PA Environment Digest 

An Update On Environmental Issues In Pennsylvania 
Edited By: David E. Hess, ​
Crisci Associates 
 
Winner Of  ​
PA  Association of Environmental Educators 
Business Partner Of The Year Award 
 
PA Environment Digest Daily Blog​
     ​
Twitter Feed 
                                                                                                                                                                  
Issue #612                                    Harrisburg, PA                                  March 21, 2016  
 
4th Senate, House Republican Budget Sent To Governor In The Face Of Veto Threat 
 
Senate and House Republicans, in overwhelmingly 
party­line votes, took final action to send ​
House Bill 
1801​
 (Irvin­R­Centre) containing $6.05 billion in 
supplemental appropriations for FY 2015­16 (Senate­ 
31 to 18, House­ 128 to 63), the Fiscal Code bill­­ 
House Bill 1327​
 (Peifer­R­Pike) (Senate­ 30 to 19, 
House­ 120 to 71) and the bills funding state­related 
universities to the Governor for his action. 
Gov. Wolf said Wednesday afternoon he 
would veto the bills, but we don’t know at this point 
if that means the entire bills or whether he will use his line­item veto. 
The bills were formally presented to the Governor for action on Thursday by the Senate 
and House. 
House Speaker Mike Turzai (R­Allegheny) said Friday​
 without closing out the FY 
2015­16 budget, negotiations cannot begin to talk about the FY 2016­17 budget.  He and other 
Republicans urged Gov. Wolf to sign the budget bills on his desk. 
Regardless of the veto, Speaker Turzai did hint there might be enough Democratic votes 
in the House to override the veto. 
“We were very appreciative that we picked up 13 of our Democratic colleagues’ votes, 
we think that many more of our Democratic colleagues—many of us who are good friends, very 
professional—understand the need to close the 15­16 budget,” Rep. Turzai said. 
Reacting to the Speaker’s comments Friday afternoon, House Democratic Caucus 
spokesperson Bill Patton said the Speaker “is continuing to refuse to acknowledge reality.” 
“Every step the governor has taken has been an action to close the deficit, not make it 
worse,” he said. “The people that are making the deficit worse are the House Republican 
leadership who would not let the House take a vote on a real budget." 
House Bill 1327​
 (Peifer­R­Pike) amends the Fiscal Code to among other things, kill DEP 
Chapter 78 conventional drilling regulations and make DEP start over, reduce Growing Greener 
watershed restoration funding by $15 million this fiscal year and to slow consideration of any 
state plan to comply with the EPA Clean Power Climate Plan. 

         The bill would also transfer $12 million from the High Performance Green Buildings 
Program to the Natural Gas Infrastructure Development Fund administered by the 
Commonwealth Financing Authority. 
House Republicans and some Democrats finally reached the required two­thirds vote and 
passed funding for the state­related universities­­ Penn State, Pitt, Lincoln and the University of 
Pennsylvania in Senate Bills 912, 913, 914, 915 and 916­­ and sent them to the Governor for his 
action. 
Gov. Wolf threatened to veto these bills as well. 
This entire package of bills put together by Senate and House Republicans represents a 
$30 billion FY 2015­16 General Fund budget restoring many, but not all, of the ​
line­item vetoes 
Gov. Wolf​
 made in the $30.2 billion Republican budget approved in December. 
Republicans say the budget requires no additional tax revenue and increases funding for 
basic education and nonpreferred appropriations to state­related universities. 
Gov. Wolf and Senate and House Democrats say the Republican budget is out­of­balance 
by at least $290 million, would create a year end deficit of more than $1.6 billion in 2016­17 and 
would force Pennsylvania “off the fiscal cliff.” 
Specifically, Democrats say, it does nothing to fund state programs administered by 
counties. 
Click Here​
 for a copy of the line­by­line General Fund spreadsheet by House 
Republicans. 
This is the ​
fourth budget Republicans​
 have sent to the Governor since June 30 of last 
year.   ​
(​
Click Here​
 for the timeline.) 
The General Fund budget was vetoed entirely by the Governor last July.  A stopgap 
budget package in September was vetoed by the Governor in its entirety.  And finally, $6.8 
billion of the General Fund budget passed in December was line­item vetoed by the Governor. 
In between those budgets, the House failed in 14 attempts to override the Governor’s veto 
of the June 30 budget. 
And now we have budget #4. 
Governor’s Veto Threat 
Gov. Wolf issued this statement just after the Senate vote on the Republican budget: 
“Despite repeated efforts by my administration to work with Republican leaders to find 
compromise, including over the last couple days, Republican leaders are once again insistent on 
passing another irresponsible and unbalanced budget that does not fund our schools or fix the 
deficit. 
“This is further indication that the Republican leaders have no intention of working 
together with me to produce a final budget. This is the third time they have attempted to pass an 
unbalanced budget with no consultation with the administration. This is simply unproductive and 
a waste of taxpayer resources. 
“The math in the latest version still does not work. Even using the Republicans’ 
questionable math and assumptions, the budget creates a $1.6 billion deficit that will prompt 
massive cuts to education, teacher layoffs, higher property taxes, and cuts to vital programs for 
seniors. This budget not only does nothing to address Pennsylvania’s challenges, but by 
continuing to kick the can down the road, it further exacerbates our problems, 
“In its current form, I will veto this budget, and I urge Republicans in the legislature to 
stop the partisan games and come back to the table to negotiate a final budget that funds our 

schools and eliminates the nearly $2 billion deficit. I look forward to working with both parties 
in the legislature to finally end this impasse, fix our schools, and eliminate the deficit.” 
In later comments, Gov. Wolf said specifically he will veto funding for state­related 
universities because there is no revenue to support it. 
Senate Republican Comments 
Senate Republican Leaders offered the following statements on the passage of the budget 
Wednesday­­ 
Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati (R­Jefferson):  “Today’s vote took an 
important step to close the 2015­16 budget impasse which has now entered its ninth month.  I am 
pleased that we are finally completing this budget year without raising taxes on Pennsylvania’s 
hardworking residents.  The supplemental budget passed by the Senate today will provide our 
schools, agriculture programs, critical access hospitals and many other worthwhile programs 
with the funding they need to keep their doors open.   Gov. Wolf’s desire to create a crisis by line 
item vetoing funding last December was completely inappropriate.  It is long past time to close 
the 2015­16 budget and move on to working to provide a timely and responsible budget for 
2016­17.” 
Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman (R­Centre):  “We are in an emergency situation. 
Let’s stop looking at what this budget isn’t and focus on what it is. This budget is $200 million 
new dollars for education and keeps our schools from closing their doors. It restores the funding 
for our agricultural community and means Penn State won’t lay off 1,100 employees. Rural 
hospitals receive their funding as do regional cancer centers, poison control facilities and more. 
This plan gets our communities the money they desperately need without the tax increases the 
Governor so desperately wants.” 
Senate Appropriations Committee Majority Chair Pat Browne (R­Lehigh):  “We cannot 
continue down the path we are on where schools are facing the real prospect of being forced to 
close and where vital nonprofits and social service organizations are unable to keep their doors 
open and operating. We have a fundamental and constitutional responsibility to provide funding 
to these critical state programs and services. This supplemental 2015­16 appropriations budget 
restores most of the Governor’s line­item veto cuts from December and provides increased 
funding for education, restores funding to correctional facilities and social service agencies and 
does so without raising taxes on our hard­working families and job creators.” 
Senate Majority Whip John Gordner (R­Columbia):  “I am pleased the Senate has acted 
to restore funding to our schools, agricultural community, rural critical access hospitals and other 
vital programs.  This responsible budget reverses the punitive cuts inflicted by Governor Wolf 
through his line­item vetoes and at the same time increases public school funding by $200 
million without raising a single tax.” 
General Fund Bill Contents 
House Bill 1801​
 (Irvin­R­Centre) includes $6.05 billion in supplementation 
appropriations for­­ 
­­ Dept. of Agriculture ­ $83.8 million 
­­ Dept. of Conservation & Natural Resources ­ $2.25 million Heritage Parks Program 
­­ Dept. of Environmental Protection ­ does NOT restore $900,000 for Sewage Facilities Grants 
Click Here​
 for a copy of the line­by­line General Fund spreadsheet by House 
Republicans. 
NewsClips: 

McNickle: Phone Call Telegraphs Wolf’s Real Intent On Shale Gas? 
Swift: Worsening Budget Mess Awaiting Lawmakers 
Editorial: Better Leaders Would End The Budget Impasse 
Auditor General To Examine Act 13 Impact Fee Spending 
PCN: PA Supreme Court Arguments On Act 13, Oil & Gas Lease Fund 
PLS: Speaker Turzai Implores Gov. Wolf To Sign Budget 
Wolf Threatens Veto Of Republican Budget 
Sen.Yudichak (D) Rips Wolf, Legislature Over Budget Impasse 
Thompson: GOP Ponders Veto Override, With Growing Dem Support 
Budget Impasse Concerns Penn State Extension Director 
Penn State Extension, 4­H Programs Hang In Balance 
Penn State’s Agricultural Extension Dollars Affect Your Table 
Lancaster Penn State Extension Office Faces Closure 
Related Stories: 
2nd Senate Budget Hearing: DEP: 12 Special Funds Will Have Funding Shortfalls By 2018 
PEC Opposes Killing Conventional Drilling Regs, Delaying Clean Power Plan 
Growing Greener Coalition Calls For Boost In Funding For Environmental Agencies 
Growing Greener Coalition Thanks House For Passing Heritage Areas Bill 
Joint Conservation Committee: Heritage Areas Generate $2 Billion For PA’s Economy 
Commonwealth Court Upholds Ability Of A Governor To Line­Item Veto Fiscal Code Bill 
 
PEC Opposes Killing Conventional Drilling Regs, Clean Power Plan Delay In Fiscal Code 
 
The ​
PA Environmental Council​
 Wednesday sent a letter to all members of the Senate expressing 
its opposition to provisions ​
House Bill 1327​
 (Peifer­R­Pike) amends the Fiscal Code to among 
other things, kill DEP Chapter 78 conventional drilling regulations and make DEP start over, 
reduce Growing Greener watershed restoration funding by $15 million this fiscal year and to 
slow consideration of any state plan to comply with the EPA Clean Power Climate Plan. 
The bill would also transfer $12 million from the High Performance Green Buildings 
Program to the Natural Gas Infrastructure Development Fund administered by the 
Commonwealth Financing Authority. 
The bill is now on the Governor’s desk for action. 
The text of the letter follows­­ 
“On behalf of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council (PEC), I am writing to express 
our strong opposition to provisions in House Bill 1327 (P.N. 2969) that utilize the fiscal code as 
a vehicle to negate important, publicly­developed environmental regulatory provisions relating to 
oil and gas development, and to seek further delay of Clean Power Plan implementation planning 
in Pennsylvania. 
“If the General Assembly wishes to address these matters, it should do so in stand alone 
legislation with due public notice and opportunity for involvement. Use of the fragmented state 
budget process to advance unrelated measures of substantive law is against good public policy 
and violates the single subject rule of the Pennsylvania Constitution. 
“We call on members of the Senate to reject these provisions, as well as the practice of 
circumventing public participation in issues of environmental law that are wholly unrelated to 
the budget.” 

For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​
PA 
Environmental Council​
 website, visit the ​
PEC Blog​
, follow ​
PEC on Twitter​
 or ​
Like PEC on 
Facebook​
.  ​
Click Here​
 to receive regular updates from PEC. 
Related Stories: 
4th Senate, House Republican Budget Sent To Governor In The Face Of Veto Threat 
2nd Senate Budget Hearing: DEP: 12 Special Funds Will Have Funding Shortfalls By 2018 
Growing Greener Coalition Calls For Boost In Funding For Environmental Agencies 
Growing Greener Coalition Thanks House For Passing Heritage Areas Bill 
Joint Conservation Committee: Heritage Areas Generate $2 Billion For PA’s Economy 
Commonwealth Court Upholds Ability Of A Governor To Line­Item Veto Fiscal Code Bill 
 
2nd Senate Budget Hearing: DEP: 12 Special Funds Will Have Funding Shortfalls By 2018 
 
DEP Secretary John Quigley Monday told the Senate Appropriations 
Subcommittee on Infrastructure, Environment and Government 
Operations DEP will have 12 special funds running in the red by 2018 
and at least two of those funds will require legislative action to fix. 
He said to make up for the shortfalls in the other funds, DEP will 
be proposing permit fee increases to cover administrative costs in the 
absence of more General Fund support for the agency. 
Secretary Quigley said DEP needs a major investment in 
information technology capacity to not only become more efficient and 
effective, but to potentially reduce the need for more staff in the future. 
He pointed to a proposal by Gov. Wolf to increase DEP’s Oil and 
Gas Program staff by 50 positions last year, saying if the agency can invest in iPads and mobile 
technology and the systems to back them up, perhaps DEP would not need all those new 
positions. 
Secretary Quigley said DEP has been looking at many other opportunities to cut costs by 
consolidating functions within the agency, partnering with other agencies to share costs, 
reviewing the need for office space and closely ​
reviews filling every single staff vacancy​

He told Senators, however, that DEP has been the victim of relentless and debilitating 
budget cuts for more than a decade. 
“This agency isn’t lean, it’s emaciated, and we can’t cut our way to cleaning up the 
environment,” Secretary Quigley said. “We are perilously close to not meeting the agency’s 
mission.   
“Every function of the agency has been compromised” by the cuts in DEP’s budget. 
He added, regulatory requirements don’t go away, if anything they expand.  
[​
Note:​
 DEP administers over 40 state environmental protection and public health and 
safety laws assigning responsibilities to the agency.  None have ever been repealed, but many 
have been replaced with new and more significant requirements.] 
At the same time, Secretary Quigley said, DEP’s employees have been doing an 
outstanding job, in spite of the lack of resources, meeting ​
Permit Decision Guarantee Program 
review deadlines 89 percent of the time, where the agency is given complete applications, and 80 
percent of the time even when applications are incomplete. 
Secretary Quigley said, overall, 22 percent of DEP’s costs are funded by the General 

Fund, 28 percent are federal funds and 50 percent come from permit review and administration 
fees and a small percentage from penalties.   
He said DEP has a complement of about 2,683 positions, down from 3,200 in 2002­03. 
This second hearing on DEP’s budget by the Senate Appropriations Committee was 
chaired by Sen. John Eichelberger (R­Blair).  He noted the Subcommittee is bipartisan, but 
Democratic members choose not to attend this hearing. 
Click Here​
 to watch the Subcommittee hearing online. 
While much of the hearing was a rehash of the original ​
Senate hearing on DEP’s budget​

here’s a quick summary of some specific questions asked during this hearing­­ 
­­ ​
Special Funds Shortfalls: ​
Sen. Eichelberger (R­Blair) said there were 12 or 13 special funds 
associated with DEP that will go into the red shortly and asked if DEP had any proposals for 
dealing with the issue.  Secretary Quigley said 12 special funds at DEP will go into the red 
sometime in 2018.  
He said ​
DEP will propose fee increases​
 to address the shortfalls in most of these funds, 
but legislative action will be needed in at least two cases­­ the Hazardous Sites Cleanup and 
Storage Tank funds.  He noted fee increases are in a 3 year review schedule and always lag 
behind costs because of the nature of the regulatory process used to increase fees. 
In a related question, Sen. Elder Vogel (R­Beaver) said the proposal to ​
increase the state 
waste tipping fees​
 would only result in the fee being paid by consumers.  Secretary Quigley said 
the reason for the fee increase was to provide enough money to transfer $35 million to the 
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund and Hazardous Sites Cleanup Fund. 
If the fee increase is not enacted, these funds would do without or alternatives would 
have to be found. 
Sen. Scott Wagner (R­York) said he can’t support increased fees, or any appropriations 
increase, until agencies “turn over every rock” to reduce costs.  
­­ ​
How Much Work Does DEP Do That Isn’t Mandated By Statute?:​
 In response to this 
question by Sen. Eichelberger (R­Blair), Secretary Quigley said all of what they do is required 
by federal or state laws.  “DEP got rid of all the extras a long time ago.” 
­­ ​
Level Of Effort To Meet Federal Funding:​
 Sen. Robert Mensch (R­Montgomery) asked 
about the level of effort needed to keep federal funding coming in for DEP programs.   Secretary 
Quigley said the agency has seen slight increases in some federal funds, but most of the federal 
funds require matching state funds which has caused problems.  He pointed to two examples: the 
mining program had to turn back $6.5 million in federal funding because they didn’t have state 
match over the last 6 years and EPA withheld $3 million in Chesapeake Bay Program funding 
because DEP did not have adequate staff.   He noted the Bay Program funding​
 has since been 
released​
 because of the Chesapeake Bay Program eboot announced in January. ​
 (​
Click Here​
 for 
more information on shortfalls in DEP funding and staff  identified by federal agencies.) 
­­ ​
Information Technology:​
 Sen. Robert Mensch (R­Montgomery) asked again about 
investments in information technology noting the cost of hardware has dropped significantly 
over the years.  He said he recognizes “we are dropping the ball on investments in information 
technology” and would like to help address the issue since he comes from an IT background. 
Secretary Quigley said DEP is still using 1990s technology, like the ​
eFACTS database 
that will shortly not be supported by the company who wrote it.  As a result, he said, DEP’s 
ability to do its basic work is being hamper.   
He noted there was a $2 million information technology line­item in the Governor’s 

budget­­ $1 million to replace eFACTS and $1 million for mobile technology like iPads for 
inspectors. 
Staff Buy Their Own Technology:​
 Sen. Mensch suggested, and Sen. Scott Wagner 
(R­York) supported, the idea that DEP employees might be asked to buy their own technology. 
Secretary Quigley pointed out that technology needs to connect to and that’s where there is a real 
challenge for DEP. 
­­ ​
Measuring Agency Performance:​
 Sen. Eichelberger (R­Blair) said one of the general issues 
the Subcommittee is looking at is to identify more accurate agency performance measures. 
Secretary Quigley said he would like to have a management dashboard, but DEP isn’t built for 
that sort of approach and needs a major investment in new information technology, like replacing 
eFACTS, to get to that level. 
­­ ​
Severance Tax Lobbying: ​
Sen. Wagner (R­York) questioned why Secretary Quigley was 
spending so much time lobbying for the Governor’s natural gas severance tax proposal. 
Secretary Quigley said he responds to questions when asked, but he doesn’t spend time lobbying 
for the severance tax.  [​
Note:​
 None of the severance tax revenue generated by Gov. Wolf’s 
proposal would go to support DEP programs.] 
Sen. Pat Browne (R­Lehigh) later commented the Wolf Administration keeps saying the 
state doesn’t have a severance tax and asked if changing the name of the Act 13 drilling impact 
fee to severance tax would deal with the problem or doesn’t the impact fee raise enough money?  
Secretary Quigley said the state needs to find additional new, sustainable sources of 
revenue to deal with a $2 billion structural deficit in the state budget.  He said he believes the 
existing impact fee has an effective tax rate of 1.5 percent and disputed the ​
5.5 percent tax rate 
published by the Independent Fiscal Office​
.   
He noted the CEOs of 5 different natural gas companies recently pointed to how uniquely 
positioned they were in Pennsylvania because of the low cost of production and proximity to 
market to deal with the current natural gas market.  He said the severance tax proposal, which 
includes a credit for impact fees paid and certain production costs, would place Pennsylvania 
squarely in the middle of the pack of those states with severance taxes.   
Secretary Quigley said Gov. Wolf wants the gas industry to succeed and said the 
Administration is addressing one of the industry’s biggest problems­­ getting natural gas to 
market.  About one­third of finished wells cannot be connected to any market because the 
pipelines are not there.  The ​
Governor’s Pipeline Infrastructure Task Force​
 made 184 
recommendations, including 84 for which DEP has responsibility, to help with the pipeline 
development in a responsible way.  He said the first recommendation was for DEP to have more 
staff. 
­­ Privatizing Oil and Gas Regulatory Program:​
 Sen. Browne (R­Lehigh) asked if it was 
possible to get along with privatizing parts of the Oil and Gas Program to avoid hiring some 
permanent staff given the ups and downs of the industry.  Secretary Quigley said while the 
number of new permits have declined by about one­third, DEP still has vacancies in the program. 
He said he believes permit reviews are a basic function of government and in some instances 
DEP may be prohibited from having private, third parties do reviews of permit applications.  He 
noted DEP has to ​
justify filling every single vacancy​
 in his agency.  In earlier budget testimony, 
Secretary Quigley, pointed out DEP has also not been inspecting conventional and 
unconventional wells with the frequency they believe is necessary. 
­­ EPA Clean Power Climate Rule:​
  Sen. Scott Wagner (R­York) asked if DEP should 

discontinue any work on plans to meet EPA’s Clean Power Plan Climate Rule ​
until the courts 
have reviewed the issue​
.  Secretary Quigley said DEP has put work on a Pennsylvania Plan on a 
“low boil,” but was continuing to work on a plan at a reasonable pace until there is some clarity 
from the federal courts.  He said DEP is also “wrapping up” its work with a National Governor’s 
Association project on modeling alternative compliance strategies for the state.   
However, Secretary Quigley said if DEP stops work altogether, the state would be behind 
the curve if the EPA rule is upheld.  He noted renewable energy and cheap natural gas will 
continue to replace expensive and inefficient coal­fired power plants in the future regardless of 
what the state does.  There is also a concern, he said, about defining the role nuclear power 
plants will play because they represent 95 percent of carbon­free energy generation now in the 
state. 
­­ ​
Nutrient Credit Purchases By State:​
 Sen. Wagner (R­York) asked about the program 
suggested by Sen. Vogel​
 to have the state buy nutrient credits to meet Chesapeake Bay 
requirements.  Secretary Quigley said having the state buying nutrient credits would be 
unprecedented and very expensive.  The technology advocated by Sen. Vogel’s legislation, he 
said, would require the state paying an estimated $11 per pound of nutrient reduction, when 
currently credits are selling for less than $1 for practices like forested buffers.  DEP is actively 
looking at market­based solutions and is proposing changes to its market­based Nutrient Credit 
Trading Program to make it more competitive. 
­­ ​
New Growing Greener Program: ​
In response to a question from Sen. Vogel (R­Beaver), 
Secretary Quigley said the Governor’s Office has had discussions about a new Growing Greener 
funding initiative with stakeholders and would be anxious to continue that dialogue with 
legislators. 
­­ ​
Recycling Law Update: ​
Sen. Eichelberger (R­Blair) said waste haulers in his district have 
expressed concerns about finding markets for all the recycled materials they pick up and asked if 
it wasn’t time to take another look at the Act 101 recycling law.  Secretary Quigley said he 
would like to have a conversation about increasing the state’s recycling targets and pointed to a 
specific concern now is ​
changing the electronics waste recycling law​
 to deal with electronics 
recycling issues.  
­­ ​
Permit Reviews:​
 In response to a question from Sen. Wagner (R­York), Secretary Quigley 
said a number of factors have affected permit review times.  He said DEP lost 671 positions over 
the last decade­­  441 of those were permit writers and inspectors.  He pointed to the Harrisburg 
Regional Officer as an example of the impact of these reductions where 4 permit writers have 
200 permit applications on their desk with new ones coming in every day.  He said DEP has also 
lost people to the private sector because of higher private salaries and is having difficulty filling 
positions.   
In addition, in the near future, 30 percent of DEP’s workforce­­ about  800 people ­­ will 
be old enough to retire and their experience will be lost to the agency. 
In spite of these difficulties, Secretary Quigley said DEP, under its ​
Permit Review 
Guarantee Program​
, meets the deadline for permit reviews 89 percent of time when applications 
are complete and even 80 percent of the time when they aren’t complete. 
He also explained, permit reviews at DEP, he said, are not “box checking operations,” 
they require actual review. 
Secretary Quigley said 39 percent of the permit applications coming in the door at DEP 
have deficiencies, according to a recent study by DEP, and the private sector needs to “up their 

game,” but, he added,  “I will own any problems in my agency.” 
Sen. Wagner followed up by saying there should be an “Angie’s List” for consulting 
firms and understood the issue because he was personally involved in a permit issue where he 
was not well served by a consultant. 
Status Of Permit Reviews: ​
Sen. Eichelberger (R­Blair) expressed concerned about 
permit applications moving at their own pace and going into a “black hole.”  Secretary Quigley 
said the Permit Decision Guarantee Program provides deadlines for review where applications 
are complete. He said he also understand there will be applications that have significant 
economic development opportunities behind them.  It all comes back to limited staff, he said. 
Length Permit Review Times: ​
Sen. Mensch (R­Montgomery) asked if there are other 
ways to address the permit review issues by lengthening permit review times a bit, for example. 
Secretary Quigley said they have been looking at a variety of ideas for refining DEP’s permit 
review programs including electronic permitting. 
­­​
Restructuring Programs: ​
 Sen. Browne (R­Lehigh) asked about opportunities to restructure 
programs and the agency to save money, create synergies and make staff more effective. 
Secretary Quigley said they have reorganized to ​
meet Chesapeake Bay commitments​
, but there 
was no opportunity to save money.   He pointed out again water quality­related programs in 
particular have been hard hit by budget cuts and “we are underwater” as the agency.  He pointed 
to the 25 percent reduction in staff in Safe Drinking Water Program as another example.  
­­ ​
Controlling Overtime: ​
In response to a question from Sen. Pat (R­Lehigh) about the steps 
taken to control overtime, Secretary Quigley said he has authorized some overtime for permit 
processing.  He pointed out DEP staff responds to emergencies that frequently involve work on 
weekends or outside normal work hours and overtime is authorized in those circumstances. 
Click Here​
 to watch the Subcommittee hearing online. 
NewsClips: 
McNickle: Phone Call Telegraphs Wolf’s Real Intent On Shale Gas? 
Swift: Worsening Budget Mess Awaiting Lawmakers 
Editorial: Better Leaders Would End The Budget Impasse 
Auditor General To Examine Act 13 Impact Fee Spending 
PCN: PA Supreme Court Arguments On Act 13, Oil & Gas Lease Fund 
PLS: Speaker Turzai Implores Gov. Wolf To Sign Budget 
Wolf Threatens Veto Of Republican Budget 
Sen.Yudichak (D) Rips Wolf, Legislature Over Budget Impasse 
Thompson: GOP Ponders Veto Override, With Growing Dem Support 
Budget Impasse Concerns Penn State Extension Director 
Penn State Extension, 4­H Programs Hang In Balance 
Penn State’s Agricultural Extension Dollars Affect Your Table 
Lancaster Penn State Extension Office Faces Closure 
Related Stories: 
4th Senate, House Republican Budget Sent To Governor In The Face Of Veto Threat 
PEC Opposes Killing Conventional Drilling Regs, Delaying Clean Power Plan 
Growing Greener Coalition Calls For Boost In Funding For Environmental Agencies 
Growing Greener Coalition Thanks House For Passing Heritage Areas Bill 
Joint Conservation Committee: Heritage Areas Generate $2 Billion For PA’s Economy 
Commonwealth Court Upholds Ability Of A Governor To Line­Item Veto Fiscal Code Bill 

Growing Greener Coalition Calls For Boost In Funding For Environmental Agencies 
Budget Hearing: DEP: State Can’t Cut Its Way To A Better Environmen​

Senate Hearing: DEP Does Not Have Enough Staff To Meet Needs In Any Of Its Programs 
DEP Secretary John Quigley’s Written Budget Testimony­Full Text 
Governor’s Office Latest Regulatory Agenda: DEP Permit Fee Increase For 6 Programs 
DEP Tells House Committees Chesapeake Bay Program Faces Inadequate Resources, Data 
Agriculture Secretary Says More Resources Needed To Meet Clean Water Commitments 
House Budget: DCNR To Propose $40 Fee For Natural Diversity Inventory Permit Reviews 
Senate Budget : DCNR: No Drilling Rigs Now On State Forest Land 
DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn Written Budget Testimony­Full Text 
PUC Asks For Increased Funding For More Rail, Pipeline Inspectors 
After 9 Months, No Due Date For Resolving State Budget Impasse 
 
