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MARCH 2329, 2016

Helping
the

homeless

pet population
Millions of animals find themselves
homeless each year, and pets
in South Jersey are no exception
By MIKE MONOSTRA and KRISTEN DOWD
The Sun
As the skies turned slate grey and the temperatures began
to dip below freezing, someone placed a small, shivering dog
in a box behind a local hardware store and walked away.
Underweight, dehydrated and riddled with mammary tumors, the six-pound miniature pinscher mix could barely see
through her crusted-over eyes. Severe dental disease left her
mouth sore and rotting. At 13 years old, she could no longer
depend on the kneecaps in her hind legs.
With a massive snowstorm fewer than 24 hours away, the
dog curled up in the box, waiting for rescue, which luckily for
her came in the form of a good Samaritan who happened behind the hardware store.
Picking up the box and placing it in the warmth of his car,
please see MORE, page 10

GET INVOLVED WITH OUR SERIES


For the next four weeks, The Sun looks into the state of
homeless pets in South Jersey and what is being done
to find homes and futures for thousands of animals.
We want our readers involved! Go to our Facebook
page to share your animal adoption stories and photos.

Special to The Sun

A mixed breed puppy one of thousands of animals ending


up in area shelters every year stares through its cage at
the Animal Welfare Association in Voorhees.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE


Evans to close
BOE approves plan to close
elementary school. PAGE 6

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . 2023
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

2 THE MARLTON SUN MARCH 2329, 2016

Ronald Dunster named


a Ballpark Banker
Citizens Bank has announced
that 59 colleagues have been selected for the 2016 Citizens Bank
Ballpark Banker program, including Ronald Dunster of Marlton.
Ballpark Bankers are Citizens
Bank colleagues who work as
brand ambassadors during all
Philadelphia
Phillies
home
games at Citizens Bank Park.
Launched in 2004 with the
opening of Citizens Bank Park,
the Ballpark Bankers program is
an ambassador program.
A select squad of Citizens
Bank colleagues help fans find
their seats, provide directions
and offer courtesy golf cart rides
to fans before the game from the
parking lot to the gates.
Our ballpark bankers provide
a unique experience for the thousands of fans that come to Citi-

zens Bank Park every year, said


Daniel K. Fitzpatrick, president
of Citizens Bank for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.
In no other ballpark that we
know of can baseball fans encounter special ambassadors who
provide assistance in order to ensure the fans have a great time.
Ballpark Bankers also distribute prize packs, including tshirts, backpacks and other
branded items, to seven lucky
fans during the seventh inning of
each home game.
In addition to these roles, Ballpark Bankers volunteer in community outreach efforts, such as
the bank's involvement with the
Phillies Jr. RBI League. The
league reaches more than 7,000
inner-city children by teaching
them baseball and the basics of
teamwork and sportsmanship.

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MARCH 2329, 2016 THE MARLTON SUN 3

Regional school
taxes could increase

CALL NOW FOR FOR WINTER SAVINGS!

LRHSD approves tentative budget with $36.73


increase for average Evesham homeowner
By SEAN LAJOIE
The Sun

please see CHEROKEE, page 17

NJ Lic. #13vh0111555900

In preparation for submission


to the state Department of Education, the Lenape Regional School
District Board of Education
shared its preliminary budget at
last week's board meeting.
Evesham Township residents
will likely see a small increase in
their regional school tax bill for
the 2016-17 year.
The tax levy will potentially increase by 1.5 cents, resulting in an
increase in regional school taxes
of $36.73 on a home assessed at
the township average of $269,900.
The total budget is $156.6 million, an increase of $2.6 million
from last year. Most of the budget

is funded with taxpayer money,


with $116.1 million expected to
come from taxpayers in the district's eight municipalities.
Details on the tentative budget
were not discussed at the meeting.
District officials will hold their
next Board of Education meeting
on Wednesday, April 27 at the administration building in Shamong at 7:30 p.m. This meeting
will play host to a public hearing
in which a more in-depth discussion of the budget and tax impact
will take place.
In other news:
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4 MARCH 2329, 2016

on campus
The following Marlton students at Fairleigh Dickinson University's Metropolitan Campus,
located in Teaneck, have been
named to the dean's or honors
lists for the fall semester: Kelsey
Wainwright,
Grant
Rawden,
Samantha Rubin, Andrew Remeniski and Amanda Brandt.
The following Marlton residents have been named to the fall
dean's list at University of the
Sciences: Allison Haber, Megan
Lew, Liujia Peng, Justin Markelwith, Gianna Saraullo, Sarah Makar,
Brianne Iaeck and Lauren Transue.
The following Marlton students have been named to the
Loyola University Maryland fall
dean's list: Anna Marchio, Alyssa
Perini, Samantha Pharo, Gabriel
Sapuay, Erica DeCecco and Daniela
Laudisio.
Jaclyn Christine Liguori of
Marlton has been named to the
president's list at Clemson University for the fall semester.
Liguori is majoring in nursing.

COLLEGE NEWS
Send The Sun your
announcement and we will
print it, free of charge. Email
your college announcements
to news@marltonsun.com.

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5-C N. Main Street Medford, NJ 08055
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THE MARLTON SUN MARCH 2329, 2016

in our opinion

Say no to new casinos

108 Kings Highway East


Haddonfield, NJ 08033
856-427-0933

Building new casinos in North Jersey wont help the state; itll kill A.C.
n November, New Jersey voters
will have a very important choice
to make at the polls. Were not talking about the choice between the Republican, Democratic or independent
candidates for president of the United
States although that is an important
choice, too.
Were talking about the choice of
whether you believe the state should
authorize the creation of two new casinos in North Jersey. And we believe
your answer should be no.
Last week, the Legislature approved
the ballot question that will ask voters
to approve the expansion of casino
gambling in the state to two undetermined locations in separate counties
in North Jersey.
Atlantic City, the states only current
location for casino gambling, has been
devastated by competition that has
popped up in neighboring states in re-

Your thoughts
What are your thoughts on the proposed
expansion of casino gambling to two
locations in North Jersey? Share your
thoughts on this, and other topics,
through a letter to the editor.

cent years. More than half of casino


revenue in Atlantic City has disappeared because of this, and four casinos shut the doors in 2014 as a result.
Atlantic City Mayor Don Guardian
predicted that three more of the eight
remaining casinos would close if the
North Jersey casinos were approved,
and some analysts believe that number
could even be four.
Supporters of the plan say the extra
casinos in North Jersey will help recapture gambling money that is going
to casinos in other states. And some,
including Jeff Gural, operator of the
Meadowlands Racetrack, say the high

taxes the North Jersey casinos would


pay he has offered a 55 percent tax on
casino revenue, while Atlantic City
pays around 8 percent could go to
help beef up A.C.
Were not so convinced that would
happen. The market is already flooded
with gambling options both in terms
of in-person and online casinos in New
Jersey and surrounding states. Building new casinos wont definitely generate new revenue; it may just shift it
from one part of the state to another.
New Jersey needs a new revenuegenerating plan, not a re-configuration
of a plan that is already not working.
Our lawmakers need to be creative. If
casinos arent working in Atlantic City,
what guarantee is there that they will
work in North Jersey?
When you go to the polls in November to pick your next president, we advise also saying no to new casinos.

