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Buoy Power:Neg

Christos Dimoulis, Eveready

Buoy Power: Neg
1. INHERENCY: 1.1. Stimulus Bill offers tax credits for marine power 1.2. State Power: Oregon to instal buoys 2. SOLVENCY: 2.1. Wave power iffy 2.2. Handful of Buoy power problems 2.3. Wave power should be done with thousands of small generators 2.4. Wave power is still diffuse 2.5. 1.5 MW for every 100 feet of shoreline occupied by generators 2.6. Large Scale wave power would be met by stiff resistance 2.7. One Oregon household uses 1MW each month 2.8. High Cost due to intermittence 2.9. High operating and upkeep costs 2.10. Economic recession causing pull-back in new renewable tech 2.11. Aesthetic 2.12. Storms could cause unmooring 2.13. Species protection could get in the way 2.14. Technology is very new, underdeveloped (addressing wave power in general) 1. INHERENCY: 1.1. Stimulus Bill offers tax credits for marine power Carolyn Elefant, “Stimulus Bill Promises to Buoy Marine Renewables Industry” February 20, 2009 On Tuesday, February 17, 2009, President Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, or as it is commonly called, the “stimulus package.” The legislation contains a combination of tax cuts and funding programs that bring unprecedented support to the marine renewables industry. Despite the legislation’s fast track, OREC managed to ensure parity for marine renewables. In particular, OREC is proud of the legislation’s inclusion of a choice between an investment tax credit (ITC) and production tax credit (PTC), as this is an option that we’ve been pressing since early 2007. The bill extends the deadline to place marine renewables in service through the end of 2013 to qualify for production tax credits. Marine renewables still qualify for only half the PTC that wind receives, however, marine renewables projects have an additional year of PTC eligibility. For all renewables, the PTC credits run for 10 years after a project is placed in service. 1.2. State Power: Oregon to instal buoys Ted Sickinger, The Oregonian, Oregon Business News, “Oregon Iron Works will build first buoy for wave farm off Reedsport”, December 04, 2009, http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2009/12/oregonians_build_wave_energy_b.html
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Buoy Power:Neg

Christos Dimoulis, Eveready

Courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies As part of a U.S. Navy project, Ocean Power Technologies installed one of its PowerBuoys 75 miles off the coast of New Jersey. The company has also installed test buoys under contract with the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities to demonstrate their ability to capture wave energy and convert it to electricty. A New Jersey firm has hired Oregon Iron Works to build the first of 10 wave energy buoys that it will begin installing off the Oregon coast next year in the country's first commercial-scale wave energy farm. 2. SOLVENCY: 2.1. Wave power iffy C. Bruce Lowery (a retired power plant engineer. He began his career at the U.S. Navy Propulsion Engineering School at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. After separating from the Navy, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1971. He obtained a Class A Stationary Engineers License, and was hired by General Motors as a Shift Engineer at the Chevrolet Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. He obtained a Master HVAC Mechanics Certification (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning), and at the age of 49 graduated Suma Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from Park University. Energy Consumers Edge, (Energy Consumers Edge is about solutions to high gasoline and utility costs. It is also about winning a secure energy future.) “PROS AND CONS OF OCEAN WAVE ENERGY“ 2007, http://www.energy-consumers-edge.com/about-the-author.html Ocean wave energy looks like an iffy proposition. There are a few areas where wave power may prove desirable. But environmental and aesthetics concerns combined with expensive intermittency problems will be serious obstacles to significant wave power use for some time. 2.2. Handful of Buoy power problems Christine Miller, A Brief History of Wave and Tidal Energy Experiments in San Francisco and Santa Cruz, August 2004, http://www.outsidelands.org/wave-tidal3.php According to the California Energy Commission, in the last decade, projects have been discussed at Half Moon Bay, Fort Bragg, San Francisco and Avila Beach. Issues that have prohibited the development of wave power in California include the limitations of the technology, environmental impact issues, disturbance of marine life, high costs, concern over possible collisions with ships and other problems. 2.3. Wave power should be done with thousands of small generators C. Bruce Lowery (a retired power plant engineer. He began his career at the U.S. Navy Propulsion Engineering School at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. After separating from the Navy, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1971. He obtained a Class A Stationary Engineers License, and was hired by General Motors as a Shift Engineer at the Chevrolet Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. He obtained a Master HVAC Mechanics Certification (Heating

