R

B WS DS1 1-3 T/R


B RPTR DS1 T/R

DX35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O INTFC
B

J202
WS DS1 1-3 OUT T/R

B3E
DX35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O INTFC
B

DX35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O INTFC
A

J203

A3E
DX35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O INTFC
A

DX35-P
OC3/STM-1
I/O
INTFC
B

B3E

A WAYSIDE ONLINE

J201
FROM
CROSSCONNECT

OC3/STM-1
INTFC AUX

J203
RPTR DS1 OUT T/R

TO
CROSSCONNECT

TO
2ND SHELF
(RPTR)

LMW-5000F
05/18/05

Figure 3 - 18 OC3/STM-1 Aux Interface Interconnect Diagram


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Functional Description Section

DS1 OUT T

A T1 TX T

FROM
DX-35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O
INTFC
A

J202

RCV CIRCUIT

A3E

XFMR
A T1 TX R

TO
DS1
CROSSCONNECT

B3E
B T1 TX T

FROM
DX-35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O
INTFC
B

XFMR
B T1 TX R

DS1 OUT R

XMT CIRCUIT

A3E
A T1 RX T

TO
DX-35P
OC3 I/O
INTFC
A

J2O1
DS1 IN T

XFMR
A T1 RX R

FROM
DS1
CROSSCONNECT

B3E
B T1 RX T
DS1 IN R

XFMR
B T1 RX R

TO
DX-35P
OC3 I/O
INTFC
B

LINE 1 OF 3 LINES (LINES 2 & 3 ARE IDENTICAL)


LMW-3168F
05/18/05

Figure 3 - 19 OC3/STM-1 Aux Interface Functional Block Diagram


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Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3.5.4 Ethernet Aux Interface


The MDR-8000 is equipped with an auxiliary (aux) interface to interface up to four DS1,
I/O interface-to-I/O interface data and controls, and repeater data. See Figure 3 - 20 for to/from
signal information and application information.

3.5.4.1

DS1 XMT Circuit

See Figure 3 - 21. Transformers couple the DS1 in tip and ring (DS1 IN T/R) signals at J201
to DX-35P OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface A (via connector A3E), and B (via connector B3E) if the
system is hot-standby.

3.5.4.2

DS1 RCV Circuit

The demultiplexed signals (DS1 OUT T/R) from the DX 35P OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface module(s) are transformer coupled to the DS1 cross-connect via connector J202.

3.5.4.3

Repeater Signal Distribution

In a hot-standby configuration, the OC3/STM-1 aux interface distributes SC1 TX and RX


service channel data, insert data, insert off-hook, and repeater and TX sync to/from RPTR
connector J203 and the A and B I/O interface modules. The SC2 service channel is wired but
not used.

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Functional Description Section

A3E

DX35-P
OC3/STM-1
I/O
INTFC
A

B3E

OT DATA 1-6 IN/OUT T/F

OT DATA 1-6 IN/OUT T/F

SYNT-SYNC IN/OUT

SYNT-SYNC IN/OUT

RGRK IN/OUT T/F

RGRK IN/OUT T/F

OT SYNC IN/OUT T/F

OT SYNC IN/OUT T/F

A3D

B3D

OR DT 0-3 IN/OUT T/F

OR DT 0-3 IN/OUT T/F

OR 39 CLK IN/OUT T/F

OR 39K CLK IN/OUT T/F

OR FRAME IN/OUT T/F

OR FRAME IN/OUT T/F

OR PARITY IN/OUT T/F

OR PARITY IN/OUT T/F

A3E

B WAYSIDE DISABLE

A WAYSIDE DISABLE

B WAYSIDE ONLINE

A RCV AUX ONLINE

B RCV AUX DISABLE

A RCV AUX DISABLE

B RCV AUX ONLINE

A TX AUX ONLINE

B TX AUX DISABLE

A TX AUX DISABLE

B TX AUX ONLINE

A3E

WS DS1 1-3 IN T/R

A WS DS1 1-3 T/R


A RPTR DS1 IN T/R

FROM
2ND SHELF
(RPTR)

RPTR DS1 IN T/R


B3E
B WS DS1 1-3 T/R
B RPTR DS1 T/R

A WS DS1 1-3 T/R


A RPTR DS1 T/R

B WS DS1 1-3 T/R


B RPTR DS1 T/R

DX35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O INTFC
B

J202
WS DS1 1-3 OUT T/R

B3E
DX35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O INTFC
B

DX35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O INTFC
A

J203

A3E
DX35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O INTFC
A

DX35-P
OC3/STM-1
I/O
INTFC
B

B3E

A WAYSIDE ONLINE

J201
FROM
CROSSCONNECT

OC3/STM-1
INTFC AUX

J203
RPTR DS1 OUT T/R

TO
CROSSCONNECT

TO
2ND SHELF
(RPTR)

LMW-5000F
05/18/05

Figure 3 - 20 Ethernet Aux Interface Interconnect Diagram


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DS1 OUT T

A T1 TX T

FROM
DX-35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O
INTFC
A

J202

RCV CIRCUIT

A3E

XFMR
A T1 TX R

TO
DS1
CROSSCONNECT

B3E
B T1 TX T

FROM
DX-35P
OC3/STM-1
I/O
INTFC
B

XFMR
B T1 TX R

DS1 OUT R

XMT CIRCUIT

A3E
A T1 RX T

TO
DX-35P
OC3 I/O
INTFC
A

J2O1
DS1 IN T

XFMR
A T1 RX R

FROM
DS1
CROSSCONNECT

B3E
B T1 RX T
DS1 IN R

XFMR
B T1 RX R

TO
DX-35P
OC3 I/O
INTFC
B

LINE 1 OF 3 LINES (LINES 2 & 3 ARE IDENTICAL)


LMW-3168F
05/18/05

Figure 3 - 21 Ethernet Aux Interface Functional Block Diagram


3.5.5 ETH T1 Line Interface
The ETH T1 Line Interface is equipped with connectors to interface up to 32 T1 lines, I/O
interface-to-I/O interface data and controls, and repeater data. See Figure 3 - 22 for to/from signal information and application information.
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Functional Description Section

LINE INTFC CARD

J303

A3E

T1 1-16 IN
X-CONN

J323

T1 1-32 IN

B
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O

J304

T1 1-11 & 17-25 OUT


A
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O

A
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O

B3E

T1 17-32 IN
A3D

T1 1-32 IN

T1 1-16 OUT
A3E

X-CONN

J324

T1 12-16 & 26-32 OUT

T1 17-32 OUT
B3D

T1 1-11 & 17-25 OUT


B
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O

A
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O
B
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O
J203
ON 2ND
MDR-8000
SHELF

B3E
T1 12-16 & 26-32 OUT
A3E
PROTECT 1-4
B3E
PROTECT 1-4
J203

A3E

RPTR IN & OUT


A3D

RPTR IN & OUT

A
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O

RPTR IN & OUT

B
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O

B3E

RX AUX
B
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O

TX AUX
T1
B3D
T1

B
DX-35S
ETH/T1
I/O

TX AUX
RX AUX
= HARD WIRED
MDR-1294
04/06/07

Figure 3 - 22 ETH Line Interface Interconnect Diagram


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Functional Description Section

3.5.5.1

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

T1 XMT Circuit

See Figure 3 - 23. Transformers couple the T1 IN tip and ring (T1 IN T/R) signals at J303
(1-16) and J323 (17-32) to DX-35S ETH/T1 I/O A (via connector A3E), and B (via connector
B3E) if the system is hot-standby.

RCV CIRCUIT

A3E
A T1 TX T
FROM
DX-35S
ETH/T1 I/O
A

J304
DS1 OUT T

XFMR
A T1 TX R

TO
DS1
CROSSCONNECT

B3E
B T1 TX T
FROM
DX-35S
ETH/T1 I/O
B

XFMR
B T1 TX R

DS1 OUT R

XMT CIRCUIT

A3E
A T1 RX T

TO
DX-35S
ETH/T1 I/O
A

J303
T1 IN T

XFMR
A T1 RX R

FROM
DS1
CROSSCONNECT

B3E
B T1 RX T
T1 IN R

TO
DX-35S
ETH/T1 I/O
B

XFMR
B T1 RX R

Line 1 of 32 lines. Lines 2 thru 32 are the same except:


T1 lines 1-16 IN connect to J303
T1 lines 17-32 IN connect to J323
T1 lines 1-17 OUT connect to J304
T1 lines 17-32 OUT connect to J324.
MDR-1296
04/08/07

Figure 3 - 23 ETH/T1 Line Interface Functional Block Diagram


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Functional Description Section

T1 RCV Circuit

The demultiplexed signals (T1 TX T/R) from the DX-35S ETH/T1 I/O module(s) are transformer coupled to the cross-connect via connectors J304 (1-16) and J324 (17-32).

3.5.5.3

Repeater Signal Distribution

In a hot-standby configuration, the ETH T1 Line interface distributes SC1 TX and RX service channel data, insert data, insert off-hook, and repeater and TX sync to/from RPTR connector J203 and the A and B ETH/T1 I/O modules. The SC32 service channel is wired but
not used.

3.5.5.4

I/O Interface-to-I/O Interface Data Distribution

The OC3/STM-1 aux interface distributes redundant data between I/O interface A and I/O
interface B. I/O interface A-to-B data is wired directly to connectors A3E and B3E. WAYSIDE ONLINE/DISABLE, RCV AUX ONLINE/DISABLE, AND TX AUX ONLINE/DISABLE CONTROLS are cross-coupled to provide a make-before-break switch control.
3.5.6 DX-35M-1/2 DS1/E1 I/O Interface
The DX-35M-1/2 DS1/E1 I/O Interface multiplexes/demultiplexes up to 16 DS1/E1 channels,
up to four X/Y data rail pairs, and service channel data in the MDR-8000 radio. The DX-35M-1
(PN 3DH 03131 AA) operates with North American data while the DX-35M-2 (PN 3DH 03131
AB) is compatible with international (E1) data rates.
See Figure 3 - 24 for to/from signal information and application information. The I/O Interface
consists of several functional blocks each of which is described in the following paragraphs.

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DX-35M
I/O INTERFACE
UD-35AN
RCVR

P101
(3A)

P102
(3A)

RX X/Y 1-4

UD-35AN
RCVR

DX FRAME LOSS

RX BIT CLK
RX BAUD CLK

A2/B2

A2/B2

UD-36AN
XMTR

I 0-4

CLK 1/2 (CLK 2 NOT USED)


UD-36AN
XMTR
PROV 1-8 (CAPACITY KEY)

A4/B4

Q 0-4

FREQ CONTROL

TX2 BAUD CLK

SERIAL CLK (12C)

P102
(3B)

SERIAL DATA (12C)


AE-37Y
CNTLR

SERIAL DATA

LAMP TEST

AE-37Y
CNTLR

RCV SC DATA E

SERIAL SELECT 0-3

SC 256k CLK E

SERIAL DATA TX

SC 64k CLK E

SERIAL CLK

SC 16k CLK E

SERIAL TX/RX

SC MARK E

XMT ENABLE

SC FRAME E

I/O ENABLE

RCV SC DATA W

RCV ENABLE

SC 256k CLK W

XMT SC DATA E

SC 64k CLK W

XMT SC OFFHOOK E
C1

A4/B4

TX BAUD CLK

P102
(3B)

SC 16k CLK W

XMT SC DATA W

SC MARK W

XMT SC OFFHOOK W

C1

SC FRAME W
P104
(3D)

P103
(3C)

DX1 MX T/R 1-16


DS1/E1
LBO

XMT X/Y DATA T/F 1-4


RPTR SYNC T/F

DS1/E1
LBO

2
P104
(3D)

ALL ZERO CLK


MX X/Y DATA 1-4

DS1 DX T/R 1-11

DS1 DX T/R 12-16

RCV X/Y DATA T/F 1-4

MX CLK

RCV SYNC T/F

8
2

MX SYNC
DX X/Y DATA 1-4

I/O DISABLE

DX CLK

RCV DISABLE

DX SYNC
I/O DISABLE

A3/B3

RCV DISABLE

MW211-0011-1F
01/21/99

Figure 3 - 24 DX-35M DS1/E1 I/O Interface Interconnect Diagram


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3.5.6.1

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Signal Crossover

See Figure 3 - 25. Crossover occurs in the LIO ASIC in both XMT and RCV directions. Crossover signals include data, sync, and clock. Refer to Table 3 - 2 for switching characteristics.
Refer to Table 3 - 3 for switching priorities.

Table 3 - 2 I/O Interface Switching


Radio Config

XMT Switch

I/O Switch

RCV Switch

Terminal

Independent
Switching

Independent
Switching

Tracks on-line
RCVR

Repeater with all lines provisioned ON

Independent
Switching

Independent
Switching

Tracks on-line
RCVR

Repeater with all through


lines provisioned NM

Independent
Switching

Independent
Switching

Tracks on-line
RCVR

Repeater with all through


lines provisioned OFF

Tracks on-line
XMTR

Tracks on-line I/O

Tracks on-line
RCVR

Table 3 - 3 I/O Interface Switching Priorities


I/O Switch

RCV Switch

Override (Switch on Controller Front Panel)

Override (Switch on Controller Front Panel)

Module Not Present

Module Not Present

Leghorn ASIC Failure

Radio Frame Loss

XMT/RCV Alarm on Leghorn ASIC

High CRC Error Rate

Common Loss Alarm

Eye Closure

Manual Switch (Switch on Controller Front Panel)

Path Distortion
AGC Alarm
Manual Switch (Switch on Controller Front Panel)

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DS1 I/O INTFC A

XMT
BUFFERS
DS1 IN

XMTR
A

RCV
OUTPUT DRIVER

BUFFERS

DS1 OUT

RCVR
A

MX DATA
MX CLK
MX SYNC

TO/FROM
DS1 LBO

DX DATA
DX CLK
DX SYNC

XMT
DS1 IN

XMTR
B
BUFFERS
RCV
OUTPUT DRIVER

BUFFERS

DS1 OUT

RCVR
B

DS1 I/O INTFC B

I/O
ON LINE

RCV
ON LINE

MDR-1238F
04/24/06

Figure 3 - 25 DS1 Crossover Functions Simplified Functional Block Diagram

3.5.6.2

Multiplex Signal Flow

The I/O interface module receives 16 DS1/E1 channels from the DS1/E1 LBO via connector
P104. Each channel (CHAN 1-16 DS1/E1) consists of positive (P) and negative (N) data
streams in RZ format. The channel inputs are applied to appropriate DS1/E1 interface
ASICs. The I/O interface module sends four I and Q data rails to the UD-35( ) Transmitter
module via connector P101.

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3.5.6.2.1

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

DS1/E1 Interface ASIC MUX

There are eight DS1/E1 interface ASICs that serve as DS1 or E1 line interface processors.
Each of these ASICs processes two DS1 or E1 channels and performs clock recovery, clock
smoothing, elastic buffering, and line encoding and decoding (AMI, B8ZS, HDB3). The RZ
data pairs (Chan 1-16 In Tip and Ring) entering the multiplex section of the DS1/E1 interface gate arrays are bridged onto one channel, converted to NRZ format, B8ZS or HDB3
decoded, and then written into an elastic buffer by the recovered clock. In the elastic buffer,
stuff requests are generated whenever the two clocks writing into (recovered clock) and
reading from (Mux Clock) the elastic buffer are five states apart. The data is re timed off the
rising edge of the Mux Clock and sent to the output pins as MUX CHAN 1-4 DATA. The outputs of two of the DS1/E1 interface ASICs (1 and 2) are applied directly to the low capacity I/
O (LIO) ASIC. The outputs of the remaining six DS1/E1 interface ASICs (3 through 8) are
applied to the MUX/DEMUX EPLD.
3.5.6.2.2

Low Capacity I/O ASIC MUX

The multiplexer circuits in the low capacity I/O ASIC combines inputs from the following
sources (redundant, if the system is hot-standby): 1) rail X/Y 1-4 data from repeater via connector J314 on the LBO, 2) channel 1 MUX data from DS1/E1 interface ASIC #1, 3) channel
2 MUX data from DS1/E1 interface ASIC #1, 4) channel 3 MUX data from DS1/E1 interface
ASIC #2, 5) channel 4 MUX data from DS1/E1 interface ASIC #2, 6) rail X/Y 2-4 data (multiplexed channels 5-16) from the muldem ASIC, and 7) loopback data from demultiplexer circuits in the muldem ASIC and the low capacity I/O ASIC.
In the low capacity I/O ASIC, the MUX CHAN 1-4 DATA outputs of the DS1/E1 interface
ASICs are combined and converted to an X/Y data rail pair. Using control bits from the serial
interface, this data may be inserted into the rail pairs, overwriting the repeater data. Service
channel and auxiliary channel data is converted for insertion into the X/Y data rail pair.
The four X/Y data rail pairs are scrambled into pseudo-random bit sequences and then multiplexed and modulated to form a 32 or 128 TCM encoded data set. The data set is output as
I and Q data (TX I/Q 1-4) to the transmitter module via connector P101.
3.5.6.2.3

Muldem PLD MUX

In the multiplex section of the muldem PLD, twelve data outputs from the six DS1/E1 interface ASICs are combined into 3 pairs of data rails, MX X/Y DATA 2-4, which are sent to the
on-line low capacity I/O interface ASIC.
The muldem PLD provides the rail clock (MX CLK) and frame pointer (MX SYNC) necessary
to regenerate the transmit radio frame counters. For each of the 12 data streams emanating
from the DS1/E1 interface ASICs, a clock derived from the MX CLK is generated from these
counters. Each of these twelve clocks are sent to the appropriate DS1/E1 interface ASIC to
clock the data out of the MX elastic buffer and to place the data properly within the MX X/Y
2-4 DATA rails. Stuff requests from the DS1/E1 interface ASICs are processed to provide stuff
code bits in the radio frame overhead and to keep the MX elastic buffer pointers aligned.

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July 23, 2007

P102
G

RCV ENABLE

P104

P104

TO RCV DISABLE
INPUT ON OTHER
I/O INTFC VIA LBO

RCV ON LINE

RCV
SW
LOGIC
RCV DISABLE
RCV ON LINE

P102
I/O ENABLE

B
I/O
SW
LOGIC

P104

P104
TO I/O DISABLE
INPUT ON OTHER
I/O INTFC VIA LBO

I/O ON LINE

I/O DISABLE
I/O ON LINE
P102
(3A)
TO/FROM
UD-36AN
XMTR
A4/B4

SH 2

Q 0-4

TO
UD-36AN
XMTR
A4/B4

CLK 1/2
LIO
ASIC

49 MHz
P103
(3D)

TO/FROM
DS1 CROSSCONNECT/
E1 INTFC

I 0-4

FREQ CONTROL

LIO ASIC

PROV 1-8 (CAPACITY KEY)

P101
(3A)

P103
(3C)

RCV BAUD CLOCK


DS1 MX T/R
1-4

TO/FROM
DX-35M
I/O
INTFC B
(VIA LBO)

FROM
UD-35AN
RCVR
A2/B2

RCV BIT CLOCK


8

DS1 DX T/R
1-4

DS1/E1
INTFC
ASIC
CHAN 1-4

I/O ON LINE
P104
(3D)

P102
(3A)

(2 EA)
CHAN SYNC 1
A/B
2

MX DATA 1-4

MX CLOCK 1-4

RX X/Y 1-4

MX STUFF RATE
STUFF REQ 1-4

DX DATA 1-4

DX CLOCK 1-4

SYNC FAIL
RCV FAIL
COMMON LOSS
ALARM

I/O FAIL

RCV SC DATA E
ALL ZERO CLOCK

SC 256k CLK E

MX CLOCK

SC 64k CLK E

MX SYNC
DX CLOCK
DX SYNC

XCVR

P102
(3B)

TO
AE-37Y
CNTLR

SC 16k CLK E
SC MARK E
SC FRAME E

RCV SC DATA W
C

SC 256k CLK W

SH 2
D

SC 64k CLK W
SC 16k CLK W

P102
(3B)

SC MARK W
XMT SC DATA E

FROM
AE-37Y
CNTLR

XMT SC OFFHOOK E

SC FRAME W
XCVR

XMT SC DATA W
B

XMT SC OFFHOOK W

MW211-0027A-1A-F
07/21/06

Figure 3 - 26 DX-35M DS1/E1 I/O Interface Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 1 of 3)


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Functional Description Section

P103 (3C)
CHAN 5 OUT T/R
P104 (3D)
CHAN 5 IN T/R
CHAN SYNC 2A
CHAN 6 IN T/R

DS1/E1
INTFC
ASIC

MX DATA 5/6
SRO 5/6
MX CLK 5/6
MX STUFF RATE
DX DATA 2
DX CLK 5/6

CHAN 5/6
CHAN 6 OUT T/R

CHAN 7 OUT T/R


P104 (3D)
CHAN 5 IN T/R
CHAN SYNC 2A
CHAN 6 IN T/R

DS1/E1
INTFC
ASIC

MX DATA 7/8
SRO 7/8
MX CLK 7/8
MX STUFF RATE
DX DATA 2
DX CLK 7/8

CHAN 7/8
CHAN 8 OUT T/R

CHAN 9 OUT T/R


P104 (3D)
CHAN 5 IN T/R
CHAN SYNC 2A
CHAN 6 IN T/R

DS1/E1
INTFC
ASIC

SH 3
E

MX DATA 9/10
SRO 9/10
MX CLK 9/10
MX STUFF RATE
DX DATA 3
DX CLK 9/10

CHAN 9/10
CHAN 10 OUT T/R

CHAN 11 OUT T/R


P104 (3D)
CHAN 11 IN T/R
CHAN SYNC 3B
CHAN 12 IN T/R

DS1/E1
INTFC
ASIC

SH 3
F

MX DATA 11/12
SRO 11/12
MX CLK 11/12
MX STUFF RATE
DX DATA 3
DX CLK 11/12

CHAN 11/12
CHAN 12 OUT T/R

CHAN 13 IN T/R

CHAN SYNC 4A

DS1/E1
INTFC
ASIC

CHAN 14 IN T/R

CHAN 13/14

CHAN 13 OUT T/R

MX DATA 13/14
SRO 13/14
MX CLK 13/14
MX STUFF RATE
DX DATA 4
DX CLK 13/14

CHAN 14 OUT T/R

CHAN 15 IN T/R

CHAN SYNC 4B

DS1/E1
INTFC
ASIC

CHAN 16 IN T/R

CHAN 15/16

CHAN 15 OUT T/R

MX DATA 15/16
SRO 15/16
MX CLK 15/16
MX STUFF RATE
DX DATA 4
DX CLK 15/16

DX FRAME LOSS
ALL ZERO CLK

CHAN 16 OUT T/R


DECODE

SERIAL ENABLE
SERIAL SELECT 0
SERIAL SELECT 1
SERIAL SELECT 2
SERIAL SELECT 3

TO/FROM
AE-37Y
CNTLR

SERIAL DATA/CLK
I/O ON LINE
A

D C

SH 1

MW211-0027-1B-F
07/21/06

Figure 3 - 26 DX-35M DS1/E1 I/O Interface Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 2 of 3)


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July 23, 2007

P104

TD X1
TD Y1
TD X2
TD Y2
TD X3
TD Y3
TD X4
TD Y4

MX FRM SYNC
MX RAIL CLK

EPLD

LIO
ASIC

MX X2 DATA
MX Y2 DATA
E

MX X3 DATA

MUX

MX Y3 DATA

SH 2

MX X4 DATA
MX Y4 DATA
XCVR
DX FRAME SYNC
DX RAIL CLK
DX X1 DATA
DX Y1 DATA
DX X2 DATA
F

DX Y2 DATA

DEMUX

SH 2

DX X3 DATA
DX Y3 DATA
DX X4 DATA
DX Y4 DATA

XCVR

RX X1 T/F

P103
(3C)

RX Y1 T/F
RX X2 T/F
RX Y2 T/F

TO RPTR
CONN J314
VIA LBO

RX X3 T/F
RX Y3 T/F
RX X4 T/F
RX Y4 T/F
P104
(3D)

TO/FROM
OTHER I/O
INTFC VIA
LBO

B I/O ON LINE
SH 1

G RCV ON LINE
SH 1

MDR-1241F
07/24/06

Figure 3 - 26 DX-35M DS1/E1 I/O Interface Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 3 of 3)


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3.5.6.3

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Demultiplex Signal Flow

The I/O interface module receives four RX X/Y data rails from the UD-36( ) Receiver module
via connector P102. The I/O interface module sends 16 DS1/E1 channels to the DS1/E1 LBO
via connector P103. Each channel (CHAN 1-16 DS1/E1) consists of positive (P) and negative
(N) data streams in RZ format.
3.5.6.3.1

Low Capacity I/O ASIC DEMUX

The low capacity I/O (LIO) ASIC receives RX X/Y data rails from the UD-36( ) Receiver module (connector P102). The data is demultiplexed, according to the modulation mode (determined by the capacity key), and DADEed, to align the receive portion of the ASIC with the
on-line ASIC, which is necessary for errorless switching.
Each X and Y rail contains four channels of data. Rail number 1 channel number 1 also contains auxiliary data, including service channel. The X/Y rail number 1 data is decoded and
de-scrambled and service channel and auxiliary channel data is recovered. The received service channel data (recovered from the first rail pair) is sent to the OSS circuit in the AE-37( )
Controller module. Repeater service channel data from the OSS circuit is inserted back into
the first rail pair.
The four X/Y rail pairs of the on-line module (RCV) are then sent to the DS1/E1 demultiplexing sections of the A and B I/O Interface modules, and the repeater port connectors. X/Y rail
pair 1 is sent to the DS1/E1 interface ASICs TI CHANNELS 1-4. X/Y rail pairs 2, 3, and 4
are applied to the MUX/DEMUX EPLD.
The LIO ASIC may bridge onto any of the X/Y rail channels and route that channel data to
the line interface arrays for lines 1-4 (channel is selectable by provisioning). This data may
originate in the on-line low capacity I/O ASIC or the off-line ASIC.
3.5.6.3.2

DS1/E1 Interface ASICs, Lines 1-4

Each DS1/E1 interface ASIC (Leghorn) can process two DS1/E1 lines. The DS1/E1 interface
ASICs numbers 1 and 2 provide a smooth clock and elastic buffer for each line 1-4. Line coding is added and the coded P and N data from the on-line module (I/O) is sent to lines 1-4 of
the DS1/E1 LBO module.
3.5.6.3.3

MUX/DEMUX EPLD

The MUX/DEMUX EPLD regenerates the receive frame counters using the clock and frame
sync from the LIO array. It bridges onto the second, third, and fourth X/Y rail pairs and
routes the channel data to the DS1/E1 interface ASICs for lines 5-16.
In the demultiplex section, the multiplexed receive rail data from the low capacity I/O ASIC
(DX X/Y 2-4) is converted into three DS2 signals (DX DATA 2-4). Each DX DATA signal is
applied to a pair of DS1/E1 Interface ASICs for ultimate conversion to four DS1/E1 data
streams (DX DATA 2 is applied to DS1/E1 Interface ASIC #3 and #4, DX DATA 3 is applied
to DS1/E1 Interface ASIC #5 and #6, and DX DATA 4 is applied to DS1/E1 Interface ASIC
#7 and #8). The muldem PLD provides the rail clock (DX CLK 5-16)) and frame pointer (DX
SYNC) necessary to regenerate the receive radio frame counters. These counters are used to
provide the twelve clocks necessary for clocking the DX DATA into the DS1/E1 Interface
ASIC DX elastic buffers. Stuff code bits contained within DX X/Y rail overhead are used to
gap the DX elastic buffer clocks so that the receive DS1/E1 data rate equals the transmit
DS1/E1 data rate.
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Functional Description Section

3.5.6.3.4

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

DS1/E1 Interface ASICs, Lines 5-16

The DS1/E1 interface ASICs provide a smooth clock and elastic buffer for each line. Line
coding is added and the coded P and N data from the on-line module is sent to lines 5-16 of
the DS1/E1 LBO.
The demultiplex section of each DS1/E1 interface ASIC receives 6.312 MHz data (2DXDT,
containing four channels of DS1/E1 data), a 1.544 or 2.048 MHz DEMUX gapped clock
(E1DXCK), the 49 MHz reference clock (49 MHZ), and a 1.544 or 2.048 MHz MUX gapped
clock (E1DXCK). Normally the DEMUX clock is used. In an out of frame condition the integrity of the DEMUX clock is lost and the MUX clock is selected. The 6.312 MHz NRZ data,
and the stuffed gapped clock are re timed by the 49 MHz reference clock. The data is then
clocked by the gapped clock to remove the appropriate two channels of data. The two channels of data are clocked into an elastic buffer by the gapped clock. The data is then converted
to a quasi-RZ format and encoded, according to the modulation mode. The encoded data is
sampled in an AIS detector for loss of signal, demultiplexed onto two (T&R) channels, and
converted to RZ data. In the DS1 mode only, TEO (trailing edge overshoot) pulses are added
to the RZ data so that the pulses conform to cross-connect requirements without the need of
an external equalizer. Tip and ring outputs for each channel (DS1/E1 Chan 1-16 Out T/R)
are applied to the MDR-8000 DS1/E1 LBO module via connectors P103 and P104.
3.5.6.3.5

Service Channel

At a terminal, the LIO ASIC multiplexes the 256 kb/s data stream (comprised of three 64 kb/
s service channels and one 16 kb/s auxiliary channel from the AE-37( ) Controller) together
with the MX DATA 1-( ) and MX X/Y DATA (hot-standby only) inputs into radio frames. The
radio frames are then converted into four X/Ys rail pairs (XMT X/Y RAILS 1-4 P/N) and
clocked into the encoder/decoder circuit by the BAUD CLK.
The XMT X/Y 1-4 T/F and REPEATER SYNC T/F inputs from connector J103, via LBO connector J401, are the primary inputs to the I/O in a drop and insert or through-repeater configuration. If the repeater is hot-standby, the I/O multiplexes the 256 kb/s data stream
(comprised of three 64 kb/s service channels and one 16 kb/s auxiliary channel from the AE37X Controller) together with the XMT X/Y 1-4 T/F repeater inputs (J103) and MX X/Y
DATA (J106) from the off-line DX-35L I/O interface. The REPEATER SYNC T/F syncs the
repeater LIOs. Insert data consists of MX DATA 1-4 and MX X/Y DATA 5-16. The insert
data is inserted into the rail pairs, overwriting the repeater data.

3.5.6.4
3.5.6.4.1

Control and Monitor Functions


Provisioning

PROV 1-8 inputs from the provisioning key, located on the UD-35( ) Transmitter module,
select the type of radio and trellis coded modulation scheme (32/128 TCM).
3.5.6.4.2

I2C Bus

The I2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit) bus communicates module part number, serial number,
and revision history information to the AE-37( ) Controller.

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3.5.6.4.3

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

I/O and RCV Enable

In a hot-standby system, an I/O ENABLE signal from the controller turns on the DS1/E1
output drivers in the RCV circuits on the on-line module and turns off the output drivers on
the redundant off-line I/O interface module. The RCV ENABLE signal from the controller
turns on the MX X/Y 1-4 rail drivers on the inputs to LIO ASIC and turns on the repeater X/
Y rail drivers (RCV X/Y DATA T/F 1-4) on the output of LIO.
3.5.6.4.4

Loopback Controls

Refer to loopback information on the Control screen for details. To access the Control screen:

3.5.6.4.5

Click here to enter Controls guide. Main screen will open.

On the Main screen, on dropdown for type of radio, click on DS1. DS1 Status
Alarm screen will open.

On DS1 Status Alarm screen, on tool bar, click on User Control. User control
screen will open.

On User Control screen, click on loopback function.

Alarms

I/O FAIL red LED, indicates loss of signal, bipolar violation detected, or failure on one
of the active DS1/E1 lines.
SYNC FAIL red LED, indicates a transmit synchronization failure between I/O interface modules in a hot-standby configuration.
RCV FAIL red LED, indicates a loss of receive frame synchronization.
COMMON LOSS ALARM red LED, indicates a far end transmit common loss alarm.
A transmit Common Loss Alarm (CLA) is generally an indication of a silent failure (no alarm
activated) at the transmitter. The common loss alarm, generated by the AE-37( ) Controller,
triggers when both A-side and B-side downstream receivers have a radio frame loss or channel failure. In a hot-standby hop, loss of both receivers initiates a request to switch to the
standby transmitter, even though no transmit alarms are present. If the path is nominal, the
transmitter switches in 5 seconds. If the path is in a fade (ATPC is in active range), the
transmitter switches in 30 seconds. If the downstream alarms clear within 5 seconds, a CLA
is initiated on the off-line side to indicate a silent transmit failure. If alarms still exist, the
transmitter continues to switch every 30 seconds. This process continues until the receive
alarms clear, but no CLA is activated.
3.5.6.4.6

Status

I/O ON LINE green LED, indicates the module is in service.

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Functional Description Section

Issue 3
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3.5.7 DX-35N-1 DS3 I/O Interface


The DX-35N I/O Interface multiplexes/demultiplexes up to three DS3 channels, P/N data
pairs, and service channel data in the MDR-8000 radio. The DX-35N-1 (PN 3DH 03169 AA)
operates with North American data rates.
There are two capacity/modulation versions and three generations of I/O interface modules.
The different versions and generation modules functionally perform the same. The differences
include front panel controls and DADEing requirements.

3.5.7.1

Capacity/Modulation Versions

The DS3 I/O interface module is available in a 1 or 3-line 64 QAM version or a 2-line 32 TCM
version. The 2-line 32 TCM version of the modules, introduced in the second generation, are
typically used for applications in the 6.875 to 7.125 GHz Broadcast Auxiliary Service Band.
The typical RF bandwidth for this 2-line application is 25 MHz. The RF bandwidth requirement for 3 DS3 lines is 30 MHz.
3.5.7.1.1

First Generation

The first generation modules (part number 3DH03169AA, AB, and AG) require both radio
and line DADE, manually, using the front panel controls.
3.5.7.1.2

Second Generation

The second generation modules (part number 3DH03169AH, and AJ) have automatic line
DADE capability. Manual radio DADE is required using the front panel controls. Second
generation modules can be mixed and matched with the first generation modules that have
the same modulation scheme, however when mixed in the same shelf, both radio and line
DADE must be performed manually.
3.5.7.1.3

Third Generation

The third generation modules (part number 3DH03169AK, AL, AM, and AN) have automatic radio and line DADE capability. Third generation modules with AK and AL variants
have front panel controls. Third generation modules with AM and AN variants do not have
front panel controls.
Third generation modules with part numbers 3DH03169AK and AL can be mixed and
matched in the same shelf with first, second, and third generation modules that have the
same modulation scheme. When third generation modules with AK and AL variants are
mixed with first generation modules, both radio and line DADE must be performed. When
AK and AL modules are mixed with second generation modules, only radio DADE must be
performed. Radio DADEing may be required when a third generation AK is matched with
another AK module or AL is matched with another AL module. This requirement is configuration dependent. Refer to Chart 3 DS3 I/O Interface Removal and Replacement procedure
in the Maintenance section for details. No DADEing is required when mixing third generation modules with AM and AN variants with other third generation modules.
See Figure 3 - 27 for to/from signal information and application information.The DS3 I/O
Interface consists of several functional blocks each of which is described in the following
paragraphs.

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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

DX-35N
DS3
I/O INTFERFACE

RX I 0-3

UD-35A( )
RCVR

P101
(3A)

P102
(3A)

RX Q 0-3

UD-35A( )
RCVR

DX FRAME LOSS

RX BIT CLK
A2/B2

RX BAUD CLK
A2/B2

UD-36A( )
XMTR

TX I 0-4

CLK 1/2 (CLK 2 NOT USED)


UD-36A( )
XMTR
PROV 1-8 (CAPACITY KEY)

A4/B4

TX Q 0-4
TX2 BAUD CLK

FREQ CONTROL

SERIAL CLK (I2C)

P102
(3B)

SERIAL DATA (I2C)


AE-37Y
CNTLR

SERIAL DATA

LAMP TEST

AE-37Y
CNTLR

RCV SC DATA E

SERIAL SELECT 0-3

SC 256k CLK E

SERIAL DATA TX

SC 64k CLK E

SERIAL CLK

SC 16k CLK E

SERIAL TX/RX

SC MARK E

XMT AUX ENABLE

SC FRAME E

WSDS1 ENABLE

RCV SC DATA W

RCV ENABLE

SC 256k CLK W

XMT SC DATA E

SC 64k CLK W

XMT SC OFFHOOK E
C1

A4/B4

TX BAUD CLK

P102
(3B)

SC 16k CLK W

XMT SC DATA W

SC MARK W

XMT SC OFFHOOK W

C1

SC FRAME W
P104
(3D)

P103
(3C)

WE1 MX T/R 4

DS3/E3 LINE 1
WDS1/E1 MX T/R 1-3
DS3
LBO

XMT P/N DATA T/F 1-4

DS3/E3 LINE 2

RPTR SYNC T/F

MX P/N DATA T/F 1-4

E3 LINE 4

2
P104
(3D)

ALL ZERO CLK


8

WDS1/E1 DX T/R 1-3


WE1 DX T/R 4

MX CLK

RCV P/N DATA T/F 1-4

MX SYNC

RCV SYNC T/F

DX P/N DATA T/F 1-4

8
2

XMT AUX DISABLE

DX CLK
DX SYNC

DS3
LBO

DS3/E3 LINE 3

WDS1 DISABLE
A3/B3

RCV DISABLE

I/O DISABLE
RCV DISABLE
DS3/E3 LINE 1
DS3/E3 LINE 2
DS3/E3 LINE 3
E3 LINE 4

Figure 3 - 27 DX-35N DS3 I/O Interface Interconnect Diagram


3-46

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Functional Description Section

3.5.7.2

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Multiplex Signal Flow

The DX-35N DS3 I/O Interface multiplexes three DS3 data streams of primary traffic, three
DS1 data streams of secondary traffic (wayside DS1/E1), and low-speed data streams for
miscellaneous signaling and communication, creating the radio frame output I/Q data.
The XMT circuits (Figure 3 - 28) receive DS3 data, auxiliary (overhead data), and a reference
sync signal. The overhead data contains a 262 kb/s service channel, a 1.544 Mb/s WDS1 per
each DS3, and two 16 kb/s command path channels. (The 262 kb/s SC data interfaces from
the service channel muldem where four 64 kb/s data streams are multiplexed into the 262
kb/s SC data stream.) A UNIXMT gate array multiplexes/encodes these inputs to form parallel I, Q data signals, and clock.
3.5.7.2.1

DS3 Interface

The DX-35N contains three identical DS3 interface circuits. A fourth identical interface circuit is wired but not used. The DS3 signals are applied to the DS3 interface circuits via connector P103. Each interface circuit consists of a DS3 processor that converts the bi-polar
DS3 data into positive (P) and negative (N) uni-polar digital pulses and recovers the clock
(CK) used to clock the data into the UNIXMT ASIC.
The P and N data clocked into the UNIXMT ASIC is B3ZS decoded and frame synchronized.
Parity violations are monitored and removed from the data. The data is passed through an
elastic buffer and then multiplexed with the overhead data. The multiplexed data is scrambled, differentially and gray encoded, and converted to I and Q data. The I and Q data is
applied to the XMT EPLD for FEC. The UNIXMT ASIC also creates low-speed clock (MCK)
from the recovered DS3 clock that is used to clock wayside DS1 data (MDT) and stuffing signals (MSR) into the UNIXMT ASIC.
3.5.7.2.2

Forward Error Correction (FEC)

The XMT EPLD performs XMT FEC functions on the I and Q signals from the UNIXMT ASIC.
The encoding function uses the Nakamura Single Lee Error Correcting (SLEC) codes. One 3bit symbol is added by ENFEC to the I channel data and to the Q channel data every 27 data
symbols, increasing the bit rate from 81 to 84. Removal of the 3-bit symbols, correcting the
data, and decoding are functions of the UNIRCV ASIC, described later in this section.
The TX I (2:0) and TX Q (2:0) data is applied to the transmitter module via connector P101.

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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

BIT CLK
48.840 MHz

R446
SC
ALIGN

LOOP
FLTR

VCXO
PED.
R445

LINE 1
P1
P103

DS3

DS3
PROC.

CK1

TO/FROM
LBO
P104

P102
(3B)
TO/FROM
CONTROLLER

WDS1

PROV.

P102 (3A)
FROM XMTR

N1

1/2 DS1
INTFC
ASIC 1

UNIXMT
ASIC

CLK

FEC
(XMT)
EPLD

TX I(2:0)

TX Q(2:0)

P101 (3A)
TO XMTR

WDS1/WE1 ON
TAUX ON

BAUD CLK
2 BAUD CLK

MSR1

P104
TO LBO

MDT1
SERIAL CLK

MCK1
SERIAL DATA
TX SERIAL
ENABLE

LINE 2
P2
P103

DS3

DS3
PROC.

N2

SERIAL
INTERFACE

CK2

P102
(3B)
TO/FROM
CONTROLLER

WDS1

TX SERIAL DATA

RSR ENABLE

1/2 DS1
INTFC
ASIC 1

LSR ENABLE

WDS1/WE1 ON

P102 (3B)
TO/FROM
CONTROLLER

SERIAL ENABLE

TO/FROM
LBO
P104

RX SERIAL DATA

TO UNIRCV (SH 2)
TO DS1 INTFC
ASICS (SH 2)

TO UNIRCV AND
DS1/E1 INTFC ASIC
RCV CKTS (SH2)

TAUX ON

MSR2

P104
TO LBO

MDT2

SC CLOCKS

SC 256K CLK E
SC 64K CLK E

MCK2

(XMT)
EPLD
LINE 3

SC FRAME E
P3

P103

DS3

DS3
PROC.

CK3

XMT DATA

SC XMT DATA E

P102 (3B)
TO/FROM
CONTROLLER

SC XMT OFF HOOK E

P104

WDS1

1/2 DS1
INTFC
ASIC 1

SC XMT DATA W
SC XMT OFF HOOK W

WDS1/WE1 ON
TAUX ON

MSR3

P104
TO LBO

SC DATA E

N3

TO/FROM
LBO

P102
(3B)
TO/FROM
CONTROLLER

SC 16K CLK E
SC MARK E

MDT3
MCK3

TX SC DATA W
RX SC DATA W
TX INSERT W
RX INSERT E
TX OFF-HOOK W
RX OFF-HOOK E

P103/P104
TO/FROM
LBO

TX SYNC W
RX SYNC E

LMW-3111A-F
04/10/00

Figure 3 - 28 DX-35N DS3 I/O Interface Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 1 of 2)


3-48

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

P102
FROM
CONTROLLER

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

RCV ENABLE
XMT AUX ENABLE
WDS1 ENABLE

RCV ON

(RCV)
EPLD

WDS1 ON
LINE

XMT AUX ON

RCV DISABLE
OTHER
I/O
COND

RCV ON
LINE

WDS1 ON

XMT ON
LINE

XMT AUX DISABLE


WDS1 DISABLE

SW
DADE
RX I(2:0)
P101
FROM
RCVR

RX Q(2:0)

RETIME

LSR ENABLE

FEC

RFL

RCV
FAIL

S.C.L.

RCV
AUX
FAIL

CLK

FROM
SERIAL
INTERFACE
(SH1)

RSR ENABLE

CLK

UNIRCV
ASIC

BAUD CLK
WDS1 FAIL

LINE 1

BIT CLK
P103/P104
TO/FROM
LBO

ALIGN 1
SET 1

LINE 1

ALIGN 1 SET 1

RCV ON

DS3
ALIGN

R 830

DS3
CLK
RECOVERY

P
N
CLK

DATA
CLK

BIPOLAR
DRIVE

1/2 DS1
INTFC
ASIC 1

DS3

WDS1

P103

P104

LINE 2

LINE 2

BIT CLK

P
ALIGN 2 SET 2

P103/P104
TO/FROM
LBO

N
CLK

ALIGN 2
SET 2

DS3
ALIGN

R 930

DS3
CLK
RECOVERY

BIPOLAR
DRIVE

DS3

P103

TO
LBO
DATA
CLK

1/2 DS1
INTFC
ASIC 1

WDS1

P104

LINE 3
P
N

LINE 3

BIT CLK

ALIGN 3 SET 3
P103/P104
TO/FROM
LBO

ALIGN 3
SET 3

DS3
ALIGN

R 630

DS3
CLK
RECOVERY

CLK

DATA
CLK

BIPOLAR
DRIVE

1/2 DS1
INTFC
ASIC 2

RX SC DATA

WDS1

P103

P104

SC 256K CLK W

SC
CLOCKS

DS3

(XMT)
EPLD

SC 64K CLK W
SC 16K CLK W
SC MRK W
SC FRM W

P102 (3D)
TO
CONTROLLER

SC DATA W

LMW-3112A-F
04/10/00

Figure 3 - 28 DX-35N DS3 I/O Interface Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 2 of 2)


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3.5.7.2.3

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Wayside DS1 Interface

The wayside DS1 interface circuits use one-half of a Leghorn ASIC to provide clock recovery,
clock smoothing, elastic buffering and line encoding for each wayside DS1 (WDS1) channel.
Each DS1 interface circuit is controlled by the WDS1 ON and TAUX ON inputs from the AE37Y-1 controller module. The WDS1 ON control signal turns on the driver that supplies the
MCK( ) to the DS1 interface circuits. The TAUX ON control signal turns on the output drivers that provide WDS1 data (MDT) and stuff requests (MSR) to the UNIXMT ASIC, and in
protected systems, to the off-line I/O conditioner module (P104).
The wayside DS1 tip and ring signals (WSDS1-1 MXT and WSDS1-1 MXR) are applied to the
DS1 interface circuits via connector P104. The balanced tip and ring signals consist of pulsed
square waves at 1.544 Mb/s. The DS1 interface circuit bridges the RZ data onto one channel,
converts the balanced tip and ring signals to NRZ data, B3ZS encodes the data, and using the
recovered clock, writes the data into an elastic buffer. In the elastic buffer, the recovered clock
is compared to the low-speed clock (MCK) created by the UNIXMT ASIC and if a mismatch is
detected, stuffing bits are inserted. The output of the DS1 interface circuit is clocked into the
UNIXMT ASIC by the low-speed clock (MCK) generated by the UNIXMT ASIC.
3.5.7.2.4

Service Channel Interface

Service channel data is processed by the XMT EPLD. The XMT EPLD receives east and west
insert service channel data (RX SC DATA E and W) and sync signals (RX SYNC E and W)
from the LBO via connectors P103 and P104. The XMT EPLD receives through service channel data from the AE-37Y-1 controller module via connector P102. The through service channel data consists of the clocks (SC 256K, 64K, and 16K CLK E and W) mark and frame bits
(MARK and FRAME E and W), and off hook clocks (SC XMT OFF-HOOK E and W).
In the XMT EPLD, the service channel insert data is clocked into time slots in the through
data stream by the SC XMT OFF-HOOK E and/or W signals to provide the XMT DATA output to the UNIXMT ASIC. The service channel insert data is inserted into the radio frame
overhead when the off-hook command is active high. The through-data is inserted into the
radio frame overhead when the off-hook command is active low. If there is no insert service
channel data, the through data is passed to the UNIXMT ASIC, and vice versa.
3.5.7.2.5

Clock Source and Sync

Note
When provisioned as a terminal, the A-side I/O interface is automatically
put on pedestal and the B-side I/O interface automatically locks to the Aside I/O interface. When provisioned as a repeater, both A and B sides (online and off-line) sync to the recovered clock. Loss of sync causes the I/O
interface to be put on the fixed pedestal voltage.
A Phase Locked Loop (PLL) controls the frequency of the Voltage Controlled Crystal Oscillator (VCXO) generated clock (48.840 BIT CLK) that is the clock source for the UNIXMT ASIC.
See Figure 3 - 29. The PLL consists of the Voltage Controlled Crystal Oscillator (VCXO), a
phase detector circuit in the UNIXMT ASIC, an analog MUX, an activity detector circuit,
and a loop filter. The UNIXMT ASIC generates clocks from the BIT CLK that enable the
UNIXMT to multiplex DS3, DS1, AUX channels, and overhead, generating the radio frame.
3-50

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Issue 3
July 23, 2007

FREQUENCY CORRECTION VOLTAGE

PEDESTAL
FIXED
VOLTAGE

VCXO

R445

FROM J401
VIA LBO

FROM
CONTROLLER
FROM
OTHER I/O
COND
VIA LBO

BIT CLK

UNIXMT
ASIC

PHASE
CORRECTION
VOLTAGE

ANALOG
MUX

PHASE
CORRECTION
VOLTAGE

LOOP
FILTER

RPTR SYNC
TERM/RPTR
SELECT

ACTIVITY
DETECTOR

SYNC DETECT

TERM SYNC

TO
XMTR
MODULE

LMW-3122-SM
03/07/00

Figure 3 - 29 Phase-Lock Loop Functional Block Diagram

The 48.840 BIT CLK is phase detected by the phase detector circuit in the UNIXMT ASIC
and a resulting correction voltage is applied to the analog MUX. The analog MUX is controlled by the SYNC DETECT signal from the activity detector. Activity detected on the
RPTR SYNC input or TERM SYNC input turns on the analog MUX and the correction voltage from the UNIXMT ASIC is applied to the loop filter. The loop filter completes the PLL by
looping the correction voltage to the VCXO, correcting the frequency of the BIT CLK. If no
activity is detected by the activity detector on the RPTR SYNC input or TERM SYNC input.
the analog MUX is turned off, and the correction voltage path to the loop filter is opened.
This action places the VCXO under pedestal voltage control. The pedestal voltage is factory
adjusted for VCXO center frequency by potentiometer R445.
The TERM/RPTR control line selects the TERM or the RPTR SYNC input to the activity
detector. This is a software control and automatically selects the input when TERM or RPTR
is provisioned on the USI screen.

The loop filter provides a FREQ CONTROL output to the capacity key located in the
XMTR module to sync the VCXO (clock source) in the XMTR module to the VCXO in the
I/O conditioner.

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3.5.7.3

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Demultiplex Signal Flow

The DX-35N DS3 I/O Interface RCV circuits (Figure 3 - 28) receive parallel I, Q data signals
(RX I and Q 2:0), and BAUD CLK from the RCVR module. The UNIRCV ASIC demultiplexes/decodes these inputs to form DS3 data, auxiliary (overhead data), and a reference
sync signal. The overhead data contains a 262 kb/s service channel, a 1.544 Mb/s WDS1 per
each DS3, and two 16 kb/s command path channels.
3.5.7.3.1

RCVR Interface

RCVR module interface circuits consist of a retime circuit and FEC circuit. RX I (2:0) and
RX Q ( 2:0) signals from the RCVR are clocked into the retime circuit by the BAUD CLK.
The retime circuit retimes the I and Q signals to the baud clock and the I and Q signals are
applied to the FEC circuit. The FEC circuit removes the FEC encoding that was placed on
the data stream by the MDR-8000 XMTR. The I and Q outputs are clocked out of the FEC
circuit and into the UNIRCV ASIC by the CLK.
3.5.7.3.2

UNIRCV ASIC

The UNIRCV ASIC performs differential and gray decoding for 64 QAM, descrambling,
radio frame detection and alignment, extracting service channel and DS1 overhead channels, elastic buffering, DS3 frame detection and B3ZS encoding, PVMR, data rate adjustment to interface with FEC array, and phase/frequency detection and alignment signal
generation.

3.5.7.4

DS3 Interface

The DX-35N contains three identical DS3 interface circuits. A fourth identical interface circuit is wired but not used. Each DS3 interface circuit consists of a DS3 alignment circuit,
DS3 clock recovery circuit, and a bipolar drive circuit.
3.5.7.4.1

DS3 Clock Recovery

The DS3 clock recovery circuit recovers the DS3 clock from the I and Q inputs to the
UNIRCV ASIC. The UNIRCV ASIC uses the DS3 clock to clock the P and N data out of the
UNIRCV ASIC to the bipolar drive circuits.
3.5.7.4.2

Bipolar Drive

The bipolar drive circuits convert the framed P and N input signals into framed DS3 data.
The circuits are enabled by the RCV ON output of the RCV EPLD. The DS3 outputs are
routed through connector P103 to the DS3 LBO.
3.5.7.4.3

DS3 Alignment Circuit

For errorless switching, SET and ALIGN lines are connected between the A- and B-side
I/O conditioner modules. The SET input is used to synchronize the B3ZS encoder of the
off-line channel to the on-line channel for errorless switching. The ALIGN input is used
to synchronize the DS3 framing of the off-line channel to the DS3 of the on-line channel
for errorless switching.

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Functional Description Section

3.5.7.4.4

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

DADE

Each DS3 data line for the radio has adjustable delay processed in the UNIRCV gate array.
This allows factory DADE alignment using S2 ALIGN switch.
3.5.7.4.5

UNIRCV VMR

Parity bits are continuously monitored and a parity error pulse is generated when a mismatch is detected. If the VMR (Violation Monitor and Removal) is enabled (by the controller
through the serial interface) parity bits are replaced with new calculated parity bits. Otherwise they are not changed.
3.5.7.4.6

UNIRCV Blue Signal

The blue signal detector is enabled when DS3 is out of frame. The blue signal generated is a
DS3 frame with valid framing bits, C bits set to zero, and information bits have a 101010.....
pattern.
3.5.7.4.7

UNIRCV AIS

The AIS detector is enabled when DS3 is out of frame. The AIS generated is an unframed all
1s pattern.

3.5.7.5

Wayside DS1 Interface

The DX-35N contains three identical wayside DS1 interface circuits. A fourth identical interface circuit is wired but not used. Each DS1 interface circuit uses a Leghorn ASIC (hereafter
referred to as DS1 interface ASIC) for DS1 signal processing. The demultiplex section of each
DS1 interface ASIC receives 6.312 MHz data (2DXDT, containing four channels of DS1 data),
a 1.544 DEMUX gapped clock (DXCK), the 49 MHz reference clock (49 MHZ), and a 1.544
MHz MUX gapped clock (DXCK). Normally the DEMUX clock is used. In an out of frame
condition the integrity of the DEMUX clock is lost and the MUX clock is selected. The 6.312
MHz NRZ data and destuffed gapped clock are retimed by the 49 MHz reference clock. The
data is then clocked by the gapped clock to remove the appropriate two channels of data. The
two channels of data are clocked into an elastic buffer by the gapped clock. The data is then
converted to a quasi-RZ format and encoded, according to the modulation mode. The encoded
data is sampled in an AIS detector for loss of signal, demultiplexed onto two (T&R) channels,
and converted to RZ data. TEO (trailing edge overshoot) pulses are added to the RZ data so
that the pulses conform to cross-connect requirements without the need of an external equalizer. Tip and ring outputs for each channel (DS1 Chan 1-4 Out T/R) are applied to DS1 LBO
circuits on the MDR-8000 DS3 LBO module via connectors P103 and P104.

3.5.7.6

Service Channel Interface

Service channel data from the UNIRCV ASIC is clocked into the XMT EPLD by the 256K
CLK in the SC CLKS. The XMT EPLD separates and applies the SC 256K, 64K, and 16K
CLK E and W, MARK and FRAME E and W, and SC DATA E and W to AE-37Y-1 controller
module via connector P102.

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3.5.7.7
3.5.7.7.1

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Control and Monitor Functions


Serial Interface

The serial interface is used to transfer alarm and status information to the AE-37( ) Controller. It is also used to receive control information from the AE-37( ) Controller.
Alarms generated in the UNIXMT ASIC are latched in the serial interface until they are
acknowledged by the system controller. Alarms provided for each DS3 line are loss of input,
buffer spill, and frame alarm. Status provided for each DS3 line are summary line and blue
signal detect. A counter is provided for each DS3 line, which counts parity errors.
Data is sent and received during a two-byte transfer. The first byte is a poll byte that selects
the device ID and register address. It also controls whether a read or write operation is taking place. The second byte contains data from the selected register.
3.5.7.7.2

Provisioning Inputs

Provisioning inputs (PROV 1-8) from capacity keys on the XMTR and RCVR modules,
control the following functions:
Select 64 QAM modulation scheme.
Select local oscillator control source (pedestal voltage or PLL).
Select DS3 operation and number of DS3 lines enabled.
Select data scrambler or passes data through unmodified.
Select stuff rate source for stuffing DS1/E1 signals in radio frame (average stuff rate or
stuff request signals from Leghorns).
Enables or disables data scrambler stuck pattern (all 1s, all 0s, or alternating 1s and 0s).
3.5.7.7.3

I2C Bus

The I2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit) bus communicates module part number, serial number,
and revision history information to the AE-37( ) Controller.
3.5.7.7.4

ON-Line/Off-Line Enable/Disable

In a hot-standby system, a XMT AUX ENABLE, RCV ENABLE, and WDS1 ENABLE signals from the AE-37Y Controller module turn on the respective XMT, RCV and wayside DS1
circuits on the on-line DS3 I/O interface module. This results in XMT AUX DISABLE, RCV
DISABLE, and WDS1 DISABLE signals being generated in the on-line I/O conditioner that
turn off the respective circuits in the off-line DS3 I/O interface module.
3.5.7.7.5

Loopback Controls

3.5.7.7.6

Alarms

Refer to loopback information on the Control screen for details. To access the Control screen:
1

3-54

Click here to enter Controls guide. Main screen will open.

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

On the Main screen, on dropdown for type of radio, click on DS3. DS3 Status
Alarm screen will open.

On DS3 Status Alarm screen, on tool bar, click on User Control. User control
screen will open.

On User Control screen, click on loopback function.

I/O FAIL red LED, indicates loss of signal, bipolar violation detected, or failure on one
of the active DS1/E1 lines.
SYNC FAIL red LED, indicates a transmit synchronization failure between I/O interface modules in a hot-standby configuration.
RCV FAIL red LED, indicates a loss of receive frame synchronization detected by
UNIRCV ASIC.
RCV SC FAIL red LED, indicates a loss of service channel receive frame synchronization detected by UNIRCV ASIC.
WDS1 FAIL red LED, indicates loss of signal, bipolar violation detected, or failure on
one of the active WDS1 lines.
3.5.7.7.7

Status

RCV ON LINE - green LED, indicates UNIRCV circuits are enabled, allowing transfer of
data to DS1 interface circuit.
XMT ON LINE - green LED, indicates UNIXMT circuits are enabled, allowing transfer of
data to encoder/decoder circuits.
WDS1 ON LINE - green LED, indicates DS1 interface circuit output drivers are enabled.
3.5.8 DX-35P-1 OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface
The DX-35P I/O Interface multiplexes/demultiplexes up to three STS1 channels (OC3/STM-1),
wayside DS1/E1, and service channel data in the MDR-8000/i/s radio. Two types of DX-35P are
available to comply with wayside DS1 and E1 data rates. The DX-35P-1 accepts wayside DS1.
The DX-35P-2 accepts wayside E1. Both types accept multimode and single mode fiber.
See Figure 3 - 30 for to/from signal information and application information. The DS3 I/O
Interface consists of several functional blocks each of which is described below.

3.5.8.1

Adjacent I/O Interface Module Interface

The adjacent I/O interface module interface at connector J3E.


3.5.8.1.1

Signal Crossover

See Figure 3 - 31. Crossover occurs in a framer on the SMCRA in Optical Receive (OR) and
Radio Receive (RR) directions. Optical RCV crossover signals include OR DATA, OR PARITY, OR FRAME, and OR 39CLK. Radio RCV crossover signals include Optical XMT (OT)
DATA, and OT SYNC.

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LC or MT-RJ
CONNECTOR

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

155 Mbp/s
J3A
TCMS

UD-35AN
RCVR

J3A

BAUD ID

LC or MT-RJ
CONNECTOR

155 Mbp/s

DX-35P
OC3 I/O
INTFC

UD-35AN
RCVR

RR LOF

A2/B2

RXD 0-4

RSD 0-2

UD-36AN
XMTR

TX I 1-4

BIT CLK
A2/B2

RCV BAUD

TX Q 1-4

J3B

IRQ
AE-37Y
CNTLR

2 BAUD CLK
BAUD CLK
TCK B
CORRECTION VOLTAGE

ADDR 0-9
SERIAL CLK (I2C)
SERIAL DATA (I2C)

J3B

CI 0-7
SELECT A/B
RT SDCC
RT OW DATA
RX 64k AUX 1-3
TX AUX ENABLE
WAYSIDE ENABLE
RX AUX ENABLE
EAST SC XMT DT 1/2
EAST SC XMT OH 1/2
WEST SC XMT DT 1/2
WEST SC XMT OH 1/2

C1

A4/B4

SERIAL DATA
EAST SC RX DATA 1/2
EAST SC 256k CLK
EAST 64k CLK
EAST 16k SYNC
EAST 8k SYNC
EAST 2k SYNC
WEST SC RX DATA 1/2
WEST SC 256k CLK
WEST SC 64k CLK
WEST SC 16k CLK
WEST SC 8k SYNC
WEST SC 2k SYNC

AE-37Y
CNTLR

OR SDCC
OR OW DATA
T192 CLK
T192 SYNC
RR SDCC
RR OW DATA
R192 CLK
R192 SYNC

C1

J3E J3E
OC3/STM-1
AUX
INTFC

OT DT OUT 1-6 T/F

12

OT DT OUT 1-6 T/F

WS DS1 1-3 T/R

WS DS1 1-3 T/R

RPTR DS1 T/R


SYNT-SYNC-IN
RJRK-IN

RX AUX ONLINE
WAYSIDE ONLINE
TX AUX ONLINE

RX AUX DISABLE
WAYSIDE DISABLE
TX AUX DISABLE

OR DT 0-3 IN T/F

RPTR DS1 T/R


SYNT-SYNC-OUT
RJRK-OUT

OR 39 CLK IN T/F
OR PARITY IN T/F
OR FRAME IN T/F

OR DT 0-3 OUT T/F

OR 39 CLK OUT T/F


OR PARITY OUT T/F
OR FRAME OUT T/F

= WIRED BUT NOT USED FOR CURRENT OC3 RADIO APPLICATIONS

Figure 3 - 30 DX-35P OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface Interconnect Diagram


3-56

OC3/STM-1
AUX
INTFC

LMW-4019F
05/18/05

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

OC3 I/O INTFC A


OPTICAL RCV
OR/RT
A

XMTR
A

SW

SW
CMD

OC3 I/O INTFC A


RADIO RCV
RR/OT
A

SW

RCVR
A

SW
CMD

OR DATA (3:0)
OR PARITY
OR FRAME
OR 39 CLK

OT DATA (6:1)
OT SYNC

OC3 I/O INTFC B


OPTICAL RCV
OR/RT
B

XMTR
B

SW

SW
CMD

OC3 I/O INTFC B


RADIO RCV
RR/OT
B

SW

RCVR
B

SW
CMD
LMW-5045F
11/19/06

Figure 3 - 31 OC3/STM-1 Crossover Functions Simplified Functional Block Diagram

3.5.8.2

Optical RCV/Radio XMT Signal Flow

See Figure 3 - 32. The DX-35P I/O interface receives the OC3 optical signal on the front panel
and routes the optical signal to the laser hybrid. The laser hybrid converts the optical data
into an electrical data stream at 155 mb/s. The data stream is applied to the clock recovery
circuit. In the clock recovery circuit, a 39 mb/s clock is separated from the data stream. The
clock is used to clock the serial data into the 4 X 39 translator circuit. The 4 X 39 translator
separates the applied data in the data stream into four data streams, each containing 4-bit
nibble data at 39 mb/s. The nibble data is applied to the SONET Media Converting Regenerator Array (SMCRA). The SMCRA multiplexes the nibble data with data from the serial service channel interface and converts the multiplexed data, first to STS1 and then X/Y data
streams. The X/Y data is buffered in an elastic buffer and then applied to a multiplexer. In
the multiplexer the X/Y data is combined with overhead data and the serial data is applied
to a scrambler. The scrambled X/Y data is applied to a Forward Error Correction (FEC)
encoder circuit. Forward Error Correction (FEC) is provided using Trellis Coded Modulation
and Reed-Solomon coding. The encoded X/Y data steams are converted to I and Q data
steams that are clocked out of the SMCRA by the T CLK B input from the XMTR module.
The TX I 1-4 and TX Q 1-4 data is applied to the transmitter module via connector J3A.
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Issue 3
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J3B
CONTROLLER

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

J3E
OC3 AUX
INTFC

SMCRA
SWITCHING
CONTROL
LOGIC

TX AUX DISABLE

TX AUX DISABLE

RT SDCC
J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

SMCRA
(OPTICAL
RCV/RADIO
XMT)

RT OW DATA

155 Mb/s

LASER
HYBRID

SERIAL
DATA
CLK
155
Mb/s
RECOVERY

SERIAL
DATA
155
Mb/s

(P/O LASER
HYBRID)

WS DS1-1T
WS DS1-1R
J3E
OC3/STM-1
AUX
INTFC

J3E
OC3/STM-1
AUX
INTFC

TX AUX ENABLE

WS DS1-2T
WS DS1-2R
WS DS1-3T
WS DS1-3R
RPTR T
RPTR R

4-BIT
NIBBLE
DATA
39 Mb/s
4
3
4X39
2
XLATOR
1
CLK

DATA 1
CLK 1

WAYSIDE
SYSTEM
INTFC

DATA 2
CLK 2

BUFFER

OR SDCC
OR OW DATA
T192 CLK
T192 SYNC

BUFFER

EAST SC 256K CLK


EAST SC 64K CLK
EAST SC 16K CLK
EAST SC 8K SYNC
EAST SC 2K SYNC
EAST SC RX DATA 1
EAST SC RX DATA 2

OR SDCC
OR OW DATA
T192 CLK
T192 SYNC

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

J3C
CONTROLLER

TXI 1-4
TXQ 1-4
BAUD CLK
2 BAUD CLK

J3A
TO XMTR
MODULE

DATA 3
CLK 3
DATA 4
CLK 4
MHZ54T

CORRECTION
VOLTAGE

PH54A

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

SC TX DATA 1 E
SC TX DATA 2 E
SC TX OH 1 E
SC TX OH 2 E
RX 64K AUX 1
RX 64K AUX 2
RX 64K AUX 3

PH54B

PLL

XMT
VXCO

TCKB
PHBA
PHBB

J3E
OC3/STM-1
AUX
INTFC
(OTHER
I/O INTFC)

OR DATA 3 IN T/F
OR DATA 2 IN T/F
OR DATA 1 IN T/F
OR DATA 0 IN T/F
OR PARITY IN T/F
OR FRAME IN T/F
OR 39 CLK IN T/F

= WIRED BUT NOT USED FOR CURRENT OC3


RADIO APPLICATIONS

CORRECTION
VOLTAGE

PLL

OR DATA 3 OUT T/F


OR DATA 2 OUT T/F
OR DATA 1 OUT T/F
OR DATA 0 OUT T/F
OR PARITY OUT T/F
OR FRAME OUT T/F
OR 39 CLK OUT T/F

BAUD
VCXO

J3E
OC3/STM-1
AUX
INTFC
(OTHER
I/O INTFC)

LMW-3161C-SM

Figure 3 - 32 DX-35P OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 1 of 3)


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Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

SMCRA
CONTROL
INTFC

ADDRESS (9:0)

ALM

SELECT A
SELECT B
SERIAL CLK
SERIAL DATA

EEPROM
I2C

INSVC

WAYSIDE
SYSTEM CI DATA 0-7
INTFC

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

WYSD ON

WYSD ALM

OC3/STM-1 IN
CI DATA (7:0)

IRQ
J3E
AUX
BACKPLANE
(OTHER I/O
INTFC)

OC3/STM-1 ALM
A-SIDE
OC3/STM-1 OUT

LMW-3161B
05/18/05

Figure 3 - 32 DX-35P OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 2 of 3)


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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

RX AUX ENABLE
WAYSIDE ENABLE

J3B
CONTROLLER

J3E
OC3 AUX
INTFC
(OTHER I/O
INTFC)

RX AUX DISABLE
WAYSIDE DISABLE

RXD (4:0)
RSD (2:0)
BAUD ID
TCMS
RCV_BAUD
BIT CLK
FRMF (RR SEF)
VITERBI CORE

J3A
RCVR
MODULE

MHZ-51R

RCV
VXCO

J3E
OC3/STM-1
AUX
INTFC
(OTHER I/O INTFC)

RX AUX DISABLE

SMRCA
SWITCHING
CONTROL
LOGIC

SMCRA
(RADIO
RCV/
OPTICAL
XMT)

WAYSIDE DISABLE

4-BIT NIBBLE
DATA
4
3
2
1
CLK 39M

4X39
XLATOR

SERIAL
DATA
155 Mb/s

155 Mb/s

LASER
HYBRID

A
CORRECTION
VOLTAGE

LOOP
FILTER/
AMP

WS DS11T
WS DS11R

RCV PDA

WS DS12T

RCV PDB

WAYSIDE WS DS12R
SYSTEM
INTFC WS DS13T

J3E
OC3/STM-1
AUX
INTFC

WS DS13R

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

RPTR T
RPTR R

WEST SC TX DATA 1
WEST SC TX DATA 2
WEST TX OH 1
WEST SC TX OH 2
OT SDCC
OT OW DATA

BUFFER

WEST SC 256K CLK


WEST SC 64K CLK
WEST SC 16K CLK
WEST SC 8K SYNC
WEST SC 2K SYNC
WEST SC RX DATA 1
WEST SC RX DATA 2

TX 64K AUX 1
TX 64K AUX 2
TX 64K AUX 3

RR SDCC
RR OW DATA
R192 CLK
R192 SYNC

J3E
OC3/STM-1
AUX INTFC
(OTHER
I/O INTFC)

OT DT IN 16 T/F

12

OT SYNC IN T/F
SNT-SYNC-IN
RGRK-IN

= WIRED BUT NOT USED FOR CURRENT


OC3 RADIO APPLICATIONS

OT DT OUT 16 T/F
OT SYNC OUT T/F
SNT-SYNC-OUT
RGRK OUT

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

BUFFER

RR SDCC
RR OW DATA
R192 CLK
R192 SYNC

12

J3E
OC3/STM-1
AUX INTFC
(OTHER I/O
INTFC)

LMW-3161A-F
05/18/05

Figure 3 - 32 DX-35P OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 3 of 3)


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Functional Description Section

3.5.8.2.1

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

RCVR Module Interface

The RCVR module interface at connector J3A consists of Receive Data (RXD), Receive Subset data (RSD), BAUD Identification (ID), Trellis Code Modulation Sync (TCMS), Receive
BAUD clock (RCV BAUD), Bit Clock (CLK), (FRMF) and Viterbi Correcting Errors (VITERBI CORE).
3.5.8.2.2

Wayside DS1 Interface

The wayside DS1 interface circuit provides clock recovery, clock smoothing, elastic buffering
and line encoding for each wayside DS1 (WS DS1-1-3 T/R) channel.
The wayside DS1 tip and ring signals (WS DS1-1T and WS DS1-1R) are applied to the DS1
interface circuits via connector J3E. The balanced tip and ring signals consist of pulsed
square waves at 1.544 Mb/s. The DS1 interface circuit bridges the RZ data onto one channel,
converts the balanced tip and ring signals to NRZ data, B3ZS encodes the data, and using
the recovered clock, writes the data into an elastic buffer. In the elastic buffer, the recovered
clock is compared to the low-speed clock created by the SMCRA and if a mismatch is
detected, stuffing bits are inserted. The DATA 1-4 outputs of the DS1 interface circuit are
clocked into the SMCRA by the respective four output clocks (CLK 1-4) .
3.5.8.2.3

Service Channel Interface

Figure 3 - 33 and Figure 3 - 34 show XMT and RCV signal flow. Refer to service channel
demultiplex description later in this section for RCV details. The DX-35P receives inserted
service channel 1 data from the AE-37Y-1 controller module via connector J3B. Service channel 2 data from the controller is wired (J3C) but not used for the OC3/STM-1 radio applications.
3.5.8.2.3.1

Terminal

See Figure 3 - 33. At a terminal, the service channel interface at the SMRCA in the I/O interface consists of the EAST SC XMT DT input and EAST SC CLKS (EAST SC 256K CLK,
EAST SC 64K CLK, EAST SC 16K SYNC, EAST SC 8K SYNC, and EAST SC 2K SYNC)
outputs. The EAST SC XMT DT input consists of four 64kb/s channels multiplexed into a
single 256 kb/s signal.
Overhead MUX circuitry in the SMRCA receives local insert-service channel data (EAST SC
XMT DT) from the service channel muldem in the controller module. The EAST SC XMT DT
is clocked into the SMCRA by the controller using the EAST SC CLOCKS (EAST SC 256K
CLK, EAST SC 64K CLK, EAST SC 16K SYNC, EAST SC 8K SYNC, and EAST SC 2K
SYNC) provided by the SMCRA. In the SMCRA, the service channel insert data (EAST SC
XMT DT) is inserted into the radio frame overhead.