BOE approves plan to close Evans Elementary

Dan McDonough Jr.


chairman of elauwit media

Tim Ronaldson

Joe Eisele

executive editor

publisher

manaGinG editor

Kristen Dowd
senior associate editor Mike Monostra
marlton editor Zane Clark
art director Stephanie Lippincott
advertisinG director Arlene Reyes
elauwit media Group
publisher emeritus
editor emeritus

Steve Miller
Alan Bauer

The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit


Media LLC, 108 Kings Highway East, 3rd
Floor, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. It is mailed
weekly to select addresses in the 08053 ZIP
code. If you are not on the mailing list, sixmonth subscriptions are available for
$39.99.
PDFs of the publication are online, free of
charge. For information, please call 856427-0933.
To submit a news release, please email
news@marltonsun.com.
For advertising information, call 856427-0933 or email advertising@marltonsun.com.
The Sun welcomes suggestions and comments from readers including any information about errors that may call for a correction to be printed.

The move comes after officials, board members continue to cite declining enrollment figures across district
By ZANE CLARK
The Sun
At its March 17 meeting, the Evesham
Township Board of Education voted 6-3 to
close Evans Elementary School effective
the 2017-2018 school year.
With a nearly four-hour long meeting,
most of the meetings public discussion
was devoted to arguments for and against
the Evans closure, with participation from
residents, teachers and ultimately members of the board.
When the board voted in favor of the
Evans closure, the decision was met with
silence from both sides of an audience that

had been constantly cheering and clapping


throughout the duration of the meeting.
Board members Elaine Barbagiovanni,
Jeff Bravo, Joseph DeJulius, Joseph Fisicaro Jr., Michele Hassall and Lisa Mansfield voted for the closure, while board
members JoAnne Harmon, Nichole Stone
and Sandy Student voted against.
Those who voted to close Evans cited declining enrollment in the district and the
need to look out for all of Eveshams students. Those who voted against the closure
spoke about the need to explore other options before closing a school and said they
worried about the negative impact such a
decision could have on Evans students.

No board member disagreed when their


fellow members spoke to the difficulty of
the decision and how there would be those
unhappy no matter the outcome.
The decision comes as district officials
continue to outline declining enrollment
figures for the district. Superintendent
John Scavelli Jr. said enrollment was once
as high as 5,436 students in the 2002-2003
school year, but that number has dropped
by nearly 1,000 students to 4,440 this year.
Enrollment numbers are also projected
to continue declining in the coming years,
with the current farthest projected 2020please see STUDENTS, page 15

SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@marltonsun.com, via fax at 856427-0934, or via the mail. You can drop
them off at our office, too.
The Marlton Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including electronically.

CALENDAR

PAGE 8

WEDNESDAY MARCH 23
Parachute Play: Ages 2-4. 10:30
a.m. Evesham Library at 984
Tuckerton Road. Join the library
for a half hour of parachute
games and playtime. Must be
accompanied by a caregiver.
Adult Yarn Social: Adult. 11 a.m. Evesham Library at 984 Tuckerton
Road. Knit and/or crochet? Then
come join other knitting and crochet fans for an hour (or more, if
preferred) of relaxed, social yarn
time. Registration is not required.
More information online at
www.bcls.lib.nj.us, in person or
call the library at (856) 983-1444.
MOMS club: For at-home mothers.
Email
momsclubmarltons@
gmail.com for information.
Preschool storytime: Barnes and
Noble, 200 West Route 70. 11 a.m.

Call 596-7058 for information.


Overeaters Anonymous: 4:15 p.m.
at Prince of Peace Church. Call
(609)
239-0022
or
visit
www.oa.org for information.

THURSDAY MARCH 24
BNI Evesham Regional Chapter
Lunch: Every Thursday at 11:30
a.m. at Indian Spring Country
Club, 115 S. Elmwood Road. BNI is
a business and professional networking referral organization.
Join us to learn more about how
to grow your business. Call Jim
for details at (856) 669-2602.
BNI Marlton Regional Chapter
Lunch: Every Thursday at 11:30
a.m. at The Mansion, 3000 Main
St., Voorhees. BNI is a business
and professional networking
referral organization. Join us to
learn more about how to grow

your business. Call Ray for details


at (609) 760-0624.
Mat Pilates: Gibson House. Targets
abs, back, posture, balance and
flexibility. Call 985-9792 for information.
Piloxing: Gibson House. Non-contact, explosive boxing drills using
one-pound piloxing gloves. Call
985-9792 for information.

SATURDAY MARCH 26
Refresh & Renew Yoga for Adults
& Teens: Ages 13 and up. 11 a.m.
Evesham Library at 984 Tuckerton Road. Start the day by energizing, stretching and relaxing
the body. Join the library for a
one-hour yoga class. Please
bring a mat or towel and a bottle
of water and wear comfortable
clothing. Registration is required.
Register
online
at

MARCH 2329, 2016

WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event. Send information by mail to: Calendar, The
Marlton Sun, 108 Kings Highway East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. Or
by email: news@marltonsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar
listing through our website (www.marltonsun.com).

www.bcls.lib.nj.us, in person or
call the library at (856) 983-1444.

MONDAY MARCH 29
Book Discussion Cold Mountain: Adult. 2 p.m. Evesham
Library at 984 Tuckerton Road.
Join the library to discuss Cold
Mountain by Charles Frazier,
winner of the National Book
Award and featured this year as
One Book Philadelphia. New
members are welcome and registration is not required. More
information
online
at
www.bcls.lib.nj.us.
Marlton Womens Club meeting: 7
p.m. at Gibson House, Recreation
Drive. Call 596-0651 or 988-0422
for information.

TUESDAY MARCH 30
Itsy Bitsy Time: Ages 6 through 12
months. 10:15 a.m. Evesham
Library at 984 Tuckerton Road.
Join Ms. Jenn for a fun activity
with motion and music for babies
6 through 12 months. Bring a
blanket. Siblings must remain
seated. Registration is required.
Register
online
at
www.bcls.lib.nj.us, in person or
call the library at (856) 983-1444.
Little Movers and Shakers: Ages 2
through 3. 11 a.m. Evesham
Library at 984 Tuckerton Road.
Join Ms. Jenn for a half-hour of
musical fun and movement. Sib-

lings must remain seated. For


ages 2 through 3 years. Registration is required. Register online at
www.bcls.lib.nj.us, in person or
call the library at (856) 983-1444.
Emoji Pillow Craft: Ages 6-12. 4 p.m.
Evesham Library at 984 Tuckerton Road. Learn basic sewing
skills and sew an Emoji pillow that
you design. All materials provided. Registration is required. Register online at www.bcls.lib.nj.us,
in person or call the library at
(856) 983-1444.
Book Discussion Cold Mountain: Adult. 7 p.m. Evesham
Library at 984 Tuckerton Road.
Join the library to discuss Cold
Mountain by Charles Frazier,
winner of the National Book
Award and featured this year as
One Book Philadelphia. New
members are welcome and registration is not required. More
information
online
at
www.bcls.lib.nj.us.
Overeaters Anonymous: 10 a.m. at
Prince of Peace Church. Call
(609)
239-0022
or
visit
www.oa.org for information.
Marlton Central Networkers Chapter: 11:30 a.m. at Marcos at Indian
Spring, 115 S. Elmwood Road. BNI
meets Tuesdays for lunch. Feel free
to bring plenty of business cards
and a guest or two to find out how a
trade exclusive business networking group can help increase qualified referrals. Call (856) 304-9320
for more information.

