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CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM

1860

TO

1865.

seized

;

President Buchanan proclaimed a

I860.

fast.

Fort Morgan, Ala., was taken.

November

8.

The Election

of Abra-

1S61.

ham

Lincoln as Pi'esident, and Hannibal
as Vice-President of the United

January

5.

Steamship Star op the

Hamlin
States.

This event Avas the signal for the uprising of the Southern States. The next

"West sailed from New York with troops and provisions for Fort Sumter. Alabama

day South Carolina Senators resigned their In rapid succession seats in the Senate. followed the resignation of Howell Cobb, Lewis Cass, and the meeting of the South
Carolina State Convention.

Legislatures of
;

and Mississippi State Conventions, and the Virginia and Tennessee met Thompson resigned the Secretaryship
;

of the Interior

the sub-treasury at Charles-

ton was seized.


foip ris'

9.

Mississippi
;

Ordinance of Se-

December
'
'

30.

The South Carolina
Three

cessiou passed

and on the same day the
fired into

Ordinance of Secession " passed.

steasuship Star of the West, Avith supplies

days afterward Jacob Thompson embezzled

Fort Sumter, w«s

from Mor-

The day following, South Carolina Members of Congress resigned. The citizens of Pittsburgh prevented the reTrust Fmids.

Island and Fort Moultrie, and driven

moval south of ordnance in the Alleghany Arsenal. Maj. Anderson removed all his forces to Fort Sumter. South Carolina sent
commissioners to treat
cutter
Avith the

from Charleston harbor. Thus the first gun Avas fired by the Southern secessionists just two months after the election of Lincoln.


19.

Convention of Georgia adopt-

GovernStates

ed a secession ordkiance by a vote of 308
to 89.
36.

ment in Washington, and a United was betrayed into the hands

of the

rebels.

—38.

an ordinance of secession by a

LouisiABTA Convention passed A'ote of 113
vote afterward taken

The Palmetto flag
C,
luid Castle

wis raised

to 17.

The popular
;

Qver the custom-house and posO-office in
Charleston, S.

Avas 30,448 for

Pinckncy and

Fort Moultrie were occupied by the South Carolina military. Union meetings followed
ill

39. Secretary Dix's dispatch to Hemphill Jones at Ncav Orleans, " If any one attempts to haul down the American

17,390 against.

miugton, Del.

Memphis, Tcnn., and in AV'ilJohn B. Ployd resigned.
troops took

Tlicso Avords flag, shoot him on the spot !" have justly entered into the classic heroic

—30.

South Carolina
its

utterances of history.

possession of the United States arsenal at

February
tioil,

1.

I'he

Texas Convenan ordinance of

Charleston, with all

arms and
seized
;

stores.

at Galveston, passed

Fort Macon, N.

C, was

the

com
Avat>

liecession, to

be voted on by the people on

missioners from South Carolina left Wasli-

the 33i of F§hrtta»\ and to take effect
.Miu-ch 3d.

iugton iu disgust.

Mobile

arsenal

^O^j-j

/^

1st

Month.

JAmtARY,
MOOIM'
V.

18C^>.

8t

Days,

PHASKS. Middle
M. 16 Mo.
4(5
I

(slates.
T>.

JANUARY.
ir

H
1
1

H.

Lapt Qnartor

5

I

New Moon

12

Afi

First Quarter Full Moon

20 27

7
8

l(i -P-".

28 Ev.

Kno-wing that many will read this

article

who

are unacquainted with nie, I append
are kno\\Ti in all parts of the

remarks from those of
world.
I

my

native city whose

names

am

acquainted with Mr. H. T. Helmbold.

He

occupied the

Drug

Store opposite

my

residence,

and was successful

iu

conducting

the business where others had not

been equally so before
enterprise.

Mm.

I have been favorably impressed with his character and

^VTLLIAJM

WEIGHTMAN,
& Weightman,
Sts.,

Firm of Powers

Manufacturing Chemists, 9th aad Browning

Philadelphia,

For further information,
world,
Prof.

see remarks

from

largest Manufacturing Chemists in the

JouKNAL Pharmacy,
Dewees' valuable

Dr. Keyser's Letter, Dispensatory, United States, &c.>

late celebrated Dr. Physick, Philadelp'hia

works on the Practice «f Physic, reiparks made by the remarks made by Er. Ephraim McDowell, a
;

and member of the Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland, and published in the transactions of the King's and Queen's Journal Medico-Chirurgical liEViEW, published by Benjamin Travers, Fellow &i Koyal College of Surgeons, and most of the late Standard Works on Medicine.
celebrated Physician,

A QUESTION TO THE READER.
If

you were about

to

embark

in the Medicine Business,
?

would the merit of an

article,

or your confidence in advertising, inspire you so to d©
application without a thorough investigation
bility of

and would you devote years of

? I will take upon myself the responsianswering this question, although I have heard thousands remark that

" All that
I have never yet seen

is

necessary, IS

TO ADVERTISE."

any but would hesitate. Many intelligent and persevering men hsive been induced to embark in the business, believing they had this essential element, and after having expended thousands op dollars in bringing it before the community,
Ihey find, in a short time, that their article was not successful in curing in a majority of
cases,

but

it

and failure was the inevitable consequence. Advertising does not make merit makes merit kno^^^l, and that makes both reputation and mone} I full well know
.

that there are thousands
in a complimentary
I»Avill

who

are envious of the success of others, and
article, or

who seldom speak

manner of the merits of an
I

remark, that

do not believe there
if

is

of the enterprise of any, but a " DRiiGGLsr " or a "• ]*hysician " in the

United States, or the world, who,

he had as good a remedy as mine, would hesitate to pursue the same course adopted by me. My
^^

IB XJ

O 13: XJ "
gratified.

not a patent medicine, and I withhold no knowledge of
is perfectly safe.

My ^Laboratory,

its ingredients. I'he remedy and the mode of preparation, has been inspected

by thousands of Physicians and Druggists, who ex5)ressed themselves

H, T.

HELMBOLD,
Genuine Preparations.

•tanufacturer of Helmbold's

FEMALE IRREGULARITIES.
Females, owing to the peculiar and important relations which they sustain, their peculiar organi^zation, and the offices they perform, are subject to many sufierings and ailments peculiar to the sex. Freedom from these contributes in no small degree to their happiness and welfare, for

none can be happy who are ill. Not only so, but no one of these various female complaints can long be suffered to run on without involving the general health of the individual, and ere long producing permanent sickness and premature decline. Nor is it phiasant to consult a physician, fur the relief of these various delicate affections, and only upon the most urgent necessity will a true woman so fur sacrifice her greatest charm as to do this. The sex will then thank us for placing in their hands simple specifics which will be found efficacious in relieving and curing almost every one of those troublesome complaints peculiar to the sex.

LEUCORRH(EA OR WHITES
HunIs one of the most common and annoying diseases of females. dreds suffer on in silence, and hundreds of others apply vainl}^ to druggists and doctors, who either merely tantalize them with the hope of a cure or apply remedies which make them worse. It is analogous to Spermatorrhoea of the male. It is a white discharge, proceeding from the vagina and sometimes from the womb itself. 1 would not wish to assert in this book anything that would do injustice to the afflicted, but I am obliged to say, that though it may be produced from excessive exhaustion of tiie powers of life, by laborious employment, unwholesoihe air and food, profuse menstruation, the use of tea and coU'ee, and frequent chiklbirth; it is far oftener caused by direct irritation, applied

mucous membrane of the va4^ina itself. Many of the symptoms The reader of leucorrhoea are occasionally identical with gonorrhoea. will remember that we advance the opinion that gonorrhoea in the male occasionally originated in this disease, even in virtuous and married life. From its causes it is peculiar to adult life, although children are often affected with transient inflammation of the vagina, from atmospheric and other causes, vicious practices and examples of servants and schoolmates; and unless decisive measures are instituted, aflections
to the

of the

womb and dropsy supervene. For Female Weakness and Debility, Whites or Leucorrh«a, Too Profuse, Exhausting, Too Long Continued Periods, for Prolapsus and Bearing Down, or Prolapsus Uteri, we ofil'r the most perfect specific known; Helmbold's Compound Extract of Buchu.
Direictions for use, diet,

and advice aiccompany.