Growing Greener Coalition Calls For Boost In Funding For Environmental Agencies 
 
The ​
PA Growing Greener Coalition​
 Monday called on the Wolf Administration and state 
lawmakers to boost funding for the Department of Environmental Protection, citing concerns that 
inadequate technology and bare bones staffing levels are putting Pennsylvania's environment at 
risk. 
In addition, the Coalition urged the Governor and legislators to also provide adequate 
funding for the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and the Department of 
Agriculture to address Pennsylvania's growing environmental needs. 
"If we want to improve and protect the quality of our water and air, the state must stop 
short­changing environmental protection," said Andrew Heath, executive director of the 
Pennsylvania Growing Greener Coalition. "Inadequate funding directly threatens the health of 
Pennsylvania's land, air and water and consequently, our communities." 
As discussed in ​
Monday's Senate Appropriations Committee hearing​
, DEP simply cannot 
absorb further budget cuts without sacrificing the ability to enforce regulations that protect the 
Commonwealth's environment, and in fact, the state should be putting more money – not less – 
toward programs that protect and preserve Pennsylvania's open spaces, family farms, parks and 
trails, waterways and historic sites. 
"With hundreds of acres of open space lost to development each day in Pennsylvania, we 
need to be doing more to protect our natural resources, not less," said Heath. "As the 
Environmental Stewardship Fund continues to shrink, now is the time for lawmakers from both 
sides of the aisle to come together to advance a Growing Greener III initiative and continue 
Pennsylvania's conservation, recreation, and preservation legacy." 
Funding for the Growing Greener Environmental Stewardship Fund has decreased from 
an average of $200 million in the mid­2000s to approximately $60 million in 2014. 
The Coalition also called for restoring funding for the state Department of Agriculture, 
which along with DEP, plays a critical role in ensuring Pennsylvania meets its commitments to 
cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and urged the Wolf Administration to save DCNR's 
Heritage Areas Program from being eliminated. 
The ​
PA Growing Greener Coalition​
 is the largest coalition of conservation, recreation 
and preservation organizations in the Commonwealth. 
Related Stories: 

4th Senate, House Republican Budget Sent To Governor In The Face Of Veto Threat 
2nd Senate Budget Hearing: DEP: 12 Special Funds Will Have Funding Shortfalls By 2018 
PEC Opposes Killing Conventional Drilling Regs, Delaying Clean Power Plan 
Growing Greener Coalition Thanks House For Passing Heritage Areas Bill 
Joint Conservation Committee: Heritage Areas Generate $2 Billion For PA’s Economy 
Commonwealth Court Upholds Ability Of A Governor To Line­Item Veto Fiscal Code Bill 
 
Reservations Now Being Accepted For April 19 Governor’s Environmental Awards Dinner 
 
The ​
PA Environmental Council​
 is now accepting 
reservations for the ​
April 19 dinner to honor the 2016 
winners​
 of the Governor’s Environmental Excellence 
Award to be held at the Harrisburg Hilton. 
The Governor’s Awards are presented each year by the 
Department of Environmental Protection to highlight the best in environmental innovation and 
expertise throughout the Commonwealth.   
The awards are the highest statewide honor bestowed upon businesses and organizations 
for environmental performance and innovation from cleaning up watersheds, saving energy, and 
eliminating pollution, to reducing waste and more. 
DEP Secretary John Quigley will provide the keynote address and DCNR Secretary 
Cindy Adams Dunn will provide special commentary for this special event. 
Janelle Stelson, news anchor with WGAL Channel 8 in Lancaster, will be the program 
emcee. 
The year’s sponsors include: Platinum­ Dominion Resources, Silver­ UGI Corporation, 
Bronze­Crisci Associates, Environmental Excellence Sponsor­ Groundwater Sciences 
Corporation and Innovator Dinner Sponsors­ K&L Gates LLP and RT Environmental Services, 
Inc. 
For all the details and to register, visit PEC’s ​
Governor’s Award Dinner​
 webpage or send 
an email with your questions to Angela Vitkoski at: ​
avitkoski@pecpa.org​

 
Presque Isle State Park Beaches Named Best Freshwater Beach By USA Today 
 
The beaches at ​
Presque Isle State Park​
 in Erie were 
named the best freshwater beaches in the United 
States by the ​
USA Today 10Best Readers’ Choice 
Contest​
 Friday. 
The contest page described Presque Isle this 
way: "Visitors to Presque Isle State Park are in for a 
singular Pennsylvania experience: the state's only 
formidable shoreline, which boasts a number of 
beaches.  
Beach 11 (photo) is the park's most sheltered, 
and therefore most serene. Its shallow water is a safe 
option for visitors with little ones and boasts views of the Erie skyline.  
Beach 6 on the other hand, is a draw for young people, with its concession stands and 

volleyball courts. The flip side, it is often the most crowded." 
Presque Isle encompases 3,200 acres on a sandy peninsula that arches into Lake Erie.  As 
Pennsylvania’s only seashore, Presque Isle offers its visitors a beautiful coastline and a variety 
recreational activities, including swimming, boating, fishing, hiking, bicycling and in­line 
skating.  
A National Natural Landmark, Presque Isle is a favorite spot for migrating birds. Because 
of the many unique habitats, Presque Isle contains a greater number of the state's endangered, 
threatened and rare species than any other area of comparable size in Pennsylvania. 
Also featured at the park is the ​
Tom Ridge Environmental Center​
 which is not only home 
to a visitor and education center for the park, but also houses ground­breaking research facilities 
on Great Lakes and water quality issues affecting Lake Erie and a 75 foot observation tower. 
For more information, visit DCNR’s ​
Presque Isle State Park​
 webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Presque Isle Wins National Best Beach Contest 
Philadelphia Chosen To Host 2021 International Parks Conference 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
New Northwest Lancaster County River Trail Section, Visitor’s Center Open 
Waterfront Road Will Fill Gap In D&L Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Holds Meeting On Fell Twp Trail 
Kennett Township Greenway Gets Green Award In Chester 
Crowd Provides Input Into New Section Of Lackawanna Heritage Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Trail To Get 14 Cameras 
Goal Reached To Save Appalachian Trail Hotel 
Tourists Spent $1 Billion In Route 6 Corridor In 2014 
Susquehanna River People Seeks To Save Island Retreat 
National Geographic Effort To Boost Lehigh Valley Geotourism 
 
PA Environment Digest Google+ Circle, Blogs, Twitter Feeds 
 
PA Environment Digest now has a Google+ Circle called ​
Green Works In PA​
.  Let us join your 
Circle. 
Google+ now combines all the news you now get through the PA Environment Digest, 
Weekly, Blog, Twitter and Video sites into one resource. 
You’ll receive as­it­happens postings on Pennsylvania environmental news, daily 
NewsClips and links to the weekly Digest and videos.   
 
Also take advantage of these related services from ​
Crisci Associates​
­­ 
 
PA Environment Digest Twitter Feed​
:  On Twitter, sign up to receive instant news updates. 
 
PA Environment Daily Blog:​
 provides daily environmental NewsClips and significant stories 
and announcements on environmental topics in Pennsylvania of immediate value.  Sign up and 
receive as they are posted updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a 
once daily email alerting you to new items posted on this blog.  ​
NEW!​
  Add your constructive 
comment to any blog posting. 

 
PA Capitol Digest Daily Blog​
 to get updates every day on Pennsylvania State Government, 
including NewsClips, coverage of key press conferences and more. Sign up and receive as they 
are posted updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a once daily 
email alerting you to new items posted on this blog. 
 
PA Capitol Digest Twitter Feed​
: Don't forget to sign up to receive the ​
PA Capitol Digest 
Twitter​
 feed to get instant updates on other news from in and around the Pennsylvania State 
Capitol. 
 

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule/ Bills Introduced 
 
Here are the Senate and House Calendars and Committee meetings showing bills of interest as 
well as a list of new environmental bills introduced­­ 
 
Bill Calendars 
 
House (March 21): ​
House Bill 544​
 (Moul­R­Adams) further providing for liability protection 
for landowners who open their land for recreation (​
sponsor summary​
); ​
House Resolution 60 
(Emrick­R­Northampton) directing the Legislative Budget and Finance Committee to conduct a 
comprehensive review of the state’s program to regulate the beneficial use of sewage sludge; 
Senate Bill 307​
 (Yudichak­D­Luzerne) providing for an independent counsel for the 
Environmental Quality Board; ​
Senate Bill 811​
 (Hughes­D­ Philadelphia) FY 2015­16 Capital 
Budget bill; ​
Senate Bill 1071​
 (Browne­R­Lehigh), the “agreed­to” pension reform bill; ​
Senate 
Bill 1073​
 (Browne­R­Lehigh) “agreed­to” $30.8 billion General Fund budget bill; ​
Senate 
Resolution 55​
 (Hutchinson­R­Venango) re­establishing the Forestry Task Force under the Joint 
House/Senate Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and Conservation Committee 
(​
sponsor summary​
).​
 ​
 <> ​
Click Here​
 for full House Bill Calendar. 
 
Senate (March 21):​
 ​
Senate Bill 805​
 (Boscola­D­ Lehigh) allowing an Act 129 opt­out for large 
electric users (​
sponsor summary​
); ​
Senate Bill 1123​
 (Vogel­R­Beaver) extends the one­pound 
Reid Vapor Pressure waiver for gasoline sold in Pennsylvania that is due to expire on May 1, 
2016;  ​
Senate Bill 1142​
 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) amends the Storage Tank Act to add members to the 
Underground Storage Tank Indemnification Fund Board; ​
House Bill 806​
 (Causer­R­Cameron) 
providing for county­specific use values for land in forest reserves (​
sponsor summary​
).  <> ​
Click 
Here​
 for full Senate Bill Calendar. 
 
Committee Meeting Agendas This Week 
 
House: ​
the ​
Appropriations Committee​
 meets to consider ​
Senate Bill 385​
 (Pileggi­R­Delaware) 
further providing for Transit Revitalization Investment Districts; the ​
Environmental Resources 
and Energy Committee​
 meets, but the agenda is not yet available, DEP’s Chapter 78 drilling 
regulations may be discussed; the ​
 ​
House Democratic Policy Committee​
 hearing on 
incentivizing use of natural gas. <>  ​
Click Here​
 for full House Committee Schedule. 
 

Senate:​
 the ​
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​
 is scheduled to consider ​
Senate 
Bill 1114​
 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) allowing the use of alternative on­lot septic systems on the sewage 
facility planning process (​
sponsor summary​
); ​
Senate Bill 1041​
 (Schwank­D­Berks) amending 
Act 101 to authorize counties and local governments to charge a recycling fee (​
sponsor 
summary​
); ​
Senate Bill 1145​
 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) amending the Oil and Gas Conservation Law to 
exempt drilling companies that pass through the Onondaga formation without producing it from 
a $5,000 permit fee (​
sponsor summary​
); ​
House Bill 1712​
 (R.Brown­R­Monroe) establishing a 
Private Dam Financial Assurance Program (​
House Fiscal Note​
 and summary).  <>  ​
Click 
Here​
 for full Senate Committee Schedule. 
 
Other:​
 the Joint Conservation Committee holds a hearing on ​
Collapse of Pennsylvania’s 
Electronic Waste Recycling Program​

 
Bills Pending In Key Committees 
 
Here are links to key Standing Committees in the House and Senate and the bills pending in 
each­­ 
 
House 
Appropriations 
Education 
Environmental Resources and Energy 
Consumer Affairs 
Gaming Oversight 
Human Services 
Judiciary 
Liquor Control 
Transportation 
Links for all other Standing House Committees 
 
Senate 
Appropriations 
Environmental Resources and Energy 
Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure 
Community, Economic and Recreational Development 
Education 
Judiciary 
Law and Justice 
Public Health and Welfare 
Transportation 
Links for all other Standing Senate Committees 
 
Bills Introduced 
 
The following bills of interest were introduced this week­­ 

 
Storage Tanks:​
 ​
House Bill 1895​
 (Metzgar­R­Bedford) changing the members of the 
Underground Storage Tank Indemnification Board (​
sponsor summary​
). 
 
Greenhouse Gas Reductions:​
 ​
House Bill 2030​
 (Santarsiero­D­Bucks) setting a goal of reducing 
greenhouse gas emissions in Pennsylvania by 50 percent (​
sponsor summary​
). 
 
World Water Day:​
 House Resolution 741​
 (McClinton­D­Delaware) designating March 22 as 
World Water Day in PA (​
sponsor summary​
). 
 
Session Schedule 
 
Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House­­ 
 
Senate 
March 21, 22, 23 
April 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13 
May 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18 
June 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 
 
House 
March 21, 22, 23 
April 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13 
May 2, 3, 4, 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25 
June 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 
 
Governor’s Schedule 
 
Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day 
will be posted each morning.   ​
Click Here​
 to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public 
Appearances. 
 

Bills On Governor's Desk                                                                                    
 
The following bills were given final approval by the Senate and House and are now on the 
Governor's desk for action­­ 
 
Supplemental FY 2015­16 Appropriations:​
 ​
House Bill 1801​
 (Irvin­R­Centre) containing $6.05 
billion in supplemental appropriations for FY 2015­16 developed by Republicans were passed by 
votes of­­ Senate­ 31 to 18, House­ 128 to 63 and sent to the Governor for his action. .  ​
Click 
Here​
 for a copy of the line­by­line General Fund spreadsheet by House Republicans.  A ​
Senate 
Fiscal Note​
 and summary are available. 
 
FY 2015­16 Fiscal Code Bill:​
 ​
House Bill 1327​
 (Peifer­R­Pike) amending the Fiscal Code to 
implement the FY 2015­16 Republican General Fund budget were passed by votes of­­(Senate­ 

30 to 19, House­ 120 to 71) and sent to the Governor for his action.  A ​
House Fiscal Note​
 and 
summary are available. 
The bill amends the Fiscal Code to among other things, kill DEP Chapter 78 conventional 
drilling regulations and make DEP start over, reduce Growing Greener watershed restoration 
funding by $15 million this fiscal year and to slow consideration of any state plan to comply with 
the EPA Clean Power Climate Plan. 
         The bill would also transfer $12 million from the High Performance Green Buildings 
Program to the Natural Gas Infrastructure Development Fund administered by the 
Commonwealth Financing Authority. 
 

Senate/House Bills Moving                                                                                  
 
The following bills of interest saw action this week in the House and Senate­­ 
 
House 
 
Stormwater:​
 ​
House Bill 1103​
 (Zimmerman­R­Lancaster) providing for exemptions from 
stormwater permitting for agricultural high tunnels was removed from the Table, referred into 
and out of the House Appropriations Committee and passed by the House.  A ​
House Fiscal Note 
and summary is available.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action. 
 
Heritage Areas:​
 ​
House Bill 1605​
 (James­R­Venango) which would establish the program in 
law, was removed from the Table, referred into and out of the House Appropriations Committee 
and was passed by the House.  A ​
House Fiscal Note​
 and summary is available.  The bill now 
goes to the Senate for action. 
 
Transit Revitalization District:​
 ​
Senate Bill 385​
 (Pileggi­R­Delaware) further providing for 
Transit Revitalization Investment Districts was removed from the Table, amended on the House 
Floor and was referred to the House Appropriations Committee.  ​
(A House Appropriations 
Committee meeting has been scheduled for March 21 to consider the bill.) 
 
Potomac River Basin Commission:​
 ​
House Bill 577​
 (Moul­R­Adams) authorizing designees 
with proxy voting rights for certain members of Interstate Commission on the Potomac River 
Basin (​
sponsor summary​
) was reported from the House Environmental Resources and Energy 
Committee and Tabled. 
 
USTIF Board: ​
 ​
House Bill 1895​
 (Metzgar­R­Bedford) changing the members of the 
Underground Storage Tank Indemnification Board (​
sponsor summary​
) was amended to require 
the Senate and House to appoint 4 members of the 10 member board leaving the Governor to 
appoint 2 members and reported from the House Environmental Resources and Energy 
Committee and Tabled. 
 
Forestry Task Force:​
 ​
Senate Resolution 55​
 (Hutchinson­R­Venango) concurrent resolution 
reestablishing the Forestry Task Force under the ​
Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution 
Control and Conservation Committee​
 was given final action by the House and now becomes 

effective. 
 
Senate 
 
Supplemental FY 2015­16 Appropriations:​
 ​
House Bill 1801​
 (Irvin­R­Centre) containing $6.05 
billion in supplemental appropriations for FY 2015­16 developed by Republicans were passed by 
votes of­­ Senate­ 31 to 18, House­ 128 to 63 and sent to the Governor for his action. .  ​
Click 
Here​
 for a copy of the line­by­line General Fund spreadsheet by House Republicans.  A ​
Senate 
Fiscal Note​
 and summary are available. 
 
FY 2015­16 Fiscal Code Bill:​
 ​
House Bill 1327​
 (Peifer­R­Pike) amending the Fiscal Code to 
implement the FY 2015­16 Republican General Fund budget were passed by votes of­­(Senate­ 
30 to 19, House­ 120 to 71) and sent to the Governor for his action.  A ​
House Fiscal Note​
 and 
summary are available. 
The bill amends the Fiscal Code to among other things, kill DEP Chapter 78 conventional 
drilling regulations and make DEP start over, reduce Growing Greener watershed restoration 
funding by $15 million this fiscal year and to slow consideration of any state plan to comply with 
the EPA Clean Power Climate Plan. 
         The bill would also transfer $12 million from the High Performance Green Buildings 
Program to the Natural Gas Infrastructure Development Fund administered by the 
Commonwealth Financing Authority. 
 
USTIF Board:​
 ​
Senate Bill 1142​
 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) amends the Storage Tank Act to add 
members to the Underground Storage Tank Indemnification Fund Board was amended to require 
the Senate and House to appoint 4 members of the 10 member board leaving the Governor to 
appoint 2 members and reported out of the Senate Banking and Insurance Committee and is now 
on the Senate Calendar for action. 
 
1­Pound Waiver:​
 ​
Senate Bill 1123​
 (Vogel­R­Beaver) extends the one­pound Reid Vapor 
Pressure waiver for gasoline sold in Pennsylvania that is due to expire on May 1, 2016 was 
reported out of the Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee and is now on the Senate 
Calendar for action. 
 
Farmland Preservation:​
 ​
House Bill 806​
 (Causer­R­Cameron) providing for county­specific use 
values for land in forest reserves (​
sponsor summary​
) was amended and reported from the Senate 
Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action. 
 
Natural Gas Competition:​
 ​
House Bill 57​
 (Payne­R­Dauphin) further providing for natural gas 
competition (​
sponsor summary​
) was Tabled per the 10­day rule. 
 

News From The Capitol                                                                                     
 
House Environmental Committee Will Review Final DEP Drilling Regulations 
 
Rep. John Maher (R­Allegheny), Majority Chair of the ​
House Environmental Resources and 

Energy Committee​
, announced Wednesday the Committee will be reviewing the final DEP 
Chapter 78 and 78a oil and gas drilling regulations​
 at its next meeting. 
Since this meeting, the Committee has scheduled a meeting for March 23 starting at 9:30 
in Room B­31 Main Capitol. 
At Wednesday’s meeting, Rep. Maher asked members to provide him with comments and 
questions on the regulation prior to the meeting. 
Under the Regulatory Review Act, the Committee can offer comments to the Independent 
Regulatory Review Commission or choose to report out a concurrent House­Senate resolution 
blocking their implementation. 
The Senate and House must pass the resolution and present it to the Governor for his 
action.  The resolution can be signed or vetoed by the Governor.  If he signs it, the regulation is 
dead and DEP would have to start over. 
Rep. Maher has been a critic of the process used by DEP to develop the regulations and 
voted against them at the February Environmental Quality Board meeting. 
The IRRC is scheduled to meet on the drilling regulations April 21. 
The Committee also reported out two bills­­ 
­­ ​
House Bill 577​
 (Moul­R­Adams) authorizing designees with proxy voting rights for certain 
members of Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (​
sponsor summary​
); and 
­­ ​
House Bill 1895​
 (Metzgar­R­Bedford) changing the members of the Underground Storage 
Tank Indemnification Board (​
sponsor summary​
).  The Committee amended the bill to require the 
Senate and House to appoint 4 members of the 10 member board leaving the Governor to appoint 
2 members and make it look like ​
Senate Bill 1142​
 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) reported out of the Senate 
Banking and Insurance Committee Tuesday. 
Rep. John Maher (R­Allegheny) serves as Majority Chair of the House Environmental 
Committee and can be contacted by sending email to: ​
jmaher@pahousegop.com​
.  Rep. Greg 
Vitali (D­Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by sending email to: 
gvitali@pahouse.net​

 
House Committee Held Information Meeting On Natural Gas Royalty Legislation 
 
The ​
House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​
 Tuesday conducted an 
informational meeting on ​
House Bill 1391​
 (Everett­R­Lycoming) that would protect natural gas 
royalty owners from unjustified post­production cost deductions.  
House Bill 1391 is also co­sponsored by Reps. Sandra Major (R­Susquehanna), Matt 
Baker (R­Bradford), Tina Pickett (R­Bradford) and Karen Boback (R­Lackawanna). 
"This meeting is another step in what continues to be a long, ongoing process to protect 
landowners from being cheated by the natural gas drilling companies when it comes to royalty 
funds they have rightly earned," said Rep. Everett. "I am pleased that the committee heard from a 
number of interested parties on this issue and I am hopeful this will break the logjam and help 
move this badly needed legislation." 
Rep. Everett said the Guaranteed Minimum Royalty Act (Act 60 of 1979) simply states 
that a lease for oil or natural gas shall guarantee a minimum one­eighth (12.5 percent) royalty.  
The development of unconventional shale gas wells (i.e. Marcellus) in the 
Commonwealth has been accompanied by an effort of some companies to reduce royalties below 
this statutory minimum by deducting post­production costs from the royalty payments to 

landowners.  
These post­production costs can include compression, dehydration, transmission and 
other costs incurred between the wellhead and a final market point of sale. When these expenses 
are deducted, final royalty payments often are below the statutory one­eighth. 
"This is clearly an issue of fairness, period," said Rep. Everett. 
This is the second consecutive legislative session in which this legislation has been 
offered. Rep. Everett said he has held talks with all interested stakeholders to satisfy their 
concerns. 
Rep. Major, who attended the hearing, said this effort has taken a great deal of time. 
"We have been working on this issue for the past few years, and I am hopeful we can 
finally get this bill through the legislative process and signed into law so landowners across the 
northeast region are ensured to receive fair and equitable payments for natural gas reserves under 
their land," said Rep. Major. 
The legal process on this issue includes a critical ruling made in 2010 that has had a 
major impact on the landowners. Rep. Pickett, who also attended the meeting, said that ruling 
changed the way in which royalties were calculated and that new legislation is vital for the 
region and for all leaseholders. 
"Before any more time passes, it's imperative that we enact these very basic consumer 
protections," Rep. Pickett said. "When many of these leases in our area were signed, the 1979 
royalty law was standard practice. It was only after further shale development and a Supreme 
Court ruling in 2010 that allowed drillers to consider in calculating royalties the cost of moving 
the gas from the wellhead to the marketplace – thereby known as post­production costs. I 
appreciate all the landowners coming forward and sharing their experiences today, and I am 
hopeful that this legislation moves forward so that when the natural gas market bounces back, 
our residents will be protected." 
Rep. Baker said this is a matter of the drilling companies living up the promises made in 
legal contracts. 
"This is important legislation that, once signed into law, will require natural gas 
companies to uphold the good­faith contracts signed by landowners with respect to royalties 
owed them by the companies," said Rep. Baker. "Landowners need to have a guaranteed 
minimum royalty law to ensure they receive fair payment and are not undercut by any 
unscrupulous practices." 
Testimony was taken from Jackie Root, president of the National Association of Royalty 
Owners (Pennsylvania chapter); royalty owners David DeCristo and Robert Sher; James Soto, 
senior vice president and chief risk and administrative officer of PS Bank of Wyalusing; Daniel 
A. Devin, state forester, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources; Michael DiMatteo, 
chief environmental planning and habitat protection division, Game Commission; and Jessica 
Brisendine, litigation manager, EQT, a natural gas and petroleum pipeline company based in 
Pittsburgh. 
Rep. Boback said she is pleased that forward progress is being made on this 
long­standing issue. 
"I am encouraged by the progress made on the important issue of protecting natural gas 
royalty owners. It is critical that we continue to advocate for landowners and ensure they are 
treated fairly by natural gas drilling companies," she said. 
Rep. Everett called the meeting a success. 