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Functional Description Section

OC3/STM-1
I/O INTFC
West - RCV
West SC RCV DT
West SC Clocks

SMCRA

East SC XMT DT
East SC Clocks

SMCRA

East - XMT

CONTROLLER
LMW-5030F
05/18/05

Figure 3 - 33 OC3/STM-1 Terminal Service Channel Signal Flow


3.5.8.2.3.2

Repeater

The service channel interface at the SMRCA in rack 2 I/O interface consists of the EAST SC
XMT DT and EAST SC XMT OH inputs and EAST SC CLKS (EAST SC 256K CLK, EAST
SC 64K CLK, EAST SC 16K SYNC, EAST SC 8K SYNC, and EAST SC 2K SYNC) outputs,
and rack 1 data input via the RPTR cable. Each data (DT) input and output consists of four
64kb/s channels multiplexed into a single 256 kb/s signal.
When EAST SC XMT OH is low (No off hook from rack 2 controller) data received over the
repeater cable by the frame in/frame out (FIFO) circuit (EAST SC RCV DT) is passed
through the MUX and inserted into the radio frame overhead.When EAST SC XMT OH is
high (off hook), EAST SC RCV DT is clocked into the rack 2 controller by the EAST SC
CLKS. The rack 2 controller multiplexes the EAST SC RCV DT with local insert-data and
the combined signal (EAST SC XMT DT) is passed through the MUX and inserted into the
radio frame overhead.

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RACK 1 - I/O INTFC

RACK 2 - I/O INTFC

WEST - RCV

WEST - RCV
(SAME AS
WEST-RCV RACK 1)
WEST SC RCV DT
WEST SC CLOCKS

RR RPTR CLK

RT RPTR CLK

RR RPTR DATA

RPTR DS1

RT RPTR DATA

FIFO

WEST SC XMT OH
WEST SC XMT DT

EAST SC RCV DT
EAST SC XMT DT
EAST SC XMT OH
EAST SC CLOCKS
EAST - XMT
(SAME AS EAST-XMT
RACK 2)

EAST - XMT

RACK 1

RACK 2

CONTROLLER

CONTROLLER

LMW-5027-SM
01/29/04

Figure 3 - 34 OC3/STM-1 Repeater Service Channel Signal Flow


3.5.8.2.4

Clock Source and Sync

The I/O interface locks to the incoming fiber. It is only put on pedestal upon LOS or LOF
alarm.
3.5.8.2.5

Normal Operation

The 39 MHz clock, recovered from the fiber input is used for front-end SMCRA function (all
functions before the elastic buffer). The 39 MHz clock is used to perform frame sync, LOS,
LOF, and B1 Bit error checks in framer. Crossover occurs after the framer.
3.5.8.2.6

XMT VCXO

The input clock (MHZ54T) from the XMT VCXO is used to generate radio XMT STS1 data,
sync, and clock. A Phase Locked Loop (PLL) controls the frequency of the Voltage Controlled
Crystal Oscillator (VCXO) generated clock that is the clock source for SMRCA XMT functions. The PLL consists of the Voltage Controlled Crystal Oscillator (VCXO). a phase detector circuit in the SMCRA, a loop filter/amplifier.
Phase Detector A/B (PH54A/B) complimentary outputs provide relative phase difference
between pointers in STS elastic buffer. The phase difference is converted to a correction voltage in the PLL to control the frequency of the VCXO.

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Holdover

When LOS or LOF is declared, the holdover condition is enabled. The SAMPLE voltage from
the loop amplifier holds the oscillator to the frequency at the time the alarm occurred. The
oscillator stays close to frequency and then over time slowly migrates to pedestal.
The SAMPLE voltage is applied to the holdover switch circuits and is switched to the analog
MUX. The analog MUX selects the sample voltage to output to the loop filter. The loop filter/
amplifier develops a correction voltage from the phase difference and uses the voltage to
drive the VCXO.
3.5.8.2.8

Pedestal

The oscillator is placed on a fixed voltage (pedestal) before lockup, when forced to pedestal
for test, and after holdover has migrated to pedestal.
When pedestal is selected by the analog MUX holdover switching is disabled, and the fixed
pedestal voltage is applied to the pedestal circuit. This action places the VCXO under pedestal voltage control. The pedestal voltage is factory adjusted for VCXO center frequency by
potentiometer R418.
An LOS in the laser receiver, a loss of activity on all four of the input data bits, or an input
SEF condition will cause the holdover circuits to stop sampling the control voltage for the 54
MHz oscillator. A LOS in the laser receiver, a loss of activity on all four of the input data, or
an input LOF condition will force an AIS condition in the STS insert circuits and force the
loop into holdover.
3.5.8.2.9

Baud VCXO

TCKB The input clock (TCKB) from the baud VCXO is used to generate the baud and nibble clocks. Frequency dependent. Phase Detector A/B (PHBA/B) complimentary outputs provide relative phase difference between pointers in an elastic buffer.

3.5.8.3

Radio RCV/Optical XMT Signal Flow

The DX-35P OC3/STM-1 I/O Interface RCV circuits (Figure 3 - 28) receive parallel I, Q data
signals (RX I and Q 2:0), and BAUD CLK from the RCVR module. The SMCRA demultiplexes/decodes these inputs to form STS1 data, auxiliary (overhead data), and a reference
sync signal. The overhead data contains a 262 kb/s service channel, a 1.544 Mb/s WDS1 per
each DS3, and two 16 kb/s command path channels.
3.5.8.3.1

RCVR Module Interface

The RCVR module interface at connector J3A consists of Receive Data (RXD), Receive Subset data (RSD), BAUD Identification (ID), Trellis Code Modulation Sync (TCMS), Receive
BAUD clock (RCV BAUD), Bit Clock (CLK), (FRMF) and Viterbi Correcting Errors (VITERBI CORE).
RCVR module interface circuits consist of a retime circuit and FEC circuit. RX I (2:0) and
RX Q ( 2:0) signals from the RCVR are clocked into the retime circuit by the BAUD CLK.
The retime circuit retimes the I and Q signals to the baud clock and the I and Q signals are
applied to the SMCRA FEC circuit. The FEC circuit removes the FEC encoding that was
placed on the data stream by the MDR-8000 XMTR at the other end of the hop.
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SMCRA Functions

The SMCRA performs Reed-Solomon decoding, descrambling, radio frame detection and
alignment, extracting service channel and DS1 overhead channels, elastic buffering, STS1
frame detection, PVMR, data rate adjustment to interface with FEC array, phase/frequency
detection, and alignment signal generation.
3.5.8.3.3

RCV VCXO

The input clock (MHZ-51R) from the RCV VCXO is used to generate the 39 MHz clock that is
used for all SMCRA RCV functions and to generate the RCV baud and nibble clocks used by
the 4X39 translator RCV circuits. A Phase Locked Loop (PLL) controls the frequency of the
Voltage Controlled Crystal Oscillator (VCXO) generated clock. The PLL consists of the Voltage Controlled Crystal Oscillator (VCXO), a phase detector circuit in the SMCRA, and a loop
filter/amplifier.
RCV PDA/B - Receive Phase Detector A/B. Complimentary outputs provide relative phase
difference between pointers in local or adjacent SMCRA elastic buffers. The loop filter/amplifier develops a correction voltage from the phase difference and uses the voltage to drive the
RCV VCXO.
3.5.8.3.4

Errorless Switching

Errorless switching is performed using elastic buffers in the A and B I/O interface modules
and a common read clock between the modules, in a protected system.
3.5.8.3.5

DADE

DADE is an automatic function of the SMRCA and is performed using the elastic buffers in
the A and B I/O interface modules.
3.5.8.3.6

B1 Byte

Parity bits are continuously monitored and a parity error pulse is generated when a mismatch is detected.
3.5.8.3.7

AIS (K1/K2 Byte)

An AIS detector is enabled when STS1 is out of frame.

3.5.8.4

Wayside DS1 Interface

The DX-35P uses a DS1 interface ASIC for DS1 signal processing. The demultiplex section
of the DS1 interface ASIC receives four channels of DS1/E1 data and clocks (WS DS1-1 through
3 T/R and RPTR T/R). The four channels of data are clocked into an elastic buffer. The data is
then converted to a quasi-RZ format and encoded, according to the modulation mode. The
encoded data is sampled in an AIS detector for loss of signal, demultiplexed onto two (T&R)
channels, and converted to RZ data. TEO (trailing edge overshoot) pulses are added to the RZ
data so that the pulses conform to cross-connect requirements without the need of an external
equalizer. Tip and ring outputs for each channel (DS1 Chan 1-4 Out T/R) are applied to DS1 LBO
circuits on the MDR-8000 OC3/STM-1 AUX interface via connector J3E.

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Functional Description Section

Service Channel Interface

Figure 3 - 33 and Figure 3 - 34 show XMT and RCV signal flow. Refer to service channel multiplex description previously described in this section for XMT details. The DX-35P sends
service channel 1 data to the AE-37Y-1 controller module via connector J3B. Service channel
2 data from the controller is wired (J3C) but not used for the OC3/STM-1 radio applications.
3.5.8.5.1

Terminal

See Figure 3 - 33. At a terminal, the service channel interface at the SMRCA in the I/O interface consists of the WEST SC RCV DT and WEST SC CLKS (WEST SC 256K CLK, WEST
SC 64K CLK, WEST SC 16K SYNC, WEST 8K SYNC, and WEST SC 2K SYNC) outputs.
The WEST SC XMT DT output is a single 256 kb/s multiplied signal that contains four 64kb/
s channels.
In the SMRCA, the service channel data (WEST SC RCV DT) is removed from the radio
frame overhead and is sent to the service channel muldem in the controller module. The
WEST SC RCV DT is clocked into the controller by the SMRCA using the WEST SC
CLOCKS provided by the SMRCA.
3.5.8.5.2

Repeater

See Figure 3 - 34. The service channel interface at the SMRCA in the rack 1 I/O interface consists of the WEST SC XMT DT and WEST SC XMT OH inputs and WEST SC CLKS (WEST
SC 256K CLK and WEST SC 2K SYNC) outputs. The WEST SC XMT DATA input consists
of four 64kb/s channels multiplexed into a single 256 kb/s signal.
When WEST SC XMT OH is low (No off hook from rack 1 controller) data received over the
RF path (WEST SC RCV DT) is passed through the MUX and put on the repeater cable to
rack 2. When WEST SC XMT OH is high (off hook), WEST SC RCV DT is clocked into the
rack 1 controller by the WEST SC CLKS. The rack 1 controller multiplexes the WEST SC
RCV DT with local insert-data and the combined signal is passed through the MUX and put
on the repeater cable to rack 2.

3.5.8.6
3.5.8.6.1

Control and Monitor Functions


Controller Interface

The controller interface is used to transfer alarm and status information to the AE-37( )
Controller. It is also used to receive control information from the AE-37( ) Controller.
Alarms generated in the SMCRA are latched in the controller interface until they are
acknowledged by the system controller. Optical receive/radio transmit alarms generated by
the SMCRA include: Severely Errored Frame (SEF), Loss of Frame (LOF), B1 Bit Error (B1
ERROR), and Loss of Signal (LOS).
3.5.8.6.2

SEF

SEF is declared when a minimum of four consecutive errored framing patterns has been
received. SEF is cleared when a minimum of two consecutive error-free framing patterns
have been received.

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LOF

LOF is declared if the SEF state persists for a count comparable to 23 frames. LOF is
cleared when the signal remains in-frame for a minimum of one millisecond.
3.5.8.6.4

B1 ERROR

The B1 parity checker calculates BIP-8 parity over all the bytes of the STSn frame and
checks this calculated parity against the RCV parity (B1 byte) in the next frame. B1 ERROR
is declared if a mis-compare or error is detected.
3.5.8.6.5

LOS

LOS is declared when an all zeros pattern is received on all four bits of nibble data (a minimum of 100 microseconds).
Data is sent and received during a two-byte transfer. The first byte is a poll byte that selects
the device ID and register address. It also controls whether a read or write operation is taking place. The second byte contains data from the selected register.
3.5.8.6.6

Provisioning Inputs

The I/O interface receives the following provisioning inputs (PROV 1-8) from capacity keys
on the XMTR and RCVR modules:
modulation scheme
local oscillator control source (pedestal voltage or PLL)
STS1 operation and number of STS1 lines enabled
data scrambled or passed data through unmodified
stuff rate source for stuffing DS1/E1 signals in radio frame (average stuff rate or stuff
request signals from DS1 interface ASIC)
enables or disabled data scrambler stuck pattern (all 1s, all 0s, or alternating 1s and 0s).
3.5.8.6.7

I2C Bus

The I2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit) bus communicates module part number, serial number,
and revision history information to the AE-37( ) Controller.
3.5.8.6.8

ON-Line/Off-Line Enable/Disable

In a hot-standby system, a XMT AUX ENABLE, RCV ENABLE, and WDS1 ENABLE signals from the AE-37Y Controller module turn on the respective XMT, RCV and wayside DS1
circuits on the on-line OC3/STM-1 I/O interface module. This results in XMT AUX ONLINE,
RCV ONLINE, and WDS1 ONLINE signals being generated in the on-line I/O interface that
are applied to the OC3/STM-1 AUX interface. The XMT AUX DISABLE, RCV DISABLE,
and WDS1 DISABLE output signals from the OC3/STM-1 AUX interface turn off the respective circuits in the off-line OC3/STM-1 I/O interface module.

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Functional Description Section

Loopback Controls

Refer to loopback information on the Control screen for details. To access the Control screen:
1

Click here to enter Controls guide. Main screen will open.

On the Main screen, on dropdown for type of radio, click on OC3. OC3 Status
Alarm screen will open.

On OC3 Status Alarm screen, on tool bar, click on User Control. User control
screen will open.

On User Control screen, click on loopback function.

3.5.8.6.10 Alarms
ALM red LED, indicates I/O interface module failure.
OC3/STM-1 ALM red LED, indicates OC3/STM-1 signal failure.
WYSD FAIL red LED, indicates loss of signal, bipolar violation detected, or failure on
one of the active WDS1 lines.
3.5.8.6.11 Status
RF ON green LED, indicates I/O on-line.
OC3/STM-1 ON green LED, indicates OC3/STM-1 on-line.
WDS1 ON green LED, indicates DS1 interface circuit output drivers are enabled.
3.5.9 DX-35R-1/2 Ethernet I/O Interface
There are two versions of the DX-35R Ethernet I/O Interface module. The earlier version,
(DX35R-1 (PN 3EM16610AA), supports electrical ethernet applications and is equipped with
one front-panel mounted RJ-45 connector. The later version, DX35R-2 (PN 3EM16610AB)
replaces the DX-35R-1 and supports both electrical and optical Ethernet applications. The DX35R-2 module is equipped with a front-panel mounted RJ-45 connector for electrical Ethernet
connection and an SFP (Small Form factor Pluggable) module receptacle for optical Ethernet
connection. The SFP plugs into the SFP receptacle and XMT and RCV fiber optic cables connect to the SFP. One interface (electrical or optical) is active, the other interface is backup and
becomes active if the already active interface fails.
The DX-35R Ethernet I/O Interface multiplexes/demultiplexes up to three data channel pairs,
DS1, and service channel data in the MDR-8000 Ethernet radio. The Ethernet data input/output is via Ethernet cable connected to an RJ45 connector. The input/output between the I/O
interface and the MDR-8000 radio is via the radio backplane output between the I/O interface
and the MDR-8000 radio is via the radio backplane through J3A, J3B, and J3C. There is also
connection to the AUX card via J3D and J3E.
See Figure 3 - 35 for to/from signal information and application information. The Ethernet I/O
Interface consists of several functional blocks each of which is described below.

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SFP
OC 3*

10/100/GigE

DX-35R
ETHERNET
I/O INTFC
J1

TCMS

J3A

LINK
PARTNER

UD-35AN
RCVR

ETH TRD 3-0

J3A

BAUD ID

UD-35AN
RCVR

RR SEF

A2/B2
RXD 4-0

RSD 2-0

UD-36AN
XMTR

TX I 0-4

BIT CLK
RCV BAUD
A2/B2

TX Q 0-4

VITERBI CORE

2 BAUD CLK
BAUD CLK
TCK B
CORRECTION VOLTAGE

J3B
AE-37Y
CNTLR

ADDR 9-0
SERIAL CLK (I2C)
SERIAL DATA (I2C)

J3B
SERIAL DATA (I2C)

CI DATA 7-0

EAST SC RX DATA
EAST SC 256k CLK
EAST 64k CLK
EAST 16k SYNC
EAST 8k SYNC
EAST 2k SYNC
WEST SC RX DATA
WEST SC 256k CLK
WEST SC 64k CLK
WEST SC 16k CLK
WEST SC 8k SYNC
WEST SC 2k SYNC

TX AUX ENABLE
RX AUX ENABLE
EAST SC XMT DT
EAST SC XMT OH
WEST SC XMT DT
WEST SC XMT OH
C1

J3D
RTDT IN 5-0 T/F
RT FRAME IN T/F
RT PARITY IN T/F
RT_CLK_IN

RT DT OUT 5-0 T/F


RT FRAME OUT T/F
RT PARITY OUT T/F
RT_CLK_OUT

2
2

RR DT IN 4-1
RR SYNC IN T/F
RGRK IN T/F

RX AUX DISABLE
TX AUX DISABLE

8
2
2

C1

J3D

12

J3E
WS DS1 1-4 T/R

AE-37Y
CNTLR

Cl DATA 7-0

SELECT A/B
DSTRB
RWF

AUX
INTFC

A4/B4

12
2

AUX
INTFC

J3E
WS DS1 1-4 T/R

RR DT OUT 4-1

RR-SYNC-OUT T/F
RGRK-OUT T/F

2
2

RX AUX ONLINE
TX AUX ONLINE

Grayed out = wired, but not used.


* Available on DX-35R-2 PN 3EM16610AB only

ETH-1092F
05/20/06

Figure 3 - 35 DX-35R Ethernet I/O Interface Interconnect Diagram


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Functional Description Section

Modes of Operation

Provisionable modes of operation include: A Only, A and B Switched, A and B Separate, and
A and B Summed. Refer to signal flow drawings in Initial Turnup section.

Note
For all modes of operation, only the Eth Out associated with the active Eth
In is allowed to put out data.
3.5.9.1.1

A Only

The A Only mode allows external equipment, that has a single input and a single output
port, to connect to an MDR-8000E that has one or two I/O interface modules. Only the A Eth
In and A Eth Out ports are active.
In the XMT direction, the A Eth In data is connected to the A I/O interface modules. Crossover data is sent to the B I/O interface module (if equipped).
In the RCV direction, the A Eth Out data is connected to the A I/O interface modules. Crossover data is sent from the B I/O interface module (if equipped).
3.5.9.1.2

A & B Switched

A failure on A or a manual switch, switches Ethernet data on A Ethernet In and A Ethernet


Out ports to the B Ethernet I/O interface. Data is not automatically returned to A when the
alarm is cleared. The data remains on B until an alarm or manual switch on B switches the
data to A.
3.5.9.1.3

A & B Separate

In this mode, A and B are two completely separate unprotected data channels.
In the XMT direction, data from the A I/O interface Eth In port is applied to the A XMTR
module and data from the B I/O interface Eth In port is applied to the B XMTR module. If a
failure occurs, data on that channel is lost.
In the RCV direction, the A Eth Out port uses data only from the farend A XMTR and the B
Eth Out port uses data only from the farend B XMTR. If a failure occurs, data on that channel is lost.
3.5.9.1.4

A & B Summed

This mode can be used to provide Ethernet link protection for hops with one RF link.
In the XMT direction, both the A and B Ethernet I/O interface modules receive data on the
Eth In port. When there is only one RF link, the data from both the A and B I/O interface
Eth In ports are combined into a single data stream and the composite signal is applied to
the active XMTR module. Frames are tagged to indicate the data source. When there are two
RF links, this mode functions the same as A and B Separate with A and B operating as separate, independent channels. In this scenario, data from both the A I/O interface Eth In port
is applied to the A XMTR module and data from both the B I/O interface Eth In port is
applied to the B XMTR module.
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In the RCV direction, the A Eth Out port uses data only from the farend A XMTR and the B
Eth Out port uses data only from the farend B XMTR. If a failure occurs, data on that channel is lost.

3.5.9.2

Ethernet Switching

See Figure 3 - 36. In the A and B Switched mode, when an I/O switch is initiated by an alarm
or a manual switch (refer to Table 3 - 4), the A ETH R/RT (Ethernet In) and A RR/ETH T
(Ethernet Out) signals are switched simultaneously to B. B will remain in service until it
alarms or a manual switch to A is initiated.

ETH I/O INTFC A


ETH RCV/RADIO XMT
ETH In
ETH R/RT
A
ETH In

XMTR
A

SW

SW
CMD

RADIO RCV/ETH XMT


RR/ETH T
A
ETH Out

SW

RCVR
A

SW
CMD

ETHR DATA (3:0)


ETH R PARITY
ETH R CTRL
ETH R ACPT CLK

ETH T DATA (4:1)


ETH T SYNC-1
ETH T SYNC-2

ETH I/O INTFC B


ETH RCV/RADIO XMT
ETH In
ETH R/RT
B
ETH In

XMTR
B

SW

SW
CMD

RADIO RCV/ETH XMT


RR/ETH T
B
ETH Out

SW

RCVR
B

SW
CMD
MDR-1201F
08/22/05

Figure 3 - 36 Ethernet Crossover Function Simplified Functional Block Diagram


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Table 3 - 4 Ethernet In/Ethernet Out Switching Priorities


Priority

Function

5 Highest

Card Not Valid (the card is being stored in the B side, but is not provisioned and not being used)

Card Not Equipped

Override (using either the controls on the controller module front


panel or the USI Control screen)

No Link or No Signal on Ethernet Data

1 Lowest

Manual Switch (using either the controls on the controller module


front panel or the USI Control screen)

3.5.9.3

DS1 Switching

See Figure 3 - 37. DS1 and AUX channel switching is independent of the Ethernet data
switching. In hot-standby, space-diversity, and frequency-diversity radios, in the radio XMT
direction, DS1 data is applied to both the A and B I/O Interface modules, multiplexed with
Ethernet data and AUX channel data, and applied to the A and B XMTRs.
In the radio RCV direction, DS1 data out of the A RCVR is applied to both the A and B I/O
Interface modules. When a DS1 switch is initiated by an alarm or a manual switch (refer to
Table 3 - 5), the A DS1 TX outputs from the A RCVR are switched to the B I/O Interface module.
DS1 switching is not revertive. DS1 RCV circuits on the B I/O Interface will remain in service until either B alarms or a manual switch to A is initiated.

Table 3 - 5 DS1 Switching Priorities


Priority

Function

4 Highest

Card not valid (the I/O Interface card is being stored on the B side,
but is not provisioned and not being used).

I/O Card not present

Override

1 Lowest

Manual switch

3.5.9.4

10/100BASE-T Operation

The 10BASE-T and 100BASE-T radios employ half-duplex and full duplex baseband transmission over two pairs of category 5/5E (CAT5/5E) balanced cabling. The aggregate data rate of
10/100 Mb/s is achieved by transmission at a data rate of 10/100 Mb/s over each wire pair. The
data is transmitted over the RF path in burst of up to 10 Mb/s and 100 Mb/s, respectively.

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1000BASE-T Operation

The 1000BASE-T (sometimes referred to in the industry as GigE) radio employs full duplex
baseband transmission over four pairs of category 5/5E balanced cabling. The aggregate data
rate of 1000 Mb/s is achieved by transmission at a data rate of 250 Mb/s over each wire pair.
The use of hybrids and cancellers enables full duplex transmission by allowing symbols to be
transmitted and received on the same wire pair at the same time. Data from the link partner
is received in bursts of up to 1000 Mb/s and is transmitted over the RF path in bursts of up to
150 Mb/s.

ETH I/O INTFC A


RADIO XMT
MUX
XMTR
A

RADIO RCV

SW

RCVR
A

SW
CMD

DS1 Tx 1-4
ETH I/O INTFC B
RADIO XMT

To/From
AUX INTFC

MUX
XMTR
B

DS1 Rx 1-4

RADIO RCV

SW

RCVR
B

SW
CMD
ETH-1036
03/23/06

Figure 3 - 37 DS1 Switching


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Functional Description Section

Ethernet Data Flow

See Figure 3 - 38. The DX-35R I/O Interface consists of the RJ45 connector, the Input/Output
transformer, the Ethernet PHY, the ETHRA FPGA, and the T1/E1 Line Interface. A description of each follows.

ETHRA FPGA

10/100/
1000BASE-T
ETHERNET

MII
RJ45

INTFC
XFMR

PHY

MII
MAC

FIFO

GFP

MULDEM

RADIO

RADIO
RX/TX

SFP_TDP/N

T1/DS1 FRAMING
ETHERNET
DATA

SFP*
SFP_RDP/N
DS1
TO/FROM AUX

T1/E1 LINE INTERFACE

* AVAILABLE ON DX-35R-2 PN 3EM16610AB ONLY

Figure 3 - 38 Ethernet Data Flow Block Diagram


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05/20/06

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3.5.9.6.1

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RJ45 Connector

The RJ45 connector is the Ethernet cable connection to/from the interface transformer on
the DX-35R Ethernet I/O Interface board.
3.5.9.6.2

Interface Transformer

The transformer is used for signal coupling between the RJ45 connector and the Ethernet
PHY block. Transformer coupling provides spike filtering and termination.
3.5.9.6.3

SFP

The SFP is used for signal coupling between the fiber optic cable and the Ethernet PHY
block.
3.5.9.6.4

Ethernet PHY

The PHY connects Ethernet media to the ETHRA FPGA (through Media Access Control)
and defines the electrical signaling, line states, clocking guidelines, data encoding, and circuitry needed for data transmission and reception.
The PHY also performs auto-negotiation (detects the rate of incoming and/or outgoing data;
10BASE-T, 100BASE-T, 1000BASE-T) and selects the highest common input rate.
3.5.9.6.5

ETHRA FPGA (Ethernet Field Programmable Gate Array)

The main internal components of the FPGA are: MAC, FIFO, GFP, Muldem and T1/DS1
Framing block.
3.5.9.6.5.1

MAC (Media Access Control)

The MAC interfaces between the Physical Layer (PHY) and the FIFO and primarily performs Ethernet Framing to wit:
When receiving Ethernet data from the PHY (for Radio XMT), this component recognizes
where frames begin and end in the bit-streams received.
When transmitting data to the PHY (during Radio RX), the MAC delimits the frame by
inserting some extra bits into or among the frames being sent to enable the receiver(s) to
recognize the beginning and ending of the frames.
The MAC employs cyclical redundancy checks (CRC) by the use of checksums to ensure
the integrity of the bits in the frame to verify the frame is intact.
The MAC implements CSMA/CD during half-duplex Ethernet RX mode.
3.5.9.6.5.2

FIFO Buffer (First Frame In - First Frame Out)

The First In First Out buffer (FIFO) connects between the MAC and the GFP processor. Its
purpose is to transfer Ethernet data to the GFP for framing encapsulation prior to insertion
in the service channel for radio XMT, and to receive decapsulated framed data from the GFP
for transfer to the MAC and further transmission over the Ethernet.
In the Ethernet RCV/Radio XMT direction the three modules are: System Receive module
(receives data from the MAC), the Fabric receive module (sends data to the GFP), and the
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Functional Description Section

Water Mark module. In the radio RCV/Ethernet XMT direction there are three sub-modules in
the data path: the Fabric TX module (receives RF from the GFP), the System TX module (sends
data to the MAC), and the Water Mark module (data flow control during data transfer). In both
directions data is written to and read from the Generic Synchronous 2-port SRAM buffer.
During half-duplex operation, CSMA/CD mode is operational and collision effects are evaluated during data transfer. Excessive collisions will cause a cessation of transfer and removal
of collision corrupted transferred data. During full-duplex operation, CAMA/CD is off and
there are no collision effects to interrupt data flow.
In the Ethernet RCV/Radio XMT direction, Ethernet data is clocked into the egress FIFO
eight bits at a time from the MAC through the System Receive module, written into FIFO
memory in the sequence of arrival, read out of memory into the Fabric Transmit module, and
then, four bytes at a time, sent to the GFP. To begin transfer of data, the MAC sends the
FIFO a Ready-To-Send signal and awaits the FIFO reply Ready-To-Receive. As the MAC
sends its Ethernet data to the FIFO, it runs data validity checks. If the data is invalid
because of corruption, or excessive collision effects, FIFO is notified to abort reception. When
data transmission resumes, the data is written into memory by the System receive module.
The data at the same time is being read out of memory by the fabric receive module. This
module hand shakes with the GFP (Ready to Send/Ready to Receive). When GFP acknowledgement is received, the data is sent to the GFP four bytes at a time. In the GFP the data
frame is encapsulated for insertion into the radio service channel.
In the Radio RCV/Ethernet XMT direction, RF data is clocked into the ingress FIFO four
bites at a time through the Fabric Transmit module, written to FIFO memory in the
sequence of arrival, read out of memory into the System Receive module and then transferred eight bits at a time to the MAC. During reception from the GFP to the FIFO the data
undergoes validity checking by the Fabric Transmit module. If data is invalid, the Fabric
Transmit module notifies the GFP to quit sending the present data and restart a new frame
sequence. A Water Mark module in the FIFO is used to control data flow and assure that
data threshold levels at all points of transmission and reception are within limits. In the
case of under-run, the FIFO holds data in the buffer until more is received from the GFP
module. In the Radio RCV/Ethernet XMT direction, a short frame (less than 64 byte frame
length) is considered an error frame and is discarded.
3.5.9.6.5.3

GFP (Generic Framing Procedure)

The Generic Framing Processor (GFP) processes received Ethernet signals for transport over
the radio network and processes received radio signals for transport over the Ethernet network. The processor preserves original control information and incurs very short transmission delay. The framing process incurs very short transmission delay. The framing process
includes encapsulation (for radio transmission) and decapsulation (for Ethernet transmission), header processing, digital encoding/decoding, performance monitoring and more. The
processor contains a simplified FIFO interface to connect to the ingress/egress FIFO.
During Ethernet RCV/Radio XMT, the processor receives the Ethernet signals from the
FIFO via the FIFO Interface. It aligns character and control code, and maps consecutive
characters into block code. Eight block codes are grouped into a superblock with core and
payload headers. There is also a CRC-16 error check code added which calculates and inserts
core and payload header error control into each transmitting GFP frame. The superblocks
are then encapsulated as payload into periodic, fixed length GFP frames and inserted in the
radio service channel for RF transmission.

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During Radio RCV/Ethernet XMT, the processor receives the radio frames from the service
channel, performs frame delineation and validation (core/payload header error control) for
each received GPF frame, and decapsulates the data into a set of superblocks. The superblocks are then decoded into 8-bit characters (data and control codes) and sent to the egress
FIFO via the FIFO interface.
3.5.9.6.5.4

Muldem

The muldem contains the circuitry to perform framing, to insert Ethernet, Service Channel,
and data into the frames for radio transmitting, and in the case of radio receiving, remove
data from the overhead and transfer it to the PHY for feed to the Ethernet cable. In the case
of DS1, the data is DS1 framed in the T1/DS1 ETHRA circuitry and directed through the T1/
E1 Line Interface to the Aux Interface.
3.5.9.6.5.5

T1/DS1 Framing

Frames the DS1 data for transmission to the T1/E1 Line Interface.
3.5.9.6.5.6

T1 Line Interface

The T1 Line Interface interfaces between the ETHRA and the AUX card for WS DS1 signals
and also connects to the backplane parallel bus for handling radio controller bi-directional data.

3.5.9.7

Ethernet RCV/Radio XMT Data Flow

See Figure 3 - 39. The DX-35R Ethernet I/O Interface board data flow follows from board input
at the RJ45 connector to the Coupling Transformer to the Physical Layer Device (PHY) and
into the ethernet Regenerator Array (ETHRA). From there it leaves the Ethernet I/O Interface
board and enters the radio path.
The PHY chip on the I/O board serves as the controlling influence for Ethernet data flow.
When enabled for Auto-Negotiation, the PHY establishes a communication link with the far
end PHY on the other end of the Ethernet cable (if it, too, has Auto-Negotiate capability) and
between them they compare their abilities and connect at the highest common data transfer
rate or mode (10BASE-T, 100BASE-T, or 1000BASE-T). Auto-Negotiation makes automatic
connection of the highest data rate available without intervention from the user or from
management software and ensures data integrity. If Auto-Negotiation is not enabled, the
transfer will occur at a pre-configured rate.
The coupling transformer filters and terminates the incoming Ethernet signal and from
there the data is picked off by the PHY for application to the ETHRA. Connecting the PHY
and the ETHRA is the Medium Independent Interface (MII) circuitry. Since the MII circuits
interface between the PHY and the ETHRA, identical circuits are located in the PHY and
also in the Media Access Control (MAC) circuitry within the ETHRA. The MII circuits convert the line signals received by the PHY into digital format signals and provide them to the
ETHRA via the MAC. the ETHRA multiplexes the Ethernet data with data from the serial
service channel interface and wayside interface and converts the final multiplexed data into
two X/Y data rail pairs. The X/Y data pairs are then applied to a serial scrambler. The scrambled X/Y data is applied to a Forward Error Correction (FEC) encoder circuit which uses
Trellis Coded Modulation and Reed-Solomon coding. The encoded X/Y data steams are converted to I and Q data steams and clocked out of the ETHRA by the T CLK B input from the
XMTR module BAUD VCXO. The TX1 1-4 and TX Q 1-4 data are applied to the transmitter
module via connector J3A.

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J3B
CONTROLLER

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

TX AUX ENABLE

J3E
AUX
INTFC

ETHRA
SWITCHING
CONTROL
LOGIC

TX AUX DISABLE

J3E
AUX
INTFC

TX AUX DISABLE

MGMT/CNTRL/STATUS
SPF4
XMT 2
XMT 3

ETHRA
(RADIO
XMT)

10/100/1000 BaseT
ETH RXD 7-

XMT
J1
RJV5
RH45

XMT 1

BUFFER

XFMR

PHY

EAST SC 256K CLK


EAST SC 64K CLK
EAST SC 16K CLK
EAST SC 8K SYNC
EAST SC 2K SYNC
EAST SC RX DATA 1
EAST SC RX DATA 2

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

ETH_RXC

XMT 2
XMT 3

ETH_125_CLK

DATA 1
CLK 1

WS DS1-1T
WS DS1-1R
WS DS1-2T
WS DS1-2R

J3E
AUX
INTFC

WS DS1-3T
WS DS1-3R

WAYSIDE
SYSTEM
INTFC

RPTR T
RPTR R

DATA 2
CLK 2

TXI 1-4
TXQ 1-4
BAUD CLK
2 BAUD CLK

J3A
TO XMTR
MODULE

DATA 3
CLK 3
DATA 4
CLK 4
MHZ54T

CORRECTION
VOLTAGE

PH54A
PH54B

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

SC TX DATA 1 EAST
SC TX DATA 2 EAST
SC TX OH 1 EAST
SC TX OH 2 EAST

PLL

TCKB
PHBA
PHBB

J3E
AUX INTFC
(OTHER
I/O INTFC)

RT_ACCEPT_OUT T/F
RT DATA 3 IN T/F
RT DATA 2 IN T/F
RT DATA 1 IN T/F
RT DATA 0 IN T/F
RT_CNTRL_IN_1 T/F
RT_CNTRL_IN_0 T/F
RT CLK IN T/F

LVDS
RCVR

XMT
VXCO

RT_ACCEPT_OUT
RT DATA 3 IN
RT DATA 2 IN
RT DATA 1 IN
RT DATA 0 IN
RT_CTRL_IN_1
RT_CTRL_IN_0
RT CLK IN

CORRECTION
VOLTAGE

PLL

RT_ACCEPT_IN
RT DATA 3 OUT
RT DATA 2 OUT
RT DATA 1 OUT
RT DATA 0 OUT
RT_CNTRL_OUT_1
RT_CNTRL_OUT_0
RT CLK OUT

LVDS
RCVR

BAUD
VCXO

RT_ACCEPT_IN T/F
RT DATA 3 OUT T/F
RT DATA 2 OUT T/F
RT DATA 1 OUT T/F
RT DATA 0 OUT T/F
RT_CNTRL_OUT_1 T/F
RT_CNTRL_OUT_0 T/F
RT CLK OUT T/F

J3E
AUX INTFC
(OTHER
I/O INTFC)

FADED LINES
(
) = WIRED BUT NOT USED FOR CURRENT ETHERNET
RADIO APPLICATIONS

* AVAILABLE ON DX-35R-2 PN 3EM16610AB ONLY

ETH-1090F
05/20/06

Figure 3 - 39 DX-35R Ethernet I/O Interface Ethernet RCV/Radio XMT Functional Block Diagram
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3.5.9.7.1

Issue 3
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XMTR Module Interface

The XMTR module interface at connector J3A receives Transmit Data (TX1 1-4 and TXQ 1-4),
BAUD CLK, and 2 BAUD CLK (twice the frequency of BAUD CLK) from the ETHRA.
3.5.9.7.2

DS1 Interface

The DS1 interface circuit provides clock recovery, clock smoothing, elastic buffering and line
encoding for each DS1 (WS DS1-1-3 T/R) channel.
The DS1 tip and ring signals (WS DS1-1T and WS DS1-1T and WS DS1-1R) are applied to the
DS1 interface circuits via connector J3E. The balanced tip and ring signals consist of pulsed
square waves at 1.544 Mb/s. The DS1 interface circuit bridges the RZ data onto one channel,
converts the balanced tip and ring signals to NRZ data, B3ZS encodes the data, and using the
recovered clock, writes the data into an elastic buffer. In the elastic buffer, the recovered clock
is compared to the low-speed clock created by the ETHRA and if a mismatch is detected, stuffing bits are inserted. The DATA 1-4 outputs of the DS1 interface circuit are clocked into the
ETHRA by the respective four output clocks (CLK 1-4).
3.5.9.7.3

Service Channel Interface

Refer to service channel demultiplex description later in this section for RCV details. The DX35R ETHRA receives inserted service channel 1 data from the AE-37Y-1 controller module via
connector J3B. Service channel 2 data from the controller is wired (J3C) but not used for the
Ethernet radio applications.
Overhead MUX circuitry in the ETHRA receives local insert-service channel data (SC TX
DATA 1 EAST, SC TX DATA 2 EAST, SC TX OH 1 E, and SC TX OH 2 E) from the service
channel muldem in the controller module. The EAST SC TX DATA is clocked into the ETHRA
by the controller using the EAST SC CLOCKS (EAST SC 256K CLK, EAST SC 64K CLK,
EAST SC 16K SYNC, EAST C 8K SYNC, and EAST SC 2K SYNC) provided by the ETHRA. In
the ETHRA, the service channel insert data (EAST SC TX DATA) is inserted into the radio
frame overhead.

3.5.9.8

Radio RCV/Ethernet XMT Signal Flow

See Figure 3 - 40. The DX-35R ETHERNET I/O Interface RCV circuits receive parallel RX and
RS data signals; an BAUD CLK from the RCVR module. The ETHRA demultiplexes/decodes
these inputs to form Ethernet data, auxiliary (overhead data), and a reference sync signal. The
overhead data contains a 262 kb/s service channel, a 1.544 Mb/s WDS1 per each DS1, and two
16 kb/s command path channels.

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J3B
CONTROLLER

J3E
AUX
INTFC
(OTHER I/O
INTFC)

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

J3E
AUX INTFC
(OTHER
I/O INTFC)

RX AUX DISABLE

RX AUX ENABLE

ETHRA
SWITCHING
CONTROL
LOGIC

RX AUX DISABLE

WAYSIDE DISABLE

10/100/1000 BaseT

J3A
RCVR
MODULE

RXD (4:0)
RSD (2:0)
BAUD ID
TCMS
RCV_BAUD
BIT CLK
FRMF (RR SEF)
VITERBI CORE

RCV
RCV 1
XFMR RCV 2
RCV 3

ETH RXD 7-

ETHRA
(RADIO
RCV)

ETH_GTX

PHY

ETH_TXC

SEP-RDP
SFP-RDN

J1
RJ 45

SFP*

WS DS11T
WS DS11R
WS DS12T
WS DS12R

SYSTEM
INTFC WS DS13T

WS DS13R

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

RPTR T
RPTR R

WEST SC TX DATA 1
WEST SC TX DATA 2
WEST TX OH 1
WEST SC TX OH 2

BUFFER

RR DATA IN 04 T/F
J3E
AUX INTFC
(OTHER
I/O INTFC)

RR SYNC IN T/F

LVDS
RCVR

RGRK IN T/F

J3E
AUX
INTFC

RR DATA IN 04

RR DATA OUT 04

RR SYNC IN

RR SYNC OUT

RGRK IN

RGRK OUT

WEST SC 256K CLK


WEST SC 64K CLK
WEST SC 16K CLK
WEST SC 8K SYNC
WEST SC 2K SYNC
WEST SC RX DATA 1
WEST SC RX DATA 2

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

RR DATA OUT 04 T/F


LVDS
RCVR

RR SYNC OUT T/F


RGRK OUT T/F

J3E
AUX INTFC
(OTHER I/O
INTFC)

FADED LINES
(
) = WIRED BUT NOT USED FOR CURRENT

ETHERNET RADIO APPLICATIONS


* Available on DX-35R-2 PN 3EM16610AB only

ETH-1093F
05/20/06

Figure 3 - 40 DX-35R Ethernet I/O Interface Radio RCV/Ethernet XMT Functional Block Diagram
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3.5.9.8.1

Issue 3
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RCVR Module Interface

The RCVR module interface at connector J3A consists of Receive Data (RXD), Receive Subset
data (RSD), BAUD Identification (ID), Trellis Code Modulation Sync (TCMS), Receive BAUD
clock (RCV BAUD), Bit Clock (CLK), Frame False (FRMF) and Viterbi Correcting Errors (VITERBI CORE).
RCVR module interface circuits consist of a retime circuit and Forward Error Correcting
(FEC) circuit. RXD and RSD signals from the RCVR are clocked into the retime circuit by the
BAUD CLK. The retime circuit retimes these to the baud clock and the signals are then
applied to the ETHRA FEC circuit. The FEC circuit removes the FEC encoding placed on the
data stream by the MDR-8000 XMTR at the other end of the hop.
3.5.9.8.1.1

ETHRA Functions

The ETHRA performs Reed-Solomon decoding, de scrambling, radio frame detection and
alignment, extracting service channel and DS1 overhead channels, elastic buffering. STS1
frame detection, PVMR, data rate adjustment to interface with FEC array, phase/frequency
detection, and alignment signal generation.
3.5.9.8.1.2

Parity Byte

Parity bits are continuously monitored and a parity error pulse is generated when a mismatch is detected.
3.5.9.8.2

DS1 Interface

The DX-35R uses a DS1 interface ASIC for DS1 signal processing. The demultiplex section of
the DS1 interface ASIC receives four channels of DS1/E1 data and clocks (WS DS1-1 through
3 T/R and RPTR T/R). The four channels of data are clocked into an elastic buffer. The data is
then converted to a quasi-RZ format and encoded, according to the modulation mode. The
encoded data is sampled in an AIS detector for loss of signal, demultiplexed onto two (T&R)
channels, and converted to RZ data. TEO (trailing edge overshoot) pulses are added to the RZ
data so that the pulses conform to cross-connect requirements without the need for an external equalizer. Tip and ring outputs for each channel (DS1 Chan 1-4 Out T/R) are applied to
DS1 LBO circuits on the MDR-8000 ETHERNET AUX interface via connector J3E.
3.5.9.8.3

Service Channel Interface

Refer to service channel multiplex description previously described in this section for XMT
details. The DX-35R sends service channel 1 data to the AE37Y-1 controller module via connector J3B. Service channel 2 data from the controller is wired (J3C) but not used for the
Ethernet radio applications.
See Figure 3 - 41. The service channel interface at the ETHRA in the Ethernet I/O interface
consists of the WEST SC RX DATA, WEST SC CLKS (WEST SC 256K CLK, WEST SC 64K
CLK, WEST SC 16K), and WEST SC SYNC (WEST SC 8K SYNC, WEST SC 2K SYNC) outputs. In the ETHRA, the service channel data (WEST SC RCV DT) is removed from the
radio frame overhead and is sent to the service channel muldem in the controller module.
The WEST SC RX DATA is clocked into the controller by the ETHRA using the WEST SC
CLOCKS provided by the ETHRA.

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Functional Description Section

ETH/T1 I/O
West RCV
West SC RX Data
West SC Clocks

ETHRA

East SC TX Data
East SC Clocks

ETHRA

East XMT

CONTROLLER
MDR-1143F
04/17/07

Figure 3 - 41 ETHRA Service Channel Interface Functional Block Diagram

3.5.9.9
3.5.9.9.1

Control and Monitor Functions


Controller Interface

See Figure 3 - 42. The controller interface is used to transfer alarm and status information to the
AE-37( ) Controller. It is also used to receive control information from the AE-37( ) Controller.
Alarms generated in the ETHRA are latched in the controller interface until they are
acknowledged by the system controller. Ethernet receive/radio transmit alarms generated
by the ETHRA include: Severely Errored Frame (SEF), Loss of Frame (LOF), Parity Error,
and Loss of Signal (LOS).

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RWF
DSTRB

ETHRA
CONTROL
INTFC
(CI)

ADDRESS (9:0)
SELECT A
SELECT B

ALM

INSVC

SERIAL CLK
SERIAL DATA

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

EEPROM
I2C

WYSD ON

SYSTEM
INTFC

CI DATA 0-7

WYSD ALM

ETH IN

CI DATA (7:0)

ETH ALM

IRQ
J3E
AUX
INTFC

ETH OUT
A-SIDE

MDR-1096B-F
04/28/05

Figure 3 - 42 DX-35R Ethernet I/O Interface Controller Interface Functional Block Diagram
3.5.9.9.2

SEF

SEF is declared when a minimum of four consecutive errored framing patterns has been
received. SEF is cleared when a minimum of two consecutive error-free framing patterns
have been received.
3.5.9.9.3

LOF

LOF is declared if the SEF state persists for a count comparable to 23 frames. LOF is
cleared when the signal remains in-frame for a minimum of one millisecond.

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3.5.9.9.4

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Functional Description Section

Parity Error

The parity checker calculates CRC-8 parity over all the bytes of the STSn frame and checks
this calculated parity against the RCV parity (B1 byte) in the next frame. An error is
declared if a mismatch or error is detected.
3.5.9.9.5

LOS

LOS is declared when an all zeros pattern is received on all four bits of nibble data (a minimum of 100 microseconds).
Data is sent and received during a two-byte transfer. The first byte is a poll byte that selects
the device ID and register address. It also controls whether a read or write operation is taking place. The second byte contains data from the selected register.
3.5.9.9.6

Provisioning Inputs

The I/O interface receives the following provisioning inputs (PROV 1-8) from capacity keys
on the XMTR and RCVR modules:
modulation scheme
local oscillator control source (pedestal voltage or PLL)
STS1 operation and number of STS1 lines enabled
data scrambled or passed data through unmodified
stuff rate source for stuffing DS1/E1 signals in radio frame (average stuff rate or stuff
request signals from DS1 interface ASIC)
enables or disables data scrambler stuck pattern (all 1s, all 0s, or alternating 1s and 0s).
3.5.9.9.7

I2C Bus

The I2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit) bus is for inventory control and communicates module
part number, serial number, and revision history information to the AE-37( )Controller.

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3.5.9.9.8

Issue 3
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Loopback Controls

Refer to loopback information on the Control screen for details. To access the Control
screen:

3.5.9.9.9

Click here to enter Controls guide. Main screen will open.

On the Main screen, on dropdown for type of radio, click on ETH. ETH
Status Alarm screen will open.

On ETH Status Alarm screen, on tool bar, click on User Control. User control
screen will open.

On User Control screen, click on loopback function.

Alarms

ALM red LED, indicates I/O interface module failure


ETH ALM yellow LED, indicates ETHERNET receive circuit failure.
3.5.9.9.10 Status
INSVC green LED, indicates XMT and/or RCV circuits are passing data
ETH IN green LED, indicates data on input to ETHERNET RCV/RADIO XMT circuits
ETH OUT green LED, indicates data on output from RADIO RX/ETHERNET XMT
circuits.
3.5.10 DX-35S-1 ETH/T1 I/O
The DX-35S-1 (PN 3EM16167AA) supports both electrical and optical Ethernet applications
and provides interface for up to 32 DS1. The DX-35S-1 module is equipped with a front-panel
mounted RJ-45 connector for electrical Ethernet connection and an SFP (Small Form factor
Pluggable) module receptacle for optical Ethernet connection. The SFP plugs into the SFP
receptacle and XMT and RCV fiber optic cables connect to the SFP. One interface (electrical or
optical) is active, the other interface is backup and becomes active if the already active interface fails.
The ETH/T1 I/O multiplexes/demultiplexes up to 32 DS1, and service channel data in the
MDR-8000 Ethernet radio. The Ethernet data input/output is via Ethernet cable connected to
an RJ45 connector or optical cable connected to the ETH/T1 I/O via an SFP. The input/output
between the I/O interface and the MDR-8000 radio is via the radio backplane through J3A,
J3B, and J3C. There is also connection to the ETH/T1 line interface card via J3D and J3E.
See Figure 3 - 43 for to/from signal information and application information. The ETH/T1 I/O
consists of several functional blocks each of which is described below.

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Functional Description Section

DX-35S
ETH/T1 I/O

SFP

J3A
RR SEF

ETHERNET DATA
LINK
PARTNER

ETH TRD 3-0

UD-35AN
RCVR
A2/B2

J1

TXI 0-4

10/100/GigE

UD-35AN
RCVR

TX Q 0-4

J3A

2 BAUD CLK

TCMS
UD-35AN
RCVR

BAUD CLK

BAUD ID

TCK B
RXD 4-0

CORRECTION VOLTAGE

A4/B4
RXD 2-0

J3B

BIT CLK

SERIAL DATA (I2C)

RCV BAUD
A2/B2

VITERBI CORE

C1 DATA 7-0

AE-37Y
CNTLR

EAST SC RX DATA

J3B

EAST SC 256k CLK


AE-37Y
CNTLR

RXD 9-0

EAST 64k CLK

SERIAL CLK (I2C)

EAST 16k SYNC

SERIAL DATA (I2C)

EAST 8k SYNC
EAST 2k SYNC

C1 DATA 7-0
WEST SC RX DATA

SELECT A/B

WEST SC 256k CLK

DISTRB

WEST SC 64k CLK

RWF

WEST SC 16k CLK


WEST SC 8k CLK

TX AUX ENABLE

WEST SC 2k CLK
RX AUX ENABLE

C1

EAST SC XMT DT

J3D

EAST SC XMT OH
T1 RX TIP & RING 1-11

WEST SC XMT DT
WEST SC XMT OH

T1 RX TIP & RING 17-25

C1

J3E
LINE
INTFC
CARD

LINE
INTFC
CARD

J3E

T1 TX TIP & RING 1-16

T1 RX TIP & RING 12-16

T1 TX TIP & RING 17-32

T1 RX TIP & RING 26-32

RPTR TX TIP & RING

RPTR RX TIP & RING

PROTECT 1-4

PROTECT 1-4
MDR-1295
04/06/07

Figure 3 - 43 DX-35S ETH/T1 I/O Interconnect Diagram


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3.5.10.1 Modes of Operation


Provisionable modes of operation include: A Only, A and B Switched, A and B Separate, and
A and B Summed. Refer to signal flow drawings in the Initial Turnup Section.

Note
For all modes of operation, only the Eth Out associated with the active Eth
In is allowed to put out data.
3.5.10.1.1 A Only
The A Only mode allows external equipment, that has a single input and a single output
port, to connect to an MDR-8000E that has one or two ETH/T1 I/O modules. Only the A Eth
In and A Eth Out ports are active.
In the XMT direction, the A Eth In data is connected to the A ETH/T1 I/O modules. Crossover data is sent to the B ETH/T1 I/O module (if equipped).
In the RCV direction, the A Eth Out data is connected to the A ETH/T1 modules. Crossover
data is sent from the B ETH/T1 I/O module (if equipped).
3.5.10.1.2 A & B Switched
A failure on A or a manual switch, switches Ethernet data on A Ethernet In and A Ethernet
Out ports to the B ETH/T1 I/O. Data is not automatically returned to A when the alarm is
cleared. The data remains on B until an alarm or manual switch on B switches the data to A.
3.5.10.1.3 A & B Separate
In this mode, A and B are two completely separate unprotected data channels.
In the XMT direction, data from the A ETH/T1 I/O Eth In port is applied to the A XMTR
module and data from the B ETH/I/O Eth In port is applied to the B XMTR module. If a failure occurs, data on that channel is lost.
In the RCV direction, the A Eth Out port uses data only from the farend A XMTR and the B
Eth Out port uses data only from the farend B XMTR. If a failure occurs, data on that channel is lost.
3.5.10.1.4 A & B Summed
This mode can be used to provide Ethernet link protection for hops with one RF link.
In the XMT direction, both the A and B ETH/T1 I/O modules receive data on the Eth In port.
When there is only one RF link, the data from both the A and B ETH/T1 I/O Eth In ports are
combined into a single data stream and the composite signal is applied to the active XMTR
module. Frames are tagged to indicate the data source. When there are two RF links, this
mode functions the same as A and B Separate with A and B operating as separate, independent channels. In this scenario, data from the A ETH/T1 I/O Eth In port is applied to the A
XMTR module and data from the B ETH/T1 I/O Eth In port is applied to the B XMTR module.

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In the RCV direction, the A Eth Out port uses data only from the farend A XMTR and the B
Eth Out port uses data only from the farend B XMTR. If a failure occurs, data on that channel is lost.

3.5.10.2 Ethernet Switching


See Figure 3 - 36. In the A and B Switched mode, when an I/O switch is initiated by an alarm
or a manual switch (refer to Table 3 - 6), the A ETH R/RT (Ethernet In) and A RR/ETH T
(Ethernet Out) signals are switched simultaneously to B. B will remain in service until it
alarms or a manual switch to A is initiated.

ETH/T1 I/O A
ETH RCV/RADIO XMT
ETH In
ETH R/RT
A
ETH In

XMTR
A

SW

SW
CMD

RADIO RCV/ETH XMT


RR/ETH T
A
ETH Out

SW

RCVR
A

SW
CMD

ETHR DATA (3:0)


ETH R PARITY
ETH R CTRL
ETH R ACPT CLK

ETH T DATA (4:1)


ETH T SYNC-1
ETH T SYNC-2

ETH/T1 I/O B
ETH RCV/RADIO XMT
ETH In
ETH R/RT
B
ETH In

XMTR
B

SW

SW
CMD

RADIO RCV/ETH XMT


RR/ETH T
B
ETH Out

SW

RCVR
B

SW
CMD
MDR-1301
04/16/07

Figure 3 - 44 ETH/T1 I/O Crossover Function Simplified Functional Block Diagram


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Table 3 - 6 Ethernet In/Ethernet Out Switching Priorities


Priority

Function

5 Highest

Card Not Valid (the card is being stored in the B side, but is not provisioned and not being used)

Card Not Equipped

Override (using either the controls on the controller module front


panel or the USI Control screen)

No Link or No Signal on Ethernet Data

1 Lowest

Manual Switch (using either the controls on the controller module


front panel or the USI Control screen)

3.5.10.3 DS1 Switching


See Figure 3 - 45. DS1 and AUX channel switching is independent of the Ethernet data
switching. In hot-standby, space-diversity, and frequency-diversity radios, in the radio XMT
direction, DS1 data is applied to both the A and B ETH/T1 I/O modules, multiplexed with
Ethernet data and AUX channel data, and applied to the A and B XMTRs.
In the radio RCV direction, DS1 data out of the A RCVR is applied to both the A and B ETH/
T1 I/O modules. When a DS1 switch is initiated by an alarm or a manual switch (refer to
Table 3 - 7), the A DS1 TX outputs from the A RCVR are switched to the B ETH/T1 I/O module.
DS1 switching is not revertive. DS1 RCV circuits on the B ETH/T1 I/O will remain in service
until either B alarms or a manual switch to A is initiated.

Table 3 - 7 DS1 Switching Priorities


Priority

Function

4 Highest

Card not valid (the ETH/T1 I/O card is being stored on the B side,
but is not provisioned and not being used).

I/O Card not present

Override

1 Lowest

Manual switch

3.5.10.4 10/100BASE-T Operation


The 10BASE-T and 100BASE-T radios employ half-duplex and full duplex baseband transmission over two pairs of category 5/5E (CAT5/5E) balanced cabling. The aggregate data rate of
10/100 Mb/s is achieved by transmission at a data rate of 10/100 Mb/s over each wire pair. The
data is transmitted over the RF path in burst of up to 10 Mb/s and 100 Mb/s, respectively.

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Functional Description Section

3.5.10.5 1000BASE-T Operation


The 1000BASE-T (sometimes referred to in the industry as GigE) radio employs full duplex
baseband transmission over four pairs of category 5/5E balanced cabling. The aggregate
data rate of 1000 Mb/s is achieved by transmission at a data rate of 250 Mb/s over each wire
pair. The use of hybrids and cancellers enables full duplex transmission by allowing symbols
to be transmitted and received on the same wire pair at the same time. Data from the link
partner is received in bursts of up to 1000 Mb/s and is transmitted over the RF path in
bursts of up to 150 Mb/s.

ETH/T1 I/O A
RADIO XMT
MUX
XMTR
A

RADIO RCV

SW

RCVR
A

SW
CMD

DS1 Tx 1-32
ETH/T1 I/O B
RADIO XMT

To/From
ETH/T1
LINE
INTFC

MUX
XMTR
B

DS1 Rx 1-32

RADIO RCV

SW

RCVR
B

SW
CMD
ETH-1096
04/16/07

Figure 3 - 45 DS1 Switching


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3.5.10.6 Ethernet Data Flow


See Figure 3 - 46. The DX-35S ETH/T1 I/O consists of the RJ45 connector, the Input/Output
transformer, the Ethernet PHY, the ETHRA FPGA, and the T1/E1 Line Interface. A description of each follows.

ETHRA FPGA

10/100/
1000BASE-T
ETHERNET

MII
RJ45

INTFC
XFMR

PHY

MII
MAC

FIFO

GFP

MULDEM

RADIO

RADIO
RX/TX

SFP_TDP/N

T1/DS1 FRAMING
ETHERNET
DATA

SFP
SFP_RDP/N
DS1

T1 LINE INTERFACE

TO/FROM
ETH/T1 Line INTFC

PARALLEL BUS

ETH-1097
04/16/07

Figure 3 - 46 ETH/T1 I/O Data Flow Block Diagram


3.5.10.6.1 RJ45 Connector
The RJ45 connector is the Ethernet cable connection to/from the interface transformer on
the ETH/T1 I/O module.
3.5.10.6.2 Interface Transformer
The transformer is used for signal coupling between the RJ45 connector and the Ethernet
PHY block. Transformer coupling provides spike filtering and termination.
3.5.10.6.3 SFP
The Small Form-factor Pluggable (SFP) is used for signal coupling between the fiber optic
cable and the Ethernet PHY block. The SFP is a compact optical transceiver.

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Functional Description Section

3.5.10.6.4 Ethernet PHY


The PHY connects Ethernet media to the ETHRA FPGA (through Media Access Control)
and defines the electrical signaling, line states, clocking guidelines, data encoding, and circuitry needed for data transmission and reception.
The PHY also performs auto-negotiation (detects the rate of incoming and/or outgoing data;
10BASE-T, 100BASE-T, 1000BASE-T) and selects the highest common input rate.
3.5.10.6.5 ETHRA FPGA (Ethernet Field Programmable Gate Array)
The main internal components of the FPGA are: MAC, FIFO, GFP, Muldem and T1/DS1
Framing block.
3.5.10.6.5.1

MAC (Media Access Control)

The MAC interfaces between Physical Layer (PHY) and the FIFO and primarily performs
Ethernet Framing to wit:
When receiving Ethernet data from the PHY (for Radio XMT), this component recognizes
where frames begin and end in the bit-streams received.
When transmitting data to the PHY (during Radio RX), the MAC delimits the frame by
inserting some extra bits into or among the frames being sent to enable the receiver(s) to
recognize the beginning and ending of the frames.
The MAC employs cyclical redundancy checks (CRC) by the use of checksums to ensure
the integrity of the bits in the frame to verify the frame is intact.
The MAC implements SMMA/CD during half-duplex Ethernet RX mode.
3.5.10.6.5.2

FIFO Buffer (First Frame In - First Frame Out)

The First In First Out buffer (FIFO) connects between the MAC and the GFP processor. Its
purpose is to transfer Ethernet data to the GFP for framing encapsulation prior to insertion
in the service channel for radio XMT, and to receive decapsulated framed data from the GFP
for transfer to the MAC and further transmission over the Ethernet.
In the Ethernet RCV/Radio XMT direction the three modules are: System Receive module
(receives data from the MAC), the Fabric receive module (sends data to the GFP), and the
Water Mark module. In the radio RCV/Ethernet XMT direction there are three sub-modules
in the data path: the Fabric TX module (receives RF from the GFP), the System TX module
(sends data to the MAC), and the Water Mark module (data flow control during data transfer). In both directions data is written to and read from the Generic Synchronous 2-port
SRAM buffer.
During half-duplex operation, CSMA/CD mode is operational and collision effects are evaluated during data transfer. Excessive collisions will cause a cessation of transfer and removal
of collision corrupted transferred data. During full-duplex operation, CAMA/CD is off and
there are no collision effects to interrupt data flow.
In the Ethernet RCV/Radio XMT direction, Ethernet data is clocked into the egress FIFO
eight bits at a time from the MAC through the System Receive module, written into FIFO
memory in the sequence of arrival, read out of memory into the Fabric Transmit module, and
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then, four bytes at a time, sent to the GFP. To begin transfer of data, the MAC sends the
FIFO a Ready-To-Send signal and awaits the FIFO reply Ready-To-Receive. As the MAC
sends its Ethernet data to the FIFO, it runs data validity checks. If the data is invalid
because of corruption, or excessive collision effects, FIFO is notified to abort reception. When
data transmission resumes, the data is written into memory by the System receive module.
The data at the same time is being read out of memory by the fabric receive module. This
module hand shakes with the GFP (Ready to Send/Ready to Receive). When GFP acknowledgement is received, the data is sent to the GFP four bytes at a time. In the GFP the data
frame is encapsulated for insertion into the radio service channel.
In the Radio RCV/Ethernet XMT direction, RF data is clocked into the ingress FIFO four
bites at a time through the Fabric Transmit module, written to FIFO memory in the
sequence of arrival, read out of memory into the System Receive module and then transferred eight bits at a time to the MAC. During reception from the GFP to the FIFO the data
undergoes validity checking by the Fabric Transmit module. If data is invalid, the Fabric
Transmit module notifies the GFP to quit sending the present data and restart a new frame
sequence. A Water Mark module in the FIFO is used to control data flow and assure that
data threshold levels at all points of transmission and reception are within limits. In the
case of under-run, the FIFO holds data in the buffer until more is received from the GFP
module. In the Radio RCV/Ethernet XMT direction, a short frame (less than 64 byte frame
length) is considered an error frame and is discarded.
3.5.10.6.5.3

GFP (Generic Framing Procedure)

The Generic Framing Processor (GFP) processes received Ethernet signals for transport over
the radio network and processes received radio signals for transport over the Ethernet network. The processor preserves original control information and incurs very short transmission delay. The framing process incurs very short transmission delay. The framing process
includes encapsulation (for radio transmission) and decapsulation (for Ethernet transmission), header processing, digital encoding/decoding, performance monitoring and more. The
processor contains a simplified FIFO interface to connect to the ingress/egress FIFO.
During Ethernet RCV/Radio XMT, the processor receives the Ethernet signals from the
FIFO via the FIFO Interface. It aligns character and control code, and maps consecutive
characters into block code. Eight block codes are grouped into a superblock with core and
payload headers. There is also a CRC-16 error check code added which calculates and inserts
core and payload header error control into each transmitting GFP frame. The superblocks
are then encapsulated as payload into periodic, fixed length GFP frames and inserted in the
radio service channel for RF transmission.
During Radio RCV/Ethernet XMT, the processor receives the radio frames from the service
channel, performs frame delineation and validation (core/payload header error control) for
each received GPF frame, and decapsulates the data into a set of superblocks. The superblocks are then decoded into 8-bit characters (data and control codes) and sent to the egress
FIFO via the FIFO interface.
3.5.10.6.5.4

Muldem

The muldem contains the circuitry to perform framing, to insert Ethernet, Service Channel,
and data into the frames for radio transmitting, and in the case of radio receiving, remove
data from the overhead and transfer it to the PHY for feed to the Ethernet cable. In the case
of DS1, the data is DS1 framed in the T1/DS1 ETHRA circuitry and directed through the T1/
E1 Line Interface to the Aux Interface.
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3.5.10.6.5.5

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

T1/DS1 Framing

Frames the DS1 data for transmission to the T1 Line Interface.