From the
*'3^merican

^mxml
May, 1865,

of

^^amacj/*
JR.,
of

edited by

WM. PROCTOR,
Professor

of

Pharmacy,

m

llie

Pliiladelpliia

College

Pliarmacy.

" Will the Fluid
or can

Extract go out of use owing to the high price,
authoritative

we have some
w^e

modification of the formulas

by

which

can make them at a more reasonable cost?"
shall

" If the latter,

the

change be
it,

in

the

quality of the men-

struum, or in the manner of applying
requisite
?

so as to reduce the quantity
of the

Can there be a convocation some new method

Committee of Revision

to authorize

or modification of the present recipes ?"

AVith regard to the contemplated change in the quantity, or in the

menstruum
occasion
(bo

itself,

in the in

preparation of fluid extracts,

I

would take
is

say that

medicine the

health

of the

patient

the

great object to be gained.

The cost

df the material is something, but

when put
is

into the scale

with human health, and often
sideration at
formcrl}^,
all.

human

life, it

hardly worthy of con-

My
it

Buchu (Helmbold's)

will continue to

be made as

and

if

cannot be maintained at present prices, they will
in the price of material.

have

to be

advanced to meet the advance

To
is

such as desire quantity insteaxl of quality w^e would say that w^ater
a cheap commodity, and

may

be readily added by the person using the

medicine

if

he desires to do

so.

H. T.

HELMBOLD,

Druggist and Chemist,
594 Broadway, N. Y. City.

\

2a.

Month.

FEBRUARY,
I).

1869.

28 Days.

MOOl^'S PHASES. Middle

FEBRUARY.
'

Last, Quarter...

;5

H. 11

New Moon

11

8

W. 42 Fr'n. 40 Mo.

States. D. H. First Quarter. .19 11 Full Moon 26 6

M.
52Fr'n.^, 51 Mo.
'

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM

1860

TO

1865.


tion

6.

Congress at

Montgomery
AlexanThis Avas

in a state of insurrection against the gov-

adopted a Constitution for a in-ovisional

ernment.

government, to go into immediate opera:

Jefferson Davis, President

;

at
S.

der H. Stephens, Vice-President.
the
first

—21. American flag publicly buried Memphis, Tenn. Andrew Johnson, U. Senator from Tennessee, mobbed at
of Mr.

overt act looking to a Confederacy.

Lynchburg, Va., thus attesting to the early
loyalty

18.

Jefferson Davis inaugurated as
the

Johnson.

Gosport Navy
fire,

President of

Southern Confederacy.

Yard, opposite Norfolk, Va., set on

Though among

the last to resign office

and A'essels sunk, by U.
to prevent their seizure

S. officers in

charge

under the Stars and Stripes, Mr. Davis was

by the

rebels.

This

among

the

first to

hold

office

under the
inaugu-

prevented the capture of Fortress Monroe.

rebel government.


A
State convention de-

25.

Gov. Letcher, of Virginia, by

March

4.

Abraham Lincoln

proclamation, transferred that

Commonby

rated 16th President of the United States,
at Washington.

wealth to the Southern Confederacy.

—26. Gov. Brown,
Northern debts
sally respected
till

of

Georgia,

clared Texas out of the Union.

proclamation, prohibited the pajTnent of all
the end of hostilities.

30.

Mississippi

State Convention
by a

ratified the Constitution of the C. S.

This act of Gov. Brown was not univer-

vote of 78 to

7.

by Georgians.

ApHl

3.

South Carolina Con^^en-

tion ratified the Constitution of the C. S.

by a vote of 114 to 16.

Secession defeated in Maryland House of Delegates by a vote of 53 to 13. Ellsworth's Fire Zouaves left New York
for Annapolis.

— 29.


the
Avill

15.

President Lincoln's proclamaThis was
it

The

career of this brilliant

tion calling for 75,000 troops.
first

and gallant officer terminated in being murdered at Alexandria by Jackson.

defensive act of the North, and

be

seen occurred over four months

May 3. President Lincoln

issued a

after the first indignity offered the Govern-

proclamation calling into serAdce 42,000
volunteers for three years, and directing
the increase of the regular of the United States, so

ment by

the South.

16.

TiiE

Southern ConfedepvAcy
me^.
of Virginia

army and navy
did even Mr.

called for 32,000

little

— 17.
sion.

State Convention

Lincoln apprehend the magnitude of the
rebellion.

passed ordinance of secession in secret ses-

Sixth Massachusetts Kegiment, on its way to Washington, attacked
by a

—10.


in

7.

The U.

S.

Texas, consisting of 11
rebels, near Eastonville.

garrison of Fort Davis, officers and 300

men, made prisoners by a force of 1,800

mob

Baltimore, 3 killed and 7

wounded.
first

Of the rebels, 7 were killed and 8 wounded. Thus ^lassachusetts lost the
blood in the rebellion as she did in the

10,

Maj. Gen. R. E. Lee appointed
the
rebel

to

command

forces in

Virginia.

Kevolution, and that, too, on the anniversary of Lexington battle.

20.

The ports

of

South Carolina,
Mississippi,

Georgia, Alabama,

Floridji,

Major General McClellan appointed to couimand the Department of Ohio, v —15. A proclamation of neutrality witli respect to the civil war in the U. S. was issued by Queen Victoria, in which the
subjects af Great Britain were forbidden to

Louisiana, and Texas, ordered to be block-

aded by the President, as those States were

take part in the contest, or endeavor to

Sa Month.V

MARCS,
D. H. 5 12

18C9.

31

Days;

MOOiVS PHASES.

Middle States.
I).

MAEOH.
&:'

Last Quarter

M. 33

I

H, M.

NewMoen

13

3

Mo. 30 Mo.

First Quarter Full Moon

21 12 47

Ma

27

4 27 Aft.

CHRONOLOGY OP THE WAR FROM
break a blockade " lawfully and
established."
eflfeotually

ISfiO

TO

1865.

10.

Loan bill passed by House

of

This act showed how much,

Representatives, authorizing the Secretary

in hour of need, the

mother country could

of the Treasury to borrow $250,000,000,

be depended upon.

The

towni of Potosi,

redeemable in 20 years.

Bill authorizing

Washinj^ton County, Mo., taken possession
of by the United States troops.

$500,000,000 and 500,000 volunteers
supj)ress the rebellion, passe<l the Senate.

to

June

3.

Hox. Stephex A. Douglas
His dying message
to


Va.

11.

Battle of Rich Mountain,
60
killed,

died at Ohicaago.
his sons was, " Tell

Defeat of the rebels under Col. Pe;

them to obey the laws and support the Constitution of the United
States."

gram

150 Avounded, and 150 200
tents,

prisoners. Capture of

60 wagons,
loss,

At

this

time obedience to the

6 cannon, and other stores.

Union

Constitution and laws was the watchword

11 killed and 35 wounded.

of the hour.

—12. 600 REBELS, under Colonel
reported in

Pe-

— —

8.

Vote of Tennessee

gram, surrendered to General IVIcClellan at
Beverley, Va.

favor of secession.

—10.
14.

Repulse of Federal

troops at

13.

Battle of Garrick's Ford,
Defeat and
I'out

Big Bethel, and death of Winthrop.
the rebel forces,

Va., and death of Gen. Gamett, rebel coml)y

Harper's Ferry evacuated who destroyed all

mander.

of

the rebels,

the

with a loss of 150 killed and wounded, and

available propei'ty.

Flight of Gov, Jack-

806 prisoners.

Federal loss 13 killed, 40
battles served to give the

son and Gen. Price from Jefferson City,
capital of ]Viissouri.
arul

wounded.

These

The telegraph

lines

Federals too much confidence in themselves.

bridges destroyed by thetn on their

—22. Rebel
assas.

Congress appointed a

route to Boone ville.

day of thanksgiving for the victory at Manat
;

17.

Rebel forces
by,
Gei;i.
;

Boonville,
rebels,

Maj. Gen. McClellan assigned to

Mo., defeated
killed
als,

Lyon

35

conomand the Department of the Potomac.

and wounded 30 prisoners. 2 killed and 8 wounded.
30.

Federat

—25.
Louis,

General McClella^j
and
General

arrived

Washington, General Fremont in St.

