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Summary of May 2009 retreat on research cyberinfrastructure needs

Executive Summary
The Office of the Vice President for Information Technology (OVPIT) and University Information Technology Services (UITS) convened a faculty retreat on May 7, 2009 to discuss strategies to fulfill recommendations given in "Empowering People: Indiana University¶s Strategic Plan for Information Technology 2009". Faculty from such diverse areas as sciences, humanities, and arts were given the opportunity to comment on spe cific Recommendations and Actions from the strategic plan. A key topic ± and a key opportunity for IU ± was to determine where IU can match its research strengths with anticipated research topics important to the nation, federal funding agencies, and the State¶s economy. IU has vast computing power, and must develop the knowledge and community for its researchers and scholars to be able to take advantage of these resources. Major themes and areas of consensus included:

Community. Indiana University should create some sort of mechanisms to support development of and interaction within the community of researchers who use advanced cyberinfrastructure at IU, such as some sort of center. Data-intensive computing. Indiana should continue and expand its focus on data-centric cyberinfrastructure, particularly the following areas:
y y y Development and deployment of innovative hardware and software systems for data storage Development of software tools for management of metadata, provenance, data -centric workflows Development of tools for analysis and markup of digital video

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Sustainability science. Indiana University should pursue opportunities to use advanced information technology in support of its research and development in sustainability science, and should look to mplement useful and i novel approaches to developing a more sustainable cyberinfrastructure. (Sustainability in our cyberinfrastructure is used here in two distinct and important ways: developing cyberinfrastructure that minimizes energy use and environmental impact; and developing cyberinfrastructure that sustains the availability and utility of the data, information, knowledge, and creative works developed by Indiana University). Life sciences. Indiana University should continue its focus on information technology in the life sciences, and particularly the development of novel information technology and informatics approaches useful in the life sciences. Efforts in these areas should continue and be expanded, with particular focus on expansion of information technology useful in translational research and health science service delivery. Performing and fine arts. Indiana University should create a ³black box´ space outfitted with the most advanced and current technology to support performances and displays ofcyberinfrastructure-enhanced fine and performing arts. Humanities. Indiana University should pursue research and development related to the creation of general tools that will be of value in humanities scholarship, building on IU¶s many successes to creat general tools ± e emphasizing the areas of online humanities texts, music, and video.

Introduction
The Office of the Vice President for Information Technology (OVPIT) and University Information Technology Services (UITS) convened a faculty retreat on May 7, 2009 to discuss strategies to fulfill recommendations given in "Empowering People: Indiana University¶s Strategic Plan for Information Technology 2009" [1]. Faculty participants were chosen from a diverse group of areas in the sciences, humanities, and fine and performing arts, and were asked to comment on the following Recommendations and Actions from ³Empowering People´: y Recommendation 1: Indiana University¶s national and international leadership should be sustained through continued maintenance and advancement of an IT infrastructure that is supported by sound fiscal planning. o Action 4: IU should continue to advance its local cyberinfrastructure, participation in national cyberinfrastructure, and its efforts to win federal funding of cyberinfrastructure programs that enhance IU¶s research capabilities. Recommendation 15. While Indiana University should advance IT-enabled research across all disciplines, it should also focus on a few highly promising opportunities for which it has a skills, knowledge, and reputational advantage to push the frontiers of IT -enabled research and scholarship. o Action 70: IU should purposefully select areas of great and timely promise for strategic development of IT-enabled research, scholarship, and/or creative activity.

y

Particular questions asked in advance and discussed at the retreat we re: y y y y In what areas of cyberinfrastructure, networking, and digital scholarship should UITS/OVPIT pursue federal funding to aid IU research accomplishment and IU's stature as a research university? How can UITS/OVPIT best collaborate with IU faculty to promote successful pursuit of research funding by faculty? What areas of infrastructure, service, and facility grants can OVPIT and UITS pursue that will best aid advancement of IU¶s research agenda? What are the best ways to simultaneously achieve a leadership position for IU in IT at the national level and serve IU faculty via pursuit of federal grants?

Twenty-two faculty members wrote short descriptions of particular needs, interests, and areas of opportunity. The faculty members who participated in the retreat or submitted comments in writing are listed in Appendix 1. Written comments, lightly edited, are included in Appendix 2. The day began with introductions by Vice President Brad Wheeler and Dean of Informatics Bobby Schnabel. VP Wheeler discussed the logic behind ³Empowering People´ and its focus on human-centric IU as a plan that succeeds IU¶s highly successful 1998 strategic plan for information technology. Wheeler stressed that the key topic for the day and a key opportunity for IU was to determine where IU can match its research strengths with anticipated research topics of importance to the nation, federal funding agencies, and the State¶s economy. Dean Schnabel, who came to IU in 2007 as IU¶s second Dean of Informatics, is both a national expert and a person who has recent leadership experience at another research university. Dean Schnabel stated that IU is uniquely positioned because of its combination of a strong, central IT organization, the School of Informatics, a President who is a leader in computer science and information technology, and the support of the Lilly Endowment, Inc., venture capitalists, and industrial investors in information technology. As a way to inform discussion of research directions, Dean Schnabel listed several areas of research that are getting significant attention at present in the commercial sector including: ,

y y y y y

Energy and computing ± how to reduce energy consumption of it systems Mobile computing Web 2.0 Social networking (and interfaces between various social networking systems) Health and life sciences