3.5.10.6.5.6

T1 Line Interface

The T1 Line Interface interfaces between the ETHRA and the AUX card for WS DS1 signals
and also connects to the backplane parallel bus for handling radio controller bi-directional data.

3.5.10.7 Ethernet RCV/Radio XMT Data Flow


See Figure 3 - 47. The ETH/T1 I/O data flow follows from board input at the RJ45 connector to
the Coupling Transformer to the Physical Layer Device (PHY) and into the ethernet Regenerator Array (ETHRA). From there it leaves the Ethernet I/O Interface board and enters the
radio path.
The PHY chip on the I/O board serves as the controlling influence for Ethernet data flow.
When enabled for Auto-Negotiation, the PHY establishes a communication link with the far
end PHY on the other end of the Ethernet cable (if it, too, has Auto-Negotiate capability) and
between them they compare their abilities and connect at the highest common data transfer
rate or mode (10BASE-T, 100BASE-T, or 1000BASE-T). Auto-Negotiation makes automatic
connection of the highest data rate available without intervention from the user or from management software and ensures data integrity. If Auto-Negotiation is not enabled, the transfer
will occur at a pre-configured rate.
The coupling transformer filters and terminates the incoming Ethernet signal and from
there the data is picked off by the PHY for application to the ETHRA. Connecting the PHY
and the ETHRA is the Medium Independent Interface (MII) circuitry. Since the MII circuits
interface between the PHY and the ETHRA, identical circuits are located in the PHY and
also in the Media Access Control (MAC) circuitry within the ETHRA. The MII circuits convert the line signals received by the PHY into digital format signals and provide them to the
ETHRA via the MAC. the ETHRA multiplexes the Ethernet data with data from the serial
service channel interface and wayside interface and converts the final multiplexed data into
two X/Y data rail pairs. The X/Y data pairs are then applied to a serial scrambler. The scrambled X/Y data is applied to a Forward Error Correction (FEC) encoder circuit which uses
Trellis Coded Modulation and Reed-Solomon coding. The encoded X/Y data steams are converted to I and Q data steams and clocked out of the ETHRA by the T CLK B input from the
XMTR module BAUD VCXO. The TX1 1-4 and TX Q 1-4 data are applied to the transmitter
module via connector J3A.

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J3B
CONTROLLER

TX AUX ENABLE

J3E LINE
INTFC CARD

TX AUX DISABLE

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

ETHRA
SWITCHING
CONTROL
LOGIC

J3E
LINE
INTFC
CARD

RT AUX ON LINE

MGMT/CNTRL/STATUS
SFP
XMT 2
XMT 3

ETHRA 2
(RADIO
XMT)

10/100/1000 BaseT
ETH RXD 7-

XMT
J1
RJ45

XMT 1

BUFFER

XFMR

PHY

EAST SC 256K CLK


EAST SC 64K CLK
EAST SC 16K CLK
EAST SC 8K SYNC
EAST SC 2K SYNC
EAST SC RX DATA 1
EAST SC RX DATA 2

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

ETH_RXC

XMT 2
XMT 3

ETH_125_CLK

T1 TX TIP
T1 TX RING

RT DATA 1
RT CLK 1

TXI 0-4
TXQ 0-4
BAUD CLK
2 BAUD CLK

J3A
TO XMTR
MODULE

LINE
SYSTEM
INTFC

T16 TX TIP
T16 TX RING

LINE
INTFC
CARD

RT DATA 16
RT CLK 16

T17 TX TIP

RT DATA 17

T17 TX RING

RT CLK 17

LINE
SYSTEM
INTFC

MHZ54T

CORRECTION
VOLTAGE

PH54A
PH54B

T32 TX TIP

RT DATA 32

T32 TX RING
RPTR TX TIP

RT CLK 32
RT DATA RPTR

RPTR TX RING

RT CLK RPTR

PLL

TCKB
PHBA
PHBB

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

XMT
VXCO

CORRECTION
VOLTAGE

PLL

BAUD
VCXO

SC TX DATA 1 EAST
SC TX DATA 2 EAST
SC TX OH 1 EAST
SC TX OH 2 EAST

PHY

PRTCT GTX CLK


PRCT TX DATA 7-0
PRCT ENABLE

PRTCT CLK 125


PRCT RX DATA 7-0
PRCT RX DV

PHY

FADED LINES
(
) = WIRED BUT NOT USED FOR CURRENT ETHERNET
RADIO APPLICATIONS
* AVAILABLE ON DX-35R-2 PN 3EM16610AB ONLY

MDR-1297
04/28/07

Figure 3 - 47 DX-35S ETH/T1 I/O Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 1 of 3)


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J3B
CONTROLLER

J3E
LINE
INTFC CARD
(OTHER I/O
MODULE)

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

T1/E1 ENABLE

RX AUX DISABLE

J3E LINE
INTFC CARD
(OTHER
I/OMODULE)

RR AUX ON LINE

RX AUX ENABLE

ETHRA
SWITCHING
CONTROL
LOGIC

T1/E1 ON LINE

T1/E1 DISABLE
10/100/1000 BaseT

J3A
RCVR
MODULE

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

RXD (4:0)
RSD (2:0)
BAUD ID
TCMS
RCV_BAUD
BIT CLK
FRMF (RR SEF)
VITERBI CORE

WEST SC TX DATA 1
WEST SC TX DATA 2
WEST TX OH 1
WEST SC TX OH 2

ETH RXD 7-

ETHRA 2
(RADIO
RCV)

ETH_GTX

PHY

ETH_TXC

RCV
RCV 1
XFMR RCV 2
RCV 3

SFP-RDP
SFP-RDN

RR DATA 1
RR CLK 1

J1
RJ 45

SFP

T1 RX TIP
T1 RX RING

LINE
SYSTEM
INTFC

RR DATA 16
RR CLK 16

T16 RX TIP
T16 RX RING

RR DATA 17

T17 RX TIP

RR CLK 17

T17 RX RING

LINE
INTFC
CARD

LINE
SYSTEM
INTFC

RR DATA 32

T32 RX TIP

RR CLK 32
RR DATA RPTR

T32 RX RING
RPTR RX TIP

RR CLK RPTR

RPTR RX RING

BUFFER

WEST SC 256K CLK


WEST SC 64K CLK
WEST SC 16K CLK
WEST SC 8K SYNC
WEST SC 2K SYNC
WEST SC RX DATA 1
WEST SC RX DATA 2

FADED LINES
(
) = WIRED BUT NOT USED FOR CURRENT

ETHERNET RADIO APPLICATIONS

Figure 3 - 47 DX-35S ETH/T1 I/O Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 2 of 3)


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CONTROLLER

MDR-1298
04/28/07

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Functional Description Section

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RWF
DSTRB

ETHRA
CONTROL
INTFC
(CI)

ADDRESS (9:0)
SELECT A
SELECT B

ALM

INSVC

SERIAL CLK
SERIAL DATA

EEPROM
I2C

WYSD ON

J3B/J3C
CONTROLLER

SYSTEM
INTFC

CI DATA 0-7

WYSD ALM

ETH IN

CI DATA (7:0)

ETH ALM

IRQ
J3E
AUX
INTFC

ETH OUT
A-SIDE

MDR-1096B-F
04/28/05

Figure 3 - 47 DX-35S ETH/T1 I/O Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 3 of 3)


3.5.10.7.1 XMTR Module Interface
The XMTR module interface at connector J3A receives Transmit Data (TX1 1-4 and TXQ 1-4),
BAUD CLK, and 2 BAUD CLK (twice the frequency of BAUD CLK) from the ETHRA.
3.5.10.7.2 T1 Interface
The line system interface circuit provides clock recovery, clock smoothing, elastic buffering and
line encoding for each T1 channel.
The T1 tip and ring signals are applied to the line system interface circuits via connector J3E.
The balanced tip and ring signals consist of pulsed square waves at 1.544 Mb/s. The line system interface circuit bridges the RZ data onto one channel, converts the balanced tip and ring
signals to NRZ data, B3ZS encodes the data, and using the recovered clock, writes the data
into an elastic buffer. In the elastic buffer, the recovered clock is compared to the low-speed
clock created by the ETHRA and if a mismatch is detected, stuffing bits are inserted. The RT
DATA 1-32 outputs of the line system interface circuits are clocked into the ETHRA by the
respective output clocks.
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Functional Description Section

3.5.10.7.3 Service Channel Interface


Refer to service channel demultiplex description later in this section for RCV details. The DX35S ETHRA receives inserted service channel 1 data from the AE-37Y-1 controller module via
connector J3B. Service channel 2 data from the controller is wired (J3C) but not used for the
Ethernet radio applications.
Overhead MUX circuitry in the ETHRA receives local insert-service channel data (SC TX
DATA 1 EAST, SC TX DATA 2 EAST, SC TX OH 1 E, and SC TX OH 2 E) from the service
channel muldem in the controller module. The EAST SC TX DATA is clocked into the ETHRA
by the controller using the EAST SC CLOCKS (EAST SC 256K CLK, EAST SC 64K CLK,
EAST SC 16K SYNC, EAST C 8K SYNC, and EAST SC 2K SYNC) provided by the ETHRA. In
the ETHRA, the service channel insert data (EAST SC TX DATA) is inserted into the radio
frame overhead.

3.5.10.8 Radio RCV/Ethernet XMT Signal Flow


See Figure 3 - 47. The DX-35S ETH/T1 I/O RCV circuits receive parallel RX and RS data signals; an BAUD CLK from the RCVR module. The ETHRA demultiplexes/decodes these inputs
to form Ethernet data, auxiliary (overhead data), and a reference sync signal. The overhead
data contains a 262 kb/s service channel, a 1.544 Mb/s WDS1 per each DS1, and two 16 kb/s
command path channels.
3.5.10.8.1 RCVR Module Interface
The RCVR module interface at connector J3A consists of Receive Data (RXD), Receive Subset
data (RSD), BAUD Identification (ID), Trellis Code Modulation Sync (TCMS), Receive BAUD
clock (RCV BAUD), Bit Clock (CLK), Frame False (FRMF) and Viterbi Correcting Errors (VITERBI CORE).
RCVR module interface circuits consist of a retime circuit and Forward Error Correcting
(FEC) circuit. RXD and RSD signals from the RCVR are clocked into the retime circuit by the
BAUD CLK. The retime circuit retimes these to the baud clock and the signals are then
applied to the ETHRA FEC circuit. The FEC circuit removes the FEC encoding placed on the
data stream by the MDR-8000 XMTR at the other end of the hop.
3.5.10.8.1.1

ETHRA Functions

The ETHRA performs Reed-Solomon decoding, descrambling, radio frame detection and
alignment, extracting service channel and DS1 overhead channels, elastic buffering, frame
detection, PVMR, data rate adjustment to interface with FEC array, phase/frequency detection, and alignment signal generation.
3.5.10.8.1.2

Parity Byte

Parity bits are continuously monitored and a parity error pulse is generated when a mismatch is detected.
3.5.10.8.2 T1 Interface
The DX-35S uses a line system interface ASIC for T1 signal processing. The demultiplex section of each line system interface ASIC receives 16 channels of T1 data and clocks. The 16
channels of data are clocked into an elastic buffer. The data is then converted to a quasi-RZ
format and encoded, according to the modulation mode. The encoded data is sampled in an
AIS detector for loss of signal, demultiplexed onto two (T&R) channels, and converted to RZ
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data. TEO (trailing edge overshoot) pulses are added to the RZ data so that the pulses conform to cross-connect requirements without the need for an external equalizer. Tip and ring
outputs for each channel are applied to the MDR-8000 interface via connector J3E.
3.5.10.8.3 Service Channel Interface
Refer to service channel multiplex description previously described in this section for XMT
details. The DX-35S sends service channel 1 data to the AE37Y-1 controller module via connector J3B. Service channel 2 data from the controller is wired (J3C) but not used for the
Ethernet radio applications.
See Figure 3 - 48. The service channel interface at the ETHRA in the Ethernet I/O interface
consists of the WEST SC RX DATA, WEST SC CLKS (WEST SC 256K CLK, WEST SC 64K
CLK, WEST SC 16K), and WEST SC SYNC (WEST SC 8K SYNC, WEST SC 2K SYNC) outputs. In the ETHRA, the service channel data (WEST SC RCV DT) is removed from the
radio frame overhead and is sent to the service channel muldem in the controller module.
The WEST SC RX DATA is clocked into the controller by the ETHRA using the WEST SC
CLOCKS provided by the ETHRA.

ETH/T1 I/O
West RCV
West SC RX Data
West SC Clocks

ETHRA

East SC TX Data
East SC Clocks

ETHRA

East XMT

CONTROLLER
MDR-1143F
04/17/07

Figure 3 - 48 ETHRA Service Channel Interface Functional Block Diagram


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Functional Description Section

3.5.10.9 Control and Monitor Functions


3.5.10.9.1 Controller Interface
See Figure 3 - 47. The controller interface is used to transfer alarm and status information to
the AE-37( ) Controller.
Alarms generated in the ETHRA are latched in the controller interface until they are
acknowledged by the system controller. Ethernet receive/radio transmit alarms generated
by the ETHRA include: Severely Errored Frame (SEF), Loss of Frame (LOF), Parity Error,
and Loss of Signal (LOS).
3.5.10.9.2 SEF
SEF is declared when a minimum of four consecutive errored framing patterns has been
received. SEF is cleared when a minimum of two consecutive error-free framing patterns
have been received.
3.5.10.9.3 LOF
LOF is declared if the SEF state persists for a count comparable to 23 frames. LOF is
cleared when the signal remains in-frame for a minimum of one millisecond.
3.5.10.9.4 Parity Error
The parity checker calculates CRC-8 parity over all the bytes of the STSn frame and checks
this calculated parity against the RCV parity (B1 byte) in the next frame. An error is
declared if a mismatch or error is detected.
3.5.10.9.5 LOS
LOS is declared when an all zeros pattern is received on all four bits of nibble data (a minimum of 100 microseconds).
Data is sent and received during a two-byte transfer. The first byte is a pull byte that selects
the device ID and register address. It also controls whether a read or write operation is taking place. The second byte contains data from the selected register.
3.5.10.9.6 Provisioning Inputs
The I/O interface receives the following provisioning inputs (PROV 1-8) from capacity keys
on the XMTR and RCVR modules:
modulation scheme
local oscillator control source (pedestal voltage or PLL)
STS1 operation and umber of STS1 lines enabled
data scrambled or passed data through unmodified

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stuff rate source for stuffing DS1/E1 signals in radio frame (average stuff rate or stuff
request signals from DS1 interface ASIC)
enables or disables data scrambler stuck pattern (all 1s, all 0s, or alternating 1s and 0s).
3.5.10.9.7 I2C Bus
The I2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit) bus is for inventory control and communicates module
part number, serial number, and revision history information to the AE-37( ) Controller.
3.5.10.9.8 Loopback Controls
Refer to loopback information on the Control screen for details. To access the Control screen:
1

Click here to enter Controls guide. Main screen will open.

On the Main screen, on dropdown for type of radio, click on ETH. ETH
Status Alarm screen will open.

On ETH Status Alarm screen, on tool bar, click on User Control. User control
screen will open.

On User Control screen, click on loopback function.

3.5.10.9.9 Alarms
ALM red LED, indicates I/O interface module failure
ETH ALM yellow LED, indicates ETHERNET receive circuit failure.
3.5.10.9.10Status
INSVC green LED, indicates XMT and/or RCV circuits are passing data
ETH IN green LED. This activity monitor indicates data on input to ETHERNET RCV/
RADIO XMT circuits.
ETH OUT green LED. This activity monitor indicates data on output from RADIO RX/ETHERNET XMT circuits.

3.6
TRANSMITTER SUBSYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
See Figure 3 - 49. The transmitter subsystem consists of a QAM transmitter, and a power
amplifier (optional). The purpose of the transmitter is to convert digital baseband signals to a
QAM RF signal and transmit the signal. The following paragraphs describe the operation of
the transmitter subsystem.
The digital baseband signals are converted to analog baseband signals that are then converted
to an RF QAM signal by mixing the analog baseband with a multiplied crystal oscillator. The
2GHz I/Q modulator output is up-converted to the desired RF frequency and amplified to a
medium power RF signal. If higher power is required the signal is sent to the UD-51( ) Power
Amplifier before being sent to the antenna. The RF QAM signal is amplified and applied to the
antenna via a transmit filter.

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Functional Description Section

AE-37( )
CONTROLLER

APC
CONTROL
TX RF
DETECTOR

PA
PRESENT

PA RF
DETECTOR

I DATA

Q DATA

UD-35( )
TRANSMITTER

BAUD
TO/FROM
I/O
INTERFACE

RF

UD-51( )
POWER AMPLIFIER
OPTIONAL

RF

TO
XMT FILTER

2X BAUD

CLOCK
CAPACITY KEY
FREQUENCY CONTROL
CAP KEY PROVISIONING

MW211-0003-1-F
01/29/04

Figure 3 - 49 Transmit Function Block Diagram


3.6.1 XMT Monitor Points Vs USI
XMT power is referenced at the antenna output of the diplexer/filter or at the top of the stack
for waveguide stacking configuration. Transmitter and Power Amplifier module monitor voltages and USI monitor voltages are relative values. The values can be recorded as reference
voltages at initialization and then checked periodically for degradation.

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See Figure 3 - 50. There is no correlation between the DC MON test point on the PA front
panel, the PA RF MON input to the controller, and the PA (DC MON) reading on the USI. The
PWR Mon test point on the XMTR front panel is not designed to match the XMTR RF MON
voltage at the input on the controller and the TX (PWR MON) voltage on the USI; however, it
is common to find less than 1% difference.
If the shelf is not equipped with a PA, the RF monitor voltage from the RF coupler/detector on
the XMTR output is switched to the XMTR AGC circuits. The detected RF monitor voltage from
the PA is switched to the AGC circuits on the XMTR module by the PA Present control signal
from the PA when equipped. The AGC circuit controls the gain of the XMTR output amplifier.

3.6.1.1

XMTR PWR Mon

The voltage on the PWR MON test point on the XMTR front panel is not adjustable. The output monitor is driven by the unity gain buffer. This reference voltage on this test point and/or
the voltage displayed on the TX (PWR MON) display on the USI Analog screen are useful as a
troubleshooting aid when the shelf does not have a PA. If the shelf is equipped with a PA, the
PA voltages should be used.

3.6.1.2

PA DC Mon

The voltage on the DC MON test point on the PA front panel is adjustable on earlier versions of the PA and is normally only factory adjustable on later versions (the control is covered by the output level label). The output monitor circuit is driven by the level shifter. The
reference voltage on this test point and/or the voltage displayed on the PA (DC MON) display on the USI Analog screen are useful troubleshooting aids.
At the factory, the DC MON test point on the PA front panel is set for 0.1 volts per dB output
power (e.g. 2.9v = 29dB output power).

Controller
Cable

RF
Out

AGC
RF
Coupler

RF
Coupler
DET
XMTR
RF MON
(Vdc)

USI

USI
INTFC

A to
D
Conv

PA
RF MON

DET

SWITCH
PWR
MON
(Vdc)

XMTR

DC
MON
ADJ

Buffer
(Unity Gain)

DC
MON
(Vdc)

ALC

(Vdc)
Level
Shift

PA Present

Processor

BACKPLANE

PA
MDR-1108F
06/15/05

Figure 3 - 50 XMTR/PA Test Points Functional Block Diagram


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Functional Description Section

Controller

The XMTR RF MON and PA RF MON voltages are applied to the analog to digital (A to D)
converter circuits on the controller. The digital outputs are read by the USI in the USI interface circuits.
3.6.2 Automatic Level Control (ALC)
When ATPC is disabled, ALC analog circuits control the output power level of the XMTR module or the PA (if equipped). The ALC loop function is disabled if ATPC is enabled.

3.6.2.1

XMTR ALC Loop (Analog)

See Figure 3 - 51 for the XMTR ALC loop signal flow. When the radio is not equipped with a PA,
the RF output of the XMTR module is detected and looped back to control the level of the IF
input to the up-converter. Lack of a ground on the PA PRESENT signal causes the PA/XMTR
select switch to switch the XMTR RF DETECTOR VOLTAGE from the RF detector to the integrator circuit in the XMTR module. Integrator circuit gain is controlled by the front panel XMT
LVL control. The control voltage developed in the integrator circuit is switched to the voltage
controlled variable attenuator that controls the level of the IF signal to the upconverter.

CONTROLLER

XMTR

PA

PA PRESENT
PA RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

XMTR
RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

INTEGRATER

XMT
LVL

RF
DETECTOR
VOLTAGE
CONTROLLED
VARIABLE
ATTENUATOR

ATPC
VOLTAGE

I C

BUS

UPCONV

RF
DETECTOR

XMTR
RF OUT

I C
IF

LMW-3001F
01/29/04

Figure 3 - 51 XMTR ALC Loop (Analog) Signal Flow

3.6.2.2

PA ALC Loop (Analog)

See Figure 3 - 52 for the PA ALC loop signal flow. When the radio is equipped with a PA, the RF
output of the PA module is detected and looped back to control the level of the IF input to the
up-converter on the XMTR module. The PA PRESENT signal causes the PA/XMTR select switch
to switch the PA RF DETECTOR VOLTAGE from the RF detector to the integrator circuit in the
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XMTR module. The control voltage developed in the integrator circuit is switched to the voltage
controlled variable attenuator that controls the level of the IF signal to the upconverter. The
output of the up-converter is amplified and applied to the fixed-gain amplifier in the PA.

CONTROLLER

XMTR

PA PRESENT

PA

PA RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

XMTR
RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

INTEGRATER
XMT
LVL
VOLTAGE
CONTROLLED
VARIABLE
ATTENUATOR

ATPC
VOLTAGE

2
I C

BUS

RF
DETECTOR

UPCONV

RF
DETECTOR

XMTR
RF OUT

2
I C
IF
LMW-3002F
01/29/04

Figure 3 - 52 PA ALC Loop (Analog) Signal Flow


3.6.3 Automatic Transmit Power Control (ATPC)
When the radio is equipped with the optional PA, ATPC is a provisioning option and can be
used to reduce the transmit power to approximately 10 dB below maximum under normal
path conditions. ATPC loop functions depend on the output power level. There are two loop
modes of operation; high and low power digital ALC loop and end-to-end digital ALC loop.

3.6.3.1

High and Low Power Digital ALC Loop

See Figure 3 - 53 for the XMTR ATPC loop signal flow. In this loop mode of operation, the
ATPC power is at the high or low rail and the level is maintained by the controller module.
The RF output of the XMTR module is detected and looped back to control the level of the IF
input to the up-converter. Lack of a ground on the PA PRESENT signal causes the PA/
XMTR select switch to switch the XMTR RF DETECTOR VOLTAGE from the RF detector to
the controller module. The control voltage developed in the controller modules switched to
the voltage controlled variable attenuator that controls the level of the IF signal to the
upconverter. The output of the up-converter is amplified and applied to the XMT filter.
See Figure 3 - 54 for the PA ATPC loop signal flow. In this loop mode of operation, the ATPC
power is at the high or low rail and the level is maintained by the controller module. The RF
output of the PA module is detected and looped back to control the level of the IF input to the
up-converter on the XMTR module. The PA PRESENT signal causes the PA/XMTR select
switch to switch the PA RF DETECTOR VOLTAGE from the RF detector to the controller module. The control voltage developed in the controller modules switched to the voltage controlled
variable attenuator that controls the level of the IF signal to the upconverter. The output of the
up-converter is amplified and applied to the fixed-gain amplifier in the PA.
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CONTROLLER

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

XMTR

PA PRESENT

PA

PA RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

XMTR
RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

INTEGRATER

XMT
LVL

ATPC
VOLTAGE

IC

BUS

RF
DETECTOR

RF
DETECTOR
VOLTAGE
CONTROLLED
VARIABLE
ATTENUATOR

UPCONV

XMTR
RF OUT

IC
LMW-3003F
05/5/99

IF

Figure 3 - 53 XMTR ATPC Loop (Digital) Signal Flow

CONTROLLER

XMTR

PA PRESENT

PA

PA RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

XMTR
RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

INTEGRATER

XMT
LVL

RF
DETECTOR
VOLTAGE
CONTROLLED
VARIABLE
ATTENUATOR

ATPC
VOLTAGE

IC

BUS

UPCONV

RF
DETECTOR

XMTR
RF OUT

IC
IF

Figure 3 - 54 PA ATPC Loop (Digital) Signal Flow


3-106

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05/5/99

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Functional Description Section

3.6.3.2

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

End-to-End Digital ALC Loop

See Figure 3 - 55 for the active region ATPC loop signal flow. In this loop mode of operation,
the ATPC power is in the active region (level is between low and high power rails) and the
far end receiver controls the transmitter via the return command path. During faded path
conditions, low RSL detected in the far end receiver causes an increase in transmit power at
the upstream transmitter.
The radio can be operated with the ATPC disabled, enabled, or enabled with timeout. Select
ATPC disable for maximum power out of the PA at all times. Select ATPC enabled with timeout to force ATPC to low power when the high power alarm is activated. An ATPC high
power alarm is generated if the ATPC is active for more than five minutes without returning
to low power. ATPC remains at low power until the far end receiver requests an ATPC power
reduction.
In normal ATPC operation, the transmitter gain and PA bias control are under software
supervision. The transmitter is set for low gain (10 dB below full gain) and the PA is set for
low bias. The low bias reduces the current consumption in the output stage of the PA to save
power and reduce heat dissipation. When ATPC is provisioned disabled, the PA operates at
full output power. In hot-standby transmitters, the bias control of the off-line PA is set to low
bias with the transmitter gain set at full.
The near end transmitter sends status information to the far end to indicate if the ATPC is
able to go up or down. The far end receiver monitors the RSL voltage from the on-line
receiver and compares this voltage to a preset threshold voltage (representative of approximately -65dBm RSL). If the RSL voltage is higher than the threshold voltage and the near
end transmitter status indicates the ATPC can go down, a down request is sent to the near
end transmitter. If the RSL voltage is lower than the threshold voltage and the near end
transmitter status indicates the ATPC can go up, an up request is sent to the near end
transmitter. The down and up messages are sent from the far end transmitter over the
return path in an internal 16 kb/s command channel in the radio overhead. The near end
controller module receives the messages from the near end receiver and moves the ATPC
one step (approximately 0.5 to 1.0 dB) down or up.
Any time ATPC is not at low gain, the PA bias is enabled so that maximum PA linearity is
available. In hot-standby transmitters, the off-line transmitter gain is set to track the online gain. In frequency diversity systems, the A and B ATPC operate independently.

3-107

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NEAR END

FAR END
RCVR

XMTR

16 kb/s

CONTROLLER

XMTR

PA

PA PRESENT
PA RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

XMTR
RF DETECTOR
VOLTAGE

INTEGRATER
XMT
LVL
VOLTAGE
CONTROLLED
VARIABLE
ATTENUATOR

ATPC
VOLTAGE

IC

BUS

RF
DETECTOR

RF
DETECTOR
DETECTOR

UPCONV

XMTR
RF OUT

IC

RCVR

IF

LMW-3005
5/5/99

Figure 3-55 Active Region ATPC Loop Signal Flow


3-109 (3-110 blank)

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Functional Description Section

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3.6.4 Transmitter Switching


Manual switches are provided on the AE-37Y Controller module to manually switch the transmitters. Under normal operation, the manual switches will be in the AUTO position, which
allows the switching decisions to be made by the controller module based on alarm information.
3.7
TRANSMITTER SUBSYSTEM MODULES
Modules are described to the functional block diagram level in the following paragraphs. Modules are described in transmit signal flow order.
3.7.1 UD-35( ) Transmitter
See Figure 3 - 56, Figure 3 - 57, Figure 3 - 58, and Figure 3 - 59. The UD-35( ) Transmitter consists of the baseband modulator board, capacity key subboard, and a RF modulator subboard
with accompanying crystal oscillator subboard. The transmitter converts I and Q baseband
signals into an IF spectrum in the 1.5-2.5 GHz range depending on the RF frequency desired.

3.7.1.1

BB Modulator Board

See Figure 3 - 57. On the BB modulator board, the digital I/Q data rails are digitally filtered
and converted to an analog I/Q baseband. The aliases are removed and the signal is amplified.

3.7.1.2

Oscillator FREQ CONT

This front panel control fine tunes the crystal oscillator resonant frequency.

3.7.1.3

XMT Enable/Disable and Online Controls

In a protected system, the controller enables the online XMTR via the A/B XMT ENABLE
signal. The enable signal causes the control logic to turn on the IN SERVICE LED and an
XMT ON LINE output signal is sent to the other XMTR module as a XMT DISABLE input.
On the other XMTR, the XMT DISABLE signal is applied to the control logic and turns off
the XMTR. In a protected system with the RF switch, when the selected XMTR is on line,
the SWITCH signal from the control logic circuit is applied to the RF switch and switches
the XMTRs.

3.7.1.4

XMT LVL Control

This front panel control adjusts the RF output power of the XMTR by changing the correction voltage applied to the output variable attenuator. Refer to the description of the ALC
loop for details.

3.7.1.5

Capacity Key

The capacity key (PN 967-1609-001 through 020) consists of an I 2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit) EEPROM, I and Q low-pass filters, VCXO, and pull-down resistor array. The I 2C
EEPROM communicates part number, serial number, and revision history to the I 2C select
circuit on the BB MOD board. The I and Q filters are baud clock frequency dependent. The
filtered I and Q outputs are applied to the RF MOD subboard. The VCXO is frequency
dependent and derives the CAPACITY CLOCK output (baud clock) from the CAPACITY
KEY FREQ CONTROL input. The pull-down resistor array uses a 6-bit word (PROV 1-8) to
communicate to the controller how the radio is configured. The PROV 1-8 outputs select the
type of radio and provision the trellis coded modulation scheme (32/128 TCM).
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3.7.1.6

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Functional Description Section

Crystal Oscillator Subboard

See Figure 3 - 58. The crystal oscillator board operates in the 105-150 MHz range depending
on the RF requirements. The oscillator is a low phase noise oscillator. The output is interfaced to the RF modulator board at 50 ohms at a +10dBm level.

UD36AN
XMTR
P101

P101

CAPACITY CLOCK
DX35M
I/O
INTFC

I 04
PROV 18 (CAPACITY KEY)
Q 04

DX35M
I/O
INTFC

CAPACITY KEY FREQ CONTROL

TX2 BAUD CLK


A3/B3

AE37Y
CNTLR

A3/B3

TX BAUD CLK

SERIAL CLK (I2C)

XMT PWR MON

SERIAL DATA (I2C)

XMT PWR ALM

LAMP TEST

TX PRESENT

SERIAL SELECT 03

XMT ON LINE

AE37Y
CNTLR
C1

SERIAL DATA TX
SERIAL CLK
SERIAL TX/RX

J301

APC ENABLE
C1

B XMT SW
(B4 ONLY)

APC CONTROL

RF
SWITCH

XMT ENABLE

J4
UD51Z
PWR AMP

PA RF DETECT

RF OUT

PA PRESENT

A5/B5

A5/B5

A4/B4

Figure 3 - 56 UD-35( ) Transmitter Interconnect Diagram


3-112

UD51Z
PWR AMP

MW21100121
112498

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

SERIAL DATA

P101

TO/FROM
CNTLR

I2C
SELECT

SERIAL CLK
(I2C)

SERIAL
PRCSR

SERIAL DATA
(I2C)

SERIAL CLK

SERIAL
DATA

SERIAL
CLK

J102

APC ENABLE

FREQ
CONTROL

FREQ
CONT

ATPC/
XMT RF DETECT
TEMP/
COMP
CONTROL CORRECTION V DC

PA PRESENT
ATPC CONTROL

XMT
LVL

XMT PWR
ALM

A/B XMT ENABLE

P103

XMT DISABLE

TO/FROM
OTHER
XMTR

TO
RF SWITCH

SWITCH

PA RF DETECT

FROM
CNTLR

P101

SERIAL DATA

EEPROM

FROM PA

SERIAL
CLK

CONTROL
LOGIC

XMT ON LINE

IN
SERVICE

J1
EEPROM

P102

CRYSTAL
OSC BD

CAPACITY KEY FREQ CONTROL


I

LPF
D/A
CONV

XTAL
MON

EEPROM
P101

CAPACITY CLOCK
PROV 18

J102

J8

RF
OUT
J4

AMP
RF
MON

DIGITAL
FILTER
TO/FROM
I/O INTFC

J5

I
CARR
NULL

LVL
ADJ

LPF
D/A
CONV

AMP

LVL
ADJ

BAUD

RF MOD
SUBBOARD
Q
CARR
NULL

CAPACITY
KEY
SUBBOARD

2XBAUD
BB MOD
BOARD

MW21100151A
120198

Figure 3 - 57 UD-35( ) Transmitter Functional Block Diagram


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P102

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

AFC

FREQ CONTROL

CRYSTAL
OSC

AMP

AMP

AMP

P102
100 MHZ
OUT

LOWPASS
FILTER

CRYSTAL
TEMP
CONTROL
CKT

SERIAL CLK (I2C)


SERIAL DATA (I2C)

EEPROM
MW21100211
072598

Figure 3 - 58 UD-35( ) Crystal Oscillator Subboard Functional Block Diagram

3.7.1.7

RF Modulator Subboard

See Figure 3 - 59. The RF modulator subboard receives the crystal oscillator input and splits
the signal to a monitor and a frequency multiplier. The multiplier is usually a low order (2, 3
or 4) and the output is heavily filtered to remove all unwanted harmonics. The signal is multiplied once or twice more to reach a 2GHz frequency, each time filtered to remove unwanted
harmonics. This LO signal is split, one side to the I/Q modulator the other to a higher frequency multiplier.
The LO feeding the I/Q modulator is split into two quadrature vectors each driving a double
balanced mixer. These mixers up-convert the analog baseband signal to a 2GHz QAM signal.
This signal is combined and amplified and fed to a voltage variable attenuator (VVA) where
ATPC and temperature compensation level correction occurs.
The LO feeding the higher frequency multiplier is multiplied as required to drive an upconverter mixer to shift the 2GHz QAM signal to the desired RF frequency. The output of the
mixer is amplified to a usable RF level so some short distance applications can be satisfied
without the optional UD-51( ) Power Amplifier.

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FROM
J8
CAPACITY
KEY
BB MOD
VIA
BOARD

MIXER

IF

FROM
100 MHz
OSC

J102

3X
MULT

5X
MULT

AMP

90 DEG
HYBRID

SPLITTER

IF
COMBINER

J1
90

XTAL
MON
FROM
CAPACITY
KEY
BB MOD
J8
VIA
BOARD

MIXER

IF

J5

3X
MULT

RF
MON

J6

RF LO
COUPLER

J4

RF
OUT

AMP

LO
MON

COUPLER

BANDPASS
FILTER

RF

AMP

IF

MIXER

VARIABLE
ATTEN

AMP

CONTROL
RF
DETECTOR

TO
BB MOD
BOARD
(ALC
LOOP)

ATPC/ALC
LOOP

XMT
DETECT

MW21100151B
120298

Figure 3 - 59 UD-35( ) RF Modulator Subboard Functional Block Diagram

3.7.1.7.1

Monitor Circuits

Two crystal oscillator monitor circuits are provided, one at the input to the RF MOD subboard
(J1 XTAL MON), that is a direct connection, and the second (J6 LO MON) at the input to the
RF/IF mixer, through a coupler. The RF output is monitored via an RF coupler (J5 RF MON).
The XTAL MON and RF MON test points are accessible via front panel connectors.

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3.7.1.7.2

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Functional Description Section

ALC Loop Output

The RF output is coupled to a detector to produce a dc voltage (XMT RF DETECT) that is


applied to the BB MOD board and used in the ALC loop.

3.7.1.8

ALC Loop

The Automatic Level Control (ALC) loop automatically maintains the RF output level of the
transmitter. Refer to Automatic Level Control (ALC) under Transmitter Subsystem Functional Description in this section for details.

3.7.1.9

Monitor and Control

The output signal is fed either to the UD-51( ) Power Amplifier (if equipped) or directly to
the antenna. The signal is also coupled to a monitor with a nominal level of 0dBm. The signal is coupled to a level detector as well which generates a DC level proportional to the RF
output level. This detector voltage is fed back to the controller which uses the signal to
determine failure and to correct for gain changes over temperature.
The transmitter sends provisioning data and a frequency control signal to the DX-35( ) I/O
Interface module. The provisioning data communicates the type of radio (DS1/E1) and the
TCM modulation scheme (32 or 128 TCM) to the I/O interface. The frequency control input is
the feedback loop from the phase-lock loop on the I/O interface module to automatically control the crystal oscillator frequency.
3.7.1.9.1

I2C Bus

EEPROMs to interface the I2C bus are provided on the BB MOD board, crystal oscillator
subboard, and capacity key subboard. The I2C bus communicates module part number,
serial number, and revision history information to the AE-37( ) Controller. The EEPROM on
the crystal oscillator subboard also provides oscillator frequency to the controller.
3.7.2 UD-51( ) RF Power Amplifier (Optional)
See Figure 3 - 60 and Figure 3 - 61. The RF signal from the UD-35( ) Transmitter is amplified by
the UD-51( ) Power Amplifier and routed through a bandpass filter to the antenna. The output
of the power amplifier varies depending on the particular unit from +25 dBm to +33 dBm. It is
a solid-state linear amplifier with a fixed gain of approximately 21 dB. The actual gain is a
function of the radio type and output power.

3.7.2.1

ALC Loop

The Automatic Level Control (ALC) loop automatically maintains the RF output level of the
fixed-gain PA by controlling the output level of the XMTR module. Refer to Automatic Level
Control (ALC) under Transmitter Subsystem Functional Description in this section for details.

3.7.2.2

Monitor and Control

The power amplifier uses an active bias control stage that allows the unit to go to high bias
only during high power operation when increased linearity is required. The RF MON test
point is coupled off of the power amplifier output and is nominally 0 dBm. A low power
alarm is provided to indicate when the RF output signal power is below a preset level. A
detector diode is used to generate a dc voltage that is proportional to output power. This voltage is used to drive alarm circuits and a dc monitor and is also fed back to the XMTR module
for ALC. The alarm and dc monitor are independently adjustable.
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3.7.2.2.1

Issue 3
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I2C Bus

An EEPROM to interface the I2C bus is provided on the bias board. The I2C bus communicates module part number, serial number, and revision history information to the AE-37( )
Controller.
3.7.2.2.2

Temperature Differential Alarm

The power amplifier mounts to the heatsink on the backplane with three screws. If the
mounting screws are not installed and tightened properly, after approximately ten minutes,
the TEMP ALM LED will light and an alarm output is sent to the controller.

UD51Z
PWR AMP
J1
UD35AN
XMTR

RF OUT

P101
SERIAL CLK (I2C)
AE37Y
CNTLR

J2

RF IN

XMT
FILTER

P101
PA RF DETECT

SERIAL DATA (I2C)

UD35AN
XMTR

LAMP TEST
HIGH LINEARITY BIAS

PA PRESENT

AE37Y
CNTLR

MW21100231
112498

Figure 3 - 60 UD-51( ) Power Amplifier Interconnect Diagram


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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

RF
MONITOR
J1

J2

RF
INPUT

RF
OUTPUT

AMPL STAGE

RF PWR
ALM

P101
HIGH LINEARITY BIAS

FROM
CNTLR

BIAS CIRCUIT
ALARM

DC MON
OUT

SERIAL CLK
SERIAL DATA

EEPROM
ALARM
ADJ

DC MON
ADJ

TEMP
ALM
TEMP
ALARM
MW21100241
050198

Figure 3 - 61 UD-51( ) Power Amplifier Functional Block Diagram

3.8
TRANSMIT FILTERS
The transmit filter removes unwanted spurious RF signals and provides a reflection point
when stacking several transmitters on a common waveguide run.
3.9
RECEIVER SUBSYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
The receiver in the MDR-8000 radio demodulates a radio frequency (RF) signal into digital
decoded data. The digital data from the receiver is fed to the input/output interface (I/O interface module) where it is further decoded and demultiplexed.
3.10
RECEIVER SUBSYSTEM MODULES
See Figure 3 - 62. The MDR-8000 receiver subsystem can have either one of two available
receiver modules; the single receiver or the dual receiver.
The following paragraphs describe the operation of the receive subsystems. The single receive
subsystem is described in the 3.9.1 series of paragraphs and the dual receive subsystem is
described in the 3.9.2 series of paragraphs.

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3.10.1 UD-36 ( ) Single Receiver


See Figure 3 - 62, Figure 3 - 63, and Figure 3 - 64. The UD-36( ) single receiver module consists
of the main receiver unit, the capacity key to set the units capacity and modulation, and the
local oscillator to set the units specific operating frequency
The receiver supports the following modulation formats and capacities:
128 TCM for DS1 and OC3/STM-1 applications
32 TCM for DS1 and 1-2 DS3 applications
64 TCM for 1-3 DS3 applications
The receiver supports a range of RF from 2 GHz to 11GHz.
The single receiver is typically used in the following radio configurations:
Non-Standby
Hot-Standby
Hot-Standby with Space Diversity
Frequency Diversity

AE-37( )
CONTROLLER

ALARMS

TDE

BIT CLOCK

RSL

XTAL
OSC

RAIL DATA

TO I/O
INTERFACE

AFC

CAP
KEY

RF

FROM
STACK

RF DEMODULATOR

BAUD CLOCK

UD-36( ) SINGLE RECEIVER


LMW-9037F
05/27/03

Figure 3 - 62 Single Receiver Functional Block Diagram


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UD-36( )
RCVR
P101

AE-37Y
CNTLR

C1

P101

SERIAL CLK

RSL MON

SERIAL DATA

AFC MON

LAMP TEST

EYE MON

SERIAL SELECT 0-3

EYE ALM

SERIAL DATA TX

CH ALM

SERIAL CLK

OFF NORM

SERIAL TX/RX

RSL ALM

AE-37Y
CNTLR

C1

RX PRESENT

DX-35( )
I/O
INTFC
A3/B3

DX FRAME LOSS

I/Q (DS3) OR RX/RS (DS1/E1/OC3)


DX-35( )
I/O
INTFC
RX BIT CLK
RX BAUD CLK
J2

RCV RF
FILTER

A3/B3

RF IN

A2/B2

Figure 3 - 63 UD-36( ) Single Receiver Interconnect Diagram


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I DATA
RF_IN

RF
DOWN
CONVERTER

ANALOG
BASEBAND

CAPACITY
KEY

A/D
BB
FILTERING

TDE

TCM
DECODER
Q DATA

AGC

CHANNEL ALM
AFC

LOCAL
OSCILLATOR

BER ALM
CONTROLLER EYE VOLTAGE
INTERFACE AGC VOLTAGE
AFC VOLTAGE

SERIAL BUS

SPI_I2C

CHANNEL
ALM
BER ALM
ALARM
INTERFACE

EYE MON
RSL MON
AFC MON

LMW-9034F
02/04/04

Figure 3 - 64 Single Receiver Block Diagram


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3.10.1.1 External Interfaces


The incoming RF signal is fed to the receiver from the RF filter assembly. An SMA connector
on the receiver front panel provides for connection of this interface.
Internal to the cardcage, the receiver feeds its digital outputs to the corresponding I/O interface. The unit communicates alarm status information to the controller. The controller provides the receiver with provisioning and control data. Power for the receiver comes from the
corresponding power supply module.

3.10.1.2 Oscillator
The operating frequency of the receiver is set by the oscillator sub-assembly, part of the RF
Down Converter. The oscillator sub-assembly contains a VCXO that operates in the 100
MHz to 150 MHz range depending on the desired channel frequency. The output of the oscillator is effectively multiplied up to the desired RF for demodulation in the RF portion of the
receiver. The center operating frequency of the VCXO is set by an external potentiometer in
earlier versions of the receiver. In later versions the center frequency is automatically controlled from the time domain equalizer (TDE). The receive oscillator is phase locked to the
transmitter by the AFC and the associated control loop parameters. The phase detector is in
the TDE functional block.

3.10.1.3 RF Demodulator
See Figure 3 - 65. The RF demodulator, part of the RF Down Converter, converts a suppressed carrier QAM RF signal into I and Q analog baseband signals. The demodulator has
a low noise amplifier (LNA) section that sets the noise figure and the overload level of the
unit. An AGC circuit is deployed to control the levels through the unit and is set to maximum gain at low signal levels to help achieve a good noise figure. Additionally, at normal to
high RSL, the AGC limits the levels through the chain to prevent amplitude distortion. The
control signal to the AGC circuit is generated in the TDE.
The down conversion function is performed in the RF demodulator and is generally done in
two steps. The RF is first converted to an IF and then further demodulated into I and Q analog baseband signals by using a quadrature demodulator. The local oscillator (LO) used to
perform the down conversion and demodulation is derived from the oscillator sub-assembly.
The CW signal from the oscillator is multiplied appropriately and fed to the down conversion
and demodulation circuits. The multiplication factor varies with RF bands. The oscillator
generates a signal in the 100 MHz - 150 MHz range. The RF input signal to be demodulated
is in the 2 GHz - 11 GHz range.

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J2
RF
IN

RF

PIN
DIODE

LNA

LNA

IF
MIXER

LNA

J102
RF AGC

PIN
DIODE

SERIAL CLK (I2C)


SERIAL DATA (I2C)

BB
AMP

TO/FROM
BB
DEMOD
BOARD

MIXER

IF

0o

CARR
FREQ
GEN

HYBRID
90o

P102
XTAL
OSC
SUBBD

MULTI
PLIER

EEPROM

BB
AMP

MIXER

IF
SPLITTER

IF

FREQ CTRL
AFC
100 MHz

MULTI
PLIER

MW21100281
072598

Figure 3 - 65 UD-36( ) Receiver, RF DEMOD Subboard Functional Block Diagram

3.10.1.4 Analog Baseband


The analog baseband section provides additional baseband gain and baseband AGC. The section is designed to maintain a constant baseband level into the A/D converter. The gain
remains constant throughout the dynamic range of the receiver from threshold to overload.
Independent gain stages are used for I and Q baseband.

3.10.1.5 Capacity Key


The capacity key, a field replaceable sub-unit, is used to configure the receiver for the proper
modulation and baud rate operation. Configuration information resides on the capacity key
and is read by the receiver, controller, and I/O interface to properly configure the receiver
chain. The capacity key also contains the baud clocks and the anti-aliasing filters for the I
and Q baseband signals. The anti-aliasing filter is used to prevent the distortion at the sampling frequency from folding back in-band.

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3.10.1.6 Digital Baseband


The digital baseband section contains the A/D converters for the I and Q channels along
with the digital pulse shaping filter. This function accepts the filtered analog baseband signal and generates the post equalized digital I and Q signals that are fed to the TDE. The digital filter is a 24-tap filter with a roll-off factor of 0.2.

3.10.1.7 TDE
The Time Domain Equalizer (TDE) is a countermeasure primarily for multipath impairments. The TDE consists of a 11-tap feed forward section and a 11-tap decision feedback section with a single center tap. The TDE uses least mean squared (LMS) and Zero forcing
algorithms for tap adaptation. The TDE output symbols are also used in the decision
directed recovery loops for AGC, AFC, and clock recovery.

3.10.1.8 TCM Decoder


The Trellis Coded Modulation (TCM) decoder for OC3/STM-1 uses the following codes:
Inner Code

4d Trellis rate 2/3 Convolutional Code providing 4.66 dB of coding gain over
uncoded 128 QAM. Modulation used is 128 signal points with channel information
density of 6.54 bits per channel symbol.
Outer Code

4-Way Byte Interleaved Reed Solomon Code with 856 bytes block size with 840
bytes of information. This is expected to provide between 0.5 and 1 dB of coding
gain. An additional level of bit interleaving is employed outside the Reed Solomon
code to distribute burst errors (105 max). Bit interleaving is performed in order to
distribute errors in a manner in which every other symbol will have no more than
1 bit error.

3.10.1.9 Controller Interface


Communication to the system processor is over the SPI bus. The system processor is the
master device in all cases and initiates all transfers. The controller interface function is used
to download provisioning and control details from the radio controller to various devices on
the receiver and also to send alarm and status information from the receiver to the radio
controller. The SPI port is also used to set the adaptation parameters of the TDE during initialization.

3.10.1.10 Monitoring
Alarm and status information from the receiver is fed to the controller for reporting to the
USI and the network management systems. The information is also brought to the receivers
front panel to test points and LEDs for local access. The LEDs indicate the Channel Alarm
and the Eye Closure Alarm status and the On-Line condition.
A Channel Alarm is generated if the incoming signal is degraded by noise or other impairments to the point that clock or carrier recovery cannot be achieved. When the Channel Alarm
is ON the LED indicator goes to red. During this time, receiver performance typically exceeds
10-6 BER. Under normal conditions the Channel Alarm indicator should be off.

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The Eye Closure Alarm threshold is provisionable from 10-5 to 10-8 BER. An Eye Closure
Alarm is generated when the receive signal degrades to these thresholds; the LED indicator
goes to red. Under normal conditions the Eye Closure Alarm indicator should be off.
The On-Line condition indicator should be green when the receiver is in service and red
when out of service.
3.10.2 UD-36 ( ) Dual Receiver
See Figure 3 - 66, and Figure 3 - 67. The UD-36( ) dual receiver module consists of the main
receiver unit, the capacity key to set the units capacity and modulation, and the local oscillator to set the units specific operating frequency. This module also contains a diversity channel
that is functionally the same as the main channel. The two channels (main and diversity) are
on the same PC board but physically on opposite sides. The diversity channel has its own independent capacity key and oscillator to set its mode of operation. The outputs of the two channels are fed to the switching circuit which monitors the condition of the channels and selects
the better signal for transmission to the I/O. The switching circuit is physically located on the
main channel side of the PC board.
The receiver supports 128 TCM for OC3/STM-1 applications only and supports an RF range
from 6 GHz to 8 GHz. The dual receiver is used where Quad Diversity operation is needed but
can also be used to provide space diversity protection in non-standby systems.

AE-37( )
CONTROLLER

ALARMS

RSL-M
RSL-D

XTAL
OSC

RAIL DATA
TDE

CAP
KEY

BIT CLOCK

RAIL DATA
DATA
RAIL

TDE STRESS
(ON LINE)

RF

FROM
MAIN
ANTENNA

RF

FROM
DIVERSITY
ANTENNA

RF DEMODULATOR

BAUD CLOCK
TO I/O
INTERFACE

RECEIVER MAIN SIDE

FPGA
SWITCH
BIT CLOCK

XTAL
OSC

RAIL DATA

BAUD CLOCK

TDE

BIT CLOCK

CAP
KEY

RF DEMODULATOR

BAUD CLOCK

RECEIVER DIVERSITY SIDE


UD-36( ) DUAL RECEIVER
LMW-9038F
02/04/04

Figure 3 - 66 Dual Receiver Functional Block Diagram


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UD-36( )
DUAL
RCVR
P101

AE-37Y
CNTLR

C1

P101

SERIAL CLK

MN RSL MON

SERIAL DATA

MN TDE STRESS

LAMP TEST

MN EYE MON

SERIAL SELECT 0-3

MN EYE ALM

SERIAL DATA TX

MN CH ALM

SERIAL CLK

MN OFF NORM

SERIAL TX/RX

MN RSL ALM

AE-37Y
CNTLR

C1

MN RX PRESENT

DV RSL MON
DV TDE STRESS
DX-35( )
I/O
INTFC
A3/B3

DV EYE MON

DX FRAME LOSS

DV EYE ALM
DV CH ALM
DV OFF NORM
DV RSL ALM
DV RX PRESENT

J2

MN RCV RF MN RF IN
FILTER
RX/RS DATA
DV RCV RF
FILTER

DX-35( )
I/O
INTFC

DV RF IN
RX BIT CLK
RX BAUD CLK

A3/B3

A2/B2

LMW-9036F
02/04/04

Figure 3 - 67 Dual Receiver Interconnect Diagram

3.10.2.1 External Interfaces


The dual receiver has two RF input signals; one for the main channel and one for the diversity channel. Internal to the card cage the unit feeds its digital outputs to the corresponding
I/O interface module. The unit communicates alarm status information to the controller
which provides the receiver with provisioning and control data. Power for the dual receiver
comes from the corresponding power supply module.

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3.10.2.2 Oscillator
The oscillators of the dual receiver are physically and functionally identical to the oscillator
used for the single receiver. A separate oscillator is provided for the main channel and the
diversity channel. The main and diversity oscillators typically operate at the same frequency.

3.10.2.3 Capacity Key


The capacity key for the dual receiver is the same as that used for the single receiver. Two
capacity keys are used in the dual receiver; one for the main channel and one for the diversity channel. The capacity keys used in each of these channels are typically identical.

3.10.2.4 Main Channel


The main channel is functionally the same as the single receiver. It is dedicated to processing the RF input signal from the main antenna and generating the digital data status and
information that are fed to the switching circuit.

3.10.2.5 Diversity Channel


The diversity channel is functionally the same as the single receiver. It is dedicated to processing the RF input signal from the diversity antenna and generating the digital data status and information that are fed to the switching circuit.

3.10.2.6 Switching
The switching circuit is physically located on the main channel side of the receiver PC board.
Data and status information from both the main and diversity channels are fed to the
switching circuit. This circuit performs two major functions; data alignment and switching.
Data alignment is required for errorless switching between the two channels. The radio
frame markers are found on each channel and are aligned by using data buffers. The alignment circuit can tolerate a maximum of 300 nsec of delay offset.
Status information is fed to the switching circuit from the TDE. The TDE processes the status
information from both sides and selects the data from the better channel for distribution to the
I/O interface unit. The following parameters are used to make the switching decision:
Channel Fail
Frame Alarm
Eye Closure Alarm
AGC Alarm
TCM Errors
TDE Stress
The switching circuit constantly evaluates these parameters and selects the channel that has
the best performance. The switching parameters from both the main and diversity channels are
also fed to the controller. In protected systems the controller evaluates the status of the on-line
channel to determine if a switch between the A and B dual receiver is required.

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3.10.2.7 Monitoring
Alarms, indicators, and test points are the same as for the single receiver, except that the
dual receiver has two sets of each. For details, refer to the single receiver section.
3.11

MONITOR AND CONTROL SUBSYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION

3.11.1 Protection Switching


The radio can be configured for full 1:1 protection of the power supply, transmitter, power
amplifier, I/O interface, and receiver modules. The AE-37( ) Controller constantly monitors the
modules for fault conditions and controls the switching of protected subsystems.
3.11.2 Switchover Priority
Upon an alarm condition, a switchover to the other transmitter or receiver is based upon priority. Initially, both power up to the A-side; then switchover is determined according to the following hierarchy:

RECEIVER
Override (initiated from controller)

Highest priority

Alarms
Manual switch (initiated from USI
laptop computer or from controller
front panel)

Lowest priority

Override (initiated from controller)

Highest priority

TRANSMITTER

CLA Switch
Alarms
Manual switch (initiated from USI
laptop computer or controller)

Lowest priority

Override (initiated from controller)

Highest priority

I/O

Alarms
CLA Switch
Manual switch (initiated from USI
laptop computer or controller).

Lowest priority

Parallel or serial receive/transmit alarms are activated by any module. Manual switching is
from the USI laptop computer local or far-end controls menu. Manual switchover cannot occur
from an alarm-free condition to the other side with an alarm. Alarms causing switchover are
as follows:

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RECEIVER ALARMS

TRANSMITTER ALARMS

I/O ALARMS

No report

No report

No report

Channel fail

PA power

DS1/E1 clock recovery

Radio frame

Common/loss

Input signal loss

Eye closure

Buffer spill

Radio errors

3.11.2.1 Low Speed Protection


Low speed (I/O) protection for the line interface array hardware is provided by redundant I/
O Interface modules. The on-line cards provide X/Y rail data to both cards. The controller
will select the set of modules with the fewest alarms.
Any of the following conditions constitutes an I/O failure in the multiplex direction.
Loss of MUX Signal Excessive zeroes have been detected.
MX Spill Elastic buffer overflow.
MUX Line Code Error B8ZS or AMI encoding error detected.
Loss of Clock Recovery Sync Clock cannot be recovered from incoming data.
Any of the following conditions constitutes an I/O failure in the demultiplex direction.
DX Spill Elastic buffer overflow.
Loss of Smooth clock A smooth clock cannot be recovered from incoming data.
Driver Failure The on-line driver signals do not match the output data.

3.11.2.2 High-Speed Protection


The high-speed portion of the system consists of the I/O interface, the receiver and transmitter
modules. One-for-one protection of the high-speed modules is available for hot-standby, space
diversity. or frequency diversity applications by adding a second set of modules.
3.11.3 Transmit Protection
In the transmit path, each I/O Interface generates digital baseband signals from the shared X/
Y rail data. The baseband output of each I/O interface module is fed to the corresponding A
and B transmitter and power amplifiers. In hot-standby transmitters, the RF data from each
power amplifier is fed to the RF switch where either A or B data is selected for transmission.
The controller selects which transmitter is on-line based on PA and common loss alarm indications. The relay switch control is provided by the B side Transmitter unit so that the switch
state is maintained when the controller is removed from the shelf. In frequency diversity
transmitters, both PA outputs are on-line at all times.

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3.11.4 Common Loss Alarm (CLA)


In hot-standby transmitter applications, the far-end receiver is used as a check for silent failures in the transmitter. The far-end controller sends periodic status messages to the transmit
end that contain information about which receiver is on line and its status. If the on-line
receiver has been out of frame continuously for 30 seconds, a transmit switch will occur. If the
receiver frame loss clears within 5 seconds of the switch, a common loss alarm will be latched
for the transmitter that was previously on-line. This alarm will only be cleared by a controller
reset, pressing the LAMPTEST switch on the front of the controller, or acknowledging the
alarm from the local status screen of the USI computer.
If the receive frame alarm does not clear, the problem is assumed to not be caused by the
transmitter. Switching will continue every 30 seconds until a receiver recovers but a common
loss alarm will not be latched. After every fifth transmit switch, the I/O will be switched.
3.11.5 Receive Path Protection
Errorless receive switching is provided for protected applications. This is accomplished in the
I/O interface modules by aligning the phase of the X/Y rail frames between the A and B-side
modules. An internal digital delay line is used to adjust the absolute delay of off-line receiver
to match the on-line receiver. When a switch command is received from the controller, the X/Y
clock and data drivers from the off-line receiver are turned on, causing the on-line drivers to
turn off (make before break). The switch is timed to occur when the clock and data signals are
stable so that no glitches are created. The X/Y rail data from the on-line receiver is fed to both
sets of demultiplex circuits.
The controller monitors each receiver for failures or degradations and selects the best one. The
following criteria are used (in order of priority):
I/O Prov Loss of communication to I/O Interface or configuration mismatch.
Radio frame The I/O Interface array has lost radio frame.
CRC error rate The radio CRC (parity) rate exceeds 1x10 -4.
AGC One side below and other above AGC (approx -65 dBm RSL). Switching can be disabled by provisioning.
Eye Closure user provisionable: 10-5, 10-6, 10-7, 10-8, or disabled.
3.11.6 DS1 Radio Receiver DADE
In order to provide errorless receiver switching, the receive A and B frames must be aligned.
This is done automatically by the off-line receiver. The off-line receiver compares the frame
sync from the on-line receiver with its own internal frame sync. The delay of an internal digital delay line is adjusted so that the sync phases match. The delay line has 12 step positions,
each step adding a delay of one period of the capacity key oscillator. The delay position of the
on-line receiver is set at a fixed position by the controller. The controller adjusts this position
so that the off-line receiver is not at the end of its delay line. A DADE alarm is generated if the
off-line receiver is at either end of the delay line.
The system differential delay may be caused by differences in antenna waveguide lengths. If
this difference is excessive, the DADE circuits may run out of range.

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Variations in counter phase relationships in the X/Y-I/Q MUX and DEMUX circuits may also
create differential delay or cause the delay to vary when the receiver lock is disturbed. These
variations are part of normal operation and do not affect the errorless switching performance.
3.11.7 Manual Switching
Manual switches are provided on the AE-37( ) Controller to manually switch the transmitters,
receivers, and I/O interface drivers. Under normal operation, the manual switches will be in
the AUTO position, which allows the switching decisions to be made by the controller based on
alarm information. In the transmit and receive directions, both data paths have equal priority.
This means that if either the A or B path is selected for transmission by the controller, it will
then remain selected until a path failure occurs. If the manual switches are set to A or B, the
controller will switch to the selected side if that side does not have a higher level of active
alarms. By simultaneously pressing the OVRD switch, the manual requests are latched and
switching will occur regardless of the alarm status. A switch will never be made to a nonequipped or non-powered side.
3.11.8 Automatic Transmit Power Control (ATPC)
Automatic Transmit Power Control (ATPC) is standard in the MDR-8000 radio, but a provisioning option allows the user to disable the function. When enabled, the user can select
between two modes of operation: ATPC for normal ATPC functions or ATPC T/O for ATPC
with timeout. The ATPC function allows the radio XMTR to operate at a level lower than maximum power output level during normal operating periods. A level detector in the associated
RCVR at the far end monitors RSL and when a failure is detected (includes fading) the RCVR
commands the associated XMTR to go to high power. Specific function details depend on the
mode of operation provisioned and/or the failure as follows:
Provisioning: ATPC or ATPC T/O
Normal Operation: ATPC tracks RCVR with highest RSL. XMTR output is 10 dB down
from maximum power out. Normally the A-side has the highest RSL (B-side RSL is 10 dB
down from A-side RSL).
If one RCVR fails: XMTR goes to high power for 10 seconds, once every minute, until
RCVR is restored.
If both RCVRs fail: XMTR goes to high power and stays there (until RCVRs are restored).
Provisioning : ATPC T/O (only)
If Command path fails: XMTR goes to high power for five minutes and then returns to low
power. Then, if command path has not been restored, once every hour the XMTR goes
high for 10 seconds and then returns to low power.
3.11.9 ALC Loop
The Automatic Level Control (ALC) loop automatically maintains the RF output level of the
fixed-gain PA by controlling the output level of the XMTR module. Refer to Automatic Level
Control (ALC) under Transmitter Subsystem Functional Description in this section for details.

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3.11.10 Provisioning
The AE-37( ) Controller uses a nonvolatile EEPROM to store configuration information
for the system. This information is displayed and modified in the provisioning screen of
the USI computer.
The controller periodically examines the status from each module to ensure concurrence
with the information stored in the EEPROM. If a mismatch is found, the OFF NORMAL
alarm is activated.
3.11.11 Remote Inventory
See Figure 3 - 68. The 256 X 8 bit EEPROM stores inventory information that is read by the
AE-37Y Controller over the I2C bus when the remote inventory function on the USI is initiated. Inventory data, including part number, software revision, serial number, and hardware
revision are stored in the non-volatile memory on each equipped module.
There is an I2C bus for the A-side modules (I2C A), B-side modules (I2C B), and ancillary modules (I2C C). Ancillary modules include the relay interface and controller modules.

DX35( )
I/O INTFC
A

UD35( )
XMTR
A

UD36( )
RCVR
A

UD51( )
PWR AMP
A

POWER
SUPPLY
A

UD36( )
RCVR
B

UD51( )
PWR AMP
B

POWER
SUPPLY
B

RELAY
INTFC
MODULE

I2C A
AE37( )
CONTROLLER

I2C C

I2C B

DX35( )
I/O INTFC
B

UD35( )
XMTR
B

MW21100051
060598

Figure 3 - 68 I2C Communications Function Block Diagram


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3.12
TMN SYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
See Figure 3 - 69 for a simplified block diagram showing Telecommunications Management
Network (TMN) overhead access in the MDR-8000. Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) data for transport is transferred to the radio controller via the parallel bus on the
backplane. The radio controller inserts the data into the provisioned service channel. The Service Channel controller inserts the data into the provisioned service channel. The Service
Channel 1 SC1) output of the controller at 256 kb/s (four 64 kb/s channels combined) is applied
to the XMT baseband (BB) circuits on the I/O interface module and output to the radio XMTR.
SC1 data from the RCV BB circuits on the I/O interface are applied to the TMN interface module where the SNMP data is extracted and applied to the radio controller via the parallel bus.

I/O INTERFACE

MCS-11/TMN

MCS-11/TMN
TRANSPORT

RADIO
CONTROLLER

PARALLEL BUS
TCP/IP

TMN INTFC
MODULE

LMW-8051F
07/21/05

Figure 3 - 69 TMN Overhead Access Simplified Functional Block Diagram


3.12.1 Radio Terminal Service Channel Signal Flow

3.12.1.1 West SC
See Figure 3 - 70. At a terminal, the west service channel interface at the I/O interface module consists of the WEST SC RCV DT and WEST SC CLKS (WEST SC 256K CLK, WEST SC
64K CLK, WEST SC 16K SYNC, WEST 8K SYNC, and WEST SC 2K SYNC) outputs. The
WEST SC XMT DT output is a single 256 kb/s multiplex signal that contains four 64 kb/s
channels. In the I/O interface, the service channel data (WEST SC RCV DT) is removed from
the radio frame overhead and is sent to the service channel muldem in the controller module. The WEST SC RCV DT is clocked into the controller by the WEST SC CLOCKS.

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3.12.1.2 East SC
At a terminal, the east service channel interface at the I/O interface consists of the EAST SC
XMT DT input and EAST SC CLKS (EAST SC 256K CLK, EAST SC 64K CLK, EAST SC 16K
SYNC, EAST SC 8K SYNC, and EAST SC 2K SYNC) outputs. The EAST SC XMT DT input
consists of fur 64 kb/s channels multiplexed into a single 256 kb/s signal. Overhead MUX circuitry in the I/O interface receives local insert-service channel data ( EAST SC XMT DT)
from the service channel muldem in the controller module. The EAST SC XMT DT is clocked
into the controller using the EAST SC CLOCKS (EAST SC 256K CLK, EAST SC 64K CLK,
EAST SC 16K SYNC, EAST SC 8K SYNC, and EAST SC 2K SYNC). In the I/O interface, the
service channel insert data (EAST SC XMT DT) is inserted into the radio frame overhead.

