You are on page 1of 574

|--|--|->

|
-

"HE HISTORICAL AND LITERARY COMMITTEE

-

- AN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.

|
|

* Apple
|

---, -, -,

|--|--

-, -

\
TRANSACTIONS

of

THE HISTORICAL AND LITERARY COMMITTEE

of The

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.

VOLUMENIII-SPART I.

PHILADELPHIA:
PUBLISHED BY CAREY AND HART.

1843.

LIST
of

THE MEMBERS OF THE HISTORICAL AND LITERARY
COMMITTEE.

Peter S. Du Ponceau,

James Mease,
Nicholas Biddle,

Nathaniel Chapman,
Benjamin H. Coates,
Robley Dunglison,
J. Francis Fisher,
James Gibson,

Charles J. Ingersoll,
John K. Kane,

Charles D. Meigs,
William Meredith,

George Ord,
Robert M. Patterson,

John Pickering, Boston,
Joseph Reed,
John Sergeant,
Thomas Sergeant,
Job R. Tyson,
William Short,
Robert Walsh,
Samuel B. Wylie,

Eugenius Nulty.

[ iv |
DECEASED MEMBERS.

B. Allison,
Nicholas Collin,
Zaccheus Collins,

Joseph Correa da Serra, Lisbon,
John E. Hall,
David Hosack, New York,
Thomas C. James,
Thomas Jefferson, Monticello, Va.

George Izard, Arkansas,
George Logan, of Stenton,
William Rawle,
Charles Smith,
Isaiah Thomas, Worcester, Mass.

William Tilghman,
Caspar Wistar,
Thomas Cooper, Columbia, S.C.
Joseph Hopkinson,
Condy Raguet,
William H. Keating,
Benjamin R. Morgan,
Joseph P. Norris,
John Vaughan.

A

LIST
OF THE

PRESIDENTS OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY,
HELD AT PHILADELPHIA,

FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, elected 2d January, 1769; died 17th April,
1790.

DAvID RITTENHoUSE, elected 7th January, 1791; died 26th June,
1796.

THOMAs JEFFERSON, elected 6th January, 1797; resigned in Janu
ary, 1815; died 4th July, 1826.
CASPAR WISTAR, elected 6th January, 1815; died 22d January,
1818.

RoBERT PATTERson, elected 1st January, 1819; died 22d July,
1824.

WILLIAM TILGHMAN, elected 7th January, 1825; died 29th April,
1827.

PETER S. DU PoNCEAU, elected 4th January, 1828.

CONTENTS

of

THIRD

WOLUME-FIRST PART.

1. Historical Sketch of Continental Paper Money.

By SAMUEL

BRECK.

2. The Social and Intellectual State of the Colony of Pennsylvania
prior to the Year 1743.

By JoB R. Tyson.

3. Biographical Notice of Edward Livingston.

By HENRY D.

GILPIN.

4. The Effects of Secluded and Gloomy Imprisonment on Indivi
duals of the African Variety of Mankind in the Production of
Disease.

By BENJAMIN H. CoATEs, M.D.

ADVERTISEMENT

THIRD

VOLUME–FIRST

PART.

THE Papers comprised in the present Publication were presented
to The American Philosophical Society by their respective Authors,
during the Special Sessions which followed the Celebration of its
Hundredth Anniversary, on the 25th of May last. On motion, the
Society referred them to its Historical and Literary Committee, with
power to take order thereon, and they are now published by direction
of that Committee.

PHILADELPHIA, November 9th, 1843.

HISTORICAL SKETCH

of

CONTINENTAL

P A P E R

M O N E Y.

BY

SAMUEL BREC K.

PHILADELPHIA:
JOHN C. CLARK, PRINTER, 60 DOCK STREET.
1843.

HISTORICAL SKETCH

of

CONTIN ENTAL PAPER

MONEY.

IN this brief History of Continental Paper Money, I shall endea
vour to trace its origin, rapid increase and downfall; the cause of its
depreciation; the honest intention of Congress to redeem it; set forth
the mode suggested by that body for its full payment; and inciden
tally show its powerful, if not indispensable agency in gaining our
Independence.
I propose, moreover, to demonstrate, that the non-redemption of
that paper money operated upon the people of that day, by its gradual
depreciation, [until its final extinction,] as nothing more than a mo
derate tax; that no sentiment of repudiation was ever entertained by
Congress; that many examples, before and since, both in Europe
and America, may be alleged, in extenuation of the neglect this pa
per met with; and I shall conclude with a short review [by a foreign
pen principally] of the temper of the people during the Revolution;
the effect this unsettled currency, for so long a period, had on their
morals; and attempt a comparison between the Americans of that
day and of this.
On the 10th of May, 1775, immediately after the battle of Lex

4.

ington, Congress prepared its first emission of Continental Colonial
Bills, and on the 22d of June, as soon as the news of the battle of

Bunker Hill reached Philadelphia, two millions of Spanish milled
dollars, [so called,] purporting to be for the defence of America,

were put in circulation; the confederated Colonies standing pledged
for their redemption.

Congress appointed twenty-eight citizens of Philadelphia to sign
and number the bills: the names of two being necessary to each bill.
Each gentleman was allowed, out of the Continental treasury, one
dollar and one-third for each and every thousand bills signed and
numbered by him. At foot will be found the names of the persons
entrusted with this duty."

Contracts were made with printers for proper paper, and for print
ing them. To administer these paper funds, joint treasurers were
appointed at a salary of five hundred dollars; and the number of in
habitants of all ages, including negroes and mulattoes, in each Co
lony, was taken, by approximation of course, in order to levy the
ways and means to pay the bills whenever they should be presented
at the treasury. They were taken for taxes and cancelled; and in
order to keep up their credit, the treasurers were directed, whenever

*Luke Morris,
Samuel Meredith,
Judah Foulke,
Samuel Morris,
Frederick Kuhl,
Robert S. Jones,
Thomas Combe,
Ellis Lewis,

John Mease,
Thomas Lawrance,

Daniel Clymer,
John M. Nesbit,

Anthony Morris,
Mordecai Lewis,

Thomas Barclay,
John Bayard,
Wm. Craig,
Thomas Bartow,
John Shee,

George Mifflin,
Robt. Tuckniss,
Andrew Bunner,
William Jackson,

Isaac Hazlehurst,
Robert Morris,

Jos. Sims,

James Milligan,
James Reed.

5

they happened to receive silver or gold, to advertise their readiness
to pay the same for Continental Bills to all persons requiring an ex
change.
In November of the same year, three millions came out in bills of
various value, as low as one-third, one-half, and two-thirds of a dol

lar, and from one dollar to eighty. The Colonies were called upon
to sink proportionally a sum of three millions.

In fixing the pro

portion to redeem that amount, Virginia was rated the highest, and
stood charged with

-

-

-

Massachusetts came next, at

-

-

Pennsylvania, third, at

-

-

Maryland, fourth, at -

-

-

-

-

$496,000

-

-

434,000

-

-

372,000

-

-

310,000

and in the fifth class there are four Colonies, all rated alike; name

ly, Connecticut, North Carolina, South Carolina, and New York!
Each of these rated at

-

-

-

-

$248,000

By the foregoing scale we find the relative wealth, by Congres
sional estimation, of those Colonies, at the beginning of the war,
sixty-eight years ago.

It is worthy of remark, that the State of

New York, the capital of which was then unoccupied by the enemy,
is placed at little more than half of Massachusetts, while Boston was
in the possession of the British.
On the occasion of a subsequent recommendation of a new tax,

when the City of New York was held by the British,

Congress

aS

sessed the State of New York at one-fourth of Virginia and Massa
chusetts, and at a less sum than New Jersey.

The City of New

York, at that period, was a town of small dimensions and moderate
Commerce.

In the month of June of the year 1787, on my return from a re
sidence of a few years in France, I arrived at that city, and found it

6

a neglected place, built chiefly of wood, and in a state of prostration
and decay. A dozen vessels in port; Broadway, from Trinity
Church inclusive down to the Battery, in ruins, owing to a fire that
had occurred when the city was occupied by the enemy, during the
latter end of the war.

The ruined walls of the burnt houses stand

ing on both sides of the way, testifying to the poverty of the place,
five years after the conflagration: for although the war had ceased
during that period, and the enemy had departed, no attempt had been
made to rebuild them.

In short, there was silence and inactivity

every where; and the whole population was very little over twenty
thousand.

One can scarcely realize her rapid increase from so small a con
dition, at so recent a period, to her size and importance in the pre
sent day, when she may be classed for population, wealth and trade,
among the chief cities of the world.
Before the close of the year 1775, a census of the inhabitants was
ordered by Congress for a due apportionment of taxes; and on the
last day but one of that year, it was resolved that the silver and gold
in the treasury be counted, and forwarded to the northern army
under a guard, and that the treasurers be empowered to employ a
broker to collect silver and gold in exchange for Continental Paper.
Early the next year, difficulties began to arise. The bills were
sometimes refused; confidence was weakened; and depreciation fol.
lowed. Then came from Congress and the committees of safety,
threatening resolutions denouncing the refractory.

It was the first

serious emergency, and required prompt relief. Patriotic men who
had the means, stepped forward to redeem the bills at par; some of
whom exchanged as much as a thousand pounds in silver for a like
sum in paper.

When Congress, hastening to propose a remedy,

7

“Resolved, that if any person shall hereafter be so lost to all virtue
and regard for his country, as to refuse to receive the bills in pay
ment, or obstruct and discourage the currency or circulation thereof,
and shall be duly convicted by the committee of safety of the district,
such person shall be deemed, published and treated as an enemy of
the country, and precluded from all trade or intercourse with the
inhabitants of these colonies.”

On the 26th December, 1776, General Washington was autho
rized to arrest and confine those who rejected the Continental cur
rency, and make a return of their names to the authorities of the

States in which they resided. The council of safety of Pennsylvania
was invited to take most vigorous and speedy steps for punishing all
such as refused the bills, and the General was directed to give aid
to the council: meantime Virginia and the other States were be
sought to furnish all the gold and silver they could procure, and take
paper in exchange.
In May, 1776, five millions were again emitted, and in the autumn,
five millions more. Although some specie was imported, it could not
avail against such profuse issues.
tinued to sink.

Credit, already on the wane, con

The States did not respond to the call for aid; the

power of taxing was virtually denied, by its shackled conditions in
the articles of confederation, and paper continuing to depreciate, an
attempt was made, in imitation of the mother country, to raise a
revenue by the establishment of a national lottery. The trial was
a failure; for the scheme, which was to sell tickets for specie, at
twenty dollars, and pay the prizes in treasury notes, bearing four
per cent. interest, did not induce many to adventure; so that no
other resource was left for the prosecution of the war, than a fresh
emission of paper money. But the people refusing to sell their pro

8

duce for it at par, Washington was authorized to seize the supplies
for the army wherever he could find them, and imprison those who
rejected the bills offered in payment.
The years 1776 and 1777 proved as unpropitious to the paper
credit as the preceding; and very strong measures were resorted to
for the purpose of fixing, by constraint, a value on the currency; of
compelling the people to receive as substance a mere shadow; of
putting the stamp of reality on a fiction: measures which were at
variance with justice and expediency, and which operated on the
people with the harshness of despotism. The resolutions which fol
low will show the bad temper of the great men who ruled at the head
of affairs, and their momentary forgetfulness of the rights of their
constituents.

On the 3d of December, 1777, Congress recommended to the le.
gislative authorities of the respective States to enact laws, requiring
persons possessed of bills of credit, struck under the sanction and
authority of the King of Great Britain, forthwith to deliver the same
to be exchanged for Continental Money: and those which shall not
be so delivered in, shall thenceforth become utterly irredeemable.
Again they “Resolved (in 1777), that the Continental Money
ought to be supported, at the full value expressed in the respective
bills, by the people of these States, who stand bound to redeem the
same according to the like value, and to guard against the pernicious
artifices of the enemies of liberty, who impair the credit of said bills
by raising the nominal value of gold and silver.” It was further
“Resolved, that all bills of credit emitted by Congress ought to pass
current in all payments, trade and dealings, in these States, and
be deemed in value equal to the Spanish dollar; and it is recom
mended to the Legislatures of these States, to pass laws inflicting

9

forfeitures and other penalties on all who do not sell their lands,
houses, goods, &c., for Continental Bills at specie value; and that
the said Legislatures be requested to enact laws to make the bills of
credit issued by Congress a lawful tender in payment of public
and private debts; and a refusal thereof, an extinguishment of such
debts: that debts payable in sterling money be discharged with
continental dollars at four shillings and sixpence sterling per dollar

[that is to say, at par], and that in discharge of all other debts and
contracts, continental dollars pass at the rate of a Spanish milled
dollar.”

Buoyed up by these enactments, Congress sent forth, on the 22d
of May, five millions of dollars of various denominations, decorated
with new emblems, escutcheons and secret marks, to prevent coun
terfeiting. And this emission was followed by another of one mil
lion, and on the 7th of November by one million more.
The pernicious legislation just adverted to could result in nothing
but the ruin of the confiding patriot, while it enabled the unprinci
pled debtor to pay his debts at an enormous discount. That result
soon became evident, and to a degree so alarming, that Congress
earnestly besought the states to repeal their iniquitous tender-laws;
those very laws which had been so pressingly recommended by that
body itself not many months before.
The whole amount of paper money issued during the war, was
about three hundred millions of dollars; but the collections made by
the Continental government in various ways, cancelled, from time to
time, the one-third: so that the maximum of circulation, at no one

period, exceeded two hundred millions.

Nor did it reach that sum,

until its depreciation had compelled Congress to take it in, and pay
it out, at the rate of forty paper dollars for one in hard money.
p

10

It kept nearly at par for the first year, during which period only
nine millions were issued; an amount about equal to the specie then
held in all the colonies.

And when used in that moderate way, it

passed with very little depreciation; but soon after, when the emis
sions increased rapidly, it fell proportionably in value, going on from
year to year, in its downward course, until Congress, as we have
seen above, fixed the scale, by law, at forty for one.

But million

following million in quick succession, lessened its exchangeable rate,

from day to day, to the agio of five hundred, and then one thousand,
for one, when it ceased to circulate.

Congress had exchanged some of the notes at forty for one, by
giving the holder loan office certificates at par, and offered to redeem
the whole in the same way, at one thousand for one, when they had
sunk to that price.

But those very loan office, and other certificates

of debt, bore in market no higher price than two shillings and six
pence on the pound, or eight dollars for one; so that very few
availed themselves of that offer.

Those public securities bearing various names, such as loan office
certificates, depreciation certificates, final settlements, &c., were
given to the public creditors, who had demands for moneys lent,
supplies furnished, services rendered, &c., and constituted the Con
gressional debt at the end of the war. They consisted of obligations
or bonds, bearing interest at six per cent, and were entirely distinct
in character and tenor from the money bills, which bore no interest,
and were used altogether as currency. The value of those certifi
cates in market, as I have already said, was not more than seven or
eight for one, until the adoption of the present Constitution in 1789,
when they were funded, and rose to par.
In the Journal of Congress of the 29th April, 1783, an estimate

1I

of the whole revolutionary debt is given [except the paper money],
and it stands thus:

1. Foreign debt to France and Holland,

$ 7,885,085 00

2. Domestic debt, in various certificates, as above,

34,115,290 06

$42,000,375 00

The foreign, bearing interest at four and five per
cent., and amounting to

-

-

The domestic at six per cent, and amounting to

- $ 369,038 06
2,046,917 04

$2,415,956 10

When the constitution, by which we are now governed, went into
operation, Alexander Hamilton, the first Secretary of the Treasury,
added to the domestic debt the claims held by several States against
the national exchequer, to the amount of twenty-one million five

hundred thousand dollars, and then funded the whole, by putting
a part on interest at six per cent immediately; postponing a part,
without interest, for ten years, and then to bear six per cent;
and the remainder on immediate interest at three per cent. The
arrears of six years interest were added, which, with some other un
settled claims, made the whole debt amount to ninety-four millions.
Accustomed as we are, at the present day, to the large expendi
ture of the federal government, we may well be astonished at the
economy of the first year of Washington's administration, when the
civil list was estimated at two hundred and eight thousand dollars,
and the war department at only one hundred and thirty-seven thou
sand, including even the Indian supplies.

12
-

The establishment of a revenue to pay the interest on the debt, in
1789, was equivalent to a capital (by bringing that debt to par) of

nearly one hundred millions, the greater part of which was held by
our own citizens: this was the cause of immediate prosperity, and
of the brilliant career which continued for many years after.

Every

dollar of this aggregate debt was, as we all know, most honourably

paid.
I have deviated from the main subject, for a moment, in order to
give a brief exposition of the first national debt, under the funding
system of a celebrated financier, and now return to the consideration
of the unredeemed paper money.
The illustrious statesmen of the revolutionary Congress had the
best disposition to pay that currency, and they professed to have the
ability so to do. They felt themselves bound in honour to discharge,
at their full value, bills emitted by themselves, and bearing on their
face a solemn engagement to redeem them in Spanish dollars, or the
value thereof, in gold or silver. To do this, however, required a
season of tranquillity; but the country was invaded by land and by
water; it required power to levy taxes, and this was denied them;

it required the industry of peaceful times to enable the people to con
tribute; but the war, in constant activity, baffled every attempt at
regular employment.

Congress had not even a choice of evils;

they had no alternative.

One source of revenue only was at their

command, and that was the emission of bills of credit. The very
necessity of the case forced them to misuse and abuse it; for even
in its depreciated condition, paper money offered facilities so attrac
tive, that the great men at the head of affairs, always intending to
pay them, were glad to find the people willing, at the current ex

13

change, to receive that which could be so easily and liberally sup
plied.
“Who,” said a member during a debate upon this subject, “will
consent to load his constituents with taxes, when we can send to our

printer and get a wagon load of money, and pay for the whole with
a quire of paper?” And with wagon loads thus cheaply obtained,
they carried on the campaigns of the two years, 1778 and 1779,
keeping an army of thirty or forty thousand men in the field, issuing

paper to the amount of sixty-three millions for the former year, and
seventy-two millions for the latter; and thus, with an active printing
press, and a few commissioners hired by the day or by the job to
sign the bills, ways and means were found to defray almost the
whole expense of the civil list, the army and navy, and contingen
cies. There was, indeed, a little hard money passing through the
treasury. The exact sums received in both those years having been
officially reported to Congress, stand recorded on their journals. If
it were not attested in this authentic shape, it would be difficult to
believe it.

Marvellous as it may appear, the aggregate of gold and

silver received into the treasury for the year 1778 was only seventy

eight thousand six hundred and sixty-six dollars [$78,666]; and for
the year 1779 the sum of seventy-three thousand dollars [$73,000]:
so that the whole machinery of government was carried on, for two
entire years, as far as concerned the agency of specie, with one hun
dred and fifty-one thousand six hundred and sixty-six dollars!! So
small an expenditure, in metallic currency, shows the powerful
agency of paper in the belligerent operations at that critical period;
performing as it did, in spite of counterfeits and depreciation, the
office of hard money.
This handful of solid coin, which, in gold, would weigh only

14

seven hundred pounds, and might be put into a wheelbarrow, was
all that came, as we have seen, into the public chest for two years;
and we may not be surprised at government being so chary of it, as
to refuse General Washington's demand of a small share, to pay a
part of the bounty to enlisted soldiers. In denying him, they de
clared that the precious metals must be kept for the commissaries of
prisoners, to be used where paper would not pass.
Paper money continued to be the chief instrument in the hands of
government. The press was kept in perpetual motion.

Printers

who laboured at it obtained an exemption from militia duty.

Rag

ged and torn notes were replaced, and bills of every denomination
were issued in millions.

The form of those bills, as settled by Congress, was thus:
CONTINENTAL CURRENCY.
Dollar

No.

This bill entitles the bearer to receive

Spanish milled dol

lars, or the value thereof in gold or silver, according to a resolution
of Congress.
On each bill was stamped a rudely printed emblem, with a Latin
motto, amounting in number to twenty. Those devices and pithy
sentences are said to have been composed by Benjamin Franklin and
Charles Thompson, aided by the Latinists of the Continental Con
gress.

Those mottoes, placed opposite to each denomination of the bills,
are as follows:
Denomination
of the Bills.

1 Dollar. Depressa Resurgit.
2

Tribulatio Ditat.

15
3 Dollars. Exitus in dubio est.
33

Aut Mors, aut vita Decora.
Sustine vel Abstine.

|

25

Serenabit.

35

Majora Minoribus consonant.

20

35

Vi concitatae.

30

55

Sirecte facies.

35

Perseverando.

30

(On the reverse) cessante vento conquiescemus.

35

23

Hinc opes.

40

**

The only English motto—“Confederation,” except
on the bills of a fractional part of a dollar.

45

55

Sic floret Respublica.

50

35

Perennis.

55

35

Post Nubila Phoebus.

60

35

Deus regnat Exultet Terra.
Fiat Justitia.

65
70

35

Quadrennium Sustinuit, Wim Procellarum.

80

35

Florescebit et in Secula Seculorum.

Eighty was the highest denomination issued.
On the small bills of one-third, one-half, and two-thirds of a dol

lar, “Fugio” was the Latin motto, and in English, “mind your
business.”

Decorated with these fine maxims, Congress sent forth this cheap
defence of the nation, with a recommendation to the Legislatures of
the States not only to make the bills a lawful tender in payment of

public and private debts, but in case of refusal to receive them, to
declare such refusal an extinguishment of the debt.
They were requested, likewise, to stop the emission of their own

16

State paper, and to adopt the Congressional currency for a circu
lating medium.
Conventions, to consist of four or five adjacent States, were, more
over, designated by Congress as necessary, in order to regulate the
price of

labour,

manufactures, country produce, and all imported

goods, as well as the charges of inn-holders; and to enact suitable
laws to empower the commissaries of the army to take from fore
stallers, engrossers and others, who might have a larger supply than
their families required, all such articles for government use as were
wanted, and at such cost as the law thus enacted should fix.

The

price of provisions, and of every thing needed by the army, was to
be settled also in this arbitrary way: and all for the purpose, say
Congress, of checking “a spirit of sharping and extortion, and the
rapid and excessive rise of every thing.” Amid all these coercive
regulations, it could not but be obvious to every thinking man, that
the only cause of the derangement of the prices was the excessive
issue of paper.
In the year 1778, a very laudable effort was made to create a
sinking fund, by establishing an annual tax of six millions of dollars
for eighteen years. A committee was directed to prepare a plan
that should specifically appropriate that sum to the extinguishment
of the Continental debt.

Yet very little confidence was placed in

those good intentions, if we may judge by the rapid depreciation at

this period; which, indeed, was such, that Congress could no longer
force the circulation at prescribed rates, in reference to metallic

money; and it was, therefore, resolved by that body, on the 8th of
October, 1778, “that all limitation of prices of silver and gold be
taken off.”

The circular to the States, when the tax for the year 1779 was

17

called for, is a very moving address, replete with ardent feeling, and
contains, among other matter, the following in relation to paper
money:—

“Being in the outset at war, without arms or ammunition, without
military discipline or permanent finances, without an established
government or allies, enfeebled by habitual attachments to our very
enemies, we were precipitated into all the expensive operations inci
dent to a state of war, with one of the most formidable nations on

earth—we, from necessity, embraced the expedient of emitting paper
money on the faith of the United States; an expedient which had
often been successfully practised in separate colonies, while we were
subject to British dominion.

Large issues were of consequence ne

cessary, and the paper currency multiplied, of course, beyond what
was required for the purposes of a circulating medium. To raise
the value of our paper money, nevertheless, and to redeem it, will

not, we are persuaded, be difficult.” They only ask

for time and

patience, and fix on the first day of January, 1797, or about eighteen
years, for the full payment of their debts.

-

A few months after, when the depreciation of the currency kept
on increasing, that illustrious Congress raised its voice again, in the
following appeal:—
“America, almost totally stripped of commerce, and in the weak
ness of youth, as it were, with ‘a staff and a sling only, dared, ‘in

the name of the Lord of Hosts, to engage a gigantic adversary pre
pared at all points, boasting of his strength, and of whom even
mighty warriors ‘were greatly afraid.

Our enemies prosecuting

the war by sea and land with implacable fury, taxation at home and
borrowing abroad, in the midst of difficulties and dangers, were alike
impracticable.
c

Hence the necessity of new emissions.”

18

The whole of this address, too long for insertion, is evincive of
strong anxiety, but without despondency. On the contrary, it speaks
throughout the language of patriotic firmness, never for a moment

admitting a doubt of success. Neither does it attempt to disguise

**PPalling state of affairs. The naked truth is told, and a remedy
proposed for every calamity. Among the numerous vexations which
annoyed Congress, loud and frequent complaints refer to monopo
lizers, and the prodigality of the inferior officers, both civil and mili
tary.

* emissions continued until two hundred millions of dollars
were in circulation at one time; that is to say, seven or eight times
* much as was wanted for a circulating medium: consisting, too,
of bills bearing no interest; having no specific fund appropriated for
their redemption; nothing, in short, but the promises of a govern
"till organized, and in a state of revolution. They could not fail
to break down. No patriotism, however ardent, could sustain them.
Yet the brave men, at the head of affairs, went into a computation

suited to allay the fears of the people, and showed by a State Paper,
which will be

presently cited, that resources belonged to the country

sufficient to meet all demands.

But the last day of the usefulness of Continental Paper Money was
fast approaching. The bills of the individual States had generally
become so worthless, that even Congress would not receive them into
its treasury. Congressional bills were, however, kept in circulation
at a great discount until May, 1781, when they fell to five hundred,
and subsequently to one thousand paper dollars for one silver, and
ceased as a currency. Two hundred millions lost all their value,
and were laid aside.

The annihilation was so complete, that barbers’ shops were pa

19

pered, in jest, with the bills; and the sailors, on returning from their
cruise, being paid off in bundles of this worthless money, had suits
of clothes made of it, and with characteristic lightheartedness turned
their loss into a frolic, by parading through the streets in decayed
finery, which, in its better days, had passed for thousands of dol
lars!

The campaign of 1781 was carried on in solid coin; nevertheless
the bills of a few of the States still lingered in circulation. I have
in my possession the receipt of Thomas Knox, dated at Boston in
that year, for three thousand three hundred dollars, for piloting in
and out of port, a distance of nine miles each way, the French
frigate L'Astrée, commanded by the celebrated Laperouse. The
specie price was twenty dollars.
I possess, likewise, original documentary papers, in tabular detail,
showing a loss, by the public chest of Rochambeau's army, of one
million six hundred and sixty-one thousand, eight hundred and se
wenty-two dollars. The intendant of the army endorsed on the
bundles—“This paper being at present valueless, the loss must be
charged to the king.” But it must be recollected, that for some
years its most favourable discount was forty for one.

-

*

In General Washington's account current with the United States,
the last transaction in paper currency is dated May, 1781.
The discredit and final rejection of that money was owing, in a
great measure, to the illiberal terms of the confederation. Had Con

gress possessed, unfettered, the power of taxation and levying of im
posts, the emissions would have been moderate, and somewhat pro
portioned to the specie in the country.

But what could they do

under such a compact as follows:
1st. They were authorized to recommend to the several States,

20

and nothing more, the consent of every one of which was necessary,
to give legal sanction to any act so recommended.
2dly.

They could not assess or levy taxes.

3dly. They had no power to execute punishments, except in the
military department.
4thly. They could not regulate trade.
5thly. They could institute no general judicial powers.
6thly. Neither could they regulate public roads, or inland naviga
tion.

With such an inefficient form of government, they failed in almost
every appeal for pecuniary aid.

They were

even denied, by the

single veto of Rhode Island, the establishment of an impost of only
five per cent. on imported goods, which, after great difficulty and
delay, had been ratified by all the other States. Unanimity being
a constitutional requirement, that measure, so obviously necessary,
SO moderate in its amount, so gentle and equal in its operation, was
defeated by the negative of the smallest State in the confederation.
Nor could the entreaty of Congress, contained in a long argumenta
tive report, addressed to Rhode Island, and drawn up by Alexander
Hamilton, James Madison, and Thomas Fitzsimmons, cause that

State to retract. A letter from Benjamin Franklin, on this subject,

dated Passy, December 23, 1782, says: “Our people certainly ought
to do more for themselves. It is absurd the pretending to be lovers
of liberty, while they grudge paying for the defence of it. It is said
here, that an impost of five per cent on all goods imported, though
a most reasonable proposition, had not been agreed to by all the
States, and was, therefore, frustrated.”

Sustaining the bills of credit, by the public, under such circum
stances, and for the length of time they did so, appears to me, one

21

of the most praiseworthy passages in our revolutionary history,
pregnant alike with honour to our forefathers for their confidence in
the illustrious administrators of the government, and with fidelity to
the glorious cause for which they fought. And this reliance on the
honourable intentions of the Congress of that day is fully vindicated
by a manifesto issued by that body, which, although inserted in a
former essay on this subject, is, from the noble sentiments it con
tains, worthy of a second transcript here.
“Suppose,” says the Congress of 1779, “that at the conclusion of
the war, the emissions should amount to two hundred millions; that
the loans should amount to another hundred millions; then the whole
national debt of the United States would be three hundred millions.

There are at present three millions of inhabitants in the thirteen
States: Three hundred millions of dollars divided among three mil

lions of people, would give to each person one hundred dollars. And
is there,” they ask, “an individual in America, unable, in the course
of eighteen or twenty years, to pay that small sum! Again, suppose
the whole debt assessed, as it ought to be, on the inhabitants, in pro
portion to their respective estates, what would then be the share of
the poorer people? Perhaps not ten dollars! And if twenty years be
taken to pay the debt, the number of inhabitants will be more than
doubled, and the ability to pay increased, of course, more than two
fold.”

-

This encouraging language was held on the 13th of September,
1779. Subsequently they recur to the same subject thus: “Paper
money is the only kind which will not make unto itself wings and
fly away.

It will remain with us; it will not forsake us.” They

then repeat their conviction of the ability of the country to redeem
it; and having pledged for the support of independence their lives,

22

their fortunes, and their sacred honour, the same pledge is given to
the public for the full payment of all their paper emissions.

A con

trary sentiment is rejected with scorn; and proceeding in their ad
dress, with the earnestness of honest men, they speak of a bankrupt,
faithless republic, as a novelty in the political world. “It would ap
pear,” say they, “like a common prostitute among chaste and re

spectable matrons. The pride of America revolts from the idea.
Her citizens know for what purposes these emissions were made,
and they must be redeemed.

He must entertain a high opinion of

American credulity who supposes the people capable of believing
that all America will act against the faith, the honour and the inte
rest of all America.

Knowing, as we all do, the value of national

character, and impressed with a due sense of the immutable laws of
justice and honour, it is impossible that America should think, with
out horror, of such an execrable deed.”

Thus spoke the band of able statesmen who governed in those
days. No thought of repudiation was for a moment tolerated. They
had created the paper currency, they suggested a feasible scheme for
its redemption, and they held the honest purpose of executing that
scheme. But they had no power. The jealousy of the States coun
teracted their good intentions. What THEY could not redeem them
selves, was assumed by a generous constituency. The people who
bore the brunt of an eight years' war, and victoriously established

independence, sustained, without a murmur, the whole tax, and vo
luntarily reduced to utter nothingness, the greatest item in the cost
of the revolution; and thus waived all claim upon posterity for its
payment.

This was, undoubtedly, a severe tax; yet, when examined with
care, it will be found less heavy than it seems at first sight. Let us

23

take the largest sum, by which the people could ever have been

af.

fected, say three hundred millions, at twenty for one, which is only
half the rate fixed by Congress. Twenty for one on three hundred
millions, will give fifteen millions of sound money. These fifteen
millions having been used as currency for six years, give an annual
average of two millions and a half. That sum, among a population
of three millions, would not be a poll tax of one dollar; or if the
three millions of inhabitants be divided into families of six persons
each, making five hundred thousand families, the annual loss per
family would be only five dollars! In all probability the real loss
was less to many, than this proportion; because the bills passed
with great activity, from hand to hand, to their last days, even when
five hundred for one; never remaining locked up, nor long with
drawn from circulation. They were divided too into small sums,
from one dollar to eighty, and always convertible at the current ex
change, into every kind of real and personal property; and in their
hourly rapid passage, leaving with each temporary possessor, the
trifling loss only of their daily depreciation.
No system of credit, as we all know now by sad experience, can
be made durable, when in the shape of currency the issues exceed
the wants of a medium of trade, or when in the more permanent
certificates of public security, they come forth,

form of bonds, or

without a competent tax to pay the interest, and a sinking fund to

discharge the principal.

The over-issues in Continental

money

being excessive, fell off in value, of course, while as a natural conse
quence, property of all kinds rose in proportion. This increase of
price in goods, was attempted to be remedied in most of the States, by
acts of limitation, fixing under high penalties the maximum at which
property should be sold. These ordinances were rigidly executed.

24
Stores were broken open by authorized committees, and goods seized

and sold at the limited legal prices; while the owners stood accused
before the public of a design to depreciate the currency, and were
called tories and speculators, and otherwise stigmatized as enemies
to their country.
But those high-handed persecutions and robberies did not arrest
the depreciation on one side, nor the appreciation on the other.
Money sank and goods rose. Yet an army of more than thirty
thousand men, and a small navy, were supported; the wheels of
government kept in motion, and the enemy kept at bay! How could
such paper funds sustain such an expense? A writer in the year
1779, says, “posterity will hardly credit it; but,” continues he,
“the universal rage and zeal of the people, through all the States,
for an emancipation from a power that claimed a right to bind them
in all cases whatsoever, supplied all defects, and made apparent im
possibilities, really practicable.”
Another great error was the making this money a legal tender.
It was a source of immense injustice between debtor and creditor.
It favoured most, in the language of a cotemporary, the slack, the

dissipated, the lazy and dilatory, who paid their creditors often at
one-twentieth of the value of the debt when it was contracted.

This

sad expedient was suggested to the States by Congress itself. But
that body, which consisted of about fifty members, whose great abili

ties and spotless integrity stand unimpeached, had the candour to
confess their mistake, and urged upon the States an immediate re
peal, which was, after much solicitation, effected; yet not until
thousands of fortunes had been ruined, including chiefly the most
generous and patriotic; while the benefit went alone to the avari
cious and idle.

25

The people “worried and fretted” by tender-laws, limitation of
prices, and other compulsory means used by the States to force the

circulation, and bolster up the value of paper, occasionally appeared
heartless and out of patience. That feeling prevailed especially at
the time when Congress, in 1780, recommended a monthly tax of
fifteen millions, payable in specie or in paper, at forty for one, and
was the cause of its failure. The intention of this act was to destroy
the bills as they came in, and to issue other bills at par, bearing an
interest of six per cent., to an amount not exceeding a twentieth part
of the nominal sum thus brought in to be destroyed.
But the community had become momentarily paralyzed, and turned
a deaf ear to all new projects. They stood, as an eye-witness says,
“amid impending destruction, when all occupations of town and
country were nearly at a stop.” Government, not having the power
to compel the payment of taxes, could only entreat or menace. In
vain, however, did they proclaim, threaten, villify, and decree, that
“whoever should refuse to receive in payment Continental Bills,

should be deemed and treated as an enemy of his country, and be
precluded from all trade and intercourse with the inhabitants;” in
other words be outlawed: in vain did they accompany these threats
with penal, tender and limitation laws, associated too with military
force; all proved ineffectual.

This brow-beating and coercion

seemed, says Peletiah Webster, who wrote in 1781, “like water

sprinkled on a blacksmith's forge, which indeed deadens the flame
for a moment, but increases the heat and force of the internal fire.”

One instance of arbitrary power flowed from those laws which would
disgrace the annals of an absolute government; and it was exercised
too by Pennsylvania. The General Assembly, on the 25th March,
1780, issued one hundred thousand pounds of paper bills founded on
D

26

the faith of the State, on some City lots in Philadelphia, and on the
Province island at the mouth of the river Schuylkill, which at that
time belonged to the State [hence the emission was called island
money]. This issue was followed up by an act, dated December
23d, of the same year, making the bills a legal tender. The penalty
for not taking them in payment of goods, lands, &c., was for
the first offence, forfeiture of double the sum offered; and for the

second offence, a confiscation of half the offender's lands, goods and
chattels, and imprisonment of his person during the war."

Bad as the Continental Bills had become in the latter period of
their existence, they always bore the stamp of nationality, and passed
currently at the exchange of the day throughout the land; whereas
the emissions of the States, made on their individual responsibility,
and at various rates of exchange, were not received beyond the
limits of each State; so

that one State would not take the bills of

another State. They were only used for municipal purposes and
local trade, as wanpum had been in the early days of Massachusetts

and other parts of New England, bundles of tobacco in Virginia, and
stamped wood or leather elsewhere.

Those persons who happened to be the last holders of the Conti
mental Bills, put up quietly with their loss. The mighty monster,

as that expiring currency was called in those days, departed unla
mented. An attempt, which proved abortive, was made some time
after to dig up its skeleton, but it never was resuscitated.

Its ser

vices when alive were incalculable; and it cannot be too often re

peated, that it saved the State, and gained our independence.

It

was the cheap price, and our emancipation the rich purchase. To

* This debt was subsequently paid in full.