Within the computer science community nationally areas that are garnering considerable attention at present include: y y y Cloud/grid/multicore Large data (provenance) Health/life sciences

College of Arts and Sciences Dean Bennett Bertenthal started off the afternoon discussion with remarks on themes related to cyberinfrastructure, particularly in the humanities and arts. Dean Bertenthal noted that we have, as a community, moved from discussion of computer infrastructure to cyberinfrastructure, a change that properly broadens the discussion to the networking, visualization, and other aspectsof advanced infrastructure required for advances in the sciences as well as humanities and arts. There is considerable challenge for researchers and artists of all sorts in learning to use the tools, share the data, and share the costs of cyberinfrastructure. Supercomputers were first used by social scientists to interpret census data.As processors become ever faster, data storage capability becomes more important. A particular challenge for the Social Sciences is that there is far too little technology expertise available regarding use of advanced cyberinfrastructure for social sciences research. Software tools have also not kept pace with the combination of hardware capabilities and researcher needs. In addition, there are significant problems with heterogeneity of data; uniform data models, metadata, etc. are needed. Technology needs to be made more accessible. Dean Bertenthal set out a grand challenge idea ± we have vast computing power, but we don¶t have the knowledge or community for most of the scholars to be able to take advantage of these resources. Changing that is indeed a grand challenge.

Comment [vpr1]: Lower case?

Major themes and areas of consensus
Community
There was considerable discussion about IU¶s many strengths in the areas of high performance computing, and the dispersion of these strengths across many schools and departments. In one regard, this is a considerable strength ± as are high performance computing, massive data storage systems, and other aspects of IU¶s research cyberinfrastructure. However, this situation means that there is no particular center of gravity or place one can go to walk (physically or virtually) into the middle of the community of IU¶s advanced research IT leaders. A lively discussion led to clear consensus on the following point:

Indiana University should create some sort of mechanisms to support development of and interaction within the community of researchers who use advanced cyberinfrastructure at IU, such as some sort of center.
Related to the general need to build a knowledgeabl and well trained research community, Dr. Hasan Aka e y called attention to the following quote that emphasizes the need to develop a community of scholars (and graduates) with expertise in computational science: ³Inadequate education and training of the nex generation t of computational scientists threatens global as well as U.S. growth of [simulation-based engineering and science] . . . .´ Nearly universally, the panel found concern that students use codes primarily as black boxes, with only a very small fraction of students learning proper algorithm and software development, in particular with an eye towards open-source or community code development.´ [2]

Data-intensive computing
Discussion of data-intensive computing was consistent with the 2005 document ³Final Report of the Indiana University Cyberinfrastructure Research Taskforce.´ [3] This very lively discussion led to clear consensus on the following points:

Indiana should continue and expand its focus on data -centric cyberinfrastructure, particularly the following areas:
y y y

Development and deployment of innovative hardware and software systems for data storage Development of software tools for management of metadata, provenance, data centric workflows Development of tools for analysis and markup of digital video

There was also clear consensus that Indiana University should strive to digitally store its vast wealth of as -yet undigitized data, both for posterity and to facilitate re-use (and citation) of IU¶s intellectual discoveries and artistic creations.

Sustainability science
There was a healthy discussion of IU¶s national and international position in the general area of sustainability science. While this particular term is relatively new, the area itself is not. Indeed, Indiana University created the nation¶s first School of Public and Environmental Affairs in 1972. IU has strong programs in atmospheric science, geology, relevant areas of biology (particularly ecology and evolutionary biology), and anthropology, and as a result is well positioned t be a national leader in o sustainability science. At the same time, there are some areas of sustainability in computing that IU is not well positioned to pursue ± for example, our lack of an engineering school means that IU is not in a position to pursue engineering research. This discussion led to consensus on the following recommendation:

Indiana University should pursue opportunities to use advanced information technology in support of its research and development in sustainability science , and should look to implement useful and novel approaches to developing a more sustainable cyberinfrastructure. (Sustainability in our cyberinfrastructure is used here in two distinct and important ways: developing cyberinfrastructure that minimizes energy use and environmental impact; and developing cyberinfrastructure that sustains the availability and utility of the data, information, knowledge, and creative works developed by Indiana University).

Life sciences
There was quick consensus that life sciences are indeed one of IU¶s top strengths, and the status of the life sciences as one of IU¶s overarching strategic goals is well deserved. A lengthy discussion led to the following basic recommendation:

Indiana University should continue its focus on information technology in the life sciences, and particularly the development of novel information technology and informatics approaches useful in the life sciences. Efforts in these areas should continue and be expanded, with particular focus on expansion of information technology useful in translational research and health science service delivery.