RACK 1 I/O INTFC


WEST RCV

WEST SC RCV DATA


WEST SC CLOCKS

EAST SC XMT DATA

EAST XMT
EAST SC CLOCKS

RACK 1

RACK 1
TMN
INTFC

CONTROLLER

PARALLEL
BUS

Figure 3 - 70 Terminal Service Channel Signal Flow


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3.12.2 Radio Repeater Service Channel Signal Flow

3.12.2.1 West SC
See Figure 3 - 71. The service channel interface rack 1 I/O interface consists of the WEST SC
XMT DATA and WEST SC XMT OFF HOOK inputs and WEST SC CLKS (WEST SC 256K
CLK and WEST SC 2K SYNC) outputs. The WEST SC XMT DATA input consists of four 64
kb/s channels multiplexed into a single 256 kb/s signal.
The rack 1 controller module and TMN interface module always receive WEST SC RCV
DATA and WEST SC RCV CLOCKS, regardless of the state of the WEST SC OFF HOOK SIGNAL from the controller. The WEST SC OFF HOOK signal from the controller controls only
the WEST SC RCV DATA output of the MUX to the repeater port.
When WEST SC XMT OFF HOOK is low, (no off hook from rack 1 controller) data received
over the RF path (WEST SC RCV DATA) is passed through the MUX and put on the repeater
cable to rack 2. When WEST SC SMT OFF HOOK is high (off hook), WEST SC RCV DATA is
clocked into the rack 1 controller by the WEST SC CLKS. The rack 1 controller multiplexes
the WEST SC RCV DATA with local insert-data and the combined signal is passed through
the MUX and put on the repeater cable to rack 2.

3.12.2.2 East SC
The service channel interface in rack 2 I/O interface consists of the EAST SC XMT DATA
and EAST SC XMT OFF HOOK inputs and EAST SC CLKS (EAST SC 256K CLK, EAST SC
64K CLK, EAST SC 16K SYNC, EAST SC 8K SYNC, and EAST C 2K SYNC) outputs, and
rack 1 data input via the RPTR cable. Each data (DT) input and output consists of four 64
kb/s channels multiplexed into a single 256 kb/s signal.
The rack 1 controller module and TMN interface module always receive EAST SC RCV
DATA and EAST SC RCV CLOCKS, regardless of the state of the EAST SC OFF HOOK signal from the controller. The EAST SC OFF HOOK signal from the controller controls only the
EAST SC RCV DATA output of the MUX to the RF port.
When EAST SC XMT OH is low (no off hook from rack 2 controller) data received over the
repeater cable by the frame in/frame out (FIFO) circuit (EAST SC RCV DT) is passed
through the MUX and inserted into the radio frame overhead. When EAST SC XMT OH is
high (off hook), EAST SC RCV DT is clocked into the rack 2 controller by the EAST SC CLKS.
The rack 2 controller multiplexes the EAST SC RCV DT with local insert-data and the combined signal (EAST SC XMT DT) is passed through the MUX and inserted into the radio
frame overhead.

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RACK 1 I/O INTFC


WEST RCV
WEST SC RCV DATA
WEST SC CLOCKS

RR RPTR CLK

TO
RACK 2

RR RPTR DATA

WEST SC XMT OFF HOOK


WEST SC XMT DATA

RT RPTR CLK

FIFO

FROM
RACK 2

RT RPTR DATA

EAST SC RCV DATA


EAST SC XMT DATA
EAST SC XMIT OFF HOOK

EAST XMT
EAST SC CLOCKS

RACK 1

RACK 1
TMN
INTFC

CONTROLLER

PARALLEL
BUS

Figure 3 - 71 Repeater Service Channel Signal Flow


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Operation

The SC XMT is always off hook and there is no direct through path in the radio. Packets are
either buffered through the TMN interface or dropped and reinserted using a forwarding
buffer in the radio controller.
See Figure 3 - 72 and Figure 3 - 73. The TMN Interface monitors the Service Channel for
packets. It also sends packets to the Radio Controller to be inserted into the Service Channel
via the TMN_E and TMN_W ports.

PR RPTR
DATA

RADIO I/O INTERFACE

TO/FROM
RACK 2

TO/FROM
RF
EAST SC XMT DATA
EAST SC XMT OFF HOOK

SOFTWARE
BUFFER

SOFTWARE
BUFFER

EAST SC RCV DATA

WEST SC RCV DATA

EAST SC RCV DATA

WEST SC RCV DATA

WEST SC XMT DATA

WEST SC XMT OFF HOOK

SW FLOW
CONTROL

SW FLOW
CONTROL

SOFTWARE
BUFFER

TMN_E

SOFTWARE
BUFFER

TMN_W

ETH
1-3

PPP

BRIDGE

RADIO CONTROLLER

TMN INTFC
LOCAL MCS-11
PORTS J307-J310

PARALLEL
BUS

LMW-9004F
10/26/05

Figure 3 - 72 East Transport Message Flow


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Functional Description Section

PR RPTR
DATA

RADIO I/O INTERFACE

TO/FROM
RACK 2

TO/FROM
RF
EAST SC XMT DATA

EAST SC XMT OFF HOOK

SOFTWARE
BUFFER

SOFTWARE
BUFFER

EAST SC RCV DATA

WEST SC RCV DATA

EAST SC RCV DATA

WEST SC RCV DATA

WEST SC XMT DATA

WEST SC XMT OFF HOOK

SW FLOW
CONTROL

SW FLOW
CONTROL

SOFTWARE
BUFFER

TMN_E

SOFTWARE
BUFFER

TMN_W

ETH
1-3

PPP

BRIDGE

RADIO CONTROLLER

TMN INTFC

LOCAL MCS-11
PORTS J307-J310

PARALLEL
BUS

Figure 3 - 73 West Transport Message Flow


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3.12.3 Packet Transport


See Figure 3 - 74 for a typical framing structure. The TMN Service Channel is operated in Full
Duplex mode. It transports MCS-11 packets and Ethernet IP packets wrapped in an HDLC
frame.

IP PAYLOAD

OPENING
FLAG
8 BITS
(7E)

ADDRESS
16 BITS

46-1500 BYTE IP PACKET

PROTOCOL SOURCE
CONTROL
OR DATA ADDRESS
8 BITS
8 BITS
16 BITS

74-200 BIT MCS-11 PACKET

CLOSING
FLAG
8 BITS
(7E)

PADDING TO
8N BITS

MCS-11 PAYLOAD

PAYLOAD
8N BITS

FRAME
CHECK
SEQUENCE
(CRC)
16 BITS

IN HDLC, THE LSB OF EACH OCTET IS TRANSMITTED FIRST, AND


THE MSB OF THE CRC IS TRANSMITTED FIRST.

LMW-8050F
01/12/03

Figure 3 - 74 Typical Framing Structure


3.12.4 External Alarm, Status, and Control Interface Options
Alarm capacity/availability for the MDR-8000 series radio is summarized as follows:
Office alarms Standard radio controller module relay outputs (Rack Alarm, Major, and
Minor Alarms). Customer must wire to appropriate pins on connector J305.
MCS-11 Standard provisioning option, enabling function on controller module. MCS-11 software is required but not supplied and must be installed on customers laptop. Except for
repeaters, customer must wire multiple radios to appropriate pins on connector J307, J308,
J309, J310, and/or J311 in accordance with the application requirements. Refer to MCS-11
functional description in this section and MCS-11 connections in the Interconnect section for
details. Customer must also dedicate (provision) one service channel to carry MCS-11 data.
The TSM-2500/8000 series (Transmission Status Monitor) are used to monitor and control the
MCS-11.
TBOS Standard provisioning option, enabling function on controller module. TBOS software
is required but not supplied and must be installed on customers laptop.
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SNMP Optional AE-37AA TMN Interface module and TMN software must be installed. Customer must also dedicate (provision) one service channel to carry the SNMP IP data (can be
carried on same service channel as MCS-11 data).
Relay Interface Optional AE-27A Relay Interface module must be installed. Customer must
wire foreign alarm interface to appropriate pins on connector J305. Refer to AE-27A Relay
Interface module functional description in this section and relay interface connections in the
Interconnect section for details.

3.12.4.1 Relay Interface


The AE-27( ) Relay Interface card provides SPST relays for alarm and status interface
between the radio and customer circuits. The relays can be provisioned normally open or
normally closed to ground. It also provides an additional 12 inputs for station alarm/status
monitoring. Alarm and status interface is provided by connector J305. See interconnect
drawing 3DH 03177-EJZZA in the Diagrams Section for connector pinout.

3.12.4.2 MCS-11 Monitor and Control System


Communication between the controller and the MCS-11 master station is based on a polling
and response sequence. Alarms, status, and controls for the MCS-11 system include station
summary alarms, detail alarms and status, and controls. The MCS-11 system uses a 2-level
polling/reporting feature.
Station summary alarm is the level-1 alarm, and is polled on an automatic basis. It is defined
as the remote station scanner (RSS) polling word. Detail alarms and status and controls are
level-2 alarms polled on a manual (demand) basis. They are defined as the remote detail scanner (RDS) polling word and the remote control decoder (RCD) polling word.
The reporting feature is also 2-level. Level-1 station and summary reporting response is on
an automatic basis and is defined as the remote substation data word (RSS). Level-2
detailed alarms and status, analog functions, and controls responses are on a manual
(demand) basis, and are defined as follows: the remote subsystem detail data word (RDS),
and the remote subsystem control data word (RCD).

3.12.4.3 Service Channels


See Figure 3 - 75 for typical service channel configurations. There are five functions of which
three may be provisioned for the three service channels. The controller inserts and drops the
provisioned function for each of the three service channels. Service channel 1 may use RS232-1, MCS, AUDIO 1 (orderwire), or AUDIO 2. Service channel 2 may use RS-232-2, MCS,
AUDIO 1 (orderwire), or AUDIO 2. Service channel 3 may use MCS, AUDIO 1 (orderwire), or
AUDIO 2. A function may only be used in one service channel at a time.

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AE37Y CONTROLLER

CSF

ADDR (A3A0)

R/WF

ECLK

DATA (D7D0)

CONTROLLER
CIRCUITS

J316
AUDIO 1 IN
AUDIO 1 OUT

SC 64K CLK E

J317

SC MRK E

AUDIO 2 IN

SC FRM E
AUDIO 2 OUT
AUDIO
INTERFACE
CIRCUITS

SC 64K CLK W
SC MRK W
SC FRM W

RCV SC DATA W
XMT SC DATA W

RCV DATA 2 E/W

XMT DATA 2 E/W

RCV DATA 1 E/W

HANDSET
(2WIRE)

J312
RS2321 IN

RCV SC DATA E
XMT SC DATA E

AUDIO
PORT 2
(4WIRE)
J301

HANDSET IN
HANDSET OUT

XMT DATA 1 E/W

DX35M( )
I/O
INTERFACE
A/B

AUDIO
PORT 1
(4WIRE)

RS2321
OSS
INTERFACE
CIRCUITS

RS2321 OUT
J313
RS2322 IN
RS2322
RS2322 OUT
MW21100371
051998

Figure 3 - 75 Typical Service Channel Configuration


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Functional Description Section

3.12.4.4 Audio Interface


The audio interface converts PCM data to audio for two separate channels. This is done for
both the radio and repeater data. Three-way bridging for each channel is provided to combine the radio and repeater audio with the local 4-wire audio. A 2-wire handset interface is
provided for the first channel along with DTMF signaling.
3.13
MONITOR AND CONTROL SUBSYSTEM MODULES
Modules are described to the functional block diagram level in the following paragraphs.
3.13.1 AE-37( ) Controller
See Figure 3 - 76 and Figure 3 - 77. The AE-37( ) Controller provides alarm collection, alarm
reporting, radio control, fault alarm and orderwire functions.
Provides two independent audio channels
Converts audio signals into 64 kb/s digital data
Converts 64 kb/s digital data into audio signals
Multiplexes and demultiplexes up to two 64 kb/s channels of audio PCM data
Provides 2-to-4-wire audio conversion
Provides RS-232 serial data communication port for USI computer interface
Provides one synchronous MCS-11 interface port
Provides one asynchronous MCS-11 interface port
Provides HDLC (16 kb/s) command path interface
The AE-37( ) performs these functions using three main circuits: controller circuit, Operation
Support System (OSS) circuit, and audio circuit. The circuit functions are described in the following paragraphs.

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AE37Y
CONTROLLER
A PWR SUPPLY ALM
REMOTE SHUTDOWN
CE16BB
PWR
SUPPLY

SERIAL CLK
C1C

SERIAL DATA

A+ BAT MON

LAMP TEST

A BAT MON

SERIAL SELECT 0B

A +10.5 V DC MON
A +12 V DC MON
A1

C1C

UD36AN
XMTR

SERIAL DATA TX
C1B

SERIAL CLK

A 12 V DC MON

SERIAL DATA RX

A 5 V DC MON

SERIAL TX/RX
A APC ENABLE
A APC CONTROL

B PWR SUPPLY ALM


REMOTE SHUTDOWN
CE16BB
PWR
SUPPLY

C1C

A4

A XMT ENABLE

B +BAT MON
B BAT MON
B +10.5 V DC MON
B +12 V DC MON

C1B

UD36AN
XMTR

B 12 V DC MON
B1

B 5 V DC MON
B APC ENABLE

UD51Z
PWR
AMP
A5

A PA RF PWR MON

B APC CONTROL

A PA RF PWR ALM

B XMT ENABLE

A HIGH LINEARITY BIAS


A PA PRESENT
B PA RF PWR MAN

UD51Z
PWR
AMP
B5

B4

C1C

A XMT ENABLE
A I/O ENABLE

B PA RF PWR ALM

DX35M
I/O
INTFC

A RCV ENABLE

B HIGH LINEARITY BIAS


B PA PRESENT

A XMT SC DATA E
A XMT SC OFF HOOK E
A XMT SC DATA W

A3

A XMT SC OFF HOOK W

MW21100141A
041598

Figure 3 - 76 Controller Interconnect Diagram (Sheet 1 of 4)


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Functional Description Section

AE37Y
CONTROLLER
DX35M
I/O
INTFC

A RSL MON
A AFC MON
UD35AN
RCVR

A EYE MON
A EYE ALM
A CH ALM

C1C

A OFF NORM
A RSL ALM
A2

B XMT ENABLE

A RX PRESENT

A3

B I/O ENABLE
B RCV ENABLE

B RSL MON
B AFC MON
UD35AN
RCVR

B EYE MON
B EYE ALM

UD35AN
RCVR

B CH ALM
B OFF NORM

C1C
A2

B RSL ALM
B2

B RX PRESENT

A XMTR PWR MON


UD36AN
XMTR

UD35AN
RCVR

A XMTR PWR ALM


A TX PRESENT

A4

B2

A XMT ON LINE
B XMTR PWR MON

UD36AN
XMTR

B XMTR PWR ALM

UD51Z
PWR AMP
A5

B TX PRESENT
B4

B XMT ONLINE

UD51Z
PWR AMP
B5

UD51Z
PWR AMP
A5
UD51Z
PWR AMP
B5

MW21100141B
041598
D

Figure 3 - 76 AE-37( ) Controller Interconnect Diagram (Sheet 2 of 4)


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AE37Y
CONTROLLER

J307

MCS11
2

Issue 3
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J307

2 RTN CLK+

2 RCV CLK+

2 RTN CLK

2 RCV CLK

2 XMT DATA+

2 RCV DATA+

2 XMT DATA

2 RCV DATA
C1A

MCS11
2

C1A

J310

MCS11
3

J310
3 RTN CLK+

3 RCV CLK+

3 RTN CLK

3 RCV CLK

3 XMT DATA+

3 RCV DATA+

3 XMT DATA

3 RCV DATA

CALL COMMON

P1 AUDIO OUT T

MCS11
3

J316

J316
CALL DETECT
P1 ELEAD

AUDIO
1

P1 AUDIO IN R

C1B

P1 AUDIO OUT R

AUDIO
1

P1 MLEAD

C1B

P1 AUDIO IN T
J318
J318

P1 LMC RCV+
P1 LMC XMT+

P1 LMC RCV

P1 LMC XMT
LMC

J315

P2 LMC XMT+

C1A

C1A

P2 LMC XMT

P2 LMC RCV

P2 AUDIO IN T

P2 AUDIO OUT T

P2 AUDIO IN R

P2 AUDIO OUT R

P2 ELEAD

P2 MLEAD

P3 AUDIO IN T

P3 AUDIO OUT T

P3 AUDIO IN R
P3 ELEAD OR RS232 P3 XMT DATA

C1B

C1B

RS232/
AUDIO
3

P3 AUDIO OUT R
P3 MLEAD OR RS232 P3 RCV DATA

J312

J313
RS232/
AUDIO
4

AUDIO
2

J312

J312
RS232/
AUDIO
3

LMC

J317

J317
AUDIO
2

J315

P2 LMC RCV+

P4 AUDIO IN T

P4 AUDIO OUT T

P4 AUDIO IN R

P4 AUDIO OUT R

P4 ELEAD OR RS232 P4 XMT DATA

P4 MLEAD OR RS232 P4 RCV DATA

RS232/
AUDIO
3

MW21100141D
041698

Figure 3 - 76 AE-37( ) Controller Interconnect Diagram (Sheet 3 of 4)


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Functional Description Section

D
AE37Y
CONTROLLER

DX35M
I/O
INTFC

SERIAL DATA TX
B3

AE27AF
RELAY
INTFC

RCV SC DATA E
SC 256k CLK E
SERIAL DATA TX
D0D7

RCV SC DATA E
DX35M
I/O
INTFC

SC 256k CLK E

C1B
AUX CSF

SC 64k CLK E

TBOS XMTOR 13 STATION ALM

SC 16k CLK E

TBOS XMT+OR 14 STATION ALM

SC MARK E

C2

TBOS RCVOR 15 STATION ALM

SC FRAME E

TBOS RCV+OR 16 STATION ALM

A3
RCV SC DATA W
SC 256k CLK W

J305

SC 64k CLK W
SC 16k CLK W
SC MARK E
RACK ALARM

SC FRAME E
C1A

AUDIBLE/MAJOR ALM
C1C

VISUAL/MINOR ALM
RACK ALM RTN

DX35M
I/O
INTFC
B3

J308

J308
1 XMT CLK+

1 RCV CLK+

1 XMT CLK

1 RCV CLK

1 XMT DATA+
MCS11
1

1 XMT DATA

1 RCV DATA+
C1A

1 RCV DATA

MCS11
1

1 OFF HOOK+
1 OFF HOOK

1 CLK OUT+
1 CLK OUT

J308
J309

MW21100141C
041598

Figure 3 - 76 AE-37( ) Controller Interconnect Diagram (Sheet 4 of 4)


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C1A

P1 LMC XMT +/
P1 LMC RCV +/
P2 LMC XMT +/
P2 LMC RCV +/

XMT SC DT E
XMT SC OH E
RCV SC DT E
SC 256K CK E
SC 64K CK E
SC 16K CK E
SC MRK E
SC FRM E

XMT SC DT W
XMT SC OH W
RCV SC DT W
SC 256K CK W
SC 64K CK W
SC 16K CK W
SC MRK W
SC FRM W

A3
I/O INTFC
P102

C1A

LMC
J318
J315

P2 RCV CLK +/
P2 RCV DATA +/
P2 RTN CLK +/
P2 XMT DATA +/

J307
MCS11
2

P3 RCV CLK +/
P3 RCV DATA +/
P3 RTN CLK +/
P3 XMT DATA +/

J310
MCS11
3

OFFHOOK +/
RCV CLK +/
RCV DATA +/
XMT CLK +/
XMT DATA +/
CLK OUT +/

OSS
INTERFACE
CKTS

J308
MCS11
1

XMT DATA +/
XMT CLK +/
RCV DATA +/
RCV CLK +/
OFFHOOK +/

C1C
SERIAL CLK
SER CLK TERM
SER DATA A

J309
MCS11

TXD 1
RXD 1

J312
RS232/
AUDIO 3

TXD 2
RXD 2

J313
RS232/
AUDIO 4

SER EN A
SER SEL 0
SER SEL 1
SER SEL 2
I/O IRQ A

OSS CSF

I/O EN B
RCV EN B
XMT EN B
LAMP TEST

RX DATA
DCD
TX DATA

IRQ

J301
USI

APC EN A
APC CTRL A
XMT PWR MON
XMT PWR ALM

A4
XMTR

RSL MON A
APC MON A
EYE MON A
EYE ALM A
CH ALM A
OFF NORM A
RSL ALM A
RX PRESENT

A2
RCVR

C1C
B4 XMTR
B2 RCVR
C1A
A3
I/O INTFC
P102

XMT INS 1/2


XMT DATA1 E/W
RCV DATA1 E/W
XMT DATA2 E/W
RCV DATA2 E/W

PROCESSOR BUS
I/O A CSF
I/O B CSF
DATA
ADDRESS
DSF
R/WF

CONTROLLER
CKTS

AUDIO CSF
HANDSET IN
HANDSET OUT

J23
TEL
C1A

AUDIO
INTERFACE
CKTS

AUDIO 1 IN T/R
MLEAD 1
ELEAD 1
AUDIO 1 OUT T/R
CALL DETECT
COMMON CALL

J316
AUDIO 1

AUDIO 2 IN T/R
MLEAD 2
ELEAD 2
AUDIO 2 OUT T/R

J317
AUDIO 2
MW21100071
041498

Figure 3 - 77 AE-37( ) Controller Functional Block Diagram


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Functional Description Section

3.13.1.1 Controller Circuit Functions


See Figure 3 - 78. The controller circuits manage command path communications, status and
alarm interfaces, and switching. The microprocessor collects and distributes switching and
alarm information and provides/processes the serial link to the farend controller, the A- and Bside serial communications, the ATPC commands, and the analog status voltages. The microprocessor reads the remaining analog status voltages, communicates between the USI laptop
computer, and services the fault interface, relay interface, and station control/monitor circuit
functions. Farend input/output functions interface through the farend 16 kb/s low-speed data
stream between the controller and DX-35( ) I/O Interface. The local 16 kb/s command path is
the back-to-back repeater-to-controller interface in adjacent racks.
3.13.1.1.1 MC68360 Microprocessor
The MC68360 is a one chip integrated microprocessor and peripheral combination with general purpose timers, two serial I/O subsystems, programmable chip selects, a watchdog
timer, and test and debug support.
3.13.1.1.2 Memory
Program memory is 256k x 32-bit flash EPROM. Variables are stored in 128k x 32-bit RAM.
Provisioning information is stored in a 8 kbyte EEPROM. The provisioning information in
the EEPROM is protected by a low voltage detector that resets the microprocessor whenever
a low voltage condition is detected on the +5 V power supply.
3.13.1.1.3 Switch Control
The switch control function monitors and displays system alarms and switches between the
A- and B-sides of the radio on hot-standby protected systems. All system alarms for the Aand B-sides of the radio are displayed on the USI laptop computer and/or receiver and transmitter fail alarms are displayed on the I/O interface.
Transmit, receive, and I/O enable outputs for both the A and B side are provided to software
and can be overridden by hardware via the front panel switches. For example, selecting the
RCV A and OVRD sets the RCV ENABLE A bit and resets the RCV ENABLE B bit. Logic is
in place that will not allow both receivers or both I/O sections to be placed on line at the
same time. The driving of an enable bit is under the control of software except when an override of that function is requested.
3.13.1.1.4 USI
See Figure 3 - 78, Sheet 2. Communication to the User System Interface (USI) is via controller front panel connector J301 and the Serial Communications Interface (SCI), internal to
the MC68360 peripheral section.

3.13.1.2 Operation Support System (OSS) Circuit


See Figure 3 - 78. The OSS circuit provides serial communication port interfaces to the system controller and interfaces with the I/O interface module to multiplex and demultiplex
the service channel data. It provides two synchronous 64 kb/s MCS interfaces (one for the
radio path and one between repeaters) and one asynchronous interface for local drop and
insert. It provides multiplexing and demultiplexing for up to two 64 kb/s of audio PCM
data. It also provides a 16 kb/s interface for controller command path data over the radio

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path and between repeaters. The OSS circuits consist of two service channel muldems,
address and register data busses, serial communication ports, and RS-232 ports.
3.13.1.2.1 Front Panel Controls and Indicators
See Figure 3 - 78 Sheet 1. Twenty two LEDs and four switches are mounted on the front
panel. Fifteen front panel LEDs light/flash to indicate status of controller/system. One
alarm LED lights to indicate controller failure and one LED lights to indicate a shelf alarm.
The LEDs are controlled/driven by the Enhanced Serial Communication Controller (ESCC).
Refer to the Operations section for control and indicator details.
3.13.1.2.2 SPI Bus
See Figure 3 - 78 Sheet 2. The Serial Processor Interface (SPI) bus interfaces the MC68360
peripheral section with the EPLD that controls bus operations. Serial data is transmitted to
and received from the MDR-8000 modules via the SPI bus. The SPI bus is controlled by the
SER TX/RX and SERIAL SELECT 0-3 outputs of the transceiver. The SER TX/RX logic
determines the mode of operation. The SERIAL SELECT 0-3 lines select the module. The
SPI CLK clocks the SERIAL SELECT 0-3 into the transceiver.
3.13.1.2.3 I2C Bus
The I2C bus consists of one bidirectional data line and a clock. Serial data received over the
I2C bus includes part numbers and revision history (all modules and the backplane) and
also capacity key information and crystal frequency from the transmitter and receiver.
3.13.1.2.4 Register Data Bus
See Figure 3 - 78 Sheet 4. The register data bus interfaces the MC68360 processor with the
peripherals and other controller circuits, the OSS circuits, and the audio circuits. Individual
chips are addressed via the address bus and enabled by the chip select lines (CS0 - CS6).
Three I2C master bus controllers interface the I2C bus with all MDR-8000 modules.
Analog-to-digital converters interface the register data bus and analog signals from the MDR8000 modules. The analog signals consists of voltages from the power supplies (+10.5, +12, 12 and -5 Vdc) , RF power monitor voltage (PA RF PWR MON) from the power amplifiers (if
equipped), RF power monitor voltage (XMT PWR MON) from the transmitter modules, and
receive level monitor voltage (RSL MON), AFC voltage (AFC MON), and a voltage representative of the signal quality (EYE MON) from the receivers.
Transceivers interface the register data bus and digital alarm and status data from the
MDR-8000 modules. Configuration status signals (TX PRESENT, RX PRESENT, and PA
PRESENT) are used to inform the processor of current configuration which is then used by
the processor logic to control functions, such as switching and the transmit ALC loop.
Alarms applied to the register data bus include PA power supply (PA PS) alarm and PA
power alarm (PA PWR ALM) from the power amplifiers (if equipped), combiner alarm
(COMBINER ALM, if equipped with combiner), XMT PWR ALM from transmitter modules,
power supply alarm (PS ALM) from power supplies, and channel fail alarm (CH FAIL), EYE
CLOSURE, and RSL alarms from the receiver modules. Refer to functional description of
relay interface module in this section for alarm descriptions.
A digital-to-analog converter for each side of the radio sends a dc voltage ( ATPC CONTROL)
to the A and B power amplifier.
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Functional Description Section

3.13.1.2.5 Power Amplifier Control Circuits


See Figure 3 - 78 Sheet 2. The EPLD controls operating power to the power amplifiers and
high biases the power amplifiers during high power operation when increased linearity is
required. The EPLD sends a REMOTE KILL PWR signal through a TTL switch ( KILL 10.5 V
TO PA) that disables the 10.5 volt output of the power supplies to the power amplifiers. The
HIGH LINEARITY BIAS signal high biases the power amplifiers.
3.13.1.2.6 MCS-11 Interface
See Figure 3 - 78 Sheet 1. When MCS is properly provisioned, four ports on the EPLD and
microprocessor on the controller module are enabled, allowing the user to interface external
MCS-11 Monitor and Control System equipment at four connectors on the backplane (J307,
J308, J309, and J310). Two connectors (J308 and J309) are synchronous, parallel, data ports
and provide CLK outputs. Connectors J307 and J310 are asynchronous ports.
For proper operation, MCS-11 must be provisioned using the following guidelines:
a. MCS-11 must be selected as one of the service channels.
b. MCS must be assigned a valid address.
c. MCS RSS must be ON to allow controller to respond when polled.

Note
MCS-11 must be provisioned MCS-11 J310 Master/Junction to enable
XMT, RCV, and OUTPUT clocks. If an external modem is being used, provision MCS-11 for MCS-11 J310 Modem. This selection disables XMT, RCV,
and OUTPUT clocks and all MCS-11 clocks must now be provided by the
external modem.
d. MCS-11 J310 Master/Junction must be selected unless an external modem is connected to
the radio. If an external modem is used it must provide all MCS-11 clocks and the radio
must be provisioned MCS-11 J310 Modem.

Note
When provisioned J308 Input Clock, J308 and J309 RCV CLK and XMT
CLK and J308 OUTPUT CLK are disabled. Select J308 Output Clock to send a
64 kb/s clock to external equipment (OUTPUT CLK J308-4/12) and also
enable RCV CLK and XMT CLK.
e. MCS-11 J308 Output Clock must be selected unless an external clock source is provided that
will supply all MCS-11 clocks. If an external clock source is used, the radio must be provisioned MCS-11 J308 Input Clock.

3-150

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Functional Description Section

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Figure 3 - 78 Controller/OSS Circuits Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 1 of 4)


3-151

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Functional Description Section

CIC
RACK ALM RLY
P/O
ESCC

RACK
ALM
RELAY

RACK ALM
VISUAL
RACK
ALM VISUAL
RELAY RACK ALM

VISUAL ALM RLY


AUDIBLE ALM RLY

AUDIBLE
RACK
ALM
RELAY

J305

AUDIBLE RACK ALM


CIB

TBOS RCV +
XCVR
C1A
J305

TBOS
XMT +
TBOS TBOS
RELAY XMT -

J301
USI RXD
TBOS
TX

P2 LMC
RCV +
LMC
RX

LMC P2 LMC
RELAY RCV -

J318
LMC 2 RELAY
P2 LMC XMT +
XCVR

LMC
TX

USI
COMPUTER
CONNECTOR

USI DCD

XCVR

P2 LMC XMT -

J305

TBOS RCV -

MC68360
PERIPHERAL
SECTION

USI TXD

SPI TX EN
CIC

SPI TX
A DATA
SPI EN A F

SPI EN A

SPI EN B F

SPI RX
A DATA

SPI CLK

SPI EN B

SPI TX
EN F

SPI TX
B DATA
SPI RX
B DATA

A SERIAL
DATA TX
A SERIAL
DATA RX
XCVR
B SERIAL
DATA TX
B SERIAL
DATA RX

SERIAL
TX/RX

SPI
BUS
TO/
FROM
ALL
MODS

SERIAL
CLK A

SPI CLK 0
SPI SEL 0-3

XCVR SERIAL
CLK B
SERIAL
SEL 0-3

P/O A REM KILL PWR


EPLD

TTL
SWITCH

A KILL 10.5 V TO PA

B REM KILL PWR

TTL
SWITCH

B KILL 10.5 V TO PA
TO
A/B
PWR
AMP

TTL
A HIGH LINEARITY BIAS
CONTROL
CKT
TTL
B HIGH LINEARITY BIAS
CONTROL
CKT

MW211-0051-1B-F
02/04/04

Figure 3 - 78 Controller/OSS Circuits Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 2 of 4)


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Functional Description Section

C1A

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

SC 256k CLK W
RCV SC DATA W

FROM
I/O
INTFC

RADIO COMM 1 RCV

P/O
ESSC

RADIO MCS RCV F

P/O
EPLD

SC 2k FRM W
SC 16k CLK W
SC TDATA 1 W

P/O
BUFFER

SC TDATA 2 W

EPLD
W
SC MLDM

RPTR MCS XMT

P/O
ESCC

RPTR MCS INSERT

RX D1
TX D1

RX D2
TX D2

RPTR COMM 1 XMT


SC CH 1 SEL I/O
SC CH 2 SEL I/O
SC CH 3 SEL I/O
RS232 BRIDGE EN
FORCE CH 3 O/H
XMT O/H 1
XMT O/H 2

C1A

C1A

XMT
SC DATA W

XMT SC DATA W

XMT
CH O/H W
SC
RDATA 1 W
SC 64k CLK E
SC MRK E

SC
RDATA 2 W

SC 64k CLK W

SC 64k CLK E

SC MRK W

SC 8k CLK E

FROM
I/O
INTFC

XCVR

SC 64k CLK W

P/O
EPLD

SC
RDATA 2 E
XMT
SC DATA E

RCV DATA 2 W

C1A
P/O
BUFFER

XMT SC DATA E

C1B

RX D1
RADIO MCS XMT
RADIO MCS INSERT

RX RS2321
TX RS2321

RS232
CONV

TX D2

RX RS2322

RADIO COMM 1 XMT

SC 256k CLK E

FROM
I/O
INTFC

SC TDATA 2 E

A
RPTR COMM 1 RCV
16k CLK E

C1A

J313

TX RS2322

SC TDATA 1 E

P/O
BUFFER

TO
I/O
INTFC

XMT SC O/H E

XMT
CH O/H E

EPLD
TX D1
E
SC MLDM RX D2

TO
AUDIO
CIRCUITS

RCV DATA 2 E

SC
RDATA 1 E

P/O
ESCC

RCV DATA 1 E
RCV DATA 1 W

SC 8k CLK W

P CLK

TO
I/O
INTFC

P/O
BUFFER XMT SC O/H W

64 k CLK E

P/O
ESSC

RCV SC DATA E
SC 2k FRM E
SC 16k CLK E

RPTR MCS RCV F

P/O
EPLD

MW21100511C
060398

Figure 3 - 78 Controller/OSS Circuits Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 3 of 4)


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Functional Description Section

REG DATA BUS

C1A
FROM A
A PA RF PWR MON
PWR AMP A5

+12 V A

A RSL MON

FROM A
RCVR A2

FROM A
RCVR A2
FROM B
PWR AMP B5

A AFC MON

A/D
CONV

+5 V A

A/D
CONV

A XMT PWR MON

+BATT A

A EYE MON

BATT A

A/D WRF
FROM
EPLD
B PA RF PWR MON

A/D WRF

FROM
EPLD
+12 V B
10.5 V B

B AFC MON

A/D
CONV

B APC

FROM B
XMTR B4

+5 V B

A/D
CONV

+BATT B

FROM B
RCVR B2
FROM A
XMTR A4

B EYE MON

BATT B

FROM A
RCVR A2

A RX PRESENT

A XMT PWR ALM

XCVR

A OFF NORMAL

FROM B
RCVR B2

B RX PRESENT

PS A ALM

EYE CLOSURE A

FROM
EPLD
PA PS B

XCVR

B PA PWR ALM
B XMT PWR ALM

XCVR

B SERIAL CLK

FROM A XMTR A4
FROM A PWR SPLY A1
FROM A RCVR A2

PS B ALM

FROM B PWR AMP B5


FROM B XMTR B4
FROM B PWR SPLY B1

CH FAIL B

SERIAL/
PARALLEL
CONV

SERIAL/
PARALLEL
CONV

FROM B PWR SPLY B1

COMBINER ALM B

B OFF NORMAL

B SERIAL DATA

FROM A PWR AMP A5

ALM RDF

B PA TEMP NORMAL

A SERIAL CLK

FROM A PWR SPLY A1

A RSL

B PA PRESENT

A SERIAL DATA

C1C

CH FAIL A

MDL PRES RDF

B TX PRESENT

P/O
MC68360
PRCSR

A PA PWR ALM

XCVR

A PA TEMP NORMAL

FROM B
XMTR B4

P/O
EPLD

COMBINER ALM A

A PA PRESENT

FROM
EPLD

FROM B
PWR AMP
B5
FROM B
RCVR B2

PA PS A

A TX PRESENT

FROM B
PWR SPLY
B1

12 V B

B XMT PWR MON

FROM A
PWR AMP
A5
FROM A
RCVR A2

FROM A
PWR SPLY
A1

12 V A

B RSL MON

FROM B
RCVR B2

TO/FROM
AUDIO
CIRCUITS

10.5 V A

A APC

FROM A
XMTR A4

C1B

EYE CLOSURE B

FROM B RCVR B2

B RSL

D/A
CONV

A APC CONTROL

APC WRF

TO A XMTR A4

FROM
EPLD

I2C CSF
R/W F

D/A
CONV

B APC CONTROL

TO B XMTR B4

ADDRESS BUS
REG DATA BUS

MW21100511D
060398

Figure 3 - 78 Controller/OSS Circuits Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 4 of 4)


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Functional Description Section

3.13.1.2.6.1

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Port 1

Note
Applicable signal lines, functions, and components are highlighted on the
block diagram. Associated signal lines, functions, and components are
faded.
See Figure 3 - 79. The EAST CLK is used to clock RCV data out of the microprocessor,
through the EPLD, and to the east SC muldem. The WEST CLK is used to clock XMT data
from the west SC muldem into the microprocessor.

EPLD

PROCESSOR

CLK EAST

XMT CLK

CLK WEST

RCV CLK

EAST
OFF HOOK

SC
MULDEM
CLK
DET

CLK EAST DETECT

CLK
DET
RCV DATA

XMT DATA

LMW-5036-SM
02/04/04

WEST
SC
MULDEM

Figure 3 - 79 MCS-11 Port 1 Clocks Signal Flow


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3.13.1.2.6.2

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

Port 2

Note
Applicable signal lines, functions, and components are highlighted on the
block diagram. Associated signal lines, functions, and components are
faded.
See Figure 3 - 80 and Figure 3 - 81. Port 2 interfaces connector J307 at a terminal or the east
and west service channel muldems at a repeater. The interface is controlled by software
switching in the EPLD that switches XMT/RCV clock and data to/from the microprocessor.

Note
MCS-11 must be provisioned MCS-11 J310 Master/Junction to enable
XMT, RCV, and OUTPUT clocks. If an external modem is being used, provision MCS-11 for MCS-11 J310 Modem. This selection disables XMT, RCV,
and OUTPUT clocks and all MCS-11 clocks must now be provided by the
external modem.
3.13.1.2.6.3

Terminal

See Figure 3 - 80. When provisioned as a terminal, the EPLD switches to position 1. XMT
DATA at J307 is switched to the EPLD output and clocked into the microprocessor using
CLK EAST output of the east SC muldem. RCV DATA is clocked out of the microprocessor
by the RTN CLK and is switched through position 1 of the EPLD switch to J307.
3.13.1.2.6.4

Repeater

See Figure 3 - 81. When provisioned as a repeater, the EPLD switches to position 2. XMT
DATA is switched to the EPLD output and clocked into the microprocessor using CLK
WEST output of the west SC muldem. RCV DATA is clocked out of the microprocessor by the
CLK EAST output of the east SC muldem and is switched through position 2 of the EPLD
switch to the west SC muldem.

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Issue 3
July 23, 2007

J307
XMT DAT +
XMT DAT RCV DAT +
RCV DAT RTN CLK +
RTN CLK RCV CLK +
RCV CLK -

ELPD

5
XMT DATA

PROCESSOR
1

13
2
1

2
RCV DATA

10
4
RTN CLK

12
1
RCV CLK

CLK
DET
CLK
DET

RTN CLK DET

CLK
DET

CLK WEST
1

CLK EAST
2

WEST
SC
MULDEM

RPTR INS DATA


CLK
DET

LMW-5037-SM
02/04/04

CLK WEST DETECT


RCV DATA
XMT DATA

EAST
SC
MULDEM

Figure 3 - 80 MCS-11 Port 2 Clocks Signal Flow, Terminal Configuration


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Functional Description Section

J307
XMT DAT +
XMT DAT RCV DAT +
RCV DAT RTN CLK +
RTN CLK RCV CLK +
RCV CLK -

ELPD

PROCESSOR

XMT DATA

13
2

RCV DATA
2

10
4
RTN CLK

12
1
RCV CLK

CLK
DET
CLK
DET

RTN CLK DET

CLK
DET

CLK WEST
1

CLK EAST
2

WEST
SC
MULDEM

RPTR INS DATA

CLK
DET

CLK WEST DETECT


RCV DATA
XMT DATA

EAST
SC
MULDEM

Figure 3 - 81 MCS-11 Port 2 Clocks Signal Flow, Repeater Configuration


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02/04/04

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

3.13.1.2.6.5

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Port 3

Note
Applicable signal lines, functions, and components are highlighted on the
block diagram. Associated signal lines, functions, and components are
faded.
See Figure 3 - 82, Figure 3 - 83, and Figure 3 - 84. Port 3 XMT data is clocked into the microprocessor by the return clock (RTN CLK). The RTN CLK is generated by an external source
in response to the external equipment receiving the RCV CLK (J310-1/9). The RCV CLK
driver is enabled by the RCV ENABLE signal from the TX/RXF select control in the EPLD.
Port 3 RCV data is clocked out of the microprocessor by one of three clocks; RTN CLK (same
clock used by Port 3 XMT), RCV CLK, or CLK EAST.
3.13.1.2.6.6

Return Clock

See Figure 3 - 82.When the RTN CLK (J310-4/12) is detected, it is switched through position
3 of the EPLD switch to the microprocessor.
3.13.1.2.6.7

RCV Clock

See Figure 3 - 83. When the RCV CLK is used as an input, the XMT CLK driver (J310-1/9) is
turned on by the XMT ENABLE signal from the TX/RXF select control in the EPLD. When
the XMT CLK is detected, it is switched through position 1 of the EPLD switch to the microprocessor.
3.13.1.2.6.8

Clock East

See Figure 3 - 84.When CLK EAST from the east SC muldem is detected, it is switched
through position 2 of the EPLD switch to the microprocessor.

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Functional Description Section

J310

EPLD

XMT DAT -

XMT DATA

13
2

RCV DAT +
RCV DAT -

RCV DATA

10
4

RTN CLK +
RTN CLK -

PROCESSOR

XMT DAT +

RTN CLK

12
CLK
DET

RCV CLK +

RTN CLK DETECT

XMT CLK

MCS3
RTN
CLK
DET

9
RCV CLK -

XMT/RCV ENABLE

TX/RXF
SELECT

3
2

RCV CLK

XMT CLK -

CLK
DET

XMT CLK +

CLK DETECT

CLK
DET

11
64K CLK

CLK EAST

EAST
SC
MULDEM

CLK
DET

CLK EAST DETECT

CLK
DET

LMW-5040F
02/04/04

Figure 3 - 82 MCS-11 Port 3 Return Clock Signal Flow


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Issue 3
July 23, 2007

J310
XMT DAT +
XMT DAT RCV DAT +
RCV DAT RTN CLK +
RTN CLK RCV CLK +

EPLD
XMT DATA

13
2
RCV DATA

10
4
RTN CLK

12
CLK
DET

RTN CLK DETECT

XMT CLK

RTN
CLK
DET

1
3

9
RCV CLK -

PROCESSOR

XMT/RCV ENABLE

TX/RXF
SELECT

RCV CLK

CLK
DET

CLK DETECT

CLK
DET

CLK EAST

CLK
DET

CLK EAST DETECT

CLK
DET

EAST
SC
MULDEM

LMW-5039F
02/04/04

Figure 3 - 83 MCS-11 Port 3 RCV Clock Signal Flow


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Functional Description Section

J310

EPLD

XMT DAT +
XMT DAT RCV DAT +
RCV DAT RTN CLK +
RTN CLK RCV CLK +

XMT DATA

13
2
RCV DATA

10
4
RTN CLK

12
CLK
DET

RTN CLK DETECT

XMT CLK

RTN
CLK
DET

1
3

9
RCV CLK -

PROCESSOR

XMT/RCV ENABLE

TX/RXF
SELECT

RCV CLK

CLK
DET

CLK DETECT

CLK
DET

CLK EAST

CLK
DET

CLK EAST DETECT

CLK
DET

EAST
SC
MULDEM

LMW-5041F
02/04/04

Figure 3 - 84 MCS-11 Port 3 Clock East Signal Flow

Note
Applicable signal lines, functions, and components are highlighted on the
block diagram. Associated signal lines, functions, and components are
faded.

Note
Only one connector on an asynchronous port can be used at a time. J308 and
J309 can not be used simultaneously in the same shelf.

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Functional Description Section

3.13.1.2.6.9

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Port 4

See Figure 3 - 85, Figure 3 - 86, and Figure 3 - 87. Port 4 RCV data is clocked out of the microprocessor by CLK EAST. Port 4 XMT data is clocked into the microprocessor by either of two
clocks; CLK EAST or CLK WEST. The XMT CLK and RCV CLK are bi-directional. Direction
is determined by bidirectional XCVRs. The bi-directional XCVR is controlled by the switch
control logic on the EPLD.
3.13.1.2.6.10 Clock East
See Figure 3 - 85. When CLK EAST from the east SC muldem is detected, it is switched
through position 1 of the EPLD switch to the microprocessor and J308 and J309 output drivers as follows:

SIGNAL NAME

DESTINATION

XMT CLK

MICROPROCESSOR
J308-3/11
J309-3/11

RCV CLK

MICROPROCESSOR
J308-1/9
J309-1/9

Note
When provisioned J308 Input Clock, J308 and J309 RCV CLK and XMT
CLK and J308 OUTPUT CLK are disabled. Select J308 Output Clock to
send a 64 kb/s clock to external equipment (OUTPUT CLK J308-4/12) and
also enable RCV CLK and XMT CLK.
When provisioned J308 CLK OUT ENABLE, CLK EAST also drives the output driver for
CLK OUT (J308-4/12).
3.13.1.2.6.11 Clock West
See Figure 3 - 86. When CLK WEST from the west SC muldem is detected, it is switched
through position 2 of the EPLD switch to the microprocessor and to the XMT CLK driver
(J308-3/11 and J309-3/11).

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BI-DIRECTIONAL
XCVRS

J309
XMT CLK +
XMT CLK RCV CLK +
RCV CLK RCV DAT +
RCV DAT XMT DAT +
XMT DAT OFF HK +
OFF HK -

3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

EPLD

XMT CLK

PROCESSOR

11
1

RCV CLK
9
2

RCV DATA
10
5

XMT DATA
13
6

OFF HK
14

J308
XMT CLK +
XMT CLK RCV CLK +
RCV CLK CLK OUT +
CLK OUT RCV DAT +
RCV DAT XMT DAT +

3
11
1

J308 CLK OUT


ENABLE/DISABLE
IS PROVISIONABLE

CLK OUT ENABLE/DISABLE

CLK
OUT
EN

12
2

CLK EAST

10

CLK
DET

CLK
DET

13

XMT DAT OFF HK +


OFF HK -

6
14

EAST
SC
MULDEM

CLK WEST
CLK
DET

CLK
DET

WEST
SC
MULDEM

LMW-5043F
05/19/04

Figure 3 - 85 MCS-11 Port 4 Clock East Signal Flow


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Functional Description Section

BI-DIRECTIONAL
XCVRS

J309
XMT CLK +
XMT CLK RCV CLK +
RCV CLK RCV DAT +
RCV DAT XMT DAT +
XMT DAT OFF HK +
OFF HK -

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

EPLD

XMT CLK

PROCESSOR

11
1

RCV CLK
9
2

RCV DATA
10
5

XMT DATA
13
6

OFF H00K
14

J308
XMT CLK +
XMT CLK RCV CLK +
RCV CLK CLK OUT +
CLK OUT RCV DAT +
RCV DAT XMT DAT +

3
11
1

J308 CLK OUT


ENABLE/DISABLE
IS PROVISIONABLE

CLK OUT ENABLE/DISABLE

CLK
OUT
EN

12
2

CLK EAST
10

CLK
DET

CLK
DET

13

XMT DAT OFF HK +


OFF HK -

6
14

EAST
SC
MULDEM

CLK WEST
CLK
DET

CLK
DET

WEST
SC
MULDEM

LMW-5042-F
05/19/04

Figure 3 - 86 MCS-11 Port 4 Clock West Signal Flow


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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

EPLD
CLK DIR CTRL

PROCESSOR

MASTER/SLAVE

CLK
E
DET

CLK E DET

SWITCH
CONTROL
LOGIC

XCVR

DRIVER
W SC
MULDEM

64 CLK W

INTFC

RCV CLK +
RCV CLK -

RCVR

CLK 7
TO PROCESSOR

CLK 8

E SC
MODEM

XCVR

64 CLK E

TX CLK OUT

J308 TX
CLK DET

DRIVER

TX CLK

INTFC

XMT CLK +
XMT CLK -

RCVR

NOTE:
SOFTWARE CONTROLS ARE SHOWN AS PHYSICAL FOR SIMPLIFICATION.

MDR-1016
5/18/04

Figure 3 - 87 XMT and RCV CLK Direction Control

Termination relays are connected in parallel to the MCS( ) XT DT lines applied to the transceiver and, when activated, terminate the data in 120 ohms (approximately). The termination relays are provisionable on or off. Off is the default position. The termination relays are
controlled by the MCS TERM control logic from the EPLD to the relay driver and MCS RLY
control signal from the relay driver. In a daisy chain MCS scenario, the termination relay
contacts should be provisioned open at all controllers except the end controller in the system, which is terminated through the closed contacts of the relay.
3.13.1.2.7 TBOS
The Telemetry byte oriented serial protocol (TBOS) fault alarm function is enabled by selecting
displays 1-8 on the radio configuration provisioning screen. This enables the appropriate drivers
on the controller and allows the user to view the external display on a PC. The four TBOS lines
share pins on connector J305 with station alarm 13 through 16. TBOS to/from the controller or
station alarm 13 through 16 to the relay interface are selected via provisioning. TBOS does not
require the optional relay interface card. Refer to the Interconnect section for further details.
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3.13.1.2.7.1

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TBOS Termination

The TBOS termination function on the radio controller is not provisionable. The function is
held in the off position by software.
3.13.1.2.8 Controller Alarm Relays
Three separate alarm outputs of the ESCC are applied to three relay drivers/relays. The
relay outputs are connected to alarm/status connector J305 on the backplane. The relays are
software controlled and two of the three relays share functions. The functions are selected
through two provisioning options: major/minor or visual/audible.
3.13.1.2.8.1

Rack (Shelf) Alarm Relay

The rack (shelf) alarm relay is activated by any MDR-8000 alarm. When activated a ground
is placed on J305-25.
3.13.1.2.8.2

Visual/Audible Alarms

The visual and audible alarm outputs are an extension of the rack (shelf) alarm. The applicable relays are activated by any MDR-8000 alarm. When activated, a ground is placed on
J305-24 (visual alarm) and J305-50 (audible alarm). the audible alarm (only) can be cleared
by setting the ACO/LT (alarm cutoff/lamp test) switch on the controller front panel to ACO.
ACO will not cutoff the visual alarm. The fault causing the alarm must be cleared before the
visual alarm is cleared.
3.13.1.2.8.3

Major Alarm Relay

The major alarm relay is activated by any service affecting alarm. When activated a ground
is placed on J305-24. The fault causing the alarm must be cleared before the major alarm is
cleared.
3.13.1.2.8.4

Minor Alarm Relay

The minor alarm is activated by any non service affecting alarm. When activated a ground is
placed on J305-50. The fault causing the alarm must be cleared before the minor alarm is
cleared.
3.13.1.2.9 Controller Interface With AE-27( ) Relay Interface Module
The controller sends relay controls and receives status to/from the AE-27( ) Relay Interface
module via a serial data bus. Refer to AE-27( ) Relay Interface functional description in this
section.
3.13.1.2.9.1

Shelf/Station Alarms

See Figure 3 - 88. Sixteen station alarm inputs to the relay interface module (J305) are
applied to XCVRs in the relay interface and routed to the MCS and USI software functions
over the serial data bus. Station alarm 1 and local rack alarm are ORed by a software OR
function and an alarm on either input to the OR gate causes ann alarm output to the MCS11 and USI. The rack alarm generated in the controller is also routed as a shelf alarm output to connector J305.

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RACK ALM
J305
SHELF ALM
STATION ALM 1
STATION ALM 2
STATION ALM 3

MCS-11
SOFTWARE
"OR"
FUNCTION

RELAY
INTFC

STATION ALM 16

SHELF ALM
OR
STATION ALM 1
STATION ALM 2
STATION ALM 3

STATION ALM 16
CONTROLLER

USI
SOFTWARE
"OR"
FUNCTION

SHELF ALM
OR
STATION ALM 1
STATION ALM 2
STATION ALM 3

STATION ALM 16
LMW-5085F
02/04/04

Figure 3 - 88 Shelf Alarm/Station Alarms 1-16 Signal Flow


3.13.1.2.10Extended Link Monitor Channel Functions
The Extended Link Monitor Channel (ELMC) function allows provisioning, alarms, status
information, and control commands for the local radio and alarms, status information, control commands for addressable remote radios as a standard feature. For remote provisioning
and downloading capability, the ELMC option key (695-5647-018) must be installed on the
AE-37Y Controller.
3.13.1.2.10.1 Timeout
ELMC timeout is a provisionable function that begins when the ELMC message is sent and
ends when the response from the remote radio is received. If the response is not received
during the provisioned time, a No Report is displayed on the USI screens. Timeout can be
provisioned for up to 10 seconds. More time is needed for systems with more hops, since each
radio processes the ELMC signal before sending it on. This individual processing of the signal creates delay.
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3.13.1.2.10.2 ELMC Message Processing


Each radio decodes the address on the ELMC message and then if not addressed, sends the
message out on its provisioned ports. If the radio is properly addressed, the ELMC message
is processed and a response is sent.
3.13.1.2.10.3 ELMC Message
Each message begins with a request for provisioning so that the local radio knows how to
paint the provisioning screens for the remote radio and communication with the remote
radio is established. The message then requests information peculiar to the USI screen from
which the address was entered. For example, if the user enters the remote address on the
local status and alarm screen, a request for current alarms is sent to the remote radio. If the
user enters the remote address on the local control screen, a request for current control status is sent to the remote radio. If the user enters the remote address on the provisioning
screens, an acknowledge bit (keep alive signal) is sent to the remote radio. The remote radio
responds with an acknowledge bit. No response to any request or acknowledge signal generates a No Report on the USI. A response after provisioned time-out time has elapsed also
generates a No Report.
3.13.1.2.10.4 ELMC Termination
The ELMC termination function on the radio controller is not provisionable. The function is
held in the off position by software.
3.13.1.2.11Service Channel Muldems
One EPLD functions as the west service channel muldem to provide multiplexing and
demultiplexing between the XMT/RCV SC DATA W and the individual data channels. A second EPLD functions as the east service channel muldem to provide multiplexing and demultiplexing between the XMT/RCV SC DATA E and the individual data channels. The SC
DATA signals consist of three 64 kb/s channels and one 16 kb/s channel. Multiplexing and
demultiplexing occur in two directions. The eastbound data is received from the repeater rail
data and sent to the I/O interface for transmission in radio rails. The westbound data is
received from the radio rails and sent to the I/O interface for transmission in repeater rails.
The multiplexing circuits latch data from the 16 kb/s channel into a shift register, and shift
the data out using a 64 kHz clock to create a 64 kHz channel. The data from this channel
and three other 64 kHz channels are latched into another register and shifted out using a
256 kHz clock. A second set of shift registers is used to multiplex the off-hook so that the
I/O interface only inserts XMT SC DATA from active channels.
The demultiplexing circuits clock the RCV SC DATA into a shift register using a 256 kHz
clock and then latch the data using a 64 kHz clock to produce four 64 kb/s data streams. The
data from the first channel is clocked into another shift register using a 64 kHz clock and the
data is then latched using a 16 kHz clock.
3.13.1.2.12Register Data Bus
The register data bus interfaces the controller and OSS circuits. Transceiver chips provides
bidirectional buffering of the register data bus. The register data bus drivers are enabled
when CSF (channel select function) input is logic 0 and R/WF input is logic 1. Address decoding is used for serial chip selecting and for accessing OSS status/control registers.

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3.13.1.2.13Serial Ports
Serial ports can be configured by the controller for asynchronous or synchronous operation
using internal or external clocks.
One port provides 16 kb/s command path communication over the RF path and between
repeater racks. The data is transported synchronously in the 16 kb/s auxiliary channels.
Communication over these ports is stopped at the other end of the RF path or at the
repeater rack.
3.13.1.2.13.1 RS-232 Data Ports
In the EPLDs functioning as E and W SC muldems, the RS-232 input data is converted to
TTL and sampled at 64 kb/s. The sampled data is inverted and inserted into XMT SC DATA
E and W and combined with the data already present in the channel. Data from TXD1 is
inserted into channel 1 and data from TXD2 is inserted into channel 2. The receive data
from RCV SC DATA E and W is converted to RS-232 levels. Data from channel 1 appears at
RXD1 and data from channel 2 appears at RXD2.
3.13.1.2.13.2 RS-232 Bridge
Distribution of RS-232 data is controlled by the provisionable RS-232 bridging function. See
Figure 3 - 89. The purpose of the bridging function is to control distribution of SC data in one
direction (terminal) or two directions (repeater or back-to-back terminal).
3.13.1.2.13.3 Bridge Enabled
If the RS-232 bridge is provisioned enabled, the RS-232 input data is converted to TTL and
sampled at 64 kb/s. The sampled data is applied to the SC muldem where it is inserted
(INSERT E and W) into XMT SC DATA E and W and combined with THRU data already
present in the channel. Data from TXD1 (J312) is inserted into channel 1 (shown in the figure), and data from TXD2 (J313) is inserted into channel 2 (not shown).

AE37X CONTROLLER

SC MULDEM

J343
RCV SC
DATA E
TO/FROM
A
I/O INTFC

XMT SC
DATA W

J314
XMT SC
DATA E

THRU
DROP
E

INSERT
E
THRU
INSERT
W

RCV SC
DATA W

DROP
W

RS232 RXD1

RS232 TXD1

J312
BRIDGE ENABLED

MW21000781
092597

Figure 3 - 89 Bridge Function Simplified Functional Block Diagram


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In the SC muldem, the receive data (DROP E and W) from RCV SC DATA E and W is
combined and the output of the SC muldem is then converted to RS-232 levels. Data from
channel 1 appears at RXD1 (J312), and data from channel 2 appears at RXD2 (J313).
3.13.1.2.13.4 Bridge Disabled
If the RS-232 bridge is provisioned disabled, insert data from TXD1 and TXD2 is added in
the radio transmit direction (XMT SC DATA W) and dropped from the radio receive direction (RCV SC DATA E) only.

3.13.1.3 AUDIO CIRCUIT FUNCTIONS


See Figure 3 - 90. The AE-37( ) converts audio signals into the 64 kb/s digital data and in the
reverse direction converts 64 kb/s digital data into audio signals. It uses pulse code modulation (PCM) to provide two independent audio channels (AUDIO 1 and 2). Audio interfaces
are 4-wire and operate at either 0/0 dBm or +7/-16 dBm ratios with E&M lead signaling.
3.13.1.3.1 DTMF
The DTMF function allows signaling individually addressable terminal, repeater, and
administration stations in the overhead channel system in the audio channel 1. An internal
audio transducer sounds at the addressed station.
The DTMF provisioning option decodes DTMF signals for outgoing calls on the telephone.
Push button 1 kHz signaling option is operational with or without the DTMF option. The 1
kHz signal is generated when the * key on the telephone keypad is pressed. Pressing the #
key on the telephone concludes a DTMF call.
The DTMF generator output, the handset, the 4-wire E & M audio 1 input port, and the 1 kHz
signal from the all-call signaling generator are summed and applied to the AUDIO 1 PCM
Codecs for encoding (A/D conversion). The 64 kb/s XMT Data 1 E/W outputs are then sent to
the service channel (SC) muldem for multiplexing. The DTMF generator output can be disconnected from the outgoing data by pressing the * key (cancelled all calls) on the external DTMF
keypad.
3.13.1.3.2 PCM CODECS
The 64 kb/s Rcv Data 1 E/W from the OSS interface circuit function is received and applied
to two PCM Codecs which decode the data and convert it to audio signals. There is a separate PCM codec for the East and West bound data directions. The decoded audio signals are
fed to the DTMF detector, telephone, and 4-wire E & M lead interface for channel 1. The
received audio signal is also looped back to the PCM Codec for insertion in the outgoing service channel 1, in order to provide party-line operations.

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Functional Description Section

1 kHz DET
1 kHz DET
GEN

1 kHz

E O/H 2
E O/H 1
DTMF ADDR (30)

SUM
AMP

DTMF
DETECT

DTMF DETECT
LCL O/H
M O/H 1
M O/H 2
ALERT EN

DTMF

REGISTER
DATA
BUS

REGISTER
SELECT

(SH 2) RING TONE


CALL DETECT
CALL COMMON

RELAY

CALL DET
LVL 1
LVL 2
CARD PRESENT
LCL O/H

SUBSCRIBER
LINE INTFC

SUM
AMP

AUDIO 1 E

SUM
AMP

T
1 KHz

PCM
CODEC

SUM
AMP

RCV DATA1 W

SC MRK W
XMT DATA1 W

AUDIO
IN 1
LCL O/H
M O/H 1

XMT INS 1

OR

O/H
MLEAD 2 DETECT

XMT INS 2
M O/H 2

ELEAD 1

E O/H 1

OR

E COMM
ELEAD 2

J317
AUDIO
PORT 2

XMT DATA1 E
SC FRM W

SC 64k CLK W

SUM
AMP

LVL 1

T
AUDIO
IN 1
R

O/H

AUDIO 1 W

MLEAD 1

J316
AUDIO
PORT 1

SC MRK E
LCL O/H

O/H
DETECT

J317
AUDIO
PORT 2

SC 64k CLK E

PCM
CODEC

SUM
AMP

SC FRM E
RCV DATA1 E

10 dB

SUM
AUDIO
OUT 1 R AMP

J316
AUDIO
PORT 1

O/H

1 KHz

HANDSET IN

C1B

T
AUDIO
OUT 2
R
T
AUDIO
IN 2
R

RELAY
E O/H 2

OR

O/H

AUDIO 2 E

SUM
AMP

RCV DATA2 E
PCM
CODEC

LVL 2
SUM
AMP

AUDIO IN 2

SUM
AMP

XMT DATA2 E
O/H

AUDIO 2 W

RCV DATA2 W

PCM
CODEC

MW21100081A
051998

SUM
AMP

XMT DATA2 W

Figure 3 - 90 Audio Circuits Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 1 of 2)


3-172

CNTLR/
OSS
CKTS

CALL DETECT

HANDSET OUT
J302
TEL

PARALLEL
DATA
(D7D0)

OSS
INTFC
CKT

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AUDIO
TRANSDUCER

ALERT EN
PARALLEL BUS
INTFC
(SH 1)

RING TONE

RING
LOGIC

RING
DRIVER

MW21100081B
041498

Figure 3 - 90 Audio Circuits Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 2 of 2)


3.13.1.3.3 Audio Timing
Three clock signals from the I/O interface are used to time the input and the output AUDIO
1 data. The 64 kHz clock is used to define the bit rate on the transmit and receive PCM highway. In the transmit PCM highway, data transitions occur on the rising edge of the 64 kHz .
In the received PCM highway, data transitions occur on the falling edge of the 64 kHz. The 8
kHz clock is used to define the beginning of the transmit and receive time-slot on the PCM
highway or marks the start of PCM word. The 8 kHz clock is synchronized with the 64kHz
clock. The transmit words begin on the rising edge of the 8 kHz clock and the receive words
begin on the falling edge of the 8 kHz clock. The 2 kHz clock is used to latch the off-hook signaling bit in the PCM data channel. The transmit off-hook is latched on the rising edge and
the receive off-hook is latched on the falling edge.
3.13.1.3.4 Audio 2
The data on AUDIO 2 is processed identically to that of AUDIO 1 data except the audio port
2 provides the audio for the PCM codecs which interface with service channel 2E and service
channel 2W. No speaker and handset are provided for AUDIO 2.
3.13.1.3.5 Local Off-Hook
The LCL O/H signal is ORed with M-Lead 1 to produce the XMT Ins 1 output to the OSS
interface circuit function.
3.13.1.3.6 DTMF Function
The DTMF generator in the telephone generates dual-tone multi-frequency pairs required
by the tone-dialing system. The DTMF detector contains the filter and decoder for detection
of a pair of tones conforming to the DTMF standard. When the input to the DTMF detector
matches the stored DTMF address, a CALL DETECT signal is produced by the microprocessor and a DTMF DETECT signal is sent to the parallel interface bus. The DTMF receiver is
always actively enabled.

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3.13.1.3.7 Parallel Interface


The parallel interface is used to receive provisioning information from the micro controller,
such as the local DTMF address, the level adjustments for AUDIO 1 and AUDIO 2, alert
enable, and call detect. The alert enable sets the warbler circuit, which causes the 1 kHz all
call signaling tone to be modulated with 10 Hz. The information sent by the parallel interface to the controller circuit function includes Off/Hook from AUDIO 1 and 2 circuits, handset Off/Hook (local off-hook), 1 kHz detect, and DTMF digital outputs. A DTMF call detect
signal is sent to the controller circuit when a DTMF address is received that matches the
local address.
The input audio from the telephone is summed with the AUDIO 1 E/W PCM Codec inputs
and output of audio port 1. The handset input is also sent to an off-hook circuit detector.
Whether the off-hook detector detects an off-hook or on-hook depends on the handset input
current.
3.13.1.3.8 Ringer Circuit
The audio transducer sounds any time the station is dialed. The ring logic is enabled by the
ALERT EN signal from the microprocessor. The applied ALERT EN signal causes the 1 kHz
RING TONE modulated by the 10 Hz ALERT EN signal to actuate the audio transducer.
3.13.2 AE-37AA TMN Interface
See Figure 3 - 91 for a functional block diagram of the AE-37AA TMN Interface module. The
AE-37AA TMN Interface module consists of a main printed circuit board and the Power
QUICC/Equipment Controller Radio Controller (PQ/ECRC) subboard. The Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), located on the main board, is the communications center of the
TMN Interface. The PQ/ECRC subboard provides all microprocessor functions for the TMN
Interface.