Nicks Auto Body


!
This vehicle was abandoned by owner.

Owned by Bysherra Richardson & Marlton Auto Group

MARCH 2329, 2016 THE MARLTON SUN 9

Spring recreation
registration opens
Officials recently examined seasonal recreation
offerings to determine if any classes were losing
money or competing with businesses in town
By ZANE CLARK
The Sun
After Evesham officials recently conducted an in-depth examination of the seasonal recreation
programs offered through the
township, registration for the
townships spring programs has
officially opened with no significant changes from last year.
Several months ago, Mayor
Randy Brown asked officials to
look over the townships seasonal
offerings and determine if it was
subsidizing any classes that lost
money and to determine if any
programs competed with local
businesses.
With the 43 spring programs
the township recently announced
for children, adults and seniors,
Evesham director of recreation
and senior services Monica Vandenberg said neither scenario
Brown presented was an issue.

OPEN 6 DAYS

According to Vandenberg, the


township will never run a program that might take the township into the negative.
Vandenberg said money from
the programs usually brings in a
small amount of revenue for the
township, and those programs
that dont bring in revenue always break even.
To Browns other concern, Vandenberg said many of the programs offered by the township
dont compete with local businesses, as oftentimes there isnt
an equivalent program offered by
a business in the town.
Some classes like Math Fun
are not offered anywhere else,
Vandenberg said.
For those business that do offer
similar activities, Vandenberg
said the townships offerings are
taught at such a beginner level
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Normans Law fighting


puppy, kitten mills

ZANE CLARK/The Sun

An Animal Welfare
Association volunteer recently took
some time to hold
Sweet Heart, an 11month-old domestic-shorthair mix.
Sweet Heart is just
one of the hundreds of cats available for adoption
at
the
AWA
throughout
the
year.

Freeholder Jeff Nash spearheads effort


to prohibit sales of animals from
unhealthy commercial breeding facilities
By MIKE MONOSTRA

in the large chains. The more I


read about it, the more I was
convinced that...the communiDuring the summer, a ty that I represent was not facilprotest outside a newly opened itating this cruelty to these anipet store on Route 70 in Cherry mals.
Hill caught the attention of
Nash decided to do somemany people who passed by, in- thing to stop the sale of puppy
cluding Camden County Free- and kitten mill animals in
holder
Jeff
Camden
Nash.
County.
In
(Animal
September,
The more I read
advocate Alan
the freeholdBraslow) was
ers
passed
about it, the more
protesting on
Normans
Route
70,
Law, named
I was convinced
Nash said. I
after Nashs
that...the community dog, adopted
would pass by
and I reached
his family
that I represent was by
out to Alan to
as a rescue six
ask
him
years ago.
not facilitating this
whats going
The counon. He started
tys resolution
cruelty to these
to educate me
had two parts
animals.
on the issue at
one was the
hand
with
prohibition of
JEFF NASH
Pats Pups and
the sale of aniCamden County Freeholder
why they were
mals
from
protesting
puppy and kitthere.
ten mills, and
The protesters claimed Pats the second dealt with encourPuppies was selling dogs that aging municipalities to pass
came from puppy mills com- similar ordinances.
mercial breeding facilities
To spread the word, Nash
where cats and dogs are bred at had a number of allies. One
high rates and in substandard was Voorhees Township Mayor
conditions. After speaking with Michael Mignogna, who served
Braslow and learning about the as president of the Camden
protesters arguments, Nash County Mayors Association in
decided to do some research.
2015.
I was really educated on
The first thing I did was
how horrific a situation ex- reach out to the Mayors Associists, Nash said. I realized ation,
to
Mayor
Mike
that, when I grew up, there Mignogna, who was quickly an
were pet stores in malls. It was ally of this legislation, Nash
then I recognized that there are said. Hes also an animal
no pet stores anymore in the rights advocate. He recognized
malls. There are no dogs for this was something he wanted
sale in places like PetSmart his community to do. He sent a
and Pet Valu. I realized there resolution to each of the mayhad been this movement ors for their consideration. Sevagainst the puppy mills to replease see NASH, page 12
strict the sale of those animals

The Sun

More people adopt, dont shop


MORE
Continued from page 1
the man brought the little dog to
the Animal Welfare Association
in Voorhees, where she was
dubbed Shiver, fed a filling meal
and given another chance at life.

Climate changing for homeless


animals, pet industry
Shiver is just one of the 6 million to 8 million animals shelters
take in across the United States
on an annual basis, according to
the Humane Society of the United
States. Only about 4 million are
adopted each year, leaving many
of these animals futures in
doubt.
The good news for Shiver and
other shelter animals is more people are adopting from shelters
and animal rescues. According to
the American Pet Products Associations 2015-16 National Pet
Owners Survey, 37 percent of people who acquire a dog got it from
a shelter or rescue, up 2 percent
from 2012-13. Forty-six percent of
cats were acquired from a shelter
or rescue in 2015-16, up from 43
percent from three years ago.
Shelters and rescues are the top
source for Americans looking to

acquire a dog or cat today, just kitten mills commercial breedahead of breeders and acquiring ing facilities where cats and dogs
are bred at high rates and in subanimals from a friend or relative.
The increase is reflective of the standard conditions.
In New Jersey, government ofadopt, dont shop movement
many animal advocates have ficials have taken action against
preached over the past few years. the pet stores selling mill aniPuppy and kitten stores, common mals, which has had a real effect
sights in places such as shopping on how people acquire pets.
Studies have shown that there
malls in decades past, are no
longer places where people ac- are extraordinary medical probquire pets.
In the APPAs
About 4 million animals
2015-16 survey,
only 4 percent of
of the 6 million-8 million brought
people who acquired a dog
into shelters each year are adopted.
and 2 percent of
people who acHumane Society of the United States
quired a cat purchased it at a pet
store. In New Jersey, the number lems attached to puppy mill aniof pet stores selling animals is mals because of inbreeding and
now down to approximately 30 to disease that is inherent in that
35 locations, with many of them type of operation, said Camden
in North Jersey. Locally, there are County Freeholder Jeff Nash,
no puppy or kitten stores remain- whose county was one of the first
ing in Camden County and only in New Jersey to take action
against stores selling animals
one left in Burlington County.
from mills. The consumer is sadLawmakers go after
dled with heartbreak and extraorpuppy mill stores
dinary veterinary expenses.
Janice Fisher, puppy mill
Animal advocates have been awareness coordinator for an adbattling pet stores for many vocacy group named Friends of
years. The argument from advo- Animals United New Jersey, was
cates is these stores are selling
please see STUDIES, page 11
animals coming from puppy and