Performing and fine arts.
Perhaps the most quotable phrase of the day came from Associate Professor Margaret D olinsky, one of few artists in the world whose primary medium of expression is virtual reality. Early on in the discussion of cyberinfrastructure and the arts, Dr. Dolinsky remarked, ³Technology will not realize its full potential until it is fused with creativity.´ Dr. Dolinsky¶s written remarks in advance merit quotation at length: ³Researchers today who work in the arts and humanities and explore technologies have the same needs as scientists, i.e., programmers, high end equipment, lab space and student liaisons. Unfortunately artists have little or no recourse to find funding in the United States. This is where forward thinking research institutions become integral to creative research. IU has a history of recognizing this and can become a leader in thisdirection. The sciences can play a pivotal role by sharing facilities, equipment and personnel as well as data and research directions. One priority area could be supporting the arts and humanities with the tools to explore creative research in a supporti e environment that includes programmers, support staff, lab space, v configurable public space and make it possible to have time dedicated to research with travelsupport and equipment funding.´ After a wide-ranging discussion there was strong consensus on one particular recommendation:

Indiana University should create a ³black box´ space outfitted with the most advanced and current technology to support performances and displays of cyberinfrastructureenhanced fine and performing arts.
The capabilities that were desired throughout the discussion ranged from advanced lighting to advanced 3D visualization to and telepresence.

Comment [vpr2]: What is this?

Humanities
Discussion of cyberinfrastructure and the humanities emphasized IU¶s many accomplishments in the humanities. Perhaps best known is the Newton Chymistry project [4], which has substantially changed our understanding of the overall research career of Isaac Newton. IU has led many other highly successful humanities projects, including Variations [5], DIDO [6], CAMVA [7], EVIA [8], and the Indiana sheet music project [9]. A long and productive discussion resulted in the following recommendation:

Indiana University should pursue research and development related to the creation of general tools that will be of value in humanities scholarship, building on IU¶s many successes to create general tools ± emphasizing the areas of online humanities texts, music, and video.
In closing discussions the group switched from themes to tactics, and IU¶s current lack of success gaining NSF funding for major Science and Technology Centers was discussed. IU is now a junior partner in a STC led by Kansas University ± a status we enjoy thanks to our expertise in developing and implementing advanced cyberinfrastructure. IU should pursue STCs to support its research activities and in particular should look for opportunities in research and development of cyberinfrastructure in areas of opportunity discussed in this retreat.

References
[1] Indiana University. 2009. Empowering People: Indiana University¹s Strategic Plan for Information Technology. http://ovpit.iu.edu/strategic2/ [2] John E. West. ³Examining the International Computational Ecosystem ± A Look at the International Assessment of R&D in Simulation-Based Engineering and Science.´ HPCwire. 07 May 2009. http://www.hpcwire.com/features/Examining-the-International-Computational-Ecosystem-44565142.html [3] Final Report of the Indiana University Cyberinfrastructure Research Taskforce. https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/handle/2022/469 [4] Chymistry of Isaac Newton. http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/newton/ [5] Variations2. http://www.dml.indiana.edu/ [6] DIDO ± Digital Images Delivered Online. http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/collections/dido/ [7] CAMVA ± Central American and Mexican Video Archive. http://www.indiana.edu/~clacs/research/camva/ [8] EVIA ± Ethnomusicological Video for Instruction and Analysis Digital Archive. http://www.indiana.edu/~eviada/ [9] IN Harmony: Sheet Music from Indiana. http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/inharmony/welcome.do
Comment [vpr3]: No editing intended here.

Appendix 1. List of faculty members participating in retreat and/or submitting written comments.
Name Akay, Hasan Allen, Colin Barnett, Bill Bertenthal, Bennett Börner, Katy Burke, Raymond Casey, Michael Cate, Fred Chen, Jake Deal, W. Scott Dolinsky, Margaret Edenberg, Howard Evans, Tom P. Fox, Geoffrey Hass, Jeffrey E. Jacquard, Nicole Katz, Barry Kim, Sun Li, Lang Lin, Bill Link, Matt Linnemeier, Micah Liu, Yunlong Long, Scott Marsh, Joss McCaulay, Scott McDonald, Robert H. Melluck, Kim Miller, Mike Pavlis, Gary Pilachowski, Catherine Plale, Beth Rinkovsky, Joe Schnabel, Bobby Shakespeare, Robert Stewart, Craig Stone, Ruth Walsh, John Wheeler, Brad Withnell, Robert Yu, Chen Zero, Domenic Zumbrun, Kevin Department or School Engineering History & Philosophy of Science Research Technologies ± UITS College of Arts & Sciences (Dean) Library & Information Science Business Archives Of Traditional Music Law Informatics Engineering Technology & Music Fine Arts Molecular Biology Geography Pervasive Technology Institute Music Fine Arts Biostatistics Informatics Bioinformatics Engineering Research Technologies ± UITS Library & Information Science Bioinformatics Sociology English Research Technologies ± UITS Libraries Informatics Radiology Geological Sciences Astronomy Informatics, Computer Science Research Technologies ± UITS Informatics Theatre Pervasive Technology Institute Folklore Library & Information Science VP for Information Technology Speech & Hearing Psychological & Brain Sciences Dentistry Mathematics

Appendix 2. Disciplinary input regarding research IT support needs at IU
Prior to the retreat, faculty participants (including faculty who were invitedto attend the retreat but could not due to schedule conflicts) submitted written comments regarding needs related to specific disciplines. These comments, lightly edited for form, are summarized below.