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RPTR HUB

ETH 1
RX +/
J1
UPLINK

LED
DRIVER

P/O FPGA

ALM

LED
CONTROL

ACTIVITY
DET

ETHERNET 1

TX +/

ETH 2

J2

RX +/

ETH 1
J1 UPLINK
ETHERNET 2

ACTIVITY
DET
TX +/

ETH 3

J3

RX +/

J2

ETHERNET 3

ACTIVITY
DET
TX +/

J3

P/O
PQ/ECRC
Q TX P/N
SUBBOARD

XCO
40 MHz

ETH 2

ETH 3

SYS CLK
Q RX P/N

SPI MTXD
P/O
PQ/ECRC SPI MODE
SUBSPI CLK
BOARD

SIGNAL

P/O
PQ/ECRC
SUBBOARD

SPI MXRD

SPI

DIRECTION
NORMAL CROSSOVER

XMT DATA P/N

OUT

IN

RCV DATA P/N

IN

OUT

XMT CLK P/N

OUT

IN

RCV CLK P/N

IN

OUT

P/O
FPGA
XMT DATA

P/O
PQ/ECRC
XMT
CLK

PPP
J4

XMT
CLK

RCV DATA

RCV DATA
RS422
RCV
RCV CLK

XMT DATA
RS422
XMT

XMT CLK

PPP
J4

P/O
PQ/ECRC

RCV CLK

FPGA
MUX
P/O
PQ/ECRC

PPP

GP OUT ( )
LMW-9020F
07/01/03

Figure 3 - 91 TMN Interface Module Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 1 of 2)


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3EM20188AAAA
Functional Description Section

LEVEL
TRANSLATOR

WEST SC

256K CLK

256K CLK

64K CLK

64K CLK

P/O
FPGA

PQ/ECRC
SUBBOARD

TMN WEST
SELECT
WEST
SC

TMN WEST RCV CLK (64 Kb/s)


TMN WEST RCV DATA
TMN WEST CD

RCV DATA

FROM
RADIO
I/O
INTFC

EAST SC

RCV DATA

LEVEL
TRANSLATOR

EAST SC

256K CLK

256K CLK

64K CLK

64K CLK

TMN EAST
SELECT
WEST
SC

TMN EAST RCV CLK (64 Kb/s)


TMN EAST RCV DATA
TMN EAST CD

RCV DATA

RCV DATA

TMN WEST XMT DATA


TMN WEST RTS
P/O
PQ/ECRC
SUBBOARD

TMN WEST CTS

TMN EAST XMT DATA


TMN EAST RTS
TMN EAST CTS

XMT
WEST
IP PACKET
BUFFER

TMN WEST XMT PACKET

PARALLEL
BUS
XMT
EAST
IP PACKET
BUFFER

HDLC SC
PACKETS
GD - GD7

TO
RADIO
CONTROLLER

TMN EAST XMT PACKET

LMW-9021F
03/24/03

Figure 3 - 91 TMN Interface Module Functional Block Diagram (Sheet 2 of 2)


3.13.3 Repeater Hub
The repeater hub consists of four 10BASE-T transceivers and activity detectors/LED drivers.
It provides four Ethernet ports. Three of the ports go to the front access RJ45 connectors, and
the fourth goes to the PQ/ECRC subboard. Data received on any one input is repeated on the
other three outputs. The data received on any one input is repeated on the other three outputs.
The repeater hub uses the Q interface to communicate with the PQ/ECRC subboard. Inputs
and outputs are transformer coupled for isolation and shaping.
The main functions of the repeater hub are data recovery and re-transmission, and collision
detection propagation. Data packets received at the Ethernet ports are detected and recovered
by the port receivers before being passed to the repeater core circuitry for re-timing and retransmission. After recovery of a valid data packet, the repeater hub repeats the packet on the
remaining ports, except the originator port. (i.e., data received on any one port is repeated on
all remaining ports). Transmissions are controlled by collision detection circuitry that monitors the ports for collisions during simultaneous transmissions.
The repeating hub cannot receive simultaneously on more than one port (causes a collision).
When a collision is detected, the collision detectors disable (jam) all ports. Any portion of a
packet received on two ports will cause a collision.
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3.13.4 PPP Interface


The PPP interface is a serial RS-422 logic-level compliant port accessible through an RJ45
connector on the main board. The port provides Transmit Data, Receive Data, Transmit Clock,
and Receive Clock balanced signal pairs. Nominal impedance of balanced pairs is 100 ohms.
3.13.5 PPP Modes of Operation
The two modes of operation supported by the TMN interface include normal and crossover.
Each mode provides both clock and direction control and clock mode control. The modes are
controlled by software via control signals (GPOUT) from the PQ/ECRC subboard to the FPGA.

3.13.5.1 Normal Mode


See Figure 3 - 92. In the normal mode (default mode), the port mode is DCE, the data/clock
follows normal directions (i.e. XMT data/clocks are outputs; RCV data/clocks are inputs),
and the clock mode is internal (dual) clock. In the internal clock mode of operation, the XMT
clock input to the MUX in the FPGA is passed to the XMT CLK output.

3.13.5.2 Crossover Mode


See Figure 3 - 93. In the crossover mode, the port mode is DTE, the data/clock follows opposite directions (i.e. XMT data/clocks are inputs; RCV data/clocks are outputs), and the clock
mode is external clock. In the external clock mode of operation, the RCV clock input is looped
to the XMT CLK output via the MUX in the FPGA. In this mode, the RCV CLK is also used
to generate XMT data in the PQ/ECRC.

XMT DATA

P/O
PQ/ECRC
XMT
CLK

XMT
CLK

RCV DATA

RCV DATA
PPP
J4

XMT DATA

RS422
RCV
RCV CLK

RS422
XMT

XMT CLK

PPP
J4

P/O
PQ/ECRC

RCV CLK

FPGA
MUX
P/O
PQ/ECRC

PPP

GP OUT ( )

LMW-9050F
07/01/03

Figure 3 - 92 Normal Mode


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Functional Description Section

RCV DATA

P/O
PQ/ECRC
RCV
CLK

RCV
CLK

XMT DATA

XMT DATA
PPP
J4

RCV DATA

RS422
XMT
XMT CLK

RS422
RCV

RCV CLK

PPP
J4

P/O
PQ/ECRC

XMT CLK

FPGA
MUX
P/O
PQ/ECRC

PPP

GP OUT ( )

LMW-9052F
07/26/03

Figure 3 - 93 Crossover Mode


3.13.6 Front Panel Indicators

3.13.6.1 ALM LED


The red ALM alarm LED lights when the TMN interface fails and during reboot. The PQ/
ECRC subboard asserts a PWRFAIL control signal (input to FPGA LED control circuit)
when a power failure is detected, turning on the red LED. While reboot is in progress, the
ALARM_LED output from the FPGA LED control circuit is asserted, turning on the red
ALM LED.

Note
The term active is used to identify an established link. A link can be active
and receiving data or active and receiving idle signals at the port. An inactive link is a link that has not been established and there is no communication between local and farend.

3.13.6.2 Ethernet 1-3 LEDs


Each of the three Ethernet ports (ETHERNET 1, 2, and 3) contains a bi-color LED indicator:
green is used for link status and yellow is for error on the port. An activity detector in the
repeater hub monitors each Ethernet input and provides a Link Status and RX Packet output to the FPGA LED control circuit. When activity is detected, the LED control circuits in
the FPGA send an output to the LED, through the LED driver, causing the LED to light (or
blink). Refer to Table 3 - 8.
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3.13.6.3 PPP LED


The PPP port J4 contains a bi-color LED indicator: green is used for link status and yellow is
used for error on the port. The PQ/ECRC subboard asserts a GPOUT( ) control signal ( LINK
ACTIVE input to FPGA LED control circuit) when the link has been established through the
PPP port J4, turning on the green PPP LED. The FPGA monitors both the XMT and RCV
data lines to determine activity and idle states. Activity is identified by data characters on
the channel. Idle, or absence of data, is identified by a special set of characters hereafter
called idle signal.

Note
The color green always indicates an active link. The color yellow always
indicates an inactive link. Regardless of color, a blinking LED always indicates the associated port is receiving data.

Table 3 - 8 Front Panel Indicators


LED

COLOR

STATE

INDICATION

ALM

Red

Steady

Module fault. also lights for the duration of reboot


and then goes off.

ETHERNET 1-3

Green

Steady

Link is active but no data is being received

ETHERNET 1-3

Green

Blinking

Link is active and receiving data packets on ports


J1-J3.

ETHERNET 1-3

Yellow

Steady

Link is not active and port J1-J3 is misconfigured.

ETHERNET 1-3

Yellow

Blinking

Link is not active and collisions are being detected.

PPP

Green

Steady

Link is active.

PPP

Green

Blinking

Link is active and receiving data packets on port


J4

PPP

Yellow

Steady

Link is not active and idle signals are being


received on port J4.

PPP

Yellow

Blinking

Link is not active but data is being received on


port J4.

3.13.7 LAN IP Transport


The TMN East and TMN West serial interfaces from the PQ/ECRC subboard interface directly
with the FPGA and indirectly with the radio controller for LAN IP transmission.

3.13.7.1 IP Transmit
The TMN East and TMN West XMT channels are independent. Each XMT channel consists
of an IP packet buffer that received inputs from the PQ/ECRC subboard and outputs to the
parallel interface. Data flow is controlled by the radio controller software interface. Data
flow is controlled by the radio controller software and via Ready To Send ( RTS) and Clear To
Send (CTS) control signals between the radio controller, the FPGA, and the PQ/ECRC subboard. The PQ/ECRC subboard sets the RTS signal when data is ready for transfer to the
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FPGA. The radio controller sets the CTS signal to let the PQ/ECRC subboard know it has not
finished reading the previous packet. The IP packet buffers in the FPGA will not accept new
data until the radio controller signifies it has finished. When the radio controller has finished reading the previous packet, the data to be transmitted is accepted as an HDLC
framed packet into the FPGA IP packet buffer. The FPGA removes the HDLC start and stop
bytes and the remaining packet data is stored in the IP packet buffer. After the data in the
packet is stored in the IP packet buffer, the FPGA sets the CTS signal to stop data transfer
from the PQ/ECRC and inform the radio controller that data is waiting to be read.

3.13.7.2 IP Receive
TMN East and TMN West RCV channels are decoded directly from the 256 kb/s overhead
stream by the FPGA. The 64 kb/s channel to be decoded is selected by provisioning. The
selected channel can be 1, 3, or 3. Channel 0 is reserved for ELMC and cannot be used. When
enabled, the East and West 64 kb/s overhead stream is output, with clock, to the TMN East
and TMN West RCV inputs on the PQ/ECRC subboard. The FPGA monitors the 256 kb/s and
64 kb/s clock inputs from the level translators for activity. The FPGA sets the TMN West
Carrier Detect (CD) signal and/or East CD signal to inform the PQ/ECRC subboard that it is
actively decoding the 256 kb/s overhead channel.

3.13.8 Craft Port (F Interface)


The Craft interface is a serial RS-232 DCE-compliant port accessible through a DB9 Female
connector (J5) on the front panel. The Craft port provides a local interface for connecting craft
terminals such as the Java craft interface. Connections are implemented as PPP over the
serial interface. The craft port provides local access to provision the TMN Interface function as
a low end NE manager as well as download new software and FPGA releases. Supports asynchronous, full duplex 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, odd parity, 38400 bps nominal.

3.13.8.1 TMN Activity Indicators


The TMN port will provide two LEDs, one to indicate Link Status and another to indicate RX
data activity. Collisions will jam on the RX LED for all active interfaces for approximately
one second.
3.13.9 FPGA
The FPGA provides access to the Radio Backplane Parallel Bus to communicate with the
Radio Controller. The Parallel Bus consists of an 8-bit data bus and a 10-bit address bus that
are used for all communication to the MDR-8000, including transmit access to the 64kb transport service channel. For receiving the 64kb transport service channel, the FPGA directly
demultiplexes channel from the 256kb/s Radio overhead. On the TMN Interface side, there are
three main interfaces, SPI Bus, TMN_E and TMN_W. The SPI bus is used for general alarm
and messaging. The TMN_E and TMN_W interfaces are used to interface to the East and West
service channels.
Messages are passed between the TMN Interface and the Radio Controller using a combination of registers and 6kBytes of RAM in the SNMP FPGA. The RAM is divided into six buffers
of fixed sizes of 512 and 2048 bytes. The RAM buffers are accessed indirectly through registers
using only 256 bytes of address space. The FPGA also directly accepts serial HDLC Framed IP
data for transport from the TMN_E and TMN_W ports and writes it directly into the TX East
and West IP Packet Buffers. Demultiplexed Receive Service channel data is not buffered and is
passed on directly to the TMN_E and TMN_W receive ports.
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3.13.10 SPI Interface


The SPI bus is used to configure the FPGA upon initialization and to access registers in the
FPGA to pass alarm and control messages to and from the FPGA. The SPI interface is controlled by the host processor on the PQ/ECRC subboard. The MODE signal is used to detect
the occurrence of a communication phase. During the communication phase, data is transferred on the interface as 8-bit packets. The first pair of packets received after the assertion
of MODE are the command packets. These packets are followed by the data packets. Packets
from the PQ/ECRC subboard are received on the MTXD input and echoed back to the PQ/
ECRC subboard on the MRXD output to check the received data.
3.13.11 PQ/ECRC Subboard
See Figure 3 - 94 for a functional block diagram of the PQ/ECRC subboard. The heart of the
TMN Interface module is the PQ/ECRC processor card. It is a 50MHz MPC86OT processor
with 16Mb RAM. Non-volatile storage is provided by a Compact Flash card. The interface to
the motherboard is through two 64 pin connectors. The available interfaces provided are a
General PIO interface (16 bit output, 16 bit input), SPI bus, TMN_RF, TMN_E, TMN_W,
Ethernet, RS-232 craft, RS-232 debug, JTAG and 12C. The card runs the PSOS operating system. The operating system provides the TCP/IP stack as well as support for the Agent software, and routing of TCP packets through the LAN and TMN interfaces.

3.13.11.1 Clock Generation and Distribution


The system clock is generated and controlled by the 24.576 MHz oscillator and clock buffer
circuits.

3.13.11.2 Boot Memory


The boot memory consists of a 2 MByte flash EPROM memory bank and is used to store the
program code (firmware) that will take the CPU control after the board reset.

3.13.11.3 System RAM


The system RAM consists of two SDRAMs and is used for both program op codes and data items.

3.13.11.4 Compact Flash Card


The Compact Flash card is a mass memory device used for storage of program executable
files for the processor and for logging alarm event reports, performance monitor data, and
other data.

3.13.11.5 F Interface (Craft port)


The F interface is used to support the craft terminal function for operation, administration,
and maintenance. Refer to description of Craft port.

3.13.11.6 SPI Bus


Used to access RAM in the FPGA to pass messages to and from the Radio Controller.

3.13.11.7 TMN Interfaces


TMN_E and TMN_W ports are used for transporting (TMN) LAN traffic to the Radio Controller via the FPGA for insertion into the East and West overhead streams. The TMN_RF port is
connected to the front accessible PP interface to allow connections to external equipment.
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VCORE

VC3V

VREGS
KAPWR

WIRED BUT
NOT USED

VCC3.3V
GPIO
BDM
10/100BT

VARIOUS
(FPGA) LXT
LX 914 HUB

TMN_W
POWER ON
RESET
OSC.

TMN_E
RES

24.576 MHz

CLOCK
BUFFER

PROCESSOR
MPC860T
50 MHz

LVC
RS232
RS232

49.152 MHz

LVC

SYSTEM RAM
6-32-64 MByte SDRAM
(4/8/16 M x 32)

TMN_RF
F
DBG_L
SPI

I2C
32 BIT

FPGA
PPP J4
CRAFT J5
INT CONN J6
FPGA

EEPROM

MAC
ADDRESS

BOOT MEMORY
2 Mbyte F_EPROM
(1024 k x 16)

16 BIT

XCVR
PIO
RES

M_RES

SYS_ID

CONTROL
LOGIC
(TRAMINER)

PCMCIA
16 BIT

COMPACT
FLASH
CARD

JTAG

LMW-8042
07/21/05

Figure 3 - 94 PQ/ECRC Subboard Functional Block Diagram


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3.13.11.8 Ethernet
The Ethernet port connects to an internal interface of the Ethernet Bridge in the TMN
Interface. It provides local LAN access.

3.13.11.9 JTAG
Used to change the programming of the Traminer on the PQ/ECRC board. Is connected in
series with the serial EEPROM and FPGA.

3.13.11.10I2C
To allow the PQ/ECRC board to access the Motherboard I 2C Inventory EEPROM.

3.13.11.11 Controller Alarm


A single Red LED will be used to indicate boot/fault in the PQ/ECRC Controller. The LED
displays a constant RED during bootup and when there is a fault. The PQ/ECRC subboard
provides the signal to drive this LED.
3.14
SOFTWARE FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
See Figure 3 - 95 for a software functional block diagram. The NE SNMP Adaptation Module
(NSAM) is the NE peculiar software module used to map NE specific data into the MIB.
3.14.1 TMBN Interface Module Software Modules

3.14.1.1 NSAM
The NE SNMP Adaptation Module (NSAM) is the NE software module that contains the software used to map NE specific data into the format required by the SGPA. The NSAM is loaded
from the flash card.

3.14.1.2 SGPA
The SNMP Generic Program Agent (SGPA) is the software module that contains the software used to map data into the MIB. The SGPA software is the same for all NEs. The SGPA
is loaded from the flash card.

3.14.1.3 Router
The router is the software module that contains the software used to distribute data
between the craft interface, Ethernet, PPP, serial TMNs and SGPA software modules. The
router is loaded from the flash card.

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ELMC
MANAGER
(WINDOWS USI)

SGPA
SVI

CRAFT
INTERFACE

ROUTER

SPI BUS
INTERFACE

SPI BUS

TMN E

TMN W

PPP

TMN RF

PQ/ECRC BOARD

MOTHERBOARD
INVENTORY

NSAM

SERIAL
TMN

ETHERNET

MCS-11

SNMP
MIB

FPGA
DOWNLOAD

EEPROM

MCS-11
PACKET
BUFFER

ELMC

I2C

TO SNMP MANAGER

TO
REMOTE
NE

HDLC
PACKET
GENERATOR

ALARM
PROVISIONING
MESSAGING
INTERFACE

EEPROM

JTAG

FPGA
TMN
INTERCONNECT

RS-232
DRIVER

ETHERNET
BRIDGE

RS-422
DRIVER

CRAFT
INTERFACE
J5

10BaseT
ETH2
J2

PPP
J4

ETH1
UPLINK
J1

SPI
INTERFACE

TMN INTFC MODULE

DUAL PORT
RAM

SC
DECODE

PARALLEL

SC1
MUX

PARALLEL
INTERFACE

RADIO CONTROLLER
(EXISTING BOARD)

FROM RADIO
I/O INTFC MODULES

ETH3
J3

TO RADIO
I/O INTFC MODULES

LMW-8049
02/15/03

Figure 3 - 95 Software Functional Block Diagram

3.14.1.4 SNMP MIB


The SNMP MIB is the database that contains the information on the NE used to interpret
events. The SGPA MIB is loaded from the flash card.

3.14.1.5 Ethernet
Ethernet is the software module that contains the software used to distribute data to/from
the ETH1 Uplink, ETH2, and ETH3 connectors from/to the router software module.

3.14.1.6 Serial TMN


Serial TMN is the software module that contains the software used to distribute data (TMN
RF) to/from the PPP connector and data (TMN E and TMN W) to/from the FPGA TMN interconnect software module from/to the router software module.

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3.14.1.7 Craft Interface


The Craft interface is the software module that contains the software used to distribute data
to/from the Craft interface connector, via the RS-232 driver, from/to the router software module.

3.14.1.8 SPI Bus Interface


The Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus interface is the software module that contains the
software used to distribute programming data to/from the FPGA SPI interface software
module and to/from the NSAM.

3.14.1.9 FPGA
The FPGA is loaded at power-up by the serial EEPROM. The EEPROM is initially programmed via the JTAG port. At power-up, the FPGA initiates a download to itself from the
EEPROM.
3.14.2 Controller Module Software Modules

3.14.2.1 ELMC
The ELMC software module contains the software used to interface the radio windows USI
to the alarm provisioning message interface software module. This allows the radio to send
and receive alarms/provisioning data to/from remote NEs over the service channel. If the
message is addressed to this radio controller, the response is returned over the same port as
received. Otherwise the incoming message is retransmitted over the remaining three ports.

3.14.2.2 Alarm Provisioning Messaging Interface


The Alarm Provisioning Messaging interface software module contains the software used to
receive and respond to alarm and/or provisioning status requests from/to the TMN Interface
module and/or the ELMC.

3.14.2.3 Parallel Interface


The Parallel Interface software module manages all communication between the TMN interface and the radio controller. The interface software stores, reads, and distributes incoming
and outgoing messages between the TMN interface and the radio controller. This interface
also locks and unlocks the reception/transmission capability between the TMN interface and
the radio controller, limiting reception and transmission to no more than one message at a
time.
Transport SNMP data to/from the controller, over the parallel bus on the radio backplane,
from/to the FPGA dual port RAM on the TMN interface module.
Route SNMP data received on the parallel bus to the HDLC packet generator.

3.14.2.4 MCS-11 Packet Buffer


The MCS-11 Packet Buffer (really an interface) software module contains the software used
to receive and transmit MCS-11 messages. If the received message is for this radio, the message is sent out the RF and repeater ports. Otherwise, it is sent out the asynch ports.

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Functional Description Section

3.14.2.5 HDLC Packet Interface


The HDLC Packet Interface software module contains the software used to control incoming
and outgoing HDLC encoded messages. An incoming receive message is decoded to determine if it is PPP or MCS-11. If PPP, it is discarded since PPP received messages also arrive
and are acted on in the TMN Interface module. If the message is for MCS-11, the HDLC
header is stripped and the MCS-11 message is sent to the MCS-11 Packet Buffer for further
processing. If the incoming MCS-11 or PPP message is for transmission, it is HDLC encoded
and transmitted to the Service Channel MUX for transmission to the Radio I/O Interface
Modules.
3.14.3 Power Supplies
The available power from the backplane is 12.0V. Switching supplies are used to generate the
required 3.3V and limited 5.0V needed by the TMN Interface module. The input to the switching supplies are C sourced from the A and B sources. Power for the FPGA core is provided by
a 5.0V to 2.5V linear regulator.
3.14.4 AE-27( ) Relay Interface
See Figure 3 - 96 for application diagram. See Figure 3 - 97 for functional block diagram. The
AE-27( ) Relay Interface receives control, alarm, and status inputs and provides alarm, status
and control relay outputs. All output relays can be disabled or provisioned normally open or
normally closed as follows:
Normally open (NO) relays are normally de-energized and relay contacts are
open. When activated, relays are energized. Relay contacts close, connecting the
output to ground.
Normally closed (NC) relays are normally energized and relay contacts are
closed and grounded. When activated, relay contacts are de-energized. Relay contacts open, presenting an open (high impedance) to the output.

AE37Y1
CONTROLLER

CONTROL

ALM/STATUS
J305

DATA

ADDRESS

C1C

3
ALM/STATUS
J305

C2B
ALARM/STATION INPUTS
16
CONTROL/STATUS INPUTS
6
REMOTE CONTROL INPUTS
3

C2B

C2B
AE27AF1
RELAY
INTERFACE

ALARM OUTPUTS
8
STATUS OUTPUTS
7
CONTROL OUTPUTS
6

MW21100091
041598

Figure 3 - 96 AE-27( ) Relay Interface Interconnect Diagram


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3.14.4.1 Controller Bus


The Relay Interface communicates with the AE-37( ) Controller card via the processor bus
and the data bus. The processor bus, consisting of three address lines, two control lines, and
a clock, is applied to a XCVR. The data bus contains the eight data line (D0-D7) is applied to
a separate transceiver. Interface with the relay transceivers is provided by the XCVR data
bus. When commanded by the AE-37( ) Controller, the decoder/DEMUX decodes and demultiplexes the address and enables the appropriate relay XCVR via the EN2-9 controls. The
controller can then write alarm/status/control information to the relay XCVRs, or read
alarm/status/control inputs from the relay XCVRs. Further descriptions of the controller
interface signals follow:
Address lines A0 through A3 HCMOS inputs. 100K Ohm pull-ups. Used by address
decoders to enable output registers and input buffers.
Buffered bidirectional data lines D0 through D7 HCMOS input/outputs. 10K Ohm pullups. Used to write data to output registers and read present bits or data from input buffers.
ECLK 2 MHz bus clock. HCMOS input. 100K Ohm pull-up.
R/WF Read/Write False. HCMOS input. 100K Ohm pull-up. A logic 1 indicates data is
being read from an input buffer or the present bits. A logic 0 indicates data is being written to an output register.
Relay Intfc CSF Relay Interface Card Select False. HCMOS input. 100K Ohm pull-up.
Chip select for relay interface card. Active low.

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Functional Description Section

P100
DATA BUS

FROM
CONTROLLER

SERIAL
DATA

XCVR

XCVR

SERIAL
CLK

PATH ALARM
LOSS OF INPUT ALARM
A XMT ALM
B XMT ALM
A RCV ALM
B RCV ALM
PWR SUPPLY ALM

RELAY
RELAY

EEPROM
EN1

PROCESSOR BUS

CTRL
STATUS 1

DECODE/
DEMUX

EN2
EN3
EN4
EN5

DECODE/
DEMUX

EN6
EN7
EN8
EN9

XCVR

RELAY
K11

CTRL
STATUS 2

RELAY
K12

CTRL
STATUS 3

XCVR

RELAY
K13

CTRL
STATUS 4

XCVR

A XMTR IN SERV
B XMTR IN SERV
A RCVR IN SERV
B RCVR IN SERV
A I/O IN SERV
B I/O IN SERV
CTRL 1

RELAY
K14

CTRL
STATUS 5

RELAY
RELAY
RELAY
RELAY

RELAY
RELAY
RELAY
RELAY

XCVR BUS

RELAY
K15

CTRL
STATUS 6

RELAY
K16

SWITCH TX
SWITCH RX
SWITCH I/O
SPARE
STATION 1
STATION 2
STATION 3
STATION 4

TO
J305

RELAY
EN10

XCVR

RELAY

EN9

FROM
J305

P100
RELAY

RELAY
EN8

XCVR
XCVR

CTRL 2
CTRL 3
CTRL 4
CTRL 5
CTRL 6
SW OFF NORM
CONTROLLER FAIL

EN2
STATION 5
STATION 6
STATION 7
STATION 8
STATION 9
STATION 10
STATION 11
STATION 12

CONTROLLER FAIL
WATCHDOG
TIMER

XCVR

RELAY
RELAY
RELAY
RELAY
RELAY
RELAY
RELAY

EN4
STATION 13
STATION 14

DIGITAL
SWITCH

STATION 15

XCVR

STATION 16
TBOS XMTTO/FROM
CONTROLLER

EN10

EN5

TBOS XMT+
TBOS RCVTBOS RCV+

Figure 3 - 97 AE-27( ) Relay Interface Functional Block Diagram


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3.14.4.2 Control Inputs


Nine buffered control inputs are provided. The inputs are diode protected from voltages outside of the 0 to +5 V range, and have a 10K Ohm resistor for current limiting purposes. In
addition, each input has a 100K Ohm pull-up resistor.
Switch Transmitter (SWITCH TX) buffered HCMOS input, sends signal to controller
module to activate the transmitter that is currently not carrying traffic.
Switch Receiver (Switch RX) buffered HCMOS input, sends signal to controller module
to activate the receiver that is currently not carrying traffic.
Switch I/O Interface (SWITCH I/O) buffered HCMOS input, sends signal to controller
module to activate the stand-by I/O interface module.

3.14.4.3 Station Alarm/Status Inputs


Station alarm/status inputs are provisionable for MCS-11 and/or TBOS alarm systems.
When the radio fault alarm is provisioned Station Alarm 13-16, sixteen station alarm/status input signals (STATION 1 THROUGH STATION16) are reported in MCS-11 station
responses. When the radio fault alarm is provisioned TBOS Display 1-8, the STATION 1316 inputs are replaced by four TBOS lines.
The alarm/status input signals are buffered HCMOS inputs, diode protected from voltages
outside of the 0 to +5 V range, with10K ohm current limiting (series) resistor and 100K ohm
pull-up resistor. A logic 0 indicates an alarm state. A logic 1 (or open) indicates a non-alarm
state.

3.14.4.4 Relay Alarm/Status Outputs

Note
Alarm/status not designated for a particular type of radio are applicable to
all radio types (DS1/E1, DS3, and OC3/STM-1).
Eight alarm relay outputs and seven status relay outputs provide relay closure to ground
(provisioned NO) or open (provisioned NC) when activated. All relays default to open if card
power is lost, except the Power Supply alarms, which default to ground. The maximum contact rating for each relay is 0.5 A, 100 V. The alarm/status relay outputs are:
Alarms:
Path Alarm This summary alarm is activated by the following alarms:
A/B Path Distortion
A/B AGC Threshold
Loss of Input Alarm This summary alarm is activated by the following alarms:
Loss of DS3 input
Loss of DS1/E1 input
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Loss of wayside DS1 input


A XMT A-side transmitter failure. This summary alarm is activated by any of
the following alarms (Table 3 - 9) on the A side:
XMT SYNC Alarm
RF Power Alarm
Common Loss Alarm
ATPC Timeout
MUX Input Loss Alarm
B XMT B-side transmitter failure. This summary alarm is activated by any of the following alarms (Table 3 - 9) on the B side:
XMT SYNC Alarm
RF Power Alarm
Common Loss Alarm
ATPC Timeout
MUX Input Loss Alarm
A RCV B-side receiver failure. This summary alarm is activated by any of the following
alarms (Table 3 - 9) on the A side:
Channel Alarm
RCV Frame Loss
Eye Closure
RSL Alarm
B RCV B-side receiver failure. This summary alarm is activated by any of the following
alarms (Table 3 - 9) on the B side:
Channel Alarm
RCV Frame Loss
Eye Closure
RSL Alarm
PWR Supply Alarm This summary alarm is activated by any A or B power supply failure.
Controller Fail relay is activated if a card select has not been detected in the previous
approximately 200 msec.
Status:
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A XMTR In Service A-side transmitter module is on-line.


B XMTR In Service B-side transmitter module is on-line.
A RCVR In Service A-side receiver module is on-line.
B RCVR In Service B-side receiver module is on-line.
A I/O In Service A-side I/O interface module is on-line.
B I/O In Service B-side I/O interface module is on-line.
Switch Off Normal Click on OFF NORM LED on USI Status Alarm screen to
view message. Indicates manual control enabled or one of following conditions
exists:
OFF NORMAL MESSAGE DISPLAYED ON USI STATUS ALARM SCREEN:

A/B Side PA Off PA ON/OFF switch on A or B power supply is set to OFF.


A/B Side LIO SPI Fail XMT or RCV circuit failure on Low Capacity I/O ASIC
in A or B DS1 I/O interface module.
A/B Side RCV SPI Fail Failure on the Serial Processor Interface bus causing
loss of communication between the controller and RCV circuits on the I/O interface module.
A/B Side DS1 SPI Fail Failure on the Serial Processor Interface bus causing
loss of communication between the controller and DS1 interface circuits on the I/
O interface module.
Fan Alarm Failure of one or more cooling fans or failure of the fan control module on the fan assembly.
IO Loopback On I/O LOOPBACK function is enabled on USI control screen on
DS1 radio.
DS1 Line 1-16 Loopback On DS1 LINE LOOPBACK RCV to XMT 1-16 function
is enabled on USI control screen on DS3 radio.
DS1 Line 1-4 Loopback On DS1 LINE LOOPBACK RCV to XMT 1-4 function is
enabled on USI control screen on DS3 radio.
A/B RCV Prov. ERROR UNIRCV Failure in communication between processor
on controller and UNIRCV ASIC on DS3 I/O interface module.
A/B DS1 Prov. ERROR LEGHORN Failure in communication between processor on controller and Leghorn ASIC on I/O interface module.
OFF NORMAL MESSAGE DISPLAYED ON USI STATUS ALARM SCREEN (CONT):

A/B ATPC LOW POWER LOCK A or B Automatic Transmit Power Control low
power lock function is enabled on USI control screen on DS1, DS3, or OC3/STM1 radio. Lock prevents ATPC from going high.
A/B ATPC HIGH POWER LOCK A or B Automatic Transmit Power Control
high power lock function is enabled on USI control screen on DS1, DS3, or OC3/
STM-1 radio. Lock prevents ATPC from going low.

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Functional Description Section

EEPROM PROV DOES NOT MATCH MODULE PROV Stored provisioning in


controller memory does not match provisioning stored in module memory.
XMTR Capacity Key Mismatch Part numbers of capacity keys on A and B
XMTRs are different.
RCVR Capacity Key Mismatch Part numbers of capacity keys on A and B
RCVRs are different.
A/B Tx OVERRIDE A or B XMTR has been switched and locked in-service
using controls on the front panel of the controller module. Online XMTR will not
switch out-of-service regardless of alarms.
A/B Rx OVERRIDE A or B RCVR has been switched and locked in-service
using controls on the front panel of the controller module. Online RCVR will not
switch out-of-service regardless of alarms.
A/B I/O OVERRIDE A or B I/O interface has been switched and locked in-service using controls on the front panel of the controller module. Online I/O will not
switch out-of-service regardless of alarms.

3.14.4.5 Relay Control Outputs

Note
Control outputs and control status inputs operate together to perform control functions. The control status inputs to the relay interface must be properly wired to the external equipment that is being controlled by the
associated control output in order to display the ON or OFF status on the
USI control screen. Without the control status inputs, the control function on
the USI screen will still turn on equipment/functions, but no status will be
indicated and, once turned on, the equipment/function cannot be turned off.
Six relay control outputs (CTRL 1-6) provide relay closure to ground (provisioned NO) or
open (provisioned NC) when activated. These relays default to open if card power is lost. The
maximum contact rating for each relay is 0.5 A, 100 V.

3.14.4.6 Control Status Inputs


Nine buffered status inputs (CTRL STATUS 1-6) from the equipment controlled by the
CTRL 1-6 outputs, verifying the controlled function. The inputs are diode protected from
voltages outside of the 0 to +5 V range, and have a 10K ohm resistor for current limiting purposes. In addition, each input has a 100K Ohm pull-up resistor.

3.14.4.7 Remote Inventory Function


The 256 X 8 bit EEPROM stores inventory information that is read by the AE-37Y Controller when the remote inventory function is initiated using the USI screens. Inventory data
including part number, software revision, type number, and hardware revision are stored in
the non-volatile memory.

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3.14.4.8 Watchdog Timer (WDT)


If the software is unable to toggle a watchdog circuit clear bit every 70 ms, a hardware
watchdog timer resets the module. The circuit is a dual one-shot whose first stage is constantly retriggered every 70 ms to prevent a pulse from being sent to the second stage. Failure of the clear bit to toggle in time after an initial pulse is received causes the second stage
to fire and reset the module.

Table 3 - 9 Alarms
ALARM

FUNCTION

Controller

This alarm indicates a failure in the controller microprocessor operation.

Off Normal (COM)

This alarm is generated by the receive interface, controller


switches, or USI computer control functions. It indicates a
switch or control is not in the normal position.

MUX Input Loss (COM)

Indicates loss of input signal or inability to recover clock


on the alarmed line. May also indicate detection of bipolar violations.

RF Power (TX)

Indicates loss of transmit signal detected at output stage of


power amplifier.

Common Loss (TX)

Common Loss Alarm (CLA) is generally an indication of a


silent failure (no alarm activated) at the transmitter. The
common loss alarm, generated by the AE-37Y Controller,
triggers when both A-side and B-side downstream receivers have a radio frame loss or channel failure. In a hotstandby hop, loss of both receivers initiates a request to
switch to the standby transmitter, even though no transmit
alarms are present. If the path is nominal, the transmitter
switches in 5 seconds. If the path is in a fade (ATPC is in
active range), the transmitter switches in 30 seconds. If
the downstream alarms clear within 5 seconds, a CLA is
initiated on the off-line side to indicate a silent transmit
failure. If alarms still exist, the transmitter continues to
switch at the provisioned rate. This process continues until
the receive alarms clear, but no CLA is activated.

APC Timeout (TX)

Indicates ATPC has been active for 5 minutes without


returning to normal (only if ATPC has been enabled with
timeout).

Channel Alarm (RX)

Indicates loss of signal lock in receive interface. May be


due to loss of RX signal or LO off frequency.

RSL Alarm (RX)

Indicates low RSL on alarmed receiver.

Eye Closure (RX)

This alarm usually indicates a degraded signal.

RCV Frm Loss (RX)

Indicates loss of receive radio frame in I/O interface.

DEMUX Alarm (RX)

Indicates loss of receive clock, buffer spills, or alarm insertion signal on the alarmed line. May also be caused by
DS1 driver failure.
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Functional Description Section

3.15
POWER DISTRIBUTION
See Figure 3 - 98. Power is supplied to the basic radio at the backplane. Primary power is 20.5
to 60 Vdc. The CE-16BB Power Supplies have floating +/- power inputs that allow for positive
or negative ground operation. Strapping on the backplane allows for positive or negative
ground connection. Primary power protection for the Power Supply is provided by a 20 amp
input fuse.
The power supply converts 20.5 to 60 Vdc power from the battery to +10.5, +12, -12, and -5
Vdc outputs. The power supply provides + and -12 Vdc operating power to all modules except
the power amplifier and provides +10.5 and -5 Vdc outputs to the power amplifier.
3.15.1 Hot-Standby
In the hot-standby configuration, the A power supply supplies the operating voltage for the
AE-37Y Controller, AE-27AF Relay Interface, and the A-side modules. The B power supply
supplies the operating voltage for the AE-37Y Controller, AE-27AF Relay Interface, and B-side
modules.
3.15.2 Input Power Protection
Input power protection circuits protect the power supply against improper input power,
improper input power wiring, and improper module removal and installation.

3.15.2.1 Input Power Wiring Protection


The potential on the +BATT input (J1/J2-1) must be more positive (higher) than the potential on the -BATT input (J1/J2-3) to prevent blowing the input fuses. Since the power supply
is floating, and either a positive voltage or round is more positive than the -BATT input,
either input is acceptable for normal operation. The input diode(s) on the power supply module provide protection for a wiring error causing reverse input potential.

3.15.2.2 Module Removal/Installation Protection


Hall effect switches on the module insertion and removal tabs prevent the power supply
module from being removed or installed with power outputs enabled.
3.15.3 C-Sourced Output Drivers
See Figure 3 - 99 for block diagram. In the A and B I/O Interface modules, +5 Vdc is developed
from the +12 Vdc inputs. In each module, the +5 Vdc is applied to one side of an OR gate and is
sent to the other I/O interface module via the backplane. The other side of the OR gate is supplied by the +5 Vdc from the opposite I/O interface. The internally generated +5 Vdc and the
+5 Vdc from the other I/O interface module are diode ORed to drive the MUX and DEMUX
output line drivers. This protects the outputs if power is lost to either the A or B side. During
normal operation the higher +5 Vdc is predominate.

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+10.5 V
5 V

DX35( )
I/O INTFC
A

UD35( )
XMTR
A

UD36( )
RCVR
A

UD51( )
PWR AMP
A

+12 V (DIGITAL)

CE16BB
POWER
SUPPLY
A

CE16BB
POWER
SUPPLY
B

+/12 V (ANALOG)
AE27AF
RELAY
INTFC

+5 V

AE37( )
CNTLR

+5 V

+12 V (DIGITAL)
+/12 V (ANALOG)

+10.5 V
DX35( )
I/O INTFC
B

UD35( )
XMTR
B

UD36( )
RCVR
B

UD51( )
PWR AMP
B
5 V

MW21100061
050898

Figure 3 - 98 Power Distribution Block Diagram


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Functional Description Section

I/O INTFC MODULE

DRIVER

MX X/Y RAIL 1-4

LIO
ASIC

TO/FROM
OTHER
I/O INTFC
MODULE

+5V
OR

TO
LBO
XMT

+5V

+5V

DS1/E1
DX T/R 1-4

TO
LBO
RCV

LEGHORN
ASIC

DRIVER
(1 OF 16)
LMW-1031F
3/14/99

Figure 3 - 99 C-Source Power to I/O Interface Output Drivers

3.15.4 CE-16BB Power Supply


The CE-16BB Power Supply is a switched-mode supply that provides multiple, regulated outputs from a semiregulated 20.5 to 60 Vdc battery source (Figure 3 - 101). Regulated output
voltages of +10.5, +12, -12 and -5 Vdc are provided with overload and overvoltage protection on
all the regulated outputs. Front panel indicators are provided for module alarm and switch off
normal status. An alarm is provided for an under voltage condition on any output, a loss of primary power, or a blown fuse. A serial I2C interface to a 256 byte serial EEPROM is provided
for inventory control.

3.15.4.1 Configurations
There are currently four versions of the CD-16BB Power Supply. All have the same part
number and functions are identical, with different designs to meet the same design requirements. Alcatel originally designed and manufactured the power supplies that are now being
supplied to Alcatel. See Figure 3 - 100 for the CE-16BB Power Supply interconnect diagram.
See Figure 3 - 101 for a typical functional block diagram.

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Issue 3
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P101

P102

BATT +
+12 Vdc (Digital)
J1/J2

GND
BATT -

CE-16BB
Power
Supply

+12 Vdc (Analog)

SER CLK

I/O INTFC
XMTR
RCVR
Controller
Relay INTFC

XMTR
RCVR
RF SW Assy
Controller
Relay INTFC

SER DAT

Controller

REM S/D

+10.5 Vdc

Lamp Test

Remote Sense

P101

-5 Vdc

-12 Vdc

PWR
Ampl

XMTR
RCVR
Fan Assy
Relay INTFC

PS ALM NC
+10.5V Temp
+12.5V Temp
+BATT MON
-BATT MON
+10.5Vdc I MON

Controller

+12.5Vdc I MON
-12.5Vdc I MON
-5Vdc I MON
MDR-1260
11/16/06

Figure 3 - 100 CE-16BB Power Supply Interconnect Diagram


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Functional Description Section

Figure 3 - 101 CE-16BB Power Supply Functional Block Diagram


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The office battery is applied through a 15 A fast-blow fuse to the input filter. Battery noise
present on the -48 Vdc inputs is attenuated by the filter, which in turn reduces noise on
power supply outputs. The output of the filter is applied to the +10.5 Vdc and +12 Vdc DC/
DC converters.

3.15.4.2 Features And Application Notes


Operates from 20.5 to 60 Vdc input battery voltage to provide regulated output voltages
Provides +10.5 Vdc, 0 to 12 A
Provides +12 Vdc, 0 to 9 A
Provides -12 Vdc, 0 to 700 mA
Provides -5 Vdc, 0 to 100 mA
Provides front panel and remote shutdown of +10.5 output
Provides front-panel indicators for module failure and switch off normal
Front access +10.5, +12, -12, and -5 Vdc, and GROUND test points
Provides slow-start power to limit inrush current
Provides field replaceable main power input fuses

3.15.4.3 +10.5 Volt DC/DC Converter


The +10.5 volt converter is a switching-type regulator that supplies +10.5 volts dc operating
power to the power amplifier via connector P102. An overvoltage circuit monitors the power
supply output and shuts down the supply if an overvoltage condition occurs. Circuit temperature sensing is provided.
Sensing circuits are used to monitor and automatically control the +10.5 Vdc voltage at the
output of the +10.5 volt dc-to-dc converter. The sensing circuits are part of the feedback loop
that maintains a constant voltage level at the input to the Pa. Any loss in the voltage at the
load (PA) is detected and a REMOTE SENSE control signal is developed. The REMOTE
SENSE signal is fed back to the dc-to-dc converter and the +10.5 Vdc output is adjusted to
compensate for the loss.

3.15.4.4 +12 Volt DC/DC Converter


The +12 volt converter is a switching-type regulator that supplies +12 volts dc operating
power to the applicable modules in the power distribution subsystem and cooling fans (if
equipped). Circuit temperature sensing is provided. The +12 volt output is filtered and supplied to the -12 Vdc DC/DC converter.

3.15.4.5 -12 Volt DC/DC Converter


The -12 volt converter is a switching-type regulator that supplies -12 volts dc operating
power to the applicable modules in the power distribution subsystem. The -12 volt output is
filtered and supplied to the -5 Vdc regulator.

3.15.4.6 -5 Volt Regulator


The -5 volt regulator converts the applied -12 Vdc to -5 Vdc and supplies regulated -5 volts dc
operating power to the PA.
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Functional Description Section

3.15.4.7 Under/Overvoltage Sensor And Alarm Circuits


The under/overvoltage detector circuit monitors each of the power supply outputs for a possible undervoltage or overvoltage condition. Should an output voltage drop below or rise
above normal, this circuit provides an output to the module alarm circuits. The module
alarm circuits monitor the power supply controllers and the under/overvoltage sensor, and
they respond to any abnormal condition by lighting the red module ALARM indicator and
generating an alarm output to the controller.
Dedicated circuits in the under/overvoltage detector circuit monitor the -5 and -12 volts for
undervoltage and shut down the +10.5 volt converter to prevent damage to the FETs.

3.15.4.8 Hall Effect Switch


The Hall effect switch function prevents the power supply from being inserted or removed
from the shelf with voltage regulator outputs enabled. The function consists of top and bottom insertion and extraction tabs, Hall effect switches, AND gate, OR gate, +10.5 Vdc DC/
DC converter, and +12 Vdc DC/DC converter. The Hall effect switch is triggered by the
removal of the magnetic field generated by the magnet attached to the insertion and extraction tab. The field is removed from the associated Hall effect switch when the insertion and
extraction tab is lifted to remove the module. When either top or bottom insertion and
extraction tab has been lifted, the logic output of the AND gate is applied to the OR gate.
Either this logic or the input from the input under voltage protection circuit generates the
output of the OR gate which is applied to two other OR gates, controlling the gate voltage to
the +10.5 Vdc DC/DC converter, and +12 Vdc DC/DC converter.

3.15.4.9 PA Disable and Remote Shutdown


When closed, the PA DISABLE switch turns off the 10.5 Vdc/DC converter and removes the
10.5 Vdc output to the PA, disabling the PA. The remote shutdown function allows the AE37Y Controller to turn off the 10.5 Vdc/DC converter and shut down the 10.5 Vdc output to
the PA, disabling the PA.

3.15.4.10 I2C Bus


An EEPROM to interface the I2C bus is provided. The I2C bus communicates module part
number, serial number, and revision history information to the AE-37Y Controller.

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4

3EM20188AAAA
Installation Section

INSTALLATION

INTRODUCTION
This section provides information for installing Alcatel MDR-8000 hot-standby shelf. Instructions are included to customize the installation for individual requirements. Refer to the following appendices for similar installation information for the Compact radio:
4.1

Appendix F Compact Indoor Shelf.


Appendix G Compact Outdoor Unit
The MDR-8000 can be ordered as a stand-alone shelf assembly and can be installed in a customer-equipped bay or cabinet or an Alcatel rack. Appendix A provides instructions for installing a rack. The MDR-8000 is shipped ready for installation with internal wiring completely
installed. All required assemblies and modules are shipped installed. Engineering drawings
referenced throughout the text are located in the Diagrams Section.
INSTALLATION TOOLS
Use standard installation tools. No special tools are required to install MDR-8000
equipment.
4.2

UNPACKING AND INSPECTION


This chart provides instructions for unpacking and inspecting equipment. Associated kits and
cables are packed separately.
4.3

DANGER
Possibility of
Injury
to Personnel

The material-handling equipment necessar y for safety includes a


forklift truck, lifting sling, or block and tackle. To prevent injur y to
personnel when operating the material-handling equipment, use
extreme care and follow standard safety precautions.

WARNING
Possibility of
Damage
to Equipment

Exercise care when moving equipment to avoid excessive shock


or vibration that can cause damage to the equipment.
1

Unpack and inspect equipment in an area that is dry, dust-free, and as close to
final installation location as possible.

Place box or crate on level floor.

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Installation Section
3EM20188AAAA

DANGER
Possibility of
Injury
to Personnel

Take care to prevent banding from recoiling when cut.


3

Use common shears to cut banding around box or crate. See Figure 4 - 1.

Remove top of box carefully to avoid damaging equipment. Remove packing or


bracing material.

Use shears to cut open moisture-vapor barrier bag. Remove packing or bracing
material.

Before removing equipment from box or crate, check for parts that may have
become loose during shipment.

Remove equipment from box and place on flat surface.

Dispose of shipping material per local practice.

Check equipment against packing list.

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

Do not install damaged equipment as it can adversely affect other


equipment.
10 Inspect equipment for physical damage. If any items are missing or damaged,

immediately notify the transportation carrier and Alcatel Network Systems.


11 Photograph all damaged equipment, and retain all inspection and packing docu-

mentation for reference.

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3EM20188AAAA
Installation Section

Figure 4 - 1 Unpacking Diagram


INSTALL RACK
Rack, PDU, and hardware are optional. Install rack and/or PDU and/or hardware in accordance with procedures in Diagrams.
4.4

INSTALL MDR-8000 SHELF IN RACK


Figure 4 - 2 shows a fully equipped DS1/E1/DS3 rack containing PDU, three MDR-8000
shelves, and associated fan assemblies and heat deflectors. Figure 4 - 3 shows a fully equipped
OC3/STM-1 rack containing PDU, three MDR-8000 shelves, and associated fan assemblies,
heat deflectors and fiber optic management panels. The fan assembly and heat deflector are
always required for the following:
4.5

PA s with +27 to +33 dBm output power, regardless of mounting configuration.


Stacked installations with two or three shelves in one rack.
Installations with an open space between shelves, such as the last shelf in the rack, require
only the fan assembly.
PDU 695-6200-001 can accommodate up to three MDR-8000 shelves for 48 Vdc or two shelves
for 24 Vdc. A second PDU is required to power the third shelf when 24 Vdc is required.
PDU 3EM13317AA supports up to four radios and two auxiliary shelves for 24 and 48 V dc.

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Installation Section
3EM20188AAAA

2.50"
6"

8.97"

RACK
POSITION

RACK
INCREMENTS

WAVEGUIDE
TRANSITIONS

1
2

PDU

A1

3
4
5

MDR-8000
SHELF 1

A2

10

FAN ASSY

A3

11

HEAT DEFLECTOR

A4

MDR-8000
SHELF 2

A5

19

FAN ASSY

A6

20

HEAT DEFLECTOR

A7

MDR-8000
SHELF 3

A8

28

FAN ASSY

A9

29

OPEN
SPACE

6
7
8
9

WAVEGUIDE
SUPPORT
BRACKET

12
13
14
15
16
17
18

21
22
23
24
25
26
27

30
31
32

OTHER
EQUIPMENT
FRONT VIEW

SIDE VIEW

Figure 4 - 2 Typical DS1/E1/DS3 Rack Mounting Configuration


4-4

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3EM20188AAAA
Installation Section

SEISMIC

STANDARD ALUMINUM
1
81.125

PDU PANEL

3
4
5
6
7
8
9

FAN UNIT

10

HEAT DEFLECTOR

11
12
13
14

48 VDC

15
16
17
18

FAN UNIT

19

HEAT DEFLECTOR

20
21
22
23

48 VDC

24
25
26
27

FAN UNIT

PDU PANEL

3
1
2

48 VDC

28

LAPTOP

29

FIBER MANAGEMENT PANEL

30

FIBER MANAGEMENT PANEL

31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43

4
5
6
7

48 VDC

8
9
10
11

FAN UNIT

12

HEAT DEFLECTOR

13
14
15
16

48 VDC

17
18
19
20

FAN UNIT

21

HEAT DEFLECTOR

22
23
24
25

48 VDC

26
27
28
29
30
31
32

FAN UNIT
LAPTOP
FIBER MANAGEMENT PANEL
FIBER MANAGEMENT PANEL

33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

LMW-6036
03/12/02

Figure 4 - 3 Typical OC3/STM-1 Rack Mounting Configuration


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Installation Section
3EM20188AAAA

MDR-8000 Shelf Installation


See Figure 4 - 4 for installation procedures. Install shelf in rack as shown.
4.5.1

RACK
CHANNEL

FRONT
OF SHELF

INSTALL WITH EIGHT


1224 SCREWS

MW21100631
112498

Figure 4 - 4 Shelf Installation


Fan Assembly Installation
See Figure 4 - 5 for installation procedures. Install fan assembly in rack as shown.
4.5.2

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3EM20188AAAA
Installation Section

MDR-8000
BACKPLANE
J302

INSTALL IMMEDIATELY
BELOW MDR-8000
SHELF ASSEMBLY.

INSTALL WITH FOUR


1224 SCREWS.

HEAT
DEFLECTOR
(MANUFACTURE
DISCONTINUED)

INSTALL WITH TWO


1224 SCREWS.

LMW-3139-sm
11/21/06

Figure 4 - 5 Typical Fan Assembly Installation


WAVEGUIDE INSTALLATION
Waveguide kits and cable drop kits are provided for single and dual antennas. Refer to
Waveguide Interface Kits drawing (967-1665-000) in the Diagrams section for kit list of materials. Kit functions are described in the Equipping Option drawing (3DH 03177 0000 BJZZA).
4.6

The customer provided interface is the antenna port on the diplexer or filter. Components
required to connect to customer furnished antenna are optional. Connect cables, isolators, circulators and waveguide flanges to meet customer requirements. Refer to Equipping Option
drawing (3DH 03177 0000 BJZZA) in the Diagrams section for waveguide, flange, and cable
information.
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Installation Section
3EM20188AAAA

Waveguide Kit Installation


See Figure 4 - 6. Waveguide kits are available for 1-, 2-, or 3-shelf rack solutions. Each
waveguide kit consists of waveguide, waveguide transitions, mounting brackets, and mounting
hardware. A waveguide flange adapter is required to interface pressurized waveguide with the
waveguide transition and must be ordered separately.
4.6.1

RACK
INCREMENTS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

10

11

12
13
14
15
16

ANT
PORT

17
18
19
20
21
22

DIPLEXER

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32

REAR VIEW

Figure 4 - 6 Waveguide Kit Installation (Sheet 1 of 2)


4-8

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3EM20188AAAA
Installation Section

2'

3'

1'

RACK
INCREMENTS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

1'

8
9

10

3'

2'

11

12
13
14
15

FILTER

16

ANT
PORT

17
18
19
20
21
22
23

DIPLEXER
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32

REAR VIEW

LMW-3165-sm
05/10/00

Figure 4 - 6 Waveguide Kit Installation (Sheet 2 of 2)


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Installation Section
3EM20188AAAA

Cable Drop Kit Installation


See Figure 4 - 7. Cable drop kits are available for 1-, 2-, or 3-shelf solutions. Each cable drop kit
consists of cables, waveguide transition, mounting brackets, and mounting hardware. The
cable drop option is an alternative method of interfacing the waveguide transitions with
diplexers/filters using cables versus lengths of waveguide. A waveguide flange adapter is
required to interface pressurized waveguide with the waveguide transition and must be
ordered separately.
4.6.2

RACK
INCREMENT

RACK
INCREMENT

SEMI-FLEX
CABLE
IS P/O KIT

9
10

8
9
10

11

11

12

12

13

13

ANT
PORT

14

14

15

15

16

16

17

17

18

18
19

19

FILTER

20

20
21

21
22

DIPLEXER

23

22
23

24

24

25

25

26

26

27

27

28

28

29

29

30

30

31

31

32

32

1. ANTENNA CONFIGURATION

2. ANTENNA CONFIGURATION
LMW-3167A-sm
05/10/00

Figure 4 - 7 Cable Drop Kit Installation


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3EM20188AAAA
Installation Section

CONNECTOR LOCATIONS
See Figure 4 - 8 for connector locations.

J301

4.7

LBO

J307
J315

J313

J308
J318

CONNECTOR DESIGNATION/FUNCTION
J302
J307
J308
J309
J310
J312
J313
J315
J318
J305
J316
J317

FAN/ALARM ASSY
MCS-11 MASTER
MCS-11 DAISYCHAIN
MCS-11 DAISYCHAIN
MCS-11 SPUR
RS-232 (1) PORT 3
RS-232 (2) PORT 4
LINK MONITOR CHANNEL (2)
LINK MONITOR CHANNEL (1)
CUSTOMER ALM/CONTROLS/TBOS
AUDIO PORT 1
AUDIO PORT 2

J309

J310

J305

J312
J316

J317

J302

CABLE ASSY OR CONNECTOR


9 PIN D
15 PIN D
15 PIN D
15 PIN D
15 PIN D
9 PIN D
9 PIN D
9 PIN D
9 PIN D
50 PIN
9 PIN D
9 PIN D

P/O FAN BOARD


695-4126-007/009/012
695-7837-021/025
695-7837-021/025
695-7837-031/035
695-4125-021/025
695-4125-021/025
695-4125-006/013
695-4125-006/013
695-4171-002
695-4125-026/030
OR 3DH 04178 AB
LMW-4014-sm
08/08/02

Figure 4 - 8 Backplane Connector Locations


INSTALL CABLE ASSEMBLIES
Refer to the Interconnect Section for cable installation details.
4.8

4-11

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Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

INTERCONNECT

5.1
SECTION INTRODUCTION
This section gives the location and describes strapping, power connections, signal connections,
status and alarm connections, and service channel connections for the MDR-8000 hot-standby
shelf. Refer to the following appendix for similar installation information for the Compact
radios:

Appendix F Compact Indoor Shelf.


Appendix G Compact Outdoor Unit
5.2
POWER CABLE CONNECTION
See Figure 5 - 1 for power cable assembly installation procedures. The MDR-8000 is internally
wired to accept 20.5 to 60 V dc input power with positive or negative ground. To protect maintenance personnel from lightning strikes, the ground system must be integrated by bonding station ground and dc battery return together. The dc power connectors J1 and J2 are located on
the rear of the back panel. Install power cables as shown.

DANGER
Possibility of
Injury
to Personnel

Shor t circuiting low-voltage, low-impedance dc circuits can cause


arcing that may result in bur ns or eye injur y. Remove rings,
watches, and other metal jewelr y while working with primar y
circuits. Exercise caution to avoid shor ting input power ter minals.

WARNING
Possibility of
Damage
to Equipment

To protect maintenance personnel from antenna tower lightning


strikes, the ground system must be integrated by bonding frame
ground and dc batter y return together.

WARNING
Possibility of
Damage
to Equipment

Do not apply batter y power until it is deter mined that A and B


batter y cables with isolated retur ns and power cables are wired
correctly. With power applied, reverse polarity on wiring (+batt
wired to -batt pin on connector) can cause power supply fuse to
blow.

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Issue 3
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Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Note
Grounding of pole, antenna, customer interfaces, and all entrances to the
building interior shall meet local electrical code and standard business
practices.

1. DETERMINE IF INSTALLATION
REQUIRES POS OR NEG GND.

PIN 1
POS

PIN 2
GND

PIN 3
NEG

2. INSTALL BATT, GND, AND JUMPER


WIRES ON PWR CABLE ASSEMBLY.
3. CONNECT PWR CABLE ASSEMBLY
TO J1 (AND J2 IF HOT-STBY).
4. CONNECT RACK GND AND
CHASSIS GND.

J1

(J2 ON OPPOSITE
END OF SHELF)

5. CONNECT BATT.
REAR VIEW OF SHELF

WARNING
Possibility of
Damage
To Equipment
PWR CABLE ASSEMBLY
PN 695-7845-005/009

To prevent connector damage and improper


wiring, ensure power cable mating connector is
properly oriented and aligned with shelf connector before attempting to seat connectors.

RED

ORN

BLK
CONNECT + BATT WIRE
TO + RACK GND FOR
POS GND INSTALLATIONS

ORN
12 AWG

CONNECT BATT WIRE


TO RACK GND FOR NEG
GND INSTALLATIONS
BLK
12 AWG

+ BATT

RED
12 AWG

CHASSIS
GND

Figure 5 - 1 Power Cable Connection


5-2

SLIDE-ON
LUG

BATT

LMW-3103F
11/20/06

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

5.3

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

PDU STRAPPING AND CONNECTIONS

BATTERY INPUT
WIRE SIZE NO. 4 (MAX)

+
A BATT

+
B BATT

TOP VIEW

POWER DISTRIBUTION PANEL


FRONT VIEW PANEL REMOVED
NEG
POS
'A' BATTERY 'A' BATTERY
-24/-48
+24/+48

NEG
POS
'B' BATTERY 'B' BATTERY
-24/-48
+24/+48

R3

TB1
TB2

TB3
TB4

E7 E15

E1 E3

E4 E6

E8

2C
2B

E2

STRAP E7 TO E15 FOR


POSITIVE INPUT VOLTAGE.
STRAP E8 TO E15 FOR
NEGATIVE INPUT VOLTAGE.

E5

2A

CIRCUIT BOARD
LOCATED INSIDE
POWER DISTRIBUTION
PANEL
FRONT VIEW

2D

CONNECT ALM INDICATOR TO


J2B AND J2C FOR 24V OPERATION.
CONNECT TO J2B AND J2D FOR 48V
OPERATION.

BRN

WHT

BLANK

JUMPER E2 TO E3 AND E5 TO E6 FOR POSITIVE


RACK GND. JUMPER E1 TO E2 AND E4 TO E5 FOR
NEGATIVE RACK GND. ALSO, MOVE CHASSIS GND
TO AGREE WITH RACK GND POLARITY. SEE FIGURE
3-1, POWER CABLE ASSEMBLY INSTALLATION,
AND APPLICATION DWG 3DH031770000 EJZZA.

ALARM
INDICATOR

ALARM CONNECTOR
(SHOWN POSITIONED
FOR 48V OPERATION).

PN 695-6200-001/002

LMW-7029F
10/10/05

Figure 5 - 2 PDU Strapping and Connections (Sheet 1 of 2)


5-3

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

BATTERY INPUT
WIRE SIZE NO. 4 (MAX)

POWER DISTRIBUTION UNIT


ISOMETRIC VIEW CIRCUIT BOARD
AND FRONT PANEL REMOVED

A+ A-

BATTERY

B+ B-

BATTERY

BATTERY

E38

E39

FUSES
3 4 5

FUSESFUSES
35 4 3 2

FUSES
4 3 2

E37

E42

E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6

E7 E2 E3 4 E15 E16 E17 E18

BATTERY

E40

E41

E19 E20 E21 E22 E23 E24

CIRCUIT BOARD
LOCATED INSIDE PDU
JUMPER E39 TO E38 AND E42 TO E41 FOR
POSITIVE RACK GND (AS SHOWN ABOVE).
JUMPER E37 TO E38 AND E40 TO E41 FOR
NEGATIVE RACK GND. FOR DETAILED WIRING
INFORMATION, SEE APPLICATION DWG
3DH031770000 EJZZA.
PN 3EM13317AA

Figure 5 - 2 PDU Strapping and Connections (Sheet 2 of 2)


5-4

LMW-9001
10/10/05

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

5.4
SHELF/RACK ALARM CONNECTION
Each MDR-8000 rack equipped with the Power Distribution Unit (PDU) 695-6200-001/002 has
a visual rack alarm indicator to report a shelf failure. In order to activate a rack alarm visual
indicator on the PDU, the shelf alarm output from each MDR-8000 shelf must be hardwired to
connector J1 on the PDU. The shelf alarm is provided on alarm connector J305 pin 24 (major/
visual alarm). A wire-wrap adapter (PN 695-4171-002) for connector J305 is available. Insulated 22-gauge solid copper wire is recommended for connecting to the wire-wrap adapter. To
attach to J1 (2-pin connector) on the PDU, use 2-position socket housing PN 372-0114-140 and
socket contact PN 372-0114-390. See Figure 5 - 3, sheet 1, for shelf-to-rack alarm wiring.

Each MDR-8000 rack equipped with PDU 3EM13317AA has a blown fuse alarm visual indicator
and a Form C relay alarm output (J4, J5, and J6) for connection to customer alarm equipment.
An optional Fuse and Shelf alarm plug-in assembly is available to provide shelf alarm connections requiring Form C relays. The alarm inputs (major and minor) must be hard wired to J3
on the PDU. The alarms are provided on alarm connector J305 pin 24 (major/visual alarm) and
pin 50 (minor/audible alarm) of each shelf. A wire-wrap adapter (PN 695-4171-002) for connector J305 is available. Insulated 22-gauge solid copper wire is recommended for connecting to
the wire-wrap adapter and also to J3 on the PDU. Alarm outputs are transmitted to customer
equipment via Form C relay outputs (J4, J5, J6, relays 1 through 8). This option also includes
the blown fuse alarm indicator and Form C relay alarm output (J4, J5, and J6 relay 9). See
Figure 5 - 3, sheet 2, for shelf to PDU alarm wiring.
5.5
MDR-8000 SYNCHRONOUS REPEATER CONNECTIONS
The following paragraphs describe the cabling and limitations involved with carrying MDR8000 service channel information across two (2) back-to-back radio terminals at a repeater
site. In this document, the term synchronous indicates that the clocks of the two radios are
locked together. Synchronous, in this document, has absolutely nothing to do with
whether or not the radios are transporting synchronous (SONET or SDH) data.

Where allowed, only two radios can be tied together synchronously. In scenarios where there
are three (3) radios (or some other odd number of radios), the third radio must be clocked independently or asynchronously from the first two.

Note
There are several scenarios that prevent two radios from being connected
synchronously. This document attempts to lay down the rules for MDR-8000
synchronous repeater cable usage.

Note
Multiple service channel functions [i.e., orderwire, fault alarm, RS-232 and
extended link monitor channel (ELMC) data] can be carried across a common synchronous repeater cable. When asynchronous connections are
required between radios, each service channel function (i.e., orderwire, fault
alarm, ELMC, etc.) must be carried across its own independent cable.

5-5

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

E30

E31

E32

E33

E7

E15

F4

R1
R2

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

TO ATTACH USE:
2 - POSITION SOCKET HOUSING:
PN 372-0114-140
AND SOCKET CONTACT:
PN 372-0114-390

E8

E34

E4

E5

J2C
J2B

ABAM CABLE
PN 424-0429-030

J2D

J2A

WIRE WRAP ADAPTER


(PN 695-4171-002)
24

PIN 1

MAJOR / VISUAL ALM

PDU

MDR-8000 SHELF

J305

24
MAJOR / VISUAL ALM

FAN ASSY
HEAT DEFLECTOR

MDR-8000 SHELF

J305

FAN ASSY

LMW-7070F
07/24/02

Figure 5 - 3 Shelf Alarm Wiring PDU (695-6200-001/002) (Sheet 1 of 2)


5-6

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

RACK GND

20 AMP

20 AMP

20 AMP

20 AMP

FUSES

E13 E14 E15 E16 E17 E18


1 AMP

E25 E26 E27 E28 E29 E30

10 AMP

10 AMP

E7 E8 E9 E10 E11 E12

10 AMP

1 AMP

1 AMP

1 AMP

10 AMP

20 AMP

FUSES

20 AMP

20 AMP

1
20 AMP

FUSE ALARM INDICATOR

E31 E32 E33 E34 E35 E36

RACK GND

WIRE WRAP
ALARM INPUT
J3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

ALARM OUTPUT
J4 J5 J6

MAJOR 1
MINOR 1
MAJOR 2
MINOR 2
MAJOR 3
MINOR 3
MAJOR 4/AUX
MINOR 4/AUX
UNUSED

1
2
3
CUSTOMER
4
OUTPUTS
5
6
7
8
FUSE ALM
NC COM NO

PIN 1

24
PDU

MDR-8000 SHELF

J305

WIRE WRAP ADAPTER

50

24

PIN 1

FAN ASSY
HEAT DEFLECTOR

MDR-8000 SHELF

J305

50

FAN ASSY

LMW-8057F
04/23/03

Figure 5 - 3 Shelf Alarm Wiring PDU (3EM13317AA) (Sheet 2 of 2)


5-7

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

5.5.1 Low Capacity DS1 Radios


The MDR-8000 synchronous repeater connection J314 in a low capacity DS1 radio is used to
pass orderwire, fault alarm, ELMC, and DS1 traffic between two (2) back-to-back low capacity
terminals over a common cable. The framing structure of the X/Y rail pairs being passed over
the synchronous repeater cable are the same for radios equipped to transport 4, 8, 12, or 16
DS1s but unique for 2 DS1. Because of the difference in frame structure, a radio configured
to transport 2 DS1 radio can only be connected via the J314 synchronous repeater cable
to another 2 DS1 radio. There are no restrictions with any combinations of capacity above 2
DS1. Connections for the service channels from a radio configured for 2 DS1 to a radio configured for 4, 8, 12, or 16 DS1s must be interconnected asynchronously.

Note
The DS1 version of the radio is the only one that can pass its through traffic across the synchronous repeater cable.

Note
The E1 version of the radio uses all of the same components as the DS1, with
the exception of the capacity keys and LBOs. Therefore, its operation is virtually identical to the DS1. However, an E1 radio cannot be configured as a
synchronous repeater with a DS1 radio.
5.5.2 High Capacity DS3 Radios
The MDR-8000 synchronous repeater connection J401 in a high capacity DS3 radio is used to
pass orderwire, fault alarm and ELMC data between two (2) back-to-back high capacity terminals over a common cable. The frame structure of the data transported over the synchronous
repeater cable on radios configured to transport 1 or 3 DS3 is the same for both capacities.
Repeater connections using J401 between a radio configured for 1 DS3 and a radio configured
for 3 DS3s is allowed. Repeater connections between a radio configured for DS1 or OC3
capacities to a radio configured for DS3 capacities using J314 to J401 or J203 to J401 are
not allowed. Connections between a radio configured for DS1, E1, or OC3 capacities and a
radio configured for DS3 capacities must be interconnected asynchronously.
5.5.3 High Capacity OC3 Radios
The MDR-8000s synchronous repeater connection J203 in a high capacity OC3 radio is used
to pass orderwire, fault alarm and ELMC data between two (2) back-to-back high capacity
terminals over a common cable. The orderwire, fault alarm and ELMC data is multiplexed
together into a standard T1. The multiplexed T1 data is the same for either version of the
OC3 radio, 10 MHz/1STS-1 or 30 MHz/3STS-1 payload. Therefore, repeater connections
using J203 between a radio configured for 1 STS-1 and a radio configured for 3 STS-1s is
allowed. Repeater connections between an OC3 version of the radio and a non-OC3 version
of the radio using J203 to J314 or J203 to J401 are not allowed. Connections between a radio
configured for OC3 capacities and a radio configured for DS1 or DS3 capacities must be
interconnected asynchronously.