The ins and outs of animal shelters and rescues


By MIKE MONOSTRA
and KRISTEN DOWD
The Sun
No two shelters or rescues are
the same. In South Jersey alone,
there are a variety of shelters
and rescues that bring dogs and
cats in on a regular basis.
One of the most common
places for people to adopt pets
today is at a shelter. There are
more than 100 licensed shelters
in New Jersey.
Shelters are places where
dogs are taken in, animal activist Janice Fisher said.
They're housed there, and they
are placed up for adoption.
Shelters take in animals that
were relinquished by a previous
owner, stray animals brought in
from animal control or an individual and animals collected
during a raid.
Some shelters, such as the
Camden County Animal Shelter

and Burlington County Animal


Shelter, are taxpayer-funded facilities.
The CCAS gets about twothirds of its operating budget
from municipalities it serves. It
also houses a public clinic on
site, providing low-cost spay and
neuter and low-cost vaccines,
and the shelter relies on that revenue.
Theres no magic formula,
said Vicki Rowland, executive
director of the Camden County
Animal Shelter. The cost per
animal It costs me about $100
to $250 to care for each animal
that comes into my facility
times more than 4,000 animals a
year, on average.
The BCAS operating budget is
a county budget, but Burlington
County public information officer Eric Arpert said there is also
a tremendous fundraising effort
on behalf of the shelter. Much of
this goes through the Friends of

the Burlington County Animal


Shelter, an all-volunteer nonprofit whose mission is to enhance the lives of shelter animals and help them find homes.
There are a number of private
shelters that operate similar to
the county ones. These privately-funded shelters rely more
heavily on donations and
fundraising. For example, the
Voorhees Animal Orphanage
gets two-thirds of its operating
budget annually from fundraising and donations, with the remaining one-third coming from
contracted municipalities.
Some shelters are also known
as no-kill shelters. The policy
for a no-kill shelter is it will not
euthanize an animal because of
a lack of space. Other shelters
that do euthanize animals will
begin to put them down if the
shelter reaches capacity and the
animal has been housed there
for a lengthy time.

There are few shelters that


(go no-kill), and were proud to
be one of them, Arpert said,
crediting the BCAS recent transition to a no-kill facility with
helping the shelters increasing
adoption rates.
Rescues operate a bit differently than shelters. Rescues are
organizations committed to
bringing in stray, unwanted and
abused animals and giving them
a place to stay until they are
adopted.
Cherry Hill resident Alan
Braslow fosters for a pit bull-specific rescue based in Sewell
named Dont Bully Us. He described the operation as a community effort, with dozens of
families taking dogs into their
homes.
We have foster families all
over the place, he said.
The rescue fosters dogs from
many locations, including some
of the local shelters.

We pull dogs many times


from the shelters because of
their capacity, Braslow said.
We take in the ones that are
going to be put down.
Braslow said the benefit of
having animals stay with foster
families is it helps with training
some of the dogs as well as providing socialization.
Dont Bully Us and other rescues are funded almost entirely
through fundraising and donations.
It's all donations and all outof-pocket, Braslow said. There
are a number of other rescues
that do that same thing.
Even though there are differences in the way shelters and
rescues operate, Rowland said
the organizations have similar
goals.
We all have the same mission. Theres no difference between what we do, Rowland
said.

Studies show puppy mills create extraordinary medical problems


STUDIES
Continued from page 10
a key player in getting a pet store
disclosure bill signed into law in
New Jersey in 2015. Fisher
brought the idea of a disclosure
bill to legislators after purchasing
an ill puppy from a store seven
years ago. She said the legislation
was essential to getting pet stores
to be honest about where their animals were coming from.
They were hiding something,
Fisher said. They didn't want
people to know where their puppies are coming from.
The disclosure bill, signed into
law by Gov. Christie in February
2015, required all pet stores in
New Jersey to give details on
where each animal came from
and prevented stores from obtaining animals from non-reputable

breeders who werent caring for


the animals properly.
The disclosure bill only worked
to a certain extent, though. Fisher
said many of the pet stores were
unwilling to comply with the law
and didnt feel the state would
crack down on them.
However, just a few months
after the disclosure law took effect, a stricter piece of legislation
began to appear. In the summer of
2015, Cherry Hill resident and animal activist Alan Braslow began
working with government officials across South Jersey to ban
pet stores that sold animals obtained from puppy and kitten
mills. The impetus came after the
opening of a pet store named
Pats Puppies in Cherry Hill.
Braslow and other activists were
protesting the stores operation,
claiming it was selling dogs coming from puppy mills. The group
wanted to make consumers aware

of the issue.
Some people go to puppy
stores not knowing that they're
puppy mill dogs, Braslow said.
Braslow reached out to Nash to
see if Camden County could take
action. Shortly after, in September 2015, Camden County freeholders passed Normans Law,
preventing pet stores from selling
dogs and cats from commercial
breeding facilities. Many municipalities in Camden County later
followed suit, including Cherry
Hill and Voorhees.
Pats Puppies changed its business model shortly after Normans Law passed. Braslow
teamed with owner Pat Youmans
to transform the store into P&Ts
Puppy Love Adoption Center, a
nonprofit offering rescue puppies
for adoption.
In less than a year, 25 municipalities and five counties in New
Jersey have passed legislation

prohibiting the sale of commercially bred dogs and cats, and a


bill extending the ban statewide
could be on the Legislatures floor
later this year.
All of this legislation has further promoted a message Fisher
and other animal activists want
the public to know about acquiring pets.
It's adopt or buy from a reputable breeder, Fisher said.
Those are the two choices.

Spotlight put on adopting


at local shelters and rescues
Statistics show Americans
have taken the adopt, dont
shop message to heart. With
Americans gravitating toward
adopting pets, a greater focus has
been placed on the efforts of area
shelters and rescues.
While the focus of Normans
Law was to attack the puppy mill

industry, Nash said one effect it


did have is it gave the county an
opportunity to promote adoptions
at local shelters.
It does bring awareness to (the
shelters) issues, he said.
In New Jersey, municipalities
within a county must have an
agreement with a facility to take
in strays and abandoned animals.
The Camden County Animal
Shelter and Voorhees Animal Orphanage are the two open admission facilities for Camden County,
meaning they service these municipal contracts.
So essentially, at the end of
the day, I dont have a choice
about what comes in, said Vicki
Rowland, executive director of
the Camden County Animal Shelter. We have to take these animals into our facility.
The CCAS has 18 municipal
please see SHELTERS, page 12

Shelters rely on fundraising, fosters and volunteers


SHELTERS
Continued from page 11

contracts, with approximately


2,000 animals a year coming from
Camden alone. According to Rowland, statistically, underdeveloped areas such as Camden have
higher pet populations, with
more than 80 percent of the animals unaltered.
The Camden County Animal
Shelter is operated through a
nonprofit called the Animal Welfare Society of Camden County.
Thats our nonprofit. Were a
vendor running the Camden
County Animal Shelter, Rowland said. Theres pros and cons
to it all, but at the end of the day,
were still a nonprofit organization making ends meet. Were financially set were not operating in deficits but we do rely on
fundraising Thats a constant.
Along with Animal Welfare Association, Animal Adoption Center, Voorhees Animal Orphanage
and Independent Animal Control,
the CCAS is part of the Animal
Alliance of Camden County. The
agencies formed the alliance in
2011 to help improve the services
it provides to animals and communities.
Were all great minds thinking alike, and were just trying to
pull our resources together to
make a better difference, Rowland said.