Astronomy
Pipeline processing and analysis of large format imaging d is necessary. The One Degree Imager at the ata WIYN telescope, scheduled for first light in 2010, will produce 1 Gigapixel images over a full degree of sky (the images will be the size of four full moons), with typically 0.6" or better resolution. Planned science programs at IU include galaxy surveys aimed at understanding the star formation history of galaxies of different morphological type (ellipticals, spirals, irregulars), the role of mergers in galaxy evolution, and the identification of complete, volu me-limited samples of galaxies; surveys of globular star clusters in external galaxies as a probe of galaxy formation models; surveys of star cluster to identify faint cluster members and the lower end of the main sequence; surveys of the stellar content of nearby dwarf galaxies dominated by dark matter. N-body simulations of dense stellar systems to follow their dynamical evolution; globular clusters, for example, evolve dynamically on the time scale of Gigayears, eventually undergoing core collapse leadi to the ng formation of close binary systems, as well as the loss of low mass stars from the outer regions of the clusters. N-body simulations involve following the motions and interactions of millions of particles over billions of years. Physically realistic, hydrodynamical simulations of planet-forming disks around young stellar objects are key. Codes include not only N-body interactions and gravitational instabilities, but radiative transfer, thermal heating, turbulence, and grain formation. The goal is t understand the formation of planets and the early o evolution of planetary systems to compare to increasingly detailed astronomical data.

Business
One of IU's strengths is our research on understanding and modeling the factors that drive the financial performance of firms and the behavior of consumers. This topic is particularly salient given the recent problems with the global economy, job losses, and the impending bankruptcy of some of the U.S.'s largest companies. The Kelley School's research in this area is often multidisciplinary and can involve sophisticated computer applications and large databases. For example, our investigations of the factors affecting consumer behavior include text mining of discourse in social networks, audio mining of mass me content, video dia mining of shopper behavior patterns in retail settings, and data mining of web interactions, purchase transactions, and customer loyalty data. These projects could benefit from the coordinated efforts of researchers with economic, behavioral, statistical, and computer science interests and the strategic investment in IT staff as we work with massive databases on customer behavior and develop more advanced tools for data collection and analysis, mathematical modeling, simulation, and visu alization. Another significant opportunity is to use information technology to strengthen IU's international capability and influence. As IU continues to build relationships with other academic and commercial institutions in the U.S. and around the world, we will need more sophisticated tools for electronic collaboration, knowledge sharing and co-creation. These include (1) telepresence capabilities (high-end videoconferencing with low latency, HD video and spatial audio) that allow us to interact with people at rem locations as if they were physically ote present and record and index these interactions for future use, and (2) the ability to build, share, manipulate and navigate photorealistic 3D models, interactive simulations, and multimedia walkthroughs of past, pr sent e and future environments. These tools will help us to bring important people, places and events to the IU campus and extend our reach internationally. (This is mentioned in Actions 11, 12 and 36 of the 2009 Strategic Plan.)

Cognitive Science
Multimedia multi-streaming data mining, data visualization, and annotation. Driven by ubiquitousness of multimedia data, this effort will support various video and audio data collected from multiple fields, from social and behavioral science departments, to music and library departments.

Digital Humanities and Humanities Computing
In the area of digital humanities and humanities computing, IU has a long tradition of support for a small number of high profile projects supported through the Libraries/UITS Digital Library Program (DLP) and more recently the Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities (IDAH) in collaboration with the DLP and UITS's Research Technologies division. Digital Humanities / Humanities Computing covers a diverse range of humanities disciplines (literary studies, classics, art and music history, history of science, ethnomusicology, and so on) and the full range of current information technologies. Projects to date have been led by a small number of faculy who have had to t compete for a limited number of resources. As this field continues to grow and more faculty become aware of the intellectual, scholarly, and practical (i.e., funding and promotional) benefits of combining information technology with the study of the humanities, there will be increasing competition for the relatively limited pool of human and technological resources in IDAH, the DLP, and other relevant units, like the Advanced Visualization Lab. Simply put, to move the next level, IU nee more resources and expertise thrown at this ds important emerging area. Digital Humanities work involves various combinations of: y y y y y y y y y y Text encoding and XML technologies Database technologies Imaging technologies Visualization and virtual environments Mapping and GIS Integration with online learning environments (e.g., Oncourse), Library systems, and social networking environments (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, etc.) Statistical analysis Reliable, scalable, and accessible digital repository services, especia a large suite of web services lly implemented on top of something like FEDORA (<http://www.fedoracommons.org/>) Triple store services for RDF data. Expertise and consulting in the full range of Web and Web 2.0 development technologies (XHTML, Advanced CSS, AJAX, etc.)