"Now that the Committee members have had an opportunity to learn about this issue and 
my bill, it is my hope that we can get it voted out of committee and to the floor for a vote, said 
Rep. Everett. 
A two­bill package on oil and gas royalties sponsored by Sen. Gene Yaw (R­Lycoming) 
has been in the House Environmental Committee since February of 2015­­ ​
Senate Bill 147​
 and 
Senate Bill 148​
 (​
sponsor summary​
). 
Copies of written testimony are available online­­ 
­­ ​
Jackie Root​
, National Association of Royalty Owners 
­­ ​
David DeCristo​
, royalty owner 
­­ ​
Robert Sher​
, royalty owner 
­­ ​
James Souto​
, National Association of Royalty Owners 
­­ ​
Daniel Devlin​
, State Forester, DCNR 
­­ ​
Michael DiMatteo​
, Game Commission 
­­ ​
Jessica Brisendine​
, EQT 
Rep. John Maher (R­Allegheny) serves as Majority Chair of the House Environmental 
Committee and can be contacted by sending email to: ​
jmaher@pahousegop.com​
.  Rep. Greg 
Vitali (D­Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by sending email to: 
gvitali@pahouse.net​

NewsClips: 
Gas Royalties Bill Back In The Spotlight 
Bill Would Prohibit Drilling Companies From Taking Royalty Deductions 
 
Joint Conservation Committee: Heritage Areas Generate $2 Billion For PA’s Economy 
 
Jane Sheffield, President of ​
Heritage PA​
, told the Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution 
Control and Conservation Committee Monday Pennsylvania’s 12 Heritage Areas ​
generate $2 
billion to the state’s economy​
, according to a recent study by the Center for Rural Pennsylvania. 
Sheffield outlined the history​
 of the PA Heritage Area Program to House and Senate 
members and others attending the Joint Committee’s Environmental Issues Forum. 
She said the data showed tourists spent an estimated 7.5 million days/nights in the 12 
heritage areas in 2014, and spent $2 billion in goods and services. To the state economy, she 
said, that spending meant 25,708 jobs and $798 million in labor income. 
Sheffield said Gov. Wolf line­item vetoed  the $2.25 million allocated for the program for 
FY 2015­16 and did not propose any funding for the program in FY 2016­17.  She warned if new 
revenue is not found in FY 2016­17, the program will begin to erode and may cease to operate as 
private and federal funds leveraged by state funding will evaporate. 
Rep. Lee James (R­Venango) note legislation he introduced­­ ​
House Bill 1605 
(James­R­Venango)­­ would establish the program in law, and is now on the House Calendar for 
possible action. 
Pennsylvania’s 12 Heritage Areas are: ​
Allegheny Ridge Heritage Area​
, ​
Delaware & 
Lehigh National Heritage Corridor​
, ​
Endless Mountains Heritage Region​
, ​
Lackawanna Heritage 
Valley​
, ​
Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor​
, ​
Lumber Heritage Region​
, ​
National Road Heritage 
Corridor​
, ​
Oil Region National Heritage Area​
, ​
PA Route 6 Heritage Corridor​
, ​
Rivers of Steel 
National Heritage Area​
, ​
Schuylkill River National & State Heritage Area​
, and ​
Susquehanna 
Gateway Heritage Area​

A copy of Sheffield’s testimony ​
is available online​

E­Waste Hearing 
The Joint Conservation Committee has scheduled a ​
hearing on the collapse of the 
electronics recycling program​
 in Pennsylvania for March 21 starting at 9:00 a.m. in Room 8E­A 
of the East Wing Capitol Building in Harrisburg.  ​
Click Here​
 for a link to watch the hearing live. 
Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R­Venango) serves as Chair of the ​
Joint Committee​
.  To sign up 
for regular updates from the Committee, send an email to: ​
mnerozzi@jcc.legis.state.pa.us​

NewsClips: 
Presque Isle Wins National Best Beach Contest 
Philadelphia Chosen To Host 2021 International Parks Conference 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
Waterfront Road Will Fill Gap In D&L Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Holds Meeting On Fell Twp Trail 
Kennett Township Greenway Gets Green Award In Chester 
Crowd Provides Input Into New Section Of Lackawanna Heritage Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Trail To Get 14 Cameras 
Goal Reached To Save Appalachian Trail Hotel 
Tourists Spent $1 Billion In Route 6 Corridor In 2014 
Susquehanna River People Seeks To Save Island Retreat 
National Geographic Effort To Boost Lehigh Valley Geotourism 
 
Senate Committee To Consider Recycling Fee, Septic System, Other Bills March 22 
 
The ​
Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​
 is scheduled to meet March 22 on 
legislation authorizing a local recycling fee, further allowing the use of alternative septic systems 
in sewage planning, establishing a private dam financial assurance program and a limited oil and 
gas permit fee exemption.  The bills include­­ 
­­ Alternative Septic Systems:​
 ​
Senate Bill 1114​
 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) allowing the use of 
alternative on­lot septic systems on the sewage facility planning process (​
sponsor summary​
); 
­­ ​
Recycling Fee:​
 ​
Senate Bill 1041​
 (Schwank­D­Berks) amending Act 101 to authorize counties 
and local governments to charge a recycling fee (​
sponsor summary​
); 
­­ ​
Onondaga Permit Fee Exemption:​
 ​
Senate Bill 1145​
 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) amending the Oil 
and Gas Conservation Law to exempt drilling companies that pass through the Onondaga 
formation without producing it from a $5,000 permit fee (​
sponsor summary​
); and  
­­ ​
Private Dam Financial Assurance:​
 ​
House Bill 1712​
 (R.Brown­R­Monroe) establishing a 
Private Dam Financial Assurance Program (​
House Fiscal Note​
 and summary). 
The meeting will be held in Room 8E­B East Wing Capitol Building starting at 9:30. 
Click Here​
 for a link to watch the meeting live. 
Sen. Gene Yaw (R­Lycoming) serves as Majority Chair of the Committee and can be 
contacted by sending email to: ​
gyaw@pasen.gov​
.   Sen. John Yudichak (D­Luzerne) serves as 
Minority Chair and can be contacted by sending email to: ​
yudichak@pasenate.com​

 
House Environmental Committee Meets March 23, Possibly To Discuss Drilling Regs 
 
The ​
House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​
 is scheduled to meet on March 23, 

however no agenda has yet been posted. 
At the Committee meeting last Wednesday, Rep. John Maher (R­Allegheny), Majority 
Chair of the Committee, said the Committee will be reviewing the final DEP ​
Chapter 78 and 78a 
oil and gas drilling regulations​
 “at its next meeting.” 
At Wednesday’s meeting, Rep. Maher asked members to provide him with comments and 
questions on the regulation prior to the meeting. 
Under the Regulatory Review Act, the Committee can offer comments to the Independent 
Regulatory Review Commission or choose to report out a concurrent House­Senate resolution 
blocking their implementation. 
The Senate and House must pass the resolution and present it to the Governor for his 
action.  The resolution can be signed or vetoed by the Governor.  If he signs it, the regulation is 
dead and DEP would have to start over. 
Rep. Maher has been a critic of the process used by DEP to develop the regulations and 
voted against them at the February Environmental Quality Board meeting. 
The IRRC is scheduled to meet on the drilling regulations April 21. 
The meeting will be held in Room B­31 Main Capital starting at 9:30. 
Rep. John Maher (R­Allegheny) serves as Majority Chair of the House Environmental 
Committee and can be contacted by sending email to: ​
jmaher@pahousegop.com​
.  Rep. Greg 
Vitali (D­Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by sending email to: 
gvitali@pahouse.net​

 
Written Testimony Available For March 21 Hearing On Collapse Of E­Waste Recycling 
 
The ​
Joint House­Senate Legislative Air and Water 
Pollution Control and Conservation Committee​
 is 
scheduled to hold a hearing March 21 on the collapse of 
Pennsylvania’s Electronic Waste Recycling Program 
created by the Covered Device Recycling Act. 
The tentative agenda for the hearing includes 
comments from ​
(click on Testimony for available written 
testimony)​
­­ 
­­ Rep. Chris Ross (R­Chester) the prime sponsor of the 
2010 Covered Device Recycling Act; 
­­ Ken Reisinger, DEP Deputy Secretary for Waste, Air, Radiation and Remediation; 
­­ Walter Alcorn, Consumer Electronics Association (manufacturers:; ​
Testimony​
. Attachment: 
Customer Survey​
. Attachment: ​
CRT Capacity​
; 
­­ Ned Eldridge, CEO of ​
eLoop LLC​
, an electronics recycler from Western PA: ​
Testimony​
; 
­­ David Vollero, ​
York County Solid Waste Authority​
: ​
Testimony​
; 
­­ Bekki Titchner, ​
Recycling & Solid Waste Coordinator, Elk County​
: ​
Testimony​
; 
­­ Shannon Reiter, President,  ​
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful​
: ​
Testimony​
; and 
­­ Bob Bylone, President & CEO, ​
PA Recycling Markets Center​
: ​
Testimony​

The Joint Committee will also be accepting written comments on electronics waste 
recycling until June 21.  Send comments to Mike Nerozzi by email to: 
mnerozzi@jcc.legis.state.pa.us​

Background 

The ​
PA Resources Council​
 has reported only 25 percent of state residents have access to 
free TV recycling, down from 63 percent just a short time ago, and that coverage continues to 
shrink.  In the last 2 years PRC said­­ 
­­ Goodwill announced it ​
will no longer accept TVs for recycling​
; 
­­ Five counties around Philadelphia report they were forced to suspend electronics programs 
because no recyclers were willing to support them; 
­­ ​
Construction Junction​
 in Pittsburgh closed its doors to accepting electronics; 
­­ ​
York County shuts down all electronics collections sites​
; 
­­ eLoop, a Pittsburgh­based recycler, announces it will ​
no longer offer CDRA­supported 
recycling in western PA​
; and 
­­ Best Buy issues a news release announcing ​
it will no longer accept TVs​
 for recycling at its 37 
PA stores. 
The lack of recycling opportunities and the ban on landfill disposal means more 
Pennsylvanians may resort to illegal dumping. 
Keep PA Beautiful​
 wrote to every House and Senate member earlier in February warning 
2016 could be a “​
record­breaking year for abandoned and dumped electronics​
” if Pennsylvania’s 
electronics recycling law isn’t fixed. 
In January the Electronics Recycling Association of PA, representing e­waste recyclers, 
called for action to fix the state’s recycling law​
 saying without fundamental changes recycling 
opportunities will continue to disappear. 
Rep. Chris Ross (R­Chester), the original sponsor of the e­waste recycling law, is 
planning to introduce changes to the law to try to get it back on track. 
Click Here​
 for the PRC action flyer on e­waste recycling. 
The Committee hearing will be in Room 8E­A East Wing of the Capitol starting at 9:00. 
Click Here​
 the day of the hearing for a link to the live webcast of the hearing. 
Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R­Venango) serves as Chair of the Joint Committee.  To sign up 
for a monthly update from the Joint Committee, send an email to: 
mnerozzi@jcc.legis.state.pa.us​
.  
For more information on e­waste recycling, visit DEP’s ​
Covered Device Recycling Act 
webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New E­Waste Website 
Editorial: Anti­Keystone Landfill Group’s Growth 
Related Stories: 
2014 DEP Report To General Assembly Documented Problems With E­Waste Recycling 
Analysis: Electronics Recycling Effort Shrinking In PA, The Law Needs To Be Fixed 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New Electronics Waste Recycling Website 
 
PA Environmental Council Opens New Bill Tracker Webpage On Legislation, Regulations 
 
The ​
PA Environmental Council​
 opened a new ​
Bill Tracker feature​
 on its 
website to provide quick, easy­to­understand information on the status 
of legislation, House and Senate Committee meetings related to 
environmental issues and DEP and other advisory committee meetings 
having an impact on the development of environmental regulations. 

Bill Tracker tracks the status, latest actions and upcoming meetings on the top 50 or so 
environmental bills pending in the House and Senate. 
The webpage also tracks key environmental rulemakings, technical guidance documents 
and environmental plans out for public comment. 
The items included in Bill Tracker are a curated list of bills, regulations and meetings 
meant to provide interested individuals, businesses and organizations with a quick reference to 
the most important environmental policy issues being discussed in Harrisburg today. 
For more information, visit the PEC ​
Bill Tracker​
 webpage. 
Visit the ​
PA Environmental Council​
 website for more information on PEC programs, 
initiatives and special events, read the ​
PEC Blog​
, follow ​
PEC on Twitter​
 or ​
Like PEC on 
Facebook​
.  ​
Click Here​
 to receive regular updates from PEC. 
 

News From Around The State                                                                           
 
ARIPPA Now Accepting Apps For Abandoned Mine Reclamation Grants+SENSE Act 
 
The ​
Anthracite Region Independent 
Power Producers​
 are now accepting 
applications for the 2016 Abandoned 
Mine Reclamation Grant Program. 
Proposals are due July 8. 
Grants at a maximum of $2,500 
will be awarded to at least one eligible 
environmental organization or 
Conservation District in the Anthracite 
Region and one eligible environmental organization or Conservation District in the Bituminous 
Region actively working on AML/AMD issues.  
Grant proposals should be for on­the­ground AML/AMD construction projects with a 
completion date between August 2015 and August 2017. The amount granted is dependent upon 
demonstrated need.  
Applying organizations must support the mission of ARIPPA, including the removal and 
conversion of waste coal into alternative energy and the beneficial use of CFB ash for 
AML/AMD reclamation. 
Applications, instructions​
 and ​
sample support letter​
 for proposals are available on the 
Western Coalition for Abandoned Mine Reclamation​
 website. 
ARIPPA Background 
Due in part to ARIPPA member activities, unsightly coal refuse piles and the problems 
associated with them are gradually disappearing. Thousands of acres of land have been and 
continue to be reclaimed to a natural state or for productive use and future development.  
ARIPPA facilities remove and utilize coal refuse from both past and current mining 
activities, thereby abating acid mine drainage from coal refuse piles. ARIPPA reports that 145 
million tons of coal refuse has been processed and converted into alternative energy by their 
member plants from 1998 to 2008.  
Further, the technology used to convert coal refuse to electricity, known as Circulating 
Fluidized Bed (CFB) technology, produces alkaline­rich ash by­products. There are many 

beneficial uses for CFB ash including; filling mine pits, as a replacement for lime (for acid mine 
drainage remediation), for acid mine drainage remediation, as a soil amendment at mining sites, 
and/or as a concrete additive for roadways. 
The unique nature of ARIPPA's work combined with the desire to coordinate efforts with 
environmentally oriented groups and governmental agencies symbolize a commitment to 
improving the landscape and environment of our nation.  
If waste coal fired plants are forced to close due to unreasonable regulations, streams will 
continue to be contaminated, public safety will continue to be at risk due to the dangers the piles 
pose, piles will continue to self­ignite and spew the same pollutants into the air that the 
regulations are trying to curtail, and communities will continue to be shadowed by the unsightly 
black mountains.   
All of this would be a taxpayer burden. 
Federal SENSE Act 
This week, the U.S. House of Representative passed ​
H.R. 3797​
, the Satisfying Energy 
Needs and Saving the Environment (SENSE) Act.   
The bill aims to establish the bases by which the Administrator of the Environmental 
Protection Agency shall issue, implement, and enforce certain emission limitations and 
allocations for existing electric utility steam generating units that convert coal refuse into energy.   
More specifically, SENSE seeks to establish alternative compliance standards for coal 
refuse facilities based upon the removal and control of SO2 relative to the Mercury and Air 
Toxics Standards Rule (MATS).  
The SENSE Act also seeks to provide coal refuse­fired power plants with the same S02 
allocations in Phase II as in Phase I of the Cross­State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) while 
ensuring that CSAPR does not increase the overall state­level CSAPR SO2 budget. 
WPCAMR supports the equitable regulations proposed in the ​
SENSE Act​
 that will help 
the waste coal industry stay in business and continue to help our communities recover from our 
unregulated coal mining history and prosper into the future.   
You can learn more about the SENSE Act by ​
Clicking Here​
.  Letters from the public can 
be sent to your Congressman and/or ​
Congressman Rothfus​
, the sponsor of the SENSE Act. 
NewsClips: 
DEP To Spend $13.4M To Remove Old Coal Pile 
Huber Coal Breaker Owners Have 10 Days To Begin Cleanup 
 
(Written By: Anne Daymut, Watershed Coordinator, ​
WPCAMR​
, and reprinted from Abandoned 
Mine Posts. ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy.) 
 
Green Infrastructure Expanding In Stroudsburg Area, Monroe County 
 
What do rain gardens and “Don’t Feed the Ducks” signs have to do with clean water? Plenty, 
says the ​
Brodhead Watershed Association​
 working in Monroe County. 
For the past several years, BWA has tested water quality in the Brodhead, McMichael 
and Pocono creeks. The findings are clear: the streams where they flow through Stroudsburg and 
East Stroudsburg are not safe for swimming and other water contact. 
That finding led to a grant from the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation to look for 
sources of pollution and develop plans to clean up the streams. 

It’s not unusual for streams to become polluted as they flow through “urban areas,” but 
the BWA and municipal partners – East Stroudsburg, Stroudsburg and Stroud Township ­ want 
to make sure the problems are fixed before they get worse. 
When water tests showed that some of the problem was caused by large gatherings of 
ducks and geese (drawn by people feeding them), BWA designed and purchased "Don't Feed the 
Ducks" signs, and municipal partners installed them at popular duck­feeding spots. 
Rain gardens capture runoff from parking lots, roofs and streets, so BWA and community 
partners have planted rain gardens at East Stroudsburg High School South, East Stroudsburg, and 
Sarah Street Grill, Stroudsburg, and plan more. These gardens capture polluted runoff before it 
can reach streams and allow it to infiltrated slowly through the soil. 
Homeowners hold the real key to cleaning up polluted runoff. They can install rain 
barrels under their downspouts (as John Provoznik has done at his East Stroudsburg law office), 
build their own rain gardens and pick up after their pets. Take a plastic bag with you whenever 
you walk your dog. 
The next step in the NFWF­funded project is to develop a plan for future projects. BWA 
has hired Hanover Engineering Associates for that task. 
Hanover will “provide municipalities, residents, and businesses a model plan to follow 
for protection and restoration of the Lower Brodhead Watershed,” the Bartonsville consultants 
said. 
The plan will identify areas for green practices, such as: Green roofs; Constructed 
wetlands; Pervious pavement; Rain gardens; Rain barrels; Planter boxes; Vegetated swales; 
Buffer restoration; and Lawn conversions (to native species, unmowed as natural area). 
Where municipalities own land such as sidewalks, streets and parking lots, green 
practices can be installed by the municipality. However, most land is privately owned, so private 
landowners will be encouraged to install green projects on their properties.  
A search for funding to help landowners and municipalities “go green” will follow the 
plan. 
Over the summer, public meetings will be held to discuss possible projects to include in 
the plan; please attend and offer your ideas.  
To receive regular updates on the project, send an email to: ​
info@brodheadwatershed.org 
(subject line “green infrastructure”) or call 570­839­1120. 
For information, visit the Brodhead Creek Watershed Association’s ​
Green Infrastructure 
Project​
 webpage. 
NewsClip: 
Proposal Means Big Improvements To Philly Park, Water Quality 
 
Landowner Open House March 29 In Westmoreland On Conservation Funding 
 
The ​
Westmoreland County Conservation District​
 will hold an open house March 29 in 
Greensburg to answer questions about funding available to landowners to create or maintain 
wildlife habitat and forested stream buffers on their lands.   
Anyone interested in learning about the ​
Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program​
, as 
well as landowners already in the program, are invited to stop in to discuss how the program can 
benefit them.  
CREP provides financial and technical assistance to landowners for creating wildlife 

habitat while addressing soil erosion and water quality issues on their properties.  Landowners 
are paid an annual rental payment and other incentive payments to take marginal land out of 
production and installing approved conservation practices.  
CREP is administered by the USDA Farm Service Agency in partnership with other 
government agencies and private organizations. 
This free Open House event will be held at the Westmoreland Conservation District,  218 
Donohoe Road, Greensburg from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.   
A light lunch will be available from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.  Landowners should stop 
anytime during the day to talk about their specific situation with CREP experts.  
An informal presentation on “CREP Eligibility, Payments and Responsibilities” will start 
at 9:30 a.m. and repeat again at 1:00 p.m.; another on “Conservation Practice Maintenance Issues 
and Solutions” will held at 10:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.  
  To learn more about CREP and this event visit the PA ​
Conservation Reserve 
Enhancement Program​
 website or contact Terry Fisher by sending email to: ​
tfisher@pacd.org​
 or 
call 717­238­7223. 
The CREP Program is available to landowners in the Ohio and Susquehanna River 
Watersheds and will be coming soon to the Delaware River Watershed. 
 
March 14 Watershed Winds Newsletter Now Available From Penn State Extension 
 
The ​
March 14 edition of the Watershed Winds​
 newsletter from Penn State Extension is now 
available featuring stories on­­ 
­­ ​
Funding Available To Help Farmers Improve Water Quality In Chesapeake Bay Watershed 
­­ ​
EPA Encourages Americans To Become Leak Detectives 
­­ ​
Do You Know Your Invasive Species? 
­­ ​
Estrogen, Antibiotics Persist In Dairy Farm Waste 
­­ ​
Freshwater Biodiversity Has Positive Impact On Global Food Security 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy. 
NewsClip: 
Penn State Extension, 4­H Programs Hang In Balance 
 
March 14 Chesapeake Bay Journal News Now Available 
 
The March 14 ​
Chesapeake Bay Journal​
 News is now available featuring stories on— 
­­ ​
Study: Bay Cleanup Threatened By Conowingo Dam’s Sediment Build­Up 
­­ ​
Sink Your Talons Into This Eagle­Eyed Quiz 
­­ ​
Chesapeake Bay Calendar of Events 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal 
 
Winter 2016 Newsletter From Partnership For Delaware Estuary Now Available 
 
The ​
Winter 2016 edition of Estuary News​
 from the ​
Partnership for the Delaware Estuary​
 is now 
available featuring articles on­­ 
­­ Tidal Wetlands­ Wet, Wild, Wonderful And Washing Away 
­­ PDE Celebrates 20/20 Vision 

­­ Decade Of Research Shines Light On Wetland Loss 
­­ Schuylkill Navy Of Philadelphia River Stewards Committee Protects Home Waters 
­­ Local Collaborations Result In Expanded Habitats In Cleaner Water 
­­ New Research Could Usher In Age Of Smart 
­­ This Wetland Is Your Wetland 
­­ Township’s Future Hinges On Wetland Research 
­­ Minions Of The Marsh 
­­ Meeting New PDE Staff and Board Members 
­­ ​
Upcoming Estuary Events 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy and other Partnership newsletters. 
 
Academy Of Natural Sciences Update On Delaware Watershed Initiative Now Available 
 
The ​
March 17 edition of Stream Samples,​
 an update on the 
Delaware Watershed Initiative​
 at the ​
Academy of Natural 
Sciences of Drexel University​
 is now available featuring 
stories on­­ 
­­ GIS And The Delaware Watershed Initiative 
­­ DRWI Water Quality Monitoring 
­­ Geotourism On The Delaware 
­­ Macroinvertebrate Madness! 
­­ Submit A Cool Photo For Publication In Stream Samples 
­­ DRWI Mapper 
­­ Upcoming Events 
­­ The DRWI is funded by the ​
William Penn Foundation 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy. 
 
DEP  Samples Show Crystal Spring Water At Acceptable Lead  Levels In Berks County 
 
The Department of Environmental Protection Friday released its own results from a water 
sample taken March 8 at ​
Crystal Spring Water​
, a company that sells well water through vending 
machines in Adamstown, Berks County.  
The Department’s testing indicated a lead level of 1.8 parts per billion, within the 
acceptable maximum contaminant level of 5 ppb. 
A routine test sample collected by Crystal Spring owner Lynn Rannels in September 
2015 contained a lead level of 16 ppb.  
According to the Safe Drinking Water Act, DEP should have been notified DEP within 
24 hours of receiving this test result and customers should have been notified within 30 days. 
Neither notification was given. 
“There is no question that the initial water sample taken from the facility contained an 
elevated lead level,” said Lynn Langer, DEP Southcentral regional director. “DEP has verified 
the results of that initial test with the lab M. J. Reider Associates, Inc., which was chosen by the 
owner.” 
“Crystal Spring has a permit to operate as a public water supply, and is bound by the 
same regulations by which all similar water supplies operate,” said Langer. “DEP took the 

proactive step of taking its own sample to protect the health and safety of the consumer.”  
There are a total of 12 regulated vended public water supplies in Berks, Lancaster and 
Lebanon counties. There are no monitoring compliance issues at the other 11 locations.  
A Notice of Violation was issued on February 19, asking Crystal Spring to take and 
submit to the department additional samples. On March 8, DEP issued an Order to Crystal 
Spring which required additional samples and results reported to DEP.  
Certified lab results are considered valid until the next set of results are obtained. Crystal 
Springs will still be required to take quarterly samples for the next year to ensure the water is 
below actionable lead levels. 
Infants and children who drink water containing lead in excess of the standard could 
experience delays in their physical or mental development. Adults who drink this water over 
many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure. Customers with specific 
health concerns should speak with their doctors. 
For more information on lead in water supplies, visit ​
DEP’s Lead In Drinking Water 
webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Berks Roadside Water Vendor Claims Vindication After Latest Tests 
Utilities Don’t Know Where Lead Pipes Are 
PA Tops Nation In Daycares, Schools With Lead In Water Supplies They Own 
2 York County Sites Flagged With Lead In Water 
Pittsburgh Water Authority Bills Customer $5 Million 
 
Insurance Commissioner Hails Congressional Action On Private Flood Insurance 
 
Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller Monday hailed a recent vote by the U.S. House of 
Representatives Financial Services Committee approving the Flood Insurance Market Parity and 
Modernization Act (​
H.R. 2901​
).  
This legislation encourages more private insurers to write flood insurance and fits with 
current efforts by the Wolf Administration to increase consumer protection by raising awareness 
about growing options in the private flood insurance market that could result in substantial 
savings for many Pennsylvania homeowners. 
"Protecting consumers and homeowners is the Insurance Department's top priority. In 
Pennsylvania, we are working with insurers to make affordable, private flood coverage more 
available for our consumers," said Commissioner Miller.  
"We are encouraged by the unanimous, bipartisan passage of this bill out of committee 
and are urging the full House of Representatives to consider this legislation soon, and the Senate 
to follow suit. We need our partners in the federal government to take this important step to 
make sure mortgages are available to homeowners with private flood insurance," Commissioner 
Miller said.  
In ​
January, Commissioner Miller testified​
 before the House Subcommittee on Housing 
and Insurance. 
"During my testimony, I stressed that one of the obstacles to increasing the availability of 
private flood insurance is that many lenders are unsure if private coverage meets the 
requirements of the federal government. This leads to reluctance among lenders to issue 
mortgages for homes with private flood coverage," Commissioner Miller said.  "The Flood 

Insurance Market Parity and Modernization Act (​
H.R. 2901​
) would remove that obstacle by 
requiring lenders to accept private flood insurance if it complies with state laws and regulations 
and includes the required limits of coverage." 
Mortgages backed by the federal government require flood insurance for homes in 
designated flood zones.  Prior to the last three years, almost all residential flood insurance was 
sold through the federal government run National Flood Insurance Program.   
Recent premium increases for many homeowners with NFIP policies, and re­mapping of 
many other properties into flood zones by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has 
made the flood insurance market more attractive to private insurers. 
"Providing options for homeowners when it comes to flood insurance is important to help 
consumers who need or want this coverage find it at more affordable prices," Commissioner 
Miller said. 
Last month, as part of the Wolf Administration's ongoing consumer protection initiative, 
Commissioner Miller announced creation of a one­stop shop for consumers to find information 
about private flood insurance in Pennsylvania. 
The legislation approved by the House committee would define as acceptable a policy 
issued by a private insurance company that is licensed, admitted, or otherwise approved in the 
state in which the insured property is located.  
 A policy issued by a non­admitted insurer, also known as a surplus lines policy, would 
also qualify.  Including surplus lines policies is important, as most private coverage now sold in 
Pennsylvania is through the surplus lines market. 
For more information, visit the Insurance Department’s ​
Flood Insurance​
 webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Flood­Prone Edwardsville Business Receives Assessment Reduction 
Survivors Of 1936 Flood Remember Rivers’ Rampage 
Push To Preserve Survivor Stories From 1936 Johnstown Flood 
 
Delaware River Basin Commission Flood Info. Portal Lets Users Sign Up For Alerts 
 
The ​
Delaware River Basin Commission​
 opened a Flood Resources Portal to provide residents of 
the watershed with a one­stop­shop for flood hazard information, flood forecasts, flood 
preparedness, flooding alerts and much more.  ​
Click Here​
 to visit the Portal. 
NewsClips: 
Flood­Prone Edwardsville Business Receives Assessment Reduction 
Survivors Of 1936 Flood Remember Rivers’ Rampage 
Push To Preserve Survivor Stories From 1936 Johnstown Flood 
 
DEP Installs Air Sampling Monitors Near Keystone Landfill, Lackawanna County 
 
As part of its ongoing monitoring of the Keystone Landfill in Dunmore, Lackawanna County, the 
Department of Environmental Protection announced Tuesday it has installed air sampling 
monitors at three locations near the landfill.  
DEP began air monitoring and sampling in Lackawanna County last month to collect data 
for a health study by the Department of Health near Keystone Sanitary Landfill in Dunmore. The 
three­month monitoring and sampling period will provide both agencies with information on 

what type of particles and vapors are in the air and what people in the surrounding area are 
breathing. 
“The Department of Health is committed to ensuring the safety of all Pennsylvania 
residents. As with all matters of public health, we are taking concerns about air quality around 
the Keystone Landfill very seriously,” said Health Secretary Karen Murphy. “Later this year, we 
will share the data with the community and engage residents in a conversation about the results.” 
The air samplers were placed in three locations within a one­mile radius of the landfill 
and near communities where residents have reported odors in the past. For the next three months, 
twice a week, DEP staff will collect new air sampling data. The DOH will review the data along 
with new and existing environmental and health information. 
“The information obtained from this study will be used by the department to identify air 
contaminants that people may be exposed to in this area,” said DEP Secretary John Quigley. 
“Complex issues surrounding air quality and public health require careful data gathering and the 
application of sound science.” 
The effort is part of a cooperative agreement with the federal Agency for Toxic 
Substances and Disease Registry to evaluate public health issues related to the landfill. 
For this air sampling initiative, DEP will collect approximately 90 samples, 30 samples 
per sampling site, over a period of three months. The samples will be analyzed by a privately 
certified laboratory selected by DEP for ammonia, volatile organic compounds, sulfur gas, 
methanol, aldehydes, methylamines, trimethylamines and other chemicals. 
Health Report 
The data will give DOH a representative picture of the local air quality for nearby 
residents. After results from this air sampling project are analyzed and complete, DOH in 
collaboration with ATSDR will prepare a report evaluating the results, as well as other available 
relevant sources of environmental exposure information for the community. 
This health report will be distributed for a 30­day public comment period, after which a 
final version will be published and distributed. 
DOH and ATSDR will also conduct a public information session in the community 
during the public comment period.   
DOH will remain available to the community to respond to any health concerns and to 
provide health education to the community and health professionals as needed. 
Residents may contact the Department of Health at 1­800­PA­HEALTH. 
NewsClips: 
PA Shows EPA The Way On Pending Methane Policy 
PA, 10 Other States Fail To Submit Sulfur Dioxide Reduction Plans 
Mild Winter, Warm­Up Could Trigger Early Allergy Season 
 