The directors in the alliance


meet once a month and strategize
programs they want to work on
collaboratively. One program
from last year was the monthly
pet food pantry.
Members of the alliance also
share the same animal management database, too. With a backend portal linking lost and found
sections together, animals are
being located and returned to
owners faster than before.
Camden County officials also
support and work with the alliance.
We work with all of them to
offer in-kind services and marketing for them, Nash said.
Burlington County operates
differently than Camden County.
For example, Burlington County
does not have an alliance of shelters or rescues. However, the
Burlington County Animal Shelter still maintains strong working
relationships with other groups
and the Friends of the Burlington
County Animal Shelter.
We meet with them on a regular basis to brainstorm what
more we can be doing, said Eric
Arpert, public information officer for Burlington County. Anything we can do to increase adoptions or better serve the animals
we are housing.
When shelters operate at capacity, it can have a trickle-down
effect to other shelters and rescues in the area. Right now, the
Burlington County Animal Shelter is not operating at capacity, in

large part due to administrative


efforts and collaborations with
rescue groups and other partners.
Arpert said when the shelter does
reach capacity, it presents challenges, including a higher risk for
disease, stress to shelter staff and
an increased cost to care for the
animals.
When were all operating at
capacity level, it limits our ability
to network with other shelters,
Arpert said.

It takes a village
to make shelters go
With her many ailments and
advanced age, the shelter environment was not an ideal place
for Shiver. Luckily, one of the Animal Welfare Associations senior
foster homes stepped up to give
Shiver a place to rehabilitate before she is put up for adoption.
We have a fantastic, large network of foster homes, AWA shelter manager Nanci Keklak said.
We sent Shiver into foster care to
recoup, get some weight on her
and help her eye condition improve.
Foster families are just one of
the elements to help animal shelters run smoothly. Shelters depend on these families, as well as
volunteers, donations and more.
Rowland said while the CCAS
could always use more volunteers
and foster families, it has a good
system in place for those already
on board. She also said theres no
comparison to an individual

ZANE CLARK/The Sun

Mel, a 3-year-old Coonhound mix, was sure to give some love and affection to the Animal Welfare Association volunteer who recently
took him outside for some exercise. Mel was happy to spend a little
time running in the AWAs play yard.
choosing to volunteer at a public
or private organization.
Its really the volunteers decision on where they want to spend
their time and where they find that
the need is, Rowland said. Our
volunteers step up. They take ownership Theyre a good group.
The CCAS does well with donations. Creating a specific, tangible
need for donations is helpful, according to Rowland, whether it is
for medication for animals or
building a new cattery space, like
the CCAS recently was able to do
because of generous donations.
You have to create that need in
order for them to give. People
want to give for a reason. They

want to give for a purpose, Rowland said, and if they can see
what that impact is, theyre going
to give. And they want to give
you just have to be able to guide
them in directing the need.
Arpert said BCAS has an active and large volunteer group,
but is also looking for more people to join. The shelter is also
very welcoming of new donations.
Were always looking for
more, Arpert said. If anybody
wants to donate, come by the shelter By and large well accept
any donation, whether it be monetary, dog food, toys whatever it
is, well find a use for it.

Nash is certain bill will find its way to Assembly and Senate for votes
NASH
Continued from page 10
eral of them adopted resolutions.
Braslow was another key ally
in getting municipalities outside
of Camden County to jump on
board with the law. Braslow and
other advocates spent much of
the fall and winter attending
meetings around South Jersey
and speaking in support of the or-

dinance.
Braslow said it has been difficult at times to pitch the ordinance to municipalities, especially considering there are so few
towns with pet stores still in operation.
The biggest challenge is saying to the municipalities, You
may not have one, but you dont
want one, he said.
As news of the ordinance
spread, interest in a statewide
ban began to grow. In December,

state Sen. Ray Lesniak announced he was going to propose


a bill similar to Normans Law.
Nash testified at a hearing before a Senate committee on the
bill Feb. 8. He said the bill takes
aim at establishments selling
puppy mill dogs, including online
sellers.
There has been some opposition to the legislation, much of it
coming from pet store owners
and others who believe consumers should have the freedom

to purchase animals.
However, Nash described the
oppositions arguments as legal
static and said it doesnt address
the issue at hand.
No one denies that the mills
treat these animals horrifically,
Nash said. No one denies that
these animals are sick. The individual storeowners will say, my
dogs arent sick. The Humane Society will counter them.
After testifying, Nash felt it
was a certainty the bill would

find its way to the Assembly and


Senate for votes.
The committee is passing
this, Nash said. It was stated explicitly that there will be a bill
that comes out of that committee.
Thats the first step.
In the meantime, Braslow
plans to continue pushing municipalities statewide to pass a
puppy mill ban ordinance.
You have to keep up the momentum and keep up the pressure, he said.

SPRING COLORING CONTEST

Win

Tickets!!

Must be original form. Only one entry per person.


Coloring must be done by using colored pencils, watercolors and/or crayons. Entries must be received by 5 p.m. on March 18, 2016, and cannot be returned.
Ages 1-17 Entries will be judged by Sun Newspaper staff and will be based on overall coloring.
Three winners will be notified by phone/email and posted on Sun Newspapers' social media sites.
Winners will receive 4-pack to Sahara Sams. Prizes will be mailed to the address listed on the entry form.
Mail to: Elauwit Media, 108 Kings Hwy. East, 3rd Floor, Haddonfield, NJ 08033

14 THE MARLTON SUN MARCH 2329, 2016

Some programs start first week of April


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SOME
Continued from page 9

that the townships programs act


as more of a feeder system to

local businesses as opposed to


competition.
As an example, Vandenberg
said karate classes offered by the
township are actually taught by
instructors from studios in Evesham, and there have been cases
where the instructor would teach
the class for free in the hope of
eventually gaining a few more
participants for their business.
They ask us to act almost as a
feeder program, Vandenberg
said. Its a starter, its considerably less money, and that instructor will come and teach it.
Vandenberg also said the township monitors how many participants
will
repeat
courses
throughout the year. If the township finds there are residents who
have enrolled in the same class repeatedly for five to six quarters,
the township will inform those
residents if there is a business in
town that offers that class or program at a higher level.
Sometimes, weve had the ac-

tual business come in and speak


with that group, Vandenberg
said.
Vandenberg said the township
also spends very little money to
run the classes from an administration standpoint, as each quarter the township changes very
few programs, and so the preparation runs nearly on autopilot.
Were not expelling any more
monies on them because the time
for the preparations and such
were looking at about one-and-ahalf hours a week during that
quarter,
Vandenberg
said.
Everything is done in-house now
and its the work between two
clerks: one in the recreation department and one in the finance
department.
Those interested in signing up
for Eveshams latest round of programs can visit the Recreation
and Senior Service page of evesham-nj.org.
Programs start as early as the
first week of April.

Free Estimates

"

!!!

MARCH 2329, 2016 THE MARLTON SUN 15

Students would be assigned to other schools


STUDENTS
Continued from page 6
2021 school year expected to leave
the district with 4,080 students.
The closure of Evans is expected to bring a savings of $1.4 million to the district, and would reduce overall staffing levels by 25
employees, with the elimination
of an administration employee,
10 professional employees and 14
support employees.
Scavelli has previously said
those numbers are close to what
the district averages in retirements each year, so the reduction
is expected to come from attrition.