IU has excellent support distributed throughout the university in all or most of the areas, but there is simply not enough to go around ± not enough for the scholars currently doing excellent work (demonstrated, for instance, by consistent success in receiving outside funding), not enough to sustain existing projects through lapses in outside funding, and certainly not enough to support the needs of less technically -oriented humanities scholars who wish to extend their traditional humanities research into the area of digital humanities. IDAH, in particular, with strong support from the DLP and UITS, has done a wonderful job of increasing the profile of digital humanities on campus, they are likely to become increasingly stressed and strained as they try to support existing research while at the same time cultivating new research projects.Resources exist at IU, but there could still be better coordination of effort and more dedication of human resources to supporting digital humanities. Except for a few rare cases, humanities scholars need more technological hand-holding to get up and running with digital projects than their counterparts in the sciences, who typically come to the table with more technology training and expertise. Hopefully thiswill be addressed in future generations of

humanities scholars as humanities disciplines begin to recognize the need to incorporate technological competencies into their curricula. IU has all or most of the building blocks for excellent digital humanities infrastructure, but units could improve coordination to develop a coherent and more easily identifiable suite of services for the computing humanist at IU.

Arts and humanities
A priority area in supporting the arts and humanities is providing researchers with the tools to explore creative research in a supportive environment. One example is data storage: being able to store large digital files and share them with collaborators, both inside and outside of IU. Another is the need to have high-resolution displays with high-end graphics machines that can do the work required. Equipment is currently borrowed for short periods of time, which is not conducive to the type of exhibitions required n certain fields. As a result, i work is localized and it is difficult to share the actual experience so oftentimes it is relegat d to publications e and lectures. There is a need for equipment, space and support staff for both development and display/exhibition. The big problem for all graphics researchers is that they can create images but it is near impossible to show them properly. IU should have high-resolution displays with standardized color calibration from researchers¶ offices to the classroom, presentation spaces, etc. It is important for the arts, drama, presentations etc. to be able to go out from the office/ studios and have consistency. In regards to the areas within the Arts (fine arts and performing) as well as certain areas of the Humanities and Social Sciences, concerns go beyond software, storage and analysis to creating tangible , objects/artifacts. In order to make objects/artifacts, overall support and infrastructure that are significantly lacking at IU are in: y y y Acquiring and maintaining up to date CAM & PR&M equipment - that can be used throughout the campus A designated space to house sensitive as well as large -scale equipment ultimately giving access to the entire university Technicians versed in: o Several machining software applications o Practical knowledge of a variety of materials , e.g., plastics, resins, wood, metal, fabrics, foam, paper o Practical knowledge in pre & post-production with a variety of materials Working space for post-production

y

Theatre and Drama
One researcher requires a sophisticated scientific tool to enable an important exploration of the interior of Hagia Sophia in Turkey. Alas, there is no funding stream to acquire a portable handheld spherical spectrophotometer (~$15,000 with software) to accurately capture the energy of the original gold ceiling mosaics and other surfaces, some stored in museums and archives.This researcher is left with having to devise makeshift methods, requiring many hours to determine potential accuracy. One of IU¶s Theatre and Drama Design and Technology faculty is keenly interested in continuing his research in exploring sustainable materials and ³greener´ methods in the practice of implementing scenic designs for the stage. There is no funding stream to provide th work with the ~ $25,000 of industrial manufacturing and is testing equipment. His work could provide the industry with tools to reduce their carbon footprint.

Staging areas and support to explore a variety of ³performance´ based works, facilitating the col laborative visions of artists from several disciplines (Music, Theatre, Dance, Fine Arts, New Media, etc), with a flexible IT infrastructure, would explode the creation of new works on this campus.

Geography
Sustainability science involves data integration challenges (often performed in a GIS framework) as well as computationally intensive modeling over sometimes large spatial extents (e.g. local to regional to global). As a side note, "Sustainability Science" is used here as an umbrella term to include human-environment (HE) interactions. ³HE interactions´ is preferable to "Human impact on Earth" as contemporary research in this area emphasizes the importance of feedback between social and physical domains. Given that the study of environmental change necessarily involves multi-temporal data, there is a need to store and manage large datasets as well as tools to facilitate reformatting of data. Metadata content management and data search challenges (spatial and non-spatial) are additional components to this topic worthy of attention. Complex analytical models (e.g. climate change, urban growth) often produce highly valuable results, but not always in a medium that is the most effective for communication. Data visualization is a useful thematic area that could involve social scientists, natural scientists, policy analysts, cognitive science and informatics/CS to produce tools that more effectively engage stakeholders and policy makers and help transform data to information/knowledge.