27

posterity was that independence transmitted, by those who achieved
it and paid for it by bearing the whole loss on the paper currency,
which was the principal item of its cost.
The Continental Money endured for nearly six years, and during
that long period worked as a most powerful state-engine; and was,
says a writer who saw its operation, “a prodigy of revenue, and of
exceeding mysterious and magical agency.

Bubbles of a like sort,

in other countries lasted but a few months, and then burst into

nothing; but this held out for years, and seemed to retain a vigorous
constitution to its last; for its circulation was never more brisk than

just before it died at five hundred for one! and when it expired, it de
parted without a groan or struggle, or being in the least lamented.”
As I have already observed, the loss was divided and subdivided
into such fractional parts during the five or six years' circulation of
the millions of paper dollars, that they were laid aside, not only un
paid and unhonoured, but even unwept. The people were tired of
the daily variation of prices, and felt how ridiculous was the state
of a currency which required five hundred dollars in paper, to pay
for a breakfast that could be bought for a silver half-dollar. It car
ried no regret with it, and seems doomed to sleep in silence, un
friended and unsung; unless, indeed, some attempt be now and then
made to awaken a transient touch of sympathy, such as I aim at in
this humble sketch.

With it disappeared that unjust and erroneous legislation of
making paper money a legal tender.

Happily, such tyranny cannot

return: the Constitution of the United States forbidding the enact
ment of laws making any kind of money a tender, except gold and
silver.

Vice and immorality were greatly encouraged, no doubt, by that

28

ever-varying currency. This I grant, yet something I hope to offer
in extenuation.

We cannot deny that during the revolution laws were broken,
morals debased, and the nation turned into a gambling community,
which upset the fortunes of thousands, broke down trade, paralyzed
industry, and scattered ruin far and wide.

Our own historians have

dwelt in sorrowful and emphatic terms upon those sad times; nor
are the notices of foreign authors less instructive and interesting.
Gordon, in his history of the Independence of the United States,
says, that without paper money the Americans could not have car
ried on the war. The public benefit of it in that instance will com
pensate, in the estimation of patriotic politicians, for the immense
evils of which it has otherwise been the occasion.

The tender-laws

on one hand, and depreciation on the other, rendered it the bane
of society.

All classes were infected. It produced a rage for spe

culation. The mechanic, the farmer, the lawyer, the physician, the
member of Congress, and even a few of the clergy, in some places,
were contaminated. The morals of the people were corrupted be
yond any thing that could have been believed, prior to the event.
All ties of honour, blood, gratitude, humanity and justice were dis
solved. Old debts were paid when the paper money was more than
seventy for one.

Brothers defrauded brothers, children parents, and

parents children. Widows, orphans, and others, were paid for mo
ney lent in specie, with depreciated paper, which they were compel
led to received.

A person who had been supplied with specie, in the

jail of Philadelphia, while the British had possession of the city, re
paid it in paper at a tenth part of its value.
Stedman, an officer in Cornwallis' army, who wrote an account of
the American War, treats this subject copiously and impartially. I

29
omit, however, some extracts that I

had

prepared, in order to intro

duce the opinion of a distinguished Frenchman, made up from per

sonal association with the American people when in the height of the
Revolutionary War. But before I transcribe his judgment of our
countrymen, I may remark, that at one period of the contest there
was, as is conceded in the Journals of Congress, an absence of exer

tion approaching to dangerous indifference, and which elicited strong
appeals from that body. This apathy attracted the attention of
foreigners employed in our army, and became the subject of an of:
ficial communication from one of them, Mons. Du Portail, who was
Colonel in the French service, and Brigadier General in the Ameri
can army.

He resided many years in Pennsylvania after the peace

of 1783, and in 1791 returned to France, where he became minister

at war. The despatch, from which I take the following extracts, is
dated at the encampment at White Marsh, 12th November, 1777,
and is addressed to the Comte de St. Germain, the then minister of

war to Louis XVI., and is marked private.
A Monseigneur le Comte de St. Germain, ministre de la

guerre.

[Pour vous seulement, Monseigneur.]
“Les Americains réussiront-ils a se rendre libres, ou non!

En

France, ou l’on ne peut juger que parles faits, on jugera pour l'affir
mative.

Nous, quiavons vu comment les choses se sont passées, me

penserons pas de même. A parler franchement, ce n'est pas par la
bonne conduite des Americains, que la campagne en général s'est
terminée assez heureusement; mais par la faute des Anglois.”

“Avant la guerre, les peuples Americains, sans vivre dans le luxe,
jouissoient de tout ce quiest nécessaire pour rendre la vie agréable
et heureuse.

Ils passoient une grande partie de leurs temps a fumer

et a boire du thé, ou des liqueurs spiritueuses. Telles étoient les

30

habitudes de ces peuples. Il ne seroit donc pas surprenant, que le
changement d'une vie efféminée, transformée subitement en celle de
guerrier, qui est dure et penible, leur fit préférer le joug des Anglois,
a une liberté achetée aux depens des douceurs de la vie. Ce que je
vous dis, ne peut que vous surprendre, Monseigneur, mais tel est ce
peuple, qui, mou, sans energie, sans vigueur, sans passion pour la
cause dans laquelle il s'est engagé, ne la soutient que parcequ'il suit
l'impulsion qu'on lui a premierement donnée. Il y a cent fois plus
d'enthousiasme pour cette revolution dans quel café de Paris que ce

soit, qu'il n'y en a dans les provinces unies ensemble. Il est donc
nécessaire,pour achever cette Revolution, que la France fournisse a
ce peuple,tout ce qui lui est nécessaire, afin qu'il trouve la guerre
moins dure a sontenir. Il est vraie qu'il lui en coutera quelque mil
lions; mais ils seront bien employes en anéantissant le pouvoir de
l'Angleterre, qui dépouillée de ces colonies, sans marine, et sans
commerce, perdra sa grandeur, et laissera la France sans rivale."
* En considerant la chose en général, il me paroit que ce qui se
passe maintenant en Amérique, doit dégouter les Européens, d'avoir
aucune affaire a demêler avec les colonies de ce continent.'"

* Le Congrés m'a élevé au rang de BrigadierGénéral."
These extracts, placed here in the original French, I translate as
follows :

* Will, or will not, the Americans obtain their independence ? In
France, where things are estimated according to the naked facts of
passing events, they will answer affirmatively. But we, who see
how things are managed here, think differently. To be candid, I
must say that itis not owing to the good conduct of the Americans
thatthe campaign closed with tolerable success, but rather in conse
quence of the blunders committed by the English."

31

“Before the war the Americans, without living in luxury, pos
sessed every thing necessary to make life agreeable and happy.
They passed a great part of their time in smoking, drinking tea and
spirituous liquors. Such was the customary habits of this people.
Is it surprising, then, that a sudden change from such effeminacy to
the rugged and painful duty of a warrior, should lead them to prefer
the yoke of the English, to freedom bought at the cost of all those
comforts of life? What I am about to say, my lord, may surprise
you, but such is the fact: this is a sluggish people, without energy,
without vigour, without affection for the cause in which they are en
gaged, and which they sustain simply by the impulse or influence
which put them in motion at the outset. There is an hundred times.
more enthusiasm for the revolution, in any one coffee-house what
ever in Paris, than in all the United States put together. It will,
therefore, be expedient, in order to finish the revolution, that France
should supply this country with every thing necessary, so as to re
lieve the people from the burden of the war. It will cost France a
few millions, but they will be well employed in annihilating the
power and authority of the English, who, when stripped of their
colonies and their commerce, will lose their greatness, and leave
France without a rival.”

“Upon duly considering the general aspect of affairs, it appears to
me that what is passing in America is suited to disgust Europeans,
and prevent their interfering in the concerns of the colonies of this
continent.”

-

Such is the picture of our countrymen, drawn by a Gallo-Ameri
can officer.

I intended to have added some extracts from the French

pens of Brissot de Warville, the Duke de Liancourt, and Messrs.
Volney and Talleyrand; but I have already reached the limits

32

usually assigned to papers communicated in this form, and will only
add, in reference to Monsieur Du Portail's opinions, that his prejudice
and ignorance may be found repeated and amplified in the writings

of all the above named distinguished foreigners: whose fanciful theo
ries, presumptuous prophecies, and absurd conclusions, have turned
out, in the march of time, only the more glaringly false and prepos

terous, the one than the other! Those indolent Americans of Du
Portail have continued to be, what they always were, intelligent,
brave, industrious and enterprising.

Some passing relaxation of re

volutionary zeal may have happened, when the ardour of the people
fell short of the wishes of their more eager rulers; but, in the main,
our countrymen have not been sluggish, and certainly were never
indifferent on the subject of their independence.

How could it be so,

when, with the “go ahead” motto in their hearts and in their actions,
they have built up an empire as powerful and populous, at this day,
as was France itself, when our fathers first landed on the shores of

Virginia and on the rock of Plymouth? A space of time from that
period to this, for the creation of a nation of nearly twenty millions
of people, not greater than two lives of Russian longevity!
Our own Revolutionary Congress, as we have seen, looked
“with horror on the execrable deed” of leaving their bills unpaid.
More sensitive on this head than their constituents, they trusted

to posterity for their honourable discharge: that posterity, never
theless, down to the present generation, have never bestowed a

thought upon the pledged faith of their illustrious fathers. They
neglected, even in the palmy days of “high built abundance,” with
“heap on heap” in their treasury—those days when the States, in
dividually, were solicited to relieve the general government of its
vast surplus revenue—they neglected, even then, to look back upon

33

that just debt, and to remember favourably those bills that stood
guard, as it were, in times of imminent danger; answering the calls
of every department of government and of the people in their various
occupations; carrying us through the perils of a long war, with
pledge upon pledge that they should be honourably paid in the
calmer days of peace. They did nothing! nothing!!
But has not “Honour,” the moral conscience of a State,” been

sometimes forfeited elsewhere as well as among us! Painful as this
confession is, in reference to our own country, similar examples of
shame and reproach, the result, not of dire necessity, but of high
handed fraud, may be traced in the history of other countries.

I

do not place them here, however, in vindication of ourselves, but
to disqualify those European nations, where they have occurred,
from pointing the finger of scorn at America.
In Burnet's history of his own times, we find that Charles II. shut
up his exchequer for two years, and scattered dismay and ruin
throughout his kingdom.

Actions commenced against debtors were

not allowed to proceed: bankers were broken, and trade paralyzed.
The same historian alludes to the disastrous explosion of the South
Sea Company, with which may be coupled John Laws' Bank and
Mississippi land scheme, the shares of which, in 1718, rose to
twenty times their original value, and then sank to nothing. But
two operations by France, upon a stupendous scale, are precisely in

point, and possess a perfect resemblance to Continental Money, both
for the good they effected, and for their subsequent extinction without
being redeemed. The first was an emission by the constituent as
sembly of France, in 1790, of a paper money called assignat,
which, although based, in general terms, on the proceeds of the sale
E

34

of the confiscated goods of the church, were so lavishly issued, as
increase to the incredible sum of forty thousand millions of livr

"they depreciated to nothing. Then followed a second kind
P"P" money, called mandate, which even the guillotine of Rob
Pierre could not sustain. They were founded, like the assignat,
confiscated Property; and two thousand four hundred millions

livres were

issued, which, after defraying the expense of one ca.

paign, lost all their value.
Philip V., the first Bourbon prince who reigned in Spain, left

" of forty-five millions of piastres, which his successor

refused

acknowledge, and it was left unpaid.
After the battle of the 12th of April, 1782, between De Gras
and Rodney, the shattered remnant of the French fleet, under t
Marquis de Vaudreuil,
tion of

Rochambeaux's

came to Boston.

Its outfit and re-embark

army occasioned a vast expense, which w;

paid by bills on the French treasury. They were drawn at the cu

tomary usance of sixty days, but the government of France pos
Poned their P*yment for twelve months; and to protect the me

chants who had negotiated them, from damages, the king retaine
the bills

"forbade his notaries making any protest.
The men of *776, upon whom cotemporary writers, in both En
l

"and France, have heaped
On th

so much opprobrium, and whom wi
-

° contrary, delight to honour and praise, were they better c
w

-

orse than their descendants?
The
general

l

-

-

-

ess strict in
an

sentiment is, I think, that we are, at the present day
observance o

-

the

* honest in "he pursuit of

rate race.

°ndeavour

f the moral duties of life; less moderat

wealth: in short, that we are a degene

'show" that
all this I believe there is a mistake; and I wi
we, of the living generation, stand for good

35

in a scale as well balanced against evil, as the men of the last cen
tury; and in the exercise of many virtues surpass them.
It is said to be an infirmity of old age, to estimate unfavourably
“the sayings and doings” of the present time; and to refer back to
the days of early life for bright examples in manners and morals.
I am an old man, and I do not attest by my judgment or feelings,
the truth of that adage. The present race, the men now in active
influence, who form this great nation, are said to have declined in
moral worth; to have dishonoured by cunning and crime the cause
of republicanism, and disgraced the good name which their revolu
tionary fathers had established and transmitted.
I offer the following vindication.
My recollection goes back pretty distinctly more than sixty years,
and I can aver that crimes of as deep a dye were committed in those
days, as strike us with such horror when they now occur. But
there did not exist then a legion of newspapers, with agents in all
directions, eager to collect, exaggerate and publish; and of course
they were not circulated. The utmost extravagance of our times in
speculation by corporations even, can be matched by individuals
who lived fifty years ago.

Public securities were made to vary

from two to twenty-eight shillings on the pound; private associa
tions were formed in all the chief towns to forestall more than half

the capital of the first Bank of the United States, by purchasing
as high as thirty per cent, advance on the par value, the funded
debt which was to constitute the larger part of the stock of that
bank.

The excitement was great; the project failed, and extensive.

ruin followed.

But extravagant as were the operations in stocks, they fell far
short of the speculations in land.

Half of Western New York, large

36

tracts in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and elsewhere, amounting
to many millions of acres, were purchased by individuals as mono
polists.

Phelps and Gorham from the east, Morris, Nicholson,

Greenleaf, Wilson, and others, in the middle States, making Phila

delphia their head quarters, acquired and held for a short time such
vast possessions, that the debts of Nicholson, yet unliquidated, are
said to amount to twelve millions of dollars.

Barry and Law aimed

at purchasing the whole City of Washington, in 1798. Wilson
gave a single bond for a million two hundred thousand dollars,

bearing six per cent. interest; and that was but one item in his vast
negotiations. The immense loss by these speculators, all of whom

failed, did not fall short, perhaps, of those by banks in our times;
and those losses were inflicted upon a nation of less than five mil
lions of inhabitants.

Robert Morris, too, whose public career had

been so splendid, and whose downfall may be mentioned at this dis
tant period without indelicacy, since it is matter of history, spent

four years a prisoner in our debtor's apartment, while Wilson,
whose ruin was as complete, died in confinement for debt in North
Carolina. All their colleagues and adjuncts went to destruction, to
the incalculable loss of the very many who trusted them.
What shall we say of lotteries, then a universal expedient for
raising money; licensed gambling shops authorized by every State
in the Union, and now as universally suppressed.
In politics, slow as we may be in believing it, there was half a
century ago, more violence, more marked separation in social life,
more virulent hatred—infinitely more, than now. What aged man
can forget the heart-burning and outrage before and during the days
of the black cockade, when that badge was worn as the signal of de
fiance from one party to the other! Then, were the presses of Peter

37

Porcupine and his opponents in full action, and licentious to a de
gree never yet surpassed. In Congress, on the floor of the House
of Representatives, vulgar scuffling, and indecent personalities, dis
graced that body. We may name as a prominent example, the
contest between Matthew Lyon and Griswold. Burr in the Senate,
and Hamilton in the Cabinet, agitated the whole nation by their
violent jarring, which ended in the death of the latter by the hand
of the former.

Compare the riotous elections of those days when

federalism and anti-federalism engendered such party heat, with the
quiet ballot of the great national election of 1840, when two millions
and a half of votes were given, without commotion or disorder.
And how can we sufficiently congratulate ourselves on the im
provement in temperance! None can estimate its importance so
well as the aged. Fifty years ago, it was no disgrace for young
men to visit a party of ladies stupefied or elevated by wine. Modern
manners would not tolerate this.

Male servants were generally

given to drunkenness: and until arrested by temperance associations,
intoxication was threatening us with universal sway.
But it is in religion that the most impressive and most salutary re
formation has taken place. This is attested by the great increase of
piety, and consequent increase of churches. Those holy temples
now filled with devout attendants, were then few in number and

sadly neglected. At the period of our revolution, the superstition
and cruelty of witchcraft was only passing away, to be succeeded by
religious indifference, and even rank infidelity.
Recollect, for a moment, Frederick of Prussia, surrounded by Vol
taire, D'Argens, Maupertuis, and in correspondence with D'Alembert
and the Parisian encyclopedists; in England, Hume, Godwin, and his
wife, Mary Woolstoncraft; in America, Thomas Paine! All uniting

38

to deride and destroy christianity, by ridiculing its ministers and
holy doctrines, in writings of unrestrained freedom; by unsettling the
belief of the religious, and confirming the unfaithful; by presump
tuously putting man's feeble reason in the place of divine revelation.
Set in contrast with those licentious times, the awakened piety of
this day, in every church of every sect. Crowds of worshippers tes
tify to the truth of their amendment, by regular and zealous devotion
in those seats, which were formerly deserted. This salutary change
will check the progress of crime. It has checked it. Isolated in
stances of high offences are no proof to the contrary. The people
collectively become more sober in their habits, and more serious in
the worship of God, will find those plague-spots which continue to
disfigure their moral character, gradually removed, by the joint in
fluence of temperance and religion.
One distinctive mark of refined civilization has been allowed to

form a national trait, by universal consent, abroad and at home;
namely, the deference paid to woman.

Every where, within the wide range of our country, she is defend
ed and protected. It is a generous virtue, which foreigners agree,
one and all, to allow us. A female may traverse the country alone,
and visit every point of the compass, in perfect personal security,
and be certain of meeting always with attention and respect; having
no other protector, in the steamers and on rail-roads, than their cap
tains and agents. This is notorious and of every day occurrence.
Virtuous women, young and handsome, start alone, and without
fear, from the Missouri, to descend to New Orleans in the south, or

wend their way to the Atlantic, up the Ohio, amid a motley compa
my of entire strangers, and thus traverse thousands of miles, unap
prehensive of rudeness or interruption.

39

In conclusion, let us hope that this improvement in morals,

will

eventually act as a corrective on the temporary defalcation in the
public engagements, which now exist in parts of our country; ever
bearing in mind that at the adoption of our national Constitution,
there was a public debt of ninety-four millions, the interest on which
had not been paid for six years, and the principal was currently sold
at the reduced price of twelve dollars for one hundred; yet the whole
was paid at par. A similar redemption awaits, I trust, the depre
ciated State debts of the present day.

The paper money of the revolution, however, was of a character
wholly dissimilar.

It was a depreciated medium almost during its

whole existence; and having sunk gradually to nothing, could never
possess the claim for redemption that belongs to a bond, for which
full value, as expressed on its face, was paid to government.
But while that artificial currency lasted, it was a happy illusion,
which worked the miracle of reality. Without its agency, we should
have been subdued, and have crept along, at a colonial pace, as
Canada has done.

Without it, the valley of the Mississippi would

have remained a wilderness; the Spaniards would still have been
masters of the great outlets of the south; our manufactures would
not have been allowed to reach even to the making of a hobnail, and
our star-spangled banner would never have been unfurled.
The cause for which the defunct old Continental Money was put
forth, has been gained. It has prevented our subjugation, and placed
us on the proud eminence we now occupy. Those who bore its
burden, when in transit, bore it cheerfully; and made it the happy
instrument of our national existence. In cherishing, with filial affec
tion, the memory of those brave men, we may pass by their faults

40

with indulgence; always resolving to cling with constancy and love,
to the

privilege of self-government, which they thus won and trans

mitted to us.

May, 1843.

THE

SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL STATE

of the

COLONY OF PENNSYLVANIA

PRIOR TO THE YEAR 1748.

By

JOB R. TYSON.

nemo generosior est te;
*

*

*

*

Ut plerique solent, naso suspendis adunco
Ignotos, ut me libertino patre natum:
Cum referre negas, quali sit quisque parente
Natus, dum ingenuus.

Hor. Sat. 6.

bona nec sua quisque recuset,
Nam genus et proavos et quæ non fecimus ipsi,
Vix ea nostra voco.
Ovid, Met. Lib. 13.

Platonem non accepit nobilem philosophia, sed fecit.
Seneca.

PHILADELPHIA:
JOHN C. CLARK, PRINTER, 60 DOCk STREET.
1843,

The

SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL STATE
of

THE

COLONY

OF

PENNSYLVANIA

Žor T.I., " " .
PRIOR TO THE YEAR 1

IT may not be an unpleasing nor altogether useless task, now that
one hundred years have passed over this institution, to recall the pe
culiar condition of society to which it owed its rise. A survey of the
state of knowledge, principles, and taste among the early inhabitants
of Pennsylvania, will show how far a love of science, as well as
letters, had been implanted in the colony at the first settlement; and
how far this was cherished by the generations which succeeded.

I

propose to bring before the Society some evidence that its formation
in 1743, was the direct result of pre-existing causes; and that the
success which has followed it, is less owing to the happy or fortuitous
circumstances which attended its birth, than to the steady operation
of other influences which were coeval with the establishment of the

English province.
The social and intellectual state of the colony of Pennsylvania,
when its population did not exceed a few thousand persons, has not
been considered by the philosopher and historian.

But the impor

tance of such a consideration will be increased, if instead of viewing
the emigrants as private persons, who had sought shelter from the

44

frowns of power, or come in quest of religious freedom, we regard
them as the seeds of an independent empire, fraught for weal or for
wo, through coming time, with the influence impressed by the per
sonal characters, the principles and policy of the adventurers.
In this point of view, the subject rises to an elevation sufficient to
engage upon its study the best powers of the mind. It is for this
reason I go back to the early settlement of the province, in order to
determine the mind and sympathies which predominated in 1743.

It

is there we must seek the elements of the future,—the seeds which

afterwards flourished to maturity,—the foundations of the structure
which we at present see.

A colony of Swedes, invited by an edict of their monarch, the cele
brated Gustavus Adolphus, and encouraged by the countenance of his
daughter Christina, alighted on the shores of the Delaware, before
the middle of the seventeenth century. These colonists seem to have
been a frugal, honest and worthy race; but I cannot find, that either
they or their Dutch invaders paid much attention to the interests of
learning. The colony of New Sweden was small in number, the
inhabitants were extremely illiterate, and its social state one of unat
tractive rudeness, of unalloyed but rustic simplicity.
The English settlement by Penn was more numerous, and project
ed with loftier aims. It occurred at a propitious period, and under
circumstances favourable to the development of a healthy national

character. The civil wars of England, and the great rebellion in
which they terminated, were past. The fury of religious persecution
was stayed, and the heat of religious controversy, though still excited
and feverish, was not as before to be quenched by blood. A new
order of men had arisen out of the burning cauldron of puritanism,
which, though partaking of the puritan leaven, was tempered by

45
cooler heads and milder tenets.

The Quaker sect, at the head of

which stood Robert Barclay, William Penn, George Whitehead and
others, proclaimed to all—even to the hunted Jew and proscribed
Mahometan—the novel doctrine of universal toleration, and united

with this sentiment a great variety of opinions, deemed subversive of
existing dogmas, and threatening the privileged orders of the Church
and State of England.
In order to reduce some of these principles to practice, Penn ac
cepted in 1681 a Charter of Pennsylvania from Charles II. Thither
he repaired in the succeeding year with such companions and fol
lowers, as animated by the hope of improving their decayed fortunes,
or induced by the adventurous spirit of change, or anxious to enjoy
their religious tenets freed from the oppressive or uplifted hand of secu
lar authority, were willing to encounter the austerities of a residence
in the new and remote regions of the west. Here the liberal princi
ples of the founder were to stand the trial of experiment. The prob
lem was to be solved, whether Government, exposed to the billows
and inundations of the democratic element, and subjected to the dan
gers of unfettered religious opinion, could subsist without the nutri
ment of a hierarchy, without the distinction of caste, and without the
aid of privilege.
As all religious professors were equally entitled to protection by
the Great Law of 1682, multitudes flocked to the new settlement.

But notwithstanding the freedom which was allowed to discussion and
conduct, and the constant influx of strangers from England and the
neighbouring colonies, it does not appear that religious controversy

engaged much of the colonial mind, or that with the exception of the
Keithian schism, diversities of sentiment estranged the affections or
excited the passions of the people. The minds of the settlers, thus

46

left free to think and act without the apprehension of restraint, or the
dread of a superior, directed their powers fearlessly to the question of
government, to the melioration of their physical state, and to the im
provement of their moral and intellectual condition.
— nec verba minacia fixo

AEre legebantur; nec supplex turba timebat
Judicis ora sui.—Ov. MET.

The early emigrants included in their number men of good educa
tions and high endowments.

Penn himself was a scholar and a

writer; his mind was of a sagacious and original order, and enriched
with various and profound knowledge. Thomas and David Loyd,
Makin, Pastorius, Kelpius, Hamilton, Logan, Norris, Brooke, Keith,
and many others who could be named, were men of considerable
classical attainments.

It is enough to say, that the mathematics and

ancient languages were taught in the Friends Public School; that the
genius, scenery and peculiarities of the province were soon celebrated
in Latin verse; and that the Roman and French tongues were, on one
occasion at least, resorted to as the mediums of intercourse between

the English and German emigrants.
A printing press was in operation in Philadelphia, so early as the
year 1686. This was only four years after the settlement by Penn,
while the forests were standing in primeval wildness around the colo
nists, and before huts were substituted for the caves which first shel
tered them from the inclemencies of winter. In all the other colonies,

this engine of mind was postponed till the asperities of a new country
were subdued by longer cultivation, or until physical ease gave more
leisure to seek for mental conveniences.

In Pennsylvania, the cause

of education and the diffusion of knowledge by means of printing,

47

were cotemporary with the landing. The following year (1687) is
signalized by the printing of an almanack. This performance was
from the printing house of Bradford, and is remarkable as one of the
first emanations of the colonial press.

In conformity with a provi

sion in the Frame of the Government, a school was opened in the next
year after the landing (1683), and in six years afterwards was estab
lished a Friends Public School, where the poor were taught gratis,

and sound literary and scientific learning was open to all. The pre
amble to the charter, which was granted to this seminary in 1701,

shows the high aims of the colonists with respect to mental culture.
It recites that the prosperity and welfare of a people depend mainly
upon the good education of youth, and that the qualifications for
public and private usefulness are chiefly derived from learning to
read and write, and from “the learning of languages and useful arts
and sciences, suitable to their sex, age and degree,” &c.
James Logan accompanied the proprietary on his second visit to
the colony, in 1699. His valuable treatises in Latin, and his English
translation of Cicero's little work, De Senectute, are well known.

These have given to posterity additional evidence, if any were
wanting, of his devotion to literature and science.

With great libe

rality, he bequeathed the books known as the Loganian department of
the Philadelphia Library to the city, “for the advancement and faci
litating,” as he observes, “of classical learning.” He was fifty years
in forming this library, which numbered nearly four thousand vo
lumes at his death.

It included one hundred folio volumes, in Greek,

mostly with versions. The Roman classics were among them, “with
out,” he says, “an exception.” All the Greek mathematicians, Ar
chimedes, Euclid, Ptolemy, &c., had a place, besides a great number
of modern mathematicians.

In addition to standard works of en

48

during value, many rare and curious volumes are to be found in this
collection, which, at the present time at least, to use his own expres
sion, “neither prayers nor price could purchase.”
In the year 1719, the first newspaper was published in the colony
of Pennsylvania, under the title, “The American Mercury.” The
Boston News Letter, undertaken and published in the year 1704, at
Boston, by John Campbell, a Scotchman, claims the undeniable dis
tinction of being the first newspaper which appeared in either of the
North American colonies. Though Pennsylvania, which is half a
century younger than Massachusetts, must yield this honour to her
elder sister, yet the priority is a period of only fifteen years, and at
Philadelphia was published the first daily newspaper which appeared
on the continent.

Four years after the commencement of “The American Mercury,”
Franklin appeared, a poor and friendless boy of seventeen, in posses
sion of a trade about half taught, in the streets of Philadelphia. Be
fore I refer to the history of this remarkable man, or the effects which
his presence and exertions produced upon our institutions, it may be
proper to show how circumstances contributed to his success.
We have seen that the leading minds of the first settlers were
scholars;

that

the means of common and scholastic education were

amply provided; and that zeal and enterprise in the cause of learning
were exhibited in the early establishment of a printing press, and in
a variety of literary performances. It remains to be shown, that the
principles of the colonial policy had concurred with these causes, in
diffusing a self respect and spirit of generous rivalry among those
classes of society, to which in other countries they were strangers.
Among the beneficial influences which the Society of Friends ex
erted upon the infant colony from its establishment, were the recog

49
nition of usefulness in occupations, simplicity in living, and equality
in classes. As these principles were engrafted in the maxims of their
religious profession, they taught that each was to be deduced as a co
rollary from the humility of the Christian character. The callings
of men however humble or laborious, were not permitted to detract
from their social standing; and frugality in living and simplicity in
furniture and dress were enjoined on all their members, without refer

ence to their pecuniary means of indulgence, or their taste for luxury

or expense. Those arts which merely embellish life, and add to our
enjoyments in the gratification of the senses, were decried. Nothing
was deemed meritorious, or voted to be respectable, but that which
could be made subservient to the great purposes of utility or practical
convenience.

-

-

They taught that as trades and manual labour were useful, as
siduity in their prosecution was honourable. William Penn recom
mended trades to his children. Other leading Friends, whose ances
tors, claiming for the most part a cavalier descent and belonging
to the best classes of English society, adopted his sentiments, and set
the example of bringing up their children to some useful or handi
craft employment.
The necessities of a new country gave force to these suggestions.
The effect of such views upon a society, in which existed no titular
ranks, except those which must result from the inevitable subordina
tions of social and political life, was pervading. The principle had
its origin in religious faith, and that only, without looking to political

consequences. While this principle left the claim of conventional
honour untouched, it raised to respectability a class of men, whose

ignorance and occupations had before consigned them to the evils of
neglect and a chilling sense of inferiority. Birth and employment
F

50

came to be disregarded in the estimate of personal character. How
ever humble and depressed these might have been esteemed else
where, their humility presented no obstacle in Pennsylvania to ad
vancement and consideration. Perhaps no event in history has tend
ed so much to the real elevation of the working classes, as the reli
gious maxims and social scheme of Penn and his companions, in
the Province of Pennsylvania.
All this had the salutary effect of bringing the different classes of
society into closer union. The social manners of mechanics, con
demned in England to isolation, were improved; and their prevailing
sympathies and impulses softened and enlarged. They were soon
taught to feel the advantages of scientific knowledge to the manual
arts, and to see the connexion subsisting between them. The mecha
nic of Pennsylvania thus became a different sort of person from the
mechanic of other countries. Many of her practical farmers and
unambitious tradesmen were the offspring of refined and educated
parents, who, in training the hands of their children to labour, did
not forget the cultivation of their minds, nor the improvement of their
religious and moral faculties.
This preference for trades in the colony, either with or without
some other employment, continued until after the middle of the last
century. The placid surface of the social stream then became disturb
ed in the tumults of the revolution, and in the upheavings caused by
war, the filth and deposits of the current, whose natural resting
place was the bottom, sometimes mounted to the top.

It was thus

that social as well as political life underwent a change.
Tantae moliserat Romanam condere gentem.

AEN.

In the excitements of a momentous contest, in the more enlarged
views which its successful issue presented, in the rivalry and compe

51

titions for political office, and in the diffusion of more luxurious tastes
and habits, the primitive ideas of devotion to practical husbandry and
the mechanic arts, gave place to the engagements of commerce, and
thence to the more ambitious and ornamental pursuits of life. But
the principle, in its native integrity, was preserved, and is still exem
plified by many members of the religious sect in which it originated.
In connexion with the ideas of frugality, simplicity and utility in
culcated by the first colonists, it must not be forgotten that they were
equally diligent in cultivating the benevolent principles of man, which
they sought to awaken by private opinion and to nurse by the stimulus
of keeping them in constant exercise. The value of physical means,
appliances and instruments in the government of the world, was de
preciated; the animal instincts and propensities were to be subdued,
if not extinguished.

In pursuance of this scheme, they denounced

war and fighting: they condemned the severity of the lash and other
modes of physical torture, in the punishment of offenders; and de
claimed against capital inflictions.

Instead of these, they set about

mitigating the rigour of the penal code; jails were reformed and me.
liorated, and charities founded for the poor and unfortunate.
The system of African slavery found no support, and as practised,
no sympathy nor encouragement from William Penn;" and his breth
ren of the province, after long continued and ineffectual remonstrance,
finally determined, in the early part of the eighteenth century, to ex
clude from religious fellowship such of their members as were con
cerned in the traffic. Pennsylvania owes to her Quaker colonists, -

especially to her founders—to Southeby, Sandiford and Lay, -to Eli
sha Tyson, Anthony Benezet, and John Woolman,—the worthy dis
tinction of setting an example to the other states of the Union, of so

modifying her system of domestic servitude as to bring about, in a
* Wide Appendix, page 61.

52

few years, its gradual but

final extinction. This memorable event

took place in the year 1780.
One of the leading motives of Penn in accepting a Charter for his
Province, was the civilization of the Indians. The Treaty of per
petual friendship, which unarmed, he concluded with their aged
sachems and distinguished warriors, amid the wild sublimity of their
primeval forests on the Delaware, remained unbroken for near half
a century.

During that period the virgin soil was unstained by a

drop of Indian or European blood. The white and the red man,
alike anxious to cement their union by the offices of mutual kind
ness, strove to become the benefactor of each other.

But when the

influence of Penn and his immediate companions was removed by
death, the benignity of their councils and the beautiful lesson of their
lives, were, for a time, forgotten. The demons of violence and wrong
entered upon the ministering angels of peace and justice, and took
possession of their sanctuary. The Indian, trampled upon, outraged
and oppressed, was obliged to fly from a country whose every cliff,
dell and mountain was interwoven with his affections by the endear
ing recollections of his childhood, by the mouldering bones of his
kindred, by the consecrated ashes of his forefathers. But the light

of that spirit which shone so brightly in the first age, though under
a temporary eclipse, was still in the firmament. It again emerged
from the shadows and clouds which obscured it, and ever after blest
the land with its heaven-descended radiance.

On the banks of the

Susquehanna the successors of the same race of colonists who made

the great Treaty, are still engaged in training to civilized life the de
scendants of the very tribes with whom that Treaty was formed; and
-thanks to the seeds which were sown in the spring-time of her

53

history,—Pennsylvania herself never fails, at the present day, to thrill
throughout her broad confines at the story of Indian wrongs.
Whatever may now be thought of some of the theories advanced
by the Quaker puritans of that day, it must be admitted that ideas
growing out of reflections upon our moral being, and based upon the
improvable capacities of our moral nature, could only spring from
minds enlarged by study and refined by general cultivation. It is to
these causes we owe the number and variety of those charitable foun
dations for which Pennsylvania is so justly distinguished, as well as
the honour of precedence, awarded to her, in the race of benevolent
enterprise, in this country. To these we are indebted for the cele

brity she has long enjoyed for her mild punishment of offenders, and
the latest improvement of the penitentiary system.
It is not surprising therefore that Franklin, on his arrival in

Pennsylvania, should find apprentices whose aspirations were equal
ly generous with his own. When he founded with characteristic
sagacity that remarkable union, the Junto of 1727, those who sym
pathised in his project were mostly mechanics, and brought up in the
same sphere of life with himself. The members of the association
were to be confined to twelve in number, but according to Franklin's
account, the original number of those who were actually enrolled,

was eleven. Of these, Thomas Godfrey was a glazier, William Par
sons, a shoemaker, William Maugridge, a joiner, and Hugh Meredith
and Stephen Potts “were bred to country work;” but at that time,
the former was engaged “to work at the press,” and Potts was at
bookbinding. Of the other five, Joseph Breintnall was “a copier of
deeds for scriveners;” Nicholas Scull was a surveyor; George Webb

is described as “an Oxford scholar,” but his time, for four years,
had been purchased by Keimer, the printer; William Coleman was

54

then a merchant's clerk, and Robert Grace was a young gentleman
of some fortune. These, with Franklin himself, the author of the so

ciety, who had been struggling with penury as a journeyman, but who
now was a master printer, comprised the company. The promiscu

ous association of different classes, as displayed in the occupations of
the members,—classes, which, in Europe, had seldom come into con

tact with each other,-cannot escape notice. No doubt the social
fusion which it evidences, was promoted by the commanding intellect
of the man who planned the enterprise; but more certainly may be
ascribed to the amalgamating properties of other and antecedent ele
ments. The notion of transmitted and hereditary virtue, however
we may condemn it as absurd and unphilosophical, cannot be over
come by suggestion, or obliterated in a few years. In Pennsylvania,
the original structure of the social state had been placed upon new

foundations, and leaned for its support upon reason and principle,
not upon the fallacies and delusions of prejudice or the maxims and
examples of antiquity.
The members of the original Junto were ingenious men, whom the
love of knowledge had

assembled, and whom the most generous aspi

rations cemented together. I will not repeat what is so generally
known respecting their characters and attainments; as the delightful
autobiography of Franklin himself, who has characterized each, and
the volumes of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, furnish very
copious information.
From the ingredients of the Junto, as well as from the contents of
the Logan library, it is evident that light literature and graceful
verses did not absorb the mind of the province. The satire of

Young against a pursuit of the muses had appeared, and though it
was caustic enough for so poetical a temperament, it could not eradi

55

cate a taste already formed.