5-8

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Note
Having the radio overhead multiplexed together into a standard T1 also
allows the overhead to be transported over non-Alcatel radio facilities (i.e.,
channel banks, fiber optic terminals, or no-Alcatel radio equipment). This
feature is extremely useful in SONET rings where part of the ring will be
MDR-8000s OC3 radio and part will be SONET fiber equipment.
5.5.4 MDR-8000 Synchronous Repeater Compatibility Matrix
Table 5 - 1 lists the combinations of MDR-8000 capacities that support the use of the synchronous repeater cable.

Table 5 - 1 Synchronous Repeater Compatibility


Radio #2 Capacity
Radio #1
Capacity

DS1

DS3

OC3
10
MHz

30
MHz

OC3
(10 MHz)

OC3
(30 MHz)

12

16

4 DS1

8 DS1

12 DS1

16 DS1

1 DS3

3 DS3

2 DS1

X denotes allowable combinations of use

5.5.5 MDR-8000 Synchronous Repeater Cables


Refer to Table 5 - 2.

Notes:
1 For both High and Low capacity applications, refer to drawing number
3DH031770000EJZZA for the specific cable connections.
2 The MDR-8000 Synchronous Repeater Cable part number is the same for both the
DS1 and D3 versions of the radio. Refer to drawing number 3DH031770000BJZZA
for cable dash numbers and lengths.
3 The MDR-8000 Synchronous repeater Cable for the OC3 version of the radio uses the
same part number as the ELMC cable.
5-9

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 2 Synchronous Repeater Cables


Capacity

Part Number

Designation

No. of Pins

DS1

695-7863-001/005

J314

50

DS3

695-7863-001/005

J401

50

OC3

695-4125-010/013

J203

5.6
DS1 CONNECTIONS (J303 IN AND J304 OUT)
Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-7806-001 through -005 (22 AWG 16 pair
shielded, jacketed cable with 37-pin D-type connector on one end). See Figure 5 - 4 for shelf connector location and pinout. Refer to Table 5 - 3 for mating cable wiring and color code.

T1 1-16

T1 17-32

J323

J324

T1 17-32

J303/J304

19

37

20

FRONT VIEW

LMW-9037F
07/03/07

Figure 5 - 4 DS1 Connectors Location and Pinout


5-10

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 3 DS1 IN J303 and DS1 OUT J304 Pinout Assignments


CONNECTOR PIN
NUMBER

WIRE COLOR

SIGNAL NAME

WHITEBLUE

CHAN 1 TIP

20

BLUEWHITE

CHAN 1 RING

WHITEORANGE

CHAN 2 TIP

21

ORANGEWHITE

CHAN 2 RING

WHITEGREEN

CHAN 3 TIP

22

GREENWHITE

CHAN 3 RING

WHITEBROWN

CHAN 4 TIP

23

BROWNWHITE

CHAN 4 RING

WHITESLATE

CHAN 5 TIP

24

SLATEWHITE

CHAN 5 RING

REDBLUE

CHAN 6 TIP

25

BLUERED

CHAN 6 RING

REDORANGE

CHAN 7 TIP

26

ORANGERED

CHAN 7 RING

REDGREEN

CHAN 8 TIP

27

GREENRED

CHAN 8 RING

REDBROWN

CHAN 9 TIP

28

BROWNRED

CHAN 9 RING

10

REDSLATE

CHAN 10 TIP

29

SLATERED

CHAN 10 RING

11

BLACKBLUE

CHAN 11 TIP

30

BLUEBLACK

CHAN 11 RING

12

BLACKORANGE

CHAN 12 TIP

31

ORANGEBLACK

CHAN 12 RING

13

BLACKGREEN

CHAN 13 TIP

32

GREENBLACK

CHAN 13 RING

14

BLACKBROWN

CHAN 14 TIP

33

BROWNBLACK

CHAN 14 RING

15

BLACKSLATE

CHAN 15 TIP

34

SLATEBLACK

CHAN 15 RING

16

YELLOWBLUE

CHAN 16 TIP

35

BLUEYELLOW

CHAN 16 RING

CABLE PAIR NUMBER


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

5-11

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

5.7

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

DS1 REPEATER (J314 ON ONE SHELF TO J314 ON SECOND SHELF)

Note
The DS1 repeater cable carries clocks, DS1 data, and overhead for two
directions. If the 314 cable is not used, the embedded data in the overhead
must be cabled individually. In this case, individual cables must be run for
MCS11, audio, RS-232, and ELMC.
Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 6957836001/005 (25 pair shielded cable
with 50 pin Amp connectors) (SCSI). See Figure 5 - 5 for shelf connector location and pinout.
Refer to Table 5 - 4 for mating cable wiring and color code.

Note
Use repeater cables for cabling repeater shelf 1 to repeater shelf 2 (eastbound/westbound data/clock)

LBO

25

J314

PIN 1

26

50
FRONT VIEW

Figure 5 - 5 Connector J314 Location DS1 LBO


5-12

LMW-9038F
05/29/03

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 4 Repeater Mating Cable DS1 LBO


FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE COLOR

PAIR

END 2

FUNCTION

NOT USED

26

WHT/TAN

25

NOT USED

NOT USED

01

TAN/WHT

50

NOT USED

RCV SYNC T

27

WHT/BRN

24

XMT SYNC T

RCV SYNC F

02

BRN/WHT

49

XMT SYNC F

NOT USED

28

WHT/PNK

23

NOT USED

NOT USED

03

PNK/WHT

48

NOT USED

RCV XID T

29

WHT/ORN

22

XMT XID T

RCV XID F

04

ORN/WHT

47

XMT XID F

RCV YID T

30

WHT/YEL

21

XMT YID T

RCV YID F

05

YEL/WHT

46

XMT YID F

RCV X2D T

31

WHT/GRN

20

XMT X2D T

RCV X2D F

06

GRN/WHT

45

XMT X2D F

RCV Y2D T

32

WHT/BLU

19

XMT Y2D T

RCV Y2D F

07

BLU/WHT

44

XMT Y2D F

RCV X3D T

33

WHT/VIO

18

XMT X3D T

RCV X3D F

08

VIO/WHT

43

XMT X3D F

RCV Y3D T

34

WHT/GRY

17

XMT Y3D T

RCV Y3D F

09

GRY/WHT

42

XMT Y3D F

RCV X4D T

35

TAN/BRN

10

16

XMT X4D T

RCV X4D F

10

BRN/TAN

10

41

XMT X4D F

RCV Y4D T

36

TAN/PNK

11

15

XMT Y4D T

RCV Y4D F

11

PNK/TAN

11

40

XMT Y4D F

NOT USED

37

TAN/ORN

12

14

NOT USED

NOT USED

12

ORN/TAN

12

39

NOT USED

NOT USED

38

TAN/YEL

13

13

NOT USED

NOT USED

13

YEL/TAN

13

38

NOT USED

NOT USED

39

TAN/GRN

14

12

NOT USED

NOT USED

14

GRN/TAN

14

37

NOT USED

XMT Y4D T

15

TAN/BLU

15

36

RCV Y4D T

XMT Y4D F

40

BLU/TAN

15

11

RCV Y4D F

XMT X4D T

16

TAN/VIO

16

35

RCV X4D T

XMT X4D F

41

VIO/TAN

16

10

RCV X4D F

XMT Y3D T

17

TAN/GRY

17

34

RCV Y3D T

XMT Y3D F

42

GRY/TAN

17

09

RCV Y3D F

XMT X3D T

18

BRN/PNK

18

33

RCV X3D T

XMT X3D F

43

PNK/BRN

18

08

RCV X3D F
5-13

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 4 Repeater Mating Cable DS1 LBO (Cont.)


FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE COLOR

PAIR

END 2

FUNCTION

XMT Y2D T

19

BRN/ORN

19

32

RCV Y2D T

XMT Y2D F

44

ORN/BRN

19

07

RCV Y2D F

XMT X2D T

20

BRN/YEL

20

31

RCV X2D T

XMT X2D F

45

YEL/BRN

20

06

RCV X2D F

XMT Y1D T

21

BRN/GRN

21

30

RCV Y1D T

XMT Y1D F

46

GRN/BRN

21

05

RCV Y1D F

XMT X1D T

22

BRN/BLU

22

29

RCV X1D T

XMT X1D F

47

BLU/BRN

22

04

RCV X1D F

NOT USED

23

BRN/VIO

23

28

NOT USED

NOT USED

48

VIO/BRN

23

03

NOT USED

RPTR SYN T

24

BRN/GRY

24

27

RPTR SYN T

RPTR SYN F

49

GRY/BRN

24

02

RPTR SYN F

NOT USED

25

PNK/ORN

25

26

NOT USED

NOT USED

50

ORN/PNK

25

01

NOT USED

5.8
DS3 LBO STRAPPING AND CONNECTIONS
The DS3 LBO compensates for the distance to the cross-connect for DS3 and wayside DS1 outputs. See Figure 5 - 6 for strap locations. Refer to Table 5 - 5 for strapping requirements.

IN/OUT STRAPPING
FOR
WAYSIDE DS1 LINES

IN

IN

IN/OUT STRAPPING
FOR
DS3 LINES

LBO
LBO
OUT

IN

OUT

LBO

IN

OUT

LBO

OUT

DS3 LINE 1
DS3 LINE 2
DS3 LINE 3

WAYSIDE LINE 1
WAYSIDE LINE 2
WAYSIDE LINE 3

Figure 5 - 6 DS3 LBO Strapping


5-14

LMW-3149B-F
07/27/02

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Note
When using 734 or equivalent type DS3 cable, 450 feet is the maximum
length to the cross-connect. The maximum length with the LBO strapped IN
is 225 feet.

Table 5 - 5 DS3 LBO Strapping


OUTPUTS

DISTANCE TO CROSSCONNECT

STRAPPING

DS3

0 to 225 ft

In

DS3

226 to 450 ft

Out

Wayside DS1

0 to 330 ft

In

Wayside DS1

331 to 660 ft

Out

5.9
DS3 LBO DS3 BNC CONNECTIONS (J21 THROUGH J26)
BNC removal tool (PN 359-0092-010) is required for installing and removing BNC cables.

J301

Recommended connectorized cable assembly for all applications except repeaters, PN 6324429-096/180 (8/15 ft RG-59B/U coax cable with straight male BNC connector on one end and
right angle male BNC connector on other end). For repeater applications, recommend PN 6324288-096/180 (8/15 ft RG-59B/U coax cable with straight male BNC connector on each end).
See Figure 5 - 7 for locations. Refer to Table 5 - 6 for connections.

J307
J315

J313

J308

J309
J305

J318

J310

J312
J316

LINE 1 OUT J21

J22 LINE 1 IN

LINE 2 OUT J23

J24 LINE 2 IN

LINE 3 OUT J25

J26 LINE 3 IN

J317

FRONT VIEW

J302

LMW-7065F
07/23/02

Figure 5 - 7 DS3 LBO DS3 Connectors Location


5-15

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 6 DS3 LBO Connectors


DS3 INPUTS

DS3 OUTPUTS

FUNCTION

BNC
CONNECTOR

FUNCTION

BNC
CONNECTOR

DS3 LINE 1

J22

DS3 LINE 1

J21

DS3 LINE 2

J24

DS3 LINE 2

J23

DS3 LINE 3

J26

DS3 LINE 3

J25

5.10
DS3 LBO WAYSIDE DS1 CONNECTIONS (J201 IN AND J202 OUT)
Wayside DS1 is an option in the MDR-8000 DS3 radios. This option provides 1 DS1 for each
equipped DS3. To activate the wayside channels requires a small circuit board, called ELMC
option key, that plugs onto the controller module. The protection of the wayside channels follows the protection scheme of the radio configuration. In other words, if the radio is hotstandby the wayside channels are hot-standby. The channels are point to point just as is the
payload traffic. They are independent of the traffic and reside in the overhead channels. The
advantage of the wayside DS1 is the ability to drop 1 to 3 DS1s without having to add a 1:3
muldem to access the traffic. Refer to Table 5 - 7 for ELMC option key requirements for remote
monitoring/controlling wayside DS1s.

Table 5 - 7 Wayside DS1 Performance and Control


PART NO.

FUNCTION

ELMC Option Key

695-5647-019

Required to enable WS DS1 lines for remote wayside


DS1status

ELMC Option Key

695-5647-020

Required to enable WS DS1 lines for remote wayside


DS1status + remote provisioning and downloading

5.10.1 Wayside DS1 Terminal


Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-041 (26 AWG 5 pair shielded,
jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on one end. See Figure 5 - 8 for shelf connector location and pinout. Refer to Table 5 - 8 for mating cable wiring and color code.

5-16

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

J301

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

J307
J315

J313

J308
J318

J309

J310

J305

J312
J316

J317

J302

LINE 3 OUT TIP

LINE 3 IN TIP

GND

GND

J201
INPUT
5

LINE 2 IN TIP
LINE 1 IN TIP
1

J202
OUTPUT
5

LINE 2 OUT TIP


LINE 1 OUT TIP
1

LINE 1 IN RING

LINE 1 OUT RING

LINE 2 IN RING

LINE 2 OUT RING

LINE 3 IN RING

LINE 3 OUT RING

FRONT VIEW

FRONT VIEW
LMW-7069F
07/23/02

Figure 5 - 8 DS3 LBO Wayside DS1 Connectors Location and Pinout


5-17

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

5.10.2 Wayside DS1 Repeater


Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-051 (26 AWG 5 pair shielded,
jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on each end). See Figure 5-9 for Wayside DS1
repeater interconnect.

SHELF 1

SHELF 2

OUTPUT

J202

J202

OUTPUT

INPUT

J201

J201

INPUT

LMW-7071-sm
7/24/02

Figure 5-9 Wayside DS1 Repeater Interconnect

Table 5-8 Wayside DS1 Mating Cable DS3 LBO


J201 (INPUTS)

5-18

202 (OUTPUTS)

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

LINE 1 TIP IN

01

BLACK

BLACK

01

LINE 1 TIP OUT

LINE 1 RING IN

06

RED

RED

06

LINE 1 RING OUT

LINE 2 TIP IN

02

BLACK

BLACK

02

LINE 2 TIP OUT

LINE 2 RING IN

07

WHITE

WHITE

07

LINE 2 RING OUT

LINE 3 TIP IN

04

BLACK

BLACK

04

LINE 3 TIP OUT

LINE 3 RING IN

08

GREEN

GREEN

08

LINE 3 RING OUT

NOT USED

05

BLACK

BLACK

05

NOT USED

NOT USED

09

BLUE

BLUE

09

NOT USED

GND

03

BLACK

GND

03

NOT USED

NOT USED

10

YELLOW

YELLOW

10

NOT USED

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

5.11

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

DS3 REPEATER (J401 ON ONE SHELF TO J401 ON SECOND SHELF)

Note
The DS3 repeater cable carries clocks, data, and overhead for two directions.
It does not carry DS3 or wayside DS1 traffic. DS3 and wayside DS1 cables
must be run separately. If the 401 cable is not used, the embedded data in the
overhead must be cabled individually. In this case, individual cables must be
run for MCS-11, audio, RS-232, and ELMC.
Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-7836-001/005 (25 pair shielded cable
with 50 pin Amp connectors) (SCSI). See Figure 5-10 for shelf connector location and pinout.
Refer to Table 5-9 for mating cable wiring and color code.

Note

J301

Use repeater cables for cabling repeater shelf 1 to repeater shelf 2 (eastbound/westbound data/clock).

J307
J315

J313

25

J308
J318

J309
J305

J310

J312
J316

J317

J401

50

J302

PIN 1

26

FRONT VIEW

LMW-7066F
07/23/02

Figure 5-10 Connector J401 Location DS3 LBO


5-19

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 9 Repeater Mating Cable DS3 LBO


FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE COLOR

PAIR

END 2

FUNCTION

GND

26

WHT/TAN

25

GND

C GND

01

TAN/WHT

50

C GND

RCV SC1 DATA T

27

WHT/BRN

24

XMT SC1 DATA T

RCV SC1 DATA F

02

BRN/WHT

49

XMT SC1 DATA F

RCV SC2 DATA T

28

WHT/PNK

23

XMT SC2 DATA T

RCV SC2 DATA F

03

PNK/WHT

48

XMT SC2 DATA F

NOT USED

29

WHT/ORN

22

NOT USED

NOT USED

04

ORN/WHT

47

NOT USED

RCV SYNC T

30

WHT/YEL

21

XMT SYNC T

RCV SYNC F

05

YEL/WHT

46

XMT SYNC F

RCV RPTR SYNC T

31

WHT/GRN

20

XMT RPTR SYNC T

RCV RPTR SYNC F

06

GRN/WHT

45

XMT RPTR SYNC F

RCV SC1 INS OH T

32

WHT/BLU

19

XMT SC1 INS OH T

RCV SC1 INS OH F

07

BLU/WHT

44

XMT SC1 INS OH F

RCV SC1 INS DATA T

33

WHT/VIO

18

XMT SC1 INS DATA T

RCV SC1 INS DATA F

08

VIO/WHT

43

XMT SC1 INS DATA F

RCV SC2 INS OH T

34

WHT/GRY

17

XMT SC2 INS OH T

RCV SC2 INS OH F

09

GRY/WHT

42

XMT SC2 INS OH F

RCV SC2 INS DATA T

35

TAN/BRN

10

16

XMT SC2 INS DATA T

RCV SC2 INS DATA F

10

BRN/TAN

10

41

XMT SC2 INS DATA F

NOT USED

36

TAN/PNK

11

15

NOT USED

RCV A DST CMD

11

PNK/TAN

11

40

XMT A DST CMD

RCV B DST CMD

37

TAN/ORN

12

14

XMT B DST CMD

NOT USED

12

ORN/TAN

12

39

NOT USED

NOT USED

38

TAN/YEL

13

13

NOT USED

NOT USED

13

YEL/TAN

13

38

NOT USED

NOT USED

39

TAN/GRN

14

12

NOT USED

XMT B DST CMD

14

GRN/TAN

14

37

RCV B DST CMD

NOT USED

15

TAN/BLU

15

36

NOT USED

XMT A DST CMD

40

BLU/TAN

15

11

RCV B DST CMD

5-20

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 9 Repeater Mating Cable DS3 LBO (Cont.)


FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE COLOR

PAIR

END 2

FUNCTION

XMT SC2 INS DATA T

16

TAN/VIO

16

35

RCV SC2 INS DATA T

XMT SC2 INS DATA F

41

VIO/TAN

16

10

RCV SC2 INS DATA F

XMT SC2 INS OH T

17

TAN/GRY

17

34

RCV SC2 INS OH T

XMT SC2 INS OH F

42

GRY/TAN

17

09

RCV SC2 INS OH F

XMT SC1 INS DATA T

18

BRN/PNK

18

33

RCV SC1 INS DATA T

XMT SC1 INS DATA F

43

PNK/BRN

18

08

RCV SC1 INS DATA F

XMT SC1 INS OH T

19

BRN/ORN

19

32

RCV SC1 INS OH T

XMT SC1 INS OH F

44

ORN/BRN

19

07

RCV SC1 INS OH F

XMT RPTR SYNC T

20

BRN/YEL

20

31

RCV RPTR SYNC T

XMT RPTR SYNC F

45

YEL/BRN

20

06

RCV RPTR SYNC F

XMT SYNC T

21

BRN/GRN

21

30

RCV SYNC T

XMT SYNC F

46

GRN/BRN

21

05

RCV SYNC F

NOT USED

22

BRN/BLU

22

29

NOT USED

NOT USED

47

BLU/BRN

22

04

NOT USED

XMT SC2 DATA T

23

BRN/VIO

23

28

RCV SC2 DATA T

XMT SC2 DATA F

48

VIO/BRN

23

03

RCV SC2 DATA F

XMT SC1 DATA T

24

BRN/GRY

24

27

RCV SC1 DATA T

XMT SC1 DATA F

49

GRY/BRN

24

02

RCV SC1 DATA F

GND

25

PNK/ORN

25

26

GND

C GND

50

ORN/PNK

25

01

C GND

5.12

FIBER OPTIC CABLE CONNECTIONS

DANGER
Possibility of
Injury
to Personnel

This system normally operates as a Class I Laser Product (no


hazard), however during servicing operations, when optical
connectors are being connected, disconnected, or handled
without dust covers, it is possible to be exposed to Class IIIB
laser radiation which can cause eye damage.

5-21

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

WARNING
Possibility of
Damage
to Equipment

Fiber optic connectors are delicate and can be damaged easily by


dirt or debris on the end of the connector. Keep fiber optic connectors free of dust and debris by cleaning the connector before and
after use. Carefully clean the fiber optic connector and cable ends
with a cotton swab dipped in alcohol or an alcohol wipe. Keep
safety cap on connectors when not in use.
The Alcatel 2 or 4 fiber management panel (PN 3EM09257AB) and 2x4 fiber management
panel (PN 3EM09257AA) connections are described. For other fiber management equipment,
refer to the manufacturers instructions. See Figure 5 - 11 and Figure 5 - 12 for typical connections. Refer to Table 5 - 10 for recommended fiber optic jumpers.

Table 5 - 10 Fiber Optic Jumpers


JUMPER TYPE

PART NO.

APPLICATION

FC to LC

3EM07651AA-AK

TERMINAL

SC TO LC

3EM07646AA-AK

TERMINAL

LC TO LC

3EM07641AA-AK

REPEATER

5.12.1 2 or 4 Fiber Management Panel


The 2 or 4 fiber management panel provides a direct interface with customers 2 or 4 fiber equipment. The two fibers on a non-standby radio or four fibers on a hot-standby radio connect to the
two or four fibers from the customers equipment. The 2 or 4 fiber configuration requires the
duplex adapter panel to route the fiber to/from the I/O interface modules. One duplex adapter
panel can accommodate two radio shelves. Customer fiber must have SC type connectors
5.12.2 2x4 Fiber Switched Management Panel
The 2x4 fiber management panel interfaces the four fibers on a hot-standby shelf with customers 2-fiber equipment. The 2x4 fiber configuration requires combiner splitter units to
route the fiber to/from the I/O interface modules. One combiner/splitter unit per radio shelf is
required. The 2x4-fiber management panel has cutouts for two combiner/splitter units and can
accommodate two radio shelves.

5-22

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

VIEW OF
CONNECTOR
WITH FIBER
OPTIC CABLES
REMOVED

IN

OT-1

OR-1

CONNECT OPTICAL
RCV (OR) CABLE TO
IN CONNECTOR

OUT

CUSTOMER INTFC SIDE VIEW


OT-3 OUT
OT-4 OUT

IN
4
RO

O
R3

SHELF 2B

IN

2
O

R-

R1

I/O INTFC MODULE SIDE VIEW

OT-1 OUT
OT-2 OUT

SHELF 2A

OUTPUTS

SHELF 1B

SHELF 1A

INPUTS

IN

IN

IN
R1

IN
R2
O

R3
O

R4

IN

IN

CONNECT OPTICAL
XMT (OT) CABLE TO
OUT CONNECTOR

OT-2 OUT
OT-1 OUT

OT-4 OUT
OT-3 OUT
LMW-6038F
07/22/02

Figure 5 - 11 2 or 4 Fiber Management Panel


5-23

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

IN

OT-1 OR-1

OUT

VIEW OF
CONNECTOR
WITH FIBER
OPTIC CABLES
REMOVED
CONNECT OPTICAL
RCV (OR) CABLE TO
IN CONNECTOR
CONNECT OPTICAL
XMT (OT) CABLE TO
OUT CONNECTOR

FRONT VIEW

COM

COM

OT-1
OT-2
FROM RADIO I/O
INTFC MODULES
OUTPUT TO
CUSTOMER
2 FIBER

COM

SPLITTER

COM

COMBINER

OR-1
OR-2
TO RADIO I/O
INTFC MODULES

INPUT FROM
CUSTOMER
2 FIBER
LMW-6037F
07/22/02

Figure 5 - 12 2 X 4 Fiber Management Panel


5-24

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

5.13
OC3/STM-1 AUX INTERFACE BOARD WAYSIDE DS1 CONNECTIONS (J201 IN AND J202 OUT)
Wayside DS1 is an option in the MDR-8000 OC3/STM-1 radios that prevents having to add a
SONET add/drop MUX to access payload traffic. This option provides 1 DS1 for each STS-1
within the OC3/STM-1. Refer to Table 5 - 7 for ELMC option key requirements for remote monitoring/controlling wayside DS1.
5.13.1 Wayside DS1 Terminal
Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-041 (26 AWG 5 pair shielded,
jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on one end). See Figure 5 - 13 for location. Refer to
Table 5 - 11 for mating cable pinout and color code.

J301

5.13.2 Wayside DS1 Repeater


Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-051 (26 AWG 5 pair shielded,
jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on each end). See Figure 5 - 13 for Wayside DS1
repeater interconnect. See Figure 5 - 9 for wayside DS1 repeater interconnect. Refer to
Table 5 - 12 for mating cable pinout and color code.

J307
J315

J313

J318

J309

J310

J305

J312
J316

J317

J302

LINE 3 IN TIP

LINE 3 OUT TIP

GND

GND

LINE 2 IN TIP

J201
INPUT
5

J308

LINE 1 IN TIP

LINE 1 IN RING

LINE 2 OUT TIP

J202
OUTPUT

LINE 1 OUT TIP


1

LINE 1 OUT RING

LINE 2 IN RING

LINE 2 OUT RING

LINE 3 IN RING

LINE 3 OUT RING

FRONT VIEW

FRONT VIEW
LMW-7068F
07/23/02

Figure 5 - 13 Wayside DS1 Connectors OC3/STM-1 AUX Interface


5-25

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 11 J201/J202 Wayside DS1 Terminal Mating Cable Pinout and Color Code
Pin

Wire Color

Function

TP
RING

1
6

BLACK
RED

MUX 1 TIP
MUX 1 RING

TIP
RING

2
7

BLACK
WHITE

MUX 2 TIP
MUX 2 RING

TIP
RING

4
8

BLACK
GREEN

MUX 3 TIP
MUX 3 RING

TIP
RING

5
9

BLACK
BLUE

MUX 4 TIP
MUX 4 RING

Table 5 - 12 J201/J202 Wayside DS1 Repeater Mating Cable Pinout and Color Code
J201/
J202

J201

5.14

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE COLOR

DS1 IN 1 T
DS1 IN 1 R

01
06

BLACK
RED

DS1 IN 2 T
DS1 IN 2 R

02
07

UNUSED

PAIR

J202
END 2

J202

01
06

DS1 OUT 1 T
DS1 OUT 1 R

BLACK
WHITE

02
07

DS1 OUT 2 T
DS1 OUT 2 R

03

CUT-BACK

03

UNUSED

DS1 IN 3 T
DS1 IN 3 R

04
08

BLACK
GREEN

04
08

DS1 OUT 3 T
DS1 OUT 3 R

DS1 IN 4 T
DS1 IN 4 R

05
09

BLACK
BLUE

05
09

DS1 OUT 4 T
DS1 OUT 4 R

OC3/STM-1 REPEATER (J203 ON ONE SHELF TO J203 ON SECOND SHELF)

Note
The OC3/STM-1 radio repeater cable carries clocks, data, and overhead
for two directions. It does not carry OC3/STM-1 or Wayside DS1 traffic.
OC3/STM-1 fiber optic cables and Wayside DS1 cables must be run separately. If the repeater cable is not used, the embedded data in the overhead must be cabled individually. In this case, separate cables must be
run for MCS-11, audio, RS-232, and ELMC.
Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-007/013 (26 AWG 5 pair shielded,
jacketed cable). See Figure 5 - 14 for shelf connector location and pinout. Refer to Table 5 - 13
for mating cable wiring and color code.

5-26

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Note

J301

Use repeater cables for cabling repeater shelf 1 to repeater shelf 2 (eastbound/westbound data/clock)

J307
J315

J308

J313

J318

J309
J

J310

J305

J312

J316

J317

J302

GND
RPTR DS1 OUT TIP

J203
5

RPTR DS1 IN TIP


1

RPTR DS1 IN RING


RPTR DS1 OUT RING

FRONT VIEW

LMW-7067
07/23/02

Figure 5 - 14 Repeater Connector OC3/STM-1 AUX Interface


5-27

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 13 Repeater Mating Cable OC3/STM-1 AUX Interface


J203/J203 MDR-8000 OC3/STM-1

J203/
J203

J203/J203 MDR-8000 OC3/STM-1

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

PAIR

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

DS1 IN TIP

01

BLACK

BLACK

02

DS1 OUT TIP

DS1 IN RING

06

RED

RED

07

DS1 OUT
RING

DS1 OUT TIP

02

BLACK

BLACK

01

DS1 IN TIP

DS1 OUT
RING

07

WHITE

WHITE

06

DS1 IN RING

NOT USED

BLACK

GND

03

GREEN

NOT USED

04

BLACK

NOT USED

08

BLUE

NOT USED

05

BLACK

NOT USED

09

YELLOW

3
4
5

BLACK

NOT USED

GREEN

03

GND

BLACK

05

NOT USED

BLUE

09

NOT USED

BLACK

04

NOT USED

YELLOW

08

NOT USED

5.15
ETHERNET AUX INTFC CABLE CONNECTIONS
Part numbers are assigned for unshielded, straight-through CAT5 UTP (PN 3AL48960AAAL) and CAT5E UTP(PN 3AL15052AA-AL) cables. The CAT5 or CAT5E cables can be used
for 10/100/1000BASE-T applications, however the CT5E cable is the recommended cable
for 1000BASE-T applications. The CAT5E cable has a tighter, higher quality twisting on
the wire pairs and is less susceptible to crosstalk. Refer to Table 5 - 14 and Table 5 - 15 for
pinout. See Figure 5 - 15 for pair wire colors. See Figure 5 - 16 and Figure 5 - 17 for interconnect information.
5.15.1 Automatic MDI/MDI-X Configuration
The Ethernet PHY provides automatic Medium Dependent Interface (MDD/Medium Independent Interface-crossover (MDI-X). Automatic MDI/MDI-X configuration eliminates the need
for crossover cables.
5.15.2 Crossover Cable Option
Crossover type cables with pin 1 wired to pin 3 and pin 2 wired to pin 6 can be used, but are
not necessary. Crossover is automatically performed by the Ethernet PHY, resulting in a
straight-through interface to the link partner.

5-28

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 14 10/100BASE-T Ethernet Connector Pinout


PIN

FUNCTION

PORT
MDI

MDI-X

TD+

Output

Input

TD+

Output

Input

RD+

Input

Output

4/5

GRD

N/A

N/A

RD-

Input

Output

7/8

GRD

N/A

N/A

Table 5 - 15 1000BASE-T Ethernet Connector Pinout


PIN

FUNCTION

DIRECTION

TRDA+

Input/Output

TRDA-

Input/Output

TRDB+

Input/Output

TRDB-

Input/Output

TRDC+

Input/Output

TRDC-

Input/Output

TRDD+

Input/Output

TRDD-

Input/Output

5-29

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

PAIR A
PAIR B

CONN 1

CONN 2
WHITE-GREEN

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

GREEN
WHITE-ORANGE
ORANGE
WHITE-BLUE
BLUE
WHITE-BROWN
BROWN
PAIR C
PAIR D

LMW-9053F
05/24/05

Figure 5 - 15 Straight-Through Mating Cable

MDI Mode

MDI-X Mode

Ethernet
I/O INTFC

Ethernet
I/O INTFC

Active

TD+

TD-

Active

Active

RD+

RD-

Active
MDR-1169F
05/24/05

Figure 5 - 16 10/100BASE-T Interconnect


5-30

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Shelf 1

Shelf 2

Ethernet
I/O INTFC

Ethernet
I/O INTFC

TRDA+

TRDA-

TRDB+

TRDB-

TRDC+

TRDC-

TRDD+

TRDD-

= Cancel. Cancels XMT data in RCV output.

MDR-1170F
05/24/05

Figure 5 - 17 1000BASE-T Interconnect


5-31

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

WARNING
Possibility of
Damage
to Equipment

Follow carefully the following dos and donts to prevent future


loss of traffic.

DO MAINTAIN A MAXIMUM BEND RADIUS OF 4 TIMES


CABLE DIAMETER (4PAIR CABLES).

DONT EXCEED A 90 DEGREE BEND.

CABLE BEND
RADIUS

CABLE DIA.=0.20

DO APPLY CABLE TIES LOOSELY AND AT RANDOM INTERVALS.

DO TRY TO MINIMIZE THE AMOUNT OF JACKET TWISTING.

DO AVOID STRETCHING CABLE.

DONT OVERTIGHTEN CABLE TIES.

DONT

DONT

OVERTWIST CABLE; IT CAN LEAD TO


TORN JACKETS.

EXCEED 25 LB OF PULLING TENSION.

25
MW21500281
071897

5-32

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

5.15.3 Terminal Connections


See Figure 5 - 18. Radio terminal connections consist of Ethernet connections (refer to Para
5.6), DS1 connections, and service channel connections. The radio provisioned as a terminal
can transport up to 4 DS1 lines. At a terminal DS1 line 4 uses the RPTR IN/OUT connector on
the AUX interface board.

Radio
Terminal
1
Eth Card

Cable
PN 695-4125-041

DS1
IN

RPTR
IN/OUT

DS1
OUT

J201

J203

J202

DS1 LINES 1-3


DS1 LINE 4

Cable
PN 695-4125-041
DS1 LINES 1-3
Cable
PN 695-4125-041

ETH-1047F
02/15/06

Figure 5 - 18 DS1 1-4 Terminal Interconnect Diagram

5.15.3.1 Terminal DS1 Lines 1-3 Connections (J201 In and J202 Out)

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-041 (26 AWG 5-pair shielded,


jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on one end). See Figure 5 - 19 for location and
pinout. Refer to Table 5-16 for mating cable pinout.

5-33

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

J301

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

J307
J315

J313

J308
J318

J309

J310

J305

J312
J316

J317

J302

LINE 3 IN TIP

LINE 3 OUT TIP

GND

J201
INPUT
5

GND

LINE 2 IN TIP

LINE 2 OUT TIP

J202
OUTPUT

LINE 1 IN TIP
1

LINE 1 OUT TIP

LINE 1 IN RING

LINE 1 OUT RING

LINE 2 IN RING

LINE 2 OUT RING

LINE 3 IN RING

LINE 3 OUT RING

FRONT VIEW

FRONT VIEW

LMW-7068F
07/23/02

Figure 5 - 19 DS1 Lines 1-3 Connectors Location and Pinout

Table 5-16 DS1 Lines 1-3 Mating Cable Aux Interface


J201 (INPUTS)
FUNCTION

END 1

202 (OUTPUTS)
WIRE COLOR

WIRE COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

LINE 1 TIP IN

01

BLACK

BLACK

01

LINE 1 TIP OUT

LINE 1 RING IN

06

RED

RED

06

LINE 1 RING OUT

LINE 2 TIP IN

02

BLACK

BLACK

02

LINE 2 TIP OUT

LINE 2 RING IN

07

WHITE

WHITE

07

LINE 2 RING OUT

LINE 3 TIP IN

04

BLACK

BLACK

04

LINE 3 TIP OUT

LINE 3 RING IN

08

GREEN

GREEN

08

LINE 3 RING OUT

NOT USED

05

BLACK

BLACK

05

NOT USED

NOT USED

09

BLUE

BLUE

09

NOT USED

GND

03

BLACK

GND

03

NOT USED

NOT USED

10

YELLOW

YELLOW

10

NOT USED

5-34

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

5.15.3.2 Terminal DS1 Line 4 Connections (J203)

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-041 (26 AWG 5-pair shielded,


jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on one end). See Figure 5 - 20 for location and
pinout. Refer to Table 5-17 for mating cable pinout.

Note

J301

Use repeater cable for cabling shelf 1 to shelf 2


(east-bound/westbound data/clock).

J307
J315

J308

J309
J3
J305

J318

J313

J310
J316

J312
J317

J302

GND
LINE 4 TIP OUT

J203
5

LINE 4 TIP IN
1

LINE 4 RING IN
LINE 4 RING OUT

FRONT VIEW
MDR-1166F
05/02/05

Figure 5 - 20 DS1 Line 4 Connector Aux Interface


5-35

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5-17 DS1 Line 4 Mating Cable Pinout


J203/J203 MDR-8000E
FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE COLOR

LINE 4 TIP IN

01

BLACK

LINE 4 RING IN

06

RED

LINE 4 TIP OUT

02

BLACK

LINE 4 RING OUT

07

WHITE

NOT USED

BLACK

GND

03

GREEN

NOT USED

04

BLACK

NOT USED

08

BLUE

NOT USED

05

BLACK

NOT USED

09

YELLOW

J203/J203
PAIR
1

J203/J203 MDR-8000E
WIRE COLOR

END 2

BLACK

02

LINE 4 TIP OUT

RED

07

LINE 4 RING OUT

BLACK

01

LINE 4 TIP IN

WHITE

06

LINE 4 RING IN

BLACK

FUNCTION

NOT USED

GREEN

03

GND

BLACK

05

NOT USED

BLUE

09

NOT USED

BLACK

04

NOT USED

YELLOW

08

NOT USED

5.15.4 Back-to-Back Terminal Connections


See Figure 5 - 21. Radio back-to-back terminal connections consist of Ethernet connections
(refer to Para. 5.7), DS1 connections, and service channel connections. When the radio is provisioned as a terminal it can transport up to 4 DS1 lines. At a terminal DS1 line 4 uses the
RPTR IN/OUT connector on the AUX interface board. In this configuration, no service channel
overhead is transported on DS1 line 4.
5.15.4.1 Back-to-Back Terminal DS1 Lines 1-3 Connections (J201 In and J202 Out)

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-051 (26 AWG 5-pair shielded,


jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on each end). See Figure 5 - 19 for location and
pinout. Refer to Table 5-16 for mating cable pinout.
5.15.4.2 Back-to-Back Terminal DS1 Line 4 Connections (J203 on one shelf to J203 on

second shelf)

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-051 (26 AWG 5-pair shielded,


jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on each end). See Figure 5 - 20 for location and
pinout. Refer to Table 5-17 for mating cable pinout.

5-36

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Radio
Terminal
1
Eth Card

10/100/1000 Base T
Ethernet Cable

Radio
Terminal
2
Eth Card

DS1
IN

RPTR
IN/OUT

DS1
OUT

DS1
IN

RPTR
IN/OUT

DS1
OUT

J201

J203

J202

J201

J203

J202

Cable
PN 695-4125-051

DS1 LINES 1-3


DS1 LINE 4 (No Service Chan Overhead)

Cable
PN 695-4125-007/013
DS1 LINES 1-3
Cable
PN 695-4125-051

Note:
Audio, MCS-11/TMN, RS-232,
and ELMC require separate
cables between shelves 1 and 2.

ETH-1048
03/14/06

Figure 5 - 21 DS1 1-4 Back-to-Back Terminal Interconnect Diagram


5.15.5 Repeater Connections
See Figure 5 - 22. Radio repeater connections consist of Ethernet connections (refer to Para.
5.15), DS1 connections, and service channel connections. When the radio is provisioned as a
repeater, service channel overhead is transported between shelves at the DS1 data rate using
the RPTR IN/OUT connector on the AUX interface board.
5.15.5.1 Repeater DS1 Lines 1-3 Connections (J201 In and J202 Out)

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-051 (26 AWG 5-pair shielded,


jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on each end). See Figure 5 - 19 for location and
pinout. Refer to Table 5-16 for mating cable and pinout.
5.15.5.2 Repeater Service Channel Connections (J203 on one shelf to J203 on

second shelf)

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-007/013 (26 AWG 5-pair


shielded, jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on each end). see Figure 5 - 20 for location and pinout. Refer to Table 5-17 for mating cable pinout.
5-37

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Radio
Repeater
1
Eth Card

10/100/1000 Base T
Ethernet Cable

Radio
Repeater
2
Eth Card

DS1
IN

RPTR
IN/OUT

DS1
OUT

DS1
IN

RPTR
IN/OUT

DS1
OUT

J201

J203

J202

J201

J203

J202

Cable
PN 695-4125-051

DS1 LINES 1-3


Service Channel Overhead

RPTR Cable
PN 695-4125-007/013
DS1 LINES 1-3
Cable
PN 695-4125-051

MDR-1165F
03/14/06

Figure 5 - 22 DS1 1-3 Repeater Interconnect Diagram

5.16
ETH/T1 LINE INTERFACE CABLE CONNECTIONS
Part numbers are assigned for unshielded, straight-through CAT5 UTP (PN 3AL48960AA-AL)
and CAT5E UTP (PN 3AL15052AAAL) cables. The CAT5 or CAT5E cables can be used for 10/
100/1000BASE-T applications, however the CAT5E cable is the recommended cable for
1000BASE-T applications. The CAT5E cable has a tighter, higher-quality twisting on the wire
pairs and is less susceptible to crosstalk. Refer to Table 5 - 14 and Table 5 - 15 for pinout. See
Figure 5 - 15 for pair wire colors. See Figure 5 - 16 and Figure 5 - 17 for interconnect information.

5.16.1 Automatic MDI/MDI-X Configuration


The Ethernet PHY provides automatic Medium Dependent Interface (MDD/Medium Independent Interface-crossover (MDI-X). Automatic MDI/MDI-X configuration eliminates the need
for crossover cables.

5-38

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

5.16.2 Crossover Cable Option


Crossover type cables with pin 1 wired to pin 3 and pin 2 wired to pin 6 can be used, but are
not necessary. Crossover is automatically performed by the Ethernet PHY, resulting in a
straight-through interface to the link partner.
5.16.3 Terminal Connections
See Figure 5-23. Radio terminal connections consist of Ethernet connections (refer to Para.
5.15), T1 connections, and service channel connections. The radio provisioned as a terminal
can transport up to 32 T1 lines.
5.16.3.1 Terminal DS1 Connections (J303/J323 In and J304/J324 Out)

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-7806-001 through 005 (22 AWG 16 pair
shielded, jacketed cable with 37-pin D-type connector on one end). See Figure 5-24 for shelf
connector location and pinout. Refer to Table 5-18 for mating cable wiring and color code for
T1 1-16. Refer to Table 5-19 for mating cable wiring and color code for T1 17-32.

Radio
Terminal
Eth Card

J323

Cable
PN 695-7806-001/005

J324

DS1
IN

RPTR
IN/OUT

DS1
OUT

J303

J203

J304

Cable
PN 695-7806-001/005

T1 LINES 17-32

Cable
PN 695-7806-001/005

T1 LINES 1-16
T1 LINES 1-16

T1 LINES 17-32
Cable
PN 695-7806-001/005
MDR-1299
07/09/07

Figure 5-23 Terminal Interconnect Diagram


5-39

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

T1 1-16

T1 17-32

J323

J324
J303/J304

19

37

T1 17-32
1

20

FRONT VIEW

LMW-9037F
07/03/07

Figure 5 - 24 DS1 Connectors Location and Pinout


5-40

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 18 DS1 IN J303 and DS1 OUT J304 Pinout Assignments


CONNECTOR PIN
NUMBER

WIRE COLOR

SIGNAL NAME

WHITEBLUE

CHAN 1 TIP

20

BLUEWHITE

CHAN 1 RING

WHITEORANGE

CHAN 2 TIP

21

ORANGEWHITE

CHAN 2 RING

WHITEGREEN

CHAN 3 TIP

22

GREENWHITE

CHAN 3 RING

WHITEBROWN

CHAN 4 TIP

23

BROWNWHITE

CHAN 4 RING

WHITESLATE

CHAN 5 TIP

24

SLATEWHITE

CHAN 5 RING

REDBLUE

CHAN 6 TIP

25

BLUERED

CHAN 6 RING

REDORANGE

CHAN 7 TIP

26

ORANGERED

CHAN 7 RING

REDGREEN

CHAN 8 TIP

27

GREENRED

CHAN 8 RING

REDBROWN

CHAN 9 TIP

28

BROWNRED

CHAN 9 RING

10

REDSLATE

CHAN 10 TIP

29

SLATERED

CHAN 10 RING

11

BLACKBLUE

CHAN 11 TIP

30

BLUEBLACK

CHAN 11 RING

12

BLACKORANGE

CHAN 12 TIP

31

ORANGEBLACK

CHAN 12 RING

13

BLACKGREEN

CHAN 13 TIP

32

GREENBLACK

CHAN 13 RING

14

BLACKBROWN

CHAN 14 TIP

33

BROWNBLACK

CHAN 14 RING

15

BLACKSLATE

CHAN 15 TIP

34

SLATEBLACK

CHAN 15 RING

16

YELLOWBLUE

CHAN 16 TIP

35

BLUEYELLOW

CHAN 16 RING

CABLE PAIR NUMBER


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

5-41

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 19 DS1 IN J323 and DS1 OUT J324 Pinout Assignments


CONNECTOR PIN
NUMBER

5-42

WIRE COLOR

SIGNAL NAME

WHITEBLUE

CHAN 17 TIP

20

BLUEWHITE

CHAN 17 RING

WHITEORANGE

CHAN 18 TIP

21

ORANGEWHITE

CHAN 18 RING

WHITEGREEN

CHAN 19 TIP

22

GREENWHITE

CHAN 19 RING

WHITEBROWN

CHAN 20 TIP

23

BROWNWHITE

CHAN 20 RING

WHITESLATE

CHAN 21 TIP

24

SLATEWHITE

CHAN 21 RING

REDBLUE

CHAN 22 TIP

25

BLUERED

CHAN 22 RING

REDORANGE

CHAN 23 TIP

26

ORANGERED

CHAN 23 RING

REDGREEN

CHAN 24 TIP

27

GREENRED

CHAN 24 RING

REDBROWN

CHAN 25 TIP

28

BROWNRED

CHAN 25 RING

10

REDSLATE

CHAN 26 TIP

29

SLATERED

CHAN 26 RING

11

BLACKBLUE

CHAN 27 TIP

30

BLUEBLACK

CHAN 27 RING

12

BLACKORANGE

CHAN 28 TIP

31

ORANGEBLACK

CHAN 28 RING

13

BLACKGREEN

CHAN 29 TIP

32

GREENBLACK

CHAN 29 RING

14

BLACKBROWN

CHAN 30 TIP

33

BROWNBLACK

CHAN 30 RING

15

BLACKSLATE

CHAN 31 TIP

34

SLATEBLACK

CHAN 31 RING

16

YELLOWBLUE

CHAN 32 TIP

35

BLUEYELLOW

CHAN 32 RING

CABLE PAIR NUMBER


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

5.16.4 Repeater Connections


See Figure 5 - 25. Radio repeater connections consist of Ethernet connections (refer to Para.
5.16), DS1 connections, and service channel connections. When the radio is provisioned as a
repeater, service channel overhead is transported between shelves at the DS1 data rate using
the RPTR IN/OUT connector J203 on the line interface board.
5.16.4.1 Repeater DS1 Connections (J303/J323 In and J304/J324 Out)

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-TBD-001 through 005 (ww AWG 16


pair shielded, jacketed cable with 37-pin D-type connector on one end). See Figure 5 - 24 for
shelf connector location and pinout. Refer to Table 5-16 for mating cable wiring and color
code for T1 17-32.
5.16.4.2 ETH/T1 Repeater (J203 on One Shelf To J203 on Second Shelf)

Note
The ETH/T1 radio repeater cable carries clocks, data, and overhead for two
directions at the DS1 data rate. It does not carry Eth or DS1 traffic. ETH
fiber optic/electrical cables and DS1 cables must be run separately. If the
repeater cable is not used, the embedded data in the overhead must be
cabled individually. In this case, separate cables must be run for MCS-11,
audio, RS-232, and ELMC.
Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-007/013 (26 AWG 5 pair shielded,
jacketed cable). See Figure 5 - 26 for shelf connector location and pinout. refer to Table 5 - 20 for
mating cable wiring and color code.

Note
Use repeater cables for cabling repeater shelf 1 to repeater shelf 2 (eastbound/westbound data/clock).

5-43

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Radio
Repeater
1

Cable
PN 695-TBD

Eth Card

10/100/1000 Base T
Ethernet Cable

Radio
Repeater
2

Eth Card

T1 17-32 IN

T1 17-32 OUT

T1 17-32 IN

T1 17-32 OUT

J323

J324

J323

J324

T1 1-16 IN

RPTR
IN/OUT

T1 1-16 OUT

J303

J203

J304

Cable
PN 695-TBD

T1 1-16 IN

RPTR
IN/OUT

T1 1-16 OUT

J303

J203

J304

T1 LINES 17-32

Cable
PN 695-TBD

T1 LINES 1-16

Servic Channel Overhead

Cable
PN 695-4125-007/013

T1 LINES 1-16

T1 LINES 17-32

Cable
PN 695-TBD

ETH-1099
07/07/07

Figure 5 - 25 ETH/T1 Repeater Interconnect Diagram


5-44

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

J301

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

J307
J315

J313

J308

J309
3
J305
3

J318

J310

J312

J316

J317

J302

GND
RPTR DS1 OUT TIP

J203
5

RPTR DS1 IN TIP


1

RPTR DS1 IN RING


RPTR DS1 OUT RING

FRONT VIEW

LMW-7067
04/09/07

Figure 5 - 26 Repeater Connector ETH/T1 Line Interface


5-45

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 20 Repeater Mating Cable ETH/T1 Line


J203/J203 MDR-8000

J203/J203 MDR-8000

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

PAIR

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

DS1 IN TIP

01

BLACK

BLACK

02

DS1 OUT TIP

DS1 IN RING

06

RED

RED

07

DS1 OUT
RING

DS1 OUT TIP

02

BLACK

BLACK

01

DS1 IN TIP

DS1 OUT
RING

07

WHITE

WHITE

06

DS1 IN RING

NOT USED

5-46

J203/
J203

BLACK

GND

03

GREEN

NOT USED

04

BLACK

NOT USED

08

BLUE

NOT USED

05

BLACK

NOT USED

09

YELLOW

3
4
5

BLACK

NOT USED

GREEN

03

GND

BLACK

05

NOT USED

BLUE

09

NOT USED

BLACK

04

NOT USED

YELLOW

08

NOT USED

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

AE37( )
CNTLR
C1

MDR8000
SHELF

TO CONNECTOR J301
(CONNECTS TO
AE37 CONTROLLER)

RS232C
INTERFACE CABLE

USI
TERMINAL

RS232C PORT

MW21100661
101598

Figure 5 - 27 USI Computer to Controller Interconnection


5-47

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

J301

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

J307
J315

J313

J308

J309
J305

J318

J310

J312
J316

J317

J302

USI
6
9

DSR
RTS
CTS
RI

DCD
RxD
TxD
DTR
GND

J301

FRONT VIEW
LMW-7059F
02/04/03

Figure 5 - 28 Controller USI Connector Location and Pinout


5-48

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 21 Controller Mating Cable


J301 MDR-8000 CONTROLLER

J301/
LAPTOP

LAPTOP

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

PAIR

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

DCD

01

BLACK

BLACK

01

DCD

DSR

06

RED

RED

06

DSR

RXD

02

BLACK

BLACK

02

RXD

RTS

07

WHITE

WHITE

07

RTS

TXD

03

BLACK

BLACK

03

TXD

CTS

08

GREEN

GREEN

08

CTS

DTR

04

BLACK

BLACK

04

DTR

RI

09

BLUE

BLUE

09

RI

GND

05

BLACK

BLACK

05

GND

NOT
USED

N/A

YELLOW

YELLOW

N/A

NOT
USED

NOT
USED

N/A

BLACK

BLACK

N/A

NOT
USED

NOT
USED

N/A

BROWN

BROWN

N/A

NOT
USED

5.17
USI/CONTROLLER CABLE CONNECTION TO LAPTOP (J301)
Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-77848-001 through 004 (24 AWG 6 pair
shielded, jacketed cable with DEMM-9P connector on each end). See Figure 5 - 27 for laptop to
controller connection. See Figure 5 - 28 for controller connector location and pinout. refer to
Table 5 - 21 for mating cable pinout and color code.
5.18
SERVICE CHANNEL CONNECTIONS
A service channel is defined as a non-revenue bearing channel provided as part of a transmission system for operation, maintenance, monitoring, and control of the system. The MDR-8000
provides a 256 kb/s auxiliary channel for servicing the radio. This is an overhead channel and
is independent of the traffic channels. The 256 kb/s service channel contains four 64 kb/s service channels. Three of the four 64 kb/s channels (Service Channel 1, 2, and 3) can be provisioned on the USI for a specific use. Service channel 4 is dedicated to radio commands and
ELMC. Service channel is not provisionable. The four channels are multiplexed and shifted in
and out of registers on the controller.

See Figure 5 - 29. There are eight connectors on the backplane to interface with three of the
service channels. The connectors on the backplane interface three functions: audio, RS-232,
and MCS-11. Each service channel is provisioned for a specific function. As shown by the vertical line connecting to the three functions on one side and the three service channels (SC1, SC2,
and SC3) on the opposite side, audio and MCS can be put on any open service channel. RS-232
data can be put on service channel 1 or 2 but cannot be put on service channel 3. This is shown
by the dashed lines to the specific service channel.
5-49

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

5.18.1 2-Wire Handset Connection


The 2-wire port at the TEL connector on AE-37Y Controller accepts either the optional handset, listed under equipment supplied in the General section, or a standard telephone. The 2wire port is not provisionable and should not be confused with the 4-wire provisionable parts
(Audio 1 and Audio 2). To use the handset, the radio must be provisioned for Audio 1.

J316

J316
RADIO

AUDIO
1

TELEPHONE
(4-WIRE)

RADIO

CONTROLLER

J317

AUDIO
1

CONTROLLER

SC1

AUDIO
2

SC
MULDEM

TSM2500

SC
MULDEM

SC2

SC2
OVERHEAD
CHANNELS

MCS

OVERHEAD
CHANNELS

SC3

J307, J310
(BRIDGED)

TSM2500

MCS

SC3

TEL

TEL

J315, J318
(BRIDGED)

J315, J318
(BRIDGED)
SC0

ELMC

J317

SC1

AUDIO
2

J307, J310
(BRIDGED)

TELEPHONE
(4-WIRE)

SC0

ELMC

J312

J312
RS2321

LAPTOP

HANDSET
(2-WIRE)

RS2321

LAPTOP

J313

J313
RS2322

RS2322
LMW-3138F
04/21/04

Figure 5 - 29 Service Channel Connections/Applications


5-50

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

5.18.2 Service Channels Provisioning Options

Note
Service channels at both ends of a hop (and end-to-end in a link) must be
provisioned the same.
Service channel provisioning is interactive. When an option is selected for any service channel,
that option is excluded from selections on the other applicable service channels. Provisioning
options for Service Channels 1, 2, and 3 are listed:
Service Channel 1 (64 kb/s channel) can be used to carry 4-wire audio, RS-232 data, or
MCS-11 fault alarm information.

AUDIO 1 and 2 Two audio provisioning options (AUDIO 1 and AUDIO 2) are provided for Service Channel 1. Each audio channel is a 4-wire audio channel that provides off-hook detection, level control, and E and M-lead signaling. AUDIO 1 also has
DTMF decoding that allows a specific station to be dialed. External connection to
AUDIO 1 is J316. External connection to AUDIO 2 is J317.

RS-232-1 RS-232 Channel 1 is an RS-232 formatted data channel that can provide
interface to an external computer/modem. External connection to RS-232-1 is J312.

MCS-11 The MCS-11 channel is an RS-422 formatted data that provides an interface to an external MCS-11 Monitor and Control System or TSM system, used to control multiple MCS-11 systems. External connections to the MCS-11 include J307,
J308, J309 and J310.

Service channel 2 (64 kb/s channel) can be used to carry 4-wire audio, RS-232 data, or
MCS-11 fault alarm information.

AUDIO-1 and -2 Same as Service Channel 1

RS-232-2 RS-232 Channel 2 is an RS-232 formatted data channel that can provide
interface to an external computer/modem. External connection to RS-232-2 is J313.

MCS-11 Same as Service Channel 1

Service Channel 3 (64 kb/s channel) can be used to carry 4-wire audio, or MCS-11 fault
alarm information

AUDIO 1 and 2 Same as Service Channel 1

MCS-11 Same as Service Channel 1.

5.18.3 Audio 1, Audio 2 (J316, J317) Connections


The Audio 1 and 2 4-wire functions are provisionable. Refer to the Initial Turnup section for
details. These audio functions should not be confused with the non-provisionable 2-wire
handset.

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3EM20188AAAA

5.18.3.1 Audio 1

Audio 1 (J316) is a 4-wire function port on the backplane that provides off-hook detection,
level control, E and M-lead signaling, and DTMF and 2-wire handset capabilities.
5.18.3.2 Audio 2

Audio 2 (J317) is a 4-wire function port on the backplane that provides off-hook detection,
level control, and E and M-lead signaling. Audio 2 has no DTMF decoding capabilities.
Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-026 through 030 (26 AWG 5 pair
shielded, jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on each end). See Figure 5 - 30 for shelf
connector locations and pinout. Refer to Table 5 - 22 for mating cable wiring and color code.
or

J301

Recommended cable PN 424-0305-030 (26 AWG 5 pair shielded, jacketed cable) for wirewrapping to wirewrap adapter PN 3DH04178AB. See Figure 5 - 31 for pinout. Refer to
Table 5 - 22 for mating cable wiring and color code.

J307
J315

J313

J308

J309

J310

J305

J318

J316

J317

J302

GND
CALL DETECT
AUDIO TIP OUT
M LEAD
AUDIO TIP IN

J316/J317
5

J312

AUDIO RING IN
E LEAD
AUDIO RING OUT
CALL COMMON

FRONT VIEW

Figure 5 - 30 Audio Connectors Location and Pinout


5-52

LMW-7238F
02/23/04

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 22 Audio Mating Cable Wiring and Color Codes


FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

PAI
R

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

AUDIO TIP IN

01

BLACK

BLACK

03

AUDIO TIP OUT

AUDIO RING IN

06

RED

RED

08

AUDIO RING OUT

AUDIO M LEAD

02

BLACK

BLACK

07

AUDIO E LEAD

AUDIO E LEAD

07

WHITE

WHITE

02

AUDIO M LEAD

AUDIO TIP OUT

03

BLACK

BLACK

01

AUDIO TIP IN

AUDIO RING OUT

08

GREEN

GREEN

06

AUDIO RING IN

CALL DETECT

04

BLACK

BLACK

04

NOT USED

CALL COMMON

09

BLUE

BLUE

09

NOT USED

GND

05

BLACK

BLACK

05

GND

NOT USED

10

YELLOW

YELLOW

10

NOT USED

5-53

Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

J301

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

J308
J315

J310

J305

J318

J313

J309

J316

J316
5

J317

J302

J317
1

J312

WIRE WRAP ADAPTER (PN 3DH04178 AB)


P316

A1

P101

P101 P316
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A6
A8
A9

1
6
2
3
8
7
4
9
5

AUDIO TIP IN
AUDIO RING IN
AUDIO M LEAD
AUDIO TIP OUT
AUDIO RING OUT
AUDIO E LEAD
CALL DETECT
CALL COMMON
GND

P317

A9 A1

P102

P102

P317

A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9

1
6
2
3
8
7
4
9
5

AUDIO TIP IN
AUDIO RING IN
AUDIO M LEAD
AUDIO TIP OUT
AUDIO RING OUT
AUDIO E LEAD
CALL DETECT
CALL COMMON
GND

Figure 5 - 31 Audio Wirewrap Adapter Pinout


5-54

A9

LMW-7055F
08/17/06

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

J301

5.18.4 RS-232-1, RS-232-2 (J312, J313)


Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-021 through 025 (26 AWG 5 pair
shielded, jacketed cable with 9-pin D-type connector on each end). See Figure 5 - 32 for shelf connector locations and pinout. Refer to Table 5 - 23 for mating cable wiring and color code.

J307
J315

J308
J318

J313

J309

J310

J305

J312

J316

J317

J302

GND
RS232 IN
RS232 OUT

J312/J313

FRONT VIEW
LMW-7056
07/23/02

Figure 5 - 32 RS-232 Connectors Location and Pinout


5-55

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Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 23 RS-232 Mating Cable Wiring and Color Codes


J312/
J313

J312/J313 MDR-8000

J312/J313 MDR-8000

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

PAIR

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

NOT USED

01

BLACK

BLACK

01

NOT USED

NOT USED

06

RED

RED

06

NOT USED

RS-232 OUT/RS232-1 OUT*

02

BLACK

BLACK

03

RS-232 IN/RS232-1 IN*

NOT USED

07

WHITE

WHITE

08

NOT USED

RS-232 IN/RS232-1 IN*

03

BLACK

BLACK

02

RS-232 OUT/RS232-1 OUT*

NOT USED

08

GREEN

GREEN

07

NOT USED

NOT USED/
RS-232-2 OUT*

04

BLACK

BLACK

04

NOT USED/RS232-2 OUT*

NOT USED/RS232-2 IN*

09

BLUE

BLUE

09

NOT USED/RS232-2 IN*

GND

05

BLACK

BLACK

05

GND

NOT USED

10

YELLOW

YELLOW

10

NOT USED

*J312 on Compact Radio

5.19
MCS-11 CONNECTIONS
When MCS is selected to be placed on one of the three service channels and then RSS is
enabled and properly addressed, applicable ports on the controller module are enabled. This
allows the user to interface external MCS-11 Monitor and Control System equipment at any or
all four connectors on the backplane (J307, J308, J309, and J310). Two connectors (J308 and
J309) are synchronous, parallel, data ports and provide CLK outputs. Connectors J307 and
J310 are asynchronous ports.

For proper operation, MCS-11 must be provisioned using the following guidelines:
a. MCS-11 must be selected as one of the service channels.
b. MCS must be assigned a valid address
c. The MCS RSS must be set to ON for each radio with a unique RSS address. Refer to Appendix B on the attached CD for address details. At a site, typically only one RSS is turned on.
Station scanners at all other radios at that site are normally jumpered to the RSS enabled
radio to allow access to their detail scanners. If station scanners are properly wired, detail
scanners always respond, regardless of whether RSS is provisioned ON or OFF.

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Interconnect Section

5.19.1 MCS-11 Master (J307)

Note
If the radio is provisioned Repeater, port 2 on the controller, that connects to
J307, is disabled. At a repeater, you can use J310 in lieu of J307 for connecting the TSM polling engine to the radio.
MCS-11 connector J307 is used to connect to a TSM (-2500, -3500, or -8000) polling engine at
a master terminal.

J301

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4126-007/009/012 (26 AWG 8 pair


shielded, jacketed cable). See Figure 5 - 33 for shelf connector location and pinout. Refer to
Table 5 - 24 for mating cable pinout and color code. See Figure 5 - 34 for typical connection
scheme.

J308

J307
J315

J313

J318

J309
J305

J312
J316

J317

J302

XMT DATA +
RTN CLK +
XMT CLK +
RCV DATA +
RCV CLK +

J307
8

J310

15

RCV CLK
RCV DATA
XMT CLK
RTN CLK
XMT DATA

FRONT VIEW
LMW-7052F
07/23/02

Figure 5 - 33 MCS-11 Master Connector (J307) Location and Pinout


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3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 24 MCS-11 Master Connector J307 Mating Cable Wiring and Color Codes
J307 MDR-8000

POLLING ENGINE

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

PAIR

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

RCV CLK +

01

BLACK

BLACK

01

RCV CLK +

RCV CLK-

09

RED

RED

09

RCV CLK-

RCV DATA +

02

BLACK

BLACK

02

RCV DATA +

RCV DATA -

10

WHITE

WHITE

10

RCV DATA -

XMT CLK +

03

BLACK

BLACK

03

XMT CLK +

XMT CLK -

11

GREEN

GREEN

11

XMT CLK -

RETURN CLK +

04

BLACK

BLACK

04

RETURN CLK +

RETURN CLK -

12

BLUE

BLUE

12

RETURN CLK -

XMT DATA +

05

BLACK

BLACK

05

XMT DATA +

XMT DATA -

13

YELLOW

YELLOW

13

XMT DATA -

NOT USED

06

BLACK

BLACK

06

OFF HOOK +

NOT USED

14

BROWN

BROWN

14

OFF HOOK -

NOT USED

07

BLACK

BLACK

07

RCV DATA

NOT USED

15

ORANGE

ORANGE

15

SIG GND

NOT USED

08

RED

RED

08

DTR

NOT USED

16

WHITE

WHITE

16

NOT USED

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Interconnect Section

SITE C

SITE D
MDR-8000

MDR-8000

B1
TERM.
DS307

B2
RPTR
DS308

J307

J401

MDR-8000

B3
RPTR
DS309
J401

695-4126-007/009/012
REPEATER CABLE
695-7836-001 THRU -005

POLLING ENGINE

MDR-8000

B4
TERM 4
DS310

J308
J310

695-7837-001
THRU -005
CROSSWIRE
STRAIGHT
CABLE
695-7837-025

SITE B

A10

SITE E

J308

B5
TERM
J309 DS303

B6
TERM
DS304

MDR-8000

MDR-8000

A9

TERM

TERM J306

J309

J311

MDR-4000e

695-7837-021
THRU -025

SITE F

MDR-4000e

J308

695-7801-001

J202

MUX

STRAIGHT
CABLE
695-7837-025

B7
TERM
J309 DS301

B8
TERM
DS302

MDR-8000

MDR-8000

SITE G
DMX-3003N

E1A
J310

E2A

RPTR
G7572

J314

TERM
P7572

MDR-6000

MDR-6000

RPTR
CABLE
372-0546-020/050/070

SITE H

E3A

E4A

RPTR
J314
S7341

TERM
T7341

MDR-6000

LEGEND:

XXXX

MCS-11 ADDRESS

YYYY

CONFIGURATION

ZZZZ

ELMC ADDRESS

SITE A

MDR-6000

MDR-8000 J308/J309
PROVISIONING NOTES
1. PROVISION RPTR DS309 (FIRST
RADIO IN CHAIN) J308 OUTPUT CLOCK.

DS3ZZ = RADIO CAPACITY (DS3)


AND SHELF NUMBER (DS301 - SHELF 1)

2. PROVISION ALL OTHER RADIOS IN


DAISY CHAIN (TERM DS303 AND TERM
DS301) J308 INPUT CLOCK.
MDR-1023F
06/08/04

Figure 5 - 34 Typical MCS-11 System


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5.19.2 MCS-11 Repeater-to-Spur Daisy Chain Connection (J308/J309)

Note
MCS-11 must be provisioned MCS-11 J310 Master/Junction to enable XMT,
RCV, and OUTPUT clocks. If an external modem is being used, provision
MCS-11 for MCS-11 J310 Modem. This selection disables XMT, RCV,OUTPUT clocks and all MCS-11 clocks must now be provided by the external
modem.

Note
Multiple radios at a site can be provisioned and connected to operate using a
common XMT and RCV clock. In this scenario, one radio is provisioned to
supply the clocks. All other radios are provisioned to sync off the supplied
clocks. Provision the radio supplying the clocks J308 Output Clock. Provision all other radios at the site J308 Input Clock.
MCS-11 connectors J308 and J309 are typically used to sync radios at a site with multiple
radios configured as junctions, spurs, and/or daisy-chained spurs. The multiple radios are connected to common XMT and RCV clocks. In this scenario, one radio is provisioned to supply
the clocks. This radio is designated master or DCE. All other radios at the site are designed
as slave or DTE and receive their sync from the master.
See Figure 5 - 35 for a typical connection scheme for three radios. Shelf 1 is the master (DCE)
radio. Shelf 1 is provisioned J308 Output Clock. Shelves 2 and 3 (slaves) sync to Shelf 1 and
are provisioned J308 Input clock. Either Repeater Shelf 1 or Repeater Shelf 2 may feed the
spur shelf. The first connection out of the repeater must be crosswired from J308 to J308.
Then, every shelf from the spur must be wired 1:1, J309 to J308, in a daisy-chain fashion.
5.19.2.1 Clock Master and Slave Modes

Clock direction is controlled by the MASTER/SLAVE control from the microprocessor. Switching
is controlled by the CLK E DET control and the Master/Slave control from the microprocessor.
The master and slave modes are provisioned functions. The master mode is set by provisioning
the radio J308 Output Clock. The slave mode is set by provisioning the radio J308 Input Clock.