Geology
IU Bloomington Specific focus areas: A variety of imaging technologies benefit from high performance computing and facilities like the data capacitor and MDSS. We are using data from the USArray, which is just now at the point of yielding some of the key science results. A general program in earthquake research is intimately linked to computing technology. We use data from USArray and Plate Boundary Observatory components of Earthscope. The big problem in Geology (and possibly the same in many other areas) is not hardware but software. Most progress is limited more by lack of people to develop applications to do calculations related to new ideas. UITS has finally come around over the past decade and recognized that computing is data access and storage as much as it is compute cycles. There remain serious issues in data handling that will need to be advanced in the next several years. Large-scale sensor networks like those in Earthscope are producing staggering amounts of data that people are struggling to handle. More similar facilities are in the pipeline such as the ocean observatories or the Deep Underground Scientific and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). Investment in facilities to processes these data must be maximized. There are similar issues with increasing massive quantities of imagery from satellitebased systems and planetary probes such as the recent Mars probes. Wave propagation simulations for earthquake hazard appraisal has been a major consumer of cycles in current generation high performance systems supported by the NSF. The key players have been people at the Southern California Earthquake center. That effort is ongoing and will likely continue for at least the next decade as they have promising results for this practical problem.

Climate modelers push the frontiers of computing technology constantly, as do those working in numerical modeling meteorology.

Informatics
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology
Sustainability and the environment is an emerging challenge to our society and planet. Human impact on the environment is complex, with economic and legal implications. The data needed to understand issues are diverse, voluminous, and drawn from many sectors and over extended periods of time. IU has substantial outreach and campus action through the Office of Sustainability but research activity is less well organized given the momentum that could exist based on the expertise, interest, and passion on the Bloomingto n campus. The Center for Research in Environmental Sciences is an interdisciplinary group of geologists, biologists, and environmental scientists. Rich research activity exists beyond in the School of Informatics, CiPEC, the Workshop on Political Theory and Analysis, in the School of Law, and likely elsewhere. A focused initiative around a common research agenda could bring these groups together into a powerful university response to this important problem. As Michael Casey and Scott Long point out, preservation of scholarly data is growing increasingly important in the face of rapid technology advances in storage mediums and a growing deluge of scientific and scholarly data. The National Science Foundation is funding several multi million dollar projects in digital preservation through its Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access Network Partners (DataNet) program. It has chosen to organize large repositories by groupings of science/humanities domains. Another approach would be for each university to preserve its own record. With these national efforts underway that may provide solutions for parts of our scholarly record, can the university develop and promote a smaller archive that is sustainable and serves the needs of communities not served by the larger archives? Handling sequence data from the next generation sequencing technologies will be a good research topic for Informatics, Biology, Medical Sciences, and UITS. Equipment, services, and studies critical to these fields include: y y y y y y y y y y y y A large cloud computing environment where big computational jobs can be run in a short period. A web server infrastructure that can host web service with big computing need in a parallel computing environment. A large storage infrastructure that local servers (those in Informatics) can connect directly to. A machine with a large main memory space (>= 128GB) Molecular modeling Multi-scale modeling (molecular -> cellular -> tissue -> clinical endpoints) Computational system biology at molecular and cellular levels Biology: Data Analysis driven by new instruments and large scale processed data such as genome sequences, phylogenetic trees Physics: QCD Simulations Physics: GlueX and ATLAS data analysis Complex Systems: population simulations Polar Science: Matlab based data analysis

Informatics & Computer Science
Develop in-house little cost/no cost ³cloud computing´ research and services that mimic the level of service provided by Amazon. Amazon is impressive in their flexibility of storing and retrieving large data based on dynamic user configurations with growing needs. Providing persistent images to run user programs is also a

huge plus for potential scholarly sharing of the precise scientific experimentation environments without the compromise of source code. Expanding web services to include web 2.0 based web development environment soIU researchers and students can easily build the next level of informatics applications. Currently, the web-based IT support remains at a platform of raw web server (plus TomCat, mySQL connectivity level). With the world moving to web 2.0, IU could consider investing in building infrastructure that support several scalable (open source or commercial) advanced content management systems with plug support for semantic web data repositories -in and advanced visualizations. Working with domain experts to gain a complete archived warehouse of electronic medical records (like what the Jacobs School of Music has done for music). This warehouse would be a rich resource of biomedical informatics research, e.g., research for data mining, information privacy, security, HCI.

Library & Information Science
A number of interdisciplinary areas that are strong at IU include: y y y y Network science, see http://nwb.slis.indiana.edu Epidemic processes, see http://epic.slis.indiana.edu/ Science of science studies, see http://sci.slis.indiana.edu/ Sustainability science

Researchers from the above four sciences need better means to share data, algorithms,and expertise in a fashion similar to Flickr or YouTube. Plus, researchers from many sciences are increasingly interested in making sense of and communicating complex data and processes via aesthetically pleasing and insightful visualizations. The libraries see a few areas in particular as areas for growth and for expansion of services within the framework of the Empowering People document. Examining these larger areas uncovers several components that should be extended in order to provide services for the larger IU community. Most of these fit under the long-term planning section and would involve a variety of collaborative partnership both with UITS, Research Computing and Enterprise Applications. Components include: y y y y Identification of topics that may be bro themes for research programs for years to come ad Data curation and preservation services that leverage UITS investments in storage and library expertise in archival data management. Shared strategies digitizing and making available all IU library collections. Collaborative frameworks for shared data preservation federations that work across institutional boundaries like the HathiTrust that engage our peer partners within the CIC and national and international partners that have like-minded goals. Shared physical spaces within the libraries that leverage a spectrum of services for our planned research commons that would include facilities for visualization, data stewardship, frameworks for shared computational services utilizing such tools as HUBzero and SEASR. Shared strategies for datamining and access to digitized library content housed within the HathiTrust. Shared strategies for managing new media including digital audio and video that scale for the IU system and that complement publishing services being driven by our IU ScholarWorks programs. Concrete strategies for developing sustainable software tools and platforms that are driven from r&d to production level implementation for advancing access to the widest possible array of online content.

y

y y y

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Shared strategies for leveraging institutional access to digital content at the widest level by using shared identity management strategies that can accommodate granular access to material that exists within the confines of current copyright restrictions.