Gen. McClellan took command
all

Banks

at

Harper's

of the Federal army in Western Virginia.
Conielius Vanderbilt offered
the steam-

Ferry to take charge of their respective
departments.

ships of the Atlantic and Pacific Steamship

—August
300

5.

Skirmish
Guards,

at Athens,
under Colonel

Company
ment.

for the service of the Govern-

Mo,

Home

Tennf.ssee seceded by proclamation of Governor Hams 104,913 for, and 47,238 against.
;

—24.
25.

IMoore,

defeated a force of 1,000 rebels,

killing 23

of su])plies au(l

and 50 wouuded. 5 wagon loads 40 horses Avere captured by

— Virginia vote announced to be 128,884 and 32,134 against secession. —July Battle at Carthage, Misfor,
5.

the Cruards.

—10. Battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo. The Federal army, under Gen. Lyon,
5,200 men, was defeated by the combined
forces

souri.

Union
;

foi'ces

under

Col.
loss,

Sigcl,

of

Gens, Price

.

and

McCulloch,
Feder-

1,500

rebels, 4,000.

Union

13 killed

20,000.
al loss,

General Lyon waskille<l.

and 31 wounded; rebel loss, 250 killed an^ wounded. In this battle Sigel wilhdrew

223

killed,
loss,

721 wounde<l, 292 mis(Mi-Culloch's report),

sing.

Rebel
killed,

^ good order and, saved

ever^-thing.

265

800

wounded* 30

missing

j

4th Month.

APRIL,

1869.

SO Days.

MOON'S PHASES.

Middle States.
D. H.

APRIL.
^

D. H.

M.
4.5

I

Last Quarter

8-3
11

Afn.

New Moon

8

4«liv.

First Quarter Full Moon

19 26

10
1

M. 6 Mo. 23 Mo.

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM
Price's
killed,

1860

TO

1865.

report

of

Missouri troops, 156

under Gen. Evans and driven to the river,
Avhere, there being

517 wounded.
lie

In this battle

fell

no adequate means for
Killed, 223,

one of the bravest heroes of the war, General

crossing, they suffered severe loss by the

Lyon,

and destined

was a native of Connecticut, had he lived. 28-29. Bombardment and capture
to higli I'ank

entjmy's fire

and by drowning.

Avounded, 250, taken prisoners, 500.
loss

Rebel

about 200 in killed

and

wounded.
Colonel

of Forts llatteras and Clark, at Hattcras
Inlet,

About 2,500
Mo., under

rebels, near Frederickto^vn.

N. C.

30 pieces of cannon, 1,000 750 prisoners were taken.

Jeff.

Thompson

antl

stand of small arms, 3 vessels with valuable
cargoes, and

Lowe, were attacked by 3,500 Federal troops,

commanded

liy

Col, J. B. Plunnner, of 11th

This fort

j^ave the Fe«lerals possession of

MissouiijAvith Missouri, Illinois, Wisconsin

the coast to the Palmetto State.

and Indiana
proclaimed
baker,

troojis,

under

Cols.

Ross,

30.

Martial Law
all

vvas

Marsh, Hovey, Baker, Lieut, Col. Penna-

throughout Missouri, by General Fremont,

Major

Schofield,

Captain Stewart
rebels

and the slaves of
the
land.
first

persons found in arms
fi-ee.

and Lieut. Wliite.
killed.

The

were de-

against the U. S. declared

This was

feated vdth great loss, and Col.

Lowe was
field,

proclamation of freedom in any

They

left

175 bodies on the

and had a large number wounded.
C.

Eighty

Sejitemher 21. J.
fled

Breckenridge

were taken prisoners, and 4 heavy guns

from Frankfort, ICy., and openly joined
Breckenridge had as yet preof 8th and 4th Ohio,

were captured.
killed

The Federal

loss

was 7

the rebels.

tended to be loyal.

and 60 wounded.

26.

An
Two

artillery-fight

across the

—23. Detachments

Potomac, at Edward's Ferry, for several
hours.
killed in General Banks' en-

and Ringgold's cavalry, under Cols. Parke and Cant\vell, advanci)ig toward Romney,

campment and 3
ments.
ginia

Avounded,

Both

parties

and drove out 700 rebels from Mechanicsville Gap, and pursued their coml)ined forces of 1,400 from Romney to
Va., attacked

were compelled to move back their encampGen. B. F. Kelly, Avith 2,500 Virand Ohio Volunteers, from New Creek, Va., attacked an inferior rebel force near Romney, who were routed and pursued through that town with severe
Col. Thos. Johns, of
loss.

the mountains.

Federal

loss,

3

killed,

10

wounded
ran

;

rebel loss, 15 killed,

30 wounded.

'^October 12.

Rebel

steamer Theodora
Charleston, S.

the blockade at
l^->urd

C,

2d regiment Potomac

having on
their

Messrs. Mason and Slidell,

Home

Guards, made a diversion of the

commissioners to England and France, with
seci-etaries. These commissioners were afterwards seized on board a British

enemy's force by marching to the rear of Romney, by way of Frankfort, and engaged

stoinncr.

The

—21.
Va.
division,

BATi'Lr. or

Foward's Ferry,
(icn. C. P. Stone's

and held in check a regiment cf the I'ebels. expedition was successful in captming ul" military stores and pro:i 1.1 rgc; sup])ly
visions.

1,900

men from

Federal

loss,

2

killed,

14 wounded.

under conunand of Col. E. D.

Rebel lossy 10 l^illed, 15 wounded, and a number of prisoners, including Col.

Baker, U. S. Senator from Oregon, were

Angus McParson
pub-

ordered to cross the Potomac at Harrison's
Island, or Ball's Bluff,
iioissances above an<l
to support recon-

Donald, their lonimander

;

their artillery

Avagons, cmnps, etc., were captured.

below that point.

At

BrownloAV
Hc.'jtiou

Avas forced to susjjcnd the

.4

P=

M. they were attacked by 3,000 rebels

qi the Knoxvilb*, (Tcun.) 'WJdg,

...

-

...

-

_

(^-^

-

-••

h.

'

5th Month.

MAY,
D. 3
.11

m\%.

31 Days,

MOOD'S PHASEg.

Middle States.
D. ...IS
*.25

MAT.
^

H.

M.

Last Qnar*er:

New Moo«

8
11

-WMo.
10 Frn.

I

|

First Quarter,. Full JMoon

H. 4 10

3>r.

;«AfTi, 2G Frn.

;

CHROrrOLOGY OF THE

WAR FROM

IStiO

TO

1865.

29.

Nearly 1000 contrabands arrived at

Avith their seci-etaries,

who had

taken pas-

Fortress

Monroe

in

two days.

Gen. Butler

sage for England.

Colonel Grensle reto Kolla,

invented the term

" contraband."

The
Flag-

turned -with his

command

Mo.,

great naval expedition sailed from Fortress

Monroe, under the
officer

command

of

from an expedition against the rebels in Texas count}', bringing 9 prisoners, 500
heatl of cattle

Com. Samuel

F. Dupont, comprising

and 40 horses and mules.

77 vessels of all classes. The land forces, numbering 20,000 men, were commanded by Brig.-Gen. Thos. W. Sherman. November!. Lieut. Gen. Winfield Scott, at his o^vn request, was retired
>


and

24.

IvEBEL Commissioners, Mason
were imprisoned in Fort War-

Slidell,

ren, Mass.

27.

Gen. McClellan appointed the

hour of 11 each Sabl)ath for religious worship throughout the U. S.
rected that all officers

from

active service,

and Maj. Gen. George

Army, and
off

di-

B. McClellan was a])])ointed to succeed him

and men

duty

Army. was in no way responsible for the disaster of Bull Run. 2. Gen. Fremont, at Springfield, received an order from Washington relieving him from command of the department of
as Cormnander-in-chief of the U. S.

should have o})portnnity to attend.
Avas

This

Scott

the

first

order of the kind in our

history.

December
of

5.

Reports

of the Secretaries

and Navy show the GoA'emment had in service for the war 682,971 men.

War
16.

IMissouri.

Gen. Hunter was
to the

appointed

The Eiiropa

arrived

from Eng-

temj)orarily
\\as

command.