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Buoy Power:Neg

Christos Dimoulis, Eveready

Ventilation and Air Conditioning), and at the age of 49 graduated Suma Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from Park University. Energy Consumers Edge, (Energy Consumers Edge is about solutions to high gasoline and utility costs. It is also about winning a secure energy future.) “PROS AND CONS OF OCEAN WAVE ENERGY“ 2007, http://www.energy-consumers-edge.com/about-the-author.html Because wave power is scattered and the size of individual waves is limited, all designs are necessarily modular. Harnessing wave energy probably won’t be done with a few, very large generators. Large-scale use of wave energy will likely involve thousands of small generators of 1MW and less. 2.4. Wave power is still diffuse C. Bruce Lowery (a retired power plant engineer. He began his career at the U.S. Navy Propulsion Engineering School at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. After separating from the Navy, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1971. He obtained a Class A Stationary Engineers License, and was hired by General Motors as a Shift Engineer at the Chevrolet Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. He obtained a Master HVAC Mechanics Certification (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning), and at the age of 49 graduated Suma Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from Park University. Energy Consumers Edge, (Energy Consumers Edge is about solutions to high gasoline and utility costs. It is also about winning a secure energy future.) “PROS AND CONS OF OCEAN WAVE ENERGY“ 2007, http://www.energy-consumers-edge.com/about-the-author.html Wave power is more energy dense than wind power, but it is still diffuse. 2.5. 1.5 MW for every 100 feet of shoreline occupied by generators C. Bruce Lowery (a retired power plant engineer. He began his career at the U.S. Navy Propulsion Engineering School at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. After separating from the Navy, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1971. He obtained a Class A Stationary Engineers License, and was hired by General Motors as a Shift Engineer at the Chevrolet Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. He obtained a Master HVAC Mechanics Certification (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning), and at the age of 49 graduated Suma Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from Park University. Energy Consumers Edge, (Energy Consumers Edge is about solutions to high gasoline and utility costs. It is also about winning a secure energy future.) “PROS AND CONS OF OCEAN WAVE ENERGY“ 2007, http://www.energy-consumers-edge.com/about-the-author.html National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ocean Wave Energy Data shows that even in high wave energy dense areas such as the Pacific Northwest, we can expect energy production rates of about 1.5 MW for every 100 feet of shoreline occupied by generators. By comparison, a large fossil fuel plant of 1,000 MW capacity would occupy about two hundred acres. Installing a similar capacity using on shore wave power would occupy over 12.5 miles of shoreline; and that’s in the best areas like the Pacific Northwest.

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Buoy Power:Neg

Christos Dimoulis, Eveready

2.6. Large Scale wave power would be met by stiff resistance C. Bruce Lowery (a retired power plant engineer. He began his career at the U.S. Navy Propulsion Engineering School at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. After separating from the Navy, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1971. He obtained a Class A Stationary Engineers License, and was hired by General Motors as a Shift Engineer at the Chevrolet Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. He obtained a Master HVAC Mechanics Certification (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning), and at the age of 49 graduated Suma Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from Park University. Energy Consumers Edge, (Energy Consumers Edge is about solutions to high gasoline and utility costs. It is also about winning a secure energy future.) “PROS AND CONS OF OCEAN WAVE ENERGY“ 2007, http://www.energy-consumers-edge.com/about-the-author.html It doesn’t take a genius to see that any proposal to line these shores with ocean wave energy generators will be met with stiff resistance. 2.7. One Oregon household uses 1MW each month Oregon Department of Energy. Energy Usage in Oregon, June 2003, www.energy.state.or.us, An aMW is 8,760 megawatt hours. This is the continuous output of a resource with one megawatt of capacity over a full year. A megawatt hour is 1,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh), which is the amount of electricity the average Oregon household uses in a month. 2.8. High Cost due to intermittence C. Bruce Lowery (a retired power plant engineer. He began his career at the U.S. Navy Propulsion Engineering School at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. After separating from the Navy, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1971. He obtained a Class A Stationary Engineers License, and was hired by General Motors as a Shift Engineer at the Chevrolet Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. He obtained a Master HVAC Mechanics Certification (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning), and at the age of 49 graduated Suma Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from Park University. Energy Consumers Edge, (Energy Consumers Edge is about solutions to high gasoline and utility costs. It is also about winning a secure energy future.) “PROS AND CONS OF OCEAN WAVE ENERGY“ 2007, http://www.energy-consumers-edge.com/about-the-author.html World Energy Council wave power cost data suggests that wave energy is very close to being competitive with installed costs that suggest electrical charges of less than $.05 per KWh; which makes it competitive with fossil fuel generators. But that figure doesn’t take into account the fact that wave energy is intermittent and variable. Even in the most active wave areas, there are many days with little wave activity. On days that have good wave activity, wave levels can vary. As explained on the Pros and Cons of Wind Power page, resolving intermittency problems to attain reliable energy output can double and even triple the cost of power. The key to reliability and economy of operation is site selection based on good site research.