Current district plans do not


involve selling Evans School, but
rather leasing its space to other
entities.
Evans students will be assigned to other schools in the district depending on their sending
zone, but even with the additional
Evans students, Scavelli said no
school in the district would be at
capacity.
Scavelli has also repeatedly
said there wouldnt be a relative
impact on class sizes at any of the
schools as a result of the Evans
closure.
If the board voted against the
Evans closure, Scavelli said larger class sizes and reductions in
programs would become necessary in the coming years, as fu-

ture budgets are projecting about


a $500,000 annual shortfall.
Overall, Scavelli said he wouldnt give information to the board
if he didnt believe it himself.
I dont put anything out that
isnt true, that isnt factual, Scavelli said. Im not a politician and
I dont plan to run for politics, so I
dont have to make stuff up.
Many members of the public
who spoke before the vote asked
the board to explore other options
and get more information before
making their decision. Even
Mayor Randy Brown spoke and
implored the board to take a closer look at its budget and the value
of the other properties it owns in
please see BOARD, page 16

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GUTTER

16 THE MARLTON SUN MARCH 2329, 2016

Board approves tentative 2016-2017 budget

CLEANING

609-586-2300
GUTTER DOCTOR

BOARD
Continued from page 15
town.
Youre not ready to vote in an

hour, youre not ready to vote in a


week, Brown said as the crowd
erupted in cheers.
Before the vote took place,
Evans Principal Nick DiBlasi was
also given time to speak. With the
Evans closure, DiBlasi will also

We are now scheduling SPRING CLEANUPS!

continue to work in the district,


as he will replace Van Zant Principal Rosemary McMullan who is
retiring in October. The district
plans to hire an interim principal
at Van Zant until Evans is closed
and DiBlasi can assume the role.
DiBlasi said no matter the outcome, the Evans students would
be alright as long as parents acted
like role models theyre supposed
to be.
I think truly, regardless of the
vote tonight, that is how Evesham
Township School District becomes again what it needs to be,
DiBlasi said.

In addition to the vote to close


Evans School, the board took another significant vote at the
March 17 meeting when it approved the tentative 2016-2017
school year budget.
Scavelli said the tentative budget totaled $73.3 million, which was
a decrease from the $74.1 million
he outlined at a series of community meetings several weeks ago.
With the tentative budget, Evesham residents with homes assessed at the average price of
$269,900 would see a $78.24 tax increase for their K-8 school taxes
next year.
Although the newest figures
for the tentative budget are still
less than what was originally presented several weeks ago, the district is still looking to raise taxes
beyond the 2 percent tax levy increase cap mandated by the state
through the use of banked cap.
However, the biggest difference
from the budget Scavelli presented to the public several weeks ago
was the removal of a nearly
$700,000 referendum the district
would have sought in November

to pay for an expansion of the


current police coverage in Eveshams schools.
Currently, the township and
district have a shared services
agreement for the program,
which Evesham officials have
said costs $500,000, with the township paying $300,000 and the district paying $200,000.
At a press conference on March
16, Brown and Evesham Police
Chief Christopher Chew announced a plan where the Evesham Police Department offered
to pay for the entire cost of the
current agreement between the
district and municipality.
At the press conference, Chew
described the current arrangement as having been an overwhelming success, and at a previous township council meeting,
Chew said he believed the agreement provides more than adequate police coverage for the districts schools.
With the additional funds from
the township, combined with
other changes in projected revenues and budget costs for the district, Scavelli said the district no
longer needed the referendum.
Evesham Township manager
Tom Czerniecki said the municipality could ill-afford to fund the
entire agreement, but the decision to do so was made to remove
any confusion over whether keeping police in schools was somehow tied to the potential
closure of Evans Elementary
School.
The last thing any of us want
is for our men and women in uniform to be given the stinkeye by
teachers, parents and students,
Czerniecki said.
For future budgets, Czerniecki
said he would be pushing the
board to address sharing the cost
of the program.

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Board approves tentative


2016-2017 budget

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MARCH 2329, 2016 THE MARLTON SUN 17

PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
PEASANT PRICES.

Cherokee jazz band students provide


free mini clinics for middle schoolers
CHEROKEE
Continued from page 3
from the 2015-16 winter sports
season at the meeting.
Superintendent Carol Birnbohm congratulated members of
the Shawnee, Lenape and Seneca
high schools DECA chapters for
winning their state and regional
competitions. They are now qualified to compete in the international career development conference national competition in Tennessee.
Lenapes math team won its
fourth consecutive championship
in the Burlington County Math
League. The team is ranked 10th
in New Jersey and No. 1 in South
Jersey.
The Seneca girls and boys basketball teams hosted free basketball clinics for youth basketball

&

players from Chatsworth, Tabernacle, Shamong and Southampton.


Students from the Cherokee
Jazz Band provided free mini
clinics for several days after
school for the Marlton Middle
School and DeMasi Middle School
band students.
Lenape students from their
foundation of leadership class
and their student leadership
academy club hosted students
from Harrington Middle School
where the students ran leadership workshops to help their
counterparts from the middle
schools enhance their abilities to
lead once they come to Lenape.
In February, Spanish teachers
from all four high schools invited
the world language teachers from
the eight LRHSD sending middle
schools to a workshop that focused on activities that provide
opportunities for students to

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speak in the target language in


the classroom and to discuss how
to consistently measure Spanish I
honors assessments between all
of the middle school and high
school programs.
At Cherokee High School, students were able to attend a seminar during Lunch & Learn at
which guest author TJ OConnor
spoke about his career in intelligence and security and how it influenced the writing of his awardwinning mystery novels.
Shawnee High School music
teacher Nick Rotindo met with individual students during their
Lunch & Learn period to help
them practice their college audition pieces.
Seneca High School teacher
Dane Reed helped the special education program further advance
by developing students social
skills during their Lunch &
Learn period.

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NJ License 13VHO3054600

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18 THE MARLTON SUN MARCH 2329, 2016

Special to The Sun

Cherokee High School had several winners in the 2015 National


Russian Essay Contest, including, from left, Zachary Fithian,
Nicholas Campbell, Illan Shnayder and (in front) Aislinn Stahl.

Cherokee students win


Russian Essay Contest
Cherokee High School offers its
congratulations to the 2015 National Russian Essay Contest winners. This year, 1,291 students nationwide from 41 Russian programs participated. Students
were given two hours to write in
Russian on My Perfect Day.
Winners include: Harrison
Krementz and Max Zeligson with
honorable mentions at the beginner level, Ethan Lacy and Caitlin
Viggiano with bronze awards at
the beginner level, Robert
Livshits with a silver award at the
beginner level, Ashley Fowler
and Thomas Gillin with honor-

Stories
Stories transform
transform e
even
ven the
the simplest
simplest fruit.
fruit.
uch more
more than
than jjust
ust a delicious
delicious ssnack.
nack. B
ut h
ow d
ow
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istinguish
An
apple
much
But
how
do
we
distinguish
A
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an rrepresent
epresent m
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an
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etween a
n apple
apple as
as an
an apple,
apple, and
and an
an apple
apple as
as a symbol
symbol for
for countless
countless entities?
entities?

able mentions at the intermediate


level, Nicholas Davis, Ethan Fyfe
and Rachel Kapanzhi with bronze
awards at the intermediate level,
Randall Fryland with a silver
award at the intermediate level,
Nicholas Campbell, Illan Shnayder and Aislinn Stahl with bronze
awards at the advanced level and
Zachary Fithian with a gold
award at the advanced level.
Contest administrators will
forward Fithians gold medal
essay to the Pushkin Institute in
Moscow for a second round of
judging. Results and awards
should be available in May.