Fremont

land Avith ncAvs of the excitement junong
the British people occasioned by the an-est
of Messi-s.

removed, not for his principles, but for
6.

extravagance.

Mason and

Slidell,

and also

Battle OP Belmont, Mo.

Gens.

the ultimatum of the British Government,

Grant and McClernand yni\\ 2,850 men landed at Belmont at 8 A. M., drove the
rebel ])i.ckets and captured their camp, which was burnt. A battery of 12 guns
Avas taken and about two hundred pnsoners. Meantime a large reinforcement of rebels was lauded from Columbus, on the opposite

demanding a
Mr.

sTirrender of the rebel

com-

missioners, and an apology for their seizure.
ScAvai'd's dispatch to

Mr. Adams, dated

December

30,

having settled the matter in

anticipation, there Avas but little excitement
in the public mind.

18.

A

part of Gen. Pope's
J. C.

forces,

side of

the river, wliich intercepted Gen.

under Col.

Davis and Col. F. Steele,

Grant's army in their return to their boats. The Federals cut their way through a much
superior force of the enemy, losing 150 of
their
killed

surprised a rebel
of Warrensburg,

camp near Milford, north Mo.,and captured nearly

1,300 men, 70 Avagons loaded Avith stores,

number

prisoners, together Avith their

and

all

their

camp equipage and arms.

and wounded, who fell into the hands
Federal
loss,

Federal loss, 2 killed, 17 Avounded.

of the rebels.

89

killed,

150

20.

Battle of Dra^esville, Va.,
from

wounded, 150 missing.

The

rebel loss Avas

Federal forces, under Gen. E. O. C. Ord,
defeated about 2,800 Confederates

\
tj
\i
'

greater.

155 were taken prisoners.
the U. S.
o^er-

—8. Captain Wilkes, with
steam sloop-of-war,
liauled

San

Jacinto,

South Carolina, Alabama and Virginia Federal force, aboRt4,000 men, of Avhom 7
Avere killed .ind 61 Avounded.

the English moil

Bteamer Ti-ent

Rebel

loss,

'n the

Bahama Channel, and tqpk from her
fMiii^gftj-^pg^

75

killed,

150 Avounded, and 30 prisoners,
a
l?irj.je

vV

^-.-b.-^!

]^lM.^»^?m4 glUlcll,

^

to;;et)iey \vitli

supply gf forage.

6th Month.

JUNE.

1869.

30 Days.

MOOIV'S PHASES.

Middle States.
H. 9

JUNE.

1).

H.

M.
a;3

M.
15 Ev.

Last Quarter

2

Mo.

Kew Moon

9

53 Ev.

Firet Quarter Full Moon...

8

8GEv.

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM
^L

1860
:

TO 1865.
Price,

—26. A
dell,

ington decided to give up

Cabinet Council at WashMason and Sli-

Gens.

Tan Dom,

McCulloch and
Federal

Pike, were defeated by the

army

on the ground that they eould not be
always maintained by the U.
S.

under Gens. Curtis,
Davis.

Sigel,

Ashboth and

held consistently with the doctrine of neutral rights

Federal loss in killed,

wounded
about

and missing, 1,851.
2,000.

Rebel

loss,

Government.

Gens.

MoCnlloch,

Mcintosh and
C.

Slack were killed.

1862.
January/
G.ip, ncaial troojis,
7.

14.

Battle of Newbern, N.

Engagement

at

Blue's

Gen. Burnside's forces attacked and carried
a continuous line of redoubts of half a mile
in extent, after a f©ur hours'

Eomney, West

Virginia.

Feder-

under Col. Dunning, of the 5th

engagement.

Ohio, attacked 2,000 of the enemy, routing

The
als

rebels, in tlmir retreat, set fire to the

them w lib the loss of 15 killed, 20 prisoners, 3 pieces of cannon, their wagons, etc. No
Federivl loss.

town, which was extinguished by the Feder-

with slight damage.

200 prisoners and


The

6 forts were taken, mounting 40 heavy
guns.
ed.
ed.

ly.

Battle of Mill Spring, Ky.
completely routed, with 192
prisoners.

Fedora!

Idss,

Skilled, 150 woundkilled,

rebels

Rebel

lias,

50

200

woundV^v,

killed

and 140

Gen. Zollicoffer,

their comraanOer,

was

killed.

The Federal
1,200

—23. BAT?B&i! OF Winchester,

troops were uiider Gen. Thomas.

After a desps6«t« engagement, the rebels

horses and mules, over 100 large wagons,

were driven from the ground iu disorder,
Avith

and 14 cannon, 2,000 muskets,
captm-cd.

etc.,

were
207

a loss of 600 killed and wounded,

^Federal

loss,

39

killed,

and 300 prisoners.
400 wounded.

Federal loss, 1 00 killed,

w'oimded.

81.

QtJEEN Victoria
obaerYe

declared her deneutrality

Ajml

8.

Gen. W. T. Sherman was

termination to

strict

dispatched by 'Gen. Grant with a large re-

during the American contest, and to prevent the use of English vessels and harbors
to aid the belligerent^.

connoitering forao on the Corinth, Miss.,
road.

A portion

of his force

was routed

by a eharge o€ rebel cavalry, and 15 killed
surren-

February
dered to
tlie

16.

Fort Donelson

and 25 woimded of the 77th Ohio regiment.
10. PIuntsville, Ala., Avas occupied by Gen. MitclieH's foi'ces. 200 prisoners,

Federal army, under General
days' desperate resist-

Grant
ance.

after three

15,000 prisoners were captured, in-

cluding Brig.

Gen. Buclaier, and an imjnaterial.

15 locomotives, and
tured.
ti(m,

many

cars were cap-

mense quantity of war
the garrison.

Gens.

PresidpHt Liaaoln,

by

proclama-

Floyd and Pillow escaped with a portion of

recommended the

i)eople

throughout

the United &;tates,on the Sabbath succeedJeff.

32.

Inauguration of
the

Davis, of

ing the receipt of his proclamation, to re-

Miss:, as President of

" Confederate

turn thanks to Almighty

God

for having

States," at l^ichraond, Va.,
Stcjihcns, of

and Alex. H.

vouchsatetl signal victoiies over rel)e!lious

Ga., as Vice-President, thcv

enemies, and ako for having averted

tbe
in-

having received the unanimous vote of 109
delegates representing 11 States.

dangers of loieign interference and
vasion.

March
Ark.

6-8.

Battle of Pea Ridge,
rebel forces

Mayfi. Gbn.

Hunter

proclaimed the

The combined

under

persons in the States of Georgia, Florida,

7th Month.

JULY,

1869.

31

Days.

MOOIV'S PHASES. Middle
D. H.

States.
D.

JULY.
^

Last Quarter

1
«,»

Mew Moon

7 8
1

M. 43 Ever, 32 Mo.
41

H. W.

i

Full

Moon
. ;

23
.

8

48

Mo.
Nooti.

Last Quarter
|

.91 12

First Q,iiarter....l(:

Mo.

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM
and South Carolina, heretofore held as
slaves,

1800

TO

1865.

wick, arrived on the

field at niglit

with re-

" forever

free."

inforcements.
procla-

19.

President Lincoln, by
declared null and

June

1.

CoL. Elliott,

Avith

the

2d

mation,

void

general

Ohio cavah-y, returned

to Corinth, Miss.,

order No. li of Maj. Gen. Hunter, com-

manding

at Hilton

Head,

S.

C, and

dated

from a successful raid on the Mobile and Ohio railroa<l. The rebel army renewed
the attack on the Federal forces at Fair

May

9, in

which he pronounces the slaves
" forever free."

of the States of Georgia, Florida and South

Oaks, Va., when the enemy Avas defeated

Carolina

The

President
of
the

and driven from the
5,739.

field

with a loss of
Federal
loss,

asked the serious
gress of

consideration

8,000 killed and wounded.

States interested to the resolution of Con-

May

6,

1863, offering to aid any

—26
menced

The great series of
before

battles on the

State which should adopt a gradual abolition of slavery.

Chickahominy,

Richmond,

com-

at 2 p. M. ]>y the attack by a large

—20. The advance of Gen. McClellan's

force of rebels, on McCall's division, on the
(

army,

under

General

Stoneman,

extreme right of
Mechanicsville.