Mr. J. F. Fisher has shown that many

of the colonists cultivated the muses with very tolerable success.
But the tendency of the colonial mind was to useful acquisitions in
science.

This arose from the convictions of our ancestors, already

referred to, that the elegant and ornamental arts were worthy of little
encouragement and care. Education was too generally disseminated
to permit the extinction of a classical taste; but though versifiers oc
casionally appeared, and a love of light literature was widely diffused,
yet the energies of the youthful province were reserved for pursuits
more congenial with practical exigencies and the predominant feel
ings of the country.
We have seen that the Junto was formed in the year 1727. In
the following year, Makin wrote his Latin poem, entitled, “Enco
mium Pennsylvania,” to which succeeded, in the year 1729, his
“Descriptio Pennsylvania.” These verses are not without merit as
metrical compositions, and show at least that the author had studied
the classical productions of Rome, and understood the structure and
prosody of the Latin tongue. The Library Company of Philadelphia
was started two years after, in 1731, and had its origin, under the
auspices of Franklin, in the desire of the Junto to have a permanent
collection of books for the benefit of its members. This Library, it
may be observed in passing, though now unequal to the literary
wants of Philadelphia, has risen to an importance far exceeding in
number and value any other bibliothecal repository in the United
States. It certainly argued a diffusive zeal for knowledge, that in an
infant and sparsely populated colony, fifty original subscribers, and
they “mostly among young tradesmen,” could be obtained for such
an enterprise, with the expectation that an annual contribution would
be required for the space of half a century.

In 1741 was attempted

56

a Magazine, which is the first effort in any of the colonies to establish
a literary journal.

In the following year another newspaper was

established in Philadelphia. About this time it was that James Lo
gan published at Leyden several works in Latin on different branches
of science, and in the province his English translation of Cicero on
Old Age; that Thomas Godfrey, the author of the quadrant, was
prosecuting his ingenious and scientific labours; and that John Bar

tram, whom Linnaeus justly pronounced the greatest natural botanist
in the world, was earning honour from his sovereign, and fame from
the learned societies of Europe. These and kindred occurrences pre
pared the way for further events.

In the year 1743 an Academy

was suggested, which grew into a great literary and medical univer
sity, whose well earned and unrivalled eminence has long been a
source of cherished and honourable pride to Pennsylvania; and the
same year witnessed the formation of this Society, whose centennary
we have just celebrated.
Many original works were published before the era of 1743, of
which a considerable number is still preserved in the City Library.
There are now on the shelves of that institution above four hun

dred original books and pamphlets, which were issued by the Phi
ladelphia press before the revolution.

A multitude of domestic pro

ductions are no doubt lost, and if we add the reprints of foreign
books, in which, at all periods, our press was prolific, the number of
works printed in the colony may be estimated much beyond what is
generally imagined.
The aim of this essay is accomplished, in showing that in the year
1743 the formation of such a society was not forced or premature,
but that amid the general culture and scientific predilections of the
colony, it was as natural, as it was certainly important, to combine

57

exertion. Like the other institutions,
which the mental wants of the country demanded, it became itself
and concentrate intellectual

the nursing mother of our infant science and the great distributor of
its scientific wealth.

The names of the first members of the Philosophical Society of
1743, as given by Dr. Franklin in his letter to Cadwalader Colden,
dated April 5th, 1744, show the materials of which it was to be com
posed. I believe that most of the first members were either natives
of Pennsylvania, or among, if not its original, its early colonists:
THoMA's HoPKINson, President.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, Secretary.
THoMA's GoDFREY, Mathematician.
JoHN BARTRAM, Botanist.
SAMUED RHODEs, Mechanician.

WILLIAM PARsons, Geographer.
THoMA's Bond, Physician.
PHINEAs BoND, General Natural Philosopher.
WILLIAM Col. EMAN, Treasurer.

It is not necessary to do more than enumerate the names of these

early pioneers of our science. They require no eulogium. Several
of them had been members of the Junto of 1727.

But, as some evi

dence of the ardour which animated these venerable labourers in our

scientific vineyard, I may point to the fact, that the poor and unfriend
ed Godfrey, while engaged at his trade of a glazier, undertook and
mastered the intricacies of the Latin language, without an instructor,
to enable him to read Newton’s Principia.

The Society of 1743, in conjunction with another Association, con
stitutes the germ of the present American Philosophical Society.

Though the first volume of its Transactions was not published

58

until after its union with the Junto, in 1769, yet it was in active
existence, and fostered the spirit which had been so auspiciously
begun.

The previous minutes

unfortunately

were not preserved

with much regularity, but a minute-book is extant which goes back
to the year 1758,—and it is well known, that in the year 1764,
the Society ordered a survey for a canal to connect the waters of the
Chesapeake and Delaware.
If Franklin was the father of this Society, Rittenhouse was its
child.

No one can read the history of these two illustrious men

without observing the most striking similarity in their careers. Alike
poor, and condemned to occupations which seemed to exclude the
benefits of systematic study, they bravely encountered the storms of
early mischances, breasted the obstructions, and overcame the impe
diments which opposed their way to greatness and to fame.
Franklin, from the lowliness of a runaway boy, with a roll of bread
under each arm; from the indignities of penury, and the associations

of the printing office; from the meanness of a twopenny earthen por
ringer, with a pewter spoon to eat his bread and milk;—became opu
lent, honoured and distinguished; the staff and reliance of his coun
try in a trying hour; the companion of the great, and the guest of a
king. Few men

have done more lasting service to their country and

to mankind than this eminent philosopher.

He projected many of

the literary, scientific, and benevolent associations of our metropolis

as they now exist; not only this Society, but the Philadelphia Li
brary, the University, and other kindred institutions. A boy, he
soon imbibed the spirit of the Province; of an independent character,

and ingenuous turn, he at once caught the contagion of the public
mind; and gave back to it, with tenfold interest, all the advantages it
had yielded. The character of Franklin, plastic and unformed, re
ceived its direction, and was nurtured to maturity, in the genial clime

59

of Pennsylvania. On the other hand, this community owes to him
an inextinguishable debt; a debt which increases with the fame of
those monuments which, if his own hands did not rear, he at least
selected the spot and fixed the time of their erection.

\

When the Society of 1743 was founded, David Rittenhouse was
twelve years of age. He was born in the county of Philadelphia, and

brought up to the self-denying toil of agricultural labour. It is by no
means an unfounded conjecture, that the existence of a society in the
Province, which was chiefly devoted to pure mathematics and astro
nomy, should have given an impulse to his genius which determined
his character through life. Such was the engrossing nature of his
taste, that with the most limited means of education, he became ac

quainted, at an early age, with the elements of geometry, with whose
figures, in chalk, he habitually filled the handles of his plough and
the fences at each end of the furrows.

In the secluded life of the

country, at that time thinly settled, and with few opportunities

for

reading, he struck out by the unaided operations of his mind, the
invention of fluxions. It was not until some years after, that he
learned from an European publication, to his infinite surprise, that
Leibnitz and Newton had, some years before, been engaged in con
testing the honour of that great discovery. The period of his elec
tion to the Society which now fondly claims him as one of its bright
est ornaments, was in the year 1768.

He was actively engaged in

making observations on the transit of Venus in the year 1769, the
results of which he contributed to the first volume of our published
Transactions.

The enthusiasm with which he pursued his favourite studies, is

exemplified in the Eulogium pronounced upon his character by the
late Dr. Benjamin Rush.

Rittenhouse had prepared an extensive

60

apparatus at Norriton, and provided a powerful telescope for ob
serving the phenomenon of the planet.

His preparations had en

gaged his attention for several successive weeks.

In contemplating

that he was to witness what had been observed but twice since the

creation, what no one had seen since the year 1639, and what
no human being alive would ever behold again, his mind became

warmed into an unusual intensity.

All his powers of thought

and imagination were concentrated upon this object.
bably lost sleep in the feverishness of his impatience,

He had pro
and exhausted

his strength in protracted watching, anxiety and study; and when
at last the contact occurred with the planet and the sun, the sen
sation of pleasure was too acute for his frame.

Under the excite

ment of the moment he was in danger of losing the great con
summation, for he sunk away into a temporary swoon!

In speak

ing of his Planetarium, Jefferson extravagantly said, “you have
not indeed made a world, but you have approached more nearly to

its Maker than any man who has lived from the creation to this
day.” It is certainly a monument to his genius and mechanical
power.

But it is time to bring this dissertation to a close.

It may safely

be asserted, that while our honoured ancestors laid the foundations

of the American Philosophical Society, the ceremony of placing its
corner stone was by the hand or under the enlightened superintend
ence of Franklin; and that if it was reared only after long continued
and sedulous toil, its erection has repaid the diligence of its archi
tects, in the spirit enkindled by it in this country, and the honour
reflected by it in distant lands.

APPENDIX.

Note to Page 51.

The text is emphatic respecting William Penn's freedom from the
relation of slave-holder. I avail myself of the opportunity to correct
an error into which Mr. George Bancroft was very naturally led, on
this subject, by a fallacious authority, in his great work, “The History
of the United States.” Mistakes which are unworthy of notice in an
inferior production, become important when found in a book which is
destined to permanent celebrity like the one named.
Mr. Bancroft has been eloquently just to the founder, in the attri
bution of some of the greatest and best qualities of man, but he com
mits a mistake in saying that Penn “died a slave-holder.” (2 Vol.
p. 403.)
The authority cited at the foot of the page for this assertion, is the
Historical Collections of Massachusetts, 8 Vol. 2d Series, which con
tains a letter from the late T. Matlack.

I have read this letter, which

is dated on the 11th January, 1817. It speaks of Penn's leaving a
family of slaves, one of whom had been his body-servant, who after
wards became a gardener at Pennsbury.
John F. Watson, of Germantown, refers in his “Annals' to the same

body-servant spoken of by Matlack. He calls him Virgil, and says
Matlack told him he remembered talking with Virgil about the year
1745.

As our amiable antiquarian derived his information from the

writer of the letter, it is not surprising he should endorse the inac

62

curacy by repeating the statement. Watson says, “These were
black people whose surname was Warder. They had been servants
of William Penn,” &c.

It is fortunate for historical truth, that owing to an original docu
ment still in existence, the assertion, as made, can be fully disproved.
This document is a bill of sale, under date 26th of 11th Month, 1733–4,

from Joseph Warder, the owner of the negro in question, conveying
him to “the Honourable Thomas Penn, Esq.” for the consideration of
fifty pounds, Pennsylvania currency. This valuable manuscript is

in the possession of George M. Justice, of Philadelphia, who deemed
the subject worthy of a written communication to the Historical So
ciety of Pennsylvania, a few months ago.

Having myself seen the

original paper in the hands of Mr. Justice, I entertain no doubt that
it is genuine, from the internal evidence it carries with it, and from
its present respectable custody.
The bill of sale calls the negro Virgil, and states his age, at that
time (1733), to have been “about 20 years.” William Penn did not
visit the Province of Pennsylvania after his second departure in 1701.
He died in the year 1718. Virgil, therefore, could have been only five
years old at the death of Penn; and as the Founder continued to re
side in England during the last seventeen years of his life, the idea
of his leaving a body-servant in the Colony, is rather too absurd for
denial.

virgil was no doubt legally owned

from his birth by Joseph War

der, and received the distinctive appellation of Warder, from the well
known custom among servants of assuming the family name of their

original master, and retaining it through every change of ownership.
The cause of Matlack's mistake is to be sought, if not in the infirmity
of age, (for he was about ninety when the letter was written) in the
antiquity of the event detailed, for he relates a conversation in 1817
which happened in 1745.

He has, strangely enough, mistaken well

63
known dates and events, and confounded William Penn, the Founder

of Pennsylvania, with Thomas Penn, one of his descendants.
In extenuation of this aged letter writer, it may be mentioned, that
no less a personage than Dr. Franklin has committed the same spe
cies of blunder in his letters and autobiography, in ascribing to the
Founder various misdeeds which were the fruits of a different policy
and a subsequent age. It is owing to the prevalence of a kindred or
identical spirit with these, in the Historical Review of Pennsylvania,
which induces me to suppose, that though Dr. Franklin has disclaim
ed the authorship of the work, his may have been one of the hands
engaged in its manufacture,
J. R. T.

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICE

EDWARD LIVINGSTON,

READ BEFORE. ThE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.

BY

HENRY D. GILPIN.

PHILADELPHIA:
JOHN C. CLARK, PRINTER, 60 DOCK STREET,

1843.

-

*

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICE

OF

offer a notice, for preservation among its records, of one who while

living was among the most distinguished of its members—of one
who earned that distinction, not less by a long life of benevolence
and virtue, than by the active exercise, through the various scenes
of an eminent political and professional career, of a practical philo
sophy which found in them all constant opportunities to promote the
happiness and the prosperity of society.

Without disparaging the

quiet labours of the student, who, in the tranquillity of his closet and
under none but self-imposed restraints, elicits by patient reflection
and sagacious reasoning, truths of enduring value; without depreciating that industry which in at least comparative seclusion from the
more active and exciting duties of life, accumulates step by step, facts
that make clear the mysteries of nature and extend the boundaries
of useful knowledge; without detracting from the merit and the praise
of those who in the pursuit of natural or exact science, and the elu
cidation of moral truths, more usually win, in the general estimation
of the world, the praise and titles of philosophy—I may yet be per

-

68

mitted to say—I am sure I shall be permitted here to say, in the

hall of this venerable Institution, and surrounded by many of the
ablest votaries of science of whom America can boast—that no

one of these does Philosophy claim more justly and truly as her
son, than he who, in the busy engagements of public life, where
he is stimulated by ambition, and occupied by objects that are
"Pposed most strongly to absorb the feelings, if not to warp the

judgment and the taste, yet blends with all his actions the love
of science, and the extension of truth, and applies that wisdom
which

springs only from knowledge and truth, to the affairs he is

called upon to engage in or direct. The father of philosophy, the

*gyrite himself, was the minister and constant counsellor of his
imperial pupil up to the moment when he crossed the Hellespont;
Tully does not less preside as the acknowledged master of the Ro

man school, because he ceaselessly devoted himself from the begin
ning to the close of life, to all the duties of a statesman and a law

yer; and though the fame of Bacon has been almost wrecked amid
the quicksands of politics and office, from which he could not tear

himself, he maintains his place as a philosopher next only to the two
great masters of Greece and Rome.

The records of our own Insti

tution are not wanting in illustrations of the same truth; for who
will venture to believe that the wreath which science binds around

the brows of Franklin and of Jefferson has lost any of its freshness,
because they devoted through life their active energies to political
pursuits. Indeed it seems to me that there is no class of her followers

whom Philosophy should more proudly recognise, than those who
forget not her lessons, and retain her animating and generous spirit,
through a career which too generally centres in individual success;

and although a name like that of Livingston may be conspicuous, as

69

it is, in the list of public men, it claims and should retain its place,
with equal justice, in the ranks of those who, as philosophers, have
contributed their share to the improvement and well-being of mankind.
Among the statesmen on whom the American people have con
ferred their honours with a just discrimination, no one has endea
voured with more consistent anxiety than Edward Livingston, to
promote their welfare, by an application of the lights of moral and
intellectual

tions.

experience and truth, to

their social and political institu

With a mind, clear, penetrating and sagacious—with an

industry that left unfinished no duty that he undertook—there were
blended from his earliest youth, serenity of temper, simplicity and
cheerfulness of manners, an active benevolence, a clear, strong sense
of right, a desire to promote in all things the good of others, and a
willingness to forego his own interest and inclinations: so that in
the relations of an advocate, a jurist, a legislator, and a statesman,

he filled his part not more for his own enduring reputation, than for
the benefit of those he served.

Born but a short time before the commencement of the revolution,

his youthful years were impregnated with the lessons best taught to
an observing mind by the incidents that occurred around him. A

brother of Robert R. Livingston, one of the committee who draughted
the Declaration of Independence; a brother-in-law of Montgomery,
who sealed with his blood the manifesto of patriotic resistance; filled
with an insatiable love of study, by which he had mastered the stores

of ancient and modern learning, and acquired a knowledge, far from
inconsiderable, of many of the branches of abstract and natural
science; he came into life just at the period when the institutions of

his country assumed their settled form, imbued with the true spirit
in which they were founded, animated with a desire to maintain

70

them in purity and vigour, and possessing the talents and information
which would enable him well to perform his part in whatever situa
tion he might be thrown, as a private or a public man.

Having adopt

ed the legal profession, and established himself in the city of New
York, he had gained before he reached the age of thirty, a high re
putation for the extent of his acquirements as a jurist, and ability as
an advocate.

He already began to apply to his professional inves

tigations the principles which he had accumulated in the wide range
of his legal studies; and in some degree introduced into a practice
necessarily founded upon and nearly confined to the English law,
those illustrations which he had derived from the jurists of antiquity
and of continental Europe, and which, at a subsequent period, were
so conspicuously and advantageously exhibited in his public and
professional labours.

From these occupations he was to some ex

tent withdrawn for several years by his election to Congress, as a
representative from the city of New York. That event took place
in the year 1794.

He was twice reëlected, and during the six years

that he remained in Congress, he maintained a position equally dis
tinguished by the ability that marked his views on all public ques
tions, and the enlightened and candid spirit which he evinced in the

discussions of a period when those differences were first developed,
that presently assumed a character more ardent and limits more dis
tinctly defined.

United in political opinions with Madison, Gallatin,

Giles, and Macon, he bore a conspicuous share in the debates on the
public measures which they approved of or opposed; and he came at
once to be considered as a leading member of the party to which he at
tached himself.

Independently, however, of subjects more peculiarly

political, he was early the advocate of various measures indicative of
a wise and philanthropic spirit; and, among these, it is especially to

71

his exertions that we owe the first endeavours to reform the criminal

code of the United States, to protect or relieve American seamen
left by accident or misfortune on foreign shores, and to promote the
gradual increase of a navy sufficient to protect American commerce
in remote seas.

Though sincerely attached, from a strong convic.

tion, to the particular political opinions which he advocated, he yet
maintained them with characteristic liberality and deference to those
from whom he differed; and no diversity of views of general policy
could induce him to withhold his cordial support of such of their
measures as he deemed calculated to sustain or protect his country's
honour or rights.
Soon after withdrawing from Congress, he was elected Mayor of
the city of New York, an office whose organization, as then con
stituted, required the exercise of important judicial as well as execu
tive functions.

He was also selected by Mr. Jefferson, when he be

came President, to fill the post for which his legal acquirements
eminently fitted him, of Attorney of the United States for the State
of New York.

Within the period of his mayoralty, the city was af.

flicted by a desolating pestilence, during which his personal exertions
and benevolence were fearlessly displayed at the risk of, and almost
with the loss of his own life.

The Common Council, on his subsequent retirement from office,
adverted, in an address unanimously adopted, to his admirable con
duct in that trying emergency and in the whole performance of his
public duties.

“Having been connected with you,” they say, “in

the discharge of the greater part of those duties, we cannot too

warmly acknowledge the uniform politeness and courtesy of your
manners.

Inflexible in the preservation of order and in the execu

tion of the laws, yet unbiassed by personal feeling or party prejudice,

72

you have invariably exhibited dignity and firmness tempered by
complacency.

Even when differing from you in opinion, we have

always had occasion to admire your rigid impartiality and the inde
pendence of your sentiments. This assemblage of qualities so rarely
combined, would suffice to command our highest respect and esteem,
but it was reserved for a period of desolating calamity to display the
extent of your philanthropy and your disinterested devotion to the
public welfare.

During the scenes of affliction and dismay with

which it lately pleased God to visit our city, we beheld with admira
tion and with the most grateful emotions, the unremitted zeal with
which you sought out and relieved distress, and the alacrity with
which you sacrificed your personal safety and comfort to that of the
suffering poor, regardless of danger and toil, and disdaining all cold
examination of the mere limits of official duty.

When humanity

called, you obeyed only the impulse of your generous heart. The
anxiety and alarm which pervaded all ranks of citizens, during the
dangerous illness which you contracted in administering to them re
lief, pronounced, in language which flatterers cannot imitate nor
envy distort, the ardour and sincerity of their affection. We must
indeed be destitute of the feelings of men if we could witness without
regret the period which dissolves a connexion endeared by such ties.
Yet you have so marked out the path of duty, that inferior abilities, if
guided by intentions as pure, may follow in the steps traced by your
wisdom, and for a time preserve the impulse which your energy has
produced.”

It was just at the period when Mr. Livingston was receiving this
gratifying testimonial of respect, on his retirement from office in New
York, that the treaty, so ably negotiated by his brother in Paris, to
secure the cession of Louisiana, was ratified by the Government of

73

the United States.

When that province became, shortly afterwards,

a part of the American Union, Mr. Livingston resolved to remove
there, and to connect his renewed professional career with the rising
institutions of the new community. The enlarged nature of his ear
lier legal studies, enabling him at once to grasp the questions which
arose out of the provisions of the civil law, as well as that of France
and Spain, introduced there at different periods of colonial authority;
his thorough knowledge of the jurisprudence then generally prevail
ing in the United States, which would necessarily come to be incor
porated to some extent with that of a territory now a part of them;
and above all his habit and power of careful discrimination of legal
principles, looking to them according to their intrinsic excellence and
fitness, neither in a spirit of unnecessary innovation nor an unwise
adherence to mere precedent or usage; these qualities not only placed
him at once, by general consent, at the head of his profession in
Louisiana, but they enabled him to exercise a more than common
influence in establishing a system of jurisprudence there, which in
all respects may bear an advantageous comparison with that of any
other of the States, and may claim over that of many of them a de
cided superiority.

Immediately on his arrival in Louisiana, Mr. Livingston perceived
the necessity of prompt attention to this subject. The inhabitants
had grown up and were living under a system of laws which were

henceforth to be administered by judges, some of whom were igno
rant of the languages in which they had been promulgated, and most
of whom had been accustomed to judicial forms altogether different.

On the other hand, the institutions of a free people were to supplant
those of a monarchical and colonial government, and the individual

citizen was to be called on constantly to perform a part personally
I

74

active and efficient.

It became, therefore, at once essential that, even

without a change in the body of the laws, a mode of procedure fitted
to the circumstances should be established without delay. The Le
gislature wisely resolved to commit this duty to the judgment and
knowledge of jurists in whom the people might safely repose unlimit
ed confidence.

Mr. Livingston was selected to perform it, and with

him was united a personal and professional friend of learning and
ability, (also while he lived a member of our Society,) Mr. James
Brown, afterwards a Senator in Congress from Louisiana, and Minis
ter Plenipotentiary to France. While they discarded the fictions and
technicalities of the English law, they avoided the prolixity so usual
in the Spanish, and not infrequent in the French code. Their sys
tem is simple and intelligible; as well as calculated to prevent unne
cessary expense and delay. It was adopted by the legislative coun
cil; it was introduced with the general approbation of the communi
ty; and for a series of years it has stood, with slight alteration, the
test of trial and experience.
A more important task remained—the complete revision of the
body of civil and criminal law, and its reduction into systematic
codes. This was naturally and properly postponed until, by their
admission into the Union as a sovereign state, the people could them
selves act upon a measure so important to their feelings and welfare.
After this event, with a just estimate for the wisdom and ability of

Mr. Livingston, he was selected for the task by the Legislature; and
no difference of opinion upon the political topics of the day withdrew
their confidence from one who had identified his fame with the juris
prudence of Louisiana, as he had devoted his talents to her service.
In the preparation of the civil code, Mr. Derbigny and Mr. Moreau
were united with Mr. Livingston. The task proved to be one of

75

great labour; the existing laws which were familiar to the people,
and therefore not without necessity to be abolished, consisted of pro
visions at once complicated and discordant; fragments of the Spa
nish ordinances frequently remained; the French law previous to the
revolution had not been altogether superseded by the code of Napo
leon; and, with American judges and the influx of American citizens,
many of the provisions of the English common law had obtained a
place. The arduous exertions of three years were required to re
duce this mass into an intelligible system; in all its parts it received
the coöperation of Mr. Livingston, and some of them, especially the
title of “obligations,” were exclusively his own; it met with a recep
tion from the Legislature and people of the State far more favourable
than could have been anticipated for such a measure; and, with the
exception of the commercial code, to some provisions of which objec
tion was made, it was promptly adopted and still continues, with few
changes in its general principles, to be the permanent law of the
State.

By an act of the Legislature, the preparation of a system of crimi
nal jurisprudence was confided to Mr. Livingston alone.

He deeply

felt the responsibility he assumed in undertaking such a trust; he
knew that he would have to encounter strong prejudices, to oppose
long settled opinions, to exercise vigilance of forecast and distinctness
objects for which the state of society, present

of enactment as to the

and future, required him to provide. Two years after his appoint
ment he presented to the Legislature a preliminary report, exhibiting
the progress he had made, explaining the plan on which he proposed
to execute the work, and giving some detached parts as specimens of
it. These were unanimously approved, and he was requested by a
vote to complete his labours.

He accordingly proceeded with them.

76

His best faculties, to use his own language, were faithfully and labo
riously employed under the direction of a religious desire to perform
the duty entrusted to him, in a manner that might realize, in some
degree, the views of his fellow citizens, for whose benefit it was de
signed. By assiduous exertion he completed the entire work in two
years more; but it was scarcely finished, when all his labours were
destroyed by an accident that, fortunately in its final result, only

produced a remarkable instance of his temper and perseverance.
Having received authority from the Legislature to submit it to them,
when completed, for greater convenience, in a printed form, he had
caused a fair copy of the whole work to be written for the use of the
printer. The evening before it was to be delivered to him, he occu
pied himself till a late hour in comparing this copy with the original
draught.

He left them together when he went to bed, consoling

himself with the pleasing thought that he had thus completed the la
bours of four years.

Not long afterwards he was awakened by the

cry of fire; he hastened to the room where his papers had been left,
but not a vestige of either copy remained. They were totally con
sumed. Though stunned at first by the event, his industry and
equanimity soon came to his aid; before the next day closed he had
recommenced his task; the Legislature, at their following session,
extended the period for its performance; and in two years more he
presented to them his complete “System of Penal Law,” in the shape
in which we now see it.

Prefixed to the system was a series of re

ports reviewing, in a masterly manner, the whole science of penal
jurisprudence; pointing out the objects to be sought for, the errors to
be combatted, and the modes in which these could be done with most

benefit to the criminal himself, and to the society whose laws he had
violated. The system has not, it is believed, been yet finally acted

77

upon, in its extended form, by the Legislature of Louisiana, but it
does not, on this account, claim less justly the admiration of the phi
lanthropist and jurist. It is a work worthy of the deep consideration
of all communities. The beauty of its arrangement, the wisdom of
its provisions, and the simplicity of its forms, have never been sur
passed, probably never equalled in any similar work; and it is not
without entire justice, that this admirable production has contributed,
perhaps more than any other of his labours, to secure to Mr. Living
ston that eminent place which he holds among those who are re
garded, not merely as distinguished jurists, but as public benefac
tors.

It was by these acts, during an uninterrupted residence of many
years, that Mr. Livingston identified himself with the State of which
he became a citizen.

His name will ever be cherished with grateful

affection and respect in Louisiana.

Nor was it by these acts alone.

His eminent standing in his profession and in society, the active in
terest which he took in all the institutions of the State, and his ser

vices in the Legislature, of which he was occasionally a member, all
united to make him not only an influential citizen, but one who was
able in innumerable ways to contribute largely to the benefit of the
community.

His patient industry, his amenity of temper, the gene

rosity of his disposition, made this at once easy and agreeable; and
when, in the circumstances of the times, acts of more serious devo

tion to public duty were required, he was found amongst the fore
most, ready and zealous to discharge them. The invasion of the
British, at the close of the war, roused the patriotic spirit as it re
quired the prompt devotion of the inhabitants. With but few regular
troops, and almost entirely unprepared for such a conflict, they were
obliged hastily to form themselves into an army to repel the in

78

vaders.

Mr.

Livingston was among the foremost to do so. In

"ly leaving his professional duties and all private occupations, he
P" himself to General Jackson as soon as he arrived to take
the command in Louisiana, and offered to place himself in any po
sition where the general might regard his services as useful. He
Was selected as his aid-de-camp.

He was by his side constantly

"&" the period of hostilities, enjoyed his confidence in a
"rked degree, and at the close of the war received from him many
evidences of that regard which was subsequently, and in another sta
tion, yet more signally evinced.

After an uninterrupted residence in Louisiana for twenty years, in

"ch he had withdrawn from political
to his
been

pursuits, and devoted himself

Profession, and those congenial studies and labours that have
adverted to, Mr. Livingston determined to retire from the bar,

"d to revisit in New York the scenes of his earlier

life and the con

"exions from whom he had been so long separated. This determi
*tion was the signal for a new mark of confidence from his adopted
State.

He was elected as a representative in Congress from Louis

iana, an event which was followed in a few years by his choice as a

*ator. After his election, an enthusiastic address was presented to
him by the City Council of New Orleans, in which they reviewed
his Various public services from the moment of his arrival in Louis

iana, *Poke of them in warm terms of approbation and gratitude, and
*Pressed their confidence that his continuance in the National Coun
"ould be a sure guaranty of further exertions for their welfare

cils

and

Prosperity.

Mr.

*ivingston

continued in Congress from 1823 to 1831.

His

*dvanced a.ge prevented the same energetic participation in the public
b

"siness which had there formerly distinguished him, but he, never

79

theless, originated several important measures, and not unfrequently
engaged in debate. Those of his speeches which are preserved ex
hibit that clearness of perception and language, that various but un
ostentatious learning, that simplicity, dignity and patriotism, which
were characteristic of him.

His views of public questions were ex

pressed with firmness but without asperity; he discussed, in a mas
terly manner, all those topics connected with a true construction of
the constitution, and the extent and limitations of power assigned to
the members of the confederacy and to the different departments of
the government, which grew out of the controversy in South Caro
lina; the reputation which he had acquired in Congress so long be-,
fore, and that which had been added to it by his eminent labours in
a different sphere, suffered no diminution, but gained additional lustre
by this return to a legislative career.

In the spring of 1831 the Department of State became vacant by
the resignation of Mr. Van Buren. Mr. Livingston, who had retired
a few months before, at the close of the session of Congress, to an
estate which he possessed on the Hudson river, in the neighbourhood
of his birth place, was summoned by General Jackson to fill that
elevated post. Totally unprepared for such an event, he hesitated
for some time to accept it; with the modesty and simplicity which
marked his character, he distrusted his abilities adequately to dis

charge its duties; and it was not without difficulty that the President
obtained the services of one whose devotion to his country he had
himself witnessed in far different scenes, and whose talents and vir

tues had received the approbation of his countrymen so often and in
so many ways.

Eminent as have been the men who have filled the

post of Secretary of State, few have displayed the same fitness and

ability to discharge its duties. His negotiations with foreign nations

S0

were very successful; and the documents connected with them, so

far as they have been published, exhibit profound political wisdom
and an enlightened spirit. The treaties that he formed are not more
beneficial in their commercial stipulations, than they are made con
sonant, in their international provisions, with the feelings and im
provement of the age. The missions which he originated or pro
moted, have opened new and important fields to American enterprise.
The counsels of which, as the chief member of the administration, he
was the advocate or adviser, were founded on views of the constitu

tion carefully considered and ably vindicated.
The duties of such a place were, however, more arduous than Mr.
Livingston, at his advanced age, was willing to continue long to
discharge; and on the reëlection of General Jackson in 1833, he
retired from his cabinet.

At that time the negotiations with France,

arising out of the treaty of 1830, which granted an indemnity to the
United States for injuries done to American commerce, during the
wars of Napoleon, were in a state of great complexity. This was in
creased by the excitement which party contests in the French Legis
lature gave to the subject; and it was evident that the position of
affairs demanded such a course on the part of the United States, as
should protect their honour and maintain their rights, without allowing
any thing not required by these just objects to interfere with or en
danger that ancient

friendship between the two nations, which had

its origin in the struggles of the revolution. For such a service no
man in the United States was more eminently fitted than Mr. Living
ston. The distinguished public office from which he had just retired,
the ability and consistency that had marked his course as a states
man, his sound views in regard to the institutions and policy of his
country, made him a representative of American feelings, opinions

81

and determination, in whom his fellow-citizens had a perfect confi.
dence. The known moderation of his character, his reputation as
a jurist, especially on international questions, his long residence in
Louisiana, whose inhabitants were connected with France by so
many associations, his knowledge, which was more than commonly
profound, of the language, literature and

history of that country,

seemed to assure for him the most friendly reception there; and, as

if to add to these circumstances of peculiar fitness for such a post, he
had not long before been elected a member of the Institute of France,

so that he was already enrolled among a body of distinguished
Frenchmen, and connected with them by those ties which spring
from mutual labours in the paths of science and of philanthropy, and
in the search of wisdom and truth.

He was accordingly selected in

the summer of 1833, by President Jackson, to fill the post of Minister
Plenipotentiary to France; he accepted the appointment, embarked
shortly after in the Delaware ship of the line, and arrived at Cher
bourg in the month of September.

He remained abroad until April,

1835, when he returned to the United States.

Although, at the time

of his leaving France, the differences between the two countries had
not been finally adjusted, and his departure was a step taken in con
sequence of what he deemed due to the honour of his own country,
yet it was shortly afterwards followed by an acquiescence, on the
part of the French Government, in the course which, under the
instructions of President Jackson, he had firmly but temperately
urged.

His whole conduct, in circumstances that demanded, at

every step, the exercise of an able judgment and an enlightened pa
triotism, served well to terminate his career as a public servant; and
the official documents in which it is exhibited and indicated, must

ever be regarded as among the most excellent of his own state
K

82

papers, and will deservedly hold a conspicuous place in the history
of our intercourse with foreign nations.
On his arrival in the United States he was hailed with cordial

and enthusiastic approbation; not only did he receive, as he me
rited, the decided and warm approval of his government, but his
fellow-citizens united to display in various ways their admiration of
a conduct alike manly and patriotic, just and resolute.

Public

meetings, accompanied with various testimonials of respect, attended
his progress to and from Washington; and he had the satisfaction
to be assured, in the liveliest and most gratifying manner, that, in a
position of unusual difficulty, he had greatly contributed at once to
maintain the honour and just pride of his country, to overcome with
out yielding to the mistaken views of her ancient ally, and to pre
serve those peaceful relations which every circumstance that could
exist in the intercourse of two such nations, made it desirable for
them to maintain.

Mr. Livingston did not long survive his return to America.
He immediately resumed his residence at his estate on the Hud
son river, among his numerous family connexions; and the rest of
his life was spent in scenes rendered equally attractive to him by
their own natural beauty, and by the associations of his earlier

years. He devoted himself with the greatest enjoyment to the pur
suits of the country. His farm and his garden, with that social in
tercourse in which he always loved to indulge, afforded him constant
employment; and it was in the midst of such occupations that his life

was terminated, by a sudden illness, in the spring of 1836. He had
just reached the age of seventy-two.
The private life of Mr. Livingston was a daily exhibition of do
mestic and social qualities which secure affection and diffuse happi

83

ness; his temper was serene and his disposition cheerful; his heart
was keenly alive to all the impulses of affection and friendship; he
could bear misfortune with equanimity, but to the close of life readi
ly participated in the cheerful amusements of society; devotedly fond

of study, and having untiring industry and a retentive memory, his
mind was richly stored with all the knowledge that literature could
impart; fond of scientific investigations, so far as his many engage
ments permitted him to pursue them, he readily gave his aid to those
who engaged in them; actively benevolent, he was unceasing in his
endeavours to promote every plan which he deemed conducive to the
welfare or improvement of men. In his profession he was eminently
distinguished; as an advocate and a lawyer, he stood by general
consent in the highest rank; and his labours in those kindred
branches of study and reflection, which were required in the prepa
ration of the systems of civil and criminal law which he framed,
gave him a reputation and secured to him honours and distinction,
in his own and other countries, not surpassed by any of the jurists
of his times.

Among the statesmen of America, his place was no

less eminent; his public speeches present, in every instance, striking
views of the questions he discussed, and although the stations of trust
to which he was elevated, place his official labours in comparison
with some of the most illustrious of his countrymen, this has only
served to display more clearly their intrinsic merit, and to secure for
them an equal approbation.

Recurring, as we must do, on an oc

casion such as this, to the character and conduct of his life, reflecting
on his virtues as a man and his services as a statesman, we cannot

indulge in a wish more just, than that those who may be called on to
fill the duties of a distinguished

public trust, may ever blend with

them the same anxious care to promote the welfare and happiness

84

of their fellow men, and that they who shall give their hours of re
flection to the development of knowledge or of moral truth, may be
as prompt and anxious as he was, practically to apply it to the im
provement of their country's institutions and the immediate benefit of
society.