12 Schools In PA Recognized In National Recycle Bowl Competition 
 
The results are in from the elementary, middle and high 
schools competing in Keep America Beautiful’s 2015 
Recycle Bowl Competition​
 which took place in the four 
weeks prior to ​
America Recycles Day​
 on November 15. 
These 12 schools in Pennsylvania were part of the completion 
and this is how they ranked in terms of how much material 

they recycled in their schools— 
­­ Albert M. Greenfield School, Philadelphia 
­­ Riverside Elementary West, Taylor 
­­ Boyce Middle School, Upper St. Clair 
­­ Tunkhannock Area School District, Tunkhannock 
­­ Reynolds Middle School, Lancaster 
­­ Park Forest Elementary School, State College 
­­ Falling Spring Elementary School, Chambersburg 
­­ South Saint Mary’s Street Elementary School, St. Mary’s 
­­ Northwest Pennsylvania Collegiate Academy, Erie 
­­ Cool St. Elementary School, State College 
­­ Colfax Upper Elementary, Springdale 
Avis Elementary in Jersey Shore collected enough to be listed in the Community 
Division Rankings by recycling material in their school and from their community. 
Nearly 700,000 students and teachers participated in Recycle­Bowl nationwide 
recovering a total of 4 million pounds of material, which prevented the release of 5,726 metric 
tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MTCO2E). This reduction in greenhouse gases is equivalent 
to the annual emissions from 954 passenger cars. 
For more information, visit the ​
Recycle Bowl Competition​
 webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Erie’s Spring Cleanup Program To Start April 10 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New E­Waste Website 
Editorial: Anti­Keystone Landfill Group’s Growth 
Related Articles: 
PEC, Conservation District Hold Illegal Dumpsite Cleanup April 19 In Potter County 
Volunteers Needed For Little Paint Creek Cleanup March 26 In Cambria County 
Annual French Creek Clean­Up Day April 23 In Montgomery County 
Volunteers Needed For Great Harrisburg Litter Cleanup April 16 
Keep PA Beautiful: Clean Earth Supports 2016 Great American Cleanup Of PA 
PA Resources Council Schedules Hard­To­Recycle Collection Events In Western PA 
 
Keep PA Beautiful: Clean Earth Supports 2016 Great American Cleanup of PA  
 
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful​
 Wednesday announced 
Clean Earth​
 as their newest sponsor of the ​
2016 Great 
American Cleanup of PA​
, their annual signature event.  
“It is our planet, our country, our Pennsylvania, 
our county, our town, our street, our home.  It is our 
responsibility to step up each and every day and 
especially our duty to show leadership and set the 
example during the Great American Cleanup,” stated 
Chris Dods, President and CEO, Clean Earth.  
“Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful welcomes Clean 
Earth as the newest sponsor of the Great American 
Cleanup of PA. We are passionate about the positive benefits that working together will provide 

our local communities and environment. Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful is honored and grateful 
for the support of Clean Earth,” stated Shannon Reiter, President of Keep PA Beautiful.  
Clean Earth joins other 2016 event supporters: the Department of Environmental 
Protection, PennDOT, ​
PA Waste Industries Association​
, the ​
PA Food Merchants Association​

Weis Markets, Inc.​
, ​
Republic Services​
, ​
Steel Recycling Institute​
, ​
Lancaster County Solid Waste 
Management Authority​
, ​
Giant Eagle Inc​
., ​
Giant Food Stores, Inc​
., ​
Wawa​
, ​
Wegmans Food 
Markets​
, ​
ShopRite​
, ​
Fresh Grocer​
 and ​
Sheetz​
.  
The 2016 Great American Cleanup of PA runs through May 31st. During this period, 
registered events can get trash bags, gloves, and safety vests from PennDOT district offices, as 
supplies last. Events can be litter cleanups, illegal dump cleanups, beautification projects, special 
collections, and educational events.  
As part of this event, the Department of Environmental Protection and the PA Waste 
Industries Association will sponsor Let’s Pick It Up PA – Everyday from April 16th­ May 9th.   
During the Pick It Up PA Days, registered events will be able to take the trash collected 
during their cleanup to participating landfills for reduced cost or free disposal. 
Since the inception of the Great American Cleanup of PA in 2004, over 1.8 million 
volunteers have picked up 86,578,947 million pounds of litter and waste and 236,743 tires from 
Pennsylvania’s landscape.  
In addition, more than 149,371 trees, bulbs, and flowers have been planted.  
More information, visit Keep PA Beautiful's ​
Great American Cleanup of PA​
 webpage or 
contact Michelle Dunn, Great American Cleanup of PA Program Coordinator, at 
1­877­772­3673 ext. 113 or send email to: ​
mdunn@keeppabeautiful.org​

For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​
Keep 
Pennsylvania Beautiful​
 website.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for regular updates from KPB, ​
Like them 
on Facebook​
, ​
Follow on Twitter​
, ​
Discover them on Pinterest​
 and visit their ​
YouTube Channel​
.   
Also visit the ​
Illegal Dump Free PA​
 website for more ideas on how to clean up 
communities and keep them clean. 
NewsClips: 
Erie’s Spring Cleanup Program To Start April 10 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New E­Waste Website 
Editorial: Anti­Keystone Landfill Group’s Growth 
Related Articles: 
PEC, Conservation District Hold Illegal Dumpsite Cleanup April 19 In Potter County 
Volunteers Needed For Little Paint Creek Cleanup March 26 In Cambria County 
Annual French Creek Clean­Up Day April 23 In Montgomery County 
Volunteers Needed For Great Harrisburg Litter Cleanup April 16 
PA Resources Council Schedules Hard­To­Recycle Collection Events In Western PA 
12 Schools In PA Recognized In National Recycle Bowl Competition 
 
Volunteers Needed For Little Paint Creek Cleanup March 26 In Cambria County 
 
The Paint Creek Regional Watershed Association and the ​
Kiski­Conemaugh Stream Team​
 are 
inviting volunteers to help with the Little Paint Creek Cleanup on March 26 in Cambria County. 
Volunteers are asked to meet at the pull off along Route 160 between Windber and Elton, 
where Little Paint Creek passes under the road.  

Volunteers should wear pants and boots or other closed­toe shoes and dress for the 
weather. Gloves, safety vests, garbage bags, and light refreshments will be available.  
Efforts will focus on Berwick Road and a portion of Route 160 from the pull off up to 
Wingards. 
Register by calling Melissa at 814­444­2669 or send email to: 
mreckner@kcstreamteam.org​

Find other cleanup events near you or register your own cleanup or beautification event 
through the ​
 ​
2016 Great American Cleanup of PA​
 webpage through May 31. 
NewsClips: 
Erie’s Spring Cleanup Program To Start April 10 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New E­Waste Website 
Editorial: Anti­Keystone Landfill Group’s Growth 
Related Articles: 
PEC, Conservation District Hold Illegal Dumpsite Cleanup April 19 In Potter County 
Annual French Creek Clean­Up Day April 23 In Montgomery County 
Volunteers Needed For Great Harrisburg Litter Cleanup April 16 
Keep PA Beautiful: Clean Earth Supports 2016 Great American Cleanup Of PA 
PA Resources Council Schedules Hard­To­Recycle Collection Events In Western PA 
12 Schools In PA Recognized In National Recycle Bowl Competition 
 
PEC, Conservation District Hold Illegal Dumpsite Cleanup April 9 In Potter County 
 
The ​
PA Environmental Council​
 and the ​
Potter County 
Conservation District​
 have organized a community illegal 
dumpsite cleanup April 9 in Galeton, West Branch 
Township in Potter County from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 
This event will focus on cleaning up illegally 
dumped trash, tires, appliances and debris located in and 
along the banks of Pine Creek. This is an illegal dumpsite 
cleanup and volunteers are asked to dress appropriately. 
On the morning of the cleanup, volunteers will gather 
across from the VFW Post 661 for registration and 
instructions. After registration, volunteers will be provided with work gloves, trash bags and 
safety vest. When supplies are distributed and instructions have been provided, volunteers will 
begin the cleanup. 
Families, individuals, scouting groups, 4­H groups, environmental organizations, 
businesses, colleges, universities and high school clubs and students are invited to be part of this 
effort. 
Anyone under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a parent/guardian or have a 
parent/guardian sign a registration/insurance form prior to the cleanup and bring it with them. 
Anyone over 18 can sign the insurance form the day of the event. 
For more information, contact Palmira Miller, PEC office 570­718­6507, (cell) 
570­592­7876 or send email to: ​
pmiller@pecpa.org​
 or Glen Dunn II, Potter County Conservation 
District 814­274­8411 ext 114 or send email to: ​
g.dunnii@pottercd.com​

For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​
PA 

Environmental Council​
 website, visit the ​
PEC Blog​
, follow ​
PEC on Twitter​
 or ​
Like PEC on 
Facebook​
.  ​
Click Here​
 to receive regular updates from PEC. 
NewsClips: 
Erie’s Spring Cleanup Program To Start April 10 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New E­Waste Website 
Editorial: Anti­Keystone Landfill Group’s Growth 
Related Articles: 
Volunteers Needed For Little Paint Creek Cleanup March 26 In Cambria County 
Annual French Creek Clean­Up Day April 23 In Montgomery County 
Volunteers Needed For Great Harrisburg Litter Cleanup April 16 
Keep PA Beautiful: Clean Earth Supports 2016 Great American Cleanup Of PA 
PA Resources Council Schedules Hard­To­Recycle Collection Events In Western PA 
12 Schools In PA Recognized In National Recycle Bowl Competition 
 
Annual French Creek Cleanup Day April 23 In Montgomery County 
 
Join ​
Green Valleys Watershed Association​
 and community volunteers as we remove litter from 
the French Creek in Phoenixville on April 23 from 8:30 a.m. to noon!  Help to protect the French 
Creek and beautify an important community resource! 
This event is part of the ​
Great American Cleanup of Pennsylvania​
, and the ​
2016 
Schuylkill Scrub​
.  
This cleanup will run rain or shine, and will focus on three sites along the French Creek 
in the Phoenixville area. Volunteers will meet with GVWA staff before driving to the three focus 
areas.  
Volunteers will be provided with clean­up supplies and refreshments. Please bring sturdy, 
closed­toe shoes, bug spray / sunscreen, and clothing that can get dirty. 
For more information and to sign up, please contact 610­469­4900 or send email to: 
kelsey@greenvalleys.org​

Find other cleanup events near you or register your own cleanup or beautification event 
through the ​
 ​
2016 Great American Cleanup of PA​
 webpage through May 31. 
NewsClips: 
Erie’s Spring Cleanup Program To Start April 10 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New E­Waste Website 
Editorial: Anti­Keystone Landfill Group’s Growth 
Related Articles: 
PEC, Conservation District Hold Illegal Dumpsite Cleanup April 19 In Potter County 
Volunteers Needed For Little Paint Creek Cleanup March 26 In Cambria County 
Volunteers Needed For Great Harrisburg Litter Cleanup April 16 
Keep PA Beautiful: Clean Earth Supports 2016 Great American Cleanup Of PA 
PA Resources Council Schedules Hard­To­Recycle Collection Events In Western PA 
12 Schools In PA Recognized In National Recycle Bowl Competition 
 
Volunteers Needed For Great Harrisburg Litter Cleanup April 16 
 
Clean and Green Harrisburg​
 and Keep Harrisburg/Dauphin 

County Beautiful are holding the ​
4th Annual Great Harrisburg Litter Cleanup​
 on April 16 from 
9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
This annual cleanup is a day for community members to join forces and remove trash and 
litter off the city’s streets, alleys, and public spaces. 
Last year, 327 volunteers registered and picked up and disposed of 16 tons waste, 3,000 
pounds of electronics were recycled at the Dauphin County Recycling Center and removed 665 
tires. 
Click Here​
 for all the details and to register. 
Find other cleanup events near you or register your own cleanup or beautification event 
through the ​
2016 Great American Cleanup of PA​
 webpage through May 31. 
NewsClips: 
Erie’s Spring Cleanup Program To Start April 10 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New E­Waste Website 
Editorial: Anti­Keystone Landfill Group’s Growth 
Related Articles: 
PEC, Conservation District Hold Illegal Dumpsite Cleanup April 19 In Potter County 
Volunteers Needed For Little Paint Creek Cleanup March 26 In Cambria County 
Annual French Creek Clean­Up Day April 23 In Montgomery County 
Keep PA Beautiful: Clean Earth Supports 2016 Great American Cleanup Of PA 
PA Resources Council Schedules Hard­To­Recycle Collection Events In Western PA 
12 Schools In PA Recognized In National Recycle Bowl Competition 
 
PA Resources Council Schedules Hard­To­Recycled Collection Events In Western PA 
 
Mark your 2016 calendar now for dates to drop off a wide variety of materials – ranging from 
computers and household chemicals to usable building materials and unwanted medications – at 
upcoming collections​
 sponsored by the ​
PA Resources Council​
 and its partners. 
“The Pennsylvania Resources Council provides residents of the Commonwealth with 
numerous options to conveniently and cost­effectively dispose of a wide variety of materials,” 
according to PRC Regional Director Justin Stockdale.  “Since details vary for each of these 
opportunities, we encourage individuals to visit our website at ​
PRC’s website​
 or call PRC at 
412­488­7452 for complete details.” 
The ​
Hard­To­Recycle Collection Events​
 for electronics waste (​
but not TVs​
) will allow 
the public to drop off computers, cell phones, printer/toner cartridges, CFLs and expandable 
polystyrene packaging material at no cost. 
For a nominal fee, individuals can drop off alkaline batteries, fluorescent tubes, small 
Freon appliances and tires.  
The Hard­To­Recycle Collection Events are scheduled for— 
— April 16:​
 Pittsburgh Technical Institute, Oakdale, Allegheny County; 
— May 14:​
 Galleria at Pittsburgh Mills, Frazer Township, Allegheny County; 
— June 25:​
 ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, Washington County; 
— July 30:​
 location to be announced; 
— August 20:​
 Century III Mall, West Mifflin, Allegheny County; and 
— October 1:​
 The Mall at Robinson, Robinson Township, Allegheny County. 
At ​
Household Chemical Collection Events​
 individuals can drop off automotive fluids, 

household cleaners, pesticides, paints and other household chemicals for a cost of $3/gallon. The 
dates for these collection events are­­ 
— May 7:​
 North Park, Allegheny County; 
— May 21:​
 Concurrent Technologies Corporation ETF Facility, Johnstown, Cambria County; 
— July 9:​
 Washington County Fairgrounds, Washington County; 
— August 13:​
 Boyce Park, Allegheny County; 
— September 17:​
 South Park, Allegheny County; and 
— October 8:​
 Bradys Run Park, Beaver County. 
The ​
2016 DEA National Drug Take­Back Day​
 is April 30​
 from 10 a.m. to  2 p.m. at 
numerous locations throughout region, including many municipal buildings and police 
departments. 
This year’s ​
Allegheny County ReuseFest​
 will be held on June 18 in the parking lot of 
Jefferson Middle School, 21 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon, Allegheny County. 
For complete collection event information, visit PRC’s ​
Collection Events​
 webpage or call 
PRC at 412­488­7452. 
NewsClips: 
Erie’s Spring Cleanup Program To Start April 10 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New E­Waste Website 
Editorial: Anti­Keystone Landfill Group’s Growth 
Related Articles: 
PEC, Conservation District Hold Illegal Dumpsite Cleanup April 19 In Potter County 
Volunteers Needed For Little Paint Creek Cleanup March 26 In Cambria County 
Annual French Creek Clean­Up Day April 23 In Montgomery County 
Volunteers Needed For Great Harrisburg Litter Cleanup April 16 
Keep PA Beautiful: Clean Earth Supports 2016 Great American Cleanup Of PA 
PA Resources Council Schedules Hard­To­Recycle Collection Events In Western PA 
12 Schools In PA Recognized In National Recycle Bowl Competition 
 
DEP Conducts Mine Rescue Safety Training Drill In Scranton 
 
Staff from the Department of Environmental Protection’s 
Deep Mine Safety Program​
 conducted a mine rescue drill for 
local mining rescue teams on March 16 at the ​
Lackawanna 
Coal Mine​
 in Scranton. 
The focus of the drill was to educate miners on proper 
techniques for dealing with a mine fire as well as the rescue 
of a patient.   
Teams of three entered the mine and had to safely address: 
carbon monoxide and methane levels, a fire below and 
rescuing a miner trapped deep in the mines.  Each team was 
evaluated for its performance.  
The Deep Mine Safety program staff is required to hold these drills twice a year. 
DEP staff who took part include: Troy Wolfgang, David Williams, Jeffrey Stanchek, 
Scott Wolfgang, Steven Geist, Arthur Snyder, Jeffrey Harman, Terry Wolfgang, Kenneth 
Dengler and Larry Graver. 

For more information, visit DEP’s ​
Deep Mine Safety Program​
 webpage. 
NewsClip: 
Deep Mine Safety Training Drill At Lackawanna Mine Tour 
 
(Reprinted from the ​
March 17 DEP News​
.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy.) 
 
Agriculture Extends 1­Pound Waiver To Avoid Gasoline Supply Disruption 
 
The Department of Agriculture ​
published notice​
 in the March 19 Pennsylvania Bulletin 
extending by technical guidance the one­pound Reid Vapor Pressure waiver now in state law, but 
due to expire on May 1, 2016. 
This continues the National Institute of Standards and Technology exception which is 
also due to expire on May 1.  NIST has been considering extending the waiver, but has not yet 
acted. 
State legislation extending the waiver was reported out of the Senate Agriculture and 
Rural Affairs Committee Tuesday­­ ​
Senate Bill 1123​
 (Vogel­R­Beaver), but the guidance will 
serve as a backstop action until the legislation is passed by the Senate and House and signed into 
law. 
Without this policy, and ultimately the legislative change, expiration of the one­pound 
waiver would create havoc in Pennsylvania’s gasoline supply system in September because a 
unique fuel would be required to be sold in the state. 
The state Department of Agriculture has been working on this issue collaboratively with 
refiners, the PA Petroleum Association and gasoline distributors and service stations. 
NewsClips: 
Allegheny Front: Oil Trains Carry Bigger Risks For People Of Color 
Storing Crude Oil In Rail Cars Not Widespread 
Low Fuel Prices Equals Savings For Westmoreland Schools 
Pittsburgh Gasoline Prices Approach $2/Gallon 
Lehigh Valley Gasoline Prices Rises To $2 Again 
In Reversal, Obama Bans Atlantic Ocean Drilling 
 
DEP Issues Water Permit For Jessup Gas­Fired Power Plant In Lackawanna County 
 
The Department of Environmental Protection Tuesday announced it has issued a National 
Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit to Lackawanna Energy Center, LLC of Chicago 
to discharge treated wastewater from a proposed 1500­megawatt natural gas­fired power plant to 
be constructed on Industrial Drive in Jessup, Lackawanna County.  
The permit authorizes the company to discharge into nearby Grassy Island Creek. 
“The department thoroughly reviewed Lackawanna Energy’s application and found that it 
met the criteria for discharge regulations,” said Mike Bedrin, Director of DEP’s Northeast 
Regional Office in Wilkes­Barre.  
The NPDES Permit allows for a new discharge of air­cooled cooling tower blowdown, 
low volume industrial wastewater, chiller effluent and storm­water into Grassy Island, which is a 
designated cold water fishery.  
The Department published notice of the draft permit in the Pennsylvania Bulletin on 

November 7, 2015 and solicited written comment. A public hearing was also held in January of 
2016 to solicit public comment at Valley View High School in Archbald.  
A total of thirty­seven (37) comments were received by the department and a subsequent 
comment/response document was also prepared. 
A copy of the NPDES permit and comment/response document can be viewed at DEP’s 
Northeast Regional Office in Wilkes­Barre.  
Those wishing to make an appointment to view the documents can do so between the 
hours of 8 a.m. ­ 4 p.m. by calling 570­826­2511.  
The public can also view the comments on the DEP Northeast Regional Office 
Community Information​
 webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Jessup Gas­Fired Power Plant Gets Final State Permit In Lackawanna 
Elizabeth Twp Gas­Fired Power Plant Leads To Zoning Debate 
Natural Gas To Surpass Coal In Electric Generation 
Carnegie Mellon’s Institute Gains Exposure With Energy Week 
Electric Supplier Accused Of Jacking Prices Order To Refund $6.8M 
Electric Customers To Get Refunds Under Settlement 
West Penn Marks 100 Years Of Electric Service 
Grants Won By Pittsburgh Projects On Energy, Music, Art 
Federal Funds To Aid Layoff­Hit Appalachian Coal Communities 
U.S. Coal Technologies Could Find Market In China 
Peabody Energy Warns Of Possible Bankruptcy 
 
Briefing: Abandoned, Orphan Oil & Gas Wells Means They’re Abandoned And Orphans 
 
A question came up ​
in the House hearing​
 on the Department 
of Environmental Protection’s budget on how many times 
DEP inspects abandoned and orphaned oil and gas wells “it 
owns” in Pennsylvania. 
The answer to this question is really simple­­ DEP 
doesn’t own any wells. 
First, “abandoned” and “orphaned” mean, by 
definition, no one owns these wells, including the state.  The 
conventional oil and gas drillers who bought the mineral 
rights to drill these wells way back when didn’t transfer that 
ownership to anyone else. 
They simply walked away from their responsibility to either produce the well or plug 
them properly. 
Since 1859 when the first oil well was drilled in Pennsylvania the conventional drilling 
industry drilled as many as 325,000 oil and gas wells, but it could be more.  We don’t know. 
For nearly 100 years they walked away from any responsibility for those wells when 
production ended or they didn’t want to produce them any more or they went bankrupt leaving 
property owners or taxpayers to clean up the mess they left behind. 
They weren’t even required to tell anyone where they drilled their wells. 
It wasn’t until 1956 when Pennsylvania passed the first law to regulate oil and gas 

drilling in even the most basic way that the state even knew where new wells were being drilled, 
aside from well blowouts and water well owners lighting their faucets and garden hoses on fire. 
It wasn’t until 1984 that conventional oil and gas operators were first required to put up 
limited bonds to cover the cost of plugging wells that were no longer produced.   
It wasn’t until 1985 that operators were required to register the location of their old wells. 
If an abandoned well is discovered by an operator or property owner now, DEP is to be 
notified within 60 days of finding it.  But, they are often very difficult to find ​
(see photo)​
, unless 
problems develop. 
In 1992 an amendment to the 1984 Oil and Gas Act first gave the Department of 
Environmental Protection the authority to plug orphan and abandoned wells in certain 
circumstances.  Surcharges were established on new permits to fund the new Abandoned and 
Orphan Well Plugging Program. 
Where no responsible party is identified for abandoned or orphan wells, which makes 
them abandoned or orphan, they can be plugged using the surcharges from the Abandoned and 
Orphan Well Plugging Fund. 
In 1999, with the creation of the Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund, 
more funding was devoted to the abandoned and orphan well plugging program, but rarely more 
than about $5 million a year. 
In 2003 most of the Growing Greener Funding was diverted to pay for debt service on the 
Growing Greener II bond issue.  It wasn’t until 2012 when the Act 13 drilling impact fees were 
passed that the well plugging program was revived somewhat. 
With limited resources, DEP is only able to plug abandoned or orphan wells that present 
the biggest environmental or safety threats. 
As of the end of 2014, DEP has ​
plugged just over 3,000 abandoned and orphan wells​
; 
nearly half of those wells­­ 1,336­­ were plugged during the first few years of the original 
Growing Greener Program. 
With the development of the Marcellus and Utica Shale unconventional natural gas 
industry, DEP put more emphasis on having operators identify abandoned or orphan wells within 
the areas of planned drilling because of safety and environmental concerns. 
In 2014 DEP began an effort to digitize​
 the locations of abandoned and orphan wells it 
has and that permittees identify.  About ​
12,301 abandoned and orphan well locations​
 have been 
confirmed out of an estimated 200,000 wells out there somewhere. 
If members of the General Assembly wants to require DEP to inspect the 12,301 
abandoned and orphan wells in the state it knows about, DEP could certainly do that, provided 
the people and money are made available to do the job. 
Right now, DEP’s Oil and Gas Program is funded primarily by permit fees, fines and 
penalties on the industry, not tax money.  Adding 12,301 new wells to inspect (and many more) 
would mean a significant increase in permit fees on the industry at a time when ​
DEP is already 
considering fee increases​
 because of a downturn in the oil and gas industry. 
Nothing is free. 
So to summarize­­ 
1. “Abandoned” and “Orphan” means, by definition, abandoned and orphaned, no one owns 
these wells, including the state, because ownership was not transferred anywhere. 
2. No one knows the location of the overwhelming majority of these wells, so even if someone 
wanted to inspect them, no one knows where most of them are. 

3. The state’s Abandoned and Orphan Well Plugging Program, due to very limited resources, is 
only able to plug those wells of greatest concern DEP knows about. 
4. If the General Assembly directs DEP to inspect the abandoned and orphan wells it knows 
about, it would mean a significant increase in permits fees on the oil and gas industry during the 
most severe downturn in industry history. 
For more information, visit DEP’s ​
Abandoned & Orphaned Well Plugging Program 
webpage. ​
Click Here​
 for a factsheet on the program.  ​
Click Here​
 to find abandoned and orphan 
wells near you included on DEP’s inventory of 12,301. 
NewsClips: 
Efforts Under Way To Find Abandoned Gas, Oil Wells 
Marcellus Shale Health Registry Stalls 
Auditor General To Examine Act 13 Impact Fee Spending 
Related Story: 
Abandoned Oil & Gas Wells­­ More than Just A Rusty Eyesore 
 
Briefing: DCNR Leasing Of Stream, River Bottoms For Natural Gas Development 
 
A question came up at the House and Senate budget hearings 
for ​
DCNR​
 and ​
DEP​
 on how much leasing the Department of 
Conservation and Natural Resources did of river and stream 
bottoms­­ submerged lands­­ in spite of the fact ​
Gov. Wolf 
signed an Executive Order​
 on January 29, 2015 putting in place 
a moratorium on leasing more State Park and Forest land for 
natural gas development. 
DCNR is the state ​
agency authorized to enter into leases 
for the development of oil and gas wells beneath streams and 
river beds­­ submerged lands­­ owned by the Commonwealth, whether or not they are within any 
State Park or Forest lands. 
Submerged lands are generally defined as the area lying below all navigable waters 
between the ordinary low water marks­­ picture a ribbon of ownership going across the 
landscape. 
This area can vary in width from a few feet to hundreds of feet across a major river like 
the Susquehanna. 
DCNR has a ​
list of these navigable streams​
 and an ​
interactive map of streams​
 posted on 
its website, although others may fit the definition. 
This authority is distinct and separate from the authority DEP has to grant rights­of­way 
across (over or under) state­owned rivers and streams for utility and pipeline crossings, bridge 
abutments, docks and other encroachments onto submerged lands through a ​
Submerged Lands 
License Agreement​
.  These agreements require ​
payment of a fee​
 to the state since the applicant is 
using state property. 
DCNR ​
adopted a formal policy​
 on leasing submerged lands for natural gas development. 
Without a lease to use these publicly­owned lands, natural gas drillers would be appropriating 
publicly­owned property without paying for it. 
DCNR has a ​
list of the 24 submerged lands natural gas leases​
 it has executed so far on its 
website. 