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Buoy Power:Neg

Christos Dimoulis, Eveready

2.9. High operating and upkeep costs Patrick Blum, International: Herald Tribune, “A setback for wave power technology, Sunday, March 15, 2009, www.principlepowerinc.com/news/articles/iht_090316.pdf On the cost side, investments in ocean-based technologies "are very high and operating costs are not entirely negligible because you have the problem of corrosion from salt water," said Colette Lewiner, head of the global energy and utilities sector at the French consultancy and services company Capgemini. 2.10. Economic recession causing pull-back in new renewable tech Patrick Blum, International: Herald Tribune, “A setback for wave power technology, Sunday, March 15, 2009, www.principlepowerinc.com/news/articles/iht_090316.pdf For sure, the economic recession and financial crisis are adding to the challenges facing such projects, as investors pull back. "There will be a pause, a slowdown, in renewable energy investment until we see the recovery," said Ms. Lewiner, of Capgemini. But "these investments take time and you can't sleep through the recession. These plants are needed." 2.11. Aesthetic C. Bruce Lowery (a retired power plant engineer. He began his career at the U.S. Navy Propulsion Engineering School at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. After separating from the Navy, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1971. He obtained a Class A Stationary Engineers License, and was hired by General Motors as a Shift Engineer at the Chevrolet Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. He obtained a Master HVAC Mechanics Certification (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning), and at the age of 49 graduated Suma Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from Park University. Energy Consumers Edge, (Energy Consumers Edge is about solutions to high gasoline and utility costs. It is also about winning a secure energy future.) “PROS AND CONS OF OCEAN WAVE ENERGY“ 2007, http://www.energy-consumers-edge.com/about-the-author.html Wherever these systems are placed they will almost certainly have to be designed with regard to visual impact. It comes down to a choice of designing something that has a natural appearance, or having thousands of miles of barren concrete seawall on all of our coasts. Offshore installations have a different kind of problem. If we expect to harvest significant amounts of energy from off shore waves, we can expect to see thousands of them bobbing around within eyesight of shore. There are some systems being tested that are underwater and out of sight. But time will tell whether or not they can stay that way. If they are shallow enough such that they are navigation hazards, they will have to have marker buoys – lots of marker buoys. 2.12. Storms could cause unmooring C. Bruce Lowery (a retired power plant engineer. He began his career at the U.S. Navy Propulsion Engineering School at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. After separating from

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Buoy Power:Neg

Christos Dimoulis, Eveready

the Navy, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1971. He obtained a Class A Stationary Engineers License, and was hired by General Motors as a Shift Engineer at the Chevrolet Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. He obtained a Master HVAC Mechanics Certification (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning), and at the age of 49 graduated Suma Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from Park University. Energy Consumers Edge, (Energy Consumers Edge is about solutions to high gasoline and utility costs. It is also about winning a secure energy future.) “PROS AND CONS OF OCEAN WAVE ENERGY“ 2007, http://www.energy-consumers-edge.com/about-the-author.html Beyond any visual impact we must be aware of the fact that storms will cause ocean wave generators to occasionally dislodge from their anchors and become serious navigation hazards. 2.13. Species protection could get in the way Todd Woody, New York Times, “Wave Power Setbacks in California”, August 12, 2009, http://greeninc.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/12/wave-power-setbacks-in-california/ However, the National Marine Fisheries Service has identified a plethora of protected species that may be affected by the Humboldt project, ranging from endangered coho salmon to the northern elephant seal and the long-beaked common dolphin. 2.14. Technology is very new, underdeveloped (addressing wave power in general) Patrick Blum, International: Herald Tribune, “A setback for wave power technology, Sunday, March 15, 2009, www.principlepowerinc.com/news/articles/iht_090316.pdf "Part of the problem is the absence of data," he said. "Countries are still at an early stage and don't want to reveal real costs." It's a very young technology, Mr. Chandler (Hugo Chandler, a renewable energy analyst at the International Energy Agency in Paris.) said, but "the indications are that it is considerably more expensive than other technologies."

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