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W H A T

Cherry Hill Sun Haddonfield Sun


Marlton Sun Medford Sun
Moorestown Sun Mt. Laurel Sun
Shamong Sun Tabernacle Sun Voorhees Sun

sale, job posting or merchandise.

65

per week

Y O U

PAGE 20

N E E D

T O

K N O W

All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 9 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.

H O W

T O

C O N T A C T

U S

Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com


43)7+9+

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'8437>

NOW IS THE TIME TO CHECK YOUR CHIMNEY!

MASONRY & CONCRETE


Fully mobile
*Works with most insurance companies

Specializing in all types of Masonry, Brick,


Block, Stucco & Chimney repairs
Concrete installed & repaired
Concrete Leveling-Mudjacking
French Drains All Work Guaranteed

856-627-1974

For all your honey-do-list needs!

43)7+9+

www.mrhandyman.com

'8437>

Lic. # NJ-HIC13VH03642600

/8)+11'3+4:8

C T Garro Mason Contractors


REPAIRS OF ALL TYPES

Siding Capping Painting


Gutters Carpentry & More

FREE EST./REAS. PRICES/REFS AVAIL. 10% OFF mention the SUN

(856) 810-2182

All Phases of Concrete & Masonry Work

A&M

steveshomerepairplus.com

MASONRY &
CONCRETE

Yards Cleaned
Sheds and Decks Removed
Attics, Basement, Garages Cleaned

CELL 609-313-3606

1-800-883-3828 856-786-5229
%

- ( ! '+ %)
'
%
' $#/'
$(.
Residential Service Upgrades
Recessed Lighting
Backup Generators & Installs

'%

4-

4'7*/3-

Your

Dog

42+ 2574;+2+39

1+)97/)'1 #+7;/)+8

&$# !
,

On time. Done Right.

www.RASBUILDERSNJ.com

REG# 13VH03811200

***

Call Today!

Since 1974 FREE ESTIMATES

S & J Construction, LLC

Annes Cleaning
856-482-1327

856-429-8991

Custom Homes, Additions, Sun rooms,


Siding, Baths, Decks, Garages,
Basements, Roof, Windows

Residental - Commercial

(609) 230-1682 (609) 268-9497


Need Your Home Cleaned?
Reliable results. Excellent references.
HOMES OFFICES
Life is too short.
Enjoy your free time!

'3*>2'3 #+7;/)+8

RAS BUILDERS

Family Owned & Operated


1+'3/3-

4397')9/3-

$"

ADDITIONS ADDITIONS ADDITIONS


DECKS DECKS DECKS
PVC & VINYL RAILINGS LOW VOLTAGE LIGHTING
Call For
Special Spring
Pricing

Jay C. Welwood
Medford, NJ
Office: 609-953-5773
Cell: 609-206-1722

FREE
ESTIMATES
NJ Lic. # 13VH05085200
www.welwoodconstruction.com
jaywoodmx@aol.com

Call 856-427-0933 to place your classified!

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In A Loving Home
NOT A KENNEL!

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roudly serving
serving tthe
he S
outh JJersey
ersey aarea
rea
Proudly
South
E A R S!
for over
over 2 5 Y EA
for
No Dispatch Fees Affordable Service Rates
Easy Payment Options

www.
OUR HOME
DOG BOARDING.com

Call Steven:
856-356-2775

CLASSIFIED
./23+>

HAPPY HELPER
CLEANING

$50 OFF

Weekly Bi-weekly Monthly


Detail Cleaning

Window Cleaning & House Pressure Wash Combo

$25.00 OFF CLEANING


Insured

CALL TOM

856-304-5019

'/39/3-

'/39/3-

AMERICAN SERVICES

Residential/Commercial
Service upgrade &
all types of wiring
No Job Too Small
Senior & Military Discounts
FREE ESTIMATES
"

21

Interior/exterior paint, flooring, bathroom & kitchen


remodeling, drywall, framing, siding repairs,
handyman services

856-429-4882
www.southjerseycaretakers.com

1+)97/)'1 #+7;/)+8

42+ 2574;+2+39

1+'3/3-

1+'3/3-

1+'3/3-

MARCH 23-29, 2016 THE MARLTON SUN

Window Cleaning Pressure Washing


Concrete Pool Cleaning
Deck Cleaning and Sealing

$50 OFF

$25 OFF

Deck Cleaning
and Sealing

609-801-1185
Full Ins. & Bonded
20 yrs. exp. Lic 13923

$:947/3'7('7'

41'3* $:947/3-

House Pressure
Washing

43)7+9+

'8437>

1+)97/)'1 #+7;/)+8

'3*>2'3 #+7;/)+8

HOME REPAIR!
Roofing, Siding,
Windows & Doors, Stucco
Gutter Cleaning, Paint,
Powerwashing, Drywall & more!!

1+'3/3Lic.# 13VH01426900

FREE ESTIMATES
856-304-3916
+3+7'1

'/39/3-

4397')9/3-

JUDYS WALLPAPER

Over
p.
35 yr. ex

REMOVAL + PAINTING

CLEANING BY STEPHANIE

Pauls Painting of Medford


Specializing in Interior &
Exterior Painting
Quality work at Reasonable Price

(609) 320-9717

House & Office Cleaning


Weekly, bi-weekly, Monthly
Linen changes, beds made,
low rates
20 years experience
call for appt. (609) 845-5922

NJ Lic# 13VH00929000

FREE ESTIMATES

+9

Schedule Now
Professional
& Clean Service

'7+

609-714-6878
609-471-3082
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.

Spring is Coming!

+15 &'39+*

Let us help you grow your idea to full bloom!


Crown Moldings Decorative Trims Bookcases
Custom Mantles Built-Ins Baths Decks & Porches
FREE ESTIMATES - REFERENCES - LICENSED & INSURED

7/;+78 4)'1 7/8941


42+ '/1> 1'9(+*
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CALL TODAY! (609) 561-7751


www.jhstraincarpentry.com
'3*>2'3 #+7;/)+8

ERICS HANDYMAN
SERVICE.COM

I CAN HELP WITH YOUR TO-DO LIST


I do quality & affordable home repairs,
locks, blinds, sheetrock repair, painting,
staining, pressure washing, fence repair,
mulch, stone, and much more.

Call 3B's HONEY DO SERVICES


And ask for Bruce.

856-983-5325

856-296-5515

Computer Prospecting / List Development


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856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com

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saving our planet, one pile at a time

4<+7 &'8./3-

PETE GENTILI'S
POWER WASHING
& PAINTING
LIC/INS.

609-617-2874

Low Pressure
Power Washing Specialist

Hands on Deck, LLC.