The first lease was executed in May of 2010 between DCNR and Chesapeake Appalachia 
for 1,538 acres under the Susquehanna River in Bradford County.  The lease payment was for 
$6,152,000.   
The next largest lease was also between DCNR and Chesapeake Appalachia for 
$4,368,000 for 1,092 acres under the Susquehanna River in Bradford and Wyoming counties in 
March of 2014. 
There have been three submerged lands natural gas development leases executed during 
the Wolf Administration, according to DCNR’s website­­ 
­­ June 2015: $695,600 for 173.9 acres under Loyalsock Creek, Lycoming County; 
­­ January 2016: $24,400 for 6.1 acres under the Cowanesque River, Tioga County; and 
­­ January 2016: $287,200 for 71.8 acres under the Allegheny River, Armstrong County. 
The total value of the submerged lands leases so far is $21,543,617, which goes into 
DCNR’s Oil and Gas Lease Fund, for 3,803.3 acres of stream and river bottom; or just over 
$5,664 per acre. 
DCNR publishes a ​
notice in the PA Bulletin​
 each time a submerged lands lease is 
executed to provide the public with notice. 
To put this in context, the ​
Rendell Administration leased 137,000 acres​
 of State Forest 
land for shale gas drilling during its tenure and when the market was at its peak.   
In October 2010, just days before the gubernatorial election, ​
Gov. Rendell signed an 
Executive Order​
 putting in place a moratorium on leasing more State Forest or Parks land for 
shale gas development. 
No additional shale gas leasing on State Forest or Parks was done during the Corbett 
Administration, although an ​
Executive Order issued in May 2014​
, replacing Gov. Rendell’s 
moratorium Order, would have allowed non­surface disturbance leasing, if there were drillers 
interested.   
The Fiscal Code bill passed as part of the budget in July 2014 included a provision 
promoted by Senate and House Republicans requiring DCNR to ​
lease thousands of additional 
acres of land to bring in at least $95 million​
 to help balance the state budget that year. 
No additional leasing was ever done because the ​
market was already going south​
 by that 
time. 
As noted, ​
Gov. Wolf signed an Executive Order​
 in January 2015 imposing a moratorium 
on further shale gas leasing on State Forest or Parks land. 
Obviously, all three administrations continued to lease state­owned submerged lands for 
natural gas development. 
For more information on submerged lands leasing, visit DCNR’s ​
Shale Gas And 
Publicly­Owned Streambeds​
 webpage.   
More information is also available on the existing State Forest shale gas leasing program 
on DCNR’s ​
Natural Gas Development and State Forests​
 webpage, including its program for 
monitoring the 1,600 acres of its 2.2 million acres of State Forests affected by shale gas leasing. 
 
2 New Members Joint PA Energy Infrastructure Alliance 
 
Two Pittsburgh­area economic development and trade organizations have joined the ​
PA Energy 
Infrastructure Alliance​
­­ the ​
Pittsburgh Airport Area Chamber of Commerce​
 and the ​
Western 
Pennsylvania Chapter of the National Electrical Contractors Association​

“As a result of Western Pennsylvania’s abundance of natural resources, our region has 
played a vital role over the last several years in shaping our nation’s energy revolution,” said 
Bernadette Puzzuole, President and CEO of the Pittsburgh Airport Area Chamber of Commerce, 
which represents more than 1,100 businesses in the 34 Pennsylvania communities that make up 
the airport corridor, as well as from neighboring Ohio and West Virginia. “We have seen 
firsthand the positive economic effects, both directly and indirectly, that pipeline projects have 
had on many of our communities along the airport corridor. 
“Energy is helping Pennsylvania create a thriving, diverse and strong economy, and one 
that should be a model for other states. It is imperative, therefore, to continue to encourage 
energy development,” added Puzzuole. “Pipeline projects provide sustainable wages for our 
region’s residents and help increase revenue for our local businesses. We joined the 
Pennsylvania Energy Infrastructure Alliance because, for our more than 1,100 members, it’s 
important to reaffirm our support for developing a modern energy infrastructure across the 
Commonwealth.” 
Also joining PEIA as a new member is the Western Pennsylvania Chapter of the National 
Electrical Contractors Association. For more than 65 years, WPA NECA, which represents 
electrical contractors throughout Western Pennsylvania, has provided its members with an 
effective channel through which to express their collective voice on issues affecting the electrical 
construction industry. 
“Investing in energy infrastructure is vital to the economic health of communities in 
Western Pennsylvania. It benefits thousands of families,” said Chad M. Jones, executive director 
of WPA NECA. “We represent the most qualified, reliable and experienced contractors in the 
region and our members are ready to help our commonwealth take its rightful place as one of the 
premiere energy­ producing states in the nation. 
“Utilizing qualified electrical contractors on pipeline infrastructure and related 
development projects ensures that the best­trained professionals are hired for the work,” Jones 
added. “We live in the communities that the pipelines will serve and we take great pride in 
ensuring our work will meet and exceed safety requirements. We’re also proud members of the 
Pennsylvania Energy Infrastructure Alliance, an organization that advocates for pipeline safety 
and believes minimizing a pipeline’s impact on communities is a key to any development plan.” 
The PA Energy Infrastructure Alliance was launched June 8 by the Washington County 
Chamber of Commerce and Delaware County Chamber of Commerce, along with the Laborers 
International Union of North America and the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 
66. There are more than two dozen PEIA members today. 
For more information, visit the ​
PA Energy Infrastructure Alliance​
 website or Follow on 
Twitter: @PAllies4Energy. 
NewsClips: 
Officials Salute Start Of Sunoco Marcus Hook Plant 
FERC Rejection Of Oregon Pipeline Plan A First 
Environmental Groups Ask FERC For Public Participation Office 
Activists: Don’t Stop Fighting Pipelines 
U.S. To Expand Safety Rules For Natural Gas Pipelines 
Explosive History Prompts Federal Pipeline Safety Proposal 
 
March 30 Deadline For Comments On DEP Climate Change Action Plan Update 

 
The Department of Environmental Protection is accepting public comments on the ​
update to the 
Pennsylvania Climate Change Action Plan​
 through March 30. ​
(January 30 formal notice) 
DEP has so far received only one comment through its ​
eComment​
 webpage. 
The Plan is required to: 
— Identify greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and sequestration trends and baselines in this 
Commonwealth; 
— Evaluate cost­effective strategies for reducing or offsetting GHG emissions from various 
sectors in this Commonwealth; 
— Identify costs, benefits and co­benefits of GHG reduction strategies recommended by the 
Plan, including the impact on the capability of meeting future energy demand within this 
Commonwealth; 
— Identify areas of agreement and disagreement among committee members about the Plan; and 
— Recommend to the General Assembly legislative changes necessary to implement the Plan. 
Climate Plan Update Sections 
Part of the Plan Update will include 13 work group reports making recommendations 
covering: ​
Combined Heat and Power​
, ​
Manure Digesters​
, ​
GeoExchange Systems​
, ​
Heating Oil 
Conservation and Fuel Switching​
, ​
Re­Lighting Pennsylvania​
, ​
Semi­Truck Freight 
Transportation​
, ​
Building Energy Codes​
, ​
High Performance Buildings​
, ​
Coal Mine Methane 
Recovery​
, ​
Urban and Community Forestry Role in Climate Change Mitigation​
, ​
Act 129 Phase 
IV & V​
, ​
Manufacturing Energy Technical Assistance​
 and ​
Energy Efficiency Finance​

Key Facts From Update 
Here are some key facts from the Climate Plan Update­­ 
­­ Overall, Pennsylvania’s greenhouse gas emissions in 2030 are expected to be lower than in 
2000. 
­­ Between 2000 and 2012 total statewide greenhouse gas emissions in Pennsylvania declined by 
35.58 million ton carbon dioxide equivalents or by 11.02 percent­­ from 322.96 MMTCO2e to 
287.38 MMTCO2e. 
­­ The 13 specific Work Plans included in the Update are expected to reduce greenhouse gas 
emissions by 337.69 million ton carbon dioxide equivalents.   
­­ The Work Plans with the most cost­effective recommendations, according to the analysis done 
in the Update are: ​
Energy Efficiency Finance​
, ​
Semi­Truck Freight Transportation​
, ​
GeoExchange 
Systems​
, ​
Heating Oil Conservation and Fuel Switching​
 and ​
High Performance Buildings​
 ​
(see 
page 6)​

­­ The Work Plans with the highest potential reductions are: ​
Energy Efficiency Finance​
, ​
High 
Performance Buildings​
, ​
Re­Lighting Pennsylvania​
, ​
Heating Oil Conservation and Fuel 
Switching​
, and  ​
GeoExchange Systems​
 (see page 6)​
.  [Note: 4 of 5 overlap.] 
A copy of the ​
Climate Plan Update for comment​
 is available online. 
DEP Secretary John Quigley has said the Climate Change Action Plan and its ​
updates are 
broader in scope​
 than the specific requirement to meet ​
EPA’s Clean Power Climate Rule 
requirements.  DEP is just now putting together Pennsylvania’s plan to meet the Clean Power 
Rule. 
Comments can be submit through ​
DEP’s eComment​
 webpage or by sending email to: 
ecomment@pa.gov​
 or in writing to the Department of Environmental Protection, Policy Office, 
Rachel Carson State Office Building, P. O. Box 2063, Harrisburg, PA 17105­2063. 

A copy of the Plan update is posted on ​
DEP’s eComment​
 webpage.  Questions about the 
Plan update should be directed to Mark Brojakowski, Bureau of Air Quality, 400 Market Street, 
Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­772­3429, ​
mbrojakows@pa.gov​

More background on the Climate Change Plan and other reports is available on DEP’s 
Climate Change Advisory Committee​
 webpage.  The next meeting of the Committee is set for 
March 8. 
For more information on PA climate­related issues, visit ​
DEP’s Climate Change 
webpage. 
NewsClips: 
PLS: PA Clean Power Climate Plan Put On Low Boil 
PA Shows EPA The Way On Pending Methane Policy 
Allegheny Front: Kasich On Climate Change, Environment 
Editorial: UN Climate Fund, More Quackery 
Editorial: New Sea Level Rise Calls For Action 
 
$65.5M In Federal Coal­Impacted Communities Economic Development Funding 
Available 
 
Gov. Tom Wolf Friday announced the availability of $65.8 million in federal funding through 
the Partnerships for Opportunity and Workforce and Economic Revitalization (POWER) 
Initiative to develop new strategies for economic growth and worker advancement for 
communities that have historically relied on the coal economy for economic stability.  
“My administration is committed to ensuring that our communities have the resources 
they need to continue to thrive as industry sectors transform,” said Gov. Wolf. “While we do 
everything in our power to advance the next generation of energy production, it is critically 
important that we inform eligible Pennsylvania communities of the federal funds that have been 
made available to support their economic needs through the transition.” 
The Department of Community and Economic Development in collaboration with the 
Department of Labor & Industry will work with communities and regions that have been 
negatively impacted by changes in the coal economy by encouraging them to apply for available 
funds and providing the data and information necessary to help support strong applications. 
“It is extremely important that we collaborate on every level to ensure that Pennsylvania 
submits the strongest applications possible,” said DCED Secretary Dennis M. Davin. “This is a 
great opportunity for our communities that are feeling the effects from changes in industry 
sectors and these resources can help strengthen their economies and workforces.” 
Funds are available for a range of activities, including: 
— Developing projects that diversify local and regional economies, create jobs in new and/or 
existing industries, attract new sources of job­creating investment, and provide a range of 
workforce services and skills training; 
— Building partnerships to attract and invest in the economic future of coal­impacted 
communities; 
— Increasing capacity and other technical assistance fostering long term economic growth and 
opportunity in coal­impacted communities. 
Webinars Begin March 23 
The federal agencies involved in the POWER Initiative will hold a series of webinars 

about the program beginning March 23.  ​
Click Here​
 for all the details. 
The POWER Initiative is a multi­agency effort aligning and targeting federal economic 
and workforce development resources to communities and workers that have been affected by 
job losses in coal mining, coal power plant operations, and coal­related supply chain industries 
due to the changing economics of America's energy production.  
The Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) is participating in the initiative with the 
U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA). 
The Obama administration launched the POWER Initiative in 2015 and awarded nearly 
$15 million to coal­impacted communities, making investments in seven Appalachian states.  
Congress expanded the work of POWER for 2016, providing $50 million to ARC to 
assist communities across Appalachia, along with $15 million to EDA to assist communities 
nationwide. 
For more information, visit the federal ​
POWER Initiative​
 webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Federal Funds To Aid Layoff­Hit Appalachian Coal Communities 
U.S. Coal Technologies Could Find Market In China 
Peabody Energy Warns Of Possible Bankruptcy 
 
PUC Orders PaG&E To Refund $6.8 Million, Pay Penalties For Deceptive Marketing 
 
The ​
Public Utility Commission​
 Friday confirmed the finalization of sanctions against 
Pennsylvania Gas & Electric Company (PaG&E) for alleged deceptive actions during and after 
the “Polar Vortex” in the winter of 2013­14.  
An Order approving a Joint Petition for Settlement directs the company to issue a total of 
$6.8 million in customer refunds, pay a $25,000 civil penalty, contribute $100,000 to electric 
distribution companies’ (EDCs’) Hardship Funds and modify its marketing practices. 
At its February 11 Public Meeting, the Commission voted 5­0 to adopt ​
a Joint Motion 
modifying a ​
Joint Petition for Settlement​
 between PaG&E, the Office of Attorney General, the 
Office of Consumer Advocate and the Commission’s independent Bureau of Investigation and 
Enforcement and seeking comments from the parties of the settlement on the ​
amended Tentative 
Order​
.  
Among other things, the Joint Motion modified the settlement obligations of OAG and 
OCA by requiring them to provide a specific notice to customers who elect to receive payment 
from a refund pool established by the settlement.  
No comments were filed, making the Order final without further action by the 
Commission. 
OAG and OCA filed a joint formal complaint against PaG&E on June 20, 2014, which 
alleged that the company misled customers with deceptive promises of savings; engaged in 
“slamming,” or the unauthorized enrollment of a customer; mishandled customer complaints; 
failed to provide accurate pricing information; charged different prices than listed in customer 
disclosure statements; and failed to comply with the Telemarketer Registration Act. 
The settlement directs the following actions by the company: 
­­ Provide refunds to customers, honoring all commitments to rebate programs, guaranteed 
introductory rates, service agreements for repair and maintenance and incentive offers; 
Pay a $25,000 civil penalty; 

­­ Contribute $100,000 to EDCs’ Hardship Funds; and 
­­ Make numerous modifications to its business practices related to product offerings, marketing, 
third­party verifications, disclosure statements, training, compliance monitoring, reporting and 
customer service. 
The total refund pool amounts to $6,836,563, including $4,511,563 that the company 
previously and voluntarily paid in cash refunds. The net refund pool effective with Friday’s 
approval is $2,325,000. 
The Attorney General’s Bureau of Consumer Protection and OCA will determine which 
customers were affected by the company’s misconduct between January and March 2014 and 
determine refund amounts, accounting for usage, price charged and refund amounts already 
received directly from PaG&E.  
BCP and OCA will utilize a third­party administrator to distribute the refunds. The 
administrator is required to provide a notice to each refund recipient stating that signing a 
Release of Claims and receipt of payment may affect a customer’s right to recover amounts for 
the same conduct of PaG&E that could result from court proceedings against the supplier. 
The administrator will use best efforts to distribute all refunds within 180 days of the 
Final Order. Customers who do not receive – or are not satisfied with – the offer by BCP and 
OCA may contact PaG&E directly to request a refund. Consumers with questions about the 
settlement may contact BCP at 1­800­441­2555.   
I&E is the independent enforcement arm of the PUC. To satisfy due process of law under 
the Pennsylvania Constitution, separation is required between staff involved in investigatory and 
prosecutory functions and the Commissioners involved in decision making. As a result, the 
Commissioners can examine each case with an unbiased perspective. 
NewsClips: 
Electric Supplier Accused Of Jacking Prices Order To Refund $6.8M 
Electric Customers To Get Refunds Under Settlement 
 
PUC Approves PPL, PECO Act 129 Energy Efficiency Plans 
 
The Public Utility Commission Thursday approved Phase III ​
Act 129 Energy Efficiency and 
Conservation plans​
 submitted by PPL Electric Utilities Corporation and PECO Energy 
Company. 
The Commission voted 5­0 to approve the PPL and PECO plans, which outline company 
efforts to reduce energy consumption and peak demand through 2021.  
EE&C plans for the state’s five other large electric distribution companies were ​
approved 
by the Commission last week​
, including plans submitted by the FirstEnergy Companies (Met­Ed, 
Penelec, Penn Power and West Penn Power) and Duquesne Light. 
All of the Phase III EE&C plans will go into effect on June 1, 2016.  
EE&C plans are required as part of Act 129 of 2008. The Act calls for efficiency and 
conservation efforts, if shown to be cost­effective, to help reduce electric price volatility and 
ensure affordable and reliable electric service to Pennsylvania’s residents and businesses.  
In June 2015, the Commission issued its ​
Final Implementation Order​
 for Phase III of Act 
129, building upon all of the lessons learned and data collected to date. 
Now about to enter their third phase, these EE&C programs have promoted the adoption 
of energy­efficient lighting, appliances and other measures intended to help reduce consumption.   

Phase III covers a five­year period, from 2016 through 2021, with new targets for each of 
the EDCs based on numerous studies by the Commission.  
The overall targets for reduction in power consumption range from 2.6 percent to 5 
percent, depending on the potential savings in each EDC territory.  
The targets for peak demand reduction also vary depending on the potential for each 
territory, ranging up to 2 percent. 
For more information, visit the ​
PUC’s Act 129​
 webpage. 
 
Electric Car Charging Station To Open At Harrisburg International Airport 
 
Travelers who park at ​
Harrisburg International Airport​
 will soon 
be able to charge their electric vehicles. 
A Level 3 DC fast charger has been installed at the cell 
phone lot as part of an ​
Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant​
 to Car 
Charging Group to install chargers throughout Pennsylvania.   
The charger will be operational beginning next week. 
HIA and CCGI have also obtained permits to install an 
additional DC fast charger in the short term parking garage. 
Click Here​
 for other electric vehicle charging stations in 
Pennsylvania and ​
sites on the Turnpike​

             DEP has scheduled a series of AFIG Grant Seminars coming up on March 22 in 
Wilkes­Barre, March 24 in Harrisburg and April 7 in Norristown.  ​
Click Here​
 for an updated list 
of seminars (bottom of the page). 
The next round of applications for the ​
Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Program​
 are due 
April 29. 
NewsClips: 
Electric Car Charging Station On Tap For York 
Wind Power vs Bats: Some Species May Better Absorb Losses 
Related Story: 
DEP Sets Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Seminar In Norristown April 7 
 
(Reprinted from the ​
March 17 DEP News​
.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy.) 
 
DEP Sets Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Seminar In Norristown April 7 
 
The Department of Environmental Protection and the ​
Eastern Pennsylvania Alliance for Clean 
Transportation​
 invite fleet managers, municipalities, school districts, incorporated nonprofit 
entities, and businesses to an April 7 ​
Alternative Fuel Incentive Grant​
 seminar in Norristown, 
Montgomery County. 
The seminar will be held at DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street, 
Norristown from 10:00 a.m. to Noon. 
The free seminar is open to eligible applicants only. Seating is limited and the registration 
deadline is April 6.  ​
Click Here​
 to register for this workshop.  
Other Seminars 
DEP will also hold AFIG seminars in other areas, including: March 22 in Wilkes­Barre 

and March 24 in Harrisburg.  ​
Click Here​
 for details. 
Seminar attendees will hear how Pennsylvanians can move away from imported 
petroleum fuels to homegrown, clear­burning, and affordable alternatives which include natural 
gas, propane, biodiesel and electricity.  
Industry experts will discuss the advantages of alternative fuels, vehicles and 
technologies. DEP staff will provide a review of the AFIG program eligibility and application 
requirements.  
Funding is available under the AFIG program to help fund four project types: alternative 
fuel vehicle retrofit or purchase, alternative fuel refueling infrastructure, biofuel use, and 
innovative technology. 
For more information on the grant program, visit DEP’s ​
Alternative Fuels Incentive 
Grant Program​
 webpage.  The grant application deadline is April 29. 
NewsClips: 
Electric Car Charging Station On Tap For York 
Wind Power vs Bats: Some Species May Better Absorb Losses 
Related Story: 
Electric Car Charging Station To Open At Harrisburg International Airport 
 
March 17 DEP News Now Available 
 
The March 17 edition of ​
DEP News​
 is now available from the Department of Environmental 
Protection featuring articles on­­ 
­­ ​
DEP Secretary Reiterates Need For Major Technology Investment Before Senate Panel 
­­ ​
DEP Installs Air Sampling Monitors Near Keystone Landfill Lackawanna County 
­­ ​
DEP Conducts Deep Mine Rescue Safety Training Drill In Scranton 
­­ ​
DEP Issues Water Permit For Jessup Gas­Fired Power Plant In Lackawanna County 
­­ ​
Electric Car Charging Station To Open At Harrisburg International Airport 
­­ ​
DEP Issues Notice Of Lead Exceedance For Berks County Water Vendor 
­­ ​
DEP Northwest Regional Employees Receive Legal Aid Excellence Award 
­­ ​
Registration Open For April 5 Peregrine Falcon Educator’s Workshop 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy. 
 
EPA Accepting Applications For 2016 Toxics Release Inventory University Challenge 
 
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is now accepting applications for its ​
2016 Toxics 
Release Inventory University Challenge​
.  Applications are due March 27. 
The TRI University Challenge aims to increase awareness of the TRI Program and data 
within academic communities; expose students to TRI data, tools, and analysis; and generate 
innovative programs, activities, recommendations, or research that improve the accessibility, 
awareness, and use of TRI data. 
EPA is looking to academic institutions to help build a diverse portfolio of practical and 
replicable projects that benefit communities, the environment, academic institutions, and the TRI 
Program. 
EPA welcomes the submission of any project proposal that advances the knowledge, use, 
and understanding of TRI data and related information. In reviewing proposals for the 2016 

Challenge, EPA is giving priority to projects that focus on the following themes: 
­­ Promoting Broader Use of TRI Data by Academics and Other External Users; and 
­­ Using TRI to Measure Program Effectiveness. 
Anyone who is affiliated with an accredited college or university is welcome to apply. 
Proposed projects may range from one semester to multi­year research or coursework. 
Applicants may include, but are not limited to: Undergraduate/graduate students with faculty 
leadership; Academic faculty and researchers; and Ph.D. candidates 
For more information, visit EPA’s ​
2016 TRI University Challenge​
 webpage. 
 
Millbrook Marsh Nature Center, Centre County, DCNR Green Park Award Winner 
 
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn Tuesday 
announced ​
Millbrook Marsh Nature Center​
 in Centre County is the ​
Green Park Award​
 winner 
for its demonstrated commitment to environmental education, diverse park uses and restoration 
of a natural environment. 
“Millbrook Marsh Nature Center is the embodiment of the Green Park Award, an 
outstanding community park demonstrating green and sustainable practices,” said Dunn. “In its 
16­year existence, the center has emerged as a statewide leader in incorporating green and 
sustainable practices in all criteria areas, while demonstrating the compatibility of diverse park 
uses with recreational opportunities and restoration of a natural environment.” 
The secretary joined other state and local parks and recreation officials in announcing the 
award recipient at a luncheon hosted by the ​
PA Recreation and Parks Society​
 at Seven Springs 
Mountain Resort, Champion, Somerset County. 
Co­sponsored by DCNR and the PRPS, the award recognizes statewide excellence in a 
public park community that demonstrates green and sustainable practices. Judges include DCNR 
staff from the department’s bureaus of Recreation and Conservation and State Parks, the 
secretary’s office, and PRPS. 
Occupying 62 acres at 548 Puddintown Road, College Township, the nature center was 
established in 1997 through cooperative efforts of the ​
Centre Region Parks & Recreation 
Authority​
, ​
Centre Region Council of Governments​
 and the Pennsylvania State University. It is 
operated by the Centre Region Parks & Recreation Authority. 
The award was accepted at PRPS luncheon by Ronald J. Woodhead, director of the 
Centre Region Parks & Recreation Authority, and Melissa Freed, the center’s supervisor. 
“The Centre Region Parks & Recreation Authority is honored that the vision, efforts and 
donations of so many community members and groups will be recognized by this award for 
Millbrook Marsh Nature Center,” Woodhead said. “We are also thankful that the state 
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has assisted by providing valuable guidance 
and support since the nature center was established in 1997.” 
The Millbrook Marsh property includes a 12­acre farmstead and an adjacent 50­acre 
wetland area.  The farmstead consists of a renovated 1850’s bank barn and the recently 
constructed LEED­certified Spring Creek Education Building.   
The marsh is preserved primarily for wildlife habitat, and boardwalk pathways give 
visitors a view of the marshland while minimizing disturbance to the ecosystem. 
The nature center hosts thousands of visitors every year, and received nearly 13,000 
visitors attending organized programs in 2015. Its wetland property contains three high quality 

streams protected by the marsh, which also helps prevents flooding during storm events.  
Other marsh areas have been restored to protect water quality and reduce erosion from 
local urban runoff. The farmstead has rain gardens, swales and permeable trails and parking 
areas to promote infiltration, and the barn also has rain barrels providing water for native 
plantings. 
In 2015, DCNR presented the Green Park Award to the Delaware River City Corporation 
and Philadelphia’s Parks and Recreation Department for their role in developing ​
Lardner’s Point 
Park​
, a riverfront improvement project that showcases a rebounding Delaware River to the 
multitude of visitors drawn to its banks in Philadelphia’s Tacony section. 
Click Here​
 for past winners. 
For more information, visit DCNR’s ​
Green and Sustainable Park Initiative​
 webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Kennett Township Greenway Gets Green Award In Chester 
Presque Isle Wins National Best Beach Contest 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
Philadelphia Chosen To Host 2021 International Parks Conference 
 
Philadelphia Chosen For 2021 City Parks Alliance Greater & Greener Conference 
 
Phillymag.com reported Friday​
 the city of Philadelphia was picked by the ​
City Parks Alliance​
 to 
host its 2021 ​
Greater & Greener Conference​
, a gathering of park professionals and political 
leaders from around the world devoted specifically to urban parks. 
Officials suggested the selection is another sign that Philadelphia has turned a corner in 
the public perception, emphasizing the city’s strengths that have attracted millennials and helped 
reverse decades of population loss. 
“Philadelphia is just really experiencing a renaissance in public space, driving the future 
of our city and its quality of life,” Kathryn Ott Lovell, commissioner of Philadelphia’s Parks and 
Recreation department, said in Friday’s announcement. 
“Something quite powerful is happening in the city through our park work,” said Nancy 
Goldenberg, executive director of the Center City District Foundation and a City Parks Alliance 
board member. “We were the manufacturing capital of the world at one point. Now we are 
reusing our old infrastructure and abandoned lots, creating public parks and open spaces that 
connect to communities and help neighbors connect to each other.” 
NewsClips: 
Philadelphia Chosen To Host 2021 International Parks Conference 
Kennett Township Greenway Gets Green Award In Chester 
Presque Isle Wins National Best Beach Contest 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
 
Growing Greener Coalition Thanks House For Passing Heritage Areas Bill 
 
The ​
PA Growing Greener Coalition​
 Wednesday thanked House members for unanimously 
passing ​
House Bill 1605​
 (James­R­Venango) that formally establishes a ​
PA Heritage Area 
Program​
 to identify, protect, enhance and promote the historic, recreational, natural, cultural and 
scenic resources of the Commonwealth. 