ON

THE

EFFECTS

of"

SECLUDED AND GL00MY IMPRISONMENT
oN INDIVIDUALS OF The

AFRICAN VARIETY OF MANKIND,
iN The

PRODUCTION OF DISEASE.

BY

BENJAMIN H. COATES, M.D.

Read at the Centennial Anniversary of the American Philosophical Society,
May 29th, 1843.

PHILADELPHIA:
JOHN C. CLARK, PRINTER, 60 DOCK STREET.

1843.

ON THE EFFECTS

of

SECLUDED AND GLOOMY IMPRISONMENT,

&c. &c.

HAvING been for many years an official visiter of the Eastern
Penitentiary of this State, my attention became strongly drawn to
the great inequality in the operation of separate and gloomy confine
ment on individuals of the white and the coloured races of mankind.

At the request of a member of this Society, I drew up a statement
on the subject, embracing tables; and that statement has been for
warded for insertion in a journal of prison discipline, published at
Frankfort on the Maine, by Messrs. Noellner, Julius and Warrentrapp.
The tables included in it, were, however, composed from incomplete
materials, though the best to which I could then procure access;
and wanted the means of concluding a judgment of the year 1841.
They were sufficient for the purpose then in view; particularly for
the moral arguments intended to be used; and were employed ac
cordingly.

88

Since then, through the politeness of Mr. George Thompson, the
Warden of the Penitentiary, and of Mr. Holloway, the Clerk of the
institution, I have been favoured with the necessary means to com

plete the averages of the year 1841; which thus enables me to pre
sent, for the first time, a complete abstract of the relative mortality
of the two colours in that prison, from its commencement to the last
annual report of its condition.
A disproportionate mortality has deep and afflicting interests for
a humane mind. These have been urged in their proper place, both
in the paper above mentioned, and in a partial communication to the
Philadelphia Prison Society, not intended for publication.

The

facts appear to me, however, to be also valuable in a scientific
sense; and I beg leave to offer a succinct account of them in their
now completed form, as a discussion in public hygiene.
The mortality of the coloured convicts in this penitentiary has
been so great as to swell the total amount, and attract the attention
of humane critics; and this has, at times, been so far the case as to

impair the character of the prison, and tend to diminish the public
confidence in the mode of punishment adopted in it. With the contro
versies which have grown out of this, we have nothing to do; but
the result exhibited was that the average mortality of white convicts
in the prison was less than that of the white inhabitants of the City
and Liberties of Philadelphia; while that of the coloured prisoners

greatly exceeded the mortality of either white or coloured among our
general population.
The following table of the mortality of the first eight years of the
use of the prison is given by Dr. Darrach, in the Ninth Annual
Report of the Inspectors of the Penitentiary, page 12.

I have ar

ranged the columns in a different order, and have also calculated

89

backwards the whole number of the deaths, which are not given in
that form by Dr. Darrach, and inserted them. The fractions are
those of Dr. Darrach.

5.:
r

Years.

E =
z 5

.#

~

©

3.

->

23

s

s

ca

#

#:

##

5

#

'#

>

&
:

#

E3 | #

# | 3 | # | 3 | E | #

£

£

=

3
0.

#:
<=

:

;

<

| 3 || > | 3 | #

C.

#

1830

31 |

21.81|

9.19|

1

1

0 | 3.

4.19

1831

67

47.75,

19.25

4

2

2

4.18 10.02

1832

91

69.42.

21.58

4

1

3 || 4.4 | 1.44 13.52

1833

123 |

89.30

33.70

1

1

0

1834

183 |123.58

59.42

5

1

4

2.7

1835

266 | 154.74 108.26

7

2

5

2.6 | 1.26

1836

360

202.

148.

12

2 | 10 || 3.3 |

1837

387 |233.

154.

17 |

7 || 10 || 4.3

6.

.8 | 1.11|,

The first prisoner was received Oct. 22d, 1829.

.8

.99.
3.

0.
6.68
4.61
6.74
6.49

During the pe.

riod of two months, nine days, which elapsed between this date and
the first of January, 1830, but few prisoners were in the house, the
number was not uniform, and is not reported; and no deaths took
place: it is, therefore, excluded from our averages.

I have compiled from different annual reports, most of the results
which follow; and have arranged them with their references in a
tabular form for convenience of inspection.

For two of the items I

am indebted to the politeness of Mr. Holloway, the Clerk of the
Prison.

90

R
eceptions.
-

Years.

'
":
''

Aver

Population.

-

Deaths.

Mortality perct.

White. Col’d. White. Col’d. White. Col’d. White Col’d. Whitel Cold.

1836

84 - 59

8th Report, p. 10 p. 10
1837

101|

60

9th Report, p. 3 p. 3*
1838

115|

63 659, 377| 240 161|

7 || 19 |2.92 11.8

10th Report, p.25 p.25 p.4 p. 4 p. 5 p. 5 p. 19p20t
1839

99|

80. 758, 457| 245 173|

2

8 .

.81| 4.62

11th Report, p. 3. p. 3. p. 4 p. 4 p. 16 p. 16 p. 33.p.33
1840

88,

51 846, 508 232, 162|

9 || 13 || 3.88, 8.02

12th Report, p. 3. p. 3. p. 4 p. 4 p. 20 p. 20 p.24 p. 24
1841

83|

43 929. 551 203] 144||

4 || 13 | 1.97-9.03

18th Report, p. 3 p. 3: p. 8 p. 3|Mr. H. Mr. h.p. 18 p. 18
1842

14th Report,

102]

40.1031, 591. 212 130

p. 3. p. 4 p. 4 p. 4, §

3

6 | 1.411-4.61

p. 4 p.4

Those who examine the above tables cannot fail to notice the fre

quent existence of strong and glaring instances of disproportion
between the two colours. Such are the occurrence of very high
ratios, a manifold mortality out of the smaller number, &c.

Thus,

in 1832, three coloured deaths occurred and only one white; though
the whites outnumbered the coloured in the proportion of 69 to 22;
rejecting fractions and taking the nearest unit.

In 1834, the colour

ed deaths were 4, the whites 1; coloured population, 59, white, 124.

* An error in the text, easily corrected.
t A trifling error in page 20.
# Dr. Darrach, page 15, classes 2 more as whites.
§ An error at page 4, where it is made 120.

91

Next year the deaths were 5 and 2, though the larger mortality
occurred among 108, and the smaller among 155.

In 1836, the

numbers were 10 and 2, among a population, respectively, of 148
and 202.

In 1839, they were 8 and 2, among 173 and 245, re

spectively.

This had not ceased to exist in 1842, when they were

6 and 3, among 130 and 212.
The irregular fluctuation of the mortality is also remarkable in
both races, but particularly among the coloured.

Among these it va

ried from nothing in 1830, to 2 in 1831; and from 3 in 1832, to no
thing in 1833, and again to 4 in 1834.

From 1841 to 1842, it is di
minished more than one-half Nor do these changes bear any relation
to the changes of the population. The most remarkable fluctuations

among the whites are from 1836 to 1837, when the deaths varied
from 2 to 7, with scarce any change in the amount of population;
from 7 in 1838, to 2 in 1839, and again to 9 in 1840; while the
fluctuations of the population were in both cases in the opposite
direction.

During the last two years there has been a reduction.

I do not know all the epidemic causes which have contributed to
produce this remarkable result. Certain I am that there was no
distinction between the treatment of the two races.

It is apparent

from the reports of the physicians, and well known among the su
perintendents of the prison, that almost all the augmentations of

deaths among the coloured prisoners occurred by scrofula, including
pulmonary consumption.

To obtain an average of mortality for the whole duration of the
prison, excepting the two months, nine days, of organization, I have
added together the average populations of the whole thirteen years,
and compared the amount with the total number of deaths for the
same period. From this I obtain the following results:--

92
Total white

averages, 13 years, with the fractions given,

Total white deaths, 13 years,

-

-

Average rate per cent of white deaths in 13 years,

2073.60
42.

-

2.03

-

Total coloured averages, 13 years,

-

-

-

Total coloured deaths, 13 years,

-

-

-

1323.40

Average rate per cent. of coloured deaths, 13 years,

93.
7.03

"he reasons why my inquiries were in the first instance directed
to the Eastern Penitentiary, have been already alluded to.

It is

that one of our prisons most open to the inspection of the public, and

which has attracted most of the public attention. Its population is,
besides, of a more permanent character. I have not been able to
*sult the records of the Moyamensing Prison.

Mr. Crans, the

clerk to that institution, to whose politeness I am under obligations,
has left me, after a free conversation, under impressions confirma
tory of what has been observed in the Penitentiary; making always

*ficient allowance for the very large differences in the class of sub
jects received there, and the duration of their confinement.

I feel,

also, strongly called upon to express my thanks for the politeness

"d love of truth of Mr. George Thompson, the Warden of the Peni

tentiary, who gave me every facility, and, among other things, com
Pleted my set of reports: and for those of Mr. Holloway, who

obligingly compared my conclusions with the records of the institu.
tion, and
ficient.
to

furnished me with

some

materials in which I was de

* obtain a more complete view of this subject, it could be wished
*pare the above results with those obtainable in relation to the

*parative mortality of the white and coloured races in our city
"burbs. Our climate, together with the mode of life prevailing

and

*ong these so frequently unfortunate people, destroys a large pro

93

portion of them beyond the average of our own race.

I have not, as

yet, been able to obtain the correct population of the districts within
the bills of mortality from the census of 1840, so as to render avail

able the statements of mortality obligingly furnished me at the Health
Office, and enable me to draw averages of the city and liberties
during the thirteen years to which these inquiries extend.

In the

absence of these, I have no better temporary alternative than to em
ploy the records of the ten preceding years.
From the researches of Dr. Emerson (Medical Statistics, Nov.
1831, p. 28), it appears that the relative proportions of deaths of
white and coloured persons in the city and suburbs of Philadelphia,
from 1821 to 1830, inclusive, were as given in the following table,
in which I have added, for convenience, the decimal numbers in the
two last columns.

Whites.

Coloured,

:

£:

1 in 16.9

2.31

5.92

1821,

1 in 49.1

1822,

,, 41.9

,,

21.5

2.39

4.65

1823,

,

33.8

,,

17.5

2.96

5.71

1824,

,, 35.1

,

17.5

2.85

5.71

1825,

, 42.4

, 27.0

2.36

3.70

1826,

, 40.3

, 26.1

2.48

3.83

1827,

,

47.4

,,

18.9

2.11

5.29

1828,

,,

43.6

, 20.8

2.29

4.81

1829,

,,

44.0

,, 23.7

2.27

4.22

1830,

,

45.4

,, 27.2

2.20

3.68

To draw an average of the whole which should be absolutely cor
rect, it would be necessary to have the whole numbers. These are

not given by Dr. Emerson. The averages of the above ratios are,
M

94

for the whole ten years, whites, 2.422; blacks, 4.752; and these are
probably near the truth.
Now these numbers are to each other in the proportion of 1 to
1.96. That is, out of an equal number of each complexion residing
in our city and suburbs, to every hundred deaths of white persons
there die one hundred and ninety-six coloured persons. The deaths
above given as occurring in the prison (whites 2.03, coloured 7.03),
are to each other as 1 to 3.46: or, out of an equal number of both
complexions residing in the Penitentiary, to every hundred deaths of
white persons there would die three hundred and forty-six coloured
persons!
It is necessary here to bear in mind, that the convicts in the Peni
tentiary are not, as has been sometimes supposed, the most wretched
and most exposed to hardships of our population. The most misera
ble, and in particular, the most miserable blacks, seldom commit the
higher crimes which render them liable to the longer periods of con
finement for which the Penitentiary is intended, but are generally
either convicted for lighter offences, or committed for vagrancy.

In

both cases they are sent to Moyamensing. Besides, the immediate
effects of drunkenness, recent colds and violence, have generally had
time to subside before the prisoners are sent to the Penitentiary; as,
prior to this, they must undergo their trials, and remain committed
in the other prison, if not bailed.
It is evident that a comparison on terms of perfect equality cannot
be made between the white mortality in the prison and that in the

city. Of causes tending to diminish the proportion of deaths in the
prison, one of the most important is, that the convicts are generally
persons in the prime of life, and that the prison is exempted from the
heavy mortality of infancy, and from that of old age. On the other

95

hand, there must be admitted to occur among the convicts a large
proportion of individuals who have injured their constitutions by a
vicious mode of life.

With this proviso, there is a convenience in

placing together these four ratios in a common view, as follows:–
Per cent.

White mortality in Penitentiary, 13 years,

2.03

White mortality in city and suburbs, 10 years,

2.422

Coloured mortality in city and suburbs, 10 years,

4.752

Coloured mortality in Penitentiary, 13 years,

7.03

If Dr. Emerson's average of white deaths in the city and suburbs
be assumed as unity, these numbers will then be represented as fol
lows:

Whites in Penitentiary,

-

-

-

Whites in city and suburbs,

-

-

-

1.

Coloured in city and suburbs,

-

-

-

1.962

Coloured in Penitentiary,

-

-

-

2.903

.838

I cannot doubt that the above statements will be found fully suf.
ficient to establish the fact, that there exists an immense discrepancy
in the effect of imprisonment between the coloured people and the
whites; and that there is an essential difference in this, as in so

many other respects, between the two races.

The most prolonged

and narrow inquiry has failed to discover any difference in the treat
ment of these two classes in the prison, unless it be, that, from the
dislike of cold, the coloured convicts frequently deprive themselves of
a portion of their ventilation.

It is evident that the difference is founded in nature and reality,
and is not the mere opinion of an unimportant individual.

If the re

ality of the occurrence be thus granted, it is proper to bring in that

96

evidence, explanatory and confirmatory, which is founded in physi
ology and in medical experience. The negro, or even the mulatto,
is a very different person, in his physical and psychical conforma
tion, from that one who may be presumed to have been held in view
in our legislation, the white Anglo-Saxon, Celt, or German.

His

ancestry, and the prototype of his race, are calculated for the torrid
zone; and even the mixed progeny suffer severely and mortally by
our cold.

Cheerful, merry, lounging and careless, the Ethiopian

American deeply enjoys the sun and light; delights in the open
air; and is, as a general rule, constitutionally free from that deep,
thoughtful anxiety for the future, so conspicuous in his paler neigh
bour. The face of heaven seems to him necessary to his existence;
and though long confinement is, in his case, less productive of
gloomy remorse, it is far more depressing to his vitality.
The morbid effects of this is unhappily visible in the produc
tion of scrofula, and pulmonary consumption; more than eighty
eight per cent. of the deaths being from chronic affections of the
lungs, and from the first named disorder. The moral consequences
are, in an equivalent degree, depressing to the mind.

It is not

by remorse and anguish that he is affected, so much as by intel
lectual and moral weakness and decay; and gloomy confinement
becomes thus to him, mentally as well as physically, a nearer ap
proach to the punishment of death. The effect of separate imprison
ment has not been, as has been erroneously charged against it, to
produce insanity, although a humane and strict analysis has shown
many to have been affected both with insanity and with imbecility,
at the times when they committed the offences for which they were
sentenced. The effect upon the unfortunate coloured prisoners,
though scarcely perceptible upon the whites, has been to produce not

97

mania, but weakness of mind; dementia, instead of deranged excite
ment.

Throughout this inquiry, I have generally preferred reasoning
from the deaths, partly from the force of the consideration, but prin
cipally, as regards the scientific question, for the sake of the greater
mathematical precision of the results. We have, in the reports for
1837, 1838, 1839, and 1842, a detail of the mortal diseases and im

mediate causes of these, in forty-three cases of coloured persons.
These are as follows:

Consumption and chronic inflammation of the lungs; 1837,
6 cases; 1838, 12; 1839, 1; 1842, 1, Scrofula of the chest, 1838, 1,

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
1

Chronic pleurisy, 1838, 2 cases; also affected with chronic in
flammation of the stomach, or with that of the bladder, and

with paralysis: 1839, 5; of which 1 was cut off by brain
fever: 1842, 1,

-

-

-

-

8

Scrofula, of other parts than the chest, 1837, 2 cases; 1838, 4,
including affections of peritoneum, bowels and knee joint;
1839, 2, including peritoneum and hip joint; and 1842, 2,
Typhus fever, 1837,

10

-

•-

-

-

-

1

Remittent fever, 1837,

-

-

-

-

-

1

Asthenia, 1842,

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

Tetanus, from a burn, 1842,

-

Total,

43

Vicious habits are enumerated as causes in fourteen of the cases;

and in three of them, they are the only cause assigned.

Four are

ascribed to previous syphilis; and in one, no other cause is

recorded.

98

Of nineteen deaths of white prisoners, during the same years, the
diseases were as follows:

Consumption, 1837, 5 cases; 1838, 3 cases,
Pulmonary and hip disease, 1842,

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

Brain fever, reported as owing to scrofula and disorganized
lungs, 1837,
Syphilitic chronic pleurisy, 1839,
-

Scrofula,

-

Syphilis, 1837,

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

•-

1

-

-

-

-

0

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

2

Chronic bowel complaints, 1838, 1; 1842, 1,
Small pox, 1838,

-

-

Asthenic brain fever, 1839,
Stone, 1838,

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

•-

1

-

-

1

-

-

1

-

Diseased arteries and enlarged heart, 1842,

-

Total,

19

Vicious habits are assigned as a cause in four cases; and in
two are the only cause named. Vice before admission is repre
sented as a cause in four cases; and in two of them is the only one
named.

Offorty-three deaths of coloured convicts, twenty-nine are ascribed
to chronic diseases of the lungs, and to affections of an adjacent struc
ture, in which these are extremely liable to produce such diseased

changes; and ten to scrofula of other parts than the lungs; leaving
only four for all other affections; and these four were produced by
typhus fever, remittent fever, asthenia and tetanus. Of nineteen
deaths among white persons, on the other hand, the causes are

found in chronic diseases of the lungs and their appendages, for

99

eleven cases; scrofula, none; chronic bowel complaint, two; small
pox, two; and four others are severally attributed to syphilis, asthe
nic brain fever, stone, and diseased arteries, with enlarged heart.
Reduced to per centages, these proportions would read as follows:
Coloured.

Diseases of chest, exclusive of heart and arteries,
Scrofula,

-

All other diseases,

-

65.12

-

-

-

-

-

23.25

-

-

-

-

-

11.63

Total,

100.

White.

Diseases of chest,

-

-

-

-

-

Scrofula,

*-

-

-

-

-

-

57.89
0.

All other diseases, including bowel complaints, 10.53, and
small pox, 10.53,

-

-

-

Total,

-

42.11

100.

LAW S
AND

REGULATIONs
OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY,
HELD AT PHILADELPHIA

FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE,
As finally amended and adopted, December 16, 1859,
TOGETHER WITH THE

CHARTER OF THE SOCIETY,
AND

A

LIST OF IT'S ME M B E R S.

PHILADELPHIA:
JOHN C. CLARK & SON, PRINTERS, 230 DOCK STREET.

1860.

THE LAWS
OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICA <

\* * * * * * >

o: " : ***.
* *

*

** * * *

OF THE MEMBERs, AND MANNER of THEIR ELECTION.

SECTION 1. The election of members shall be by ballot, and shall

form part of the stated business of the meetings on the third Friday
of January, April, July and October.
2. A member may, at any meeting, nominate in writing a candidate
for membership, and the nomination so made may, in like manner, be
concurred in by other members.

The board of officers and council

may also nominate candidates for membership; and such nominations
shall be certified to the Society by minute thereof in writing, attested
by the clerk of said board.
3. No person shall be ballotted for, unless his nomination, with the
names of the members proposing him, or the minute of the board of
officers and council, made as aforesaid, shall have been publicly read
to the Society at the two stated meetings preceding that at which the
balloting takes place. Nor shall any person be deemed duly chosen
unless three-fourths of the votes given shall be in his favour.
4. Before entering upon an election for members, one of the secre
taries shall read the names of the several candidates; and any member
may then, for the information of the Society, speak to their character
and qualifications for membership.
5. The names of the candidates and their places of abode shall be
designated on the ballot-boxes, and the names of the members qualified
to vote shall be called by one of the secretaries. The members as

4.

they are named shall then ballot for the several candidates in succes

sion; a white ball being considered in favour of the candidate.
6. After all the other business of the meeting shall have been dis
posed of the boxes shall be opened and the result of the poll declared
by the presiding member.
7. The members are mutually pledged not to mention out of the
Society the name of any candidate proposed, nor of any withdrawn
or unsuccessful candidate; and the papers containing the names of the
unsuccessful candidates shall be destroyed immediately after the elec
tion.

-

8. Every member, upon his introduction into the Society, shall be
presented to the presiding officer, and shall subscribe the laws.
9. Such members as reside within ten miles of the hall of the

Society, and such other members as desire to vote at the meetings
and elections, shall pay an admission fee often dollars, and annually
thereafter, on the first Friday of January, a contribution of five dollars.
The payment of fifty dollars at one time, by a member not in arrears,
shall exempt him from all future annual payments.
10. Members elect, residing within ten miles of the hall, shall lose

the right of membership unless they subscribe the laws and pay their
admission fee within one year after their election. Any member
liable to an annual contribution, who shall neglect or refuse to pay the
same for the term of two years, shall be notified by the treasurer in
writing, on or before the second Friday in January after such default,
that his rights as a member are suspended; and, in case the said arrears,
together with the contribution due on the first Friday in January after
such notice, shall not be paid to the treasurer on or before the said
last named day, the membership of such defaulting member shall be
forfeited, his name stricken from the roll, and reported to the Society
by the treasurer.
11. On the Society being informed of the death of a member, the
fact shall be entered on the records, and a member may be appointed

to prepare an obituary notice of the deceased.
12. The obituary notices of members shall be read to the Society,
and they shall be bound together whenever they are sufficiently nu
merous to form a volume.

13. The catalogue of the members shall be read at the meeting on
the third Friday of January, for the purpose of correction.

5
CHAPTER II.
OF THE OFFICERs, AND MANNER of THEIR ELECTION.

SECTION 1. The officers shall be a patron, a president, three vice
presidents, four secretaries, three curators, a treasurer, and twelve
counsellors.

2. The governor of the State of Pennsylvania shall be, ex officio,
the patron of the Society.
3. On the first Friday of January in every year, between the hours
of two and five in the afternoon, as many of the members as shall
have paid up their arrears due to the Society, and shall declare their
willingness to conform to the laws, regulations, and ordinances of the
Society, then duly in force, by subscribing the same, and who shall
attend in the hall, or place of meeting of the Society, within the time
aforesaid, shall choose by ballot, one president, three vice-presidents,
four secretaries, three curators, and one treasurer; and, at the same

time and place, the members, met and qualified as aforesaid, shall in
like manner choose four members for the council, to hold their offices

for three years.
4. No person residing within the United States shall be capable of
being president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, or member of the
council, or of electing to any of the said offices, who is not capable
of electing and being elected to civil offices within the State in which
he resides. Provided, that nothing herein contained shall be con
sidered as intended to exclude any of the officers or counsellors, whose
time shall be expired, from being re-elected, according to the pleasure
of the Society.
5. No one shall be esteemed a qualified voter at the election, who
has not subscribed the laws and paid the admission fee, or who is in
arrears to the Society, or has not attended a meeting during a whole
year next preceding the election.
6. Of the day, hour, and place of election, notice shall be given by
the librarian at least one week before the day of election, in such one
or more of the public newspapers of the State of Pennsylvania, as the
Society shall direct.
7. Before opening the election, the company that shall be met at
half an hour after two, shall appoint three members of the Society as

judges of the election, and also two clerks or secretaries for taking
down the names of the voters.

8. In case of an equality of votes for the candidates for any office,
the decision shall be by lot, to be drawn by one of the judges. "

6
CHAPTER III.

OF The PRESIDENT AND WICE-PRESIDENTS.

SECTION 1. The president shall preside at the meetings, preserve
order, regulate the debates, state and put questions agreeably to the
sense and intention of the members, and announce the determination

of the Society thereupon.
2. In the absence of the president from a meeting, his duties shall
devolve upon the vice-presidents in rotation; or, at his request when
present, his duties may be performed by either of the vice-presidents.
3. If the president and vice-presidents be absent, the members met
shall appoint one of their number to take the chair for the time.
4. At some time, within the year, the president shall deliver to the
Society a discourse on some literary or scientific subject, accompanied
by such suggestions, with regard to the affairs of the Society, as he
shall judge proper.
->

CHAPTER IV.
of ThE SECRETARIES.

SECTION 1. The Secretaries shall minute the proceedings of the
Society at the meetings, read all papers which are required to be
read at the meetings, and preserve, in regular files, all documents pre
sented to the Society. They shall give notice to members of their
election, acknowledge in writing the reception of all communications,
and generally conduct the correspondence.
2. Two of them, at least, shall officiate at every meeting; and, un
less a different arrangement shall be made and announced by them
at the beginning of the year, the first and third named on the list of
secretaries shall be considered responsible for the performance of all
the duties of the office during the first, third, fifth, seventh, ninth, and
eleventh months of the year, and in like manner the second and fourth
named on the list, during the alternate months.
-e

CHAPTER W.
OF THE CURATORS.

SECTION 1. The curators shall have charge of the cabinet of the
Society, and shall be responsible for its preservation and security.

7

They shall classify and arrange the articles therein, and shall preserve
an exact list of them, with the names of the donors.
2. One of them, at least, shall be in attendance as curator at every

meeting; and, unless a different arrangement shall be made and an

nounced by them at the beginning of the year, they shall be considered
severally responsible, in monthly rotation, for the performance of all
the duties of the office.
->

CHAPTER VI.
OF THE TREASURER.

SECTION 1. The treasurer shall collect and receive all moneys be

longing to the Society, or entrusted to its care, unless otherwise spe
cially directed; and he shall disburse or apply the same upon the or
ders or according to the appropriations made by the Society, which
orders and appropriations shall be duly certified to him by the presid
ing officer and secretary for the time.

2. He shall keep regular accounts; and &n the first Friday of De
cember in every year, and as much oftener as may be required, he
shall present to the Society a full report on the state of its funds.
3. He shall preserve for the use of the Society at elections and
meetings, a catalogue of all the members, designating thereon as a
distinct class those who have paid the admission fee and the annual
contributions, and noting opposite to their names the several meetings
at which they have attended during the year.
4. On the expiration of his office he shall deliver up to his succes
sor, the books, papers, vouchers of property, and moneys remaining
in his hands.

5. To secure the faithful execution of all his trusts, he shall,

before he enters upon his office, give bond and security to the Society
in such amount as the committee of finance shall judge proper; which
bond shall, without renewal, apply to the several years for which he
may be re-elected treasurer.
6. He shall, as full compensation for his services, receive five per
cent on the amount of the annual income of the Society, collected by
him.
->

CHAPTER VII.
OF THE OFFICERS AND COUNCIL,

SECTION 1. The officers and council shall meet together statedly
on the second Friday of February, May, August and November re

8

spectively, at the same hour in the evening at which the stated meetings
of the Society are appointed to be held; and specially at such times
as they may judge proper.
2. They shall keep regular minutes of their proceedings, to be laid
before the Society at its stated meetings on the third Friday of the
same months respectively.
3. They shall, from time to time, lay before the Society such mea
sures as in their judgment will conduce to the well-governing and
ordering of the affairs of the Society, or promote the objects of its
institution; particularly, they shall recommend subjects for premiums
to be offered by the Society, with the conditions on which they shall
be awarded.

4. They shall also, from time to time, nominate to the Society as

candidates for membership, such persons, of our own or of foreign
countries, as may in their judgment merit such a distinction. Such
nominations shall, as nearly as may be practicable, be agreed to by
them in the manner

pointed out

by law for the election of members,

except that no previous notice of any intended proposal to them for
their nomination shall be required; and the names of all persons
duly nominated by them shall be certified to the Society by a minute
thereof, made in writing and attested by their clerk.
5. To them shall be submitted all communications from candidates

for premiums, whether the Magellanic or those offered by the Society,
all of which shall be immediately referred to the standing committee
on premiums. Reports on such communications shall be made with
out unnecessary delay.
6. They shall annually appoint a standing committee of seven
members, to be called the committee on premiums, of which three

members shall be a quorum. It shall be the duty of this committee
to publish the terms on which the Magellanic and other premiums are
to be granted by the Society, to consider and report upon all com
munications from candidates for premiums, and to recommend to the
officers and council subjects for which new premiums shall be offered
by the Society.
7. The president and senior secretary of the Society, shall be, ex
officio, the president and clerk at their meetings; and three of their
number shall be a quorum.

8. The ex-presidents of the society shall be members of the board
of officers and council.

9
CHAPTER VIII.

*

OF ThiF LIBRARIAN.

SECTION 1. A member of the Society shall be chosen at the stated
meeting on the third Friday of January in each year, to be the libra
rian of the Society.

Nominations for said office shall be made at the

first stated meeting in January, and no person shall be voted for who
has not been so nominated.

2. The librarian shall have, under the direction of the proper stand
ing committees, the custody and care of the hall, and of the books and
papers belonging to the Society, which he shall dispose and arrange in
such a manner as shall be judged most convenient, and shall keep an
arranged catalogue of them, with the names of the donors. He shall
assist the curators in their charge of the cabinet.
3. He shall attend at the library at every meeting of the Society,
and daily, excepting Sundays, from 10 A.M. to 1 P. M. except when
allowed leave of absence by the presiding officer of the Society, and
shall then, and at such other times as he may think proper, lend out
to any resident member of the Society, who is not indebted to him for

fines or forfeitures, any books belonging to the library, except the last
volumes and loose numbers of periodical journals, and except recent
donations made to the Society, which shall not be lent out; taking
from each member, borrowing a book, an obligation, with a sufficient
penalty, to return the same uninjured, within one month thereafter,
subject to a fine of fifty cents at every stated meeting that shall occur
after the limited period before he returns the book, and a forfeiture of
double the value of the book, or of the set of which it is one, if not

returned in six months after being borrowed.
4. He shall levy and collect these fines and forfeitures, and pay
over the moneys thence arising to the treasurer, at the end of his
official year, in aid of the appropriation for the library.
5. He shall give notice in the newspapers of the meetings of the
Society and of the officers and council, and of all elections, and shall
make all such publications on behalf of the Society as are not other
wise devolved by law or special order.
6. He shall, at the beginning of each year, cause tables to be pre

pared for the use of the members, on which shall be noted the days
for the meetings of the Society and of the officers and council, the
stated business to be transacted thereat, and the names of the officiating
secretaries and curator.

7. He shall transcribe carefully and correctly the minutes of the
B

10

Society, as made by the officiating secretaries. He shall acknowledge
the reception of all donations made to the Society, and transmit copies
of its Transactions and Proceedings as directed, and shall from time to
time perform such other executive or ministerial duties as may be
charged on him by a vote of the Society, given according to the laws.
8. He shall, under the direction of the secretaries, act as reporter

of the proceedings of the Society, and shall cause such abstract of them
to be published for the use of the members, and for distribution to cor

respondents, as the secretaries may deem expedient or proper, or as
the Society may direct; but no expense shall be incurred, nor any
contracts made for printing or publishing the same, beyond the sum
appropriated by the Society for such purposes.
9. He shall receive an annual salary of seven hundred dollars, to
be paid monthly from the treasury of the Society, and his services
shall commence on the first Monday after his election.
-

CHAPTER IX.
OF THE MEETINGS OF THE SOCIETY.

SECTION 1. The ordinary meetings of the Society shall be on the
first and third Fridays of every month from October to May, both in
clusive, and on the third Friday of each of the other four months, at
seven o'clock in the evening. Special meetings may be called at
any time by order of the president; or, in his absence, by order of a
vice-president.

2. The chair shall be taken by the presiding officer within one
hour after the time appointed for the meeting.
3. The qualified voters, present at any stated or special meeting,
shall be a quorum, and be competent to elect members, dispose of
property, appropriate money, and award premiums; but no property

shall be alienated or encumbered, except by the vote of three-fourths
of the qualified voters present, and given at two successive stated
meetings. For the transaction of the ordinary business, the reception
and reference of communications on

literary, scientific, or other sub

jects, all other members present shall be deemed competent to act, and,

in the absence of qualified voters, shall form a quorum.
4. Those members shall be considered qualified voters at the meet.

ings, who have subscribed the laws and paid the admission fee, and
who are not in arrears to the Society.

11

5. No meeting shall be continued after eleven o'clock; nor shall
any new matter be introduced after ten, unless in the transaction of

business, enjoined by the laws.

6. The hall of the Society shall be open on every Friday evening,
when the Society is not in session, to the members and such friends

as they may introduce, for the purposes of reading and social inter
Course.

CHAPTER X.
OF THE TRANSACTIONS OF THE SOCIETY.

SECTION 1. Every communication to the Society which may be
considered as intended for a place in the Transactions, shall imme
diately be referred to a committee to consider and report thereon.

2. If the committee shall report in favour of publishing the com
munication, they shall make such corrections therein as they may
judge necessary to fit it for the press; or, if they shall judge the publi
cation of an abstract or extracts from the paper to be more eligible,
they shall accompany their report with such abstract or extracts. But
if the author do not approve of the corrections, abstract, or extracts,

reported by the committee, he shall be at liberty to withdraw his
paper.

3. Communications not intended by their authors for publication in
the Transactions, will be received by the Society, and the title or sub
ject of them recorded; and, if they be in writing, they shall be filed
by the secretaries.
4. The Transactions shall be published in numbers, at as short in
tervals as practicable, under the direction of the committee of publica
tion, and in such a form as the Society shall from time to time direct;
and every communication ordered to be published in the Transactions
shall be immediately sent to the printer, and fifty copies thereof be

given to the author as soon as printed.
5. The order in which papers are read shall determine their places
in the Transactions, unless otherwise ordered by the Society; priority
of date giving priority of location.
6. The expenses of publishing the Transactions shall be defrayed

by subscriptions and sales, aided by such funds as the Society shall
from time to time appropriate for that purpose.

12
CHAPTER XI.
OF STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES.

SECTION 1. There shall be chosen, at the stated meeting on the

third Friday of January in each year, three members of the Society
to be a committee of finance, five to be a committee of publication,
three to be a committee on the hall, and five to be a committee on the
library.

2. The committee of finance shall have the general superintendence
of the financial concerns of the Society.

They shall consult with the
treasurer, and authorise and direct investments of its surplus funds.
They shall always have access to his books, accounts, and vouchers;

and they shall annually, on the third Friday of December, make a full
report on the state of the treasury, particularly distinguishing the seve

ral funds, and the income and disbursements of each, and recommend
ing the amounts which should be appropriated for different objects of

*Penditure during the ensuing year. They shall also have power to
remit the fees and contributions of members, when they shall judge
that circumstances make it proper.
3. The committee of publication shall superintend the printing and
distribution of the Society's Transactions. They shall make all con

tracts for the same in the name of the Society, but shall have no
power to incur any debt, beyond the amount appropriated by the So

ciety for said publication, or derived from subscriptions. They shall
audit and

certify all bills for expenses attending the publication, to the

treasurer for payment, fix the price of the different numbers, and re

*ive subscriptions. They shall furnish the treasurer, immediately
after the publication of any number of the Transactions, with a list of
subscribers, and the sum due from each, to enable him to collect
the amount thereof, and shall annually, on the first Friday of Decem
ber, make a full report of their doings to the Society. They shall
have Power to call on the librarian for his assistance in the perform
*nce of their duties.
* The committee on the hall shall have charge of the real estate
of the Society, and shall direct all necessary repairs. They shall effect

the

"surance upon the property of the Society in such amounts as may

from time to time be directed.
-

5. The committee on the library shall confer with and assist the

librarian in the disbursement of the annual appropriations for the li
brary, and in the disposition and arrangement of the books, charts,

*nd documents belonging to the Society.

13

6. No committee appointed on any subject of deliberation shall con
sist of less than three members; but any other matter may be com
mitted to a single member. A majority of any committee shall be a
quorum.

7. All committees shall be chosen, unless otherwise directed by the
Society, on nominations previously made and seconded, the question
being put on each member separately.
8. The member first elected of any committee shall be the chair
man, and considered responsible for the discharge of the duties en
joined on the committee.
9. Committees shall report at the meeting next following their ap
pointment, unless otherwise ordered by the Society.
10. All reports shall be in writing, and signed by the members
agreeing thereto.
11. The names of the committees, the time of their appointment,
the matter or business committed to them, the time at which they are
to report, and the time at which their final report is presented, shall
beentered by the secretaries in a book provided for that purpose.
-

-Q

CHAPTER XII.
OF THE MAGELLANIC FUND,

SECTION 1. John Hyacinth de Magellan, in London, having in the
year 1786 offered to the Society, as a donation, the sum of two hun
dred guineas, to be by them vested in a secure and permanent fund,
to the end that the interest arising therefrom should be annually dis
posed of in premiums, to be adjudged by them to the author of the
best discovery, or most useful invention, relating to Navigation, As

tronomy, or Natural Philosophy (mere natural history only excepted);
and the Society having accepted of the above donation, they hereby
publish the conditions, prescribed by the donor and agreed to by the
Society, upon which the said annual premiums will be awarded.
CONDITIONS OF THE MAGELLANIC PREMIUM.