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5.19.2.2 Master Mode (CLKS OUT)

See Figure 5 - 36 for a simplified block diagram of the master mode. The master mode sends
RCV and XMT clocks out to other equipment. Typically one radio at a repeater/junction is provisioned J308 Output clock and this master radio provides the clocks on which other radios at
the site can sync. The east and west service channel modems on the controller provide the
XMT and RCV clocks. The east service channel modem provides the 64k CLK E (64 kHz clock
east) that is switched through the EPLD, amplified by the clock driver and output through the
bi-directional XCVR to connector J308. The west service channel modem provides the 64k
CLK W (64 kHz clock west) that is switched through the EPLD, amplified by the clock driver
and output through the bi-directional XCVR to connector J308.
5.19.2.3 Slave Mode (CLKS IN)

See Figure 5 - 37 for a simplified block diagram of the slave mode. The slave mode receives
RCV and XMT clocks from other equipment. Typically all but one radio at a repeater/junction
are provisioned J308 Input clock. The master radio provides the clocks on which the slave
radios at the site can sync. The RCV clock on J308 is passed through the bi-directional XCVR,
is switch through the EPLD, and output to the microprocessor as CLK 7. The XMT clock on
J308 is passed through the bi-directional XCVR, is switched through the EPLD, and output to
the microprocessor as CLK 8.
CROSSWIRED CABLE ASSEMBLY Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 6957837-001 through -005 (26 AWG 8 pair shielded, jacketed cable with 15-pin D-type connector
on each end). See Figure 5 - 38 for shelf connectors J308 and J309 location and pinout. Refer to
Table 5 - 25 for J308 to J308 mating cable pinout and color code. See Figure 5 - 34 for typical
connection scheme.
DAISY CHAIN CABLE ASSEMBLY Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 6957837-021 through -025 (26 AWG 8 pair shielded, jacketed cable with 15-pin D-type connector
on each end, wired 1:1.) Refer to Table 5 - 26 for J309 to J308 mating cable pinout and color
code. See Figure 5 - 34 for typical connection scheme.

5-61

5-62

This page intentionally left blank.

MDR-1009
04/21/04

Figure 5-35 Typical Interconnect


5-63 (5-64 blank)

SHELF 1 (DCE)
MASTER = CLKS OUT
PROVISION-J308
OUTPUT CLK

J309

OFF HK -

OFF HK +

XMT DAT -

XMT DAT +

RCV DAT -

RCV DAT +

CLK OUT -

CLK OUT +

RCV CLK -

RCV CLK +

XMT CLK -

XMT CLK +

J308

OFF HK -

OFF HK +

XMT DAT -

XMT DAT +

RCV DAT -

RCV DAT +

RCV CLK -

RCV CLK +

XMT CLK -

XMT CLK +

J309

OFF HK -

OFF HK +

XMT DAT -

XMT DAT +

RCV DAT -

RCV DAT +

CLK OUT -

CLK OUT +

RCV CLK -

RCV CLK +

XMT CLK -

XMT CLK +

J308

OFF HK -

OFF HK +

XMT DAT -

XMT DAT +

RCV DAT -

RCV DAT +

RCV CLK -

RCV CLK +

XMT CLK -

XMT CLK +

J309

OFF HK -

OFF HK +

XMT DAT -

XMT DAT +

RCV DAT -

RCV DAT +

CLK OUT -

CLK OUT +

RCV CLK -

RCV CLK +

XMT CLK -

XMT CLK +

J308

OFF HK -

OFF HK +

XMT DAT -

XMT DAT +

RCV DAT -

RCV DAT +

RCV CLK -

RCV CLK +

XMT CLK -

XMT CLK +

14

13

10

12

11

14

13

10

11

14

13

10

12

11

14

13

10

11

14

13

10

12

11

14

13

10

11

EAST
SC
MULDEM

CLK
DET

CLK EAST

CLK OUT ENABLE/DISABLE

J308 CLK OUT


ENABLE/DISABLE
IS PROVISIONABLE

OFF HK

XMT DATA

RCV DATA

RCV CLK

XMT CLK

SHELF 3 (DTE)
SLAVE = CLKS IN
PROVISION-J308 INPUT CLK

EAST
SC
MULDEM

CLK
DET

CLK EAST

CLK OUT ENABLE/DISABLE

J308 CLK OUT


ENABLE/DISABLE
IS PROVISIONABLE

OFF HK

XMT DATA

RCV DATA

RCV CLK

XMT CLK

SHELF 2 (DTE)
SLAVE = CLKS IN
PROVISION-J308 INPUT CLK

EAST
SC
MULDEM

CLK
DET

CLK EAST

CLK OUT ENABLE/DISABLE

J308 CLK OUT


ENABLE/DISABLE
IS PROVISIONABLE

OFF HK

XMT DATA

RCV DATA

RCV CLK

XMT CLK

CLK
DET

CLK
OUT
EN

CLK
DET

CLK
OUT
EN

CLK
DET

CLK
OUT
EN

CLK
DET

EPLD

CLK
DET

EPLD

CLK
DET

EPLD

CLK
DET

CLK WEST

CLK
DET

CLK WEST

CLK
DET

CLK WEST

WEST
SC
MULDEM

PROCESSOR

WEST
SC
MULDEM

PROCESSOR

WEST
SC
MULDEM

PROCESSOR

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

EPLD
CLK DIR CTRL

PROCESSOR

CLK
E
DET

MASTER/SLAVE

CLK E DET

SWITCH
CONTROL
LOGIC

XCVR

DRIVER
W SC
MULDEM

64 CLK W

INTFC

RCV CLK +
RCV CLK -

RCVR

CLK 7
TO PROCESSOR

CLK 8

E SC
MODEM

XCVR

64 CLK E

TX CLK OUT

J308 TX
CLK DET

DRIVER

TX CLK

INTFC

XMT CLK +
XMT CLK -

RCVR

MASTER (DCE) = CLKS OUT (PROVISIONED J308 OUTPUT CLK)

NOTE:
SOFTWARE CONTROLS ARE SHOWN AS PHYSICAL FOR SIMPLIFICATION.

MDR-1016A-F
6/16/04

Figure 5 - 36 Master Mode Functional Block Diagram


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3EM20188AAAA

EPLD
CLK DIR CTRL

PROCESSOR

CLK
E
DET

MASTER/SLAVE

CLK E DET

SWITCH
CONTROL
LOGIC

XCVR

DRIVER
W SC
MULDEM

64 CLK W

INTFC

RCV CLK +
RCV CLK -

RCVR

CLK 7
TO PROCESSOR

CLK 8

E SC
MODEM

XCVR

64 CLK E

TX CLK OUT

J308 TX
CLK DET

DRIVER

TX CLK

INTFC

XMT CLK +
XMT CLK -

RCVR

SLAVE (DTE) = CLKS IN (PROVISIONED J308 INPUT CLK)

NOTE:
SOFTWARE CONTROLS ARE SHOWN AS PHYSICAL FOR SIMPLIFICATION.

Figure 5 - 37 Slave Mode Functional Block Diagram


5-66

MDR-1016-F
5/13/05

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

J301

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

J307
J315

J313

15

J318

J309

J310

J305

RCV CLK
RCV DATA
XMT CLK
CLK OUT
XMT DATA
OFF HOOK

FRONT VIEW

J302

XMT CLK +
RCV DATA +
RCV CLK +

J309

15

J317

OFF HOOK +
XMT DATA +

J312
J316

OFF HOOK +
XMT DATA +
CLK OUT +
XMT CLK +
RCV DATA +
RCV CLK +

J308
8

J308

RCV CLK
RCV DATA
XMT CLK
XMT DATA
OFF HOOK

FRONT VIEW
MDR-1011F
04/12/04

Figure 5 - 38 MCS-11 Connectors J308 and J309 Location and Pinout


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Table 5 - 25 J308-to-J308 Mating Cable Wiring and Pinout


J308 MDR-8000

J308/J308

J308 MDR-8000

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

PAIR

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

RCV CLK +

01

BLACK

BLACK

03

XMT CLK +

RCV CLK-

09

RED

RED

11

XMT CLK-

RCV DATA +

02

BLACK

BLACK

05

XMT DATA +

RCV DATA -

10

WHITE

WHITE

13

XMT DATA -

XMT CLK +

03

BLACK

BLACK

01

RCV CLK +

XMT CLK -

11

GREEN

GREEN

09

RCV CLK -

04

BLACK

BLACK

04

NOT USED

CLK OUT -

12

BLUE

BLUE

12

NOT USED

XMT DATA +

05

BLACK

BLACK

02

RCV DATA +

XMT DATA -

13

YELLOW

YELLOW

10

RCV DATA -

OFF HOOK +

06

BLACK

BLACK

06

OFF HOOK +

OFF HOOK -

14

BROWN

BROWN

14

OFF HOOK -

NOT USED

07

BLACK

BLACK

07

NOT USED

NOT USED

15

ORANGE

ORANGE

15

NOT USED

NOT USED

08

RED

RED

08

NOT USED

CLK OUT+

NOT USED

5-68

WHITE

WHITE

NOT USED

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 26 J309-to-J308 Mating Cable Wiring and Pinout


309 MDR-8000

J309/J308

J308 MDR-8000

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

PAIR

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

RCV CLK +

01

BLACK

BLACK

01

RCV CLK +

RCV CLK-

09

RED

RED

09

RCV CLK-

RCV DATA +

02

BLACK

BLACK

02

RCV DATA +

RCV DATA -

10

WHITE

WHITE

10

RCV DATA -

XMT CLK +

03

BLACK

BLACK

03

XMT CLK +

XMT CLK -

11

GREEN

GREEN

11

XMT CLK -

04

BLACK

BLACK

04

NOT USED

CLK OUT -

12

BLUE

BLUE

12

NOT USED

XMT DATA +

05

BLACK

BLACK

05

XMT DATA +

XMT DATA -

13

YELLOW

YELLOW

13

XMT DATA -

OFF HOOK +

06

BLACK

BLACK

06

OFF HOOK +

OFF HOOK -

14

BROWN

BROWN

14

OFF HOOK -

NOT USED

07

BLACK

BLACK

07

NOT USED

NOT USED

08

ORANGE

ORANGE

15

NOT USED

NOT USED

15

RED

RED

08

NOT USED

NOT USED

16

WHITE

WHITE

16

NOT USED

CLK OUT+

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5.19.3 MCS-11 Spur Connection (J310)


MCS-11 connector J310 can be used to connect to a spur shelf and is the preferred connection to the external DMX-3003N MUX. When connecting to a MDR-4000e or MDR-6000
radio use J310 on all of the radios for best results.

J301

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4126-031 through -035 (26 AWG 8


pair shielded, jacketed cable with 15-pin D-type connector on each end). See Figure 5-39 for
shelf connector J310 location and pinout. Refer to Table 5-27 for mating cable wiring and
color code. See Figure 5-34 for typical connection scheme.

J307
J308

J307
J315

J313

J318

J309
J305

J312
J316

J317

J302

XMT DATA +
RTN CLK +
XMT CLK +
RCV DATA +
RCV CLK +

J310
8

J310

15

RCV CLK
RCV DATA
XMT CLK
RTN CLK
XMT DATA

FRONT VIEW
LMW-7072
07/23/02

Figure 5-39 MCS-11 Spur Connector J310 Location and Pinout


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Table 5 - 27 MCS-11 Spur Connector J310 Mating Cable Wiring and Pinout
J310 MDR-8000

J310/J310

J310 MDR-8000

FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE
COLOR

PAIR

WIRE
COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

RCV CLK +

01

BLACK

BLACK

04

RETURN CLK +

RCV CLK-

09

RED

RED

12

RETURN CLK-

RCV DATA +

02

BLACK

BLACK

05

XMT DATA +

RCV DATA -

10

WHITE

WHITE

13

XMT DATA -

XMT CLK +

03

BLACK

BLACK

03

XMT CLK +

XMT CLK -

11

GREEN

GREEN

11

XMT CLK -

RETURN CLK +

04

BLACK

BLACK

01

RCV CLK +

RETURN CLK -

12

BLUE

BLUE

09

RCV CLK -

XMT DATA +

05

BLACK

BLACK

02

RCV DATA +

XMT DATA -

13

YELLOW

YELLOW

10

RCV DATA -

NOT USED

06

BLACK

BLACK

06

NOT USED

NOT USED

14

BROWN

BROWN

14

NOT USED

NOT USED

07

BLACK

BLACK

07

NOT USED

NOT USED

15

ORANGE

ORANGE

15

NOT USED

NOT USED

08

RED

RED

08

NOT USED

NOT USED

16

WHITE

WHITE

16

NOT USED

5.20
TMN CONNECTIONS
This section gives the location and description of customer connections on the TMN interface
module.
5.20.1 Installing Module
1 Connect mating cables to applicable connectors J1-J4.

2 Install TMN Interface module loosely in slot C3 in MDR-8000 shelf.


3 Route cables through slot in module front panel, leaving a service loop in the
space below.
4 Limit the number of cable ties to prevent having to use large service loops.
Leave a service loop of ten in. minimum for future access to cable connectors and
module extraction.
5 Press top and bottom handles to seat module in backplane connector.
6 Go to Initial Turnup section for initial turnup procedures.

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3EM20188AAAA

J1
ETH 1
UPLINK
J2
ETH 2
J3
ETH 3
J4
PPP

LMW-9006F
06/13/03

Figure 5 - 40 TMN Interface Module Signal Connections


5-72

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Interconnect Section

5.20.2 Typical Interconnect Scenarios

Note
Refer to Para. 2.24, Connecting MDR-8000 Radio TMN Interface in an
Ethernet LAN, for limitations on interconnecting radios and equipment at a
site.
5.20.2.1 Scenario 1 Daisy Chain, Bridged Connection

See Figure 5 - 41. In this scenario, four TMN interface modules are connected to the LAN.
Daisy chaining prevents having to use external equipment to connect to the LAN. Daisy
chaining is typically used instead of a costly battery powered switch/hub at smaller junction
stations and/or battery powered remote sites where ac power is not available.
This is accomplished using the Uplink (U) ports on the TMN interface modules on shelves 2
and 3 to connect to the TMN interface module in shelf 1. The uplink port on the TMN interface module in shelf 3 connects to the Ethernet 2 port TMN interface module in shelf 2.
5.20.2.2 Scenario 2 Switched Connection

See Figure 5 - 42. In this scenario, four TMN interface modules are connected to the LAN via
a switch/hub using the Ethernet uplink port on each module. Ethernet 2 or 3 could be used
with a crossover cable.

Note
Since many switch/hubs are powered by ac, this scheme is typically used at
terminals where ac power is accessible.
5.20.2.3 Scenario 3 Front PPP Port Connections

For TMN to TMN PPP connections from Normal (DCE) to Crossover (DTE) or vice-versa, use
standard Cat. 5 cable. For other PPP connection options see Figure 5 - 43 and Figure 5 - 44.

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3EM20188AAAA

LAN
U
TMN
INTF
SHELF
1

2
3
PPP

U
TMN
INTF
SHELF
2

2
3
PPP

U
TMN
INTF
SHELF
3

2
3
PPP

NOTE
U
TMN
INTF
SHELF
4

ALL CABLES ARE STANDARD CAT 5


STRAIGHT-THROUGH CABLES.

2
3
PPP
LMW-9009
06/19/03

Figure 5 - 41 Daisy Chain, Using Internal Repeating Hub


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3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

LAN
U
TMN
INTF
SHELF
1

2
SWITCH
HUB

3
PPP

U
TMN
INTF
SHELF
2

2
3
PPP

U
TMN
INTF
SHELF
3

2
3
PPP
NOTE
ALL CABLES ARE STANDARD CAT 5
STRAIGHT-THROUGH CABLES.
U

TMN
INTF
SHELF
4

2
3
PPP
LMW-9008F
06/19/03

Figure 5 - 42 Switched Connection Using External Switch/Hub

TMN
Interface

Normal
(DCE)

P
P
P

Standard Cat 5 Cable

P
P
P

TMN
Interface

Crossover
(DTE)

CLK
Loopback
MDR-1279
12/15/06

Figure 5 - 43 Front PPP Port TMN to TMN Connection


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3EM20188AAAA

USER EQUIPMENT

GENERIC

MDR-8000

9400 AWY
CO-DIRECTIONAL
MODE
OR
DB-15

TXD+

TXD-

11
4

TXC+
TXC-

12

RXD+

TMN INTERFACE
CROSSOVER MODE
RJ-45
Data +
Data Clock +
Clock Data +

3 RXD+
6 RXD7 RXC+
8 RXC1 TXD+

Data -

2 TXD-

RXC+

Clock +

4 TXC+

RXC-

10

Clock -

5 TXC-

RXD-

In Crossover mode, the Received Clock is used to time the Transmitted


data, and the interface is synchronous with the external equipment.

MDR-8000

USER EQUIPMENT

GENERIC

9400 AWY
CO-DIRECTIONAL
MODE
OR
DB-15

TXD+

TXD-

11

TXC+

TXC-

12

RXD+

TMN INTERFACE
NORMAL MODE
RJ-45
Data +
Data Clock +
Clock Data +

1 RXD+
2 RXD4 RXC+
5 RXC3 TXD+

RXD-

Data -

RXC+

Clock +

7 TXC+

10

Clock -

8 TXC-

RXC-

6 TXD-

In Normal mode, the functions of the pins reverse, the clock from the user equipment is used
to time the incoming data, and an internal clock is used to time the outgoing data making the
interface fully asynchronous.

GENERIC OR 9400 AWY TO TMN

MDR-1280
12/15/06

Figure 5 - 44 Other Front PPP Port Connections (Sheet 1 of 2)


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Interconnect Section

MDR-8000
RS-422 CHANNEL BANK
DCE INTERNAL CLOCK
DB-37

TMN INTERFACE
CROSSOVER MODE
RJ-45

SEND DATA A
SEND DATA B

4
22

7
8

RXC +
RXC -

RX DATA A
RX DATA B

6
24

3
6

RXD +
RXD -

RX CLK A
RX CLK B

8
26

4
5

TXC +
TXC -

1
2

TXD +
TXD -

TT A
TT B

17
35
CHANNEL BANK TO TMN

LMW-9018F Rev
12/15/06

Figure 5 - 44 Other Front PPP Port Connections (Sheet 2 of 2)


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3EM20188AAAA

5.20.3 Front Access Connectors


Front access connectors include ETH1 Uplink connector J1, ETH2 connector J2, ETH3 connector J3, and PPP connector J4. Refer to the following paragraphs for details.

Note
See Figure 5 - 45. To determine which wire is number 1 on the RJ-45 connector on the mating cable, hold the cable so that the end of the plastic tip is facing away from you (the copper pins are facing up and the plastic spring lock
s=clip is underneath). When looking down on the copper pins, pin number 1
is on the far left.

PIN 1

PIN 8

LMW-8053F
06/30/03

Figure 5 - 45 Typical RJ-45 Connector Pinout


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Interconnect Section

5.20.3.1 Ethernet (ETH) 1 Uplink Connector J1

Uplink connector J1 is crosswired internally. Use a straight-through cable for connecting to


hub or other equipment. Refer to Table 5-28 for module connector pinout.

Table 5-28 ETH1 Uplink Connector J1 Pinout


PIN

FUNCTION

TX+

TX-

RX+

4/5

GND (via 75 ohm resistor)

RX-

7/8

GND (via 75 ohm resistor)

5.20.3.2 Ethernet Connectors J2 and J3

ETH2 and ETH3 connectors require straight-through cables to connect to external equipment. Refer to Table 5-29 for pinout/function.

Table 5-29 ETH2 and ETH3 Connectors J2 and J3 Pinout


PIN

FUNCTION

RX+

RX+

TX+

4/5

GND (via 75 ohm resistor)

TX-

7/8

GND (via 75 ohm resistor)

5.20.3.3 PPP Connector J4

Proposed wiring compatible with TIA-568B on an RJ45 connector. Using this pinout, MDR8000 radios could be interconnected using a standard four twisted pair (8 wire) straightthrough wired CAT5 Ethernet Crossover patch cord, provided that the clocks port on one
end is provisioned to receive clock instead of transmit clock. Refer to Table 5 - 30 for pinout/
function.
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3EM20188AAAA

Table 5 - 30 PPP Connector J4 Pinout


PIN

FUNCTION

DTE

DCE

TXDAP

OUT

IN

TXDAN

OUT

IN

RXDAP

IN

OUT

TXCAP

OUT

IN

RXDAN

IN

OUT

RXCAP

IN

OUT

RXCAN

IN

OUT

5.20.4 MATING CABLES


Part numbers are assigned for unshielded, straight-through CAT5 UTP cable (see
Figure 5 - 41, PN 3AL48960AAAADSZZA), shielded, straight-through CAT5 UTP cable (see
Figure 5 - 42, PN 3AL488961AAAADSZZA), unshielded, crossover CAT5 UTP cable (see
Figure 5 - 46, PN 3AL48961AAAADSZZA), and shielded, crossover CAT5 UTP cable (see
Figure 5 - 47, PN 3AL48962AAAADSZZA).

PAIR A
PAIR B

CONN 1

CONN 2
WHITE-GREEN

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

GREEN
WHITE-ORANGE
ORANGE
WHITE-BLUE
BLUE
WHITE-BROWN
BROWN
PAIR C
PAIR D

LMW-9053F
05/24/05

Figure 5 - 46 Straight-Through Mating Cable


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Interconnect Section

PAIR 3
PAIR 2

CONN 1

CONN 2
WHITE-GREEN

1
2
3
6
4
5
7
8

GREEN
WHITE-ORANGE
ORANGE
WHITE-BLUE
BLUE
WHITE-BROWN
BROWN

3
6
1
2
4
5
7
8

PAIR 1
PAIR 4

LMW-9054F
06/28/07

Figure 5 - 47 Crossover Mating Cable


5.20.5 Front Panel Craft Interface Connector J5
The CRAFT J5 connector on the front panel is used to interface the TMN interface module
with a PC. The CRAFT interface is an RS-232 compatible DCE interface, DB9 male to DB9
female cable, PN 695-7848. Refer to Table 5 - 31 for connector pinout/function. Refer to
Table 5 - 32 for mating cable pinout/function. See Figure 5 - 48 for location/connection details.

Table 5 - 31 CRAFT Terminal Connector J5 Pinout


PIN

FUNCTION

DCD

TXD

RXDD

DTR

GND

DSR

NC

NC

NC

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3EM20188AAAA

8 9

0 1

8 9

0 1

6
9

DSR
RTS
CTS
RI

DCD
RxD
TxD
DTR
GND

J5

FRONT VIEW

LMW-8054F
01/21/03

Figure 5 - 48 CRAFT Terminal Connector J5 Location and Pinout

Table 5 - 32 J5 Straight-Through Mating Cable


FUNCTION

END 1

WIRE COLOR

END 2

FUNCTION

DCD
TXD

01
02

BLACK
RED

01
02

DCD
TXD

RXD
DTR

03
04

BLACK
WHITE

03
04

RXD
DTR

GND
DTR

05
06

BLACK
GREEN

05
06

GND
DTR

NC
NC

07
08

BLACK
BLUE

07
08

NC
NC

NC

09

BLACK

09

NC

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Interconnect Section

5.21
ELMC (J315, J318)
As a standard feature, the Extended Link Monitor Channel (ELMC) function allows local provisioning, alarms, status information, and control commands for the local radio and, (with the
exception of wayside DS1), alarms, status information, control for addressable remote radios.
For wayside DS1 status, the ELMC option key (695-5647-019 or -020) must be installed on the
AE-37Y Controller. For remote provisioning and downloading capability, the ELMC option key
(695-5647-018 or 695-5647-020) must be installed on the AE-37Y Controller. Refer Table 5 - 33
for details.

Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4125-006/013 (26 AWG 5 pair shielded,


jacketed cable). See Figure 5 - 49 for shelf connectors locations and pinout. Refer to Table 5 - 34
for mating cable wiring and color code. See Figure 5 - 50 for typical connection scheme.

Table 5 - 33 ELMC Option Keys


ELMC Option Key

695-5647-018

Required for remote provisioning and downloading on DS1/E1 radios, and DS3 and
OC3/STM-1 radios without wayside DS1

ELMC Option Key

695-5647-019

Required for status of DS3 and OC3/STM-1


radios with wayside DS1 (no remote provisioning or download capability provided)

ELMC Option Key

695-5647-020

Required for remote provisioning and downloading of DS3 and OC3/STM-1 radios with
wayside DS1

Note
ELMC 1 connector J318 and ELMC 2 connector J315 are wired in parallel.
You can connect J315 to J315, J315 to J318, or J318 to J318. A typical connection scheme is shown.

Table 5 - 34 ELMC Connector J315/J318 Mating Cable Wiring and Pinout


J315/J318 MDR-8000
FUNCTION

END 1

RCV+
RCVXMT+
XMTNOT USED
GND
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED

01
06
02
07
03
04
08
05
09

WIRE
COLOR
BLACK
RED
BLACK
WHITE
BLACK
GREEN
BLACK
BLUE
BLACK
YELLOW

J315/J318 MDR-8000
PAIR
1
2
3
4
5

WIRE
COLOR
BLACK
RED
BLACK
WHITE
BLACK
GREEN
BLACK
BLUE
BLACK
YELLOW

END 2

FUNCTION

02
07
01
06

XMT+
XMTRCV+
RCVNOT USED
GND
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED

03
05
09
04
08

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Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

J301

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

J307
J315

J313

J308
J318

J309
J305

J310

J312
J316

J317

J302

GND
XMT +

J315/J318

RCV +

4
9

3
8

2
7

1
6

RCV
XMT

FRONT VIEW

Figure 5 - 49 ELMC Connectors Location and Pinout


5-84

LMW-7237F
02/23/04

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

SITE A

SITE C

MDR-8000

MDR-8000

B1
TERM.
DS307

B2
RPTR
DS308
J401

SITE G

MDR-8000

B4
TERM 4
DS310

J318
J401

REPEATER CABLE
695-7836-001 THRU -005

SITE B

MDR-8000

B3
RPTR
DS309

SITE H

695-4125-006/013
CROSSWIRE

J315

SITE D

J318

B5
TERM
DS303

MDR-8000

A10

A9

TERM

TERM

MDR-8000

695-4125-006/013
CROSSWIRE

J102
MDR-4000E

B6
TERM
DS304

MDR-4000E
J318

B7
TERM
DS301

PIGTAIL
CABLE
695-4125-008

MDR-8000

SITE E

E2A
J314

RPTR
T7572

MDR-6000

B8 J318
TERM
DS302
MDR-8000

695-4125-006/013
CROSSWIRE

MDR-6000

MDR-8000

MDR-8000

E1A
TERM
G7572

TERM
DS105

TERM
DS106

J309

J318

J318

SITE I

695-4125-006/013
CROSSWIRE

REPEATER
CABLE
372-0456
020/050/070

SITE F

J314

E4A

E3A

RPTR
J309
T7341

TERM
S7341

MDR-6000

MDR-6000

Note
When connecting MDR-8000 radios with Windows USI to radios with DOS USI, check the DOS USI ELMC address for
space, dash, slash, asterisk, or underscore. The Windows USI cannot recognize a space, dash, slash, asterisk, or
underscore. Change the DOS ELMC address to a 5-character alphanumeric address without the prohibited characters.
MDR-1026F
06/12/04

Figure 5 - 50 Typical ELMC Connections


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5.22
FOREIGN ALARM INTERFACE (J305)
Recommended connectorized cable assembly PN 695-4121-001/003 (24 AWG 25 pair cable).
See Figure 5 - 51 for shelf connector location and pinout. Refer to Table 5 - 35 for mating cable
pinout and color code.

or
Recommended wirewrap cable PN 424-0429-020 (22 AWG 30-pair twisted cable) for use with
wirewrap adapter PN 695-4171-002. Refer to Table 5 - 35 for pinout.

Note

J301

TBOS connections on J305 share pins with station alarms 13 through 16


and either TBOS or station alarms 13 through 16 is selected (provisioned)
on the USI Radio Configuration Provisioning screen.

J307
J315

J313

J308
J318

J309
J305

J310

J312
J316

J317

J302

J305

50
25

24

49

26
1

WIRE WRAP ADAPTER

26

FRONT VIEW

LMW-7060F
07/23/02

Figure 5 - 51 Alarm/Status/TBOS Connector J305 Location and Pinout


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Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 35 Alarm/Status Connector J305 Mating Cable Wiring and Pinout


ALM/STATUS/CONTROL

PIN

PR

A XMT ALM OUT

01

B XMT ALM OUT

26

A RCV ALM OUT

02

B RCV ALM OUT

27

CONTROLLER FAIL ALM OUT

03

SWITCH I/O OUT

28

SWITCH XMTR OUT

04

SWITCH RCVR OUT

29

A XMT IN SVCE OUT

05

B XMT IN SVCE OUT

30

A RCV IN SVCE OUT

06

B XMT IN SVCE OUT

31

A I/O IN SVCE OUT

07

B I/O IN SVCE OUT

32

PWR SUPPLY ALM OUT

08

NOT USED/OPEN DOOR


FAULT

33

STATION ALM 9 IN

09

STATION ALM 1 IN

34

WIRE
COLOR

REMARKS

WHT/
BLU

ALARM OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

BLU/
WHT

ALARM OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

WHT/
ORN

ALARM OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

ORN/
WHT

ALARM OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

WHT/
GRN

ALARM OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

GRN/
WHT

CONTROL OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

WHT/
BRN

CONTROL OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

BRN/
WHT

CONTROL OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

WHT/SLT

STATUS OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

SLT/WHT

STATUS OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

RED/BLU

STATUS OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

BLU/RED

STATUS OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

RED/
ORN

STATUS OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

ORN/
RED

STATUS OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

RED/
GRN

ALARM OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

GRN/
RED

ALARM OUTPUT ON COMM PAK ONLY

RED/BRN

RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER


EQUIPMENT

BRN/RED

RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER


EQUIPMENT

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Table 5 - 35 Alarm/Status Connector J305 Mating Cable Wiring and Pinout (Cont.)
ALM/STATUS/CONTROL

PIN

PR

WIRE
COLOR

STATION ALM 10 IN

10

10

RED/SLT

RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER


EQUIPMENT

STATION ALM 2 IN

35

SLT/RED

RELAYINPUT FROM CUSTOMER


EQUIPMENT

STATION ALM 11 IN

11

BLK/BLU

RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER


EQUIPMENT

STATION ALM 3 IN

36

BLU/BLK

RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER


EQUIPMENT

STATION ALM 12 IN

12

BLK/ORN

RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER


EQUIPMENT

STATION ALM 4 IN

37

ORN/BLK

RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER


EQUIPMENT

TBOS XMT- DATA IN OR


STATION ALM 13 IN

13

13

BLK/GRN

SERIAL DATA INPUT TO RADIO CONTROLLER OR RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT TO RELAY INTFC
CARD (PROVISIONABLE)

STATION ALM 5 IN

38

13

GRN/BLK

INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT

TBOS XMT+ DATA IN OR


STATION ALM 14 IN

14

14

BLK/BRN

SERIAL DATA INPUT TO RADIO CONTROLLER OR RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT TO RELAY INTFC
CARD (PROVISIONABLE)

STATION ALM 6 IN

39

BRN/BLK

INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT

TBOS RCV- DATA OUT OR


STATION ALM 15 IN

15

BLK/SLT

SERIAL DATA OUTPUT FROM RADIO


CONTROLLER OR RELAY INPUT FROM
CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT TO RELAY
INTFC CARD (PROVISIONABLE)

STATION ALM 7 IN

40

SLT/BLK

INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT

TBOS RCV+ DATA OUT OR


STATION ALM 16 IN

16

YEL/BLU

SERIAL DATA OUTPUT FROM RADIO


CONTROLLER OR RELAY INPUT FROM
CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT TO RELAY
INTFC CARD (PROVISIONABLE)

STATION ALM 8 IN

41

BLU/YEL

RELAY INPUT FROM CUSTOMER


EQUIPMENT

CONTROL 1 OUT

17

YEL/ORN

OUTPUT TO CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT

CONTROL STATUS 1 IN

42

ORN/YEL

INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT


IN RESPONSE TO CONTROL 1 OUTPUT

5-88

11

12

15

16

17

REMARKS

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

Table 5 - 35 Alarm/Status Connector J305 Mating Cable Wiring and Pinout (Cont.)
ALM/STATUS/CONTROL

PIN

PR

WIRE
COLOR

REMARKS

CONTROL 2 OUT

18

18

YEL/GRN

OUTPUT TO CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT

CONTROL STATUS 2 IN

43

GRN/YEL

INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT


IN RESPONSE TO CONTROL 2 OUTPUT

CONTROL 3 OUT

19

YEL/BRN

OUTPUT TO CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT

CONTROL STATUS 3 IN

44

BRN/YEL

INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT


IN RESPONSE TO CONTROL 3 OUTPUT

CONTROL 4 OUT

20

YEL/SLT

OUTPUT TO CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT

CONTROL STATUS 4 IN

45

SLTYEL

INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT


IN RESPONSE TO CONTROL 4 OUTPUT

CONTROL 5 OUT

21

VIO/BLU

OUTPUT TO CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT

CONTROL STATUS 5 IN

46

BLU/VIO

INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT


IN RESPONSE TO CONTROL 5 OUTPUT

CONTROL 6 OUT

22

VIO/
ORN

OUTPUT TO CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT

CONTROL STATUS 6 IN

47

ORN/
VIO

INPUT FROM CUSTOMER EQUIPMENT


IN RESPONSE TO CONTROL 6 OUTPUT

PATH ALM OUT

23

VIO/
GRN

ALARM OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

LOSS OF INPUT OUT

48

GRN/
VIO

ALARM OUTPUT FROM RELAY INTFC

MAJOR ALM/VISUAL ALM


OUT

24

VIO/BRN

ALARM OUTPUT FROM CONTROLLER


(PROVISIONABLE MAJOR/MINOR OR
VISUAL/AUDIBLE ON USI SCREEN)

RACK ALM RETURN

49

BRN/VIO

INPUT TO CONTROLLER

RACK ALM OUT

25

VIO/SLT

OUTPUT FROM CONTROLLER

MINOR ALM/AUDIBLE ALM


OUT

50

SLT/VIO

ALARM OUTPUT FROM CONTROLLER


(PROVISIONABLE MAJOR/MINOR OR
VISUAL/AUDIBLE ON USI SCREEN)

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

5.23
ALARM, STATUS, AND CONTROLS INTERCONNECT
See Figure 5 - 52 for interconnect diagram. The AE-27( ) Relay Interface provides alarm, control and status inputs, and alarm, status and control relay outputs. All output relays can be
disabled or provisioned normally open or normally closed as follows:

Normally open (NO) relays are normally de-energized and relay contacts are open. When
activated, relays are energized. Relay contacts close, connecting the output to ground.
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Normally closed (NC) relays are normally energized and relay contacts are closed and
grounded. When activated, relays are de-energized. Relay contacts open, presenting an open
(high impedance) to the output.
Rack ALM Return, Pin 49 is a ground point for use with Rack ALM Out. It is a signal ground
(low current) not used for battery voltage or high current ground.
J305
SWITCH XMTR
SWITCH RCVR

RELAY
INTERFACE

J305
PATH ALM

SWITCH I/O

LOSS OF INPUT ALM

STATION ALM 1

A XMT ALM

STATION ALM 2

B XMT ALM

STATION ALM 3

A RCV ALM

STATION ALM 4
B RCV ALM

STATION ALM 5
STATION ALM 6

POWER SUPPLY ALM

STATION ALM 7

CONTROLLER FAIL

STATION ALM 8
STATION ALM 9

A XMTR IN SERV

STATION ALM 10

B XMTR IN SERV

STATION ALM 11
A RCVR IN SERV

STATION ALM 12

B RCVR IN SERV

STATION ALM 13*

A I/O IN SERV
STATION ALM 14*

B I/O IN SERV

STATION ALM 15 IN*

SW OFF NORMAL

STATION ALM 16 IN*

CONTROL 1

CONTROL STATUS 1

CONTROL 2

CONTROL STATUS 2

CONTROL 3

CONTROL STATUS 3

CONTROL 4

CONTROL STATUS 4

CONTROL 5

CONTROL STATUS 5

CONTROL 6

CONTROL STATUS 6

DATA
CONTROL
TBOS RCV -*

MAJOR / VISUAL ALM

TBOS RCV +*

MINOR / AUDIBLE ALM

TBOS XMT -*

RACK ALM

TBOS XMT +*

NOTE: ALL RELAY CONTACTS


ARE SHOWN AS SWITCHES
FOR DOCUMENTATION
PURPOSES.

CONTROLLER

* PROVISIONABLE TBOS TO/FROM CONTROLLER


OR STATION ALARM 13-16 TO RELAY INTFC

Figure 5 - 52 Alarm and Status Relays/TBOS Interconnect


5-90

LMW-7064
5/12/04

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

5.23.1 Controller Bus


The Relay Interface communicates with the AE-37( ) Controller card via the processor bus and
the data bus. The processor bus, consisting of three address lines, two control lines, and a
clock, is applied to a XCVR. The data bus contains the eight data lines (D0-D7) and is applied
to a separate transceiver. Interface with the relay transceivers is provided by the XCVR data
bus. When commanded by the AE-37( ) Controller, the decoder/DEMUX decodes and demultiplexes the address and enables the appropriate relay XCVR via the EN2-9 controls. The controller can then write alarm/status/control information to the relay XCVRs, or read alarm/
status/control inputs from the relay XCVRs. Further descriptions of the controller interface
signals follow:

Address lines A0 through A3 HCMOS inputs. 100K Ohm pull-ups. Used by address
decoders to enable output registers and input buffers.
Buffered bidirectional data lines D0 through D7 HCMOS input/outputs. 10K Ohm pullups. Used to write data to output registers and read present bits or data from input buffers.
ECLK 2 MHz bus clock. HCMOS input. 100K Ohm pull-up.
R/WF Read/Write False. HCMOS input. 100K Ohm pull-up. A logic 1 indicates data is
being read from an input buffer or the present bits. A logic 0 indicates data is being written to an output register.
Relay Intfc CSF Relay Interface Card Select False. HCMOS input. 100K Ohm pull-up.
Chip select for relay interface card. Active low.
5.23.2 Control Inputs
Nine buffered control inputs are provided. The inputs are diode protected from voltages outside
of the 0 to +5 V range, and have a 10K Ohm resistor for current limiting purposes. In addition,
each input has a 100K Ohm pull-up resistor.

Switch Transmitter (SWITCH TX) buffered HCMOS input, sends signal to controller
module to activate the transmitter that is currently not carrying traffic.
Switch Receiver (Switch RX) buffered HCMOS input, sends signal to controller module
to activate the receiver that is currently not carrying traffic.
Switch I/O Interface (SWITCH I/O) buffered HCMOS input, sends signal to controller
module to activate the stand-by I/O interface module.
5.23.3 Station Alarm Inputs/TBOS Interface
Each radio shelf can accept/report up to 12 different user-defined station-type alarms, and, if
provisioned Station Alarm 13-16, the radio can accept an additional four station alarms, for a
total of 16. Station alarms 13 through 16 share pins on connector J305 with the four TBOS
inputs and outputs. TBOS inputs and outputs are enabled by software when the radio is provisioned TBOS Display 1-8. When TBOS is enabled station alarms 13 through 16 are disabled.

The alarm/status input signals are buffered HCMOS inputs, diode protected from voltages
outside of the 0 to +5 V range, with10 kilohm current limiting (series) resistor and 100
kilohm pull-up resistor. A logic 0 indicates an alarm state. A logic 1 (or open) indicates a nonalarm state.

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Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

5.23.4 Station Alarm Wiring


See Figure 5-53. Use wire wrap adapter PN 695-4171-002 to connect station alarm inputs to
the AE-27A Relay Interface module, via connector J305, in each rack. A typical connection scenario is shown. The station/shelf alarm for MCS-11 address A1A (MCS-11 alarm point 1) is
connected by software. The station alarms for MCS-11 address A1B and A1C are assigned to
MCS-11 Alarm points 2 and 3, respectively.

WIRE WRAP ADAPTER


(PN 695-4171-002)
24
RACK ALM 25

#1 STATION
ALM
(SEE NOTE)

PIN 1

PDU
MDR-8000 SHELF

J305

MCS-11
ADDRESS
A1A

34

36
49

35

26

#2 STATION
ALM
FAN ASSY
HEAT DEFLECTOR

MDR-8000 SHELF

J305

MCS-11
ADDRESS
A1B

PIN 25
RACK ALM
#3 STATION
ALM

FAN ASSY
HEAT DEFLECTOR

MDR-8000 SHELF

J305

MCS-11
ADDRESS
A1C

PIN 25
RACK ALM

NOTE
FAN ASSY

SOFTWARE AUTOMATICALLY CONNECTS


RACK ALM OUTPUT FROM CONTROLLER
J305-25 TO #1 STATION ALM INPUT J305-24.
LMW-8002F
07/28/02

Figure 5-53 Station Alarm Wiring


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3EM20188AAAA
Interconnect Section

5.23.5 Relay Alarm/Status Outputs


Eight alarm relay outputs and seven status relay outputs provide relay closure to ground (provisioned NO) or open (provisioned NC) when activated. All relays default to open if card power
is lost, except the Power Supply alarms, which default to ground. The maximum contact rating
for each relay is 0.5 A, 100 Vdc. The alarm/status relay outputs are:

Alarms:

Path Alarm This summary alarm is activated by the following alarms:


A/B Path Distortion
A/B AGC Threshold

Loss of Input Alarm This summary alarm is activated by the following alarms:
Loss of DS3 input
Loss of optical input (OC3/STM-1)
Loss of wayside DS1 input

A XMT A-side transmitter failure. This summary alarm is activated by any of the
following alarms on the A side:
XMT SYNC Alarm
RF Power Alarm
Common Loss Alarm
ATPC Timeout
MUX Input Loss Alarm

B XMT B-side transmitter failure. This summary alarm is activated by any of the
following alarms on the B side:
XMT SYNC Alarm
RF Power Alarm
Common Loss Alarm
ATPC Timeout
MUX Input Loss Alarm

A RCV B-side receiver failure. This summary alarm is activated by any of the following alarms on the A side:
Channel Alarm
RCV Frame Loss
Eye Closure
RSL Alarm

B RCV B-side receiver failure. This summary alarm is activated by any of the following alarms on the B side:
Channel Alarm
RCV Frame Loss
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Interconnect Section
3EM20188AAAA

Eye Closure
RSL Alarm

PWR Supply Alarm This summary alarm is activated by any A or B power supply
failure.

Controller Fail relay is activated if a card select has not been detected in the previous approximately 200 msec.

Status:

A XMTR In Service A-side transmitter module is on-line.

B XMTR In Service B-side transmitter module is on-line.

A RCVR In Service A-side receiver module is on-line.

B RCVR In Service B-side receiver module is on-line.

A I/O In Service A-side I/O interface module is on-line.

B I/O In Service B-side I/O interface module is on-line.

Switch Off Normal Click on OFF NORM LED on USI Status Alarm screen to view
message. Indicates manual control enabled or any of 22 conditions exists. Refer to the
Maintenance Section for details.

5.23.6 Relay Control Outputs

Note
Control outputs and control status inputs operate together to perform control functions. The control status inputs to the relay interface must be properly wired to the external equipment that is being controlled by the
associated control output in order to display the ON or OFF status on the
USI control screen. Without the control status inputs, the control function on
the USI screen will still turn on equipment/functions, but no status will be
indicated and, once turned on, the equipment/function cannot be turned off.
Six relay control outputs (CTRL 1-6) provide relay closure to ground (provisioned NC) or open
(provisioned NO) when activated. These relays default to open if card power is lost. The maximum contact rating for each relay is 0.5 A, 100 Vdc.
Nine buffered status inputs (CTRL STATUS 1-6) from the equipment controlled by the CTRL
1-6 outputs, verifying the controlled function. The inputs are diode protected from voltages
outside of the 0 to +5 V range, and have a 10K Ohm resistor for current limiting purposes. In
addition, each input has a 100K Ohm pull-up resistor.

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3EM20188AAAA
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Issue 3
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INITIAL TURNUP

SECTION INTRODUCTION
This section describes the procedures required to turn up the MDR-8000 Microwave
Digital Radios after installation.
6.1

This provisioning part of the section describes provisioning options available with the MDR8000 software application. Provisioning allows for the definition, editing, and storing of specific functions. The MDR-8000 provides the ability to provision equipment and facilities
through a series of Windows-based screens and messages. The Provisioning menu lists
equipment and functions which may be provisioned. You should use only those provisioning
screens that are applicable to your radio.
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
Perform the following initial turnup procedures in sequence:
6.2

a. Install software on PC.

Note
Software installed at the factory before delivery should not be overwritten by
downloading to the radio controller at initial turnup. Refer to Maintenance
section on the attached CD for procedure to upgrade existing software.
b. Turn on the radio.
c.

Establish communication between radio and USI computer.

Note
Saving provisioning on disk provides a reference for any future provisioning
changes.
d. Provision radio.

6.3

SECURITY MANAGEMENT

Note
A password is not required to operate the MDR-8000. The radio is shipped
without a password and if a password is desired, it must be entered using
the Change Password screen. Once entered initially, the password must be
entered each time the user wants to access the provisioning screens (level 1
password required) or download software (level 2 password required).
The MDR-8000 application software offers user password security management using two different levels of passwords. User security deals with access level assigned to specific users. The
level of user security affects the type and number of commands an individual user may execute. This prevents an unqualified users access to high-level commands.
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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Level 1 password allows the user to perform all tasks except downloading software. Level 2
password allows access to all functions and is the highest level.
LOAD MDR-8000 SOFTWARE ON PC
Before operating the user system interface (USI) for the first time, the programs contained on
the CD ROM must be installed on the PC. The installation process configures the PC for its
unique requirements and prepares it to run the program.
6.4

a. Insert CD ROM disk into PC.


b. On Windows desktop, double click on My Computer icon. My Computer window
displays.
c.

In My Computer window, click on CD ROM icon. Files window displays

d. See Figure 6 - 1. Follow directions and load USI software on PC.

D:\
File

Edit

Back
Address

View

Go

Forward

Favorites

Up

Help

Cut

Copy

Paste

Undo

Delete

Properties

Views

C:\

setup.exe

DOUBLE CLICK

setup.1st

win11_xx.CAB

LOADING
FILES
MDR-8000 Universal USI Setup

Setup cannot install system files or update shared files if they are in use.
Before proceeding, we recommend that you close any application you may
be running.
2 CLICK HERE
OK

Exit Setup

MDR-8000 Universal USI Setup


Begin the installation by clicking the button below.

CLICK HERE

Click this button to install MDR-8000 Universal USI software to the specified
destination directory.

COPYING
FILES
Directory:
Change Directory

c:\winuniversal_xx

Exit Setup

STARTING
DOWN LOAD
MDR-8000 Universal USI Setup
MDR-8000 Universal USI Setup was completed successfully.

4
OK

END
DOWNLOAD

CLICK HERE

LMW-4023
10/16/05

Figure 6 - 1 Load USI Software on PC


6-2

3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

6.5

Issue 3
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TURN-ON PROCEDURE

Note
For user safety, user should become familiar with locations of power distribution units and circuit breakers associated with the MDR-8000 radio.
Perform the following procedure to turn on the radio.
a. On power supply module, set PA ON/OFF switch to OFF. Yellow PA OFF
indicator will light.
b. On power supply module, set POWER ON 1/OFF 0 switch to ON 1.
c.

On power supply module, set PA ON/OFF switch to ON. Yellow PA OFF indicator
will turn off.

Note
Until both the local and farend radios in the hop are turned on and operating properly and the RF path has been established, alarm conditions will
exist.
d. Observe CHAN ALM indicator on RCVR module is lit.
e. Wait for RCVR to lock on frequency. When RCVR is locked on frequency
(approximately 5 to 30 seconds), CHAN ALM indicator on RCVR module will
turn off.
f.

Verify all front panel alarm indicators on radio shelf are off. If not, refer to
Maintenance section for troubleshooting.

ESTABLISH COM PORT


Establish communication between the USI computer and the controller in the radio.
6.6

Note
Disable infrared option on laptop (if equipped) to prevent disrupting communication on com port.
a. Connect RS-232 interface cable between USI connector on controller and PC.
See Figure 6 - 2.
b. On Windows desktop, click on Start icon. Program menu displays.

Note
Only one COM port can be used at a time.

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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

AE37( )
CNTLR
C1

MDR8000
SHELF

TO CONNECTOR J301
(CONNECTS TO
AE37 CONTROLLER)

RS232C
INTERFACE CABLE

USI
TERMINAL

RS232C PORT

MW21100661
101598

Figure 6 - 2 USI Computer Hookup


c.

On Program menu, click on Win USI program. Win USI screen displays with
message COMMUNICATING to indicate PC is communicating with the radio
controller. If COMMUNICATION DOWN message is displayed, perform procedure
shown on Figure 6 - 3 to change COM port.

d. STOP. This procedure is complete.


6-4

3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

DOUBLE CLICK HERE TO


OPEN ELMC ADDRESS
LIST

DOUBLE CLICK HERE TO


OPEN ALARM STATUS
SCREEN

Alcatel User Interface


File View Setup Options

ELMCAddress:

F4

F5

F6

Alarm Status

Analog Monitor

F7
Station Alarm

Performance

R101 LCL FAR RMT


R101

F8

F9

User Control

Provisioning

LOCAL STATUS ALARM


Communicating***

CLICK HERE.
CONFIRMATION MESSAGE
DISPLAYS.

Com 1
com 1
com 2
com 3
com 4

Save *.iniFile

Would you like to save this setting?


OK

Thursd
ay,Jan
November
30
, 200
0
Tuesday,
u Com Port
Error

1:44:19 PM

R101

ELMC
ADDRESS

IF COM PORT IS CORRECT


ALM/STATUS SCREEN
DISPLAYS. IF NOT, COMM
CLICK HERE PORT ERROR MESSAGE
DISPLAYS.
TO SAVE

Cancel

USI Version 1.20

Controller Version 1.20

Invalid port number


Please select a valid com-port in the
following picklist

OK

com 3

CLICK HERE. COMM PORT


SELECTION SCREEN DISPLAYS.

OK

LMW-7232
02/02/04
Cancel

com 1
com 2
com 3
com 4

SELECT ANOTHER
COM PORT

LMW-1023
10/16/05

Figure 6 - 3 Communications Port Setup


6-5

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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

TEST PROCEDURES
The radio has been properly aligned and tested at the factory before shipment eliminating the
need for testing after initial turn-up. The only time testing and/or adjustment is required is
after a maintenance action such as removal and replacement procedure and/or constant
alarms requiring corrective maintenance action. The completed maintenance action procedure(s) will reference any required test procedure(s).
6.7

6.8

PROVISIONING RADIO

Note
Changes to provisioning do not have to be made in any particular order.
The following procedure is used to provision the radio after installation.
a. On main screen, click on applicable radio type. Status Alarm screen will open.
b. On Status Alarm screen, click on Provisioning on upper right side of toolbar.
Radio Configuration screen will open.
c.

Review User Instructions before continuing, if required.

d. Provision radio as required.


e. Is radio TMN compatible?

Yes refer to Para. 6.9 TMN Interface Module Turnup and Test Philosophy.
No Initial Turnup is complete.
6.9

TMN INTERFACE MODULE TURNUP AND TEST PHILOSOPHY

TURNUP AND TEST PHILOSOPHY


The latest version of software is loaded onto the TMN interface module at the factory. All software required to assign an IP address and turnup and test the TMN interface module is on the
CD that is delivered with the equipment. This CD also includes a copy of the latest Management Information Base (MIB) version which is compatible with the TMN software loaded on
the module. The turnup and test procedure requires the Alcatel Lower Layer Manager
(LLMan) software program to be loaded on the PC. The Alcatel LLMan software program is
used to observe the IP address and establish IP connection to the TMN interface module. Additionally, the Textual User Interface (TUI) program needs to be installed. The TUI program is
used to perform initial provisioning of the TMN module. After installation, radios closest to the
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) manager at the Network Operations Center
(NOC) should be tested first so that network connectivity can be verified as radios further from
the NOC are installed and tested.
6.10

Start at the terminal end and move out thru hops from there

Note
Depending on the LAN configuration the far end may always be available,
automatically, via an alternate route with no proof of routing through the
radio network. Therefore pinging back to the terminal/starting point from
any radio LAN connection may always give positive results and will not
prove correct performance of all connected paths.
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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Issue 3
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Ping back to terminal router (router in TMN intfc module) as you move out thru hops

Note
Installation of the MIB and TMN interface module registration is performed
at the SNMP manager by qualified IT personnel. It is not necessary to register the TMN interface modules to test connectivity, although persistent manager registration for use with non-Alcatel managers may be done as part of
initial provisioning.
Finally follow up with configuration at the SNMP manager to monitor the radios.
TURNUP AND TEST PREREQUISITES
Before starting turnup and test, the following prerequisites must be accomplished:
6.11

MDR-8000 radio must have, at a minimum, the latest compatible radio controller software (DS1/E1, DS3, OC3, or Ethernet) for proper functionality of the TMN software (refer
to latest TMN release notes on CD-ROM). Load MDR-8000 software in accordance with
procedures in MDR-8000 Instruction Book PN 3DH03220AA or MDR-8000 Users Manual
PN 3EM11931AA.
TMN transport must be properly provisioned on the MDR-8000 radio.
For TMN transport provisioning, see Figure 6 - 4 for the proper radio controller
settings.

SELECT PORTS ON
I/O INTFC MODULE
THAT WILL BE USED
TO INSERT AND DROP
SERVICE CHANNEL
DATA.
TMN

Channel

SELECT CHANNEL 1, 2, OR 3 AS
SERVICE CHANNEL TO BE USED
FOR MCS TRANSPORT AND/OR
PPP TRANSPORT. SELECT OFF
TO DISABLE MCS AND PPP
TRANSPORT.

MCS Transport

RF/Rptr

PPP Transport

None
RF
Rptr
RF/Rptr

MCS-11 DATA

RF/Rptr
None
RF
Rptr
RF/Rptr

MCS-11 AND
IP DATA

Note
For MCS-11 to operate properly, all radio controllers in a system inter- connected by
RF or RPTR must have the same PPP transport provisioning on facing
(interconnecting) interfaces. The valid transport combinations (for terminal or
repeater) are shown. The combination chosen from MCS TRANSPORT and PPP
TRANSPORT determines the RPTR PORT and RF PORT PROTOCOLS supported.

Note
MCS-11 must be enabled even if it is unused.

MDR-1056
08/19/06

Figure 6 - 4 MCS/TMN Transport Provisioning (Sheet 1 of 5)


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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

PPP TRANSPORT SETTING = NONE


DRAWING
REFERENCE

RADIO TRANSPORT SETTING

RADIO PORT

MCS

PPP

RF

NONE

NONE

PASS-THROUGH MODE.
NO LOCAL INSERT CAPABILITY.

RPTR

B
C
D

RF
RPTR
RF/RPTR

NONE
NONE
NONE

MCS-11
DISABLED
MCS-11

DISABLED
MCS-11
MCS-11

Notes:
1) Set PPP Transport to NONE if the repeater and RF ports interface with radios not TMN
compatible.
2) RF at both ends of the hop must be provisioned for the same PPP Transport selection.
3) RPTR at both ends must be provisioned for the same PPP Transport selection.
4) MCS-11 = Non TMN compatible
MCS-11 + PPP = TMN compatible
5) TMN compatibility is determined by the radio controller software and radio provisioning.

ANY
PROTOCOL

MCS-11

RF PORT

MDR-8000
A

RF PORT

MDR-8000
B

ANY PROTOCOL

DISABLED

RPTR PORT

RPTR PORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

NONE

NONE

RF

NONE

DISABLED

MCS-11

RF PORT

MDR-8000
C

RF PORT

MDR-8000
D

MCS-11

MCS-11

RPTR PORT

RPTR PORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

RPTR

NONE

RF / RPTR

NONE
MDR-1255
12/05/06

Figure 6 - 4 MCS/TMN Transport Provisioning (Sheet 2 of 5)


6-8

3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

PPP TRANSPORT SETTING = RF


DRAWING
REFERENCE

RADIO TRANSPORT SETTING

MCS
NONE
RF
RPTR
RF/RPTR

A
B
C
D

PPP
RF
RF
RF
RF

RADIO PORT

RF
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP

RPTR
DISABLED
DISABLED
MCS-11
MCS-11

Notes:
1) Set PPP Transport to RF when the farend radio is TMN compatible, but the radio connected via the
repeater cable is not.
2) RF at both ends of the hop must be provisioned for the same PPP Transport selection.
3) RPTR at both ends must be provisioned for the same PPP Transport selection.
4) MCS-11 = Non TMN compatible
MCS-11 + PPP = TMN compatible
5) TMN compatibility is determined by the radio controller software and radio provisioning.

MCS-11
PPP

MDR-8000
A

MCS-11
PPP

MDR-8000
B

RF PORT

DISABLED

DISABLED

RPTR PORT

RPTR PORT

RF PORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

NONE

RF

RF

RF

MCS-11
PPP

MDR-8000
C

MCS-11
PPP

MDR-8000
D

RF PORT

MCS-11

MCS-11

RPTR PORT

RPTR PORT

RF PORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

RPTR

RF

RF / RPTR

RF
MDR-1254
12/05/06

Figure 6 - 4 MCS/TMN Transport Provisioning (Sheet 3 of 5)


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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

PPP TRANSPORT SETTING = RPTR


DRAWING
REFERENCE

RADIO TRANSPORT SETTING

MCS
NONE
RF
RPTR
RF/RPTR

A
B
C
D

PPP
RPTR
RPTR
RPTR
RPTR

RADIO PORT

RF
DISABLED
MCS-11
DISABLED
MCS-11

RPTR
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP

Notes:
1) RF at both ends of the hop must be provisioned for the same PPP Transport selection.
2) RPTR at both ends must be provisioned for the same PPP Transport selection.
3) MCS-11 = Non TMN compatible
MCS-11 + PPP = TMN compatible
4) TMN compatibility is determined by the radio controller software and radio provisioning.

DISABLED

MDR-8000
A

MCS-11
PPP

MCS-11

MDR-8000
B

RF PORT
MCS-11
PPP

RPTR PORT

RF PORT

RPTR PORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

NONE

RPTR

RF

RPTR

DISABLED

MDR-8000
C

MCS-11
PPP

MCS-11

MDR-8000
D

RF PORT
MCS-11
PPP

RPTR PORT

RF PORT

RPTR PORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

RPTR

RPTR

RF / RPTR

RPTR
MDR-1253
12/05/06

Figure 6 - 4 MCS/TMN Transport Provisioning (Sheet 4 of 5)


6-10

3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

PPP TRANSPORT SETTING = RF/RPTR


DRAWING
REFERENCE

RADIO TRANSPORT SETTING

MCS
NONE
RF
RPTR
RF/RPTR

A
B
C
D

PPP
RF/RPTR
RF/RPTR
RF/RPTR
RF/RPTR

RADIO PORT

RF
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP

RPTR
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP
MCS-11 + PPP

Notes:
1) RF at both ends of the hop must be provisioned for the same PPP Transport selection.
2) RPTR at both ends must be provisioned for the same PPP Transport selection.
3) MCS-11 = Non TMN compatible
MCS-11 + PPP = TMN compatible
4) TMN compatibility is determined by the radio controller software and radio provisioning.

MCS-11
PPP

MDR-8000
A

MCS-11
PPP

MCS-11
PPP

MDR-8000
B

RF PORT
MCS-11
PPP

RPTR PORT

RF PORT

RPTR PORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

NONE

RF / RPTR

RF

RF / RPTR

MCS-11
PPP

MDR-8000
C

MCS-11
PPP

MCS-11
PPP

MDR-8000
D

RF PORT
MCS-11
PPP

RPTR PORT

RF PORT

RPTR PORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

MCS TRANSPORT

PPP TRANSPORT

RPTR

RF / RPTR

RF / RPTR

RF / RPTR
MDR-1252
12/05/06

Figure 6 - 4 MCS/TMN Transport Provisioning (Sheet 5 of 5)


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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

TUI and LLman software applications on the CD must be installed on your PC/laptop
Provisioning parameters values must be readily available for the technicians use during
TMN provisioning. The required parameters are identified in the Provisioning paragraph.
6.11.1

Pre-Provisioning Software Applications Installation

6.11.1.1 CD-ROM Installation


1 Insert CD into the PCs CD-ROM drive.
2 CD-ROM window should show with a list of files.

If it does, go to step 3.
If it does not:
1) Double-click the My Computer icon on the desktop
2) Double-click the CD-ROM drive entry
3) Continue on to step 3.
3 Go to the following paragraphs for instructions on installing the individual programs.

6.11.1.2 TUI Program Installation

The TUI is needed to provision the TMN card


1 Double click the Setup.exe file on the CD-ROM
2 Follow the instructions

6.11.1.3 LLMan Installation


1 Double-Click the LLMan folder on the CD-ROM
2 Double-click the LLManES_Setup executable file
3 Choose Language and click OK
4 Follow the instructions, generally clicking Next
5 If Setup Complete window opens, check the following boxes: Configure Lower Layers

and Display the Lower Layers IP Manager installation guide . Click Finish
6 Alcatel Lower Layers settings window opens
7 Scroll System Identifier box and select identifier value
8 Scroll Sub-network Type box and enter Serial Port
9 Scroll Serial Port box, enter correct serial port (usually COM1)
10

6-12

Select Port Speed Default . Click OK

3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section
11

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

When the Alcatel Virtual Network Card for Lower Layers Help window opens, go to
Para. 6.12 Laptop to TMN Interface Communications Setup.

6.11.1.4 SIBDL Installation (optional)


1 Double-Click the SIBDL folder
2 Double-click the SIBDL_setup executable file
3 Choose Language and click OK
4 Follow the instructions

6.11.1.4.1

SIBDL Serial Modem Adapter Installation (optional)

1 Start the ADD/Remove Hardware Wizard from the Control Panel


2 Select Add/Troubleshoot a Device. Click Next.
3 Choose Add a new device. Click Next.
4 Choose No I want to Select from a list . Click Next.
5 Choose Modems and click Next.
6 Check the box next to Dont detect my modem, I will select it from a list . Click Next.
7 Click Have Disk, Browse to the SIBDL folder on the hard-drive, and select

mdmalca.inf. Click Open.


8 In Install From Disk window, click OK.
9 In Install New Modem window, select Serial Cable and click Next.
10 Select only one serial port (COM1 is recommended but not mandatory) and click Next,

Finish and Close. If Digital Signature Not Found window opens, click on Yes.
11 Install New Modem window opens and displays, Modem installation is finished.

Click Finish.
LAPTOP TO TMN INTERFACE COMMUNICATIONS SETUP
Use this procedure to change existing address values of the LLMan interface or to initially set
up the communications port between the laptop (LLMan interface) and the TMN interface
module. Assigning IP parameters that are compatible with the addressing scheme of the radio
allows the local laptop to access both local and remote equipment. If no network compatible
addresses are available at initial provisioning, alternate values may be used but communication through the Alcatel LLMan Virtual Network Card Adapter will be restricted to only the
directly attached TMN interface.When network compatible addresses become available,
repeat the procedure and insert the new addresses to replace the alternate values originally
used and gain access to remote equipment.
6.12

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Initial Turnup Section

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

If this procedure is not performed/followed at initial turnup, and


the laptop communications port has been previously setup with a
different address, communication may be limited to the local TMN
module.
1 Connect the computer to CRAFT J5 connector on the TMN interface front panel.
2 To manually access the installation window, select from the following:

for NT: <Start><Settings><Control Panel><Network>;

for Windows 2000: <Start><Settings><Network and Dialup Connections>;


for Windows XP: <Start><Settings><Network Connections>.
Network, Network and Dialup Connections, or Network Connections screen displays (Figure 6 - 5).
3 On Connections screen, right click on Alcatel LLMan Adapter (default name is LOCAL

AREA CONNECTION n) then click on Properties. Alcatel LLMan Adapter Properties


screen (Figure 6 - 6) displays.

Network and Dial-up Connections


File

Edit

Back
Address

View

Favorites

Tools

Search

Advanced

Help

Folders

Network and Dial-up Connections


Name

T...

Status

Make a New Connection

Network and Dial-up


Connections

Alcatel LLMan Adapter

LAN Network cable unplugged

Local Area Connection 1

LAN Network cable unplugged

This folder contains network


connections for this computer, and a
wizard to help you create a new
connection.
To create a new connection, click
Make New Connection.
To open a connection, click its icon.
To access settings and components of
a connection, right-click its icon and
then click Properties.

Figure 6 - 5 Connection Screen


6-14

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07/29/03

3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Issue 3
July 23, 2007

Alcatel LLMan Adapter Properties


General

Sharing

Connect using:
Alcatel Virtual Network Card for Lower Layers
Configure

Components checked are used by this connection:


Client for Microsoft Networks
File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks
Internet Protocol [TCP/IP]

Install...

Uninstall...

Properties

Description
Allows your computer to access resources on a Microsoft
network.

Show icon in taskbar when connected

OK

Cancel

LMW-9071F
10/29/04

Figure 6 - 6 LLMan Adapter Properties Screen

4 On Alcatel LLMan Adapter Properties screen, uncheck everything except Internet

Protocol (TCP/IP).
5 Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) then click on Properties. Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)

Properties screen (Figure 6 - 7) displays.


6 On Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) screen, under Use the following IP address, enter the

new IP address. Temporary alternate value = 10.0.0.2


7 Check/change Subnet mask as required. Temporary alternate value = 255.0.0.0
8 Check/change Default gateway as required. Temporary alternate value = blank.
9 Click OK. Display returns to Alcatel LLMan Adapter Properties screen.
10 On Alcatel LLMan Adapter Properties screen, click OK.
11 If prompted to reboot, click yes.

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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties


General
You can get IP settings assigned automatically if your network supports
this capability. Otherwise, you need to ask your network administrator for
the appropriate IP settings.
Obtain an IP address automatically
Use the following IP address:
IP address:

10 . 100 . 0 . 1

Subnet mask:

255 . 255 . 255 . 248

Default gateway:

10 . 100 . 0 . 2

Obtain DNS server address automatically


Use the following server addresses:
Preferred DNS server:
Alternate DNS server:

Advanced...