“We are pleased that the House recognizes the important economic and social benefits of 
Pennsylvania’s Heritage Areas,” said Andrew Heath, executive director of the Pennsylvania 
Growing Greener Coalition. “This legislation is critical to the future of the Heritage Areas, and 
we look forward to its passage in the Senate in the upcoming weeks.” 
Heath thanked Rep. Lee James (R­Venango) especially for his leadership in introducing 
the bill and his commitment to protecting Pennsylvania’s history and heritage. 
Heritage Areas are geographic regions or corridors that span two or more counties that 
contain historic, recreational, natural and scenic resources that collectively exemplify the 
heritage of Pennsylvania. 
Pennsylvania’s 12 Heritage Areas are: ​
Allegheny Ridge Heritage Area​
, ​
Delaware & 
Lehigh National Heritage Corridor​
, ​
Endless Mountains Heritage Region​
, ​
Lackawanna Heritage 
Valley​
, ​
Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor​
, ​
Lumber Heritage Region​
, ​
National Road Heritage 
Corridor​
, ​
Oil Region National Heritage Area​
, ​
PA Route 6 Heritage Corridor​
, ​
Rivers of Steel 
National Heritage Area​
, ​
Schuylkill River National & State Heritage Area​
, and ​
Susquehanna 
Gateway Heritage Area​

A recent study found that in 2014, tourists spent an estimated 7.5 million days/nights in 
Pennsylvania’s Heritage Areas, purchasing ​
$2 billion worth of goods and services​
. This spending 
supported 25,708 jobs and generated $798 million in labor income and nearly $1.3 billion in 
value­added effects. 
In addition, 70 percent of visitor spending and associated economic effects would be lost 
to these areas if heritage anchor attractions were not available, according to the study. 
The ​
PA Growing Greener Coalition​
 is the largest coalition of conservation, recreation 
and preservation organizations in the Commonwealth. 
Related Stories: 
4th Senate, House Republican Budget Sent To Governor In The Face Of Veto Threat 
2nd Senate Budget Hearing: DEP: 12 Special Funds Will Have Funding Shortfalls By 2018 
PEC Opposes Killing Conventional Drilling Regs, Delaying Clean Power Plan 
Growing Greener Coalition Calls For Boost In Funding For Environmental Agencies 
Growing Greener Coalition Thanks House For Passing Heritage Areas Bill 
Joint Conservation Committee: Heritage Areas Generate $2 Billion For PA’s Economy 
Commonwealth Court Upholds Ability Of A Governor To Line­Item Veto Fiscal Code Bill 
 
PEC: Pocono Forest & Waters Conservation Landscape Mini­Grant Apps Due April 25 
 
The ​
PA Environmental Council​
 is now accepting applications for 
the ​
Pocono Forest and Waters Conservation Landscape 
Mini­Grant Program​
.  Applications are due April 25. 
The programs provide mini­grants of $2,000 to $10,000 to 
projects within Carbon, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, 
and Wayne Counties that support and advance the goals and 
objectives of the PFW CL. 
Eligible applicants include any municipality, council of 
governments, registered Pennsylvania nonprofits, county 
conservation districts, or learning institutions to consider projects that may fit the grant criteria. 
A total of $60,000 in grant funding is available. All mini­grants require a 50/50 match. 

The program is funding by a grant from the Department of Conservation and Natural 
Resources. 
Click Here​
 for more background on the Pocono Forest and Waters Conservation 
Landscape Program. 
For more information and all the details, visit the ​
Pocono Forest And Waters Mini­Grant 
webpage or contact Janet Sweeney, PFW CL Coordinator by calling 570­718­6507 or sending 
email to: ​
jsweeney@pecpa.org​

For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​
PA 
Environmental Council​
 website, visit the ​
PEC Blog​
, follow ​
PEC on Twitter​
 or ​
Like PEC on 
Facebook​
.  ​
Click Here​
 to receive regular updates from PEC. 
 
DCNR Urges Caution To Prevent Wildfires With Spring Approaching 
 
With the approach of spring, Department of Conservation 
and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn 
Friday noted drying spring winds and warming 
temperatures quickly can combine to ​
increase fire 
dangers across Pennsylvania’s forests​
 and brushlands. 
“Despite recent wet weather and snow predicted 
this weekend in much of the state, recent, highly visible 
fires around the Harrisburg area showed us it just takes a 
few days of sun and wind to allow brush and forest fire 
danger to develop,” Dunn said. “Most of the reported fires last year are linked to people; people 
cause 98 percent of wildfires. A mere spark by a careless person can touch off a devastating 
forest blaze during dry periods when conditions enable wildfires to spread quickly. 
“Common sense can limit the threat of wildfires,” said Dunn. “When state residents and 
forest visitors are careless with burning trash, campfires and smoking, volunteer firefighters 
often pay the price, answering call after call in spring woodlands that are ripe for damaging, 
life­threatening wildfires.” 
DCNR statistics show nearly 85 percent of Pennsylvania’s wildfires occur in March, 
April and May, before the greening of state woodlands and brushy areas. Named for rapid spread 
through dormant, dry vegetation, under windy conditions, wildfires annually scorch nearly 7,000 
acres of state and private woodlands. 
In 2015, Bureau of Forestry personnel and volunteer firefighters battled a total of 817 
reported field, brush and forest fires that scorched 4,165 acres across the state. 
Anglers, campers and other state forest visitors are reminded open fires are prohibited on 
state forestland from March 1 to May 25, and when the fire danger is listed as high, very high, or 
extreme, unless authorized by district foresters. 
Communities in heavily wooded areas are urged to follow wildfire prevention and 
suppression methods of the ​
Pennsylvania Firewise Community Program​
 to safeguard life and 
property. 
DCNR’s Bureau of Forestry is responsible for prevention and suppression of wildfires on 
the 17 million acres of state and private woodlands and brushlands. The bureau maintains a 
fire­detection system, and works with fire wardens and volunteer fire departments to ensure they 
are trained in the latest advances in fire prevention and suppression. 

For more information, visit DCNR’s ​
Wildland Fire​
 webpage or call 717­787­2925. 
NewsClips: 
Rain Has Squelched Dauphin County Wildfire 
Frost, Rain Could Help Extinguish Mountain Fire 
Luzerne, DCNR Detail Plans For Gypsy Moth Spraying 
Tree Philly Offering Saplings, Famous Planter 
Warm Weather Could Sap Erie Maple Production 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
 
March 18 DCNR Resource Newsletter Now Available 
 
The ​
March 18 edition of the Resource​
 newsletter is now available from the Department of 
Conservation and Natural Resources 
­­ ​
Millbrook Marsh Nature Center, Centre County, Green Park Award Winner 
­­ ​
DCNR Urges Caution To Prevent Wildfires As Spring Approaches 
­­ ​
Veteran Forester Named To Bald Eagle State Forest District 
­­ ​
PA Heritage Areas Generate Millions In Economic Benefits 
­­ ​
Awbury Arboretum In Philadelphia Protected By Conservation Easemen​

­­ ​
PA Farmers Encouraged To Fill Out Chesapeake Bay Watershed Survey 
­­ ​
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Nominated For 10Best Award­Vote Now 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy (bottom of the page). 
 
Friends Of Wissahickon Host Valley Talks April 5, May 19 In Montgomery County 
 
The ​
Friends of the Wissahickon​
 in Montgomery County are hosting two Valley Talks this spring 
that explore various aspects of conservation and benefits of public parks.  The programs will be 
held at the ​
Valley Green Inn​
 located on Forbidden Drive in ​
Wissahickon Valley Park​

On April 5​
 the program will feature a conversation with  Dr. William Schuster, executive 
director of the ​
Black Rock Forest Consortium​
 in Cornwall, N.Y.   ​
Click Here​
 to register. 
Dr. Shuster will talk about the successful research, education and conservation efforts at 
the 4,000­acre Black Rock Forest, located an hour north of New York City, including a 
discussion of successes and challenges of managing the park, from over­abundant deer 
populations to public use. 
Dr. is executive director of the Black Rock Forest Consortium in Cornwall, N.Y. and has 
authored or co­authored nearly 100 publications. He has a B.A. in biology from Columbia 
University, an M.S. in forest ecology from Penn State University, and a Ph.D. in ecology from 
the University of Colorado. Dr. Schuster completed his postdoctoral research at the University of 
Utah. His primary interests are in ecology, ecosystem management and environmental change. 
On May 19​
, landscape architect Claudia West will talk about the benefits of ecosystems, 
particularly in urban parks and gardens and how they contribute to biodiversity and habitat. She 
will discuss the ecosystems of the Wissahickon Valley Park.  ​
Click Here​
 to register. 
Claudia West is the ecological sales manager at ​
North Creek Nurseries​
 in Landenberg, 
Pa. She holds an M.A. in landscape architecture and regional planning from the Technical 
University of Munich, Germany. West works closely with ecological design and restoration 
professionals.  

Her work is centered on the development of stable, layered planting designs and the 
reintroduction of American native plants back into the landscape. She is the co­author with 
Thomas Rainer of ​
Planting in a Post­Wild World​
 (Timber Press, 2015). 
The talks are sponsored by ​
Valley Green Bank​
 and are free and open to the public. A 
complimentary wine and cheese reception is offered at the talks. 
Spaces are limited.  Register for the lecture at the Friends of the Wissahickon  ​
April 5 
and/or ​
May 19​
 webpages or contact Sarah Marley by sending email to: ​
marley@fow.org​
 or call 
215­247­0417 x109 for more information. 
Visit the ​
Friends of the Wissahickon​
 website for information on programs, initiatives and 
other upcoming events.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign up to receive regular updates from FOW (bottom of 
the page). 
 
Penn State Extension Community Forestry Short Course In­Person, Online March 29­31 
 
Penn State Extension will hold a ​
Community Forestry Short Course​
 In­Person and Webinar 
March 29, 30 and 31 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. each day. 
Planning and managing the green infrastructure of street trees, parks, and open spaces 
will help any municipality safely take advantage of the many benefits these assets provide. With 
proper planning and management, these assets appreciate and pay us back with time. 
This Community Forestry Short Course is designed to help municipal shade tree 
commissions/committees, and staff, including managers, arborists, and foresters; community tree 
advocates; and volunteers gain knowledge and skills in the effective management of public trees 
in Pennsylvania. 
Participants will have the opportunity to attend the sessions in­person in State College, or 
attend the sessions online. They can select to attend all 3 days of training or just one or two days.  
A certificate will be awarded to people that participate in the sessions in­person or online. 
The in­person course will be held at Penn State University, Room 110 Ag Science & 
Industries Building, University Park. 
The registration deadline is March 21.  ​
Click Here​
 for all the details and to register. 
NewsClips: 
Budget Impasse Concerns Penn State Extension Director 
Penn State Extension, 4­H Programs Hang In Balance 
Penn State’s Agricultural Extension Dollars Affect Your Table 
Lancaster Penn State Extension Office Faces Closure 
 
Spring Penn’s Stewards Newsletter Now Available From PA Parks & Forests Foundation 
 
The ​
Spring edition of the Penn’s Stewards​
 newsletter from the ​
PA Parks and Forests Foundation 
featuring articles on­­ 
­­ A Short History Of Recreation In Pennsylvania 
­­ The CCC Brought Recreation To You 
­­ Your Friends In Action: Lyman Run State Park 
­­ Acts Of (Un)Kindness In Parks, Forests 
­­ Profile: Mary Hirst, One Of First Female Park Managers 
­­ Milkweeds And Monarch Butterflies 

­­ Coming Soon: 2016 Parks & Forests Thru The Seasons Photo Contest 
­­ Calendar of Events 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy. 
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​
PA Parks & 
Forests Foundation​
 website,  ​
Like them on Facebook​
 or ​
Follow them on Twitter​

NewsClips: 
Presque Isle Wins National Best Beach Contest 
Philadelphia Chosen To Host 2021 International Parks Conference 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
New Northwest Lancaster County River Trail Section, Visitor’s Center Open 
Waterfront Road Will Fill Gap In D&L Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Holds Meeting On Fell Twp Trail 
Kennett Township Greenway Gets Green Award In Chester 
Crowd Provides Input Into New Section Of Lackawanna Heritage Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Trail To Get 14 Cameras 
Goal Reached To Save Appalachian Trail Hotel 
Tourists Spent $1 Billion In Route 6 Corridor In 2014 
Susquehanna River People Seeks To Save Island Retreat 
National Geographic Effort To Boost Lehigh Valley Geotourism 
 
Northeast Lancaster County River Trail Visitor’s Center Now Open In Columbia 
 
Ad Crable, LancasterOnline.com​
, reported 
Wednesday a new ​
Northeast Lancaster County 
River Trail​
 section and ​
Columbia Crossing River 
Trails Center​
 now open in ​
Columbia Borough​

You can walk or bike through an old 
railroad tunnel blasted through rock, pass within 
feet of the base of Chickies Rock as climbers scale 
the edifice right above you, and view the 
long­forgotten remnants of no less than four 19th­century iron furnaces. 
For the first time since the recreational trail was envisioned 20 years ago, you can now 
walk along the Susquehanna from Columbia to Falmouth, near the Dauphin County line. 
The Columbia Crossing trail center, along Front Street and just across the railroad tracks 
from the 1877 train station, has a vast elevated deck that looks across the river to Wrightsville 
and is framed to the north by the art deco Veterans Memorial Bridge that opened in 1930. 
The stone bridge abutments that once supported the covered bridge that played a pivotal 
role in the Battle of Gettysburg also are visible. 
Inside, high ceilings and lots of glass showcase the history of the river and Columbia. 
Ten paintings from the Visions of the Susquehanna River Art Collection are currently hanging in 
the center, as well as black­and­white photos from the great ice jam of 1917. 
Inside, high ceilings and lots of glass showcase the history of the river and Columbia. 
Ten paintings from the Visions of the Susquehanna River Art Collection are currently hanging in 
the center, as well as black­and­white photos from the great ice jam of 1917. 
The Visitor’s Center is open Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 

5:00 p.m. and Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
Click Here​
 to read the entire article and to see photos of the Visitor’s Center. 
NewsClips: 
New Northwest Lancaster County River Trail Section, Visitor’s Center Open 
Presque Isle Wins National Best Beach Contest 
Philadelphia Chosen To Host 2021 International Parks Conference 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
Waterfront Road Will Fill Gap In D&L Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Holds Meeting On Fell Twp Trail 
Kennett Township Greenway Gets Green Award In Chester 
Crowd Provides Input Into New Section Of Lackawanna Heritage Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Trail To Get 14 Cameras 
Goal Reached To Save Appalachian Trail Hotel 
Tourists Spent $1 Billion In Route 6 Corridor In 2014 
Susquehanna River People Seeks To Save Island Retreat 
National Geographic Effort To Boost Lehigh Valley Geotourism 
 
April 1 Deadline Coming Up To Register For June PEC Environment Ride 
 
The ​
PA Environmental Council​
 ​
Environment Ride​
 will be 
here before you know it, and so will the April 1 early 
registration deadline! 
The last two weeks of March are the perfect time to 
make the commitment for this year's ride, as our winter 
registration rates are set to expire April 1!  
Take advantage of the current offer for both the 
3­day ($100) and 1­day rides ($50) for the annual event that 
will feature a scenic new route this year. 
Three­day riders will begin in Doylestown on June 3, continuing into Bethlehem, and 
biking along the Lehigh and Delaware Rivers before the event's conclusion in Philadelphia, 
where our closing party will overlook the Schuylkill River at the ​
Fairmount Waterworks​
 on June 
5.  
Meanwhile, one­day riders will begin their trek in Yardley on June 5 and arrive at the 
Fairmount Waterworks in time to celebrate at the closing party as well. 
Not able to ride? No problem! We are always looking for additional crew and volunteers. 
Contact PEC's Southeast regional office at 215­545­4570 for more information. 
Click Here​
 for all the details and to register. 
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​
PA 
Environmental Council​
 website, visit the ​
PEC Blog​
, follow ​
PEC on Twitter​
 or ​
Like PEC on 
Facebook​
.  ​
Click Here​
 to receive regular updates from PEC. 
 
Day­By­Day Schedule For June 18­25 Delaware River Sojourn Now Available 
 
An overview of the 2016 Delaware River Sojourn running from June 18 to 25 was made 
available on Tuesday.  ​
Click Here​
 for all the details. 

 
Lacawac Sanctuary Marks 50th Anniversary With Brick Campaign In Wayne County 
 
Lacawac Sanctuary and Biological Field Station​
 in Wayne County is 
celebrating its 50th anniversary and friends and supporters are 
invited to leave their personal imprint on its history and future 
through participation in our ​
Commemorative Brick Campaign​
.   
Join us in celebration of this special anniversary through the 
purchase of an engraved brick that will be placed at the entrance of 
the Coulter Visitor Center and Dr. Susan S. Kilham Environmental 
Laboratory.  
Since 1966 the mission of Lacawac Sanctuary has been to 
preserve the nearly pristine glacial Lake Lacawac, its watershed, the 
surrounding forest and historic structures in order to provide a venue 
for ecological research, scholarly interaction and the training of 
scientists; and provide public education on environmental and 
conservation issues.  
Lacawac has accomplished this mission by offering a diverse set of natural areas, 
facilities, and programs for PreK­12 grades, post­secondary educators and students, area 
residents, scientific researchers, and summer visitors to the region.  
Commemorative bricks are a wonderful opportunity to celebrate family milestones and 
honor or memorialize loved ones. They are a great way to recognize a special person in your life, 
honor a casual effort, or commemorate a special occasion. 
Why join our commemorative brick campaign?  Support Lacawac’s commitment to 
educate the next generation of scientists and conservation leaders. Share your passion for our 
natural resources by providing opportunities for others to learn about nature. Show your 
commitment to nature and conservation.  
Commemorate a loved one, friend or special memory. Celebrate a birthday or other 
memorable occasion. Honor a teacher, colleague or a friend. Promote your business or group 
Buy a brick at Lacawac’s Visitor Center and Environmental Laboratory and help support 
Lacawac’s mission of research, education and preservation for the next 50 years. Lacawac is a 
treasure and something special to be proud of and worth supporting.  
The brick campaign will allow Lacawac to raise the necessary funds to make upgrades to 
our visitor center and historic 1903 lodge. Each donated and engraved brick will be carefully 
placed in a new walkway leading visitors and guests to the entrance of the Coulter Visitor 
Center. 
The Brick Campaign Donation Options are as follows:  4”x 8” Brick ­ $100 (3 lines of 
text 20 spaces per line) or 8”x 8” Brick ­ $250 (6 lines of text 20 spaces per line).   
Bricks ​
can be ordered online​
.   ​
Click Here​
 to download a brick campaign brochure. 
For more information on the campaign, contact Lacawac by calling 570­689­9494 or 
send email to: ​
info@lacawac.org​
.   
Visit the ​
Lacawac Sanctuary and Biological Field Station​
 website for more information 
on programs, initiatives and upcoming special events. 
 
DCNR’s Cosmo’s World Series Teaches Students Important Environmental Concepts 

 
Join the Emmy­Award winning ​
Cosmo the Flying Squirrel, Terra 
the River Otter​
 and their friends on new journeys of 
environmental discovery.   
Cosmo’s World is produced by the ​
Wild Resource Conservation 
Program​
, ​
eMediaWorks​
, ​
PBS 39 Lehigh Valley​
 and ​
Natural 
Biodiversity​
 to help classroom teachers and environmental 
educators teach these topics to elementary and middle school 
students in a fun and engaging way.  
The videos and lesson plans are tied to Pennsylvania academic 
standards for environment and ecology, which require educators to teach environmental 
stewardship. 
Come visit Cosmo’s World as often as you like. Cosmo and Terra will be here to take 
you on adventures through Pennsylvania’s habitats. Do Something Wild! Be a friend to all living 
things, great and small. 
Cosmo’s World videos cover topics like: Biodiversity, Climate Change, Sustainable 
Agriculture, Endangered Species, Energy, Invasive Species, Water and more. 
The most recent ​
Cosmo video on Trees​
 will air on ​
PBS 39 on Friday at 3:30​

For more information, visit DCNR’s ​
Cosmo’s World Video Series​
 webpage. 
NewsClip: 
367 Students Compete In Lancaster Science & Engineering Fair 
 
Wildlife Leadership Academy Summer Outdoor Field Schools For Students 14­17 
 
The ​
Wildlife Leadership Academy​
 is now accepting applications for its 
four, 5­day ​
residential field schools in PA​
.  Each field school focuses on 
one particular species:  White­tailed Deer, Brook Trout, Ruffed Grouse or 
Black Bear.  The deadline for applications is April 1. 
Participants in a given session intensively explore that species’ biology, 
habitat needs, management and more. 
           For more information, visit the ​
Wildlife Leadership Academy 
webpage. 
NewsClip: 
367 Students Compete In Lancaster Science & Engineering Fair 
 
Registration Open For April 5 Peregrine Falcon Educator’s Workshop 
 
The Department of Environmental Protection Monday 
invited teachers, non­formal educators, homeschoolers and 
youth group and scout leaders to attend a free Peregrine 
Falcon Educator’s Workshop, WILD in the City, from 
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. April 5 in the second floor 
auditorium of the Rachel Carson State Office Building, 
Harrisburg.  
The workshop is sponsored by DEP and the Game 

Commission in cooperation with ​
ZOOAMERICA North American Wildlife Park​
 and the 
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. 
Since 1997, ​
peregrine falcons​
 have made a nest on a ledge off the 15th Floor of the 
Rachel Carson State Office Building their home.  
Three high definition cameras chronicle the famous Harrisburg falcons through the live 
Falcon Cam for viewers around the world.  
In Pennsylvania, peregrine falcons, a Pennsylvania endangered species, were absent from 
the state in the early 1960s as a result of use of the pesticide DDT. 
While peregrine falcons were extremely rare for many years, through reintroduction 
programs, they have adapted to life in cities like Harrisburg, Reading, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia 
and Williamsport.  
The Rachel Carson nest site has been very productive with 58 young peregrine falcons 
produced since 2000.  
“What better way to engage young people and create future environmental stewards than 
through this living laboratory,” DEP Secretary John Quigley said. “We encourage educators to 
take advantage of this unique learning opportunity that their students will really connect with.” 
Workshop participants will explore the successes of peregrine falcon reintroduction in 
Pennsylvania, examine falcon specifics and endangered species concepts, and observe falcons in 
Harrisburg. Participating teachers are eligible for 5.5 Act 48 credit hours.  
The workshop will feature a number of peregrine falcon experts, including Dr. Art 
McMorris, PGC’s Peregrine Falcon Coordinator and ZOOAMERICA Naturalist Patrick Miller. 
To register for the Peregrine Falcon workshop, educators should contact DEP’s 
Environmental Education and Information Center at 717­772­1644 or send email to: Ann Devine 
at: ​
adevine@pa.gov​
 by March 29. Space is limited, so registrations will be accepted on a 
first­come, first­service basis. 
To watch the Rachel Carson Building falcons live, visit DEP’s ​
Falcon Cam​
 webpage, 
sign up​
 for Falcon Wire email alerts (bottom of the page) or ​
follow them on Twitter​

NewsClips: 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Lays 1st Egg 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Found Dead 
Hanover Eagles’ Eggs Could Hatch In Coming Weeks 
WHYY: RadioTimes Program On Urban Birding 
 
Hawk Mountain To Hold Annual Spring Equinox Celebration March 19 
 
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary​
 in Berks County invites visitors of 
all ages to welcome the spring season at its annual Spring 
Equinox Celebration on March 19 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Trail 
fees apply for non­members but indoor events are free. 
Held on the Saturday closest to the equinox, the event 
will celebrate nature’s renewal with complimentary hot 
chocolate and bird­friendly coffee, live raptor programs, a 
guided walk, and kid’s crafts.  
In addition, a volunteer naturalist will be stationed at 
the bird feeder windows to help identify the growing number 

of birds and small mammals that visit. 
M&T Bank’s live Raptors Up Close! program begins the day at 11 a.m., followed by a 
guided “Signs of Spring” nature walk at 12:30 for the first 20 visitors that sign up. From noon to 
2 p.m., children make and take home a spring­themed craft. The day concludes with a second 
live raptor program at 2 p.m.. 
“With longer days and warmer weather, this event is a great excuse to get the family 
outside. We've already seen butterflies on the trail, dozens of wood frogs in the pond, painted 
turtles, and some of the early native plants are starting to push up,” says spokesperson Mary 
Linkevich, the director of communications at the Sanctuary. 
"We also have our new Accessible Trail, so more people than ever can make the short 
walk to the South Lookout. No matter the weather, the view is always amazing," she adds. The 
900­foot­long leads to the closest overlook and includes bench seating along the way. 
The 2,500­acre Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is the world’s first refuge for birds of prey and 
is open to the public year­round by trail­fee or membership, which in turn supports the nonprofit 
organization’s raptor conservation mission and local­to­global research, training, and education 
programs. Trail fees cost $9 adults, $7 seniors and $5 children ages 6 to 12.  
To learn more about programs, initiatives and other special activities, visit the ​
Hawk 
Mountain Sanctuary​
 website or call 610­756­6961.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for regular updates 
from the Sanctuary. 
NewsClips: 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Lays 1st Egg 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Found Dead 
Hanover Eagles’ Eggs Could Hatch In Coming Weeks 
WHYY: RadioTimes Program On Urban Birding 
 
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Launches Spring Hawk Watch April 1 
 
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary​
 in Berks County invites visitors 
to watch for returning raptors and other migrants during its 
annual Spring Hawk Watch, held daily April 1 through May 
15 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Sanctuary’s famous North 
Lookout.  
In conjunction with the count, spring weekend 
programs begin as well and are held every Saturday and 
Sunday through the count. The Sanctuary’s signature live 
raptor program, “Raptors UP Close!” is sponsored by M&T 
Bank and continues through Memorial Day.  
A full schedule of weekend programs and other details​
 can be found online​

During the count, staff, trainees, and volunteers will be stationed at the Lookout to help 
visitors spot and identify raptors including broad­winged hawks, red­tailed hawks, ospreys, and 
bald eagles.  
Migration typically peaks in mid to late April, especially on days with southerly winds 
and cloud cover, when counts of more than 100 birds may be seen. For raptor enthusiasts and 
those who cannot make it to Hawk Mountain, counts are ​
posted daily after 6 p.m​

“Besides the chance to see soaring hawks, the spring count is a chance to get tips on 

hawk identification, practice your wildlife photography, and learn more about the migration of 
birds in the area,” said Director of Long­term Monitoring Laurie Goodrich who coordinates the 
count. 
The Sanctuary has monitored the spring raptor migration since the 1960s and reports an 
average 1,063 raptors each season. Numbers are just a fraction of Hawk Mountain’s autumn 
migration, as the birds are more widely dispersed during their northbound migration. 
“You might not see as many hawks as you do during fall, but I love spring at Hawk 
Mountain. Some people are all about fall foliage, but my favorite view is green. Here, it stretches 
across the valley as far as you can see," says Mary Linkevich, the Sanctuary's director of 
communications. 
Since 2000, Conservation Science trainees have regulated the daily count at the North 
Lookout during the second half of the spring migration, using the training of experienced 
volunteers and staff to learn migration count techniques.  
Those who wish to hike to the North Lookout and join in the fun should wear sturdy 
shoes, carry a bagged lunch, bottled water and other supplies in a daypack, and be prepared to 
walk nearly one mile over rocky terrain.  
The nearby South Lookout may be preferable to those with small children or with limited 
mobility and can be reached using a 900­foot­long Accessible Trail with bench seating. 
Trail fees apply for non­members and cost $9 for adults, $7 for seniors, and $5 for 
children ages 6 to 12. Members are admitted free, year­round, and ​
memberships can be 
purchased online​
 or at the Visitor Center. 
The 2,500­acre Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is the world’s first refuge for birds of prey and 
is open to the public year­round by trail­fee or membership, which in turn supports the nonprofit 
organization’s raptor conservation mission and local­to­global research, training, and education 
programs.  
To learn more about programs, initiatives and other special activities, visit the ​
Hawk 
Mountain Sanctuary​
 website or call 610­756­6961.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for regular updates 
from the Sanctuary. 
NewsClips: 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Lays 1st Egg 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Found Dead 
Hanover Eagles’ Eggs Could Hatch In Coming Weeks 
WHYY: RadioTimes Program On Urban Birding 
 
Fish & Boat Commission Celebrates 150th Anniversary March 30 
 
The ​
Fish and Boat Commission​
 will commemorate and celebrate the 
150th Anniversary​
 of its founding as one of the nation’s oldest 
conservation agencies during this month’s quarterly business meeting 
and at a special public event at the ​
State Museum​
 in Harrisburg. 
The PFBC’s quarterly business meeting will be held on March 
30­31 at the Harrisburg headquarters. The meeting was specifically 
scheduled to coincide with the agency’s founding on March 30, 1866.  
Following committee meetings on March 30, Commissioners 
and staff will join invited guests, members of the public, legislators, 

and Gov. Tom Wolf at the State Museum for presentations about the agency’s celebrated history 
and discussions about its future. 
The evening event will be held on March 30, from 6­8 p.m. at the State Museum, located 
at 300 North Street. It is free and the public is encouraged to attend and meet past and present 
Commissioners and learn more about the agency’s history. 
“Over the course of the next year, I invite fellow anglers and boaters to join in our 
commemoration of the last 150 years,” said PFBC Executive Director John Arway, who was 
named the Commission’s 10th executive director on March 2, 2010, and has worked for the 
agency for 36 years. “It will be a great time to learn about our agency’s contribution to the health 
of Penn’s woods and waters and celebrate the fact that our 86,000 miles of streams, nearly 4,000 
lakes and reservoirs, over 404,000 acres of wetlands and 63 miles of Lake Erie shoreline are still 
home to more than 25,000 species of known plants and animals, and perhaps, many thousands 
more yet to be identified.” 
“These facts demonstrate the enormity and complexity of the challenges that face the 
PFBC as we strive to fulfill our legislative and Constitutional duties to protect, conserve and 
enhance our Commonwealth’s aquatic resources,” he added. 
“Pennsylvania’s abundance of waterways, from mountain streams and lakes, to mighty 
rivers like the Susquehanna and Allegheny, to the Great Lake Erie, provide endless recreational 
opportunities to the Commonwealth’s anglers and boaters,” added PFBC Board President 
Edward Mascharka, III. “These opportunities wouldn’t be here without the hard work and 
dedication over the last 150 years by this agency to protect and conserve our natural resources. 
I’m proud to be a part of this rich history and look forward to carrying forth our mission into the 
future.” 
Over the last 150 years, the Commission has evolved from a one­man operation funded 
solely by the general fund to an agency with a complement of 432 staff funded by anglers and 
boaters through license and registration fees and federal excise taxes on fishing and boating 
equipment. 
The origins of the PFBC date to 1866 when a convention was held in Harrisburg to 
investigate water pollution being caused by the wholesale logging of Pennsylvania’s forests and 
the impacts caused by sedimentation of mountain lakes and streams. There were also serious 
concerns about the reduction of American Shad runs in the Susquehanna River.  
This discussion resulted in Gov. Andrew Curtin signing into law Act of March 30, 1866 
(P.L. 370, No. 336), which named James Worrall Pennsylvania’s first Commissioner of 
Fisheries. 
In 1925, Act 1925­263 established the Board of Fish Commissioners. Then, in 1949, Act 
1949­180 officially established the Pennsylvania Fish Commission as an agency and described 
its powers and duties.  
The Commission appointed Charles A. French as its first executive director in 1949, and 
in 1991 under Act 1991­39, the Pennsylvania Fish Commission became the Pennsylvania Fish 
and Boat Commission. 
“Our future is bright but not without challenges,” added Arway. “We have made 
substantial progress over the last generation by cleaning up our waters so that we can now say 
that we have more waters to fish today than when we were children. However, yesterday’s 
challenges were simple compared to the environmental and natural resource challenges that we 
face in the future.” 