McClellan's

army

at

reached
creek,

New Bridge, on
8 miles from

the Chickahominy

After losing more than
Federal
bat-

Kichmond, driving

1,000 men, the rebels reti*eated.
loss,

in the enemy's outposts.

The enemy had
and 3 wounded.
/

80

killed,

150 wounded.

These

then no forces south of the Chickaliominy.

tles, probabl}',

were the severest of the war.

Gen. Stoneman lost

1 killed

— 28.
Va.

Battle of the Chickahominy,
still

27.

Gens. MartiudaleandButterfield's

Gen. Porter's troops bore the brunt
success-

brigades engaged and defeated a rebel force
of 8,000 near Hanover Court House, Vu.

of the lighting, the Federals
fully retreating.

Federal loss, 54 killed, 194 wounded and
missing.
killed

— 29.

Battle of Groveton, Va. The
Sigel,

Rebel

loss,

between 200 and 300

troops of Gens. Hooker,

Kearney,

and wounded, and 500 prisoners. —30. Col. Elliott, with the 2d Iowa cavalry/ by forced marches from Corinth,
Miss., penetrated
Booneville,

the

enemy's

lines

to

on the Ohio and Mobile railway. They tore up the track in many places north and south of that point, destroyed the locomotive and 26 cars laden with supplies for the rebel army. They
also took 10,000 stand of arms, 3 pieces of
artillery, large quantities of

Reno and King defeated rebels under Jackson and Longstreet with great loss. The fight lasted from dawn till dark. August 4. An immediate draft of 300,000 was ordered by President Lincoln from
the militia of the States for nine months.

Also an additional quota by special draft
to
fill

teers previously called for, should the

up the ranks of the 300,000 volunsame
J.

not be enlisted by the 15th of August.

clothing and

—5. Rebel Gen.
ridge, Avith
j

C,

Breckbn-

ammunition, and paroled 2,000 prisoners.

—31.

5,000

men,

attacked
at

Battle of Fair Oaks,
was overwhelmed
])y

Va.,
1

Williams, Avith 2,500
La.
killed.
|

men
250

Gen. Baton Rouge, Williams
Avonndcd

General Casey's division, after a gaUant
resistance,

Rel)els

defeated.
loss,

Gen.
killed,

the rebel

Federal

army.

At night

the rebels occupied the

and

mi.s.sing.
;'0.

camps of the Fourth corps, but their advance was broken. Generals Couch, 1 leintjselman, Kearuev, Richardson, and Sedg-

Rebel loss 600
forces, consisting of

Gen. Pope's
Gen.

the corps of

Heintzclman, Porter,

McDowell and Banks, engaged Lee's army

8th Month.

AUGUST,
MOOIV'S
D.
H.

3869.

31

Days.

PHASES

iMiddle States.
D.
H.
11

AUGUST.

Nfw

7 FirKtCJiiaiter.l.l

Jloon

5 7

m

M. M

M.
'2{)

Afn Mo.

Full
T.ast

Moon

21

Ev.

Quarter. ..m

2

58

Mo.

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM
at the old battle-ground o£ Bull

1860

TO

1865,

Run, Va.

October

b.

Gen. Price's

rebel

army*

After severe loss the Federals fell back to Centerville, where they were supported by

retreating fi-oni Corinth,

IVIiss.,

were over-

taken by Gens. Ord and Ilurlbut at the

Sumner's and Franklin's corps.

It is sup-

Hatchie river, where, after six hours' fighting, the rebels broke in disorder, leaving
their

posed that the disagreement of Generals in

command

caused this disaster.
division engaged

dead and wounded, 400 prisoners,
batteries.


Va.,

27.

Gen, Hooker's

and 2
B.

rebels

near

under Gen. Ewcll at Kettle Run, Bristow's station, an J drove
field
;

—10. 1,800

rebel cavalry,

under

J.

E.

Stewart, crossed the Potomac at

Mc-

them from the
each
side.
4.

loss about

300 on

Coy's creek, and penetrated to Mercersburg

and Chambersburg, Pa., and after captur-

September
crossed the

The Confederate army
Poolesville, Md.,
State.

ing and destroying

much

property,

made

Potomac near

good their retreat

-vvith

slight loss.

and Invaded that

December
burg, Va.

13.

Battle of Fredricksrebels



Md.

8.

Gens. Lee and Johnson issued

The

works were attacked

proclamations to the people of Maryland,

endeavoring to incite them to rebellion.
14.

Battle of South Mountain,

by the national army under Gen. Burnside. It consisted of three grand divisions led by Generals Snmner, Hooker and Franklin.

Federal troops, under Gens. Houker

The Federal army was
1,512
oners.
kille.1,

repulsed, losing

and Reno, defeated Lee's army. Federal loss, 443 killed, 1,806 wounded and 76 missing.

6,000 wounded, and 460 prisrebels lost 1,800

The

men.
and

General Reno
15.

killed.

21.

Secretaries Seward

Surrender of Harper's Ferry,

Va.,vnth a large supply of military stores, and 11,000 men to the rebels after three Col, Miles, the Federal comdays' siege.

Chase tendered their resignation to President Lincoln, Avho informed them that the
acceptance of them would be incomjiatible
Avith the public welfare
;

when

the resigna-

mander,

killed.

This surrender was one of

tions

were withdrawn.

the most disgraceful of the war.

—27-29. Attack on Vicksburg, Miss.,
by Gen. Sherman's army and Federal gunl)oats.

—17

BATTLdE of ANTIETiVJM, Md. The

entire Federal

army

of Gen. McClellan,

Gen. Sherman's army ascended the
river

Defeat of rebels with loss of 15,000 men. Federal loss, 1 2,500. This was probably the

and

rebel

army

of Gen.

Lee engaged.

Yazoo

on

transports, landed and at-

tacked the rebel works in the rear of Vicksburg, while the gunboats assailed the batteries

most brilliant exploit of General McClellan. 19. Gen. Lee's army crossed the

at

Haines' Bluff.

The

Federals,

after sanguinary conflicts, carried the first

Potomac river

to Virginia, pursued by Gen.

and second
Avithin
2-^

lines of defense

and advanced

Pleasanton's cavalry.

—20. Battle of Iuka, Miss. Gen. Rosecrans' army defeated rebels, who lost
400 wounded, and 600 prisoners. Fetleral loss, 135 killed and 527 Avounded.
263
killed,

where they were defcatod and compelled to withdraw,
miles of the
city,,

with a loss of 600
1,000 missing.

killed,

1,500 wounded,

—30.

The ikon-clad steamer.
Baukhead,
N. C.
I.

Monitor,
near


all

22.

President Lincoln proclaimed
tlae first

Commander
Cape
iicr.

foundered
officers,

that on

day of

January, 1803,

Kattcr:is,

4

12 of the
lo?t

slaves in States or parts of Statca iu

crew, and 8 R.

soldiers
first

were

with

Wl^ilioja " eliould bo iorever free.

This was the

of the celcbratc4

\

9th Month.

SEPTEMBER,
H.
I

1869.

30 Days.

MOOIVS PHASES.

iMiddle States.
».

SEPTEMBER.

I>-

New Moon

()

M. 8

Mo.

I

H. M.

Full
|

~

First Quarter.. 12

4

27

A in.

Moon
.

20
.28

H
4

Layt Quarter.

48 Af n. 18 Afn.

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM
monitor
iron-dads.
Battle
at Parker's

1860

TO

1865.

1,200 prisonei-s.

Rebel

loss,

120 killed

cross-roads, Tenn.

A

desperate conflict of

and 300 Avounded.

several

hours

duration

between
General

(jleneral

Ajwil

30.

A PORTION of

Gen. Hooker's

Sullivan's

troops and

Forrest's

army

crossed the liappahannock at Fred-

rebel cavalry, in

which the latter were de-

ericksburg, Va., and after slight resistance,

iented wnth a loss of (iOO in killed,

woundabout

took possession of the
city

rifle pits

beloAv the

ed

and

prisoners.

Federal

loss

and captured 500
1.

})risoners.

200.

May
1863.
river,
.

Skirmish on the Nausemond

near Sulfolk, Va.

The 99th N.

Y.,

January 1
all

Puesident Lincoln

issued

Col.
loss.