OK

Cancel
LMW-9070
11/16/04

Figure 6 - 7 Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties


6.13

TMN PROVISIONING

Overview
The MDR-8000 TMN with installed software is provisioned via the MDR-8000 TMN Textual
User Interface (TUI) program. This program prompts the user for parameter entries. See
paragraph 5.4.2 for the required parameters.
6.13.1

Provisioning Parameters
The following parameters are required for TMN card provisioning. The initial parameters are
required. The additional parameters can be done by the technician at the time of initial provisioning or at a later time either by the technician or another designated person at the site or
remotely.
6.13.2

6.13.2.1 Initial Provisioning Parameters

The technician must have values for these parameter at hand to perform initial TMN provisioning. The values shown below are the minimum required for each TMN card to be provisioned.
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LAN (Ethernet port)


IP ADDRESS - standard decimal notation, e.g., 10.0.0.1
Net Mask - standard decimal notation, e.g., 255.255.252.0
Routing Protocol - OSPF, RIP, Both, or None
OSPF AREA - integer, e.g., 0, 1, 2, 3,
STATE - ENABLED, DISABLED (DISABLED if Ethernet ports are not being
used)
WAN (host ID)
IP ADDRESS - standard decimal notation
Routing Protocol - OSPF or None (for PPP ports)
OSPF Area - integer
SNMP Port- integer, e.g., 161
Static Routes (if required) (Enter for each route)
Address - (Network Address) standard decimal notation
Mask - standard decimal notation
Gateway - IP Address in standard decimal notation, or RF, RPTR, or PPP
NOTE: A default route is entered using all zeros for the network address and
mask, e.g., 0.0.0.0
OSPF Areas
Index - integer
Address - (Network Number) standard decimal notation
Mask - standard decimal notation
Stub - True/False
Front Panel PPP
Mode - NORMAL or CROSSOVER
Clock Rate - 0, 64000, 128000, 256000, 384000, 512000
Clock rate 0 = 64000 and is supported for backward compatibility to older TMN
software releases.
STATE - ENABLED, DISABLED (DISABLED if port is not used)
Shelf Configuration
Standard
CommPak
Other Operations
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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Username and Password Management (This can be done at anytime, locally or


remotely, but it is suggested it be done initially to protect the module from unauthorized network access).
6.13.2.2 Additional Provisioning Parameters

Values for these parameters may be entered after initial provisioning locally or remotely.
SNMP Operations
Date and Time (and NTP)
(NTP Configuration. Actual network design for use of NTP is beyond scope of this
manual)
NTP Status - Enabled/Disabled
NTP Main Server - IP Address
NTP Spare Server - IP Address

Note
If NTP is not used, the module Date and Time should be reset and checked
at regular intervals.
Station Alarms and Controls
Station Alarms (J305 Input Points) - Assign/change user label for each Alarm
point and assign/change polarity for each Alarm point - Active Low/Active High)
Station Controls (J305 Output Points) - Assign/change user label for each Control
point and assign/change polarity for each Control point - Active Low/Active High)
Other Operations
SNMP Operating Configuration

Note
The following information pertains to SNMPv3 Configuration and is for the
use of the Field Technician and the System Administrator.

Note
The TMN Interface can operate in one of four modes; 1) Factory SNMPv3
With Fixed Engine ID (default), 2) SNMPv3 with Automatic Unique Engine
ID, 3) Factory SNMPv2, or 4) Custom SNMP Configuration. Mode descriptions follow:

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Initial Turnup Section

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1 FACTORY SNMPv3 WITH FIXED ENGINE ID (default - TMN as shipped from

factory) This mode has two pre-defined user accounts to be used for initial provisioning.
Once initial configuration is complete, the system should be switched to the Automatic Unique Engine ID mode. If not, the system administrator should, for security, create new Administrator and Craft User accounts and delete the pre-defined
accounts. As a minimum, the administrator should change the default Passphrases.
Account modifications can only be performed through SNMPV3 operations.
a. Default Administrator Account:

Username: initial
Privacy Passphrase: adminadmin
Connection Mode: authPriv
Access is restricted to the following MIB objects:
system
snmpUsmMIB
snmpVacmMIB
b. Default Craft User Account (the TUI needs a Craft User Account to provision
SNMP operations):

Username: Craftperson
Authentication Passphrase: craftcraft
Connection Mode: authNoPriv
Access is to all supported MIB objects except:
snmpUsmMIB
snmpVacmMIB
2 SNMPv3 WITH AUTOMATIC UNIQUE ENGINE ID

This is the recommended operating mode since it gives each TMN card a unique
snmpEngineId. Without a unique EngineId, SNMP managers may refuse to communicate with the TMN Interface in SNMP V3 mode. Switch to this mode only after all initial provisioning has been completed.

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Initial Turnup Section

This mode has only one pre-defined User Account. Once this mode is activated, the
TUI will no longer have SNMPV3 access until the administrator creates a Craft
User Account.
Administrator Account:
Username: initial
Privacy Passphrase: adminadmin
Connection Mode: authPriv
Access is restricted to the following MIB objects:
system
snmpUsmMIB
snmpVacmMIB
3 FACTORY SNMPv2

This configuration sets the module for SNMPv2c compatibility. In this mode, the
default Communities are:
Read-Only: public
Read-Write: private
The Communities are configurable.
4 CUSTOM SNMP CONFIGURATION

The TUI supports upload of a custom configuration file but it cannot customize the configuration file. Configuration of a custom file is beyond the scope of this document.
MDR-8000 TMN TUI (this information applies only to TMN Version 2.2 and later)
Para. 5.4.3.1 shows the Main Menu headings of the TUI. Each of these headings, when
selected, displays additional sub-menus with choices of action. To complete an action, the values for the parameters from the prerequisites list (para. 5.4.2) must be entered. The procedure
in each of the sub-menus is self-explanatory and each series of menus includes a Help choice.
Of the Main Menu headings, 2)IP and Basic Module Configuration, 3)Software Upgrade, and
5)Other Operations are usually the only ones used for TMN module provisioning. These submenus and their own sub-menus are described in para. 5.4.3.2, TUI Main Menu Choices.
6.13.3

6.13.3.1 MDR-8000 TMN TUI Main Menu

1) Exit
2) IP and Basic Module Configuration
3) Software Upgrade
4) SNMP Operations
5) Other Operations
6) Help
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6.13.3.2

TUI Main Menu Choices

6.13.3.2.1

2) IP and Basic Module Configuration

This menu is used for primary provisioning of the TMN module. Definitions of the selections
follow the selection titles.
1) Go Back
2)

Get Configuration From Module Displays the present provisioning


parameter values of the installed TMN Module

3)

Open Configuration Directory

4)

Change LAN Settings Holds network information that applies to the


Ethernet port

5)

Change WAN Settings (used for provisioning) - Holds network information that applies to the PPP ports and the SNMP agent

6)

Change Static Routes Contains the Static Route List. Each block consists of a definition of a new route.

7)

Change OSPF Areas Contains the OSPF Area List with information to
configure OSPF areas.

8)

Change OSPF Aggregate Contains the OSPF Area Aggregate List

9)

Change Front Panel PPP Contains the information to describe and configure the front panel PPP port

10) Change Shelf Configuration Allows the user to identify the shelf as
Standard or Compact
11) Change RIP LAN Configuration
12) Change RIP WAN Configuration
13) Commit to Module Saves the currently displayed provisioning values to
the modules
14) Save Configuration Directory
15) HELP
6.13.3.2.2

3) Software Upgrade

This menu is used for upgrading the TMN module software using a non-SNMP download
method. This method is required to upgrade from release 1.x to 2.x. The Software Upgrade
sub-menus are displayed below:
Module Connection Method Menu
1)

Cancel

2)

Rawloader Mode

3)

LLMan

4)

Standard TCP/IP

5)

Help
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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Module Connection Method Menu Selections Definitions:


2)

Rawloader Mode

This selection requires the TMN Module to be out of service. The method utilizes the Alcatel
SIBDL Serial Modem Adapter software and requires the Microsoft RASDIAL utility.
3)

LLMan

This method is similar to the Standard TCP/IP method that operates over a serial cable
instead of the Ethernet. It will attempt to automatically start the LLMan utility, if it is not
already running, and determine the IP address of the TMN card.
4)

Standard TCP/IP

This method only requires entry of the module IP address.


6.13.3.2.3

4) SNMP Operations

Provides the user access to the following:


1) Go Back
2)

Date And Time (and NTP)

3)

Manager Registration

4)

Alarming and Notifications

5)

Station Alarms and Controls

6)

Software Downloads

7)

IP Configuration

8)

NE System Information

9)

CLA Reset

10) Help
6.13.3.2.4

5) Other Operations

Provides the user access to SNMP Communities, password management, SNMP Operating
Configuration, database deletion, and others.
1) Done

6-22

2)

SNMP Communities

3)

Username and Password Management

4)

Additional Information

5)

Engineering Utilities

6)

Force A Reset

7)

Delete Database

8)

SNMP Operating Configuration

9)

RSL History Support

3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Issue 3
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Provisioning Procedure (Initial or Primary)


1 Open LLMan program by clicking on
Start>Programs>Alcatel>Lower Layers>Lower Layers Manager>. LLman screen displays.

6.13.4

2 Connect laptop to CRAFT connector on TMN interface module.


3 Observe Adjacent IP Address on LLMan screen. The Adjacent IP address on the

LLMan screen will be used as a reference throughout this procedure. Leave the
LLMan screen open during the remainder of the procedure.
4 Start the TUI program - click on Start>Programs>Alcatel>MDR8000>TUI>MDR8000 TMN TUI
5 Do you want to modify existing information on the TMN interface card or create a new

setup?
Modify existing? Go to step 6.
Create new setup? Go to step 8.
TO RETRIEVE CURRENT PROVISIONING
6 From IP and Basic Module Configuration menu, select 2) Get Configuration From

Module.
7 Wait for process to complete; TUI prompt will appear when complete.

TO MODIFY CURRENT/CREATE NEW PROVISIONING

All menus are accessed from the TUI program.


8 Open the TUI program and from the Main Menu select 2) IP and Basic Module

Configuration menu.
TO CHANGE THE LAN SETTINGS
9 Select 4) Change LAN Settings. Change the following as required:

IP ADDRESS
Net Mask
Routing Protocol
OSPF AREA
STATE
10 When complete, select 1) Done.

TO CHANGE THE WAN SETTINGS


11 Select 5) Change WAN Settings. Change the following as required:

IP ADDRESS
Routing Protocol
OSPF AREA
SNMP Port
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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

12 When complete, select 1) Done.

TO CHANGE STATIC ROUTE SETTINGS


13 Select 6) Change Static Routes. Change the following as required:

ADD ROUTE
DELETE ROUTE
14 Follow displayed sub-menu directions to complete changes.

TO CHANGE OSPF AREA SETTINGS


15 Select 7) Change OSPF AREA. Change as required:
16 When complete, select 1) Done.

TO CHANGE OSPF AGGREGATE SETTINGS


17 Select 8) Change OSPF AGGREGATE. Change as required:
18 When complete, select 1) Done.

TO CHANGE PPP SETTINGS


19 Select 9) Change Front Panel PPP. Change the following as required:

PPP Mode
State
20 When complete, select 1) Done.

TO SET SHELF CONFIGURATION SETTING


21 Select 10) Shelf Configuration.
22 When complete, select 1) Done.

TO SET RIP LAN SETTINGS


23 Select 11) Change RIP LAN Configuration. Change as required:
24 When complete, select 1) Done.

TO SET RIP WAN SETTINGS


25 Select 12) Change RIP WAN Configuration. Change as required:
26 When complete, select 1) Done.

TO SAVE NEW SETTINGS


27 Select 13) Commit to Module.

TO ENTER NEW PASSWORD


28 From the Main Menu select 5) Other Operations menu.
29 Select 3) Username and Password Management and follow screen instructions.

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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Issue 3
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REBOOT TMN INTERFACE MODULE


30 The TUI will prompt you to Reboot the Module. Select Yes.

Note
It is not unusual to experience flashing of the ALM LED and more than one
cold start trap when TMN interface module is unseated for reboot.
31 After reboot completes (approximately 30 seconds). ALM indicator on module front

panel goes out.


Successful reboot?
Yes, go to step 26.
No, go to step 25.
32 Using handles on module, temporarily disengage module from backplane connector.

Wait a minimum of 10 seconds, and then reseat module in backplane connector. ALM
indicator on module front panel will light to indicate reboot is in progress.
33 After LLMan reestablishes a connection, the Adjacent IP Address should now be the

same as the address committed (saved) using the TUI.


Provisioning Procedure (Additional or Secondary)
The additional provisioning procedures include NTP Configuration, Station Alarm Points setting, and Station Control Points setting. The procedures follow.
6.13.5

Access the TUI as in the initial provisioning procedure.


TO MODIFY NTP CONFIGURATION
1 From the TUI Main Menu, select 4) SNMP Operations.
2 From the SNMP Operations menu, select 2) Date and Time (and NTP).
3 Insert values as indicated for the following parameters:

NTP Status: Enabled/Disabled


NTP Main Server: IP Address
NTP Spare Server: IP Address
If you choose not to use NTP you will be prompted to set the TMN clock from the
local PC. Select y or n as appropriate.
TO MODIFY STATION ALARMS AND CONTROLS
4 From the SNMP Operations menu, select 5) Station Alarms and Controls.
5 Station Alarm and Control Points menu displays.

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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

STATION ALARMS
6 From Station Alarm and Control Points menu, select 2) Station Alarms (J305 Input

Points).
7 From Station Alarm Input Points menu, select desired parameters and insert values.

Change User Labels: Name


Change Polarity: Active Low/Active High
STATION CONTROLS
8 From Station Alarm and Control Points menu, select 3) Station Controls (J305 Out-

put Points).
9 From Station Controls Output Points menu, select desired parameters and insert

values.
Change User Labels: Name
Change Polarity: Active Low/Active High
Change External State: on/off
TO MODIFY SNMP CONFIGURATION

From the Other Operations menu, select 8) SNMP Operating


Configuration.
At this point, either leave the configuration in SNMPv3 Fixed Engine ID Mode,
or reconfigure Automatic Unique Engine ID mode by selecting
4) Enable automatic Engine ID generation.
SNMP Operating Configuration menu selection choices:
Cancel
10)Commit Factory SNMPv3 Config
(If selected, this will restore the factory default mode, delete any defined SNMPv3
user accounts, and revert to the factory default accounts).
11)Commit Factory SNMPv2 Config

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3EM20188AAAA
Initial Turnup Section

Issue 3
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For this selection follow actions described below in Configuring for SNMPv2 Operation.
12)Enable automatic Engine ID generation
(This is the recommended operating mode. When this mode is selected, any
defined SNMP user accounts will be deleted, and only the default admin account
will remain. Convert the module to this mode only after all other provisioning
using the TUI is complete. Once this mode is selected, the TUI will NOT be able to
perform any additional provisioning through SNMP until a system administrator
creates a new craft level account for TUI users).
13)Commit Custom SNMP Config
14)Get Current SNMP Operating Configuration File
15)Help
TO CONFIGURING FOR SNMPV2 OPERATION
1 From Main Menu, select 5) Other Operations.
2 From Other Operations menu, select 2) SNMP Communities (This is recommended to pre-

vent unauthorized users from accessing or changing settings using the SNMP interface).
3 Enter the new read Community string (max of 40 characters), or press ENTER to

accept the default.


4 Enter the new write Community string (max of 40 characters), or press ENTER to

accept the default.


5 Delay the Reboot until step 8.
6 From Other Operations menu, select 8) SNMP Operating Configuration.
7 From SNMP Operating Configuration menu, select 3) Commit Factory SNMPv2

Config. (this does not alter the community string settings).


8 At BOOT prompt, select y to reboot the TMN card.

6-27

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Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
Operation Section

OPERATION

7.1
GENERAL
This section contains turn-on, normal operation, turn-off, and emergency operating procedures plus a description of controls. indicators, test points, and connectors for the MDR-8000
Series Microwave Digital Radios.

Note
Before performing any procedures, operating personnel should become
familiar with the locations of power distribution units and circuit breakers.
If an equipment performance problem occurs during the following procedures, refer to the Maintenance section.
7.2
TURN-ON
The radio is designed to operate continuously without operator intervention. After initial
installation and power turn-on, operating procedures are limited to periodic visual lamp
checks, alarm checks, and answering or initiating orderwire service calls. Turn-on procedures
are needed only if the system has been turned off due to a malfunction or during maintenance.
The following turn-on procedures apply to both the terminal and repeater configurations.

WARNING
Possibility of
Damage
to Equipment
Exposure to energy radiated at microwave frequencies can cause eye damage and eventual blindness. Do not operate the system with either the
transmit or the receive waveguide por t unterminated. Do not look into the
waveguide run or the antenna of an operating radio.

Note
Until all radios in the transmission link are interconnected, turned on, and
operating properly, alarm conditions may exist.
Perform the following procedure to turn on the MDR-8000 series radios:
1

On all power supply modules, set power ON/OFF switches to ON.

Verify that power distribution unit rack alarm indicator (if any) is not lighted. If
indicator is lighted, troubleshoot as described in the Maintenance section.

Verify that no red indicators are lighted. If a red indicator is lit, troubleshoot as
described in the Maintenance section.

Perform lamp test by momentarily holding OVRD-ACO/LT switch on controller to


ACO/LT. All indicator lamps/LEDs should light.

7-1

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July 23, 2007

Operation Section
3EM20188AAAA

7.3
USER SYSTEM INTERFACE (USI) PROVISIONING FUNCTION/OPERATION
The User System Interface (USI) software is used for maintenance and support of the radio
including fault and status reporting. Refer to the Initial Turn-Up section for instructions on
loading and running the software. Refer to the Users Guide section for descriptions and functions of the menus.

Note
Refer to the Software Release Notes before performing any operating, provisioning, or maintenance function on this equipment. The Software Release
Notes may contain information affecting these functions that is not contained in this instruction manual.
7.4

OPERATING PROCEDURES

Note
The USI computer is the main control for the radio. If instructions for setting
up the USI computer are needed, refer to Initial Turn-Up section.
After installation and turn-on, operating procedures are limited to periodic alarm checks and,
when necessary, answering or initiating orderwire calls. Automatic and manual switching are
provided for equipment protection. Manual switching may be accomplished using the Control
screen on the USI computer or the switches on the front panel of the controller module. The
following paragraphs provide operating procedures for manual switchover of protected radio
systems.
7.4.1

Radio Receiver Manual Switching

Note
When used in conjunction with a RCVR manual switch, press the OVRD
switch to lock the receiver on line regardless of alarms. Press again to
unlock.

7-2

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3EM20188AAAA
Operation Section

Controller Switch
Perform RCVR manual switch (Figure 7 - 1) using controls on front panel of controller
module.

ALM
OFF
NORM
SHLF
ALM

TOGGLE SWITCH LEFT TO SWITCH A XMTR,


RCVR, OR I/O MODULE IN-SERVICE AND
TOGGLE SWITCH RIGHT TO SWITCH B
XMTR, RCVR, OR I/O MODULE IN-SERVICE.

ALM
ON
LINE

TX
L
A

B
ALM
ON
LINE

RX
L
A

B
ALM
ON
LINE

I/O
L
A

NOTE
OVERRIDE (OVRD) LOCKS XMTR, RCVR, OR
I/O MODULE, SELECTED ABOVE IN-SERVICE,
REGARDLESS OF ALARMS.

POLL
LCL
RMT
A
C
O
/
L
T

TO ENABLE OVERRIDE:
1. PRESS AND HOLD TX A/B ON LINE,
RX A/B ON LINE, OR I/O A/B ON LINE
SWITCH.
2. TOGGLE ACO/LT OVRD SWITCH TO OVRD
POSITION.
3. RELEASE A/B ON LINE SWITCH.

RSP
RSP
O
V
R
D

CMD
RF

RPTR
IDLE

TO DISABLE OVERRIDE:
TOGGLE ACO/LT OVRD SWITCH TO OVRD
POSITION.

T
E
L

U
S
I

LMW-5078
08/15/02

Figure 7 - 1 Manual Switch From Controller Front Panel


7-3

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Operation Section
3EM20188AAAA

USI Switch
Perform RCVR manual switch (Figure 7 - 2) using the USI control screen.

1. OPEN USI CONTROLS SCREEN.


Controls -- MDR-8000 DS3
File View Setup Options
F4
Alarm Status

F5

F6

Analog Monitor

F7

Performance

F8

Station Alarm

User Control

F9
Provisioning

LOCAL CONTROLS

ELMC Address:

J7915

Description:

SILVERTON

Communicating*

IN-SERVICE

DS1 LINE LOOP-BACK RCV to XMT

A Transmitter On Line

A Receiver On Line

Line 1 loopback
2. SELECT RCVR TO PUT IN-SERVICE.
Line 2 loopback
SYSTEM LOOP-BACK
3. SELECT YES ON CONFIRMATION
MESSAGE
Line 3 loopback
CONTROLS
AUSER
I/O LOOPBACK
TO
ENABLE FUNCTION.

B Receiver On Line

Control
#1
B I/O
4. LOOPBACK
VERIFY
GREEN IN-SERVICE STATUS CIRCLE DISPLAYS.

A I/O On Line

Control #2

B I/O On Line

Control #3

A ATPC HIGH Power Lock

Control #4

B ATPC HIGH Power Lock

Control #5

A ATPC LOW Power Lock

Control #6

B Transmitter On Line

B ATPC LOW Power Lock

Thursday, November 30, 2000

1:44:19 PM

USI Version R1.02

Controller Version R1.02


LMW-5081-sm
08/15/02

Figure 7 - 2 RCVR Manual Switch Using USI Control Screen


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7.4.2

3EM20188AAAA
Operation Section

Radio Transmitter Manual Switching

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

Switching the radio transmitter may momentarily interrupt traf fic. Before switching the transmitter, obtain permission from the
proper authority.

Note
When used in conjunction with a XMTR manual switch, press the OVRD
switch to lock the XMTR on line regardless of alarms. Press again to unlock.
Controller Switch
Perform XMTR manual switch (Figure 7 - 1) using controls on front panel of controller
module.
USI Switch
Perform XMTR manual switch (Figure 7 - 3) using the USI control screen.
7.4.3

Radio I/O Interface Manual Switching

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

Traffic and auxiliary channel service will be momentarily interrupted. Obtain proper authorization before making this switch.

Note
When used in conjunction with an I/O interface manual switch, press the
OVRD switch to lock the I/O interface on line regardless of alarms. Press
again to unlock.

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Operation Section
3EM20188AAAA

Controls -- MDR-8000 DS3


File View Setup Options
F4

F5

Alarm Status

F6

Analog Monitor

F7

Performance

F8

Station Alarm

User Control

F9
Provisioning

LOCAL CONTROLS

ELMC Address:

J7915

Description:

SILVERTON

Communicating*

1. SELECT XMTR TO PUT IN-SERVICE.

IN-SERVICE

SYSTEM LOOP-BACK

A Transmitter On Line

2. SELECT YES ON CONFIRMATION MESSAGE


A I/O TO
LOOPBACK
ENABLE FUNCTION. Line 1 loopback

B Transmitter On Line
A Receiver On Line

DS1 LINE LOOP-BACK RCV to XMT

Line STATUS
2 loopback
B I/O
LOOPBACK
3. VERIFY
GREEN IN-SERVICE
CIRCLE DISPLAYS.
Line 3 loopback

USER CONTROLS

B Receiver On Line

Control #1

A I/O On Line

Control #2

B I/O On Line

Control #3

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

Control #4
Switching the radio transmitter may momentarily interrupt
Control
#5 Switching I/Os will momentarily interrupt traffic and
traffic.
B ATPC HIGH Power Lock
Control
#6
auxiliary
channel service. Before switching, obtain permission
A
ATPC
LOW
Power
Lock
B
ATPC
LOW
Power
Lock
Thursday, November 30, 2000 1:44:19 PM USI Version R1.02
Controller Version R1.02
from the proper authority.
A ATPC HIGH Power Lock

LMW-5076-SM
06/12/04

Figure 7 - 3 XMTR Manual Switch Using USI Control Screen


Controller Switch
Perform I/O manual switch (Figure 7 - 1) using controls on front panel of controller
module.
USI Switch
Perform I/O manual switch (Figure 7 - 4) using the USI control screen.

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3EM20188AAAA
Operation Section

1. OPEN USI CONTROLS SCREEN.

Controls -- MDR-8000 DS3


File View Setup Options
F4
Alarm Status

F5

F6

Analog Monitor

F7

Performance

F8

Station Alarm

F9

User Control

Provisioning

LOCAL CONTROLS

ELMC Address:

J7915

Description:

SILVERTON

Communicating*

IN-SERVICE

SYSTEM LOOP-BACK

DS1 LINE LOOP-BACK RCV to XMT

A Transmitter On Line

A I/O LOOPBACK

Line 1 loopback

B Transmitter On Line

B I/O LOOPBACK

Line 2 loopback

A Receiver On Line

USER
CONTROLS
2. SELECT
I/O INTERFACE MODULE TO PUT IN-SERVICE.

B Receiver On Line
A I/O On Line

Control #1
3. SELECT YES ON CONFIRMATION MESSAGE
TO#2
ENABLE FUNCTION.
Control

B I/O On Line

Control
#3 GREEN IN-SERVICE STATUS CIRCLE DISPLAYS.
4. VERIFY

A ATPC HIGH Power Lock

Control #4

B ATPC HIGH Power Lock

Control #5

A ATPC LOW Power Lock

Control #6

Line 3 loopback

B ATPC LOW Power Lock

Thursday, November 30, 2000

1:44:19 PM

USI Version R1.02

Controller Version R1.02


LMW-5077-sm
08/15/02

Figure 7 - 4 I/O Manual Switch Using USI Control Screen


7-7

Issue 3
July 23, 2007
7.4.4

Operation Section
3EM20188AAAA

MCS-11 Operation

An Operational Support System (OSS) provides a means to remotely monitor and control an
MDR-8000 radio via an MCS-11 Monitor and Control System polling master. A Remote Station Summary (RSS), a Remote Detail Scanner (RDS), a Remote Analog Scanner (RAS), and a
Remote Control Decoder (RCD) are available at the polling master for each radio network element. The remote station OSS addresses are programmed during radio provisioning using the
USI laptop computer. (Refer to radio provisioning in the Initial Turn-Up section.) Refer to
Appendix B at the end of this instruction book for MCS-11 details, including alarm/status
mapping and connector information.
7.4.5

Lamp Tests

Perform lamp tests by pressing and holding ACO/LT OVRD switch on controller front panel in
ACO/LT position. All indicators on controller and indicators on all equipped modules should
light. Release ACO/LT OVRD switch.
7.4.6

Alarm Checks

The USI Alarm and Status screens provide alarms and status for the radio. Refer to description of alarms and status in the Maintenance Section.
7.4.7

Orderwire Operation

These operating procedures describe use of the orderwire system to answer incoming calls and
initiate outgoing calls. The DTMF function allows the user to ring the dialed station.
7.4.8

7.4.9

Initiating Outgoing Orderwire Calls


1

Connect telephone to J302 TEL jack on front panel of AE-37( ) Controller.

Dial the 3-digit DTMF extension on the telephone keypad to call specific party or
press the * key on keypad to initiate CALL signaling to all stations.

Answering Incoming Orderwire Calls

Note
Call can be heard by all stations.
1

When the buzzer sounds, alerting the operator there is an incoming call, connect
telephone to J302 TEL jack on front panel of AE-37( ) Controller and turn ONHOOK/OFF-HOOK switch to OFF-Hook position.

To terminate call, turn ON-HOOK/OFF-HOOK switch to ON-Hook position.

Note
During the DTMF dialing process, if an incorrect number sequence has been
dialed, press # to reset DTMF digit accumulator to zero. A redial can then be
initiated.

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3EM20188AAAA
Operation Section

Note
If 1.5 seconds elapse between dialed digits, the DTMF digit accumulator
resets to zero, and a redial must be initiated.

Note
Caller can press # to clear all flashing CALL indicators at all DTMF sites
equipped with the DTMF signaling option (a tone is transmitted).
7.5
TURN-OFF PROCEDURE
The radio is designed for continuous operation. If power must be removed while performing
maintenance on a particular cabinet or shelf, power can be removed by turning off associated
power supplies.

Note
Normally, the turn-off procedures are not used. System design allows maintenance of the rack without interrupting service. It is recommended that
turn-off be performed only in an emergency.
7.6
EMERGENCY OPERATION
If an emergency occurs, such as a short circuit or a fire, turn off all MDR-8000 Microwave Digital Radio power supplies as quickly as possible.
7.7
MODEM OPERATION
Refer to Appendix F for modem connection and setup procedures.
7.8

CONTROLS, INDICATORS, TEST POINTS, AND CONNECTORS

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

Do not adjust controls unless instructed to do so in an installation


or maintenance procedure. Unauthorized adjustment of controls
illustrated and described in this section may interrupt traffic and/
or degrade system performance.

Refer to list of modules for controls and indicators.

7-9

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User Guide Section

USER GUIDE

8.1
GENERAL
This section contains general system description information, basic screen access information,
and detailed descriptions of screens not used or described in other sections. Detailed descriptions of screens used in other sections are not repeated in this section. For example, refer to
Initial Turnup for provisioning screen functions. Refer to troubleshooting in Maintenance for
detailed alarm information. Where there are operational differences, DS1/E1, DS3, and OC3/
STM-1 screens are shown separately.
8.2
MDR-8000 SOFTWARE
The MDR-8000 software operates under a Windows 98, NT, 2000 or XP environment on an
IBM-compatible Pentium-based PC/laptop. See Figure 8 - 1. MDR-8000 software consists of
applications interface or User System Interface (USI) software and embedded software in the
controller.
8.2.1
USI Software
USI software resides on the users PC/laptop and provides the interface (APPS INTFC) with
the controller software that resides on the radio controller module. This interface allows the
user to view radio functions and parameters on screens and control some functions/parameters via provisioning and control screens.
8.2.2
Controller Software
Controller Version Controller software resides on the microcontroller registers on the radio
controller module. Controller software is protected by storing the same code in redundant primary and secondary registers. The controller software consists of Application (APPS) code and
boot codes.
Boot Code Initializes microcontroller registers, checks boot and APPS checksums, and
performs RAM test.
APPS Code Interfaces with the USI software files and MCS-11 ports. The APPS code
also initializes provisioning.

8-1

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User Guide Section


3EM20188AAAA

PLATFORM
WINDOWS 98, NT, 2000, XP

APPS
INTFC

EMBEDDED
SOFTWARE

USI
SOFTWARE

CONTROLLER
SOFTWARE
(PRIMARY)

DNLD
FILES

PROV
DATA

ALM
DATA

PERF
DATA

APPS
CODE

BOOT
CODE

(SECONDARY
REDUNDANT
SOFTWARE)

CTRL
DATA

LMW-7230
02/02/04

Figure 8 - 1 MDR-8000 Software


8.3

LOCAL/NETWORK MANAGEMENT

Note
At initial turnup, the MDR-8000 radios at each site must be provisioned onsite using local provisioning menus on the USI computer. Radio configuration, mode of operation, equipment configuration provisioning, and entering/changing remote addresses can only be performed locally. After the
remote address has been set locally, and if the ELMC option key with remote
provisioning is installed on the AE-37Y Controller, the user can change
transmit switching and receive switching functions, DS1, E1, DS3, and
OC3/STM-1 functions, and fault alarm provisioning remotely.
Local communication is achieved by connecting an RS-232 cable from the RS-232 port on the
USI terminal to the 9-pin (female) DB connector mounted on the front panel of the AE-37 ( )
controller module located on the MDR-8000 shelf. Communication between the MDR-8000
software application and the MDR-8000 shelf is via ASCII bit stream protocols over an RS232 connection. The RS-232 connection may or may not involve a modem. Radio overhead
channels are used to communicate with remote addressable radios in a common network.
The Extended Link Monitor Control (ELMC) function allows the customer to monitor and
control multiple addressable radios (one radio at a time) from one location. The ELMC monitor and control data is carried in the overhead, separate from traffic.
8-2

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User Guide Section

8.4
PC HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS
Customer preferences and site requirements determine whether the PC is a desktop or laptop
machine. The MDR-8000 software application requires one of the PC-based hardware platforms from Table 8 - 1.

Table 8 - 1 PC-Based Hardware Platforms


Components

Characteristics

CPU

Pentium (or equivalent)

Clock Speed

100 MHz or greater

Random Access Memor y (RAM)

256 Mbytes, minimum

Graphics

VGA

Display

Color

Hard Disk

Required

Mouse

Required

CD ROM Drive

Required

Software Platform

Microsoft Windows 98/NT/2000/XP

8.5
PC SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS
The system application requires the following software:
A completely installed and operational Windows 98, NT, 2000 or XP software
platform
Downloadable shelf software for MDR-8000.

Note
Microsoft Windows and MDR-8000 application software must be installed
on the same disk drive and within the same sub-directory to ensure proper
operation.
8.6
SOFTWARE PACKAGING
The CD ROM supplied with the equipment contains USI and download software, release
notes, and up-grade procedure
8.7
MODEM
A modem is required to communicate between a PC and a radio over telephone lines. Refer to
Appendix F for details.

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3EM20188AAAA

8.8
PRINTERS
A printer is optional, but recommended. A printer is beneficial for the following reasons:
To print actual software screens
To print lists of current alarms and conditions
To print alarm log.

Any printers compatible with Windows and the PC can be used for printing. If a printer is
added to the PC configuration, a parallel port must be available.
To establish port location and set up characteristics of the printer, use the Windows Control
Panel to display the printer dialog box. For additional information on printer setup, refer to
Windows documentation.
8.9

SECURITY MANAGEMENT

Note
A password is not required to operate the MDR-8000. The radio is shipped
without a password and if a password is desired, it must be entered using
the Change Password screen. Once entered initially, the password must be
entered each time the user wants to view screens (level 1 password required)
or download software (level 2 password required).
The MDR-8000 application software offers user password security management using two different levels of passwords. User security deals with access level assigned to specific users. The
level of user security affects the type and number of commands an individual user may execute. This prevents an unqualified users access to high-level commands.
Level 1 password allows the user to view screens. Level 2 password allows access to all functions and is the highest level. A level 2 password is required anytime a change to the software
is saved (downloaded).
8.9.1
Enter/Change Password
The Change Password screen is used to initially enter passwords or change existing passwords. Passwords can be up to 5 characters long and have the following characteristics:
Case sensitive
Special characters ok
Alphanumeric.

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User Guide Section

Change Password --

Change Level 1 Password


Enter the New Level 1 Password:
Confirm the New Level 1 Password:

Change Level 2 Password


Enter the New Level 2 Password:
Confirm the New Level 2 Password:

Save Password

Cancel

Forgot Password

MDR-1033
09/02/04

Level One Password --

Please Enter Level 1 Password:

OK

Forgot Password

Cancel

MDR-1032
09/02/04

Figure 8 - 2 Password Screens


8-5

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8.10

User Guide Section


3EM20188AAAA

LAUNCHING MDR-8000 APPLICATION SOFTWARE

Note
All users must have a basic working knowledge of the Windows environment. If Windows experience is lacking, it would be beneficial to learn the
basics. Windows 98/NT/2000 provides a tutorial for this purpose. Practice
using the mouse, opening and closing menus, and become familiar with
Windows workspaces.
To launch MDR-8000 from Windows 98/NT/2000/XP, do the following:
1

On Start menu, select Programs.

On Programs side menu, select MDR-8000.

8.11
MAIN WINDOW
See Figure 8 - 3 for main window details. The main window includes a title bar, menu bar, tool
bar, and frame. The frame is hereafter referred to as application window. Double click on the
radio icon to establish communication. The COM 1-4 icon will display and the radio and COM
icons are joined by a line, indicating communication is established. If not, change COM port.
Refer to the Initial Turnup section.

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3EM20188AAAA
User Guide Section

DOUBLE CLICK HERE TO


OPEN ELMC ADDRESS
LIST

DOUBLE CLICK HERE TO


OPEN ALARM STATUS
SCREEN.

Alcatel User Interface


File View

Setup

Options
F4

F5
Analog Monitor

Alarm Status

ELMC Address:

F6

R103

LCL

F7

Performance

FAR RMT

F8

Station Alarm

F9

User Control

Provisioning

LOCAL MAIN
Communicating***

INDICATES LAPTOP IS
COMMUNICATING WITH
RADIO CONTROLLER

Com 1

INDICATES LAPTOP
IS CONNECTED TO
RADIO CONTROLLER
R101

Tuesday, July 26, 2005

1:33:34 AM

DOUBLE CLICK HERE


TO OPEN COM PORT
SELECTION SCREEN
CURRENT
DATE

USI Version R2.01


CURRENT
TIME

ELMC
ADDRESS

MDR-8000 OC3 Controller Version R2.01


RADIO
TYPE

VERSION OF SOFTWARE
LOADED ON PC/LAPTOP

LMW-7231
10/16/05

VERSION OF SOFTWARE
DOWNLOADED TO RADIO
CONTROLLER

Figure 8 - 3 Typical Main Menu


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3EM20188AAAA

8.12
APPLICATION WINDOW
See Figure 8 - 4. Each application window includes a title bar, menu bar, tool bar, and application workspace. The following paragraphs describe application window components.

ELMC ADDRESS
AND DESCRIPTION

MINIMIZE BUTTON
TITLE BAR

WINDOW TITLE

MAXIMIZE BUTTON
CLOSE BUTTON

Sample Application
MENU BAR
TOOL BAR

Current Application Title

Application Workspace

Status Bar
MOUSE POINTER

WINDOW BORDER
LMW-1024-sm
10/27/99

Figure 8 - 4 Application Window Components


8.12.1 Title Bar
The title bar, displaying the name of the application, is located across the top of the application
window.
8.12.2 Menu Bar
The menu bar contains File, View, Setup, and Options menu items. Click once on menu item to
open the next level menu. File, View, Setup, or Options drop-down menu displays.
8.12.3 Tool Bar
The tool bar provides quick access to frequently used functions/screens. Click once on toolbar
button to open function/screen.
8.12.4 ELMC Address and Description
This 5-character, case sensitive, alphanumeric word is unique to the site. The ELMC address
can only be changed by going to the site, connecting the laptop directly to the radio controller,
opening the provisioning screens, changing the address on the Setup ELMC Address Screen,
and saving the new address.
8-8

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User Guide Section

8.12.5 Select Radio (ELMC Address) to Monitor


See Figure 8 - 5. This function allows the user to select different radios to monitor using ELMC. It
also allows the user to verify the contents of the list containing all of the ELMC addresses.

Alcatel User Interface - [Alarm Status -- MDR-8000 DS3]


File View Setup Options
F3

F4

Acknowledge

F5

Alarm Status

F6

F7

Analog Monitor

LOCAL STATUS ALARM

ELMC Description: DURANGO

Communicating***

RECEIVER

TRANSMITER
A

F9

Performance

ELMC Address [F8]: J7914 LCL FAR RMT

STATUS

F8

CLICK HERE
TO OPEN User
ELMC
ADDRESS
LIST SCREEN
Station Alarm
Control
Provisioning

XMT On Line

COMMON
A

STATUS

RCV ON LINE

COMMON LOSS

CHANNEL FAIL

PA TEMP

RADIO FRM LOSS

PA POWER

Double
EYE
CLOSUREClick

TRANSMIT

RSL STATUS

ATPC HIGH

PATH DISTORTION

ELMC's

Power Regulator
COMMAND PATH

on the Elmc to
OFFSelect
NORMAL Address:
CONTROLLER

Descriptions
INVENTORY

[LOCAL]

SYNC LOSS

RADIO ID
[FAREND]
RING BROKEN
DS3 Frame Loss
<NEW>
DS3 Degraded
R101
-- OC3 South Middle Top DS1 Input Loss
DS1 XMT ALARM
DS3 AIS Det.
R102
-- OC3 South Middle Bottom
DS1 AIS INSERT
DS3 AIS Ins.
R103
-- OC3 South West Top
DS1 RCV ALARM
R104
-- OC3 South West Bottom
R105
-- OC3 South East Top
R106
-- OC3 South East Bottom
R107
-- DS1 North West Top

DS3 Degraded
DS3 AIS Detect

Thursday, November 30, 2000

1:44:19 PM

DSI Provisioning

ATPC TIMEOUT
DS3 Frame Loss

I/O On Line

PROVISIONINGLIST
ELMCRCV
ADDRESS

XMT Provisioning

STATUS

PROV. MISMATCH

USI Version R1.02

Controller Version R1.02

Exit

DOUBLE CLICK TO SELECT A DIFFERENT


RADIO (ELMC ADDRESS) TO MONITOR
LOCAL

RADIO THAT IS PHYSICALLY CONNECTED TO THE LAPTOP

FAREND RADIO AT OTHER END OF SAME HOP AS LOCAL RADIO


NEW

OPENS SETUP ELMC ADDRESS SCREEN


TO ADD NEW ELMC ADDRESS TO LIST

LMW-7232
09/06/05

Figure 8 - 5 Select Radio to Monitor


8-9

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User Guide Section


3EM20188AAAA

8.13
FILE DROP-DOWN MENU
See Figure 8 - 6 for the file drop-down menu. Refer to the following paragraphs for details.

Alarm Status -- MDR-8000 DS1


File View Setup Options
New ELMC

Ctrl+N

OPEN SETUP ELMC ADDRESS SCREEN

Open ELMC

Ctrl+O

OPEN ELMC FILE SCREEN

Save ELMC

Ctrl+S

SAVE CURRENT FILE

Save ELMC As
Exit

RENAME AND SAVE FILE IN DIFFERENT LOCATION


Ctrl+X

EXIT MDR-8000 PROGRAM

LMW-1000-SM
01/29/04

Figure 8 - 6 File Drop-Down Menu

8.13.1 Create/Add ELMC Address to ELMC Address List


See Figure 8 - 7. This function is used to create one or more ELMC addresses and save them to
the ELMC Address List screen. You do not have to be at the radio site to create the list, however, you must be at the site to change the address and download it to the controller.

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3EM20188AAAA
User Guide Section

Alarm Status -- MDR-8000 DS1


File View Setup Options
New ELMC

Ctrl+N

ELMC Address

Ctrl+0

Open ELMC

Ctrl+5

Save ELMC
Save ELMC As
Exit

Ctrl+X

Setup ELMC ADDRESS -- MDR-8000 High Capacity


ELMC's

DESCRIPTION

Extended Link Monitor Channel [ELMC] Address


ELMC:
Description:

Add Elmc=>

Delete Elmc

Save

Cancel

4. CLICK HERE
TO SAVE ELMC
ADDRESS ON
LIST
3. CLICK HERE
TO ADD ADDRESS
TO LIST
2. TYPE IN DESCRIPTION IF DESIRED (OPTIONAL)
1. TYPE IN UNIQUE ADDRESS
5 CHARACTERS
CASE SENSITIVE
ALPHANUMERIC NO SPACE, COMMAS,
SPECIAL CHARACTERS
UNIQUE TO RADIO, NOT REPEATABLE

LMW-7233
01/29/04

Figure 8 - 7 New ELMC


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3EM20188AAAA

8.13.2 Open ELMC List of Addresses


See Figure 8 - 8. This function is used to select a list of ELMC addresses to view when more
than one list has been created.

Alarm Status -- MDR-8000 DS1


File View Setup Options
New ELMC

Ctrl+N

Open ELMC

Ctrl+0

Save ELMC

Ctrl+S

Save ELMC As
Exit

Ctrl+X

Open ELMC
Look in:

History

Winusi13
East_elmc.dat - List of ELMC Addresses #1
West_lab_elmc.dat - List of ELMC Addresses #2
Mid_elmc.dat - List of ELMC Addresses #3

Desktop

My Computer

My Network P...

File name:
File of type:

Open
Data Files (*.dat)

Cancel

OPEN SELECTED LIST

Figure 8 - 8 Open ELMC


8-12

LMW-7234
02/04/04

Issue 3
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3EM20188AAAA
User Guide Section

8.13.3 Save ELMC Address


This function saves the ELMC address and station alarm and control names in the current
list. The current list is the list you have open when you save.
8.13.4 Save ELMC Address As
See Figure 8 - 9. This function allows you to divide and subdivide networks and systems into
subnetworks and subsystems by grouping ELMC addresses. Individual ELMC addresses can
be filed in separate lists for the separate groups.

Alarm Status -- MDR-8000 DS1


File View Setup Options
New ELMC

Ctrl+N

Open ELMC

Ctrl+0

Save ELMC

Ctrl+S

Save ELMC As
Exit

Ctrl+X

Save As
Save in:

History

Winusi13
East_elmc.dat - List of ELMC Addresses #1
West_lab_elmc.dat - List of ELMC Addresses #2
Mid_elmc.dat - List of ELMC Addresses #3

Desktop

My Computer

My Network P...

File name:

test_elmc.dat

File of type:

Data Files (*.dat)

Save
Cancel

CLICK HERE TO SAVE ELMC


ADDRESS IN SELECTED LIST

Note
Saving ELMC means saving the ELMC Address action (e.g.: added to list, deleted from list,
new) plus saving names assigned to the Setup Station Alarm Names screen and Setup
LMW-7235
Control Names screen.
02/04/04

Figure 8 - 9 Save ELMC As


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User Guide Section


3EM20188AAAA

8.13.5 Options Drop Down Menu


See Figure 8 - 10 for the options drop-down menu. Options include communications options
(currently limited to modem connect/disconnect options), new controller function, and firmware upgrade function. Options/functions are described in the following paragraphs.

Alcatel User Interface


File View

Setup

Options
Communication Options

Modem Dial-Up

Connect

New Controller

Disconnect

Firmware Upgrade

OPEN MODEM
DIAL-UP SCREEN
DISCONNECT MODEM

Download

DOWNLOAD AND PROVISION


REPLACEMENT CONTROLLER,
THEN REBOOT
DOWNLOAD AND AUTOMATICALLY
REBOOT

LMW-3135-SM
01/29/04

Figure 8 - 10 Options Drop-Down Menu


8.13.5.1

Communications Options

This option opens the modem dial-up screen to connect to modem or disconnect modem. See
Figure 8 - 11 for modem dial-up screen.

Modem Dial-Up

Initialization String

ATDT

Phone Number

2010

Setting

2400,N,8,1

Com-Port

COM 1
Exit

Save Phone
Number

DialUp

LMW-5031-SM
06/23/01

Figure 8 - 11 Modem Dial-Up Screen


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8.13.5.2

3EM20188AAAA
User Guide Section

New Controller

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

The new controller function prevents automatic RCVR switching


in a protected system. Service will be interrupted if a failure
occurs while the new controller function is active (under provisioning hold). If the new controller function is not activated, when
a controller module fails and is replaced, the radio will operate
using the provisioning stored in the replacement controller which
may or may not be correct for the radio application in which it is
being used.

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

The new controller function prevents service interruption when a


controller module must be replaced. It serves two main purposes:

Prevents radio from operating on wrong firmware. The controller will automatically re-boot if the firmware is correct. If an attempt is made to install a controller
with firmware from a different type radio (i.e.; DS3 versus DS1 or OC3/STM-1),
the controller will not re-boot. Correct firmware will first have to be installed.
Prevents radio from operating on wrong provisioning. This function gives the user
time to reprovision a replacement controller module while the radio continues to
operate on the provisioning stored in the controller module being replaced. A provisioning hold message is displayed while the function is active. When provisioning is saved, the radio will return to normal operation and use the provisioning
stored in the replacement controller.

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Firmware Upgrade

8.13.5.3

This function is designed to support the new controller function and provides access to the
download screen for upgrading/changing software. See Figure 8 - 12 for the Firmware
Upgrade Download Screen.

Alcatel User Interface [Download]


File View Setup Options
F3

F4

Prov. Save
ELMC Address:

F5

Alarm Status

F6

Analog Monitor
R101

F7

Performance

Station Alarm

F8

F9

User Control

Provisioning

REMOTE DOWNLOAD
Communicating

Please select a file from the Drive/Directory before Downloading

c:

C:\
windnld
8000 OC3

Start Down Load

css13_19 dat
css13_20 dat
css13_21 dat

Details

CSS 11 _xx.dat =

DS1/E1 Files

_xx.dat
DS3 Files
5:28:23 CSS
PM 12 USI
Version=R1.01
MDR-8000 OC3
CSS 13 _xx.dat =

Controller Version R1.01

OC3 Files

Where _xx = version


e.g.: _11 = 1.01 Version/Release
_21 = 2.01 Version/Release

Figure 8 - 12 Firmware Upgrade Download Screen


8-16

LMW-7062-SM
01/29/04

Issue 3
July 23, 2007
9

3EM20188
Maintenance Section

MAINTENANCE

INTRODUCTION
This section contains information and procedures to aid in restoring the equipment to
its proper operating condition after it has been determined that a problem exists.
9.1

The following warnings and cautions apply while operating, performance testing, troubleshooting, or repairing the MDR-8000 series radios.

DANGER
Possibility of
Injury
to Personnel

Shor t circuits in low-voltage, low-impedance dc circuits can cause


severe arcing that may result in bur ns or eye injur y. Remove
rings, watches, and other metal jewelr y while working with primar y circuits. Exercise caution to avoid shor ting power input terminals.

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

XMTR Crystals should never be shipped as replacements without


being soldered and tuned up in an oscillator assembly board at the
factory.

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

Units with the electrostatic-sensitive (ESS) symbol contain ESS


devices. Store these units in an antistatic container when not in
use, and anyone handling a unit should observe antistatic precau tions. Refer to the Special Precautions pages in the front of the
instruction book for detailed handling information.

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Maintenance Section
3EM20188

CAUTION
Possibility of
Service
Interruption

RF flex coaxial cable requires special consideration. The electrical


characteristics of the coax can be affected if it is accidentally
twisted or bent. Provide mechanical support to prevent any weight
or strain to the coax and connector when connecting or discon necting equipment. Loosen the connectors at both ends of a coax
section if one end must be moved even slightly. SMA connectors
should be secured in place fingertight, and then gently tightened
using a torque wrench with a 5/16 in. head set for 7 to 9 inchpounds. The connectors should not be left fingertight.

Note
Ensure that all antennas are properly aligned and waveguide is in good
physical condition.

Note
Before performing procedures that might in any way affect transmission, it
is recommended that the person performing the procedure understand the
FCC Rules and Regulations pertaining to the equipment and be properly
authorized to operate the equipment.

MAINTENANCE PHILOSOPHY
This section provides information and procedures for equipment maintenance down to the
module level. Module repair is not covered in this manual. A replacement procedure for the
crystal oscillator subboard on the transmitter and receiver modules is provided to enable
future use of the local oscillator at a different frequency in another application or at another
location. Use the drawings in the appendix and those in the station drawing package to support the procedures in this section
9.2

The use of maintenance procedures in this section may result from failure of a periodic check,
an alarm indication, or unacceptable performance. These problems should normally be
resolved as shown in the maintenance philosophy flow chart (Figure 9 - 1).

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3EM20188
Maintenance Section

Alarm
Indication
Para. 9.6

Periodic Check
Failure*
Para. 9.7

Performance
Screen Errors
Para. 9.9.3

Perform
Trouble Analysis
Para. 9.9 thru Para. 9.10

Checks and Adjustments


Required

Cause
of
Alarm
Module Replacement
Required

Refer to Module
Replacement Table
Table 9 - 3

Module
Adjustment
Required

No

Yes

Perform Applicable Checks


and Adjustments Per Module
Replacement Table
Table 9 - 3

Maintenance
Complete

Yes

Problem
Resolved

No

Perform Additional
Troubleshooting Using Theory
and Diagrams Sections as
Required to Resolve Problem

*If Applicable

Figure 9 - 1 Maintenance Philosophy Flow Chart


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3EM20188

RECOMMENDED TEST EQUIPMENT


Refer to Table 9 - 1 for the list of recommended test equipment. Alcatel recommends this test
equipment to properly maintain the radio.
9.3

Table 9 - 1 Recommended Test Equipment


Test Equipment/Function

Essential Characteristics

Digital Volt Meter (DVM)


Fluke 75
Frequency Counter,
Agilent 5315A

Used On
Chart 12, XMTR Carrier Null Adjustment
Using DVM

106 to 150 MHz

Chart 8, XMT Crystal Oscillator Frequency


Correction
Chart 15, RCV Crystal Oscillator Frequency
Correction

Power Meter, Agilent


E4418A with E4418B
Power Sensor E9300A

-60 to +20 dBm, 10 MHz


to 18 GHz, 50 ohms

Chart 13, XMTR Output Level Calibration


(No PA)
Chart 17, PA Output Level Calibration

Test Lead and Tool Kit

PN 695-0675-003

As Required

OPTIONAL TEST EQUIPMENT


Refer to Table 9 - 2 for a list of optional test equipment to support alternate test procedures in
this section and the over-the-hop test procedure in Appendix G.
9.4

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Maintenance Section

Table 9 - 2 Optional Test Equipment


Test Equipment/Function

Essential
Characteristics

Adapter
Type N Male Interface Adapter
(Qty. 2 Required)
Tyco Electronics 1048789-1
Attenuator
Narda 768-30
Bit Error Rate Test Set
Acterna ANT-5
Data Rate
Modulation Scheme
Communications Analyzer w/DS1
Package
Acterna TB 2310-P4
D1 Data Rate
DS1 Modulation Scheme
Communications Analyzer w/DS3
Package
Acterna TB 2310-P5
DS3 Data Rate
DS3 Modulation Scheme
Communications Analyzer w/OC3
Package
Acterna TB 2310-P2

Used On
Flexible RF Test Cable

30 dB, 50 Ohms,
20 Watts

Chart 17, PA Output Level Calibration


(Alternate Procedure)
Over-The-Hop E1 BER Threshold Test

2.048 Mb/s,
HDB3
Over-The-Hop DS1 BER Threshold Test

1.544 Mb/s,
B8ZS or AMI
Over-The-Hop DS3 BER Threshold Test

44.736 Mb/s,
64 QAM
Over-The-Hop OC3/STM-1 BER Threshold Test
155.52 Mb/s

Flexible RF Test Cable, 6 Ft.


Tyco Electronics 1049982-5

Spectrum Analyzer

Optical Power Meter


RIFOCS 555B with SC and FC
SOC
Power
Wavelength

Over-The-Hop Optical Power Test

-8 to -28 dBM,
1310/1550 nm

Oscilloscope, Tektronix TDS3052B

Chart 4, DS3 Radio DADE


Chart 5, DS3 Line DADE

Spectrum Analyzer, Agilent


E4408B

1.7 to 11.7 GHz

Chart 10, XMTR Carrier Null Adjustment Using


Spectrum Analyzer

Variable Attenuator, Narda 791

1.7 to 11.7 GHz,


0 to 37.5 dB

Over-The-Hop DS1 BER Threshold Test,


Over-The-Hop E1 BER Threshold Test,
Over-The-Hop DS3 BER Threshold Test,
Over-The-Hop OC3/STM-1 BER Threshold Test,
OC3/STM-1/ETH I/O Interface Removal and
Replacement,
Over-The-Hop OC3/STM-1 Fade Margin Test
(to the 10-6/10-3 BER Level)

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3EM20188

PERSONAL COMPUTER (PC)/LAPTOP


The PC is an on-line maintenance and troubleshooting tool. Refer to the General Section for
PC guidelines. See Figure 9 - 2. Connect the RS-232 Interface cable between USI connector on
controller and the PC.
9.5

MDR-8000 ALARMS
MDR-8000 Alarms are displayed on:
9.6

1 USI Alarm and Status screen


2 Alcatel MCS-11 Monitor and Control System
3 SNMP MIB browser
4 TBOS foreign alarm system
5 External relay interface
6 Module front panel indicators

Alarm names are radio/alarm equipment dependent. The Alarm List identifies every alarm
name indicated by the above alarm display equipment, in alphabetic order. By clicking on the
alarm name, the user can go straight to the description, cause, effect, and action for that
alarm, regardless of where the alarm is displayed. The alarm list is a summary of alarms
designed for use by NOC personnel. Refer to the detail troubleshooting later in this section for
more information.
ALARM MONITORING AND INSPECTION
Perform the following checks whenever a station is entered:
9.7

1 Verify that no alarms are lighted; only the green status indicators should be lighted.
2 Momentarily press LAMP TEST switch. Verify all indicators light.

Note
Keeping records of errors and alarm history can be an aid to system troubleshooting.

Note
The local status alarms screen displays the alarms of the radio to which the
USI is connected, either physically or addressed via the ELMC.
3 Using the USI computer, check local alarms on the Local Status Alarms screen.

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Maintenance Section

AE37( )
CNTLR
C1

MDR8000
SHELF

TO CONNECTOR J301
(CONNECTS TO
AE37 CONTROLLER)

RS232C
INTERFACE CABLE

USI
TERMINAL

RS232C PORT

MW21100661
101598

Figure 9 - 2 USI Computer to Controller Interconnection


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Maintenance Section
3EM20188

RECOMMENDED PERIODIC CHECKS


Perform XMTR local oscillator frequency verification(Chart 8) and XMTR output check
(Chart 9) 1 year after initial setting and at 5-year intervals thereafter to correct possible drift
caused by aging.
9.8

RADIO TROUBLESHOOTING
The digital radio system is equipped with alarm circuitry and automatic switching (in hotstandby, frequency diversity, and space diversity configurations) to provide protection against
loss of traffic. This automatic switching, coupled with adaptive equalization of multipath distortion, provides protection against equipment outage and propagation variations. Because of
the finite life of electronic equipment, failures occur.
9.9

Troubleshooting USI Alarms


First alert for an alarm is normally the USI Status Alarm Screen. Detailed alarm information
and troubleshooting guidelines are provided in the links to the applicable DS1, DS3, OC3, and
Ethernet Status and Alarm screens. Additional links from the Status Alarm screen to the
alarm generation drawings is provided to assist the troubleshooter.
9.9.1

To use the troubleshooting guide in this section,


1 Click here to enter the troubleshooting guide. Main screen will open.
2 On the Main Screen, click on the type of radio (DS1, DS3, OC3, or ETH) indicating the

alarm. Status Alarm screen for the radio selected will display.
3 Click on the alarm name on the Status Alarm screen for description and procedure.

Troubleshooting RCVR Lockup Problems


The radio is operational when the RCVR is locked onto the associated farend XMTR frequency.
Normally lockup occurs within minutes after power is applied. Successful lockup is indicated
by not having the channel alarm (Chan Alm) lit on the RCVR front panel.
9.9.2

9.9.2.1

Slow Lockup At Initial Turnup

Slow lockup at initial turnup is defined as lockup occurring five minutes or more after powerup. If the radio is non-standby/no space diversity (one RCVR in A side), replace the RCVR.
If radio is non-standby space diversity or hot-standby (two RCVRs, A and B sides) problem is
probably the XMTR at the farend of the hop. The most common cause of slow lockup is incorrect carrier null. First try switching XMTRs. If this clears the problem, perform carrier null
(Chart 10, Chart 11 or Chart 12) and XMTR/PA calibration procedure (Chart 13 or
Chart 17) on the off-line XMTR. If the problem is not cleared, replace the XMTR.
9.9.2.2 Slow Lockup During Normal Operation

Slow lockup after a bad fade or other temporary interruption is defined as lockup occurring
less than a second after RSL is restored. Troubleshooting this type of slow lockup requires
knowing what the RSL is. Check RSL using the procedure in Appendix G.

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Maintenance Section

If the RSL is at least 4 to 5 dB above RCV threshold, the two most probable causes are carrier
leakage and the RCVR local oscillator. Perform carrier null test (Chart 9/10) on the farend
XMTR. If slow lockup continues, remove and replace the RCVR crystal oscillator subboard.
If the RSL is below or 1 to 3 dB above RCVR threshold, wait until RSL improves to at least 4
to 5 dB above RCVR threshold before starting troubleshooting.
Troubleshooting Performance Screen Errors
Path and intermod problems can occur that cause errors to be indicated on the Performance
monitor screens that are not severe enough to generate an alarm on the USI Alarm and Status
screen. Errors of this type fall into two categories: burst and dribbling errors.
9.9.3

The performance screens can be a useful tool in troubleshooting a radio with and without
alarms being indicated on the Status Alarm screen.
To use the Performance screens for troubleshooting:
1. Enter the troubleshooting guide. Main screen will open.
2. On the Main screen, click on the type radio (DS1, DS3, OC3/STM-1, or ETH). Status
Alarm screen for the radio type selected will display.
3. Click on Performance on the toolbar (or click on View and then Performance on the
dropdown list). The performance screen for the radio type will be displayed.
4. Scroll the curser over the screen searching for active buttons.
5. Click on the active button to view that functions description.
9.9.3.1

Troubleshooting Burst Errors

Burst errors are defined as multiple errors in a very short time. Burst errors can be caused
by many things, including loose connections on cable or waveguide at either end of the hop.
A popping oscillator can cause burst type errors. Burst errors can be identified by a high
number of Errors and low number of Error Seconds on the Performance screens. The most
probable cause of burst errors is a loose connection. Check/repair all shelf and external
cables and check all waveguide connections The next most probable cause is the crystal on
the crystal oscillator subboard at either end of the hop.If the radio has both A and B XMTRS
and RCVRS and both A and B are indicating burst errors, the fault is at the XMT end of the
hop. If only A is equipped and indicates burst errors, remove and replace the crystal oscillator subboard on the on-line RCVR.
9.9.3.2

Troubleshooting Dribbling Errors

Dribbling errors are defined as small number of errors over long period of time (no frame
errors). Dribbling errors can be caused by a path problem, such as interference or fading, or
by a hardware problem such as a XMTR or PA that is being over driven, or high phase noise
in the XMTR or RCVR oscillator. Dribbling errors can be identified by observing the Radio
CRC Errors (DS1), Radio Errors (DS3), Receiver Errors (OC3), or RF Receiver Errors (ETH) fields on the
radio Performance screen. Typically, less than five Errors to one Error Second identifies the
fault as dribbling errors. Try isolating the transmitter by switching transmitters in a pro-

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3EM20188

tected system. You can further isolate a transmitter by changing output levels using ATPC
and or dropping the output power out of the XMTR to the PA by one or two dB.
The DS1 radio performance screen has a Repeater CRC Error Sec field that indicates errors
over the repeater cable.
Two troubleshooting tips: 1) errors are displayed on the USI at the receive end in which they
are detected, and 2) these specific type of radio errors are not propagated down the path.
Troubleshooting Using the USI RSL Screens
The RSL screens can be useful tools in troubleshooting a radio with and without alarms being
indicated on the Status Alarm screen.
9.9.4

To use the RSL screens for troubleshooting:


1. Enter the troubleshooting guide. Main screen will open.
2. On the Main screen, click on the type of radio (DS1, DS3, OC3/STM-1, or ETH). Status
Alarm screen for the radio type selected will display.
3. Click on View and then RSL on the dropdown list. The RSL screen will be
displayed.
4. Scroll the curser over the screen searching for active buttons.
5. Click on the active button to view that functions description.
The USI RSL screens can be helpful in isolating an alarm due to a path problem, such as fading, or an equipment failure. If for example there is an intermittent A-side Loss of Frame
alarm displayed on the Export list of alarms (available by clicking on the Export button on
the bottom toolbar on the RSL screen) and the A-side trace on the RSL screen does not indicate a fade or low RSL, the fault is most probably in the equipment. If there had been a fade or
low RSL indicated on the trace for the A side along with the Loss of Frame alarm on the
Export list, the fault would probably be in the propagation path, antenna, or waveguide/
cabling.
The same holds true for the other alarms. For example, if Eye Closure is only on the Export
list, with no other alarms or RSL problems indicated, the most probable cause would be degradation in equipment. However if RSL had also dropped, the cause is probably a weak fade
caused by changes in the environment.
ETHERNET-SPECIFIC TROUBLESHOOTING
The LEDs on the front panel of the Ethernet I/O Interface module and the alarms on the radio
USI status and alarm screen are the first indication of a fault. Troubleshoot radio XMT and
RCV alarms using the procedures in the MDR-8000 Instruction Book/Users Manual. Troubleshoot Ethernet alarms as follows:
9.10

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Troubleshooting Using Ethernet I/O Interface Module Front Panel Indicators


Refer to Table 9 - 3. In this analysis, troubleshoot using Table 9 - 3 to isolate the most probable
cause. Replace modules or repair as directed.
9.10.1

Table 9 - 3 Troubleshoot Using Ethernet I/O Interface Module Indicators


LED

Indication

Probable Cause

Corrective Action

ALM

Steady
Red LED

1. Module failure

1. Replace Ethernet I/O Interface module

WYSD ALM

Yellow LED
Lit

1. Loss of DS1 radio XMT


input to I/O Interface

Check presence of DS1 input to radio. Is


DS1 Present?
Yes - Replace Ethernet I/O module.
No - Check/repair cables to customer
interface.

2. I/O Interface cannot


recover clock, or there
are errors on DS1 output
of radio RCVR (RCV input
to I/O Interface).

Check XMTR end of hop for alarms.


Farend XMTR alarmed?
Yes - Troubleshoot farend XMTR
No 1. Replace local alarmed I/O Interface
module.
2. Replace local radio RCVR module.

3. AIS has been detected on


DS1 output of radio
RCVR (RCV input to I/O
Interface). RCVR fault is
not in this radio.

Check upstream XMTR/hops for alarms.

ETH IN

Green LED
Not Lit

Loss of Ethernet RCV/radio


XMT signal in. Most probable causes:
1. Cable between link partner and radio is disconnected/broken.

Connect/repair cable.

2. Speed/Mode provisioning mismatch between


link partner and radio

1. Check local Ethernet facility provisioning screen.


2. Check link partner provisioning.

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Table 9 - 3 Troubleshoot Using Ethernet I/O Interface Module Indicators (Cont.)


LED

Indication

Probable Cause

Corrective Action

ETH ALM

Yellow LED
Lit

Summary alarm, could be


caused by XMT or RCV
Ethernet degrade

Use USI to determine if degradation is in


the input or output side.

ETH OUT

Green LED
Not Lit

Loss of Ethernet XMT/radio


RCV signal out. Most
probable causes:

9-12

1. Loss of RF input to radio


RCVR

Check local RSL screen on USI. Is RSL ok?


Yes - Check farend for Ethernet alarm.
No - Check farend XMTR output. Is
farend XMTR Out ok?
Yes - Check path, antenna,
waveguide/cabling
No - Check/replace farend XMTR.

2. Loss of Ethernet input to


radio RCVR

Check farend for Ethernet alarms.


Are any alarms indicated?
Yes - Troubleshoot farend alarms
No - Check farend Ethernet status. Is only
abnormal status indicated?
Yes - Troubleshoot farend Ethernet
status.
No 1. Replace local alarmed Ethernet
I/O Interface module.
2. Replace local RCVR module.

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Maintenance Section

TMN-SPECIFIC TROUBLESHOOTING
Refer to Table 9 - 4. The red ALM LED on the front panel of the TMN Interface module and the
alarm on the radio USI status and alarm screen are the first indication of a fault. The ALM
LED on the front panel of the TMN Interface module lights for any module fault. The LED
remains lit during module reboot and also after reboot if reboot is not completed satisfactorily.
9.11

Table 9 - 4 Troubleshooting Using TMN Interface Module Indicators


LED

Indication

Probable Cause

Corrective Action

ALM

Steady Red

1. Module failure
2. Module reboot in progress
(several seconds to reboot)
3. Module reboot failed.

1. Replace module
2. Wait several seconds for reboot
to complete.
3. Attempt reboot. What next?

Ethernet
1, 2,
and/or 3

Blinking Yellow

Network with too much traffic


(collisions occurring). Some
collisions are normal in any
network.

Wait for situation to clear. If collisions continue (severe occurrence),


troubleshoot network.

Ethernet
1, 2,
and/or 3

Not Steady
Green When
First Connected

1. Cable is disconnected/
broken

1. Connect/repair cable.

2. Cable/port mismatch

2. Check application matches


cable. Straight cable instead of
crossover cable, etc.

3. Rate mismatch. Far end


equipment does not support 10Base/T.

3. Check far end equipment supports 10Base/T.

1. Cable is disconnected/
broken.

1. Connect/repair cable.

2. Cable/port mismatch

2. Check application matches


cable. Straight cable instead of
crossover cable, etc.

Local end is receiving data but


PPP disabled locally

Check local provisioning for PPP


port enabled.

PPP

PPP

Not Steady
Green When
First Connected

Yellow

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Table 9 - 5 TMN Network Troubleshooting


Problem

Possible Cause

Possible Solution

Unusually slow communication in radio network

1. Normal network management


traffic is saturating the communications channel.

1. There may be too many radios


being managed within a single
region. Split the radio network
management into different regions
and backhaul the traffic for each
region through separate channels.

2. Polling radios for PM data or


missed alarms too rapidly

2. Poll the radios more slowly.

3. Multiple remote software downloads in process

3. Download to fewer radios at a


time.

4. IP traffic other than network management traffic being routed


through radio network

4. Configure external routers to


allow only network management
related traffic through the Management network of the radios.
Dynamic route updates (OSPF,
RIP) may attempt to reroute high
speed traffic through the TMN network if a high speed ink fails.

Unable to operate controls using