“Our new challenges will no longer be at the local scale but will require much different 
solutions at the watershed, regional, national and even global scales,” he added. “We will have to 
work across disciplines and use the appropriate science to diagnose the problems, apply the 
engineering skills to develop the solutions and have the political will to create the laws and 
provide the funding for the solutions.” 
For more information, visit the Fish & Boat Commission’s ​
150th Anniversary​
 webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Real March Madness Awaits Outdoors 
Popular Mentored Youth Trout Fishing Days Return March 26, April 9 
Video: Amphibian Crossing At Delaware Water Gap Signals Spring 
North Allegheny Grad Helps Solve Tully Monster Enigma 
 
Game Commission: 315,813 Deer Harvested In 2015­16 Hunting Seaso​

 
The Game Commission Monday reported hunters harvested an estimated 315,813 deer – an 
increase of about 4 percent compared to the 2014­15 harvest of 303,973. 
Of those, 137,580 were antlered deer – an increase of about 15 percent compared to the 
previous license year, when an estimated 119,260 bucks were taken.  
Hunters also harvested an estimated 178,233 antlerless deer in 2015­16, which represents 
an about 4 percent decrease compared to the 184,713 antlerless deer taken in 2014­15. 
The percentage of older bucks in the harvest might well be the most eye­popping number 
in the report. 
A whopping 59 percent of whitetail bucks taken by Pennsylvania hunters during the 
2015­16 deer seasons were 2½ years old or older, making for the highest percentage of adult 
bucks in the harvest in decades. 
Game Commission Wildlife Management Director Wayne Laroche pointed out the trend 
of more adult bucks in the harvest started when antler restrictions were put into place. More 
yearling bucks are making it through the first hunting season through which they carry a rack. 
Season after season, a greater proportion of the annual buck harvest has been made of adult 
bucks. 
In 2014­15, 57 percent of the bucks taken by hunters were 2½ or older. 
“But to see that number now at nearly 60 percent is remarkable,” Laroche said. “It goes 
to show what antler restrictions have accomplished – they’ve created a Pennsylvania where 
every deer hunter in the woods has a real chance of taking the buck of a lifetime.” 
While the 137,580 bucks taken in 2015­16 is a sharp increase over 2014­15, it compares 
to a 2013­14 estimate of 134,280 bucks. In 2014­15, a number of factors including poor weather 
on key hunting days and limited deer movements due to exceptionally abundant mast contributed 
to a reduced deer harvest overall. 
The decrease in the 2015­16 antlerless harvest was a predictable outcome, given that 
33,000 fewer antlerless licenses were allocated statewide in 2015­16, compared to the previous 
year. 
Reducing the allocation within a Wildlife Management Unit allows deer numbers to grow 
there.  Records show it takes an allocation of about four antlerless licenses to harvest one 
antlerless deer, and the success rate for antlerless­deer hunters again was consistent at about 25 
percent in 2015­16. 

Game Commission Executive Director R. Matthew Hough congratulated deer hunters on 
their successes afield during the 2015­16 seasons. 
“While the Game Commission again reduced the number of antlerless licenses that were 
allocated in 2015­16, and the antlerless harvest dropped accordingly, as expected, the overall 
increase in the harvest – and, in particular, the buck harvest – show this was another outstanding 
deer season in Pennsylvania,” Hough said. “The pictures I’ve seen of trophy bucks this season 
came from all over the Commonwealth – including the big woods of the northcentral – and they 
were jaw­dropping and impressive. And the best news is there are plenty of new memories 
waiting to be made when deer hunters get back out there in the coming license year.” 
Click Here​
 to read the full announcement. 
For more information, visit the Game Commission’s ​
White­Tailed Deer​
 webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Schneck: State Had Biggest Buck Kill In 13 Years 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Lays 1st Egg 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Found Dead 
Hanover Eagles’ Eggs Could Hatch In Coming Weeks 
WHYY: RadioTimes Program On Urban Birding 
Wind Power vs Bats: Some Species May Better Absorb Losses 
 
State Museum, Game Commission Working Together For Wildlife Exhibit Coming April 8 
 
The PA Historical and Museum Commission and the Game Commission 
will host the opening of a special exhibit, “​
Working Together for Wildlife: 
Three Decades of Pennsylvania’s Nature in Art​
” at 10:00 a.m. on April 8 
at ​
The State Museum of Pennsylvania​
 in Harrisburg 
James Vaughan, executive director of the PHMC, and Matt Hough, 
executive director of the Game Commission, will join museum staff and 
other officials to celebrate the opening of this exhibit.   
“Working Together for Wildlife: Three Decades of Pennsylvania’s 
Nature in Art” features 34 original paintings by 19 different Pennsylvania 
artists.  In the historical tradition of the Pennsylvania naturalist­artists 
Alexander Wilson, John James Audubon and Ned Smith, “Working 
Together for Wildlife” artists depict the beauty of animals in their natural 
habitats.   
The works highlight game and nongame animals such as the black bear, the bobcat, the 
gray squirrel, the great blue heron, the cardinal and the ruffed grouse – Pennsylvania’s State 
Bird. 
Each year, the Game Commission hosts “Working Together for Wildlife,” a competition 
that is open to Pennsylvania artists. The Game Commission makes the winning artwork available 
in special edition prints and patches, with the proceeds benefitting the preservation and 
maintenance of Pennsylvania’s wildlife.  
This entire collection will be exhibited publicly and for the first time on April 8 at The 
State Museum.  
The opening ceremony will be followed by three Pennsylvania Wildlife presentations 
hosted by Wildlife Conservation Officer Michael Doherty and Senior Curator of Zoology and 

Botany Dr. Walter Meshaka in Nature Lab, a multipurpose demonstration space adjacent to the 
natural history exhibits on the third floor of The State Museum.   
Presentations are scheduled at 10:30 a.m., 11:15 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. and are included 
with museum admission. 
The exhibit will run from April 8 to September 11 in The State Museum’s changing 
natural history gallery, adjacent to Mammal Hall. 
The State Museum of Pennsylvania, adjacent to the State Capitol in Harrisburg, is one of 
25 historic sites and museums administered by the PA Historical and Museum Commission as 
part of the ​
Pennsylvania Trails of History​
.  
With exhibits examining the dawn of geologic time, the Native American experience, the 
colonial and revolutionary era, a pivotal Civil War battleground, and the Commonwealth's vast 
industrial age, The State Museum demonstrates that Pennsylvania's story is America’s story. 
Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday 
12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m..  Admission is $7 for adults (ages 12­64), $6 for senior citizens (ages 65 
and up), and $5 for children (ages 1­11). 
For more information about the museum, visit the ​
The State Museum of Pennsylvania 
website. 
Wildlife Art Resource:​
 ​
Ned Smith Center for Nature & Ar​
t, Millersburg, Dauphin County 
NewsClips: 
Schneck: State Had Biggest Buck Kill In 13 Years 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Lays 1st Egg 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Found Dead 
Hanover Eagles’ Eggs Could Hatch In Coming Weeks 
WHYY: RadioTimes Program On Urban Birding 
Wind Power vs Bats: Some Species May Better Absorb Losses 
 
Manada Conservancy’ Annual Spring Native Plant Sale May 7 In Dauphin County 
 
The ​
Manada Conservancy​
 will hold its annual Spring Native Plant Sale on May 7 in 
Hummelstown, Dauphin County.  Pre­orders are now being accepted through April 15.  For 
more information, visit Manada Conservancy’s ​
Spring Native Plant Sale​
 webpage.  Questions? 
Call 717­566­4122. 
 
DEP’s Michael Korb Recognized By Interstate Mining Compact Commission 
 
The ​
Interstate Mining Compact Commission​
 recently announced 
Michael Korb, P.E., Environmental Program Manager for DEP’s Bureau 
of Abandoned Mine Reclamation in Wilkes­Barre, is the winner of the 
IMCC’s 2016 Public Outreach Award.  The text of the award 
description follows— 
Korb has enjoyed a distinguished 50­year long career working in 
the mining and mine reclamation field and has been committed to public 
outreach and education on a wide range of mining and reclamation 
issues. 
He has been dedicated and involved member of organizations 

such as the ​
Society of Mine Engineers​
 that have focused significant efforts toward educating the 
public and youth about how our lives have been enriched due to the many commodities and 
products that required mined resources. 
Korb has always strived to conduct mining and mine reclamation work in the most 
technically and scientifically sound manner that minimizes mining’s impact on the environment 
and restores mined sites to as high a use as possible following reclamation. 
He is passionate about sharing with others about his successes and failures in order to 
enable them to learn from his experiences. 
Korb also has a passion for mining history and has worked to preserve mining’s legacy 
near his home in Pennsylvania’s Anthracite region. 
As Korb’s retirement approaches, it is especially appropriate to present this individual 
award as an acknowledgement of his distinguished lifetime commitment to educating the public 
about the benefits and necessity of mining in order to maintain our way of life and in teaching 
others how mining, when done responsibly, can be completed with minimal impacts to the 
environment and the local community. 
A few of the many highlights of Korb’s accomplishments in minerals education include: 
outreach and talks with local communities about what a new mine or expansion of an existing 
mine would do for the community; involvement in community meetings about mining projects; 
providing talks to civic and environmental groups and public meetings; authoring several 
technical papers for various entities, including the Governor’s Energy Commission, the 
Northeast Pennsylvania Economic Development Council, the Juran Institute, the National 
Association of Abandoned Mine Land Programs, and the Society of Mine Engineers, among 
others; involving residents living near a mine in a collaborative effort with public and mine 
employees to construct a National Wildlife Federation Certified Wildlife Habitat on a reclaimed 
mine area, and to construct a park and picnic area in a subsidence area unsuitable for building 
homes; donating old maps and drawings and obsolete mining equipment to universities, 
museums and historical societies; donating large pieces of coal for parks; starting a library in a 
community center; engaging in mining and environmental heritage development with the 
Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor​
, the ​
Susquehanna Greenway Partnership​
, and 
numerous local and regional watershed, historical, and civic organizations; organizing a number 
of community heritage and environmental conferences; instructing sessions on coal mining and 
the environment at ​
King’s College​
 in Wilkes­Barre; serving in outreach efforts through SME, 
such as speaking to civic, community, heritage and environmental groups; serving as a 
Pennsylvania Anthracite SME Outreach Volunteer at several Boy Scouts of America Merit 
Badge Colleges for the geology and Mining in Society Merit Badge; serving as an SME 
Outreach Volunteer at the ​
Anthracite Heritage Museum​
 and at environmental, heritage and 
industry conferences; serving as a technical instructor for the federal Office of Surface Mining 
National Technical Training Program; and a myriad of other outreach and educational endeavors. 
Korb currently works for the ​
DEP’s Bureau of Abandoned Mine Reclamation​
, where he 
has served for the past eight years.  During that time his public outreach has focused on 
informing people about the good work the state’s ​
Abandoned Mine Land Program​
 does in 
reclaiming AML sites. 
His speaking engagements include presentations highlighting award­winning AML 
projects and the “​
Stay­Out­Stay­Alive​
” campaign to advise people of the many hazards 
associated with abandoned mines. 

Through his engagement in outreach with local colleges and local and national 
student­teacher and environmental conferences, Korb has shed a positive light on the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and its AML Program. 
Korb has received many awards and recognitions over the years, and most recently, in 
May of 2015, he was nominated to be elevated to the Grade of Distinguished Member of the 
National Society of Mining Engineers. 
Recent Stories Involving Mike Korb: 
Schuylkill County Abandoned Mine Reclamation Project Receives National Recognition 
PA Project Wins Top Honors From Federal Office Of Surface Mining 
DEP’s Mine Reclamation Efforts Featured On Scranton TV Program 
National Abandoned Mine Reclamation Programs Conference In Scranton 
DEP Awards $9.3 Million Contract To Extinguish Carbon County Mine Fire 
Work Begins To Reclaim Hazardous Abandoned Mine Land In Luzerne County 
Northeast PA Observes January As Mining History Month 
National Mining Hall Of Fame To Induct 3 New PA­Related Members 
 
DEP Northwest Regional Employees Receive Legal Aid Excellence Award 
 
Six employees from the Department of 
Environmental Protection’s Northwest Regional 
Safe Drinking Water Program and Office of Chief 
Counsel were part of a team honored with the Legal 
Aid Excellence Award for their work to help 
residents of Hardwood Estates Mobile Home Park 
located outside of Conneaut Lake in Crawford 
County. 
More than 24 people who live in the park 
were left without a reliable public water system after 
the property owner abandoned it in 2012.  
The DEP employees, with the help of Legal Aid and several other organizations, helped 
the residents form an association and secure funding to repair the water system's chlorinator, 
obtain necessary permitting, hire a properly trained certified water operator, and ultimately take 
ownership of the mobile home park through a judicial sale in April 2015.  
This action enabled the residents to remain in their homes. 
"This example of your work with the general public is yet another remarkable story of 
DEP employees going above and beyond our day­to­day jobs and is a perfect indication of the 
commitment and dedication I see every day amongst your peers at DEP," DEP Secretary John 
Quigley said. "Congratulations for a job well done!" 
The DEP employees receiving the award are Brad Vanderhoof, Matt Postlewaite, Melissa 
Crow, Sean Singer, John (Jack) Crow and Angela Erde. 
(Photo: Brad Vanderhoof, DEP Drinking Water Program Manager; Charles Scalise, 
Housing and Neighborhood Development Services of Erie, Carla Falkenstein P.H F.A., Wendy 
Carter, PathStone, Robert Damewood Esq., Regional Housing Staffing Services, Kenneth 
Joseph, Esq., Pepper Hamilton, LLP; and Wesley R. Payne, IV, President Emeritus of the PA 
Legal Aid Network, Inc.) 

 
(Reprinted from the ​
March 17 DEP News​
.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign up for your own copy.) 
 

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events 
 
This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and 
meetings and other interesting environmental events. 
NEW​
 means new from last week. ​
[Agenda Not Posted] ​
means not posted within 2 weeks 
of the advisory committee meeting.  Go to the ​
online Calendar​
 webpage for updates. 
 
March 19­­​
 ​
Red Clay Valley Cleanup​
. Chester County. 
 
March 19­­​
 ​
The Nature Conservancy­PA​
: ​
Forest Pools Preserve Walk​
. ​
Kings Gap 
Environmental Center​
, Newville, Cumberland County.  1:00­3:00 p.m. 
 
March 19­­​
 ​
Berks County Conservation District​
 ​
Manure Management Workshop​
.  Hoss’s Steak 
and Sea House, 121 Center Ave. in Leesport. 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
 
March 19­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary​
 ​
Spring Equinox Celebration​
. Berks County. 
 
March 20­­​
 ​
Cameron County Annual River And Roadway Cleanup​
. Emporium. 
 
March 21­­ ​
NEW​
. ​
House Appropriations Committee​
 meets to consider ​
Senate Bill 385 
(Pileggi­R­Delaware) further providing for Transit Revitalization Investment Districts.  Room 
140 Main Capitol.  Off the Floor. 
 
March 21­­​
 Joint Conservation Committee hearing on ​
Collapse of Pennsylvania’s Electronic 
Waste Recycling Program​
.  Room 8E­A East Wing. 9:00.  Click Here​
 the day of the hearing for 
a link to the live webcast of the hearing. 
 
March 21­­​
 ​
House Democratic Policy Committee​
 ​
hearing on incentivizing use of natural gas​

Room 418 Main Capitol Building.  10:00. 
 
March 22­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​
 is scheduled to 
consider ​
Senate Bill 1114​
 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) allowing the use of alternative on­lot septic 
systems on the sewage facility planning process (​
sponsor summary​
); ​
Senate Bill 1041 
(Schwank­D­Berks) amending Act 101 to authorize counties and local governments to charge a 
recycling fee (​
sponsor summary​
); ​
Senate Bill 1145​
 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) amending the Oil and 
Gas Conservation Law to exempt drilling companies that pass through the Onondaga formation 
without producing it from a $5,000 permit fee (​
sponsor summary​
); ​
House Bill 1712 
(R.Brown­R­Monroe) establishing a Private Dam Financial Assurance Program (​
House Fiscal 
Note​
 and summary).  Room 8E­B East Wing. 9:30.  ​
Click Here​
 for a link to watch the meeting 
live. 
 
March 22­­​
 ​
Agenda Posted​
. ​
DEP Sewage Advisory Committee​
 meeting.  Room 105  Rachel 

Carson Building. 10:30.  ​
DEP Contact: John Diehl, Bureau of Point and Non­Point Source 
Management, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­783­2941, ​
jdiehl@pa.gov​

­­ Fact Sheet ­ DCNR Bureau of Forestry Leased Camp Sites 
­­ Chesapeake Bay Data Sharing Agreement 
­­ Draft National Science Foundation 350 Guidance Document 
­­ Status of Proposed Changes to Chapters 71a, 72a and 73a of Sewage Regulations 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 for available handouts 
 
March 22­­​
 ​
Agenda Posted​
. ​
DEP Laboratory Accreditation Advisory Committee​
 meeting. Room 
206, DEP Bureau of Laboratories Building, 2575 Interstate Dr., Harrisburg. 9:00.  ​
DEP Contact: 
Aaren Alger, Bureau of Laboratories, 2575 Interstate Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17110, 
717­346­7200, ​
aaalger@pa.gov​

­­ Pre­Draft Lab Reporting For Total Coliform, E. Coli In Public Water Systems 
­­ Pre­Draft Cryptosporidia, E. Coli and Turbidity Lab Reporting Instructions 
­­ Discussion: Target Quantitation Limits 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 for available handouts. 
 
March 22­­​
 ​
DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Seminar​
. Wilkes­Barre. 
 
March 22­­​
 ​
Lunch And Learn With Grey Towers Heritage Association​
. Pike County. 
 
March 23­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​
 meets, but the 
agenda is not yet available.  DEP’s Chapter 78 drilling regulations may be discussed.  Room 
B­31 Main Capitol. 9:30. 
 
March 23­­ ​
Agenda Posted​
. ​
DEP Board of Coal Mine Safety​
 meeting.  DEP Cambria Office, 
286 Industrial Park Rd., Ebensburg.  10:00.  ​
DEP Contact: Allison Gaida, Bureau of Mine 
Safety, Department of Environmental Protection, New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Road, 
New Stanton, PA 15672, 724­404­3147, ​
agaida@pa.gov​
.  ​
(​
formal notice​

­­ Status Of Proximity Detection Systems Proposed Regulation 
­­ EMT ­ Industrial 
­­ Performance­Based Cable Safety Requirements 
­­ Bureau of Mine Safety Director Position 
­­ New Regulations Book 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 for available handouts 
 
March 23­­​
 ​
Agenda Posted​
. ​
DCNR Conservation and Natural Resources Advisory Council 
meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DCNR Contact: Gretchen Leslie at 
717­772­9084 or send email to: ​
gleslie@pa.gov​
.  ​
(​
formal notice​

­­ DCNR Report­­ DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn 
­­ PA Commitment To Chesapeake Bay Program­­ DEP Secretary John Quigley, Matt Keefer, 
Assistant State Forester 
­­ PA Explorer Conservation Tool ­ PA Natural Diversity Inventory 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 for available handouts 
 

March 24­­​
 ​
Agenda Posted​
. ​
DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​
 meeting.  Room 105 
Rachel Carson Building. 9:30.  DEP Contact: Sean Gimbel, Office of Water Management, 400 
Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­783­4693, ​
sgimbel@pa.gov​
.  ​
(​
formal notice​

­­ Fee Increase Packages For NPDES (Chapter 92a­­ ​
application​
, ​
annual​
 fees) and Water Quality 
Management (​
Chapter 91​
) permits. 
­­ Triennial Review Of Water Quality Standards Overview 
­­ Triennial Review Of Water Quality Standards Chloride Methodology 
­­ Triennial Review Of Water Quality Standards Chapter 93 Annex 
­­ Proposed Updates To Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy Policy 
­­ ​
Click Here​
 for available handouts. 
 
March 24­­​
 ​
DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Seminar​
. Harrisburg. 
 
March 25­­​
 ​
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Kestrel Webcam Educators Workshop​
.  Berks County. 
 
March 25­­​
 ​
The Nature Conservancy­PA​
: ​
Forest Pools Preserve Walk​
. ​
Kings Gap 
Environmental Center​
, Newville, Cumberland County.  6:30­8:30 p.m. 
 
March 26­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Little Paint Creek Cleanup​
.  Cambria County. 
 
March 28­­​
 Environmental Quality Board ​
public hearing on proposed changes to public water 
supply disinfection requirements​
.  DEP Southcentral Regional Office, Susquehanna Room, 909 
Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 1:00 p.m. A copy of the proposed regulation is available and 
comments can be submitted via ​
DEP’s eComment​
 webpage​
 (Feb. 20 PA Bulletin­­​
page 857​

 
March 29­­​
 ​
Elk County Stream Protection, Water Quality Workshop​
.  ​
Elk County Visitor 
Center​
, Benezette.  9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
 
March 29­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Westmoreland County Conservation District​
 ​
Landowners Conservation 
Reserve Enhancement Program Workshop​
.  Greensburg. 
 
March 29, 30, 31­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Penn State Extension Community Forestry Short Course​
.  In­Person, 
Online. 
 
March 30­­​
 ​
[Agenda Not Posted] ​
DEP Conventional Oil and Gas Advisory Committee​
 meeting. 
Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.  DEP Contact: Kurt Klapkowski, Office of Oil and 
Gas Management, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­772­2199, 
kklapkowsk@pa.gov​

 
March 30­­ ​
Partnership For The Delaware Estuary​
 ​
Green $aves Green Stormwater Management 
Workshop​
.  Phoenixville, Chester County. 
 
March 30­­ ​
Project WET Educator Workshop​
. Brandywine Red Clay Alliance, West Chester. 
 
March 31­­​
 ​
[Agenda Not Posted] ​
DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​
 meeting. Room 

105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.  DEP Contact: Kurt Klapkowski, Office of Oil and Gas 
Management, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­772­2199, ​
kklapkowsk@pa.gov​

 
March 31­­​
 ​
PA Environmental Council​
 ​
Regional Watershed Workshop​
. Mechanicsburg. 
 
March 31­­​
 ​
Green Stormwater Infrastructure Partners Awards Program​
.  Philadelphia. 
 
March 31­April 1­­​
 Green Building Alliance ​
Green Schools Conference & Expo​
.  Pittsburgh. 
 
April 1­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Spring Hawk Watch Begins​

 
April 2­­​
 ​
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Project Clean Stream!​
 Chesapeake Bay Watershed. 
 
April 2­­​
 ​
Friends of Fort Washington State Park Volunteer Work Day​
.  Montgomery County. 
 
April 4­­​
 ​
Spring Black History Achievement Awards Banquet Recognizes Ralph Elwood Brock 
First African American Forester​
.  Coraopolis. 
 
April 5­­​
 Environmental Quality Board ​
public hearing on proposed changes to public water 
supply disinfection requirements​
.  DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main St., Norristown. 
1:00 p.m. A copy of the proposed regulation is available and comments can be submitted via 
DEP’s eComment​
 webpage​
 (Feb. 20 PA Bulletin­­​
page 857​

 
April 5­­​
 Susquehanna River Basin Commission ​
Developing Aquifer Testing Plans & 
Groundwater Withdrawal Applications Workshop​
.  Commission’s Conference Center located at 
4423 N. Front Street, Harrisburg, PA. Day­Long. 
 
April 5­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
DEP Peregrine Falcon Educator’s Workshop​
.  Harrisburg. 
 
April 5­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Friends Of The Wissahickon​
 ​
Lessons Learned From Black Rock Forest​

Montgomery County. 
 
April 6­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
House Health Committee​
 holds an information meeting on Lyme disease. 
Room 205 Ryan Building. 10:00. 
 
April 6­­​
 ​
PA Environmental Council​
 ​
Regional Watershed Workshop​
. Scranton. 
 
April 6­­​
 ​
Berks County Conservation District​
 ​
Manure Management For Horse Operations 
Workshop​
. Berks County Agricultural Center, 1238 County Welfare Road, Leesport. 6:00 to 
9:00 p.m. 
 
April 6­7:​
 ​
PA Bar Association Environmental Law Forum​
. Harrisburg. 
 
April 7­­​
 ​
House Game and Fisheries Committee​
 hearing on hunting license fees. Room 205 
Ryan Building. 10:00. 