Nixon, defeated rebels with severe

his Kinancipation

Proclamation, declaring;

Union

loss,

41 killed and Avounded.

the slaves then held in rebellious terri-

Battle of Fort Gibson, Miss.

Gen. Grant's
J. S.

(uiy to be forever free.

Galveston, Texas,

army defeated the troops of Gen.
BoAven.

recaptured by rebels under Gen. McGruder,
Avitli

Rebel loss 1,500 in killed, Avound-

its {garrison

of 300 men.

6 Federal

ed and prisoners.

jzuuboats were in the harbor.

The

Harriet.
fi<;ht,

2.

Gen. Sedgwick's corps

of

the

J>ane

was captured
of his crew.

after a severe

in

Army

of Virginia attacked the rebel Avorks

which Captain Wainwright was

killed,

and

in the heights, in the rear of Fredericks-

many

Westlield Avas

The Federal fl:xo-ship blown u]) by Commander
the crew
of Stone River, or

burg, and carried
struggle, in
OA'er

them, after a desperate
the Fetleral loss Avas

Avhic-h

l\enshaw,to avoid capture, by which he lost
his life, Avith

2,000 in killed and Avounded.

many of —2. The battlk

—2-3. Battle of Chancellors vi lle,
Va.

The army

of Gen.

Murfreesboro, Tenn., between Geu. Rosecrans'
Avhich

Federal forces under Gen.
after a series

Lee attacked the Hooker, and

army and Gen. Bragg's rebel troops, commenced two days before, was re-

of sanguinary contests, the
Avas

Union army
loss

compelled to retire and

sumed, and after an obstinate and bloody contest, which lasted all day, the rebels were defeated with great slaughter.
eral loss, 1,553 killed, 6,000

recrossed the Rappahannock.

Very heavy

on both

sides.

Fedwounded, 2,000

11-16. Gen. Lee's army crossed the Potomac and invaded Maryland aud Pennsylvania.

prisoners

;

rcl»el loss,

over 10,000, of

whom

9,000 were killed and wounded.

—14. Capture of Winchester,
by rebel troops.
army,
tillery

Va.,

—11. Arkansas Post, Fort Hindman,
captured by Admiral Porter's squadron and General McClemand's army. Federal loss, nearly

Defeat of Gen. Milroy's

who
and

lost 2,000
stores.

men and

all

his ar-

1,000 in killed, wounded
loss,

15.

and missing;

rebel

550

killed

and

100,000
vania,

wounded, and 5,000 prisoners.

President Lincoln calls for men for six months from PennsylMaryland, West Virginia and Ohio,
were promptly furRebel troops entered Chambers-

March

5.

Fight at Thompson's Station,

to resist»Invasion, Avho

near Franklin, Tenn. Federal force under Col. Colburn Avas attacked by a large

A

nished.

burg, Pa.
26. Gen. Meade superseded Gen. Hooker in coimnand of the Army of the

army under Van Doran, aud defeated in battle, after Avhich the entire Union brigade was captured, excepting 150 men. Feder,al

Potomac.

lo^s,

100

killed,

300 wounded, and

--July

J.

Fj^T

cpufiict at Qettjfcburg,

.

10th Montb.

OCTOBER,

ISfiO.

31

Dav9.

I>IOO\'S FII.\8KS.

Middle

Stalest.

OCTOBER.
tt

I).

H.
'.>

M.
.•!!

D.

H.

New Moon

.

.

....5
....la

First Quarter

5

15

Mo. Full Moon Mo. Last Quarter
I

I

20 28

8

M. 12 50

Mo. Mo.

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM
Rebel advance checked.
killed.

1860

TO

1865.

Gren.

Reynolds

March
Union

4.

Killpatrick returned within

Bragg retreats before Rosecrans. Tullahoma occupied by Federal advance. 2-i. Defeat of rebel Gen. Lee's army

lines,

having destroyed large por-

tions of the Virginia Central Railroad,

and
Loss

burned several mills on James

river.

near Gettysburg, Pa., by Gen.

Meade's

150, including Colonel Dahlgren.

army

after a sanguinary conflict, in which

25.

Rebei; Gen. Forrest, with 7,000

40,000

to

men were killed or wounded. 4. Surrender of Vicksburg, Miss., General Grant; with 30,000 men under
Assault on Helena,

men, attacked the Federal fort at Paducah,
Ky., defended by Col. Hicks with 500 men.

Aided by 2 gunboats, Col. Hicks
Forrest,
killed

defeateil

Gen. Pemberton, and a large supply of

who

retii-ed

with a loss of 1,000
Federal
loss,

arms and ammunition.
Ark., by rebel

and Avounded.

Gens. Marmaduke, Price

killed

and 46 wounded.
3.

The

toAvn

14 was

and Holmes, with 6,000 men, who were

nearly destroyed by the bombardment.

by Gen. Prentiss' garrison, who took 1,000 prisoners, and killed
signally defeated

May
by the

The

crossing of the Rapidan

Anny

of the

Potomac

effected with-

or wounded 500.

out opposition, at Culpepper,
of Gen.

Germania

5.

Rear-guard

Johnson's
b}^

and Ely's Fords.

army, numbering 4,000 men, captured
Gen. Grant's forces, near Bolton, Miss.
riot

5.

Battle of the

Wilderness
on
in

city.

—13-17. Great draft in New York —August Battle OF Chtckamau2Q.

commenced.

A

day of

terrific fighting

most

difficult

ground, in the AVilderness,

near Chancellorsville, Va.

Night closed

without any definite
killed.

result.

General Hays

ga raged furiously.

Union army defeated.
Rosecrans'

21.

At night

army with-


(len.

6.

Battle of the Wilderness conAnother day of
killed.

drew from Chickamauga to Chattanooga. Bragg did not follow. 28. Flanking and capture of Lookout Mountain. It was soon after abandoned and reoccupied l)y the rebels. —29. Union prisoners from Richmond, in a state of starvation, arrive at Annapolis. Some die on the trip from

ti)iued.

terrible fighting,

resulting in the falling l)ack of Lee's ai-my.

Wadsworth

Loss of

l)oth

armies about 15,000 each in the two days'
iighting.

The

rebel

General Longstreet

wounded.
citizens.

Federal wounded, who had l;een
fired

removed to Fredericksburg,

on

by
C,

Fortress Monroe.


Hooker's
oi'
* '

8.

Battle of Spottsylvania

November 24. Storming and capture of
Lookout Mountain.
the clouds."
fight above

H., Va., commenced.

The armies near

Spottsylvania C. H. engaged from 8 to 12
A. M., at

Defeat

Gen. Bragg.

which time Federal forces gained

1861.

the point for Avhich they contended.
p. M.,

At 6
in,

February 27. Sherman's expedition returns to Vicksburg after 22 days' raid, devastating

two fresh
half,

divisions

-svere

thrown

and after a and a

many

to^vns,

burning

bridges,

engagement of an liour the rebel position was carried,
sevei*e

seizing or destroying vast

quantities

of

and their

first line

of breast- works occupied.
C^ H.,
stand,

stores, liberating 10,000 negroes, breaking

up many miles of railways, and taking 600 prisoners. Union loss^ %'^ft killed and
'ovuad^d.

—9. Battle OF Spottsylvania Va., continued. Lee's army made a
morning.

but no general engagement occurred in the

Maj. Gen. Sedgwick

killed.

The

11th Month,

NOVEMBEK,
D.
H.

1869.

30 Days.
States.
D.
1ft Full Moon Last Quarter. .26

MOO]\'S PHASES. Middle

NOVEMBER.
^

New

Moon.... 3

First Qmiiter. 10

6 10

M. 15 Ev.
11

I

H.

M.
31

2
1

Mo.

Ev.

|

26 Afn.

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR PROM
fight

ISfiO

TO

1865.

in

the evening
cx'ossed

was brought on hy
the River Po, and
l)nnlc.

Ju{i/ 0.

Battle at Monogact, Md.,
A, M. to 5 P. M.

Hancock, wlio

lasting

from 9

Federal

esta})lished himself


eral

on the south

forces overi)o\vered

and forced to retreat in
issued

10.

BattljEx of Spottsylvania C.

disorder, losing 1,000 men.

H. continued.

A general
at 5 A.

advance of Fedi\r.