1. The candidate shall send his discovery, invention or improve
ment, addressed to the president, or one of the vice-presidents of the
Society, free of postage or other charges; and shall distinguish his
performance by some motto, device, or other signature, at his pleasure.

Together with his discovery, invention, or improvement,

he shall also

14

send a sealed letter containing the same motto, device or signature,
and subscribed with the real name and place of residence of the author.
2. Persons of any nation, sect, or denomination whatever, shall be

admitted as candidates for this premium.
3. No discovery, invention or improvement shall be entitled to this
premium, which hath been already published, or for which the author
hath been publicly rewarded elsewhere.

4. The candidate shall communicate his discovery, invention or im
provement, either in the English, French, German, or Latin language.
5. All such communications shall be publicly read or exhibited to
the Society at some stated meeting, not less than one month previous
to the day of adjudication, and shall at all times be open to the in
spection of such members as shall desire it. But no member shall

carry home with him the communication, description, or model, except
the officer to whom it shall be entrusted; nor shall such officer part
with the same out of his custody, without a special order of the So
ciety for that purpose.
6. The Society, having previously referred the several communica
tions from candidates for the premium, then depending, to the conside
ration of the twelve counsellors and other officers of the Society, and
having received their report thereon, shall, at one of their stated meet
ings in the month of December, annually, after the expiration of this
current year (of the time and place, together with the particular occa
sion of which meeting, due notice shall be previously given, by public
advertisement) proceed to final adjudication of the said premium; and,
after due consideration had, a vote shall first be taken on this question,
viz., Whether any of the communications then under inspection be

worthy of the proposed premium! If this question be determined in
the negative, the whole business shall be deferred till another year;
but if in the affirmative, the Society shall proceed to determine by bal

lot, given by the members at large, the discovery, invention, or im
provement most useful and worthy; and that discovery, invention,
or improvement, which shall be found to have a majority of concur
ring votes in its favour, shall be successful; and then, and not till then,
the sealed letter accompanying the crowned performance shall be

opened, and the name of the author announced as the person entitled
to the said premium.
7. No member of the Society who is a candidate for the premium

then depending, or who hath not previously declared to the Society,
that he has considered and weighed, according to the best of his judg

ment, the comparative merits of the several claims then under conside

15

ration, shall sit in judgment, or give his vote in awarding the said
premium.
8. A full account of the crowned subject shall be published by the
Society, as soon as may be after the adjudication, either in a separate
publication, or in the next succeeding volume of their Transactions, or
in both.

9. The unsuccessful performances shall remain under consideration,
and their authors be considered as candidates for the premium for
five years next succeeding the time of their presentment; except such
performances as their authors may, in the mean time, think fit to with
draw. And the Society shall annually publish an abstract of the
titles, object, or subject matter of the communications, so under conside
ration; such only excepted as the Society shall think not worthy of
public notice.
10. The letters containing the names of authors whose performances
shall be rejected, or which shall be found unsuccessful after a trial of
five years, shall be burnt before the Society, without breaking the
seals.

11. In case there should be a failure, in any year, of any commu
nication worthy of the proposed premium, there will then be two pre

miums to be awarded the next year. But no accumulation of pre
miums shall entitle the author to more than one premium for any one
discovery, invention or improvement.
12. The premium shall consist of an oval plate of solid standard
gold, of the value of ten guineas. On one side thereof shall beneatly
engraved a short Latin motto suited to the occasion, together with the
words; “The Premium of John Hyacinth de Magellan, of London,
established in the year 1786;” and on the other side of the plate shall
be engraved these words: “Awarded by the A. P. S. for the disco
very of
A. D.
” And the seal of the Society shall be an
nexed to the medal by a ribbon passing through a small hole at the
lower edge thereof.
SECTION 2. The Magellanic fund of two hundred guineas shall be
considered as ten hundred and fifty dollars, and shall be invested sepa
rately from other funds belonging to or under the care of the Society,
and a separate and distinct account of it shall be kept by the treasurer.
The said fund shall be credited with the sum of one hundred dollars,

to represent the two premiums for which the Society is now liable.
The treasurer shall credit the said fund with the interest received

on the investment thereof, and, if any surplus of said interest shall re
main after providing for the premiums which may then be demand

16

able, said surplus shall be used by the Society for making publication
of the terms of the said premium, and for the addition, to the said pre
mium, of such amount as the Society may from time to time think
suitable, or for the institution of other premiums.
The treasurer shall, at the first stated meeting of the Society in the
month of December annually, make a report of the state of said fund
and of the investment thereof.
--

CHAPTER XIII.
of The LAWS OF THE SOCIETY.

SECTION 1. No statute, law, regulation, or ordinance shall ever be
made or passed by the Society, or be binding upon the members
thereof, or any of them, unless the same hath been duly proposed,
and fairly drawn up in writing, at one stated meeting of the Society,
and enacted or passed at a subsequent meeting, at least the space of

fourteen days after the former meeting, and upon due notice in some
of the public newspapers, that the enacting of statutes and laws, or the
making and passing ordinances and regulations, will be part of the
business of such meeting.
2. Nor shall any statute, law, regulation or ordinance be then, or
at any time, enacted or passed, unless thirteen members of the Society
be present in addition to the quorum of the officers and council; nor
unless the same be voted by two-thirds of the whole body then present.
3. The laws contained in the thirteen foregoing chapters, shall be
in force from and after the time of their adoption by the Society; and

thereafter all other laws, regulations and ordinances heretofore passed
or made by the Society, shall be and the same are hereby repealed.

17

Rules of Order, &c. of the American Philosophical
Society.
1. The Order of Business at the ordinary meetings of the Society
shall be as follows:
1.
2.
3.

The chair taken by the presiding officer.
Names of members present minuted.
New members presented, and visiters from corresponding societies
introduced.

4.

Records read of last ordinary meeting, and of any subsequent
special meetings.
Correspondence read and acted on, unless giving rise to debate:
a. Acknowledgments of election to membership.
b. Letters from learned societies.
c. Other letters.

Donations and other additions announced and acted on:
a. To the library.
b. To the cabinet.

Reports on communications and subjects of science read and
acted on:

a. From standing committees and officers.
b. From special committees.

Obituary notices of members read, and announcements of the
decease of members made and acted on.

13.

Communications for Magellanic preminms and communications
intended for the Transactions presented and acted on.
Communications not intended for the Transactions presented.
Visiters from corresponding societies retire.
Stated business of the meeting.
Pending nominations for membership announced and new nomi

14.

Reports on business made and acted on:

10.
11.
12.

nations read.
a. From standing committees and officers.
b. From special committees.
15. Deferred business:
a. Of the meeting.
b. Of former meetings.
16. New business.
17.

Minutes read, and submitted for correction.

18.

The Society adjourned by the presiding officer,
C

18

2. No debate shall ever take place in the Society but on motion
duly made and seconded and afterwards stated by the presiding
member.

3. When a member speaks he shall stand up, addressing himself
to the presiding member; and, avoiding desultory remarks, he shall
confine himself strictly to the merits of the question under considera
tion.

4. No member while speaking shall be interrupted, unless by the
presiding member, when he shall think fit to call him to order or to
admonish him to a closer adherence to the question under discussion.
5. When a member speaking is called to order he shall instantly
sit down or appeal from the call to the Society, who shall determine
without debate.

6. No member shall speak more than twice to the same question
without previously asking and obtaining leave of the Society.
7. Whilst any question or motion is under debate, no other motion
shall be admitted, unless to divide the question, to amend, to postpone,
to adjourn, or to take the pending question.
8. No motion to reconsider a former vote can be made or seconded

except by a member who voted in the majority.

Nor shall any such

motion be entertained unless it be made forthwith, or at the next stated

meeting after the action which it proposes to reconsider.
9. A motion for adjournment shall at all times be determined with
out debate.

10. The presiding member shall have no vote, unless in the case of
a tie or equality of votes among the other members, or where the act
of incorporation or the laws require more than a bare majority of the
members present, or where the vote is taken by ballot.
11. Where a ballot is not required by the laws, the votes, if re
quested by three of the members present, shall be taken by ayes and
noes, and shall be recorded among the proceedings of the meeting.
12. Every meeting of the Society and of the council shall be
advertised in at least two of the daily newspapers of the city on the
day previous to the time of meeting.
13. Any of the foregoing rules of order may, for the more con
venient despatch of business at any meeting, be suspended by a vote
of two-thirds of the members present.

< * : * >*
19

42

of

-

s:
AN ACT

~ : -.

For Incorporating the American Philosophical Society, held at Philadelphia,
for promoting Useful Knowledge.

WHEREAs, the cultivation of useful knowledge, and the advance.
ment of the liberal arts and sciences in any country, have the most

direct tendency towards the improvement of agriculture, the enlarge
ment of trade, the ease and comfort of life, the ornament of society,
and the increase and happiness of mankind. And whereas, this country
of North America, which the goodness of Providence hath given us
to inherit, from the vastness of its extent, the variety of its climate,

the fertility of its soil, the yet unexplored treasures of its bowels, the
multitude of its rivers, lakes, bays, inlets, and other conveniences of
navigation, offers to these United States one of the richest subjects of
cultivation, ever presented to any people upon earth. And whereas,
the experience of ages shows that improvements of a public nature,
are best carried on by Societies of liberal and ingenious men, uniting
their labours, without regard to nation, sect or party, in one grand
pursuit, alike interesting to all, whereby mutual prejudices are worn
off, a humane and philosophical spirit is cherished, and youth are
stimulated to a laudable diligence and emulation in the pursuit of
wisdom. And whereas, upon these principles, divers public spirited
gentlemen in Pennsylvania, and other American States, did heretofore
unite themselves, under certain regulations, into one voluntary Society,
by the name of “The American Philosophical Society, held at Phila
delphia, for promoting Useful Knowledge,” and by their successful
labours and investigations, to the great credit of America, have ex
tended their reputation so far, that men of the first eminence in the
republic of letters in the most civilized nations in Europe, have done
honour to their publications, and desired to be enrolled among their
members. And whereas, the Society, after having been long inter

rupted in their laudable pursuits by the calamities of war, and the dis
tresses of our country, have found means to revive their design, in
hopes of being able to prosecute the same with their former success,
and being further encouraged therein by the public, for which purpose

they have prayed us, the representatives of the freemen of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania, that they may be created one body politic

and corporate for ever, with such powers, privileges, and immunities,

20

as may be necessary for answering the valuable purposes which the
said Society had originally in view:
Wherefore, in order to encourage the said Society in the prosecution
and advancement of all useful branches of knowledge, for the benefit
of their country, and of mankind; be it enacted, and it is hereby en
acted, by the representatives of the freemen of the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania in general assembly met, and by the authority of the
same, that the members of the said American Philosophical Society
heretofore voluntarily associated for promoting useful knowledge, and
such other persons as have been duly elected members and officers of
the same, agreeably to the Fundamental Laws and Regulations of the
said Society, comprised in twelve sections, prefixed to their volume
of transactions, published in Philadelphia by William and Thomas
Bradford, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and
seventy-one; and who shall in all respects conform themselves to the
said laws and regulations, and such other laws, regulations and ordi
nances, as shall hereafter be duly made and enacted by the said So
ciety, according to the tenor hereof, be, and for ever hereafter shall
be, one body corporate and politic in deed, by the name and style of
The American Philosophical Society, held at Philadelphia, for pro
moting Useful Knowledge, and by the same name they are hereby
constituted and confirmed one body corporate and politic, to have
perpetual succession, and by the same name they and their successors
are hereby declared and made able and capable in law, to have, hold,
receive, and enjoy lands, tenements, rents, franchises, hereditaments,
gifts and bequests of what nature soever, in fee simple, or for term of
life, lives, years, or otherwise, and also to give, grant, let, sell, alien,
or assign the same lands, tenements, hereditaments, goods, chattels,
and premises, according to the nature of the respective gifts, grants, and
bequests, made to them the said Society, and of their estate therein.
Provided, That the amount of the clear yearly value of such real
estate do not exceed the value of ten thousand bushels of good mer
chantable wheat.

And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the said
Society be, and shall be for ever hereafler, able and capable in law
to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered
unto, defend and be defended, in all or any of the courts or other
places, and before any judges, justices, and other person and persons,
in all manner of actions, suits, complaints, pleas, causes and matters,
of what nature or kind soever, within this Commonwealth: and that

it shall and may be lawful to and for the said Society, for ever here

21
after, to have and use one common seal in their affairs, and the same

at their will and pleasure to break, change, alter and renew.
And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That for the
well governing the said Society, and ordering their affairs, they shall
have the following officers, that is to say, one Patron, who shall be
his Excellency the President of the Supreme Executive Council [now
the Governor] of this Commonwealth, for the time being, and likewise
one President, three Vice-Presidents, four Secretaries, three Curators,

one Treasurer, together with a Council of twelve Members: and that
on the first Friday of January next, between the hours of two and
five in the afternoon, as many of the members of the said Society as
shall have paid up their arrears due to the said Society, and shall
declare their willingness to conform to the laws, regulations and ordi
nances of the Society, then duly in force, according to the tenor hereof,
by subscribing the same, and who shall attend in the Hall, or place
of meeting of the said Society, within the time aforesaid, shall choose
by ballot, agreeably to the Fundamental Laws and Regulations herein
before referred to, one President, four Secretaries, three Curators,

and one Treasurer, and at the same time and place, the members met
and qualified as aforesaid, shall in like manner choose four members
for the council, to hold their offices for one year, four more members
for the council to hold their offices for two years, and four more mem
bers for the council to hold their offices for three years. And on the
first Friday in January, which shall be in the year of our Lord one
thousand seven hundred and eighty-two, and so likewise on the first
Friday of January, yearly and every year thereafter, between the
hours of two and five in the afternoon, the members of the said Society
met and qualified as aforesaid, shall choose one President, three Vice
Presidents, four Secretaries, three Curators, and one Treasurer, to

hold their respective offices for one year, and four Councilmen, to
hold their offices for three years. Provided, That no person residing
within the United States shall be capable of being President, Vice
President, Secretary, Treasurer, or member of the Council, or of
electing to any of the said offices, who is not capable of electing and
being elected to civil offices within the state in which he resides. Pro
vided also, That nothing herein contained, shall be considered as
intended to exclude any of the said Officers or Counsellors, whose

times shall be expired, from being re-elected, according to the pleasure
of the said Society; and of the day, hours, and place of all such elec
tions, due notice shall be given by the Secretaries, or some one of

22

them, in one or more of the public newspapers of this State, agreeably
to the said Fundamental Laws and Regulations before referred to.
And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the
Officers and Council of the said Society shall be capable of exercising
such power for the well governing and ordering the affairs of the
Society, and of holding such occasional meetings for that purpose, as
shall be described, fixed and determined, by the statutes, laws, regu
lations and ordinances of the said Society, hereafter to be made. Pro

vided always, That no statute, law, regulation or ordinance shall ever
be made or passed by the said Society, or be binding upon the mem
bers thereof, or any of them, unless the same hath been duly proposed,
and fairly drawn up in writing at one stated meeting of the Society,
and enacted or passed at a subsequent meeting, at least the space of
fourteen days after the former meeting, and upon due notice in some
of the public newspapers, that the enacting of statutes and laws, or
the making and passing ordinances and regulations, will be part of the
business of such meeting; nor shall any statute, law, regulation or
ordinance be then or at any time enacted or passed, unless thirteen
members of the said Society, or such greater number of members as
may be afterwards fixed by the rules of this Society, be present, besides
such quorum of the officers and council as the laws of the Society for
the time being may require, and unless the same be voted by two-thirds
of the whole body then present; all which statutes, laws, ordinances
and regulations so as aforesaid duly made, enacted and passed, shall
be binding upon every member of the said Society, and be from time
to time inviolably observed, according to the tenor and effect thereof;
provided they be not repugnant or contrary to the laws of this Com
monwealth, for the time being in force and effect.
And whereas, nations truly civilized (however unhappily at variance
on other accounts) will never wage war with the arts and sciences
and the common interests of humanity;
Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and
may be lawful for the said Society, by their proper officers, at all times,
whether in peace or war, to correspond with learned Societies, as well
as individual learned men, of any nation or country, upon matters
merely belonging to the business of the said Society; such as the
mutual communication of their discoveries and proceedings in phi
losophy and science; the procuring books, apparatus, natural curiosi
ties, and such other articles and intelligence as are usually exchanged
between learned bodies for furthering their common pursuits. Pro
vided always, That such correspondence of the said Society be at all

23

times open to the inspection of the Supreme Executive Council of this
Commonwealth.

(Signed)

JOHN BAYARD,

Speaker.
Enacted into a Law at Philadelphia, on Wednesday, the fifteenth
day of March, Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and eighty.
(Signed)

THOMAS PAINE,

Clerk of the General Assembly.
(coPY.)

24

A LIST OF THE PRESIDENTS
OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL S00IETY,
Held at Philadelphia, for promoting Useful Knowledge,

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN-elected 2d January, 1769; died 17th
April, 1790.

DAVID RITTENHOUSE—elected 7th January, 1791; died 26th
June, 1796.

THOMAS JEFFERSON-elected 6th January, 1797; resigned in
January, 1815; died 4th July, 1826.
CASPAR WISTAR-elected 6th January, 1815; died 22d January,
1818.

ROBERT PATTERSON-elected 1st January, 1819; died 22d
July, 1824.
WILLIAM TILGHMAN-elected 7th January, 1825; died 29th

April, 1827.
PETER STEPHEN DUPONCEAU-elected 4th January, 1828;
died 1st April, 1844.
ROBERT M. PATTERSON.—elected 3d January, 1845; declined
accepting the position.
NATHANIEL CHAPMAN-elected 2d January, 1846; died 1st
July, 1853.
ROBERT M. PATTERSON—re-elected 5th January, 1849; died
5th September, 1854.
FRANKLIN BACHE—elected 7th January, 1853.
ALEXANDER DALLAS BACHE—elected 5th January, 1855.

JOHN K. KANE—elected 2d January, 1857; died 21st February,
1858.

GEORGE B. WOOD-elected 7th January, 1859.

R.E.

GULATIONs

American Philosophical Society,
HELD AT PHILADELPHIA

-

FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE,
As finally amended and adopted, Dec. 16, 1859.

CHARTER OF THE SOCIETY,

A LIST OF ITS PRESIDENTS

-

--

P. H. L. L. A. D. E. L. P. H. L.A.:

|

*ING & BAIRD, PRINTERS, No. 607 SANSOM STREET.
18 6 6.

|

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

-

T_ _A. NW S
AND

REGULATIONS
OF THE

American Philosophical Society,
HELD AT PHILADELPHIA,

FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE,
As finally amended and adopted, Dec. 16, 1859.

ToGEThER WITH THE

CHARTER OF THE SOCIETY,
AND

... A LIST OF ITS PRESIDENTS,

PHILA. D. E L PHIA :

KING & BAIRD, PRINTERS, No. 607 SANSOM STREET.
1866.

THE LAWs
OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.
---

CHAPTER I.
OF THE MEMBERs, AND MANNER OF THEIR ELECTION.

SECTION 1. The election of members shall be by ballot, and

shall form part of the stated business of the meetings on the
third Friday of January, April, July and October.
2. A member may, at any meeting, nominate in writing a
candidate for membership, and the nomination so made may, in

like manner, be concurred in by other members. The board of
officers and council may also nominate candidates for member
ship; and such nominations shall be certified to the Society by
minute thereof in writing, attested by the clerk of said board.
3. No person shall be balloted for, unless his nomination,
with the names of the members proposing him, or the minute
of the board of officers and council, made as aforesaid, shall

have been publicly read to the Society at the two stated meet
ings preceding that at which the balloting takes place. Nor
shall any person be deemed duly chosen unless three-fourths of
the votes given shall be in his favor.
4. Before entering upon an election for members, one of the
secretaries shall read the names of the several candidates; and
any member may then, for the information of the Society, speak
to their character and qualifications for membership.
5. The names of the candidates and their places of abode shall
be designated on thc ballot-boxes, and the names of the members

qualified to vote shall be called by one of the secretaries. The
members as they are named shall then ballot for the several can

4

-

didates in succession; a white ball being considered in favor of
the candidate.

6. After all the other business of the meeting shall have been

disposed of the boxes shall be opened and the result of the poll
declared by the presiding member.
7. The members are mutually pledged not to mention out of

the Society the name of any candidate proposed, nor of any
withdrawn or unsuccessful candidate; and the papers containing
the names of the unsuccessful candidates shall be destroyed im
mediately after the election.
8. Every member, upon his introduction into the Society, shall
be presented to the presiding officer, and shall subscribe the laws.
-

9. Such members as reside within ten miles of the hall of the

Society, and such other members as desire to vote at the meet
ings and elections, shall pay an admission fee of ten dollars, and
annually thereafter, on the first Friday of January, a contribution

of five dollars. The payment of fifty dollars at one time, by a
member not in arrears, shall exempt him from all future annual
payments.

-

-

10. Members elect, residing within ten miles of the hall, shall
lose the right of membership unless they subscribe the laws and
pay their admission fee within one year after their election. Any

member liable to an annual contribution, who shall neglect or
refuse to pay the same for the term of two years, shall be noti
fied by the treasurer in writing, on or before the second Friday
in January after such default, that his rights as a member are
suspended; and, in case the said arrears, together with the con
tribution due on the first Friday in January after such notice,
shall not be paid to the treasurer on or before the said last
named day, the membership of such defaulting member shall be
forfeited, his name stricken from the roll, and reported to the
Society by the treasurer.
11. On the Society being informed of the death of a member,
the fact shall be entered on the records, and a member may be
appointed to prepare an obituary notice of the deceased.
12. The obituary notices of members shall be read to the
Society, and they shall be bound together whenever they are
sufficiently numerous to form a volume.
13. The catalogue of the members shall be read at the meet
ing on the third Friday of January, for the purpose of correction.

CHAPTER II.
oF THE OFFICERs, AND MANNER OF THEIR ELECTION.

SECTION 1. The officers shall be a patron, a president, three

vice-presidents, four secretaries, three curators, a treasurer, and
twelve counsellors.

-

2. The governor of the State of Pennsylvania shall be, ex
officio, the patron of the Society.
3. On the first Friday of January in every year, between the
hours of two and

five in the

afternoon, as many of the members

as shall have paid up their arrears due to the Society, and shall
declare their willingness to conform to the laws, regulations, and
ordinances of the Society, then duly in force, by subscribing the
same, and who shall attend in the hall, or place of meeting of
the Society, within the time aforesaid, shall choose by ballot, one
president, three wice-presidents, four secretaries, three curators,
and one treasurer; and, at the same time and place, the mem
bers, met and qualified as aforesaid, shall in like manner choose
four members for the council, to hold their offices for three years.
4. No person residing within the United States shall be cap
able of being president, vice-president, -secretary, treasurer, or
member of the council, or of electing to any of the said offices,

who is not capable of electing and being elected to civil offices
within the State in which he resides. Provided, that nothing
herein contained shall be considered as intended to exclude any

of the officers or counsellors, whose time shall be expired, from,
being re-elected, according to the pleasure of the Society.
5. No one shall be esteemed a qualified voter at the election,

who has not subscribed the laws and paid the admission fee, or
who is in arrears to the Society, or has not attended a meeting
during a whole year next preceding the election.
6. Of the day, hour, and place of election, notice shall be
given by the librarian at least one week before the day of elec
tion, in such one or more of the public newspapers of the State
of Pennsylvania, as the Society shall direct.
7. Before opening the election, the company that shall be met
at half an hour after two, shall appoint three members of the
Society as judges of the election, and also two clerks or secre
taries for taking down the names of the voters.

6

8. In case of an equality

'. votes for the candidates for any

office, the decision shall be by lot, to be drawn by one of the
judges.
CHAPTER III.

of THE PRESIDENT AND vice-PRESIDENTs.
SECTION 1. The president shall preside at the meetings, pre
serve order, regulate the debates, state and put questions

agreeably to the sense and intention of the members, and
announce the determination of the Society. thereupon.
2. In the absence of the president from a meeting, his duties
shall devolve upon the vice-presidents in rotation; or, at his re
quest when present, his duties may be performed by either of
the vice-presidents.
3. If the president and vice-presidents be absent, the mem

bers met shall appoint one of their number to lake the chair for

*

time.

4. At some time, within the year, the president shall deliver
to the Society a discourse on some literary or scientific subject,
accompanied by such suggestions, with regard to the affairs of
the Society, as he shak judge proper.

CHAPTER IV.
OF THE SECRETARIES.

-

SECTION 1. The Secretaries shall minute the proceedings of

the Society at the meetings, read all papers which are required
to be read at the meetings, and preserve, in regular files, all
documents presented to the Society. They shall give notice to
members of their election, acknowledge in writing the reception -

of all communications, and generally conduct the correspondence.
2. Two of them, at least, shall officiate at every meeting; and
unless a different arrangement shall be made and announced by
them at the beginning of the year, the first and third named on
the list of secretaries shall be considered responsible for the
performance of all the duties of the office during the first, third,
fifth, seventh, ninth, and eleventh months of the year, and in

like manner the second and fourth named on the list, during the
alternate months.

CHAPTER V.
OF THE CURATORS.

SECTION 1. The curators shall have charge of the cabinet of

the Society, and shall be responsible for its preservation and
security. They shall classify and arrange the articles therein,
and shall preserve an exact list of them, with the names of the
donors.

-

2. One of them, at least, shall be in attendance as curator at
every meeting; and, unless a different arrangement shall be

made and announced by them at the beginning of the year,
they shall be considered severally responsible, in monthly rota
tion, for the performance of all the duties of the office.
CHIAPTER VI.
OF THE TREASURER."

-

serios 1.

The treasurer shall collect and receive all moneys

belonging to the Society, or entrusted to its care, unless other
wise specially directed; and he shall disburse or apply the same
upon the orders or according to the appropriations made by the

Society, which orders and appropriations shall be duly certified
to him by the presiding officer and secretary for the time.
2. He shall keep regular accounts: and on the first Friday of
December in every year, and as much oftener as may be

required, he shall present to the Society a full report on the
state of its funds.

-

-

3. He shall preserve for the use of the Society at elections,
and meetings, a catalogue of all the members, designating
thereon as a distinct class those who have paid the admission
fee and the annual contributions, and noting opposite to their

names the several meetings at which they have attended during
the year.

4. On the expiration of his office he shall deliver up to his
successor, the books, papers, vouchers of property, and moneys
remaining in his hands.
5. To

secure the faithful execution of all his trusts, he shall,

before he enters upon his office, give bond and security to the
-

-

8

Society in such amount as the committee of finance shall judge
proper; which bond shall, without renewal, apply to the several
years for which he may be re-elected treasurer.
6. He shall, as full compensation for his services, receive five
per cent on the amount of the annual income of the Society
collected by him.
-

CHAPTER VII.
OF THE OFFICERS AND COUNCIL.

SECTION 1. The officers and council shall meet together

statedly on the second Friday of February, May, August and
November respectively, at the same hour in the evening at
which the stated meetings of the Society are appointed to be
held; and specially at such times as they may judge proper.
2. They shall keep regular minutes of their proceedings, to
be laid before the Society at its stated meetings, on the third
Friday of the same months respectively.
*

3. They shall, from time to time, lay before the Society such
measures as in their judgment will conduce to the well-governing
and ordering of the affairs of the Society, or promote the ob
jects of its institution; particularly, they shall recommend
subjects for premiums to be offered by the Society, with the
conditions on which they shall be awarded.
-

4. They shall also, from time to time, nominate to the Society
as candidates for membership, such persons, of our own or of
foreign countries, as may in their judgment merit such a dis
tinction. Such nominations shall, as nearly as may be prac
ticable, be agreed to by them in the manner pointed out by law.
for the election of members, except that no previous notice of

any intended proposal to them for their nomination shall be
required; and the names of all persons duly nominated by them
shall be certified to the Society by a minute thereof, made in
writing and attested by their clerk.
5. To them shall be submitted all communications from candi

dates for premiums, whether the Magellanic or those offered by
the Society, all of which shall be immediately referred to the
standing committee on premiums. Reports on such communi
cations shall be made without unnecessary delay.

9

6. They shall annually appoint a standing committee of
seven members, to be called the committee on premiums, of
which three members shall be a quorum. It shall be the duty
of this committee to publish the terms on, which the Magel
lanic and other premiums are to be granted by the Society, to
consider and report upon all communications from candidates
for premiums, and to recommend to the officers and council
subjects for which new premiums shall be offered by the Society.
7. The president and senior secretary of the Society, shall
be, ex-officio, the president and clerk at their meetings; and
three of their number shall be a quorum.

8. The ex-presidents of the Society shall be members of the
board of officers and council.

CHAPTER VIII.
OF THE LIBRARIAN.

SECTION 1. A member of the Society shall be chosen at the
stated meeting on the third Friday of January in each year,
to be the librarian of the Society. Nominations for said office
shall be made at the first stated meeting in January, and no

person shall be voted for who has not been so nominated.
2. The librarian shall have, under the direction of the proper

standing committees, the custody and care of the hall, and of
the books and papers belonging to the Society, which he shall
dispose and arrange in such a manner as shall be judged most
convenient, and shall keep an arranged catalogue of them, with
the names of the donors. He shall assist the curators in their
charge of the cabinet.
3. He shall attend at the library at every meeting of the
Society, and daily, excepting Sundays, from 10 A. M. to 1
P. M. except when allowed leave of absence by the presiding
officer of the Society, and shall then, and at such other times
•as he may think proper, lend out to any resident member of the
-

-

Society, who is not indebted to him for fines or forfeitures, any
books belonging to the library, except the last volumes and loose
numbers of periodical journals, and except recent donations
made to the Society, which shall not be lent out; taking from
each member, borrowing a book, an obligation, with a sufficient

10

penalty, to return the same uninjured, within one month there

after, subject to a fine of fifty cents at every stated meeting that
shall occur after the limited period before he returns the book,
and a forfeiture of double the value of the book, or of the set
of which it is one, if not returned in six months after being
borrowed.

*

4. He shall levy and collect these fines and forfeitures, and
pay over the moneys thence arising to the treasurer, at the end

of his official year, in aid of the appropriation for the library.
5. He shall give notice in the newspapers of the meetings of
the Society and of the officers and council, and of all elections,
and shall make all such publications on behalf of the Society as
are not otherwise devolved by law or special order.
6. He shall, at the beginning of each year, cause tables to be
prepared for the use of the members, on which shall be noted
the days for the mfeetings of the Society and of the officers and
council, the stated business to be transacted thereat, and the
names of the officiating secretaries and curator.
7. He shall transcribe carefully and correctly the minutes of
the Society, as made by the officiating secretaries. He shall
-

acknowledge the reception of all donations made to the Society,
and transmit copies of its Transactions and Proceedings as

directed, and shall from time to time perform such other execu
tive or ministerial duties as may be charged on him by a vote

of the Society, given according to the laws.
8. He shall, under the direction of the secretaries, act as
reporter of the proceedings of the Society, and shall cause such
abstract of them to be published for the use of the members,
and for distribution to correspondents, as the secretaries may
deem expedient or proper, or as the Society may direct; but no
expense shall be incurred, nor any contracts made for printing
or publishing the same, beyond the sum appropriated by the
Society for such purposes.
9. He shall receive an annual salary of seven hundred dollars

to be paid monthly from the treasury of the Society, and his.
services shall commence on the first Monday after his election.

11

CHAPTER IX.

-

OF THE MEETINGS OF THE SOCIETY.

SECTION 1. The ordinary meetings of the Society shall be on
the first and third Fridays of every month from October to
May, both inclusive, and on the third Friday of each of the
other four months, at seven o'clock in the evening. Special
meetings may be called at any time by order of the president;
or, in his absence, by order of a vice-president.
2. The chair shall be taken by the presiding officer within
one hour after the time appointed for the meeting.
3. The qualified voters, present at any stated or special meet

ing, shall be a quorum, and be competent to elect members,
dispose of property, appropriate money, and award premiums;
but no property shall be alienated or encumbered, except by
the vote of three-fourths of the qualified voters present, and .

given at two successive stated meetings. For the transaction
of the ordinary business, the reception and reference of com

munications on literary, scientific, or other subjects, all other
members present shall be deemed competent to act, and, in the
absence of qualified voters, shall form a quorum.

4. Those members shall be considered qualified voters at the
meetings, who have subscribed the laws and paid the admission

fee, and who are not in arrears to the Society.
5. No meeting shall be continued after eleven o'clock; nor
shall any new matter be introduced after ten, unless in the
transaction of business, enjoined by the laws.
6. The hall of the Society shall be open on every Friday
evening, when the Society is not in session, to the members and
such friends as they may introduce, for the purposes of reading
and social intercourse.

-

-

-

CHAPTER X.

OF THE TRANSACTIONS OF THE SOCIETY.

SECTION 1. Every communication to the Society which may
be considered as intended for a place in the Transactions, shall
immediately be referred to a committee to consider and report
thereon.

12

2. If the committee shall report in favor of publishing the

communication, they shall make such corrections therein as
they may judge necessary to fit it for the press; or if they shall

judge the publication of an abstract or extracts from the paper
to be more

eligible, they shall accompany their report with such

abstract or extracts. But if the author do not approve of the
corrections, abstract, or extracts, reported by the committee, he
shall be at liberty to withdraw his paper.
3. Communications not intended by their authors for publi
cation in the Transactions, will be received by the Society, and
the title or subject of them recorded; and, if they be in writing,
they shall be filed by the secretaries.
4. The Transactions shall be published in numbers, at as
short intervals as practicable, under the direction of the com
mittee of publication, and in such a form as the Society shall
from time to time direct; and every communication ordered to
-

be published in the Transactions shall be immediately sent to
the printer, and fifty copies thereof be given to the author as
soon as printed.

5. The order in which papers are read shall determine their

places in the Transactions, unless otherwise ordered by the
Society; priority of date giving priority of location.

6. The expenses of publishing the Transactions shall be
defrayed by subscriptions and sales, aided by such funds as
the Society shall from time to time appropriate for that purpose.

CHAPTER XI.
OF STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES.

SECTION 1. There shall be chosen, at the stated meeting on
the third Friday of January in each year, three members of the
Society, to be a committee of finance, five to be a committee

of publication, three to be a committee on the hall, and five to
be a committee on the library.
2. The committee of finance shall have the general superin

tendence of the financial concerns of the Society. They shall
consult with the treasurer, and authorize and direct investments

of its surplus funds. They shall always have access to his
books, accounts, and vouchers; and they shall annually, on

13

the third Friday of December, make a full report on the state

of the treasury, particularly distinguishing the several funds,
and the income and disbursements of each, and recommending
the amounts which should be appropriated for different objects
of expenditure during the ensuing year. They shall also have
power to remit the fees and contributions of members, when
they shall judge that circumstances make it proper.
3. The committee of publication shall superintend the print
ing and distribution of the Society's Transactions. They shall
make all contracts for the same in the name of the Society, but
shall have no power to incur any debt, beyond the amount ap
propriated by the Society for said publication, or derived from
subscriptions. They shall audit and certify all bills for expenses
attending the publication, to the treasurer for payment, fix the
price of the different numbers, and receive subscriptions. They
shall furnish the treasurer, immediately after the publication of
any number of the Transactions, with a list of the subscribers,
and the sum due from each, to enable him to collect the amount

thereof, and shall annually, on the first Friday of December,
make a full report of their doings to the Society. They shall
have power to call on the librarian for his assistance in the per
formance of their duties.

4. The committee on the hall shall have charge of the real
estate of the Society, and shall direct all necessary repairs.
They shall effect insurance upon the property of the Society in
such amounts as may from time to time be directed.
5. The committee on the library shall confer with and assist
the librarian in the disbursement of the annual appropriations

for the library, and in the disposition and arrangement of the
books, charts, and documents belonging to the Society.
6. No committee appointed on any subject of deliberation
shall consist of less than three members; but any other matter

may be committed to a single member. A majority of any com
mittee shall be a quorum.
7. All committees shall be chosen, unless otherwise directed
-

by the Society, on nominations previously made and seconded,

the question being put on each member separately.
8. The member first elected of any committee shall be the
chairman, and considered responsible for the discharge of the

duties enjoined on the committee.

f

14

9. Committees shall report at the meeting next following their

appointment, unless otherwise ordered by the Society.
10. All reports shall be in writing, and signed by the mem
bers agreeing thereto.
11. The names of the committees, the time of their appoint
ment, the matter or business committed to them, the time at

which they are to report, and the time at which their final
report is presented, shall be entered by the secretaries in a book
provided for that purpose.

CHAPTER XII.
OF THE MAGELLANIC EUND.

SECTION 1. John Hyacinth de Magellan, in London, having in
the year 1786 offered to the Society, as a donation, the sum of
two hundred guineas, to be by them vested in a secure and per
manent fund, to the end that the interest arising therefrom
should be annually disposed of in premiums, to be adjudged by

them to the author of the best discovery, or most useful inven
tion, relating to Navigation, Astronomy, or Natural Philoso
phy (mere natural history only excepted); and the Society hav
ing accepted of the above donation, they hereby publish the con
ditions, prescribed by the donor and agreed to by the Society,

upon which the said annual premiums will be awarded.
CONDITIONS OF THE MAGELLANIC PREMIUM.