IU has a major strength in "Networks and Complex Systems" ± see recent Research and Creative Activity issue, several relevant Centers at IUB, and the talk series on this topic (http://vw.slis.indiana.edu/netscitalks with more than 100 speakers over the last four years, many from IU). There is also major expertise in "Science of Science" studies, i.e., the study of science by scientific means. Colleagues at SLIS including Lokman Meho (Bibliometrics), Ying Ding (Semantic Web), Blaise Cronin (Citation analysis, informetrics, scholarly communication, and strategic intelligence), and also Johan Bollen (new hire in SI, http://www.mesur.org/MESUR.html) do major work on this topic. In this research, TBs of (streaming) data are federated, analyzed, modeled, visualize in order to improve d information and expertise access, management, and utilization. See also the Mapping Science exhibit at http://scimaps.org or http://www.pnas.org/content/101/suppl.1 (with Rich Shiffrin). The ultimate goal is to serve "daily science forecasts" - very similar to today¶s weather forecasts but filled with breaking news and information on what is collectively known, what new fields are emerging, who/what is driving which R&D, how it all interconnects, etc.

Mathematics
Computing needs of the Mathematics department are modest, but growing. The main computational activities are currently in the areas of: geometry/topology, mainly symbolic computations using MAPLE and MATHEMATICA (Livingston, Edmonds, Weber, Solomon, for example), but also computation of minimal surfaces using PDE solvers both from MATLAB package and handwritten C+ code (Weber, mainly); Fluid dynamics/climatology, sophisticated PDE solvers modeling air/ocean interaction and ocean currents (Institute for Scientific Computation, Temam and Wang); dynamical systems/inertial manifolds and turbulence theory, PDE solvers and high-dimensional ODE solvers, path-following bifurcation analyses (Jolly); Eigenvalue/stability analysis of shock waves and other solutions of gas and fluid dynamics, high-dimensional ODE (Zumbrun). Temam and Zumbrun have expressed intention starting in the Fall 2009 to move to parallelized code to aid in large-scale computations.

Faculty requests
The main requests from informal faculty poll are at the level of infrastructure/ logistics: specifically, more availability/licensing and server support of MATHEMATICA, MAPLE, MATLAB, and convenient access to large-scale (e.g. parallel) computing facilities. Faculty applaud the excellent infrastructure and support already in place, in particular the excellent connectivity and frequent update of faculty desktop machines. One more serious user wondered whether it might be possible to supply more powerful machines on individual basis where there is research need. Requests of logistical nature were better information on how to access software on Libra and Quarry (mentioned as a very nice thing), and information on what software/hardware is and is not available in Tech rooms, and how to have desired software installed if not ava ilable. As part of the push toward internationalization of the University, the more support of video connectivity the better. (This may be essentially obsolete with the advent of Skype, but perhaps even an improved connective environment, readily available, would help.)

Sustainability
Mathematics has a top climatology group in Temam, Wang, and visitors/postdocs at the Institute for Scientific Computing, which is a strength that could fit well with the suggested push in sustainability/global modeling directions. There is also significant strength at theoretical level in materials science (superconductivity, in particular) with Rubinstein (now adjunct) and Sternberg, so the department is well-positioned to lead in the related area of energy science (e.g., photovoltaic and fuel cell design), with just a single, quite feasible hire. One excellent candidate, Keith Promislow of Michigan State, has a proven track record of interface with industry, with multi million dollar grants with Ballard Power (fuel cell technology) in B.C., Canada, and continuing projects with G.M. and other Detroit-based manufacturers, and at the same time is a very strong mathematical analyst. He also has strong ties to IU. (He is an alumnus.) There are several others of this quality that the Mathematics department could attract, and would immediately put IU on the map in this area. The issue is how to put together a position/situation that would attract such a candidate.Perhaps some sort of ³energy chair'' could be supported by industry donor or grant. Of course such a plan would be much more successful as part of a larger push by IU/UITS in the areas of energy science/sustainability. This is an important use of resources from a societal/global point of view, independent of academic positioning.

Life science/complex systems
Certainly these are two areas where IU appears well -poised to lead, through faculty strength, interdisciplinary connections, and computing infrastructure. In any case, the university is already on these paths and should stay the course. Mathematics is benefiting indirectly from this push, with increased activity in immediately surrounding areas, and can also serve as an important technical resource. Current work and collaborations lead toward analysis of large, complicated (but not ³complex'' under the definition given in the panel, as they have a small set of governing rules) diff. equations, and toward bifurcation in natural systems. So, there could conceivably be further interactions in the future.