856-428-9797

CLASSIFIED

22 THE MARLTON SUN MARCH 23-29, 2016


'3*8)'5/3-

+15 &'39+*

3D Landscaping and Lawn Care


Trees, Shrubs, Pruning, Clean-ups, Mulch,
Topsoil, Sod, Grading, Paver, Patios,
Walks, Walls, Stone, Ties,
Sprinklers installed-repaired,
Underground Drainage

CALL MIKE 856-535-4946

Call for a free estimate for Spring cleanups


We do mulch, lawn cutting,
gardens, seeding, fertilizer
hedge trimming, leaf vacuum
service & more!
Call Rich 609-707-2318

'/39/3-

&'39+* 94
$

:>

TECHNICAL
Cisco Systems, Inc. is accepting resumes for the
following position in Moorestown, NJ: Solutions
Integration Architect (Ref.# MOO4): Perform analysis and diagnosis of highly complex networking
problems and network designs. Travel may be
required to various unanticipated locations
throughout the United States.
Please mail resumes with reference number to
Cisco Systems, Inc.,
Attn: M51H, 170 W. Tasman
Drive, Mail Stop: SJC 5/1/4,
San Jose, CA 95134.
No phone calls please.
Must be legally authorized to work in the U.S. without
sponsorship. EOE. www.cisco.com

COSTUME JEWELRY

4<+7 &'8./3-

$7++ #+7;/)+

ROOF CLEANING &


POWERWASHING

R&L TREE SERVICE

Remove Black Mold & Algae

Tree Removal
Tree Pruning
Stump Removal
24 Hr. Emergency Service

Vinyl Siding
Concrete Driveways
Decks & Fence
Sealing & Staining

Best Price Guaranteed!

FREE ESTIMATES
Fully Insured

FREE ESTIMATES
Fully Insured

856 222-0676

856 222-0676
10% OFF WITH THIS AD

Firewood for sale!


10% OFF WITH THIS AD

$7++ #+7;/)+

TREE SERVICE

D.E.C. Contracting
609-953-9794
609-405-3873
Lic #13VH03950800
ISA Cert. Arborist NJ-0993A

42+ 2574;+2+39
CHINA DINNERWARE
SETS OR PARTS
!

FURNITURE
LAMPS - MIRRORS
STATUES
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
!
CALL GINA"
856-795-9175
609-471-8391

Well shine light


on your business!

ADDITIONS - 12 x 14 $19,800
Est. 1985 License # 13VH05163200

:8/3+88

M.M. Humenik & Associates, L.L.C.


O. 609-714-8501 C. 609-923-5673

Call us at
(856) 427-0933.

55479:3/9/+8

#$%
"!&
- CASH BUYERS ONLY -

CLASSIFIED

MARCH 23-29, 2016 THE MARLTON SUN

'3*8)'5/3-

1:2(/3-

23

$'30 "+24;'1

WILLIAM SHUSTER
OWNER

10% OFF
L

LIC#13085

andsc
Servicesaping
Only

Like us on FACEBOOK
and get 10% OFF
your next job!

Expires 4/3
0/16

oday!
Call T
BACK-FLOW TESTING SEWER JETTING SEWER EXCAVATION
PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE TRADITIONAL PLUMBING WATER HEATERS
VIDEO SEWER INSPECTIONS

"44,/3-

(856) 629-8886
(609) 698-4434
NJ LIC. # 13VH00102300

'5+7.'3-/3-

30 Years
30
Years Ex
Experience
xperience Fa
Family
amily OOwned
wned & OOperated
perated
FAST
F
A ST
High
High Quality
Quality Products
Products Senior
Senior Citizen
Citizen Discount
Discount
EMERGENCY
E
MERGENCY
No
No High
High Pressure
Pressure Sales
Sales Tactics
Tactics
SERVICE!
SERVICE! Professional
Professional Installation
Installation Serving
Ser ving tthe
he Tri-State
Tri-State area
area

NEW CUSTOMER SPECIAL!

$50 OFF

FREE
ESTIIM
MATES

Expires 4/30/16.

Any
Any new
new complete
complete roofing
roofing or
or siding
siding job
job
Must
Must present
present coupon
coupon at
at time
time of
of eestimate.
stimate. Not
Not valid
valid with
with other
other offers
offers or
or prior
prior services.
services. EExpires
xpires 4/2/16.
4/2/16.

ROOFING
Shingle Cedar Shake Rubber
Hot Asphalt Skylites & Repairs

(609) 268-9200

LET THE SUNS


WORK FOR YOU!

Lic.# 13VH01716900

Call 856-427-0933
for Advertising Info.
$7++ #+7;/)+

&'9+75744,/3-

National/American Waterproofing
Pruning, Topping and Removal
Guaranteed To Beat Any Written Estimate
24 Hr. Emergency/Insurance Work

GREAT WINTER PRICES

Residential
Specialist
Underground
Crawlspace
Above Ground
Tanks
Clean Ups
Structural Support
DEP Certified
Insurance Approved
NJ Grant Money
Available
Ask our expert!

$7++ #+7;/)+

NEW SHINGLE
NEW
SHINGLE R
ROOF
OOF SPECIALISTS
SPECIALISTS S
SLATE
LATE ROOF
ROOF REPAIRS
REPAIRS RUBBER
RUBBER ROOFS
ROOFS
S
SEAMLESS
EAMLESS GUTTERS
GUTTERS SIDING
SIDING WINDOWS
WINDOWS & DOORS
DOORS CAPPING
CAPPING SOFFITS
SOFFITS
EMERGENCY
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
EMERGENCY TARP
TARP SERVICE
SERVICE AVAILABLE
AVAILABLE R
ESIDENTIAL & C
OMMERCIAL

DI AMOND

OIL TANK
REMOVAL /
INSTALLATION

856-767-4443

www.americanwatermanagement.com.
Lic # 13VH06045200

Paperhanging,
Removal & Painting
By Randy Craig

(856) 981-1359
www.rcpaperhangings.com

ALL NEW

2016 VOLVO S60

Power Glass Moonroof, Leather Seating Surfaces, Sensus


NAVIGATION w/ Mapcare, 17'' SADIA alloy wheels, Heated
Front Seats, SIPS airbags.

Sign & Drive


$369x36*

Volvo Innovations
Everything we do is designed around people, so every innovation we make is designed to
simplify and improve your life. We're especially proud of our advances in efficient power,
connectivity and safety. We call our thinking in these areas: Drive-E, Sensus and IntelliSafe.
2016 S60, stock#16-6096, vin#YV126MFKOG2407977 MSRP : $39,725, 4cyl, e-drive,$0.00
down payment,$0.00 security deposit, total of lease payments $13,284.00
Option to purchase at lease end $21054.25 based on 36 months. close end lease. 10,000 mi/yr,
excess mi $0.25/mile thereafter. Offer can not be combined. Prices include all costs to be paid
by a consumer expert lic. taxes, reg & doc fees. Added options additional. NOT responsible for
errors or omissions. CH volvo Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Cherry hill volvo reserves the right to amend or revoke any program without notice. Prior sales excluded. Limited
Supply. Total amount due at signing 0. (all State tax, reg & Doc fees to be paid by consumer).
Offers expire and customer must take delivery by 3/31/2016.

! ! ! $

"