1. The candidate shall send his discovery, invention or im
provement, addressed to the president, or one of the vice-presi
dents of the Society, free of postage or other charges; and shall
distinguish his performance by some motto, device, or other sig
nature, at his pleasure. Together with his discovery, invention,
or improvement, he shall also send a sealed letter containing
the same motto, device or signature, and subscribed with the

real name and place of residence of the author.
2. Persons of any nation, sect or denomination whatever,
shall be admitted as candidates for this premium.

3. No discovery, invention or improvement shall be entitled
to this premium, which hath been already published, or for
which the author hath been publicly rewarded elsewhere.

15

4. The candidate shall communicate his discovery, invention
or improvement, either in the English, French, German, or
Latin language.
5. All such communications shall be publicly read or exhib
ited to the Society at some stated meeting, not less than one
month previous to the day of adjudication, and shall at all times
-

-

be open to the inspection, of such members as shall desire it.
But no member shall carry home with him the communication,
description, or model, except the officer to whom it shall be
entrusted; nor shall such officer part with the same out of his
custody, without a special order of the Society for that pur
pose.

6. The Society, having previously referred the several com
munications from candidates for

the premium, then depending, to

the consideration of the twelve counsellors and other officers of
the Society, and having received their report thereon, shall, at

one of their stated meetings in the month of December, annu
ally, after the expiration of this current year (of the time and
place, together with the particular occasion of which meeting,
due notice shall be previously given, by public advertisement)
proceed to final adjudication of the said premium ; and, after
due consideration had, a vote shall first be taken on this ques

tion, viz., Whether any of the communications then under in
spection be worthy of the proposed premium ? If this question
be determined in the negative, the whole business shall be de
ferred till another year; but if in the affirmative, the Society
shall proceed to tietermine by ballot, given by the members at
large, the discovery, invention, or improvement most useful and
worthy; and that discovery, invention, or improvement, which
shall be found to have a majority of concurring votes in its
favor, shall be

successful; and then, and not till then, the sealed

letter accompanying the crowned performance shall be opened,
and the namé of the author announced as the person entitled to
the said premium.
7. No member of the Society who is a candidate for the pre
mium then depending, or who hath not previously declared to
the Society, that he has considered and weighed, according to
the best of his judgment, the comparative merits of the several
claims then under consideration, shall sit in judgment, or give

his vote in awarding the said premium.

16

8. A full account of the crowned subject shall be published
by the Society, as soon as may be after the adjudication, either in
a separate publication, or in the next succeeding volume of their
Transactions, or in both.

9. The unsuccessful performances shall remain under consid
eration, and their authors be considered as candidates for the
premium for five years next succeeding the time of their pre
sentment; except such performances as their authors may, in
the mean time, think fit to withdraw. And the Society shall
annually publish an abstract of the titles, object, or subject
matter of the communications, so under consideration; such
only excepted as the Society shall think not worthy of public
notice.

10. The letters containing the names of authors whose per
formances shall be rejected, or which shall be found unsuccess
ful after a trial of five years, shall be burnt before the Society,
without breaking the seals.
11. In case there should be a failure, in any year, of any com
munication worthy of the proposed premium, there will then be
two premiums to be awarded the next year. But no accumula

tion of premiums shall entitle the author to more than one pre
mium for any one discovery, invention or improvement.
12. The premium shall consist of an oval plate of solid stand

ard gold, of the value of ten guineas. On one side thereof shall

be neatly engraved a short Latin motto suited to the occasion,
together with the words; “The Premium of Jphn Hyacinth de
Magellan, of London, established in the year 1786; and on the
other side of the plate shall be engraved these words: “Awarded
by the A. P. S. for the discovery of
A. D.—” And the
seal of the Society shall be annexed to the medal by a ribbon

passing through a small hole at the lower edge thereof.
SECTION 2. The Magellanic fund of two hundred guineas shall
be considered as ten hundred and fifty dollars, and shall be in
vested separately from other funds belonging to or under the
care of the Society, and a separate and distinct account of it
shall be kept by the treasurer.
*

The said fund shall be credited with the sum of one hundred

dollars, to represent the two premiums for which the Society is
now liable.

-

17
The treasurer shall credit the said fund with the interest re

ceived on the investment thereof, and, if any surplus of said in
terest shall remain after providing for the premiums which may
then be demandable, said surplus shall be used by the Society
for making publication of the terms of the said premium, and

for the addition, to the said premium, of such amount as the
Society may from time to time think suitable, or for the insti
tution of other premiums.
The treasurer shall, at the first stated meeting of the Society
in the month of December annually, make a report of the state
of said fund and of the investment thereof.
-

CHAPTER XIII.
OF THE LAWS OF THE SOCIETY.

SECTION 1. No statute, law, regulation, or ordinance shall
ever be made or passed by the Society, or be binding upon the
members thereof, or any of them, unless the same hath been
duly proposed and fairly drawn up in writing, at one stated
meeting of the Society, and enacted or passed at a subsequent
meeting, at least the space of fourteen days after the former
meeting, and upon due notice in some of the public newspapers,
that the enacting of statutes and laws, or the making and pass
ing ordinances and regulations, will be part of the business of
such meeting.
2. Nor shall any statute, law, regulation or ordinance be then,
or at any time, enacted or passed, unless thirteen members of
the Society be present in addition to the quorum of the officers
and council; nor unless the same be voted by two-thirds of
the whole body present.

3. The laws contained in the thirteen foregoing chapters,
shall be in force from and after the time of their adoption by
the Society; and thereafter all other laws, regulations and or
dinances heretofore passed or made by the Society, shall be and
the same are hereby repealed.
-

RULES OF ORDER, &c.
of the

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.
************************-**-*****-*.*.*.*.*.

1. Tho Order of Business at the ordinary meetings of the

Society shall be as follows:–
1.
2.
3.

The chair taken by the presiding officer.
Names of members present minuted.
New members presented, and visitors from corresponding
societies introduced.

-

. Records read of last ordinary meeting, and of any subse
quent special meetings.

. Correspondence read and acted on, unless giving rise to
debate:
a. Acknowledgments of election to membership.
b. Letters from learned societies.
c. Other letters.

-

-

6. Donations and other additions announced and acted on:
a. To the library.
b. To the cabinet.

7

Reports on communications and subjects of science read
and acted on :
a. From standing committees and officers.
b. From special committees.

8.

Obituary notices of members read, and announcements
of the decease of members made and acted on. .

. Communications for Magellanic premiums and communi
cations intended for the Transactions presented and
acted on.

*

10.

Communications not intended for the Transactions pre

11.

sented:
Visiters from corresponding societies retire.

19

12. Stated business of the meeting.
13. Pending nominations for membership announced and new
nominations read.

-

14. Reports on business made and acted on :

-

a. From standing committees and officers.
b. From special committees.

~onR"r"
A 's

15. Deferred business:

42

U: IV .

->

Ty

a. Of the meeting.
b. Of former meetings.

16. New business.
17. Minutes read, and submitted for correction.
18. The Society adjourned by the presiding officer.
*

2. No debate shall ever take place in the Society but on

motion duly made and seconded and afterwards stated by the
presiding member.

3. When a member speaks he shall stand up, addressing
himself to the presiding member; and, avoiding desultory re
marks, he shall confine himself strictly to the merits of the
question under consideration.

4. No member while speaking shall be interrupted, unless by
the presiding member, when he shall think fit to call him to
order or to admonish him to a closer adherence to the question
under discussion.

-

5. When a member speaking is called to order he shall in
stantly sit down or appeal from the call to the Society, who
shall determine without debate.

-

6. No member shall speak more than twice to the same

question without previously asking and obtaining leave of the
Society.
7. Whilst any question or motion is under debate, no other
motion shall be admitted, unless to divide the question, to amend,
to postpone, to adjourn, or to take the pending question.
8. No motion to reconsider a former vote can be made or
seconded except by a member who voted in the majority. Nor
shall any such motion be entertained unless it be made forth
with, or at the next stated meeting after the action which it
-

proposes to reconsider.

-

-

-

20

9. A motion for adjournment shall at all times be determined
without debate.

10. The presiding member shall have no vote, unless in the
case of a tie or equality of votes among the other members, or
where the act of incorporation or the laws require more than a
bare majority of the members present, or where the vote is
taken by ballot.

11. Where a ballot is not required by the laws, the votes, if
requested by three of the members present, shall be taken by
ayes and noes, and shall be recorded among the proceedings
of the meeting.
12. Every meeting of the Society and of the council shall be
advertised in at least two of the daily newspapers of the city on
the day previous to the time of meeting.
13. Any of the foregoing rules of order may, for the more
convenient despatch of business at any meeting, be suspended
by a vote of two-thirds of the members present.
-

21

-

AN ACT
*

-

For Incorporating the American Philosophical Society, held at Philadelphia,
for promoting Useful Knowledge.

WHEREAs, the cultivation of useful knowledge, and the ad
vancement of the liberal arts and sciences in any country, have
the most direct tendency towards the improvement of agricul
ture, the enlargement of trade, the ease and comfort of life, the
ornament of society, and the increase and happiness of mankind.
And whereas, this country of North America, which the good
ness of Providence hath given us to inherit, from the vastness of
its extent, the variety of its climate, the fertility of its soil,
the yet unexplored treasures of its bowels, the multitude of its
rivers, lakes, bays, inlets, and other conveniences of navigation,
offers to these United States one of the richest subjects of cul
tivation, ever presented to any people upon earth. And whereas,
the experience of ages shows that improvements of a public
nature, are best carried on by Societies of liberal and ingenious
men, uniting their labors, without regard to nation, sect or
party, in one grand pursuit, alike interesting to all, whereby
mutual prejudices are worn off, a humane and philosophical
spirit is cherished, and youth are stimulated to a laudable dili
gence and emulation in the pursuit of wisdom. And whereas,
upon these principles, divers public spirited gentlemen in Penn
sylvania, and other American States, did heretofore unite them
selves, under certain regulations, into one voluntary Society, by
the name of “The American Philosophical Society, held at Phil
adelphia, for promoting Useful Knowledge,” and by their suc
cessful labors and investigations, to the great credit of America,
have extended their reputation so far, that men of the first emi
nence in the republic of letters in the most civilized nations in
Europe, have done honor to their publications, and desired to
be enrolled among their members. And whereas, the Society,
after having been long interrupted in their laudable pursuits by
the calamities of war, and the distresses of our country, have
found means to revive their design, in hopes of being able to
prosecute the same with their former success, and being further

-

22

encouraged therein by the public, for which purpose they have
prayed us, the representatives of the freemen of the Common

wealth of Pennsylvania, that they may be created one body
politic and corporate for ever, with such powers, privileges, and
immunities, as may be necessary for answering the valuable pur-"
poses which the said Society had originally in view:
Wherefore, in order to encourage the said Society in the pro

secution and advancement of all useful branches of knowledge,
for the benefit of their country, and of mankind; be it enacted,
and it is hereby enacted, by the representatives of the freemen.
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in general assembly met,
and by the authority of the same, that the members of the said
American Philosophical Society heretofore voluntarily asso
ciated for promoting useful knowledge, and such other persons

as have been duly elected members and officers of the same, agree
ably to the Fundamental Laws and Regulations of the said So
ciety, comprised in twelve sections, prefixed to their volume of
transactions, published in Philadelphia by William and Thomas
Bradford, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred
and seventy-one; and who shall in all respects conform themselves
to the said laws and regulations, and such other laws, regula
tions and ordinances, as shall hereafter be duly made and enacted
by the said Society, according to the tenor hereof, be, and for
ever hereafter shall be, one body corporate and politic in deed,
by the name and style of The American Philosophical Society,
held at Philadelphia, for promoting Useful Knowledge, and by
the same name they are hereby constituted and confirmed one
body corporate and politic, to have perpetual succession, and by
the same name they and their successors are hereby declared
and made able and capable in law, to have, hold, receive, and
enjoy lands, tenements, rents, franchises, hereditaments, gifts
and bequests of what nature soever, in fee simple, or for term

of life, lives, years, or otherwise, and also to give, grant, let,
sell, alien, or assign the same lands, tenements, hereditaments,
goods, chattels, and premises, according to the nature of the
respective gifts, grants, and bequests, made to them the said
Society and of their estate therein.
Provided, That the amount of the clear yearly value of such
real estate do not exceed the value of ten thousand bushels of

good merchantable wheat.

23

And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the
said Society be, and shall be for ever hereafter, able and capable
in law to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and
be answered unto, defend and be defended, in all or any of the
courts or other places, and before any judges, justices and other

person and persons, in all manner of actions, suits, complaints,
pleas, causes and matters, of what nature or kind soever, within

this Commonwealth: and that it shall and may be lawful to
and for the said Society, for ever hereafter, to have and use one
common seal in their affairs, and the same at their will and

pleasure to break, change, alter and renew.
And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That for
the well governing the said Society, and ordering their affairs,
they shall have the following officers, that is to say, one Patron,
who shall be his Excellency the President of the Supreme
Executive Council [now the Governor] of this Commonwealth,
*

for the time being, and likewise one President, three Vice
Presidents, four Secretaries, three Curators, one Treasurer, to
gether with a council of twelve Members: and that on the first
Friday of January next, between the hours of two and five
in the afternoon, as many of the members of the said Society
as shall have paid up their arrears due to the said Society, and

shall declare their willingness to conform to the laws, regula
tions and ordinances of the Society, then duly in force, accord
ing to the tenor hereof, by subscribing the same, and who shall
attend in the Hall, or place of meeting of the said Society,
within the time aforesaid, shall choose by ballot, agreeably to
the Fundamental Laws and Regulations herein before referred
to, one President, four Secretaries, three Curators, and one
Treasurer, and at the same time and place, the members met
and qualified as aforesaid, shall in like manner choose four

members for the council, to hold their offices for one year, four
more members for the council to hold their offices for two years,
and four more members for the council to hold their offices for

three years. And on the first Friday in January, which shall be
in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty
two, and so likewise on the first Friday of January, yearly and

every year thereafter, between the hours of two and five in the
afternoon, the members of the said Society met and qualified as
aforesaid, shall choose one President, Three Vice-Presidents,

24

four Secretaries, three Curators, and one Treasurer, to hold .
their respective offices for one year, and four Councilmen, to
hold their offices for three years. Provided, That no person
residing within the United States shall be capable of being
President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, or member of
the Council, or of electing to any of the said offices, who is not
capable of electing and being elected to civil offices within the

state in which he resides.

Provided also, That nothing herein

contained, shall be considered as intended to exclude any of the
said Officers or Counsellors, whose times shall be expired, from
being re-elected, according to the pleasure of the said Society;
and of the day, hours, and place of all such elections, due notice
shall be given by the Secretaries, or some one of them, in one
or more of the public newspapers of this State, agreeably to
the said Fundamental Laws and regulations before referred to.
And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That
the Officers and Council of the said Society shall be capable of
exercising such power for the well governing and ordering the
affairs of the Society, and of holding such occasional meetings
for that purpose, as shall be described, fixed and determined, by

the statutes, laws, regulations and ordinances of the said Society,
hereafter to be made. Provided always, That no statute, law,
regulation or ordinance shall ever be made or passed by the
said Society, or be binding upon the members thereof, or any
of them, unless the same hath been duly proposed, and fairly
drawn up in writing at one stated meeting of the Society, and
enacted or passed at a subsequent meeting, at least the
space of fourteen days after the former meeting, and upon
due notice in some of the public newspapers, that the
enacting of statutes and laws, or the making and passing
ordinances and regulations, will be part of the business of such
meeting; nor shall any statute, law, regulation or ordinance be
then or at any time enacted or passed, unless thirteen members

of the said Society, or such greater number of members as may
be afterwards fixed by the rules of this Society, be present,
besides such quorum of the officers and council as the laws of

the Society for the time being may require, and unless the same
be voted by two-thirds of the whole body then present; all which
statutes, laws, ordinances and regulations so as aforesaid
duly made, enacted and passed, shall be binding upon every

25

member of the said Society, and be from time to time inviolably
observed, according to the tenor and effect thereof; provided

they be not repugnant or contrary to the laws of this Common
wealth, for the time being in force and effect.

-

And whereas, nations, truly civilized (however unhappily at .
variance on other accounts) will never wage war with the arts
and sciences and the common interests of humanity;
Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall
and may be lawful for the said Society, by their proper officers,
at all times, whether in peace or war, to correspond with learned
Societies, as well as individual learned men, of any nation or

country, upon matters merely belonging to the business of the
said Society; such as the
coveries and proceedings
curing books, apparatus,
articles and intelligence

mutual communication of their dis
in philosophy and science; the pro
natural curiosities, and such other
as are usually exchanged between

learned bodies for furthering their common pursuits. Provided
always, That such correspondence of the said Society be at all
times open to the inspection of the Supreme Executive Council
of this Commonwealth.

(Signed)
-

-

-

JOHN BAYARD,

Speaker.

-

Enacted into a Law at Philadelphia, on

Wednesday,

the

fifteenth day of March, Anno Domini one thousand seven hun
dred and eighty.
(Signed)

THOMAS PAINE,

Clerk of the General Assembly.
(CoPY.)

A LIST OF THE PRESIDENTS

American philosophical $ociety,
-

Held at Philadelphia, for promoting Useful Knowledge.
-- - - - -

-

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN,

-

Elected 2d January, 1769; died 17th April, 1790. .

DAVID RITTENHOUSE,
Elected 7th January, 1791; died 26th June, 1796.

THOMAS JEFFERSON,
Elected 6th January, 1797; resigned in January, 1815; died 4th July, 1826.
CASPAR WISTAR,

-

Elected 6th January, 1815; died 22d January, 1818.

RQBERT PATTERSON,

-

Elected 1st January, 1819; died 22d July, 1824.
WILLIAM TILGHMAN,
Elected 7th January, 1825; died 29th April, 1827.

PETER STEPHEN DUPONCEAU,
Elected 4th January, 1828; died 1st April, 1844.

ROBERT M. PATTERSON,
Elected 3d January, 1845; declined accepting the position.

NATHANIEL CHAPMAN.
Elected 2d January, 1846; died 1st July, 1853.

ROBERT M. PATTERSON,
Re-elected 5th January, 1849; died 5th September, 1854.

FRANKLIN BACHE,
Elected 7th January, 1853; died March 19, 1864.

ALEXANDER DALLAS

BACHE,

Elected 5th January, 1855.

JOHN K. KANE,
Elected 2d January, 1857; died 21st February, 1833.

GEORGE B. wood,
Elected 7th January, 1859.

-

-

*
;

~~

\-w^_^_^a \_^-a-r-T-a-a-a-N-a-r-z > /*~N~~~~

:

T_ _A. VVS

:

REGULATIONS

t

OF THE

\.

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
HELD AT PHILADELPHIA,

FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE,
As finally amended and adopted, Dec. 16, 1859.

ToGETHER WITH THE

CHARTER OF THE SOCIETY

A LIST OF ITS PRESIDENTS,

Philadelphia :

McCALLA & STAvRLY, PRINTERs, 237-9 Dock STREET.
1875.

*~

*…*.*.*.*.*/~~~~

*

~*

*

T_ _A VV S

AND

REGULATIONS
OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
HELD AT PHILADELPHIA,

FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE,
As finally amended and adopted, Dec. 16, 1859.

ETHER WITH THE

CHARTER OF THE SOCIETY
AND

A LIST OF ITS PRESIDENTS.

THE LAWS
oF THE

AMERI[AN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
CHAPTER I.
OF THE MEMBERS, AND MANNER OF THEIR ELECTION.

SECTION 1. The election of members shall be by ballot, and

shall form part of the stated business of the meetings on the
third Friday of January, April, July and October.

2. A member may, at any meeting, nominate in writing a
candidate for membership, and the nomination so made may,
in like manner, be concurred in by other members. The
board of officers and council may also nominate candidates
for membership; and such nominations shall be certified to

the Society by minute thereof in writing, attested by the
clerk of said board.

3. No person shall be balloted for, unless his nomination,

with the names of the members proposing him, or the minute
of the board of officers and council, made as aforesaid, shall
have been publicly read to the Society at the two stated

meetings preceding that at which the balloting takes place.
Nor shall any person be deemed duly chosen unless three
fourths of the votes given shall be in his favor.
4. Before entering upon an election for members, one of
the secretaries shall read the names of the several candidates;

and any member may then, for the information of the So
ciety, speak to their character and qualifications for member
ship.

5. The names of the candidates and their places of abode

4

shall be designated on the ballot-boxes, and the names of the
members qualified to vote shall be called by one of the secre
taries. The members as they are named shall then ballot for
the several candidates in succession; a white ball being con
sidered in favor of the candidate.

6. After all the other business of the meeting shall have
been disposed of the boxes shall be opened and the result of
the poll declared by the presiding member.
7. The members are mutually pledged not to mention out
of the Society the name of any candidate proposed, nor of
any withdrawn or unsuccessful candidate; and the papers
containing the names of the unsuccessful candidates shall be
destroyed immediately after the election.
8. Every member, upon his introduction into the Society,
shall be presented to the presiding officer, and shall sub
scribe the laws.
9. Such members as reside within ten miles of the hall of

the Society, and such other members as desire to vote at the
meetings and elections, shall pay an admission fee of ten
dollars, and annually thereafter, on the first Friday of Jan
uary, a contribution of five dollars. The payment of fifty
dollars at one time, by a member not in arrears, shall ex
empt him from all future annual payments.
10. Members elect, residing within ten miles of the hall,
shall lose the right of membership unless they subscribe the
laws and pay their admission fee within one year after their
election. Any member liable to an annual contribution, who
shall neglect or refuse to pay the same for the term of two years,
shall be notified by the treasurer in writing, on or before the

second Friday in January after such default, that his rights
as a member are suspended; and, in case the said arrears, to
gether with the contribution due on the first Friday in Jan
uary after such notice, shall not be paid to the treasurer on
or before the said last-named day, the membership of such
defaulting member shall be forfeited, his name stricken from
the roll, and reported to the Society by the treasurer.
11. On the Society being informed of the death of a mem

5

ber, the fact shall be entered on the records, and a member
may be appointed to prepare an obituary notice of the de
ceased.

12. The obituary notices of members shall be read to the
Society, and they shall be bound together whenever they are
sufficiently numerous to form a volume.
13. The catalogue of the members shall be read at the
meeting on the third Friday of January, for the purpose of
correction.
CHAPTER II.
oF THE OFFICERs, AND MANNER of THEIR

ELECTION.

SECTION 1. The officers shall be a patron, a president, three
vice presidents, four secretaries, three curators, a treasurer,
and twelve counsellors.

2. The governor of the State of Pennsylvania shall be, ex
officio, the patron of the Society.
3. On the first Friday of January in every year, between
the hours of two and five in the afternoon, as many of the
members as shall have paid up their arrears due to the So
ciety, and shall declare their willingness to conform to the
laws, regulations, and ordinances of the Society, then duly
in force, by subscribing the same, and who shall attend in
the hall, or place of meeting of the Society, within the time
aforesaid, shall choose by ballot, one president, three vice
presidents, four secretaries, three curators, and one treasurer;
and, at the same time and place, the members, met and

qualified as aforesaid, shall in like manner choose four mem
bers for the council, to hold their offices for three years.
4. No person residing within the United States shall be
capable of being president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer,
or member of the council, or of electing to any of the said
offices, who is not capable of electing and being elected to
civil offices within the State in which he resides. Provided,
that nothing herein contained shall be considered as intended
to exclude any of the officers or counsellors, whose time shall

6

be expired, from being re-elected, according to the pleasure
of the Society.
5. No one shall be esteemed a qualified voter at the elec
tion, who has not subscribed the laws and paid the admis
sion fee, or who is in arrears to the Society, or has not at
tended a meeting during a whole year next preceding the
election.

6. Of the day, hour, and place of election, notice shall be

given by the librarian at least one week before the day of
election, in such one or more of the public newspapers of the
State of Pennsylvania, as the Society shall direct.
7. Before opening the election, the company that shall be
met at half an hour after two, shall appoint three members
of the Society as judges of the election, and also two clerks
or secretaries for taking down the names of the voters.
8. In case of an equality of votes for the candidates for any
office, the decision shall be by lot, to be drawn by one of the
judges.
CHAPTER III.
OF THE PRESIDENT AND WICE-PRESIDENTS.

SECTION 1. The president shall preside at the meetings,
preserve order, regulate the debates, state and put questions
agreeably to the sense and intention of the members, and an
nounce the determination of the Society thereupon.
2. In the absence of the president from a meeting, his du

ties shall devolve upon the vice-presidents in rotation; or, at
his request when present, his duties may be performed by
either of the vice-presidents.

3. If the president and vice-presidents be absent, the mem
bers met shall appoint one of their number to take the chair
for the time.

-

4. At some time, within the year, the president shall de
liver to the Society a discourse on some literary or scientific

subject, accompanied by such suggestions, with regard to the
affairs of the Society, as he shall judge proper.

7
CHAPTER IV.
OF THE SECRETARIES.

SECTION 1. The secretaries shall minute the proceedings of
the Society at the meetings, read all papers which are re
quired to be read at the meetings, and preserve, in regular
files, all documents presented to the Society. They shall

give notice to members of their election, acknowledge in
writing the reception of all communications, and generally
conduct the correspondence.
2. Two of them, at least, shall officiate at every meeting;
and unless a different arrangement shall be made and an
nounced by them at the beginning of the year, the first and
third named on the list of secretaries shall be considered re

sponsible for the performance of all the duties of the office
during the first, third, fifth, seventh, ninth, and eleventh
months of the year, and in like manner the second and
fourth named on the list, during the alternate months.
CHAPTER V.
OF THE CURATORS.

SECTION 1. The curators shall have charge of the cabinet
of the Society, and shall be responsible for its preservation
and security. They shall classify and arrange the articles

therein, and shall preserve an exact list of them, with the
names of the donors.

2. One of them, at least, shall be in attendance as curator

at every meeting; and, unless a different arrangement shall
be made and announced by them at the beginning of the
year, they shall be considered severally responsible, in
monthly rotation, for the performance of all the duties of
the office.

CHAPTER VI.
OF THE TREASURER.

SECTION 1. The treasurer shall collect and

receive all

moneys belonging to the Society, or entrusted to its care,

S

unless otherwise specially directed ; and he shall disburse or
apply the same upon the orders or according to the appro
priations made by the Society, which orders and appropria

tions shall be duly certified to him by the presiding officer
and secretary for the time.
2. He shall keep regular accounts: and on the first Friday
of December in every year, and as much oftener as may be
required, he shall present to the Society a full report on the
state of its funds.

3. He shall preserve for the use of the Society at elections,

and meetings, a catalogue of all the members, designating
thereon as a distinct class those who have paid the admis
sion fee and the annual contributions, and noting opposite
to their names the several meetings at which they have at
tended during the year.
4. On the expiration of his office he shall deliver up to
his successor, the books, papers, vouchers of property, and
moneys remaining in his hands.
*

5. To secure the faithful execution of all his trusts, he

shall, before he enters upon his office, give bond and se
curity to the Society in such amount as the committee of fi
nance shall judge proper; which bond shall, without re
newal, apply to the several years for which he may be re
elected treasurer.

6. He shall, as full compensation for his services, receive
five per cent. on the amount of the annual income of the So
ciety collected by him.
CHAPTER VII.
OF THE OFFICERS AND COUNCIL.

SECTION 1. The officers and council shall meet together
statedly on the second Friday of February, May, August
and November respectively, at the same hour in the evening

at which the stated meetings of the Society are appointed to
be held; and specially at such times as they may judge
proper.

9

2. They shall keep regular minutes of their proceedings,
to be laid before the Society at its stated meetings, on the
third Friday of the same months respectively.
3. They shall, from time to time, lay before the Society
such measures as in their judgment will conduce to the well
governing and ordering of the affairs of the Society, or pro
mote the objects of its institution; particularly, they shall
recommend subjects for premiums to be offered by the So
ciety, with the conditions on which they shall be awarded.
4. They shall also, from time to time, nominate to the So
ciety as candidates for membership, such persons, of our own
or of foreign countries, as may in their judgment merit such
a distinction. Such nominations shall, as nearly as may be
practicable, be agreed to by them in the manner pointed out
by law for the election of members, except that no previous
notice of any intended proposal to them for their nomination
shall be required; and the names of all persons duly nomi
nated by them shall be certified to the Society by a minute
thereof, made in writing and attested by their clerk.
5. To them shall be submitted all communications from

candidates for premiums, whether the Magellanic or those
offered by the Society, all of which shall be immediately re
ferred to the standing committee on premiums. Reports on
such communications shall be made without unnecessary
delay.
6. They shall annually appoint a standing committee of
seven members, to be called the committee on premiums, of
which three members shall be a quorum. It shall be the
duty of this committee to publish the terms on which the
Magellanic and other premiums are to be granted by the So
ciety, to consider and report upon all communications from
candidates for premiums, and to recommend to the officers
and council subjects for which new premiums shall be offered
by the Society.
7. The president and senior secretary of the Society, shall
-

be, ex-officio, the president and clerk at their meetings; and
three of their number shall be a quorum.

10

8. The ex-presidents of the Society shall be members of
the board of officers and council.
CHAPTER VIII.
OF THE LIBRARIAN.

SECTION 1. A member of the Society shall be chosen at the

stated meeting on the third Friday of January in each year,
to be the librarian of the Society.

Nominations for said

office shall be made at the first stated meeting in January,
and no person shall be voted for who has not been so nomi
nated.

2. The librarian shall have, under the direction of the

proper standing committees, the custody and care of the

hall, and of the books and papers belonging to the Society,
which he shall dispose and arrange in such a manner as shall
be judged most convenient, and shall keep an arranged cata
logue of them, with the names of the donors. He shall as
sist the curators in their charge of the cabinet.

3. He shall attend at the library at every meeting of the
Society, and daily, excepting Sundays, from 10 A.M. to 1

P. M. except when allowed leave of absence by the presiding
officer of the Society, and shall then, and at such other times
as he may think proper, lend out to any resident member of
the Society, who is not indebted to him for fines or forfeit
ures, any books belonging to the library, except the last
volumes and loose numbers of periodical journals, and ex
cept recent donations made to the Society, which shall not

be lent out; taking from each member, borrowing a book,
an obligation, with a sufficient penalty, to return the same
uninjured, within one month thereafter, subject to a fine of
fifty cents at every stated meeting that shall occur after the
limited period before he returns the book, and a forfeiture
of double the value of the book, or of the set of which it is

one, if not returned in six months after being borrowed.
4. He shall levy and collect these fines and forfeitures, and
pay over the moneys thence arising to the treasurer, at the

11

end of his official year, in aid of the appropriation for the
library.
5. He shall give notice in the newspapers of the meetings
of the Society and of the officers and council, and of all elec
tions, and shall make all such publications on behalf of the
Society as are not otherwise devolved by law or special order.
6. He shall, at the beginning of each year, cause tables to
be prepared for the use of the members, on which shall be
noted the days for the meetings of the Society and of the
officers and council, the stated business to be transacted
thereat, and the names of the officiating secretaries and cu
-

rator.

7. He shall transcribe carefully and correctly the minutes

of the Society, as made by the officiating secretaries. He
shall acknowledge the reception of all donations made to the
Society, and transmit copies of its Transactions and Proceed
ings as directed, and shall from time to time perform such
other executive or ministerial duties as may be charged on
him by a vote of the Society, given according to the laws.
8. He shall, under the direction of the secretaries, act as

reporter of the proceedings of the Society, and shall cause
such abstract of them to be published for the use of the mem
bers, and for distribution to correspondents, as the seereta
ries may deem expedient or proper, or as the Society may
direct; but no expense shall be incurred, nor any contracts
made for printing or publishing the same, beyond the sum
appropriated by the Society for such purposes.
9. He shall receive an annual salary of seven hundred dol
lars, to be paid monthly from the treasury of the Society,
and his services shall commence on the first Monday after
his election.

CHAPTER IX.
OF THE MEETINGS OF THE SOCIETY.

SECTION 1. The ordinary meetings of the Society shall be
on the first and third Fridays of every month from October

to May, both inclusive, and on the third Friday of each of

12

the other four months, at seven o'clock in the evening.
Special meetings may be called at any time by order of the
president; or, in his absence, by order of a vice-president.
2. The chair shall be taken by the presiding officer within
one hour after the time appointed for the meeting.
3. The qualified voters, present at any stated or special
meeting, shall be a quorum, and be competent to elect mem
bers, dispose of property, appropriate money, and award pre
miums; but no property shall be alienated or encumbered,
except by the vote of three-fourths of the qualified voters
present, and given at two successive stated meetings. For
the transaction of the ordinary business, the reception and
reference of communications on literary, scientific, or other

subjects, all other members present shall be deemed compe
tent to act, and, in the absence of qualified voters, shall form
a quorum.

4. Those members shall be considered qualified voters at
the meetings, who have subscribed the laws and paid the ad
mission fee, and who are not in arrears to the Society.
5. No meeting shall be continued after eleven o’clock;
nor shall any new matter be introduced after ten, unless in
the transaction of business, enjoined by the laws.
6. The hall of the Society shall be open on every Friday
evening, when the Society is not in session, to the members
and such friends as they may introduce, for the purposes of
reading and social intercourse.
CIIAPTER X.

OF THE TRANSACTIONS OF

THE SOCIETY.

SECTION 1. Every communication to the Society which
may be considered as intended for a place in the Transac
tions, shall immediately be referred to a committee to con
sider and report thereon.
2. If the committee shall report in favor of publishing the
communication, they shall make such corrections therein as
-

they may judge necessary to fit it for the press; or if they

13

shall judge the publication of an abstract or extracts from the
paper to be more eligible, they shall accompany their report
with such abstract or extracts. But if the author do not ap
prove of the corrections, abstract, or extracts, reported by the
committee, he shall be at liberty to withdraw his paper.
3. Communications not intended by their authors for pub
lication in the Transactions, will be received by the Society,
and the title or subject of them recorded; and, if they be in
writing, they shall be filed by the secretaries.
4. The Transactions shall be published in numbers, at as
short intervals as practicable, under the direction of the com
mittee of publication, and in such a form as the Society shall
from time to time direct; and every communication ordered
to be published in the Transactions shall be immediately
sent to the printer, and fifty copies thereof be given to the
author as soon as printed.
5. The order in which papers are read shall determine
their places in the Transactions, unless otherwise ordered by
the Society; priority of date giving priority of location.
6. The expenses of publishing the Transactions shall be
defrayed by subscriptions and sales, aided by such funds as
the Society shall from time to time appropriate for that pur
pose.
CIIAPTER XI.
OF STANDING

AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES.

SECTION 1. There shall be chosen, at the stated meeting on
the third Friday of January in each year, three members of
the Society, to be a committee of finance, five to be a com
mittee of publication, three to be a committee on the hall,
and five to be a committee on the library.

2. The committee of finance shall have the general super
intendence of the financial concerns of the Society.

They

shall consult with the treasurer, and authorize and direct in

vestments of its surplus funds. They shall always have ac
cess to his books, accounts, and vouchers; and they shall
annually, on the third Friday of December, make a full re

14

port on the state of the treasury, particularly distinguishing
the several funds, and the income and disbursements of each,

and recommending the amounts which should be appropria
ted for different objects of expenditure during the ensuing
year. They shall also have power to remit the fees and con

tributions of members, when they shall judge that circum
stances make it proper.
3. The committee of publication shall superintend the

printing and distribution of the Society's Transactions. They
shall make all contracts for the same in the name of the So

ciety, but shall have no power to incur any debt, beyond the
amount appropriated by the Society for said publication, or
derived from subscriptions. They shall audit and certify all
bills for expenses attending the publication, to the treasurer
for payment, fix the price of the different numbers, and re
ceive subscriptions. They shall furnish the treasurer, imme
diately after the publication of any number of the Transac
tions, with a list of the subscribers, and the sum due from
each, to enable him to collect the amount thereof, and shall

annually, on the first Friday of December, make a full report
of their doings to the Society. They shall have power to call
on the librarian for his assistance in the performance of their
duties.

4. The committee on the hall shall have charge of the real
estate of the Society, and shall direct all necessary repairs.
They shall effect insurance upon the property of the Society
in such amounts as may from time to time be directed.
5. The committee on the library shall confer with and as
sist the librarian in the disbursement of the annual appro

priations for the library, and in the disposition and arrange
ment of the books, charts, and documents belonging to the
Society.
6. No committee appointed on any subject of deliberation
shall consist of less than three members; but any other

matter may be committed to a single member. A majority
of any committee shall be a quorum.
7. All committees shall be chosen, unless otherwise di

15

*

rected by the Society, on nominations previously made and
seconded, the question being put on each member separately.
8. The member first elected of any committee shall be the
chairman, and considered responsible for the discharge of the
duties enjoined on the committee.

9. Committees shall report at the meeting next following
their appointment, unless otherwise ordered by the Society.

10. All reports shall be in writing, and signed by the
members agreeing thereto.

11. The names of the committees, the time of their ap
pointment, the matter or business committed to them, the
time at which they are to report, and the time at which
their final report is presented, shall be entered by the secre
taries in a book provided for that purpose.
CHAPTER XII.
OF THE MAGELLANIC FUND.