—18. President Lincoln
order
J'or

an

army ordered

A

tremend-

a

di-aft

of 500,000 men, to take

ous conflict ensued.
attack was

In the afternoon an
the rebel batteries.

pbice immediately after September 5, the

made on

term of service to be one year.

After the assault had continued some time,
it

22.

Great

battle

before

Atlanta.

-was

found that the rebel batteries could
loss,

The

rebels assaulted Sherman's lines -with

not be carried without great
ctt'ort

and the

great fury seven times, and were as often
repulsed, after a terrible struggle.
loss, 3,521
;

was abandoned.
P. M.,

The

battle ceased

Federal

about 9
terrible

and was one of the most
flanks

rebel loss estimated at 10,000.
killed.

and bloody of the war.

—24.
Altoon. Grant's

Gen. McPherson was

ShePvMan

Johnson

at

26.

Gen.

Stoneman

despatched a

1,000 rebels captured by General

army

at

Mount Carmel

Chui'ch,

Va.
-~2~).

Battle
ilrove
;

near Dallas, Ga.

Gen
Union

Macon and Westeni Railroad. They succeeded in destroying 18 miles of track and in capturing 500 rebels, when they wei'e in turn attacketl,
cavalry force to destroy the
the prisoners released, and 1,000 of Gen.

Hooker
loss,

rebels

two

miles.

15,000

rebels about the same.

—28. LoNGSTKEET attacked
at Dallas,
Ke!)cl

Sherman

and was driven toward Marietta. loss, 2,500 killed and wounded, and

McCook's troops captured. 30. Explosion of an immense mine by Union trooi)S in front of Burnsido-'s

position before Petersburg.

Its explosion

1)00 prisoners.

Grant north of Chickahominyand was repulsed. Hancock
30.

Union

loss, 300.

Avas the signal for the discharge

of every

Lee

attacked

piece of artillery

on the

line

from the ApAfter the

ponuittox to the extreme

left.

drove him out of intrenched line of
]>its

rifle-

discharge of the artillery, the

army

ad-

and held
7.

it.

venced and assaulted the rebel works, but,
^\ith

June
—13.

Morgan,

3,000 men, com-

after a desperate
Avas repulsed Avith

attempt to carry them,
a loss of over 4,000 men.

mences a raid into Kentucky.

The Fugitive Slave Law

re-

The

rebels entered

Chambersburg, Avhere

pealed in the House of Representatives.

the rebel conmiander
at-

demanded $500,000
city.

—18. Simultaneous and desperate
the armies of the

under threat of burning the

His de-

tack on the rebel Avorks at Petersburg, by

mand

not being complied, the city Avas

19.

The rebel
al'ter

Potomac and the James. privateer Alabama
of Cherbourg,

burned.

August
Federal

5.

Great battle

at the entrance

was sunk
France,

ncju' the harljor

of Mobile Bay.
fleet at

Fort Gaines opened on
about 7 A. M., the monitor

an engagement of over an
S.

hour with the U.

sloop-of-Avar Kcar-

sage. Captain Winslow. 70 of the rebel crew were taken on board the Kearsago, and 115 reached England and France. 3

Tecumseh haAnng opened the attack a short time before. The i-ebe|l ram /Pennessee
captured after cmc of the fiercest naval battles

on record.

In the night the rebels

persons only were A\ounded on the Kearsage.

evacuated and bleAV up l*ort PoAvell.

The

monitor Tccumsch Avas

bloA\:u ui)

by a rebel

19tli

Month.

"DErEMBER,

18f)9.

m

Bays.

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM
torpedo.

ISfiO

TO

1865.

Explosion of a rebel mine near

Petersburg, Va,

But

little

damage
It

done.
last-

McClellan resigned his commission in the U. S. army.

A terrific fight in front of Petersburg,
ing from 5.30 to 7.30 P. m.
pulsed wdth slaughter.

—13.

Gen.

Sherman's

right

witig,

commenced by a charge of the enemy, which was reon Burnside's corps at Six Mile Station, on ihe Weldon Railroad near Petersburg, which was re18.

under Gen, Howard, moved out of Aulantu and began its march through Georgia.

Furious

attack

pulsed ^yith great loss to the rebels.

—31.

Battle op Franklin, Tenu. 30. The rebels, under Hood, attacked Thomas' army at Franklin, but were repulsed at all points. The rebels commenced aavaiicinf?: on Federal lines at 4 p. M. They charged
furiously on the lines, b^L were driven back

The battle of Atlajjta

conat 5

tinued.
P.

A brilliant charge

was made

and a great victorv
oners.

"-ained.

Rebel

loss,

M. by Gen. Davis' force, resulting in the

5,000 killed and wounded, and 1,000 prisFederal
loss,

discomfiture of the rebels and the surrender

1,000.

Gen. A. J,

of a large number.

Great destruction by

Smith's army passed through Nashville and
reinforced Thomas.

the rebels of large magazines of stores ac-

cumulated at Atlantic.
ammunition.
the afternoon.

They blew up,

in

December
connnenced.

15.

Battle op Nashville
Federal lines advanced

addition to other things, 80 car-loads of

Gen. Thomas attacked Hood's
five miles.

Gen. Slocum's corps assault-

army

at 2 A. M.

ed the enemy's works around the city in

on the right
river,

The

rebels were

driven from their intrenchments, from the
19.

September
Hill,
tle

Battle op Bunker

near Winchester, Va.

A

great bat-

left rested,

from a range of lulls, on Avhich their and forced back upon the right

fought by Sheridan in the Shenandoah Sheridan made the attack and won

and center.

The

rebels

lost

VI cane on,

Valley.

1,500 wounded, and a whole line cf earthAvorks.

a splendid victory, captui-ing over 2,500 prisoners, together with 9 battle-flags and
artillery. The rebel Generals Gordon and Rhodes were killed, and 3 other general officers wounded. All of the rebel killed and most of the wounded fell

In the night Hood withdrew his

right from the river.

5 pieces of


fore

16.

Another

battle before Nashville.

Hood completely
Kashville,
deserters,

routed.

Hood's
prisoners,
smiail

loss be-

13,180

2,207

30 guns, 7,000
loss,

arms.

An
Total

into Federal hands.

entire rebil division (Ed. Johnson's) cap-

October 19.

Battle op Cedar Creek.
Gen. Sheridan's army

tured.

Union

about 6,500.

Shenandoah Vallcv.

loss of the vel^ols,

about 23,000.
of Savannah by 800 prisoners, 150
cotton,

was attacked before daylight and its lef<! turned and driven in confusion, with a loss Gen. Sheridiui of 30 pieces of artillery. afterward arrived on the field and dro\'c the rebels, taking 48 pieces of artilleiy and

—21.
Sherman.

Occupation
Ib^ (captured

pieces of artillery, 33^000 baiss of

3 steamers.

many

prisoners, gaining a great victory.

18G5.
'February 15.
Fisher, which
assault on Fort was captured with entire

Sheridan

pursued

the

rebels

to

Mount
re-

Grand

Jackson, wliich he reached at night.

November^. President Lincoln
elected,

garrison.

and Andj-ew Johuson elected VicePresident of the United States. General

17.

CiiARLESTOi^r

evacuated by the

rebstU

Helmbold's Extract Buchu.
IS

A CERTAIN CURE FOR DISEASES OF THE

BLADDER, KIDNEYS, GRAVEL, DROPSY, ORGANIC AVEAKNESS, FEMALE COMPLAINTS

GENERAL DEBILITY,
And
all diseases of the

URINARY ORGANS,

whether existing

in

MALE OR FEMALE,
ATTENDED WITH THE FOLLOWING SYMPTOMS:—
Indisposition to Exertion, Loss of Power, Loss of

Memory,

DifiQculty

of Breathing, General Weakness, Horror of Disease, Weak Nerves, Trembling, Dreadfnl Horror of Death, Night Sweats, Cold Feet, Wakefulness,
lar

Dimness of Vision, Languor, Universal Lassitude of the MuscuSystem, often Enormous Appetite with Dyspeptic Symtoms, Hot
in the Back,

Hands, Flushing of the Body, Dryness of the Skin, Pallid Countenance

and Eruptions on the Face, Pain

Heviness of the Eyelids,

Frequently Black Spots flying before the Eyes, with
sion

Temporary
Mobility,

Suffu-

and Loss of Sight,

Want

of Attention, Great

Rest-

lessness, with Horror of Society.