 
April 7­­​
 ​
DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​
 meeting.  14th Floor Conference 
Room, Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.  ​
DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic, Bureau of Radiation 
Protection, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­783­9730, ​
jmelnic@pa.gov​

 
April 7­­​
 Environmental Quality Board ​
public hearing on proposed changes to public water 
supply disinfection requirements​
.  DEP Southwest Regional Office, Building 500, 400 
Waterfront Dr., Pittsburgh. 1:00 p.m. A copy of the proposed regulation is available and 
comments can be submitted via ​
DEP’s eComment​
 webpage​
 (Feb. 20 PA Bulletin­­​
page 857​

 
April 8­­​
 ​
Berks County Conservation District​
 ​
Manure Management For Horse Operations 
Workshop​
. Berks County Agricultural Center, 1238 County Welfare Road, Leesport. 6:00 to 
9:00 p.m. 
 
April 8­­​
 ​
NEW​
. State Museum Of PA, Game Commission ​
Working Together For Wildlife Art 
Exhibit Opens​
.  Harrisburg. 
 
April 9­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
PA Environmental Council​
, ​
Potter County Conservation District​
 ​
Illegal 
Dumpsite Cleanup​
.  Galeton, Potter County. 
 
April 11­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
House Democratic Policy Committee​
 hearing on clean energy jobs.  Room 418 
Main Capitol. 10:00. 
 
April 12­­ ​
DEP State Board for Certification of Water and Wastewater Plant Operators​
 meeting. 
10th Floor conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.  DEP Contact: Cheri Sansoni, 
Bureau of Safe Drinking Water, Operator Certification, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 
17101, 717­772­5158, ​
csansoni@pa.gov​

 
April 13­­​
 ​
DEP Technical Advisory Committee On Diesel­Powered Equipment​
 meeting. DEP 
New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Rd., New Stanton. 10:00.  Contact: Allison Gaida, 
agaida@pa.gov​

 
April 14­­ ​
CANCELED.​
 ​
DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​
 meeting.  Room 105 
Rachel Carson Building. 9:15. Contact: Nancy Herb, ​
nherb@pa.gov​

 
April 14­­​
 ​
PA Environmental Council​
 ​
Regional Watershed Workshop​
. King of Prussia. 
 
April 14­­​
 ​
Clean Water Counts: York County Town Hall Reception On Water Quality Issues​

Wrightsville. 
 
April 14­15­­​
 ​
Registration Open​
. ​
West Branch Susquehanna Restoration Symposium​
.  Toftrees 
Resort and Conference Center, State College. 
 
April 15­­​
 Penn State Extension, ​
DCNR Tree Tenders Training​
. Scranton. 
 

April 16­­ ​
NEW​
. ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Hard­To­Recycle Collection Event​
. Oakdale, 
Allegheny County. 
 
April 16­­​
 ​
NEW​
. Clean & Green Harrisburg, ​
Keep Harrisburg/Dauphin County Beautiful 4th 
Annual Great Harrisburg Litter Cleanup​
.  Dauphin County. 
 
April 18­­​
 ​
Lunch And Learn With Grey Towers Heritage Association​
. Pike County. 
 
April 19­­​
 ​
DEP Mine Families First Response & Communications Advisory Council ​
meeting. 
DEP New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Rd., New Stanton. 10:00.  ​
DEP Contact: Allison 
Gaida, Bureau of Mine Safety, Department of Environmental Protection, New Stanton Office, 
131 Broadview Road, New Stanton, PA 15672, 724­404­3147, ​
agaida@pa.gov​

 
April 21­­​
 ​
Independent Regulatory Review Commission​
 meets to consider ​
final Chapter 78 
Drilling Regulations​
. ​
333 Market St., 14th Floor, Harrisburg.  9:00 a.m. 
 
April 22­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Earth Day​

 
April 22­­​
 ​
Berks County Conservation District Annual Tree Seedling Sale​

 
April 23­­​
 ​
Centre County Watershed Cleanup Day​

 
April 23­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
French Creek Cleanup Day​
. Montgomery County. 
 
April 23­­ ​
Grey Towers Heritage Association 8K Run/Walk​
. Pike County.\ 
 
April 27­­​
 ​
Agenda Posted​
. ​
DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee​
 meeting.  12th 
Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Nancy Herb, Bureau of 
Air Quality, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­783­9269, ​
nherb@pa.gov​

 
April 30­­​
 ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Pharmaceutical Collection Events In Allegheny County​
.  4 
Locations.  10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 
 
April 30­­​
 ​
Foods Of The Delaware Highlands Dinner​
. Hawley, Wayne County. 
 
May 4­­ ​
PA Groundwater Symposium​
.   Ramada Inn Conference Center, State College. 
 
May 7­­​
 ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Household Chemical Collection Event​
.  Allegheny County, 
North Park Swimming Pool.  9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
 
May 7­­​
 ​
NEW​
. Manada Conservancy’s ​
Annual Spring Native Plant Sale​
. Dauphin County. 
 
May 10­​
­ ​
Wildlife for Everyone​
 ​
Governor Tom Ridge Wetlands Thru The Camera Lens Student 
Program​
.  Centre County. 
 

May 10­12­­​
 ​
PA American Water Works Association Annual Conferenc​
e. Bethlehem Sands 
Hotel and Casino, Bethlehem. 
 
May 11­­​
 ​
PA Parks & Forests Foundation 2016 Awards Banquet​
.  Camp Hill, Cumberland 
County. 
 
May 11­13­­​
 ​
PA Association of Environmental Professionals​
 Annual Conference.  State College. 
 
May 13­15­­​
 ​
PA Outdoor Writers Association​
 ​
Spring Conference​
. Sayre, Bradford County. 
Conference details are coming together.  Contact Nick Sisley by email to: 
nicksisley@hotmail.com​
 with any questions. 
 
May 13­15­­​
 ​
Susquehanna Greenway​
: ​
Susquehanna River Sojourn Sayer to Sugar Run​

 
May 14­­ ​
NEW​
. ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Hard­To­Recycle Collection Event​
. Frazer Township, 
Allegheny County. 
 
May 14­­​
 ​
Foundation for Sustainable Forests​
 ​
Loving The Land Through Working Forests​

Corry, Erie County. 
 
May 17­­​
 Susquehanna River Basin Commission ​
Developing Aquifer Testing Plans & 
Groundwater Withdrawal Applications Workshop​
.  Commission’s Conference Center located at 
4423 N. Front Street, Harrisburg, PA.  Day­Long. 
 
May 19­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Friends Of The Wissahickon​
 Lessons ​
Benefits Of Park, Garden Ecosystems​

Montgomery County. 
 
May 21­­​
 ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Household Chemical Collection Event​
. Cambria County, 
Concurrent Technologies Corp. ETF Facility, Johnstown.  9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
 
June 3­5­­​
 ​
PA Environmental Council​
 ​
Environment Ride​
.  Philadelphia to Bethlehem back to 
Philadelphia. 
 
June 7­­​
 ​
DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​
 meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 
10:00.  ​
DEP Contact: Charles M. Swokel, Bureau of Environmental Cleanup and Brownfields, 
400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­772­5806 or (800) 428­2657 ((800) 42­TANKS) 
within the Commonwealth, ​
cswokel@pa.gov​
.  ​
(​
formal notice​

 
June 12­17­­​
 ​
Susquehanna Greenway​
: ​
Susquehanna River Sojourn Laceyville to Shickshinny​

 
June 17­19­­​
 ​
Susquehanna Greenway​
: ​
Susquehanna River Sojourn Shickshinny To Sunbury​

 
June 18­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
PA Resources Council​
 Allegheny County ReuseFest.  Mt. Lebanon. 
 
June 18­25­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
Delaware River Sojourn​

 
June 25­­ ​
NEW​
. ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Hard­To­Recycle Collection Event​
. LTBA, Allegheny 
County. 
 
July 9­­​
 ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Household Chemical Collection Event​
. Washington County, 
Washington County Fairgrounds.  9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
 
August 13­­​
 ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Household Chemical Collection Event​
.  Allegheny County, 
Boyce Park Four Seasons Ski Lodge parking lot.  9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
 
August 20­­ ​
NEW​
. ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Hard­To­Recycle Collection Event​
. West Mifflin, 
Allegheny County. 
 
September 17­­​
 ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Household Chemical Collection Event​
.  Allegheny 
County, South Park Wave Pool parking lot.  9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
 
September 22­­ ​
DEP Recycling Fund Advisory Committee​
 meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson 
Building. 10:00.  DEP Contact: Keith Ashley, Bureau of Waste Management, 400 Market Street, 
Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­787­2553, ​
riashley@pa.gov​

 
September 22­­​
 Penn State Extension ​
Dive Deeper III Water Educator Summit​
. The Central 
Hotel & Conference Center, Harrisburg. 
 
October 1­­ ​
NEW​
. ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Hard­To­Recycle Collection Event​
. Robinson 
Township, Allegheny County. 
 
October 7­­​
 ​
DEP Low­Level Radioactive Waste Advisory Committee​
 meeting. Room 105 
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.  DEP Contact: Rich Janati, Bureau of Radiation Protection, 400 
Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717­787­2147, ​
rjanati@pa.gov​

 
October 8­­​
 ​
PA Resources Council​
 ​
Household Chemical Collection Event​
. Beaver County, 
Bradys Run Park Recycling Center.  9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
 
October 26­28­­​
 ​
Pennsylvania Brownfields Conference​
.  Lancaster Convention Center, 
Lancaster. 
 
Visit DEP’s ​
Public Participation Center​
 for public participation opportunities.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign 
up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department. 
 
Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​
 Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit 
applications submitted in your community?  Notice of new technical guidance documents and 
regulations?  All through its eNotice system.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign up. 
 
DEP Regulations In Process 
Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​
 ­ DEP webpage 

Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​
DEP’s eComment System 
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Recently Finalized Regulations​
 ­ DEP webpage 
DEP Regulatory Update​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Feb. 27 DEP Regulatory Agenda ­ ​
PA Bulletin, page 1123 
 
DEP Technical Guidance In Process 
Draft Technical Guidance Documents​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​
DEP’s eComment System 
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​
 ­ DEP webpage 
DEP Non­Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (Feb. 1, 2016)​
 ­ DEP webpage 
 
Other DEP Proposals For Public Review 
Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​
DEP’s eComment System 
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​
 ­ DEP webpage 
 
DEP Facebook Page​
     ​
DEP Twitter Feed​
         ​
DEP YouTube Channel 
 
Click Here​
 for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages. 
 
DEP Calendar of Events​
        ​
DCNR Calendar of Events 
 
Note: ​
The Environmental Education Workshop Calendar is no longer available from the PA 
Center for Environmental Education because funding for the Center was eliminated in the FY 
2011­12 state budget.  The PCEE website was also shutdown, but some content was moved to 
the ​
PA Association of Environmental Educators'​
 website. 
 
Senate Committee Schedule​
                ​
House Committee Schedule 
 
You can watch the ​
Senate Floor Session​
 and ​
House Floor Session​
 live online. 
 
Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 

Grants & Awards                                                                                               
 
This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other 
recognition programs.  ​
NEW​
 means new from last week. 
 
March 21­­​
 ​
West Branch Susquehanna River Orange Rock Awards 
March 21­­​
 ​
PA American Water Stream Of Learning Scholarships 

March 21­­ ​
PAEP Karl Mason, Walter Lyon Awards 
March 24­­​
 ​
Champion Of PA Wilds’ Award​

March 25­­​
 ​
Mid­Atlantic Panel On Aquatic Invasive Species Grant Proposals 
March 25­­​
 ​
Game Commission Seedlings For Schools Program 
March 27­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
EPA Toxics Release Inventory University Challenge 
March 30­­​
 ​
Delaware Highlands Conservancy College Scholarships 
March 30­­ ​
PA American Water Protect Our Watershed Student Art Contest 
March 31­­​
 ​
DEP Host Municipal Inspector Grants 
March 31­­ ​
Delaware Water Resources Assn. College Scholarship 
March 31­­​
 ​
Schuylkill Action Network Scholastic Drinking Water Awards 
March 31­­​
 ​
USDA Farm Conservation Practices Funding For PA 
April 1­­​
 ​
PA American Water Environmental Grant Program 
April 1­­​
  ​
CFA Alternative And Clean Energy Grants 
April 1­­ ​
Northeast PA Audubon Environmental Ed Scholarship 
April 1­­ ​
NEW​
. ​
Wildlife Leadership Academy Field Schools 
April 8­­​
 ​
EPA Environmental Education Grants 
April 13­­​
 ​
DCNR Community Conservation Partnerships Grant Program 
April 15­­​
 ​
USDA Bedford, Blair Farm Conservation Practices Funding 
April 15­­​
 ​
Recycling Partnership Grants 
April 25­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
PEC Pocono Forest & Waters Conservation Landscape Mini­Grants 
April 26­­​
 ​
EPA Clean Diesel Grants 
April 30­ ​
Abele College Scholarship Applications 
April 30­­​
 ​
Northeast PA Audubon College Scholarship 
April 30­­​
 ​
York­Lancaster Counties Habitat Improvement Grants 
May­­ ​
CFA Renewable Energy­Geothermal And Wind Grants 
May­­​
 ​
 ​
CFA High Performance Building Grants 
May 3­­​
 ​
Energy Sprout Sustainable Energy Design Competition 
May 16­­​
 ​
EPA Presidential Environmental Education Innovation Award 
May 31­­​
 ​
$2K Scholarships By National Assn. Of Abandoned Mine Land Programs 
June 3­­​
 ​
Great American Cleanup of PA Video Contest 
June 30­­ ​
CFA Act 13 Watershed Restoration Grants 
June 30­­​
 ​
CFA Act 13 Abandoned Mine Drainage Abatement And Treatment Grants 
June 30­­​
 ​
CFA Act 13 Orphan Or Abandoned Well Plugging Grant Program 
June 30­­ ​
CFA Act 13 Baseline Water Quality Data Grant Program 
June 30­­​
 ​
CFA Act 13 Sewage Facilities Grant Program 
June 30­­​
 ​
CFA Act 13 Flood Mitigation Grant Program 
June 30­­​
 ​
CFA Act 13 Greenways, Trails And Recreation Grant Program 
June 30­­ ​
Susquehanna Greenways Partnership Photo Contest 
June 30­­​
 ​
Energypath Conference Student/Educator Scholarships 
July­­ ​
CFA Renewable Energy­Geothermal And Wind Grants 
July­­​
 ​
CFA High Performance Building Grants 
July 8­­​
 ​
NEW​
. ​
ARIPPA Abandoned Mine Reclamation Grants 
September­­ ​
CFA Renewable Energy­Geothermal And Wind Grants 
September­­​
  ​
CFA High Performance Building Grants 
October 31­­ ​
PA Resources Council Lens On Litter Photo Contest 

December 31­­​
 ​
DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants 
 
­­ Visit the ​
DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​
 webpage for more ideas on how to get 
financial assistance for environmental projects. 
 
­­ Visit the DCNR ​
Apply for Grants​
 webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from 
DCNR. 
 

Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 

Environmental NewsClips ­ All Topics                                                            
 
Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General 
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more. 
 
The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​
PA Environment Digest Daily 
Blog​
, ​
Twitter Feed​
 and ​
add us to your ​
Google+ Circle​

 
Air 
PA Shows EPA The Way On Pending Methane Policy 
PA, 10 Other States Fail To Submit Sulfur Dioxide Reduction Plans 
Mild Winter, Warm­Up Could Trigger Early Allergy Season 
Alternative/Renewable Energy 
Electric Car Charging Station On Tap For York 
Wind Power vs Bats: Some Species May Better Absorb Losses 
Awards/Recognition 
Presque Isle Wins National Best Beach Contest 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
Kennett Township Greenway Gets Green Award In Chester 
Beautification 
Donora To Receive Penn State Community Garden 
Budget 
McNickle: Phone Call Telegraphs Wolf’s Real Intent On Shale Gas? 
Swift: Worsening Budget Mess Awaiting Lawmakers 
Editorial: Better Leaders Would End The Budget Impasse 
Auditor General To Examine Act 13 Impact Fee Spending 
PCN: PA Supreme Court Arguments On Act 13, Oil & Gas Lease Fund 
PLS: Speaker Turzai Implores Gov. Wolf To Sign Budget 
Wolf Threatens Veto Of Republican Budget 
Sen.Yudichak (D) Rips Wolf, Legislature Over Budget Impasse 
Thompson: GOP Ponders Veto Override, With Growing Dem Support 
Budget Impasse Concerns Penn State Extension Director 
Penn State Extension, 4­H Programs Hang In Balance 
Penn State’s Agricultural Extension Dollars Affect Your Table 
Lancaster Penn State Extension Office Faces Closure 

Chesapeake Bay 
Study: Chesapeake Bay Threatened By Nutrients Flowing Past Conowingo Day 
Op­Ed: Let’s Heal The Sick Susquehanna River 
Editorial: Court Right To Uphold Chesapeake Bay Pollution Diet 
Climate 
PLS: PA Clean Power Climate Plan Put On Low Boil 
PA Shows EPA The Way On Pending Methane Policy 
Allegheny Front: Kasich On Climate Change, Environment 
Editorial: UN Climate Fund, More Quackery 
Editorial: New Sea Level Rise Calls For Action 
Compliance Action 
Electric Supplier Accused Of Jacking Prices Order To Refund $6.8M 
Electric Customers To Get Refunds Under Settlement 
Deep Mine Safety 
Deep Mine Safety Training Drill At Lackawanna Mine Tour 
Drinking Water 
Berks Roadside Water Vendor Claims Vindication After Latest Tests 
Utilities Don’t Know Where Lead Pipes Are 
PA Tops Nation In Daycares, Schools With Lead In Water Supplies They Own 
2 York County Sites Flagged With Lead In Water 
Pittsburgh Water Authority Bills Customer $5 Million 
Economic Development 
Tourists Spent $1 Billion In Route 6 Corridor In 2014 
National Geographic Effort To Boost Lehigh Valley Geotourism 
Warm Weather Could Sap Erie Maple Production 
Advocates Push For Philadelphia Low­Income Housing Impact Fee 
Marcellus Downturn Causes Baker Hughes To Close $40M Facility 
Education 
367 Students Compete In Lancaster Science & Engineering Fair 
Energy Policy 
Jessup Gas­Fired Power Plant Gets Final State Permit In Lackawanna 
Elizabeth Twp Gas­Fired Power Plant Leads To Zoning Debate 
Natural Gas To Surpass Coal In Electric Generation 
Carnegie Mellon’s Institute Gains Exposure With Energy Week 
Electric Supplier Accused Of Jacking Prices Order To Refund $6.8M 
Electric Customers To Get Refunds Under Settlement 
West Penn Marks 100 Years Of Electric Service 
Grants Won By Pittsburgh Projects On Energy, Music, Art 
Federal Funds To Aid Layoff­Hit Appalachian Coal Communities 
U.S. Coal Technologies Could Find Market In China 
Peabody Energy Warns Of Possible Bankruptcy 
Energy Efficiency 
PUC Approves $475M PECO Plan For Saving Energy 
FirstEnergy Smart Meters Come To Erie 
Environmental Heritage 

Historical Marker Set For Luzerne Mining Group 
Anthracite Heritage Museum Celebrates State Charter Day 
Lackawanna Coal Mine Nominated For USA Today’s Contest 
Survivors Of 1936 Flood Remember Rivers’ Rampage 
Push To Preserve Survivor Stories From 1936 Johnstown Flood 
Flooding 
Flood­Prone Edwardsville Business Receives Assessment Reduction 
Survivors Of 1936 Flood Remember Rivers’ Rampage 
Push To Preserve Survivor Stories From 1936 Johnstown Flood 
Forests 
Rain Has Squelched Dauphin County Wildfire 
Frost, Rain Could Help Extinguish Mountain Fire 
Luzerne, DCNR Detail Plans For Gypsy Moth Spraying 
Tree Philly Offering Saplings, Famous Planter 
Warm Weather Could Sap Erie Maple Production 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
Green Infrastructure 
Proposal Means Big Improvements To Philly Park, Water Quality 
Litter/Illegal Dump Cleanup 
Erie’s Spring Cleanup Program To Start April 10 
Mine Reclamation 
DEP To Spend $13.4M To Remove Old Coal Pile 
Huber Coal Breaker Owners Have 10 Days To Begin Cleanup 
Oil & Gas 
Efforts Under Way To Find Abandoned Gas, Oil Wells 
Marcellus Shale Health Registry Stalls 
Auditor General To Examine Act 13 Impact Fee Spending 
McNickle: Phone Call Telegraphs Wolf’s Real Intent On Shale Gas? 
Editorial: Apparently Jurors Like Clean Water 
Editorial: Cabot’s Loss In Court Warns Drilling Industry 
Gas Royalties Bill Back In The Spotlight 
Bill Would Prohibit Drilling Companies From Taking Royalty Deductions 
Op­Ed: Stop Over Regulation Of PA Natural Gas Industry 
Officials Salute Start Of Sunoco Marcus Hook Plant 
FERC Rejection Of Oregon Pipeline Plan A First 
Environmental Groups Ask FERC For Public Participation Office 
Activists: Don’t Stop Fighting Pipelines 
U.S. To Expand Safety Rules For Natural Gas Pipelines 
Explosive History Prompts Federal Pipeline Safety Proposal 
Marcellus Downturn Causes Baker Hughes To Close $40M Facility 
Washington County Looks For Rebound In Gas Drilling 
Penn Virginia Energy Reports A Miserable Yea​

In Reversal, Obama Bans Atlantic Ocean Drilling 
Allegheny Front: Oil Trains Carry Bigger Risks For People Of Color 
Storing Crude Oil In Rail Cars Not Widespread 

Low Fuel Prices Equals Savings For Westmoreland Schools 
Pittsburgh Gasoline Prices Approach $2/Gallon 
Lehigh Valley Gasoline Prices Rises To $2 Again 
Permitting 
DEP Gives Belated OK To Bridge Rebuild Without Permit 
Pipelines 
Officials Salute Start Of Sunoco Marcus Hook Plant 
FERC Rejection Of Oregon Pipeline Plan A First 
Environmental Groups Ask FERC For Public Participation Office 
Activists: Don’t Stop Fighting Pipelines 
U.S. To Expand Safety Rules For Natural Gas Pipelines 
Explosive History Prompts Federal Pipeline Safety Proposal 
Recreation 
Presque Isle Wins National Best Beach Contest 
Philadelphia Chosen To Host 2021 International Parks Conference 
New Northwest Lancaster County River Trail Section, Visitor’s Center Open 
Waterfront Road Will Fill Gap In D&L Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Holds Meeting On Fell Twp Trail 
Kennett Township Greenway Gets Green Award In Chester 
Crowd Provides Input Into New Section Of Lackawanna Heritage Trail 
Lackawanna Heritage Trail To Get 14 Cameras 
Goal Reached To Save Appalachian Trail Hotel 
Tourists Spent $1 Billion In Route 6 Corridor In 2014 
Susquehanna River People Seeks To Save Island Retreat 
National Geographic Effort To Boost Lehigh Valley Geotourism 
DCNR Secretary Recognized For Role In Preserving Environment 
Recycling/Waste 
Keep PA Beautiful Launches New E­Waste Website 
Editorial: Anti­Keystone Landfill Group’s Growth 
Sustainability 
Teddy’s Great­Grandson Brings Environmental Push To Pittsburgh 
Chambersburg Seeks Sustainable Community Designation 
Wastewater Treatment 
Valley Forge Sewage Spill Costs Go To Court 
Watershed Protection 
Study: Chesapeake Bay Threatened By Nutrients Flowing Past Conowingo Day 
Op­Ed: Let’s Heal The Sick Susquehanna River 
Editorial: Court Right To Uphold Chesapeake Bay Pollution Diet 
Proposal Means Big Improvements To Philly Park, Water Quality 
Meet Montgomery County Watershed Volunteer Geoffrey Selling 
Delaware Riverkeeper March 11 Riverwatch Video Report 
Trout Unlimited Reinventing Precious Coldwater Streams 
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal 
Click Here​
 to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal 
Wildlife 

Real March Madness Awaits Outdoors 
Popular Mentored Youth Trout Fishing Days Return March 26, April 9 
Video: Amphibian Crossing At Delaware Water Gap Signals Spring 
North Allegheny Grad Helps Solve Tully Monster Enigma 
Schneck: State Had Biggest Buck Kill In 13 Years 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Lays 1st Egg 
Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Found Dead 
Hanover Eagles’ Eggs Could Hatch In Coming Weeks 
WHYY: RadioTimes Program On Urban Birding 
Wind Power vs Bats: Some Species May Better Absorb Losses 
Other 
Lawmakers: More Oversight On Municipal Authorities 
 
Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program 
 

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits                                            
 
The DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety ​
published notice​
 of proposed regulations in the March 19 
PA Bulletin relating to proximity detection systems.  Comments are due April 18. 
 
The Delaware River Basin Commission published notice of final regulations in the March 19 PA 
Bulletin relating to the review of water withdrawal projects (​
PA Bulletin, page 1417​
). 
 
Pennsylvania Bulletin ­ March 19, 2016 
 
Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​
 Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit 
applications submitted in your community?  Notice of new technical guidance documents and 
regulations?  All through its eNotice system.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign up. 
 
DEP Regulations In Process 
Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​
DEP’s eComment System 
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Recently Finalized Regulations​
 ­ DEP webpage 
DEP Regulatory Update​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Feb. 27 DEP Regulatory Agenda ­ ​
PA Bulletin, page 1123 
 

Technical Guidance & Permits 
 
The Department of Agriculture ​
published notice​
 in the March 19 PA Bulletin extending by 
technical guidance the one­pound Reid Vapor Pressure waiver now in law, but due to expire on 
May 1, 2016.   The Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Tuesday reported out 
Senate Bill 1123​
 (Vogel­R­Beaver) extending the one­pound waiver and the bill is now on the 
Senate Calendar for action.  Questions regarding this guidance should be directed to 
Agriculture’s Bureau of Ride and Measurement Standards by calling 717­787­9089. 

 
The Department of Environmental Protection ​
published notice​
 in the March 19 PA Bulletin of 
final technical guidance on Permit Transfers for Coal and Noncoal Operators.  Questions 
regarding this technical guidance document should be directed to Greg Greenfield, 717­787­3174 
or send email to: ​
grgreenfie@pa.gov​

 
DEP Technical Guidance In Process 
Draft Technical Guidance Documents​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​
DEP’s eComment System 
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​
 ­ DEP webpage 
DEP Non­Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (Feb. 1, 2016)​
 ­ DEP webpage 
 
Other DEP Proposals For Public Review 
Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​
DEP’s eComment System 
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​
 ­ DEP webpage 
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​
 ­ DEP webpage 
 
Visit DEP’s ​
Public Participation Center​
 for public participation opportunities.  ​
Click Here​
 to sign 
up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department. 
 
DEP Facebook Page​
     ​
DEP Twitter Feed​
         ​
DEP YouTube Channel 
 
Click Here​
 for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages. 
 
DEP Calendar of Events​
    ​
DCNR Calendar of Events 
 

Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 

CLICK HERE To Print Entire PA Environment Digest           
 
CLICK HERE​
 to Print The Entire PA Environment Digest. 
 

Stories Invited                                                                                      
 
Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or 
programs for publication in the ​
PA Environment Digest​
 to:  ​
DHess@CrisciAssociates.com​

 
PA Environment Digest​
 is edited by David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department 
of Environmental Protection, and is published as a service of ​
Crisci Associates​
, a 
Harrisburg­based government and public affairs firm whose clients include Fortune 500 

companies and nonprofit organizations. 
 
Did you know you can search 10 years of back issues of the PA Environment Digest on dozens 
of topics, by county and on any keyword you choose?  ​
Just click on the search page​

 
PA Environment Digest​
 weekly was the winner of the PA Association of Environmental 
Educators' ​
2009 Business Partner of the Year Award​

 
Supporting Member PA Outdoor Writers Assn./PA Trout Unlimited          
 
PA Environment Digest​
 is a supporting member of the ​
Pennsylvania Outdoor Writers 
Association​
, ​
Pennsylvania Council Trout Unlimited​
 and the ​
Doc Fritchey Chapter Trout 
Unlimited​