SECTION 1. John Hyacinth de Magellan, in London, having
in the year 1786 offered to the Society, as a donation, the
sum of two hundred guineas, to be by them vested in a se
cure and permanent fund, to the end that the interest arising
therefrom should be annually disposed of in premiums, to be
adjudged by them to the author of the best discovery, or
most useful invention, relating to Navigation, Astronomy,
or Natural Philosophy (mere natural history only excepted)
and the Society having accepted of the above donation, they
hereby publish the conditions, prescribed by the donor and
agreed to by the Society, upon which the said annual pre
miums will be awarded.
CONDITIONS OF THE MAGELLANIC PREMIUM.

1. The candidate shall send his discovery, invention, or im
provement, addressed to the president, or one of the vice
presidents of the Society, free of postage or other charges;

and shall distinguish his performance by some motto, device,
or other signature, at his pleasure. Together with his dis

16

covery, invention, or improvement, he shall also send a sealed
letter containing the same motto, device or signature, and
subscribed with the real name and place of residence of the
author.

2. Persons of any nation, sect, or denomination whatever,
shall be admitted as candidates for this premium.
3. No discovery, invention, or improvement shall be enti
tled to this premium, which hath been already published, or
for which the author hath been publicly rewarded elsewhere.
4. The candidate shall communicate his discovery, inven
tion, or improvement, either in the English, French, German,
or Latin language.
5. All such communications shall be publicly read or ex
hibited to the Society at some stated meeting, not less than
one month previous to the day of adjudication, and shall at
all times be open to the inspection of such members as shall
desire it. But no member shall carry home with him the
communication, description, or model, except the officer to
whom it shall be entrusted; nor shall such officer part with
the same out of his custody, without a special order of the
Society for that purpose.
6. The Society, having previously referred the several com
munications from candidates for the premium, then depend
ing, to the consideration of the twelve counsellors and other
officers of the Society, and having received their report there
on, shall, at one of their stated meetings in the month of De
cember, annually, after the expiration of this current year (of
the time and place, together with the particular occasion of
which meeting, due notice shall be previously given, by pub
lic advertisement) proceed to final adjudication of the said
premium; and, after due consideration had, a vote shall first
be taken on this question, viz.: Whether any of the commu
nications then under inspection be worthy of the proposed
premium ? If this question be determined in the negative,
the whole business shall be deferred till another year; but if
in the affirmative, the Society shall proceed to determine by

ballot, given by fhe members at large, the discovery, inven

17

tion, or improvement most useful and worthy; and that dis
covery, invention, or improvement, which shall be found to
have a majority of concurring votes in its favor, shall be suc
cessful; and then, and not till then, the sealed letter accom

panying the crowned performance shall be opened, and
name of the author announced as the person entitled to
said premium.
7. No member of the Society who is a candidate for
premium then depending, or who hath not previously

the
the

-

the
de

clared to the Society, that he has considered and weighed,
according to the best of his judgment, the comparative
merits of the several claims then under consideration, shall

sit in judgment, or give his vote in awarding the said
premium.
8. A full account of the crowned subject shall be pub
lished by the Society, as soon as may be after the adjudica

tion, either in a separate publication, or in the next succeed
ing volume of their Transactions, or in both.
9. The unsuccessful performances shall remain under con
sideration, and their authors be considered as candidates for

the premium for five years next succeeding the time of their
presentment; except such performances as their authors may,

in the mean time, think fit to withdraw. And the Society
shall annually publish an abstract of the titles, object, or
subject-matter of the communications, so under considera
tion; such only excepted as the Society shall think not
worthy of public notice.
10. The letters containing the names of authors whose
performances shall be rejected, or which shall be found un
successful after a trial of five years, shall be burnt before the
Society, without breaking the seals.
11. In case there should be a failure, in any year, of any
communication worthy of the proposed premium, there will

then be two premiums to be awarded the next year. But no
accumulation of premiums shall entitle the author to more
than one premium for any one discovery, invention, or im
provement.
2

18

12. The premium shall consist of an oval plate of solid
standard gold, of the value of ten guineas. On one side
thereof shall be neatly engraved a short Latin motto suited
to the occasion, together with the words; “The Premium of

John IIyacinth de Magellan, of London, established in the
year 1786;” and on the other side of the plate shall be en

graved these words: “Awarded by the A. P. S. for the dis
covery of

A. D.—” And the seal of the Society

shall be annexed to the medal by a ribbon passing through
a small hole at the lower edge thereof.
SECTION 2. The Magellanic fund of two hundred guineas
shall be considered as ten hundred and fifty dollars, and
shall be invested separately from other funds belonging to
or under the care of the Society, and a separate and distinct
account of it shall be kept by the treasurer.
The said fund shall be credited with the sum of one hun

dred dollars, to represent the two premiums for which the
Society is now liable.
The treasurer shall credit the said fund with the interest

received on the investment thereof, and, if any surplus of
said interest shall remain after providing for the premiums
which may then be demandable, said surplus shall be used

by the Society for making publication of the terms of the
said premium, and for the addition, to the said premium, of
such amount as the Society may from time to time think
suitable, or for the institution of other premiums.
The treasurer shall, at the first stated meeting of the So

ciety in the month of December annually, make a report of
the state of said fund and of the investment thereof.

CHAPTER XIII.
OF THE LAWS OF THE SOCIETY.

SECTION 1. No statute, law, regulation, or ordinance shall
ever be made or passed by the Society, or be binding upon
the members thereof, or any of them, unless the same hath

19

been duly proposed and fairly drawn up in writing, at one
stated meeting of the Society, and enacted or passed at a

subsequent meeting, at least the space of fourteen days after
the former meeting, and upon due notice in some of the pub

lic newspapers, that the enacting of statutes and laws, or the
making and passing ordinances and regulations, will be part
of the business of such meeting.
2. Nor shall any statute, law, regulation, or ordinance be
then, or at any time, enacted or passed, unless thirteen mem
bers of the Society be present in addition to the quorum of

the officers and council; nor unless the same be voted by
two-thirds of the whole body present.
3. The laws contained in the thirteen foregoing chapters,
shall be in force from and after the time of their adoption
by the Society; and thereafter all other laws, regulations
and ordinances heretofore passed or made by the Society,
shall be and the same are hereby repealed.

RULES OF ORDER, &c.
OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.

1. The Order of Business at the ordinary meetings of the
Society shall be as follows:–

!

. The chair taken by the presiding officer.
. Names of members present minuted.
. New members presented, and visitors from correspond
ing societies introduced.
. Records read of last ordinary meeting, and of any sub
sequent special meetings.

. Correspondence read and acted on, unless giving rise
to debate:
a. Acknowledgments of election to membership.
b. Letters from learned societies.
c. Other letters.

. Donations and other additions announced and acted on:
a. To the library.
b. To the cabinet.

. Reports on communications and subjects of science
read and acted on:
a. From standing committees and officers.
b. From special committees.

Obituary notices of members read, and announcements
of the decease of members made and acted on.

. Communications for Magellanic premiums and com

munications intended for the Transactions presented
and acted on.

21
10. Communications not intended for the Transactions

presented.
11. Visitors from corresponding societies retire.
12. Stated business of the meeting.

13. Pending nominations for membership announced and
new nominations read.

14. Reports on business made and acted on:
a. From standing committees and officers.
b. From special committees.

15. Deferred business:
a. Of the meeting.
b. Of former meetings.

16. New business.

17. Minutes read, and submitted for correction.

18. The Society adjourned by the presiding officer.
2. No debate shall ever take place in the Society but on
motion duly made and seconded and afterwards stated by
the presiding member.
3. When a member speaks he shall stand up, addressing
himself to the presiding member; and, avoiding desultory
remarks, he shall confine himself strictly to the merits of the
question under consideration.
4. No member while speaking shall be interrupted, unless
by the presiding member, when he shall think fit to call
him to order or to admonish him to a closer adherence to

the question under discussion.
5. When a member speaking is called to order he shall in
stantly sit down or appeal from the call to the Society, who
shall determine without debate.

6. No member shall speak more than twice to the same

question without previously asking and obtaining leave of
the Society.
7. Whilst any question or motion is under debate, no other
motion shall be admitted, unless to divide the question, to
amend, to postpone, to adjourn, or to take the pending
question.

t

22
8. No motion to reconsider a former vote can be made or

seconded except by a member who voted in the majority.
Nor shall any such motion be entertained unless it be made
forth with, or at the next stated meeting after the action
which it proposes to reconsider.
9. A motion for adjournment shall at all times be deter
mined without debate.

10. The presiding member shall have no vote, unless in
the case of a tie or equality of votes among the other mem
bers, or where the act of incorporation or the laws require
more than a bare majority of the members present, or where
the vote is taken by ballot.
11. Where a ballot is not required by the laws, the votes,
if requested by three of the members present, shall be taken

by ayes and noes, and shall be recorded among the proceed
ings of the meeting.
12. Every meeting of the Society and of the council shall
be advertised in at least two of the daily newspapers of the
city on the day previous to the time of meeting.

13. Any of the foregoing rules of order may, for the more
convenient despatch of business at any meeting, be sus
pended by a vote of two-thirds of the members present.

AN ACT
For Incorporating the American Philosophical Society, held at Philadelphia, for
promoting Useful Knowledge.

WHEREAs, The cultivation of useful knowledge, and the
advancement of the liberal arts and sciences in any country,
have the most direct tendency towards the improvement of
agriculture, the enlargement of trade, the ease and comfort
of life, the ornament of society, and the increase and happi
ness of mankind. And whereas, this country of North
America, which the goodness of Providence hath given us
to inherit, from the vastness of its extent, the variety of its
climate, the fertility of its soil, the yet unexplored treasures
of its bowels, the multitude of its rivers, lakes, bays, inlets,
and other conveniences of navigation, offer to these United
States one of the richest subjects of cultivation, ever pre
sented to any people upon earth. And whereas, the experi
ence of ages shows that improvements of a public nature, are
best carried on by Societies of liberal and ingenious men,

uniting their labors, without regard to nation, sect, or party,
in one grand pursuit, alike interesting to all, whereby
mutual prejudices are worn off, a humane and philosophical
spirit is cherished, and youth stimulated to a laudable
diligence and emulation in the pursuit of wisdom. And
whereas, upon these principles, divers public-spirited gentle
men in Pennsylvania, and other American States, did here
tofore unite themselves, under certain regulations, into one
voluntary Society, by the name of “The American Philoso
phical Society, held at Philadelphia, for promoting Useful
Knowledge,” and by their successful labors and investiga
tions, to the great credit of America, have extended their
reputation so far, that men of the first eminence in the re
public of letters in the most civilized nations in Europe,
have done honor to their publications, and desired to be en

rolled among their members. And whereas, the Society,

24

after having been long interrupted in their laudable pursuits
by the calamities of war, and the distresses of our country,
have found means to revive their design, in hopes of being
able to prosecute the same with their former success, and
being further encouraged therein by the public, for which
purpose they have prayed us, the representatives of the free
men of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, that they may
be created one body politic and corporate forever, with such
powers, privileges, and immunities, as may be necessary for
answering the valuable purposes which the said Society had
originally in view:

Wherefore, in order to encourage the said Society in the
prosecution and advancement of all useful branches of knowl
edge, for the benfit of their country, and of mankind; be it
enacted, and it is hereby enacted, by the representatives of

the freemen of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in gen
eral assembly met, and by the authority of the same, that the
members of the said American Philosophical Society hereto
fore voluntarily associated for promoting useful knowledge,
and such other persons as have been duly elected members
and officers of the same, agreeably to the Fundamental Laws
and Regulations of the said Society, comprised in twelve
sections, prefixed to their volume of transactions, published
in Philadelphia by William and Thomas Bradford, in the
year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy

one; and who shall in all respects conform themselves to the
said laws and regulations, and such other laws, regulations,
and ordinances, as shall hereafter be duly made and enacted
by the said Society, according to the tenor hereof, be, and for
ever hereafter shall be, one body corporate and politic in
deed, by the name and style of The American Philosophical
Society, held at Philadelphia, for promoting Useful Knowl
edge, and by the same name they are hereby constituted and
confirmed one body corporate and politic, to have perpetual
succession, and by the same name they and their successors
are hereby declared and made able and capable in law, to
have, hold, receive, and enjoy lands, tenements, rents, fran

25

chises, hereditaments, gifts, and bequests of what nature so
ever, in fee simple, or for term of life, lives, years, or other
wise, and also to give, grant, let, sell, alien, or assign the
same lands, tenements, hereditaments, goods, chattels, and
premises, according to the nature of the respective gifts,
grants, and bequests, made to them the said Society and of
their estate therein.

Provided, That the amount of the clear yearly value of
such real estate do not exceed the value of ten thousand

bushels of good merchantable wheat.
And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid,
That the said Society be, and shall be for ever hereafter able,
and capable in law to sue and be sued, plead and be im
pleaded, answer and be answered unto, defend and be de

fended, in all or any of the courts or other places, and before
any judges, justices, and other person and persons, in all
manner of actions, suits, complaints, pleas, causes, and mat
ters, of what nature or kind soever, within this Common

wealth; and that it shall and may be lawful to and for the
said Society, for ever hereafter, to have and use one common
seal in their affairs, and the same at their will and pleasure
to break, change, alter and renew.
And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid,
That for the well governing the said Society, and ordering
their affairs, they shall have the following officers, that is to
say, one Patron, who shall be his Excellency the President
of the Supreme Executive Council [now the Governor] of
this Commonwealth, for the time being, and likewise one
President, three Vice-Presidents, four Secretaries, three Cu

rators, one Treasurer, together with a council of twelve
Members: and that on the first Friday of January next, be
tween the hours of two and five in the afternoon, as many
of the members of the said Society as shall have paid up
their arrears due to the said Society, and shall declare their

willingess to conform to the laws, regulations, and ordi
nances of the Society, then duly in force, according to the

tenor hereof, by subscribing the same, and who shall attend

26

in the Hall, or place of meeting of the said Society, within
the time aforesaid, shall choose by ballot, agreeably to the
Fundamental Laws and Regulations herein before referred
to, one President, four Secretaries, three Curators, and one
Treasurer, and at the same time and place, the members met
and qualified as aforesaid, shall in like manner choose four
members for the council, to hold their offices for one year,
four more members for the council to hold their offices for

two years, and four more members for the council to hold
their offices for three years. And on the first Friday in Jan

uary, which shall be in the year of our Lord one thousand
seven hundred and eighty-two, and so likewise on the first

Friday of January, yearly and every year thereafter, between
the hours of two and five in the afternoon, the members of

the said Society met and qualified as aforesaid, shall choose
one President, three Vice-Presidents, four Secretaries, three
Curators, and one Treasurer, to hold their respective offices
for one year, and four Councilmen, to hold their offices for
three years. Provided, That no person residing within the
United States shall be capable of being President, Vice-Pre

sident, Secretary, Treasurer, or member of the Council, or of
electing to any of the said offices, who is not capable of elect
ing and being elected to civil offices within the State in
which he resides. Provided also, That nothing herein con
tained, shall be 3onsidered as intended to exclude any of the
said Officers or Counsellors, whose times shall be expired,

from being re-elected, according to the pleasure of the said
Society; and of the day, hours, and place of all such elec
tions, due notice shall be given by the Secretaries, or some
one of them, in one or more of the public newspapers of this

State, agreeably to the said Fundamental Laws and Regula
tions before referred to.

And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid,
That the Officers and Council of the said Society shall be
capable of exercising such power for the well governing and

ordering the affairs of the Society, and of holding such occa
sional meetings for that purpose, as shall be described, fixed

27

and determined, by the statutes, laws, regulations and ordi
nances of the said Society, hereafter to be made. Provided
always, That no statute, law, regulation, or ordinance shall
ever be made or passed by the said Society, or be binding
upon the members thereof, or any them, unless the same

hath been duly proposed, and fairly drawn up in writing at
one stated meeting of the Society, and enacted or passed at a
subsequent meeting, at least the space of fourteen days after

the former meeting, and upon due notice in some of the pub
lic newspapers, that the enacting of statutes and laws, or the
making and passing ordinances and regulations, will be part
of the business of such meeting; nor shall any statute, law,
regulation, or ordinance be then or at any time enacted or
passed, unless thirteen members of the said Society, or such
greater number of members as may be afterwards fixed by
the rules of this Society, be present, besides such quorum of
the officers and council as the laws of the Society for the

time being may require, and unless the same be voted by
two-thirds of the whole body then present; all which stat

utes, laws, ordinances and regulations, so as aforesaid duly
made, enacted and passed, shall be binding upon every mem
ber of the said Society, and be from time to time inviolably

observed, according to the tenor and effect thereof; provi
ded they be not repugnant or contrary to the laws of this
Commonwealth, for the time being in force and effect.
And whereas, nations, truly civilized (however unhappily
at variance on other accounts) will never wage war with the
arts and sciences and the common interests of humanity;

Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it
shall and may be lawful for the said Society, by their proper
officers, at all times, whether in peace or war, to correspond
with learned Societies, as well as individual learned men, of

any nation or country, upon matters merely belonging to the
business of the said Society; such as the mutual communica
tion of their discoveries and proceedings in philosophy and
science; the procuring books, apparatus, natural curiosities,
and such other articles and intelligence as are usually ex

28

changed between learned bodies for furthering their common
pursuits. Provided always, That such correspondence of the
said Society be at all times open to the inspection of the
Supreme Executive Council of this Commonwealth.
(Signed)
JOHN BAYARD,
Speaker.
Enacted into a Law at Philadelphia, on Wednesday, the
fifteenth day of March, Anno Domini one thousand seven
hundred and eighty.
(Signed)
THOMAS PAINE,
Clerk of the General Assembly.
(coPY.)

A LIST OF THE PRESIDENTS
OF THE

MERICAN HISOPHIAL SOCIETY
Hell at Philadelphia, f \mming US fill KWls'
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN,
Elected 2d January, 1769; died 17th April, 1790.

DAVID RITTENHOUSE,
Elected 7th January, 1791; died 26th June, 1796.

THOMAS JEFFERSON,
Elected 6th January, 1797; resigned in January, 1815; died 4th July, 1826.

CASPAR WISTAR,
Elected 6th January, 1815; died 22d January, 1818.

ROBERT PATTERSON,
Elected 1st January, 1819; died 22d July, 1824.

WILLIAM TILGHMAN,
Elected 7th January, 1825; died 29th April, 1827.

PETER STEPHEN DUPONCEAU,
Elected 4th January, 1828; died 1st April, 1844.

ROBERT M. PATTERSON,
Elected 3d January, 1845; declined accepting the position.

NATHANIEL CHAPMAN,
Elected 2d January, 1846; died 1st July, 1853.

ROBERT M. PATTERSON,
Re-elected 5th January, 1849; died 5th September, 1854.

FRANKLIN BACHE,
Elected 7th January, 1853; died March 19, 1864.

ALEXANDER DALLAS BACHE,
Elected 5th January, 1855.

JOHN K. KANE,
Elected 2d January, 1857; died 21st February, 1858.
GEORGE B. WOOD,
Elected 7th January, 1859.

L IST

of The

M EM B E R S

OF THE

2 m t t t tan 10 bild 30 pb ital # ottetp,

Held at Philadelphia,

FOR PROMOTING US EFU L KNOWLEDGE,

FROM Its EstABLISHMENT, 2D JANUARY, 1769, To THE 20th of APRIL, 1838.

39 it flat, el pit ia:
JOSEPH AND WILLIAM KITE, PRINTERS,
Seventh and Carpenter Streets.

1838.

-

-

L IST

of The

M E M B E R S
of The

3 m t t t t a m 19 b i I G 3 C p b it a I # 0 t t t t p,
HELD AT PHILADELPHIA FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNow LEDGE,

FROM ITs EstABLISHMENT, 2nd JANUARY, 1769.

Admission to

Vacation
Names.

Membership.

of Membership.

1769.

Jan. 2. Benjamin Franklin.
John Bartram, F.R.S. and Botanist to his Maj.

Died Apr. 17, 1790, aet. 84.
Sep. 22, 1777, aet. 76.

Dr. Cadwalader Evans.

1773, aet. 57.

John Lukens, Surveyor General of Pennsylvania.
Joseph Galloway, Speaker of the Assembly.

1803, aet. 74.

Dr. Thomas Cadwalader.
Dr. John Redman.
John Dickinson.
Dr. Charles Moore.

Nov. 14, 1779, aet. 72.
Mar. 19, 1808, aet. 86.
Feb. 14, 1808, aet. 75.

Francis Hopkinson.
Dr. Alexander Garden, of Charleston, S.C.
John Kidd, of Bucks county, Penn.
William Franklin, Gov. of New Jersey.
Stephen Watts.

May, 9, 1791, aet. 53.
Apr. 15, 1792, aet. 64.

Rev. Jacob Duché.
John Foxcroft.

Nov. 17, 1813, aet. 83.
Jan.

1798, aet. 60.

John Sellers, surveyor, of Chester county, Penn.
Dr. Thomas Graeme.

Capt. Oswell Eve.
James Wright, of Lancaster county, Penn.
Hon. Charles Reade, of Burlington, N.J.
John Smith, of Burlington, N.J.
Hon. Edward Antill, of Burlington, N.J.
Dr. Benjamin Gale, of Killingworth, Conn.
Dr. Ashton Warner, of Antigua.
William Culein, M.D., of Edinburgh.
William Coleman.
Dr. Thomas Bond.
Dr. Phineas Bond.
Samuel Rhoads.

Hon. Cadwallader Colden, Lt. Gov. of New York.
Rev. Dr. Francis Alison, Vice Prov. Coll. Philad.
Dr. William Shippen,

1790, aet. 75.

Mar. 26, 1784, aet. 72.
June
1773, aet. 56.
Nov. 29, 1784, aet.
Sep. 28, 1776, aet. 88.
Nov. 28, 1779, aet. 72.
Nov. 4, 1801, aet. 89.

LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE
1769.

Jan. 2. Dr. William Shippen, Jun., Prof. Anat. Coll., Phil. Died July, 11, 1808, aet.
Philip Syng,
Rev. Dr. William Smith, Prov. of the Coll. of Phil.

May 14, 1803, aet. 76.

George Bryan.
Rev. John Ewing.
Edward Shippen, Jun.

Jan. 28, 1791, aet. 60.

David Rittenhouse.

June 26, 1796, aet. 64.

Hugh Roberts.

July 23, 1786, aet. 80.
Apr. 22, 1779, aet. 64.

Israel Pemberton.

James Tilghman.
William Logan.
Joseph Shippen, Jun.
Thomas Willing.

Benjamin Chew,

Aug. 28, 1802, aet. 70.

Oct. 28, 1776, aet. 58.
Jan. 19, 1821, aet. 89.
Jan. 16, 1810, aet. 87.

Dr. Adam Kuhn, Prof. Bot. & Mat. Med. Coll. Phil.

July 5, 1817, aet. 75.

James Pemberton.

Feb. 9, 1809, aet. 86.

Thomas Pryor.
Dr. Hugh Williamson.

May 22, 1819, aet. 85.

Hon. John Penn.

, Hon. James Hamilton.

Hon. William Allen, Chief Justice of Penn.

Sep.

1780, aet.

Rev. Ebenezer Kinnersley, Prof. of Eng, and Orat.
Coll. Phil.

John Reynell.
Lyndford Lardner.
Joseph Richardson, merchant.
Richard Penn.
John Ross.
Andrew Allen.
Thomas Coombe.

Sep. 3, 1784, aet.
Oct.

6, 1774, aet. 59.

May 6, 1776, aet.

James Allen.
Jonathan B. Smith.
John Allen.
Alexander Stedman.

Daniel Dulaney, of Annapolis, Md.
Dr. Arthur Lee, of Virginia,
Rev. Dr. Ezra Stiles, of Connecticut,
John Winthrop, F.R.S., Hollis. Prof. Mat. Harv.
Edward Duffield.
Samuel Mifflin.

David Hall, printer.
Rev. Thomas Barton, of Lancaster, Penn.

Dec. 14, 1792, aet 42.
May 3, 1779, aet. 65.
July 12, 1803, at. 73.
May 26, 1780, aet. 50.

Robert Smith, architect.
Thomas Smith.

May 23, 1795, aet. 84.

Thomas Barnsley, of Bucks County, Penn.
Thomas Bond, Jun.
William West.
Robert Proud.

Joseph Fox.

July 5, 1813, aet. 85.
Dec. 9, 1779, aet. 70,

James Dlckinson.
John Rhea.
Isaac Jones.

Robert Strettell Jones.
Samuel Caldwell.

Edward Shippen, of Lancaster, Penn.
Thomas M'Kean, of Newcastle, Del.
Rev. Richard Peters, Rector of Ch. Church, and St
Peters, Phil.

June 24, 1817 aet. 83.
1775, aet.

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.

5

1769.

Jan. 2. Dr. John Kearsly, Sen.

Died Jan. 11, 1772, aet. 88.

Samuel Purviance, Jun.

Rev. Mr. Harding.
Thomas Potts, of Philadelphia Co.
Alexander Wilcocks.
Thomas Bradford.
James Biddle.

Hon. William Smith, of New York.
William Livingston, of New York.
John Morin Scott, of New York.

:

May 7, 1838, aet. 93.
Nov. 22, 1769, aet. 93.
July 25, 1790, aet. 67.
Sep. 14, 1784, aet.
Feb. 28, 1781, aet. 50.
Nov. 20, 1801, tet. 78.

Richard Stockton, of New Jersey.
William Peartree Smith, of New Jersey.
Hon. Samuel Smith, of Burlington N. J.
Joseph Reed,
Richard Hockley.
Rev. James Davidson, Prof. of Lang. Coll. Phil.
William Rumsey, of Maryland.
Henry Holiday, of Maryland.
Rev. John Davis, of Philadelphia county.
Dr. James Anderson, of Maryland.

June 28, 1809, aet. 77.

Dr. Edward Holyoke, of Massachusetts Bay.

Mar. 21, 1829, aet. 101.

Mar. 5, 1785, aet. 44.

Dr. Sandiford, of Barbadoes.

Dr. John Denormandie, of Bristol, Penn.
Joseph Kirkbride, of Bucks Coeuty Penn.

Dr. Peter Bergius, Prof. Nat. Hist. Stockholm.
Rev. Dr. Charles Magnus Wrangel, of Sweden.
Christian Magee, LL.D., of Heidelberg.
Monsieur Buffon, of Paris.

Apr. 16, 1788, aet. 81.

Rev. Ferdinand Farmer, of Philadelphia.

His Excellency Gen. Gage, Com. in chief of his
Majesty's forces in North America.
Sir William Johnson, Bart.

William Logan, Jun., of Bristol, Penn.
Gilbert Hicks, of Bucks County, Penn.
Matthias Aspden.
Dr. Samuel Duffield.

Nov. 27, 1814, aet. 82.

Rev. Chauncey Whittlesey, of New Haven, Con.
Rev. Nathaniel Hooker, of Hartford, Con.
Rev. Samuel West, of Dartmouth, N. H.
Col. Francis Lee, of Virginia.
Charles Thomson.
Isaac Paschall.

Edmund Physick.

Aug. 16, 1824, aet. 95.
1775, aet. 47.
1804, aet.

Joshua Howell.

William Hopkins.
Moses Bartram.

Joseph Paschall.
Owen Biddle.

Paul Fooks, Prof. Fr. and Span. Lang. Coll. Phil.

Mar. 10, 1799, aet. 61.
1781, aet.

Hon. John Vining, of Dover, Del.

Dr. Charles Ridgley, of Dover, Del.
Isaac Bartram.
James Pearson.
Samuel Powel.

William Bettle.

Samuel Eldridge.
Beniamin Davis.
Nicholas Waln.

Aug. 25, 1785, aet. 48.

LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE
1769.
Jan. 2. Clement Biddle,

Died Aug. 11, 1814, aet. 74.

John Morgan, M.D., F.R.S. Prof. of the Theory and
Pract. of Physic in the Coll. Phil.
– Oct. 15, 1789, aet. 53.
William Henry, of Lancaster County, Penn.
-

William Johnson, of Charleston, S.C.

-

Charles Mason, surveyor, London,
Dr. Samuel Bard, Prof. of the Practice of Physic.
King's College, New York.
— May 24, 1821, aet. 80.
David Evans.
Resigned Apr. 6, 1770. .
-

Thomas Mifflin.

Died

George Roberts.

– Sept. 17, 1801, aet. 60.

John Morris, Jun.

William Bartram, son of John Bartram.
Dr. John Chapman, of Bucks County, Penn.
Isaac Jamineau, British Consul at Naples.
Rev. Dr. Jonathan Odell, of Burlington, N.J.
Richard Wells, of Burlington, N.J.
Dr. Hugh Mercer, of Virginia.
Benjamin Rush, M. D.

July 22, 1823, aet. 84.

Apr. 19, 1813, aet. 67.

Samuel Elliot, of Boston.
James Alexander.

Samuel Robinson,

Stephen Hopkins, Gov. of Rhode-Island.
Joseph Harrison, of Boston.

July 13, 1785, aet. 77.

Peter Harrison, of Rhode-Island.
Dr. Charles Bensell, of Germantown, Penn.

Pierre Eugene du Simitiere, of Geneva.
Hon. Andrew Oliver, Lt. Gov. of Massachusetts Bay.
Hon. Jonathan Belcher, Ch. Just. of Nova Scotia,
Jeremiah Dixon, Surveyor, London.
Abel James.

Oct.

Michael Hillegas.
George Morgan.

1790, aet. 64.
1804, aet.

Thomas Fisher,

Lewis Nicola, of Northampton county, Penn.
Rev. William White.

July 17, 1836, aet. 88.

Peter Miller, of Ephrata, Penn.
Humphrey Marshall, of Chester County, Penn.
Benjamin Jacobs, of Chester County, Penn.
James Webb, of Lancaster County, Penn.
Chr. Frederick Post, of Mosquito Shore.
John Okely, of Bethlehem, Penn.
Sir George Saville, Bart of York, England,
Professor Famitz, of Naples.
Thomas Warner, Solicitor Gen. of Antigua.
Sir Alexander Dick, M.D., Bart. of Edinburgh.
John Martin Butt, M.D., of Kingston, Jamaica.
Sidney George, of Maryland.

Jan. 9, 1784, aet. 58.

Rev. Samuel Stillman, of Boston.

Samuel Warner, Counsellor, of Antigua.
Paul Bedford, of Barbadoes,
John Francis Oberlin, of Bethlehem, Penn.

Lionel Chalmers, M.D., of Charleston, S. C.
Ralph Izard, of Charleston, S.C.
Rev. Mr. Elliot, of Boston.
David Jameson, of Yorktown, Penn.
Stephen Paschall.
John Gill, Physician, of Kinsale, Ireland.

*--- *--

-

--

-

- -- --

-- - -

1802, aet. 88.

-

-

-

f

-

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.
1769.
Jan. 2.

Dr. John Paschall, of Derby, Penn.

1779, tet. 73.
– Mar. 10, 1820, aet. 82.

Died

Benjamin West, of London.
Samuel Miles, of Philadelphia.

Dr. John Tweedy, of Newport, R.I.
Aug. 18, 1789, aet. 72.

Rowland Evans, of Philadelphia County, Penn.
William Pool, of Wilmington, Del.
Joseph Bringhurst.
Dr. John Kearsly, Jr.
Dr. Gerardus Clarkson.

Dr. James A. Bayard.
Dr. Robert Harris.
Dr. Peter Sonmans.

Dr. George Glentworth.
Dr. Jonathan Potts.

James Span, M.D., Prof. of Mat. Med. in the Univ.
of Dublin.

James Dick, M.D., of Charleston, S.C.
Richard Huck, M.D. F.R.S., of London.
Williams Smibert, of Boston.

John Arbo, of Bethlehem, Penn.
William Scull, of Reading, Penn.
Joseph Hutchins, of Barbadoes.

Apr. 29, 1833, aet. 86.

John Himili, of Charleston, S.C.

John Deas, of Charleston, S.C.
June 18, 1769, aet. 72.
1780, aet,

Thomas Foxcroft.
John Benezet.

Dr. Isaac Smith, of Trenton.
John Walker, of Virginia.
Lambert Cadwalader, of Trenton.
John Cadwalader,

John Murgatroyd.
James Wilson, of Reading, Penn.

Aug. 28, 1798, aet. 55.
May 1, 1774, aet. 35.

William Hewsom, Anatomist, London.

1779, aet.

Edward Biddle, Attorney at Law, Reading, Penn.
Jacob Duché.

Edward Penington.

Capt. Valentine Gardner, of Lord Howe's Regt.
Dr. Mim, of Yorktown.
Henry Drinker.
Matthew Clarkson.

Oct. 5, 1800, aet. 67.

Capt. Joseph Stiles
Thomas Livezey, of Philadelphia County, Penn.

Sept. 9, 1790, aet. 74.

Samuel Wharton.

Benjamin Wynkoop.
John Drinker.

Mar. 3, 1778, aet.

Thomas Gilpin.
Thomas Clifford.

Levi Hollingsworth.
James Worrall.
Isaac Wharton.

Apr. 21. Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon, Pres, of the Coll. of
New Jersey.

Nov. 15, 1794, aet. 72.

Rev. Dr. Myles Cooper, Pres. of King's Coll. N.Y.
Col. Landon Carter, of Virginia.
Dr. Otto, of Bethlehem, Penn.
Daniel Clark.

Dr. John Lorimer, of West Florida.
Dr. Brooke, of Maryland.
Dr. Ebenezer Prime, of New York.

:

LIST OF THE MEMBERS OF THE
1769.

Apr. 21. Dr. John Jones, of New York.

Died

Samuel Bowen, of South Carolina.

Samuel Shoemaker, of Philadelphia.
Sir Charles a Linné, M.D., &c., Upsal.

–Jan. 10, 1778, at 71.

1770.

Jan. 19. Dr. John Fothergill, of London.

1780, aet. 69.

Lord Sterling, of New Jersey.
Dr. John David Hahn, Prof. Chem. Univ. of Utrecht.
Edward Nairne, of London.

. 1784, aet. 55.

1776, aet. 66.

James Ferguson, F.R.S., of London.
John Morrell, of Georgia.
Mr. Guald, surveyor, of West Florida.
Joel Bailey, of Chester County, Penn.
Joseph Ellicot, of Bucks County, Penn.
Joseph Gilpin, of Caecil County, Md.

1797, aet.
Mar. 30, 1790, aet.

1771.
Jan. 18. Dr. Morton, of Jamaica.
Mar.

Dr. James Lloyd, of Boston.
Richard Thomas, of Chester County, Penn.
Henry Hill.

1810, aet.82.
1793, aet.

William Parr.

Samuel Rhoads, Jr.
Dr. Thomas Preston.

Henry Bembridge.
John Baynton.
Dr. Samuel Preston Moore,

Joseph Otolenge, of Georgia.
Nevil Maskelyne, Astron. Royal, Greenwich.

Feb. 9, 1830, aet. 79.

Samuel Filsted, of Jamaica.

Dr. Archibald Gloucester, of Antigua.
Frederick Marshall, of North Carolina.
1772.

Apr. 17. Lieut. Stephen Adye, of the Royal Artillery.
Jesse Lukens, of Philadelphia.
Daniel Coxe, of Trenton, N.J.
Mr. Lane, of London.

Lieut. Thomas Hutchins, of the 60th Regt.

Apr. 28, 1789, aet.
July 2, 1820, aet. 90,

Peter Dollond, of London."

Archibald McClean, of York County, Penn.
1798, aet. 58.

Gerard Bancker, of New York.

Capt. John Montresor, of New York.
Col. Henry Laurens, of South Carolina.
Rev. Samuel Williams, of Massachusetts Bay.
Dr. George Milligan, of South Carolina.
1773.
Jan. 15.

Dec. 8, 1792, aet. 69.
Jan.

l817, aet. 73.

Timothy, Baron de Klingstedt, of Russia.
Monsieur Le Roy, Vice Director of the Academy
of Sciences at Paris.

Aug. 25, 1785, aet. 68.

Hon. Andrew Oliver, of Boston.

Dr. Torbern Bergmann, Prof. of Math, Stockholm.

July 8, 1784, aet. 49.

Alexander Small, of London.

Rev. Thomas Coombe, of Philadelphia.

:

Right Hon. Earl of Stanhope.

- Dec. 14, 1816, aet. 63.

Dr. James Tilton, of Dover, Del.
Dr. Nicholas Way, of Wilmington, Del.
Rev. William Ludlam, of Leicester.

May 14, 1822, aet. 77.

1774.

Jan. 21.

Right Hon. Lord Mahon.

–--------

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.
1774.
Jan. 21.

Dr. Andrew Duncan, of Edinburgh.

Died

Samuel Moore, of London.

George Gauld, of Pensacola.
Bernard Romans, of Pensacola.

Hon. Bryan Edwards.
Hon. John Ellis, of Jamaica.

Dr. William Wright, of Jamaica.
Dr. Walter Jones, of Virginia.
Dr. James M'Clurg, of Virginia.
Dr. Jonathan Elmer, of New Jersey.
Dr. William Bryant, of New Jersey.
John Jones, of Maryland.