Nothing

is

more desirable

to such

Patients than Solitude, and nothing they more dread for fear of themselves,

no

Repose of manner, no Earnestness, no Speculation, but a

hurried Transition from one question to another.

These symptoms,

if

allowed to go on
Loss-

— which

this

Medicine invariably

removes

—soon follow
f

of power, Fatuity and Epileptic Fits, in one of

wliich the patient

may

expire.

Who

can say that those excesses are

not frequently followed by those

direful diseases Insanity

and Con-

sumption

The records of the Insane Asylums, and the melancholy

deaths by Consumption, bear ample witness to the truth of these assertions.

In Lunatic Asylums the most melancholy exhibition appears.
is

The countenance

actually sodden and quite destitute
it.

—neither Mirth
it

or Grief ever visits
articulate.

Should a sound of the voice occur,

is

rarely

"

With woeful measures wan Despair

Low

sullen sounds his grief beguiled.^'

.

PHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR FROM
March
ville.

18G0

TO

1S65.

11.

Sherman arrived at Fayettepieces of artillery
pieces,
;

-8.

Gen. Lei]

replied,

inquiring the

Exported haviu<; captured Fort Co-

terms of surrender.

Gen. Sheridan made

lumbia, S.

C, 43
C, 25
;

at

Cheraw,
pieces

S.

of gun-powder

and 3,600 barrels at Fayetteville, N. C, 30
in a

and large quantities of ammunition,

nwre captures at Appomattox Station. 9. Gens. Grant and Lee meet at Appomattox Court House, and the rebel army of Northern Virginia, numbering

—18. Rebel Congress adjourned
panic.

26,115 men, were surrendei'cd, with its arms and material of Avar, and the officers

ApHl

2.

Kebel

lines assaulted at Five

and

men
14.

paroled.

Forks, and forced near Hatcher's

Run

;

President

Lincoln

shot

at

then the main line carried, and two strong

Ford's Theatre by John Wilkes Booth, an
actor.

works commanding south of Petersburg
were captured.

Secretary ScAvard attacked at his

The rebels south of
fled

Peters-

house, Avhile in bed, and seriously AA'ounded

burg were severely beaten, and
the Appomattox.

toward

by another

assassin, Avho also dangerously

At

night Lee evacuated

Avounded Mr. Frederick ScAvard.

Petersburg and Richmond, retreating toAvai'd Dan\'ille.

15,

President Lincoln

died at 7.20

Many

thousai^ds of pris-

o'clock A, M,, having remained insensible
since his Avound.

oners were captured by the Union forces on
this day.

Vice-President AndrcAv

Johnson became SeA'enteenth President of
Avas intercepted


5.

Lee

by Sheridan
Farmville

the United States.

at Burkesville,
6.

Va.
struck near

^26,

Surrender

of

Gen. Johnson's

Lee was
hun
at

army, numbering about 27,500 men.

and gained a partial success, but Sheridan
defeated
Sailors' Creek, capturing

20.

John Wilkes Booth and David
Booth
re-

C. Harrold discovered in a barn of Garret's

6,000 pi'isoners, 16 guns, 400 wagons, &c. Rebel Generals Ewell, Kershaw, Corse and
Custis Lee captux-ed.

farm, near Fredericksburg, Va.
fused to suiTender, and
AA^as

killed

by Ser-

geant Corbett, of the 16th N. Y. Cavalr>

7.

crossed

Pursuit of Lee continued; he to the north of the Appomattox and

Harrold surrendered.

May 0. President Johnson
the
ceased.

declared

was constantly harrassed.
A\Tote to

He was attacked
Gen. Grant
Avas impossible,

war at an end, and belligerent rights

by the 2d corps at Farmville.

him that escape

and proposeil to receive his surrender

The End.

I-3:ii]LMB011.I>'S
wiewf.Y
imifflTiifiPi

FLOID

EXTRACT SARSAPARILLA
ERADICATES
OP THE

EEUPTIVE AHD ULCERATIVE DISEASES
THKOAT, NOSE, EYELIDS, SCALP AND SKIN,
WHICH SO DISPIGUKE THE APPEARANCE,

PURGING THE EVIL EFFECTS OF MERCURY
AND

REMOVINa ALL TAINTS
THE

REMNAMTS OF
AND
IS

DISEASE;^

HEREDITARY OK OTHERWISE,
TAKEN
111'

A_r>ULTS

A-ISTD
PERFECT

CHILDREN!
SAFETY.

WITH

TWO TAB LESPOONFU LS
OP

Helmbold's Extract of Sarsaparilla
Added
to

a Pint of

Water

is

equal to the

LIS130:iS'
0]t

DIET DUINK,
IS

AND ONE UOTTLE

EC^UAL TO A

..f

rvniid-,

Tin:

DECOCTIONS AS USU^VLLY :MADE.
-"ctive that

Both are prepared

accordiiij^ to the rules of

rimrniacy aud Chenustry, aud are the most CHU be made-

AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE
Hottentots have long used
FOE A

Buchu
,,

VARIETY OF DISEASES.
It was borrowed from those rude practitioners by the English and Dutch physicians, on whose r«commendation it was employed in Europe, and has now come into general use. It is given chiefly in gravel, chronic catarrh of the bladder, morbid irritation of the bladder and urethea, for female weakness and debility, for prolapsus and bearing down, or prolapsus uteri, diseases of the prostate gland, retention or incontinence of urine, and all diseases requiring the aid of a diuretic arising from a loss of tone in the parts concerned in its evacuation. It is also recommended in

cases of dyspepsia, chronic rheumatism, cutaneous affections «Bd dropsy. To cure these diseases we must bring into action the muscles which are engaged in their various functions. To neglect

them, however slight

may be the attack, it is sure to affect the bodily health and mental powers. Our flesh and blood are supported from these sources. Persons at every period of life, from infanaj to old age, and in every state of health, are liable to be subjects of these diseases. The causes in many instances are unknown. The patient has, however, an admirable remedy in

HELMBOLD'S

FLUID EXTRACT OF BUCHU,
inflammation,
in its action.

and when taken in early stages of the disease, none suffer to any extent. It allays pain and is free from all injurious properties, pleasant in its taste and odor, and immediate
It is the

ANCHOR OF HOPE TO THE THYSICIAN,
and was always so esteemed by the
late

eminent Dr. Physic

The

proprietor, with

upwards of

thirty thousand unsolicited certificates

and hundreds of thousands of living witnesses of its curative properties, accumulated within fifteen years, has not been in the habit of resorting to their publication, he does not do this, from the fact that his remedies rank as standard, they do not
need to be propped np by certificates. The science of medicine, like the Doric column, should stand simple, pure, a/id ?najestic, Jiaving fact for its basis, 'induction for its pillar, and truth alone for its ccyv.<iL. liis Solid and Fluid Extracts embody the full streugth of the ingredients of which they are named. They are left to the inspection of all. A ready and conclusive test of their properties will be a comparison with those set forth in the United States Dispensatory. These remedies are prepared by H. T. IIelmbolb, Druggist of eighteenyears' experience, and'^ve believe them to be reliable, in fact we have never known an article lacking merit to meet with a permanent success, and Mr. Helmbolw's success is certainly priw,a /biri^? evidence. His Drug and Chemical Warehouse, in tke city of New York, is not excelled, if equaled, bv njjy in this country, and we would advise our readers when visiting that city, to give him & ^iilland judge for
themselves.

ftiii

IIIBAW llill

HOTTENTOTS SEEN GATHERING BUCHIJ LEAVES
AT THB
\m

FOB

H. T.

HELMBOLD,
594.

Druggist,

Broadway,

New

Yor

E 468
.S68

Copy

1

im^

594 Broadway
Adjoining Metropolitan
Ilotel^

i&

^mi'^^

llliMBilil^i
104
South
loth

HlMiAl
Street,

Philadelphia.

PRESsiETVTED

03

Y

HERMON W. ATWOOD,
.r^ttlisl,

846 BROADITITAY, N.
ADJOINING WALLACK'S THEATRE.

Y.

STORE OPEN

AX^X^

NIGHT.