Data science/handling
Again this seems an area in which IU is well positioned both technologically (UITS) and in faculty infrastructure (Informatics).

Music and Arts Technology
Preservation of music research data involves more than bit-level preservation. It also includes preservation services such as data integrity checks, linking of metadata to files, audit trails, etc. that are found in what is known as a preservation repository or a trusted digital repository. Such a repository for research data is onl y partly developed here. Preservation of research data for us also involves the conversion of analog recordings to digital objects. This is a huge problem on the Bloomington campus, which holds well over 300,000 degrading audio and video recordings plus fim. There are no plan for these materials at present. l Development of communications/interactive software that address needs of the performing arts communities is necessary. Current multi-disciplinary arts and humanities networked efforts require a customi ed synthesis z of existing applications for networked transmission of high fidelity audio and video streaming, synchronization, virtual machine control, motion/data capture, and integration with existing media and live players. Further research is needed to develop a networked environment capable of the following criteria:

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Utilizing current formats (such as HD SDI audio/video) with minimal compression and latency (less than 30ms) for up to ten remote locations simultaneously. A single platform for video and audio control interacting with and displaying imagery. Communications menu for real-time control and direction of players and technicians with ability to install plug-ins and other customized features. Affordable, manageable and dual platform interface tailored to artists. Ability to function well in a broad range of bandwidth configurations, from research -grade Internet2 to Commodity Internet (DSL). Developing media-rich arts spaces. Multiple facilities are needed to meet a range of functions from "laboratory/studio" spaces for creation and rehearsal, to flexible venues suitable for high -end public presentation of performances, exhibitions and installations. While the construction of a good black box performance venue requires a major financial initiative, upgrading selected studios and spaces across the campus system could be a very positive action in the right direction.

Some examples of successful facilities include: y y The Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute: http://empac.rpi.edu/ The Roy and Edna Disney Cal Arts Theater (REDCAT): http://www.redcat.org/

Individual digital artist/researcher needs are minimal compared to most scientific areas, howe the ver institutional need for a flexible, shared performance space for digital audio, video, dance technology (such as video tracking and sensor networks) and mixed-media works produced needs to be a priority. Performance space should include highly networked, current state-of-the art systems for pervasive sound diffusion arrays, video distribution networks and projection, reconfigurable seating and performance area. Without such an outlet for public performance, no amount of creative activity in the dig arts can reach the ultimate goal of ital realization in an appropriate venue at the institution where it was created. The resources to fund both the technology and bricks and mortar for such a facility is beyond the ability of individual units in the crea tive digital arts areas. Some existing models include: y Sonic Arts Research Centre (SARC), Belfast, Ireland: http://www.sarc.qub.ac.uk/main.php?page=building&bID=1 http://www.sarc.qub.ac.uk/main.php?page=soniclab NOVARS Research Centre for Electroacoustic Composition and Sound-Art, Manchester, UK: http://www.novars.manchester.ac.uk/facilities/index.html Duderstadt Center Video and Performance Studio, U. Michigan: http://www.dc.umich.edu/index.html

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School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI
Grand challenge applications in the IUPUI School of Engineering and Technology include: y Computational Energy Science and Engineering o Computational battery and fuel cell dynamics o Advanced coal research o Solar energy o Wind energy Multiscale materials modeling o Simulations from atomic and molecular levels to continuum levels Computational Neurosciences and Mechanics

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Computational Cardiovascular Mechanics o Complete simulation of human cardiovascular system Cyber Security Computational processing of smart electric grids Pattern recognition and signal processing o Biometrics, especially biometrics application to large population. o medical image processing, especially real- time medical image processing for surgery needs o Hyperspectral image processing, for real time target detection and recognition o 3D image processing Real time simulators with 3D graphics Music Technology: Customized synthesis of applications for networked transmission of high fidelity audio and video streaming, synchronization, virtual machine control, motion/data capt re, and u integration with existing media and live players ± Scott Deal¶s research via Internet2 Wireless systems and sensors for vehicular safety ± vehicle to vehicle (V2V) and a vehicle to infrastructure (V2I) laboratories

Next generation computing needs and ideas include: y y Access to easy-to-use high performance scientific computing tools, including application portals and grid gateways for parallel computing, grid computing, and advanced visualizations A collaborative environment for university-wide graduate level interdisciplinary computational science and engineering degree programs or minors. Joint development of online and for credit core courses (three or four) related to computational mathematics, simulations methods, software engineering, parallel and grid computing offered online for interdisciplinary applications. See e.g., o http://www.cse.illinois.edu/index.html, o http://www.coe.berkeley.edu/departments/engineering -science/computational-engineeringscience.html o https://engineering.purdue.edu/ProEd/credit/CompEng

Sociology
A potential priority area was conceived from a recent mailing/brochure from UITS called ³Protecting Red -Hot DATA,´ which dealt entirely with administrative data. The same effort and resources should be devoted to protecting and preserving research data.