1806, aet. 63.
1776, aet. 65.

-

-

- Sept.

1819, aet. 84.

— July

1823, tet. 77.

Dr. John Perkins, of Boston.

Sharp Delany, of Philadelphia.
James Bringhurst, of Philadelphia.
Benjamin Morgan, of Philadelphia.
Dr. Thomas Parke, of Philadelphia.

Resigned

1775.

Jan. 28. Dr. Adams, of Barbadoes.

Died

Marquis of Condorcet.
Monsieur Daubenton, Jr., of Paris.
M. J. B. Dubourg, of Paris.

Dec. 31, 1799, aet. 83.

M. Le Roux, of Paris.

Feb. 9, 1795, aet. 71.
1770, æt. 52.

M. Macquer, of Paris.
Abbé Raynall, of Paris.

Mar. 6, 1796, aet. 83.
May 8, 1794, aet. 51.
Sept. 29, 1793, aet. 59.

M. Lavoisier, of Paris.
Abbé Rozier, of Paris.

Capt. Holland, of London.
Rev. Dr. Thomas Gibbons, of London.

1785, aet. 65.

Fortunatus de Warris, M.D.

June 15, 1819, aet. 80.

Dr. Benjamin Moseley, of Jamaica.
1779.

Apr. 16. Conrad Alexander Gerard, Min. Plen. H.M.C. M.
Dr. James Hutchinson, of Philadelphia.
Rev. George Duffield.

1793, aet. 41.

Feb. 2, 1790, aet. 58.

1780.

July 4, 1826, aet. 83.
July 24, 1807, aet. 78.

Thomas Jefferson.

Rev. Dr. John C. Kunze, of New York.
Chev. de la Luzerne, of Paris.

Jan. 14, 1837, aet. 91.

Barbé de Marbois,

Timothy Matlack.
Mar. 6, 1812, aet. 62.
Sept. 6, 1806, aet. 69.

Rev. Dr. James Madison.
Charles Pettit.

Monsieur Sue, Prof. Roy. of Anat, Paris.
1834, aet.
Dec. 14, 1799, aet. 68.

Jan.

John Ternant.

''

George
Gen. Anthony Wayne.

Dec.

1781.
Jan. 19. Gen. la Fayette.
Ebenezer
Postmaster General.

1796, aet. 51.

May 20, 1834, aet. 76.

£,

June 13, 1817, tet. 73.

Hon. Thomas Bee, of South Carolina.

Dr. Hugh Shiell, of Philadelphia.
Isaac Gray, of Philadelphia.
Chevalier de Chastellux.

Jared Ingersoll, of Philadelphia.

:

1788, aet. 82
Oct. 31, 1822, aet. 72.

1783,

Jan. 18. Samuel Huntington, of Connecticut.
2

Jan. 5, 1796, aet. 63.

LIST OF THE MEMBERS OF THE

10
1783.
Jan. 18.

John Beale Boardley, of Maryland.
Abbé Fontana.

Died Jan. 26, 1804, set. 76.
Mar. 9, 1805, aet. 76.

Chevalier Danmours, of Baltimore.
Dr. Coste.

Robert Patterson, Prof. Math. Univ. Penn.

Rev. Robert Davidson, Prof. Hist. &c., Univ. Penn.
1784.
Jan. 16. Count de Campomanes.

Rev. Dr. Samuel Magaw.
Samuel Vaughan.
John Vaughan.
Rev. Jeremy Belknap, of New Hampshire.
Major Ferdinand J. S. de Brahm.
Arch. Gamble, Prof. Eng. and Orat, Univ. Penn.
Rev. Justus Hen. Christ. Helmuth, Prof. of Ger. &c.
James Six, of Canterbury.

Marquis d'Angeville, of Paris.
Count de Vergennes.
John Dunlap.
Peter J. Van Berckel, Minister Plenipotentiary

July 22, 1824, aet.81.

|

Dec. 1, 1812, aet. 77.
Dec. 4, 1802, aet. 83.

June 20, 1798, aet. 54.

:

Feb. 5, 1825, aet. 79.
Feb. 13, 1787, aet. 70.

from the Netherlands.

George Fox.
Dr. John Foulke.

Dr. Barnabas Binney.
Rev. Robert Blackwell.

Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant.
George Gray.
Thomas Haywood, Jun., of South Carolina.
John Hyacinth de Magellan, F.R.S., of London,

:

July
1787, aet. 36.
Feb. 12, 1831, aet. 82.
Mar.
Feb.

1809, aet. 62.

1790, aet. 67.

1785.

22. Frederick Eugene Francis, Baron de Beelen Ber
tholff.

Samuel Gustavus, Baron Hermelin, of Stockholm.
William Bradford, Attorney General of Penn.

May 4, 1820, tet. 74.
Aug. 23, 1795, aet 39.
July
1833, aet.

Edward Burd, Proth. Supreme Court of Penn.
Dr. Adair Crawford, of London.

1795, aet. 46.

Dr. John Carson, of Philadelphia.
Rev. Manasseh Cutler, of Ipswich, Mass.

July 28, 1823, aet. 80.

Count de Guichen, Lieut. Gen. &c.

1790, aet. 78.
1820, aet. 67.

Andrew Ellicott, of Maryland.

Samuel Powel Griffitts,

.D., of Philadelphia.

May 12, 1826, aet. 67.

Dr. Hugh James, of Montego Bay, Jamaica.
Joseph Mandrillon, merchant, of Amsterdam.

Jan. 7, 1799, aet.

Gen. Thaddeus Kosciozko.

Oct. 16, 1817, aet. 65.

William Herschel, F.R.S., of Bath.

Aug. 23, 1822, aet. 83.

Dr. James M'Henry, of Baltimore.
James Madison.

June 28, 1836, aet. 85.
June 24, 1817, aet. 61.

Rev. Henry Muhlenburg, of Lancaster, Penn.
Christian Fred. Michaelis, M.D., of Gottenberg.
William Parker, of London.

Hon. Mann Page, of Fredericksburg, Va.
Thomas Paine.

June 8, 1809, aet. 72.

Dr. Robert Perceval, Prof. of Chem. in Trin. Coll.,
Dublin.

Rev. Dr. Richard Price, F.R.S., of London.
Rev. Joseph Priestley, F.R.S., of Birmingham.
Rev. Dr. Sam. Smith, Vice Pres, of Princeton Coll.

Jean Baptiste Sue, Jr., Surgeon & Prof. Anat, Paris.

Mar. 19, 1791, aet. 68.
Feb. 6, 1804, aet. 71.

=

Aug. 21, 1819, at 69

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.

11

1785.
k
i.

Jan. 22. Col. George Wall, Jun., Mem. of the Sup. Ex. Coun.
of Pennsylvania.
Benjamin Workman, Teacher of Math. &c.

D

»

1786.
#

July 21.

May 8, 1806, aet. 71.

Hon. Robert Morris.

Jonathan Hoge, Mem, of the Sup. Ex,Coun, of Penn.
George Clymer.
William TempleFranklin.
Samuel Vaughan, Jr., of Jamaica.
Rev. John Andrews, D.D.

Jan. 23, 1813, aet. 73.
Mar. 30, 1813, aet. 68.
1826, aet.

Charles Wilson Peale.

Robert Edge Pine.
Dr. Benjamin Duffield.

Nov. 13, 1799, aet. 46.

Dr. John Morris.
William Rawle.

Apr. 12, 1836, tet. 77.

Duke de Rochefoucauld, of the Acad.Sci., Paris.
Marquis of Condorcet, Sec. of the Acad. Sci., Paris.
Aug. 25, 1785, aet. 68.

M. Le Roy, of the Acad. Sci., Paris.

1813, aet. 62.
1799, aet. 69.

Abbé Soulavie.

Mar.

Dr. Ingenhausz, of Vienna, Phys, to the Emperor.
M. Gastillier, Doctor of Physic, of Montargis.

Sept.

M. Grivel.

Oct. 17, 1810, aet. 75.

M. Charles, Lecturer in Experimental Philosophy.
1807, aet. 51.

M. Cabanis.

M. Le Veillard,

M. Hubert Garbier, Doctor of Physic, &c.
M. Feutry, a Mechanician, &c.
Lorenz Crell, M.D.
Count de Castilione, ofMilan.
Dr. Noel, of Paris.
Chev. de Granchain, of Paris.

Richard Kirwan, F.R.S., of London,
John Whitehurst, F.R.S., of London,
Benjamin Vaughan.
Dr. James Beattie, Prof. of Moral Phil. Aberdeen.
Dr. Thomas Percival, of Manchester.

Dr. Thomas Henry, of Manchester.
Rev. Charles H. Wharton, D.D., of New Castle, Del.
1787.
Jan. 19. William Bingham, of Philadelphia.

June 22, 1812, aet.

|

1788, aet. 73.

Dec. 8, 1835, aet. 85.
1803, aet. 68.

Aug. 30, 1804, aet. 64.
June 18, 1816, aet. 82.
1833, aet.
July

Feb. 7, 1804, aet. 52.

Benjamin Chew, Jr., of Philadelphia.
Francis Johnston, Receiver Gen. of the Land office.

Joseph James, of Philadelphia.
Robert Millegan, of Philadelphia.
William Barton, of Philadelphia.
Dr. Thomas Ruston, of Philadelphia.
Major Isaac Craig, of Pittsburg, Penn.
Simeon DeWitt, of New York.
His Excell. James Bowdoin, Gov. of Massachusetts.
Hon. Lewis William Otto, Chargé des Affaires, &c.
Hon. John Jay, Sec. for Foreign Affairs, New York.
M. Cadet de Vaux, of Paris.

1804, aet.

Dec. 3, 1834, aet. 78.
Nov. 6, 1790, aet. 63.
Nov. 9, 1817, aet. 63.

May 17, 1829, aet. 83.

M. Cadet, of Paris.

Hon. John Powell, Judge of Appeals, Boston.

May 6, 1805, aet. 58.

Sir Edward Newenham, Baronet, of Ireland.
Duke of Richmond.

Dr. John Coakley Letsom, of London.
John Barclay, of London.

Mar. 1, 1815, aet. 72.

LIST OF THE MEMBERS OF THE

12
1787,

Jan. 19. Dr. William Thornton, of London.

Died.

Dr. George Spence, of Jamaica.
June 19, 1820, aet. 77.
Oct. 16, 1793, aet. 64.

July 20. Sir Joseph Banks, Pres, of the Royal Society.
John Hunter, Surgeon, London.
George Vaux, Surgeon, London.

William Baker, of Bayfordbury, Hertfordshire, Eng.
Dr. John R. B. Rogers, of Philadelphia.
Dr. Caspar Wistar, of Philadelphia.
Dr. Enoch Edwards, of Philadelphia County.

Jan. 22, 1818, aet.

Col. John Bayard, of Philadelphia.
Dr. Thomas White, of Manchester.
Rev. Thomas Barnes, of Manchester.

William W. Smith, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Jonathan Williams, Jr.

May 20, 1815, aet. 64.

1789.

Jan 16. David Redick, Mem. of the Sup. Ex. Coun. of Penn.
Don Diego de Gardoqui, Envoy from Spain, &c.
Rev. Dr. Nicholas Collin, Rector of the Swedes'

Church, Philadelphia.
David Brearley, Chief Justice of New Jersey.
M. Stainsby, Prof. of Nat. Phil. at Prague.

Oct. 7, 1831, aet.
Aug.
1790, aet. 45.

M.St.Jean Crevecoeur, French Consul at New York.

John Cox, of Bloomsbury, N. J.
May
1820, set.
Apr. 7, 1789, aet. 67.

Dr. Blagden, Sec. of the Royal Society, London.
Petrus Camper, of Friesland.
Baron de Heynitz, Prof. &c., of Berlin.
Benjamin Smith Barton, M.D., of Philadelphia.
M. Arthaud, of Cape François.
Médéric Louis Elias Moreau de St. Méry, of Cape
François.
Joseph Miguel de Flores, of Madrid.
Charles Stewart, M.D., F.R.S., of Edinburgh.
William Patterson, late Attorney Gen. of N. Jersey.
Walter Minto, LL.D., Prof. of Math. Princeton Coll.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, of South Carolina.

Dec. 19, 1815, aet. 49.

Jan. 28, 1819, aet. 69.

:

Oct. 21, 1796, aet.
Aug. 16, 1825, aet. 79.

Rev. Ashbel Green.

William Findley.
Oct.

J. P. Brissot de Warville.

1793, aet. 38.

Rev. Burgess Allison, of Bordentown, N.J.

Benjamin Rittenhouse.
Sept. 28, 1829, aet.

Thomas Pole, Surgeon, London.

Apr. 17. Princess Catharine Daschkaw.
John Stevens, Jr., of New Jersey.
Joshua Humphreys, of Philadelphia.
James Rumsey, late of Virginia.
George Monro, M.D., of New Castle, Del.
Winthrop Sargent.
John Bleakley, of Philadelphia.

Jan. 12, 1838, aet.86.

George Buchanan, M.D., of Baltimore.
Samuel Beach, of Charleston, S. C.

Don Francis de Gardoqui.

July 17. Peter Le Gaux, of Spring Mill, Penn.
1790.

Jan.15. George Turner, one of the Judges of the West. Ter. Resigned.
Caleb Whitfoord.

Died

Baron de Hupsch, of Cologne.
Dr. John Walker, Prof. of Nat. Hist, Edinburgh.
Dr. Andrew Sparman, Prof. of Natural Hist, &c.
Stockholm.

- -

Jan.

1, 1805, aet. 86.

July 20, 1820, aet. 73.

-- -

------ ----

- -

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.
1791.
Jan. 21.

13

Alexander Hamilton, Sec. of the Treas. U.S.
Died July 12, 1804, aet. 47.
Edmund Randolph, Att. Gen. U. S.
Alexander Addison, of Washington County, Penn.
James Ross, of Washington County, Penn.
Dr. Absolom Baird, of Washington County, Penn.
John Smilie, of Fayette County, Penn.
Albert Gallatin, of Fayette County, Penn.
John Hoge, of Fayette County, Penn.
Col. Alexander Anderson, of Philadelphia.
Capt. William Ferguson, of the Artillery.

=

Benjamin Gloxin, M.D., of Strasburgh.
Samuel L. Mitchell, M.D., of New

#.

Sept. 7, 1831, aet. 66.

Robert Goldsborough, of Talbot County, Md.
James Anderson, M.D., of Madras.

Apr. 15. Charles Peter Thunberg, Prof. Nat. Hist, Upsal.
Nicholas L. Burmann, M.D., Prof. Bot. Amsterdam.

E

Aug. 8, 1828, aet.
1793, aet. 59.

John Gottlieb Grosche, M.D., Prof. Nat. History,
Mittau, Courland.

Dec. 16, 1798, aet. 72,

Thomas Pennant.

Oct. 29, 1806, aet. 55.

Henry Knox, Sec. of War, U.S.
July 15. John Lusac, Prof. of Greek, Leyden.
John Nicholson, Comptroller Gen. of Pennsylvania.
Andrew Ross, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Benjamin Waterhouse, M.D., of Cambridge, Mass.
John Penington, M.D.
John Beckley, Clerk of the House of Rep. U.S.
Peter Stephen Du Ponceau, of Philadelphia.
Oct. 21. Andrew Murray, M.D., Prof. of Bot. Goettengen.
Peter Simon Pallas, M.D., Prof. Nat. Hist. St. Pe.

Dec. 5, 1800, aet. 40.

tersburg.

1812, aet. 71.

Dugald Stewart, #of Mor. Philosophy, Edinburgh.

June 11, 1828, aet.
Jan. 16, 1817, aet. 57.

Alexander James Dallas.
1792.
Jan. 20.

Count Paul Andreani, of Milan.
Rodolph Vall-Travers, F.R.S., of Hamburg.
Anthony Fothergill, M.D., of Bath.

Anthony Renatus Charles M. de la Forest.
Joseph Ceracchi, of Rome.
Palisot de Beauvois.

John Rouelle, M.D., of Virginia.
Richard P. Barton, of Dinwiddie County, Va.
Dr. David Jackson, of Philadelphia.
Dr. William Smith, of Philadelphia.
Nicholas B. Waters, M.D., of Philadelphia.
July 20. Erasmus Darwin, M.D., F.R.S.
Dr. William Currie, of Philadelphia.
Uno Von Troil, Archbishop of Sweden.
John Trumbull, Historical Painter, Connecticut.
1793.
Jan. 18.

:

Apr. 18, 1802, aet. 71.

M. Coupigny, Mem. of the Soc. of Arts and Sciences
at Cape François.
Louis Valentine, M.D., of Cape François.
John Adams.

Dr. David Nassy, of Philadelphia.
Dr. George Logan of Philadelphia.
John W. Kittera, of Lancaster, Penn.
Apr. 19.

William Waring, of Philadelphia,
Thomas Lee Shippen, of Philadelphia.

July 4, 1826, tet. 90.

:

Apr. 9, 1821, aet. 66.
June 8, 1801, aet. 49

LIST OF THE MEMBERS OF THE

14
1793.

Apr. 19. John Reinhold Forster, L.U.D.

Died Dec. 9,

1798, aet. 69.

1794.

Apr. 18. Thomas Mann Randolph, of Virginia.
James Anderson, LL.D., of Cotfield, Scotland.

Apr. 19, 1829, aet.87.

Earl of Buchan.

Dr. James Greenway, of Dinwiddie County, Va.
Sep. 30, 1834, aet.

Edward Stevens, M.D., F.R.S. Ed., of St. Croix.

John Nancarrow, of Philadelphia.
Eberhard A. W. Zimmerman, Prof. of Math. &c.,
Brunswick.

-

1795.

Jan. 16. Earl of Dundonald, of Culross, Scotland.
Samuel Wheeler, of Philadelphia.
Jan. 29, 1829, aet.84.

Timothy Pickering, Sec. of War, U. S.
Robert Leslie, Watchmaker, of Philadelphia.
Gustaf Von Carleson, of Sweden.
Rev. Valentine Melscheimer, of Hanover, Penn.
1796.

Jan. 15. Dr. Frederic Anthony Grassi, of Bordeaux.

Dr. Deveze, Physician of the Hospital at Bushhill.
Dr. Nathaniel B. Bedford, of Pittsburg, Penn.
Isaac Briggs, of Montgomery County, Md.

|

Francis Alexander Frederic de la Rochefoucauld

Mar. 28, 1827, aet.

Liancourt.

Dr. Hugh Hodge, of Philadelphia.
Jacques Marie le Fessier de Grandpré.
John F. Mifflin, of Philadelphia.
Tench Coxe, of Philadelphia.
Richard Peters Smith, of Philadelphia.

:

Apr. 15, 1813, aet. 54.
July 10, 1824, aet. 68.
1798, aet.

Mons. F. H. Le Comte, of Paris.

James Edward Smith, M.D., F.R.S.
1834, aet.

P. A. Adet, Min. Plen. &c.

Mar.

William Dandridge Peck, of Kittery, N. H.
James Woodhouse, M.D., Prof. Chem. Univ. Penn.

Oct. 3. 1822, aet. 59.
June 4, 1809, aet. 38.

Apr. 15. Chevalier Cypriano Ribeiro Freire, Min. of Portu
gal to the United States.
Alexander Lerebours, late of Paris,
A. I. Larocque.
C. M. Talleyrand de Perigord.
Rev. James Abercrombie, of Philadelphia.

-

1824, aet.

-

– May 17, 1838, aet.83.
Feb. 22, 1819, aet, 56.

July 15. Dr. Isaac Cathrall, of Philadelphia.
Louis Etienne Duhail, Fr. Consul for Maryland.
Don Joseph de Jandennes, Mem. of the Roy. Soc.
of Valencia in Spain.

Joanne Baptista Cunat, Doctor of Civil Law, &c.
His Excellency Don Luis de Urbini, Capt. Gen. of
-

Valencia, &c.

-

Oct. 21. Dr. Charles Caldwell, of Philadelphia.
1797.

- July 5, 1835, aet. 69.
Jan. 20. Thomas C. James, M.D., of Philadelphia.
- May 2, 1825, aet. 52.
Adam Seybert, M.D., of Philadelphia.
John Newnan, M.D., ofSalisbury, N.C.
Andreas E.Van Braam Houckgeest, of Bristol, Penn. —
Theodore Charles Mozard, French Con. at Boston. Samuel Harrison Smith.

Mons. Volney.
Apr. 21. John Heckewelder, of Bethlehem, Penn.

John Stewart, of Green Briar County, Va.

– Apr. 24, 1820, aet.
– Jan. 31, 1823, aet. 80.
- Aug. 23, 1823, aet.

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.

15

1797.

Apr. 21. Rev. Samuel Blair, D.D., of Philadelphia.

Died Sept. 24, 1818, aet. 77.
Thomas Pinckney, of South Carolina, late Min. Plen. – Nov. 2, 1828, aet. 77.

July 21. John Guillemard, A.M., of St. John's Coll. Oxford.
William Bache, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Alexander Martin, of North Carolina.
William Hamilton, of the Woodlands.

=

1798.

Jan. 19. Gen. James Wilkinson, of the United States Army.
Major Francisco de Zach.
Apr. 20. William Patterson, M.D., of Londonderry.
J. B. Scandella, M.D., of Venice.
Julien U. Niemcewicz, of Poland.

John Frederick Blumenbach, M.D., F.R.S., &c.
1799.

July 19. William Boys, A.M., of Philadelphia.

-

John Redman Coxe, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Thomas Peters Smith, of Philadelphia.
Joseph Clay, of Philadelphia.
Samuel Elam, of Newport, R.I.
Benjamin Henry Latrobe, Engineer.
William Maclure, of Philadelphia.

Aug. 17, 1811, aet. 47.

1800,

Jan. 17. Robert Liston, Min. Plen. from Great Britain to the
United States.

John R. Smith, A.M., of Philadelphia.
Justus Erick Bollman, M.D., of Philadelphia.
William Dunbar, of Mississippi Territory.

Apr. 18. Samuel Brown, M.D., of Kentucky.

July 15, 1836, aet. 93.

B

Rev. Samuel Miller, of New York.
Dupont de Nemours,

Dec. 9, 1821, aet.
Nov. 15, 1819, aet.
Jan. 12, 1830, aet. 60.

Aug. 6, 1817, aet. 78.

1801.

Jan 16. Samuel Falberg, Physician at St. Bartholomews.
Gustavus Paykull, of Sweden.
Alexander Ramirez, of Guatemala.

Dr. Francis Blanchet, of Quebec.
Robert R. Livingston, Chancellor of New York.

Feb. 26, 1813, aet. 66,

William Jones, Math. Instrument-maker, London.

Apr. 17. Thomas Tickell Hewson, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Don Joseph Joaquin de Ferrer, of Cadiz.
Don Francisco Peyrolon, of Valencia.
1802,

Jan.15. Thomas Cooper, of Northumberland, Penn.
Jarvis Roebuck, M.D., of St. Croix.

William Barnwell, M.D., of Philadelphia./
William Roxburgh, M.D., of Calcutta.
Chev. Don Carlos de Yruio.

'uly 16. Peter Bleeker Olsen, Danish Minister Resident, &c.

1803

:

Letombe, late French Consul General.
William Stephen Jacobs, M.D.
Philip Rose Roume, Mem. of the French Institute.
James Mease, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Dec. 15, 1837, aet. 69.
Philip Syng Physick, M.D., of Philadelphia.
John Church, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Chev. Dr. Valentine de Foronda, Consul General of
Spain.
John Garnett, of New Brunswick, N.J.
– May 11, 1820, aet. 69.

Jan. #1. Robert Hare, M.D., of Philadelphia.

:--------"

-

LIST OF THE MEMBERS OF THE

16
1803.

Died Aug.

Jan. 21. Benjamin, Count Rumford.

Apr. 15. Benjamin Dearborn, of Boston.
Jean Baptiste Joseph de Lambre.
Daniel Melamderhjelm, Prof. of Astronomy, Sweden.
Eric Prosperin, Prof. of Astronomy, Upsal.
Francis Nichols, of Philadelphia.
Oct. 21. David Ramsey, M.D., of Charleston, S.C.
Capt. Merewether Lewis, of Virginia.
Robert Gilmor, Jun., of Baltimore.

1814, aet. 62.
– Feb. 22, 1838, aet. 83.

– Aug. 19, 1822, aet.
1810, aet. 84.
– Jan.
-

– May 8, 1815, aet. 65.
– Oct. 11, 1809, aet. 35.

1804.

Jan. 20. David Humphreys, late Min. to Lisbon.

– Feb. 21, 1818, aet. 65.

Joshua Gilpin, of Philadelphia.

Apr. 20. Samuel Webber, of Cambridge, Mass.
Manuel Godoy, Prince of Peace.
His Excell. Don Pedro Cevallos, Spain.
Don Antonio Josef de Cavanillas, Spain.
Edward Jenner, M.D., of London.

– July 17, 1810, aet. 51.

-

– Jan. 25, 1823, aet. 74.

July 20, William Short, of Virginia.
Baron Alexander von Humboldt.

Joseph Willard, D.D.
Zaccheus Collins, of Philadelphia.

– Sep. 25, 1804, aet. 64.
- June 12, 1831, aet.

1805.

Jan. 18. John Maclean, Prof. of Nat. Phil. and Chem.,
Princeton College.
Edward Miller, M.D., of New York.
Rev. John Prince, of Salem, Mass.

Capt. William Jones, of Philadelphia.
Charles Smith, of Lancaster, Penn.
William Hawes, M.D., of London.

-

– Mar. 17, 1812, aet. 51.
– June 7, 1836, aet. 84.
-

1831, aet

– Mar. 17, 1836, aet.
-

Samuel Moore, M.D. of Pennsylvania.
Fred. Adrian Vanderkemp, of Oneida County, N.Y. – Sep. 7, 1829, aet. 77.

Benjamin Silliman, M.D., Prof. of Chem. &c. Yale
College.
Apr. 19. William Tilghman.
July 19. Bushrod Washington.

– Apr. 30, 1827, aet. 70.
– Nov. 26, 1829, aet. 70.

1806.

– Mar. 9, 1836, aet.
– Sep. 18, 1817, aet. 57.

Jan. 17. M. Destutt Tracy.
Olof Swartz, of Sweden.

Martinus Van Marum, M.D., of Haarlem.
Joseph Cloud, of Philadelphia.
Rev. Samuel B. Wylie, D.D., of Philadelphia.
\
Apr. 18. Joseph Sansom, of Philadelphia.
William Dubourg, D.D., of St. Mary's College,
Baltimore.

-

-

Qct. 17. Samuel F. Conover, M.D., of Philadelphia.

-

Francis de Borja Garcas Stockler, of Lisbon.

– Mar. 6, 1829, aet.

Adrian Giles Camper, Anatomist, of Friesland.

-

1807.

Jan. 16. Mahlon Dickerson, of Philadelphia.
Iréné Dupont, of Wilmington, Del.
Apr. 17. Nathaniel Chapman, M.D., of Philadelphia.
John M'Dowell, Provost of the Univ. of Penn.
Ferdinand Rudolph Hassler, Prof. of Math. &c.
George Izard, of Pennsylvania.
John Eric Forstom, of St. Bartholomews.

– Oct. 31, 1834, aet.
-

– Nov. 22, 1828, aet.
-

James Gibson, of Philadelphia.
Oct. 16. Archibald Bruce, M.D., of New York.

– Feb. 22, 1818, set. 41

Charles Philibert de Lasteyrie, of Paris.

-

- - - - --

- - - - - --------

* --

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.
1808.
Jan. 16.

Edward Penington, of Philadelphia.

17

Died Mar. 16, 1834, aet. 68.

July 15. Horace Binney, of Philadelphia.
Rev. William Staughton, D.D., of Philadelphia.
1809.

Jan. 20. Robert Fulton, of New York.
Ross Cuthbert, of Lower Canada.
Joel Barlow, of the District of Columbia.
Apr. 21. Silvain Godon, of Philadelphia.

Feb. 24, 1815, aet. 50.
Dec. 26, 1812, aet. 54.

George William Featherstonhaugh, of New York.
David B. Warden, of New York.
Robert M. Patterson, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Thomas Moore, of Maryland. .

Hon. James Winthrop, of Cambridge, Mass.
Nathaniel Bowditch, of Salem, Mass.
Jean Andrè Michaux, of Paris.

Sep. 26, 1821, aet.
Mar. 16, 1838, aet. 63.

1810.

July 20. George Gibbs, of Boston, late of Rhode Island.
William Johnson, of Charleston, S.C., one of the
Judges of the Sup. Court, U.S.

Sir Humphry Davy, of London.
1811

David Hosack, M.D., &c., of New York.
John Haighton, M.D., F.R.S., of London.
John H. Brinton, of Philadelphia.

Jan.18. John Mason Good, F.R.S., of London.

1812

Rev. William Bentley, of Salem, Mass.
A. Vauquelin, of Paris.
John Davis, Secretary of the Amer. Acad., Boston.
Charles J. Wister, of Philadelphia.

'an I7. Joseph Corrêa de Serra.

Aug. 5, 1833, aet. 57.
Aug. 4, 1834, aet. 63.
May 29, 1829, aet.
Dec. 22, 1835, aet. 66.
Mar. 23, 1823, aet.
Jan. 2, 1827, aet. 62.
Dec. 29, 1819, aet. 61.
1829, Get.

Sep.

1823, aet.

Robert Walsh, of Philadelphia.
Benjamin Allen, LL.D., of Philadelphia.
July 17. Robert Adrain, of New Brunswick, N.J.
1813.

Apr. 16. Andrew John Rezius, Prof. of Nat. Hist., &c.,
Lund, Sweden.
Alexander Wilson, of Philadelphia.
George Pollok, of Philadelphia.
Constant Dumeril, Prof. of Zoology, &c., Paris.

*

Aug. 28, 1813, aet. 47.

Benjamin R. Morgan, of Philadelphia.
John Sergeant, of Philadelphia.
Nicholas Biddle, of Philadelphia.
Oct 16, William P. C. Barton, M.D., of Philadelphia. .
William Meredith, of Philadelphia.
Charles Chauncey, of Philadelphia.

Reuben Haines, of Philadelphia.
William Hembel, Jun., of Philadelphia.

Oct. 19, 1831, aet.

1814.

Jan. 21. John E. Hall, of Baltimore.
Dec. 15, 1823, aet.
James Cutbush, of Philadelphia.
Dr. N. S. Allison, of Burlington, N.J.
Rev. Frederick Beasley, Provost of the Univ. of Penn.
Apr. 15. Rev. James P. Wilson, D.D., of Philadelphia.
Resigned Jan. 4, 1828.
Gen. : Gardiner Swift, of U.S. Engineers.
Thomas Gilpin, of Philadelphia.
July 15. Hon. De Witt Clinton, Pres, of the New York
Philosophical Society.
Died Feb. 11, 1828, tet. 59.
3

LIST OF THE MEMBERS OF THE

18
1814.

July 15. John Gummeré, of Burlington, N.J.
Oct. 21. John G. Biddle, of Philadelphia.

Died

John Syng Dorsey, M.D., of Philadelphia.

– Nov. 12, 1828 aet. 35.

1815.

Apr. 21. Samuel Colhoun, M.D., of Philadelphia.
John M. Scott, of Philadelphia.
Joseph Hartshorne, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Joseph Parrish, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Charles J. Ingersoll, of Philadelphia.
Rev. James Gray, D.D., of Philadelphia.
July 21. Joseph Hopkinson, of Philadelphia.
Charles W. Hare, of Philadelphia.
Joseph P. Norris, of Philadelphia.

-

-

1816.

Jan. 19.

Gerhard Troost, M.D., of Maryland.

Oct. 18.

Rev. Abiel Holmes, D.D., of Cambridge, Mass.

Joseph Reed, of Philadelphia.
- June
1837, aet. 73.
Isaiah Thomas, of Worcester, Mass.
- Apr. 4, 1831, aet. 82.
Carlo Botta, of Turin.
Jared Mansfield, Prof. of Natural Philosophy, West
Point.
– Feb. 3, 1830, aet. 71.
-

1817.
Jan. 17. Dr. William Meade.

Resigned, Feb. 20, 1824.

Charles Alexander Lesueur, of Paris.
I. C. Delamétrie, of Paris.

Died

I. P. F. Deleuze.

John C. Otto, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Richard Rush, of Philadelphia.
Apr. 18. Edward Troughton, F.R.S., of London.
July 18. J. Peter Frank, M.D., of Vienna.
Jos. Baron de Sonnefels, of Vienna.
Joseph von Hammer, of Vienna.

-

June 12, 1835, aet.

-

-

William Gaston, of North Carolina.
Charles Fenton Mercer, of Virginia.
Oct. 17.

Rev. Johann Severin Water, D.D., of Königsberg.

Eugenius Nulty, of Philadelphia.
Thomas Say, naturalist, of Philadelphia.
– Oct. 10, 1834, aet. 46.
George Ord, naturalist, of Philadelphia.
Thomas Nuttall, botanist, of Philadelphia.
Rev. Lewis David de Schweinitz, of North Carolina. – Feb. 8, 1834, aet.
Rev. H. Steinhauer, of Bethlehem, Penn.
-

1818.
Jan. 16.

Von Frederich Adelung, of St. Petersburg.
Apr. 17. John Quincy Adams.
M. Noel de la Morinière.

-

-

1822, aet.

Josiah Meigs, Commissioner of the Land Office.

James G. Thomson, Prof. of Lang, Univ. of Penn.
Parker Cleaveland, Prof. of Chem. &c., Maine.

John C. Warren, M.D., of Cambridge, Mass.
James Jackson, M.D., of Cambridge, Mass.
Nicholas Fuss, Perpet. Sec. Imp. Acad, St. Peters.
burg.

-

Gotleb Fischer, Mem. Imp. Acad, St. Petersburg.
Daniel Drake, M.D., of Cincinnati.

Jacob Bigelow, M.D., of Cambridge, Mass.
1819.

Jan. 15.

John Murray, of Edinburgh.
Lewis Matthieu Langles.

— July 22, 1820, aet.
– Jan.

1824, aet. 61.

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.

19

1819.

Jan. 15.

Roberts Vaux, of Philadelphia.

L. H. Girardin, of St. Mary's College, Baltimore.

Died Jan. 7, 1836, aet.
-

H. M. Ducrotay de Blainville, of Paris.
John Eberle, M.D., of Philadelphia.
- Feb. 2, 1838, aet. 54.
Apr. 16. Guillaume Theophile Tilesius.
Count Lamjuinais.
- Jan. 13, 1821, aet.
Stephen Elliot, of South Carolina.
June 18. Jacob Perkins, of Philadelphia.
A. G. Desmarest, Prof. of Nat. History, &c., Paris. –
-

P. A. Latreille, of Paris.

Oct. 15. Alexander Brongniart, of Paris.
Redmond Conyngham, of Nescopeek, Penn.
Rev. Frederick Christian Schaeffer, of New York.
William P. Dewees, M.D., of Philadelphia.
William E. Horner, M.D., of Philadelphia.
J. A. Albers, M.D., of Bremen.

-

1833, aet.

-

-

1820.

Jan. 21. Baron Hormayer, of Vienna.
Apr. 20. William Marsden, of England.
Franklin Bache, M.D., of Philadelphia.
William Gibson, M.D., of Philadelphia.

-

- Oct. 6, 1836, aet. 81.

Oct. 20. Rev. Samuel F. Jarvis, D.D., of New York.

Isaiah Lukens, of Philadelphia.
John Jacob Berzelius, of Stockholm.
J. A. Borgnis, Engineer, &c., Paris.
Mathieu Lesseps, French Consul at Philadelphia.
M. de Montgery, of the French Navy.
William Strickland, Architect, of Philadelphia.
John Pickering, of Salem, Mass.

-

1821.

Jan. 19. Langdon Cheves, of South Carolina.
Levett Harris, of Philadelphia.
John B. Gibson, Chief Justice of Pennsylvania.
Apr. 20. George Alexander Otis, of Boston.
Clement C. Biddle, of Philadelphia.
Elisha De Butts, M.D., of Baltimore.
James Workman, of New Orleans.
Peter Azelius, of Sweden.

-

-

Sir James Wiley, of St. Petersburg.
July 20. Gustavus, Count Wetterstedt, of Sweden.
Mathew Carey, of Philadelphia.
1822.

Jan. 18. Baron William von Humboldt, of Berlin.

- Apr. 8, 1835, aet. 74.

His Excell. Peter Poletica, Minister, &c.

His Excell. P. Pedersen, Minister, &c.
Samuel Parkes, Chemist, of London.
Solomon W. Conrad, of Philadelphia.
Richard Harlan, M.D., of Philadelphia.

– Dec. 23, 1823, tet. 66.
- Oct. 2, 1831, aet.

Zacharias Nordmark, Prof. of Mathematics, Upsal. Jo'ns Svanberg, Prof. of Mathematics, Upsal.

Oct. 18. José Bonifacio de Andrada e Silva, of Brazil.
Gottlob Ernst Schultze, of Hanover.
Condy Raguet, of Philadelphia.

-

William H. Keating, of Philadelphia.
1823

Lardner Vanuxem, of Philadelphia.

Jan. 17. Rev. John Plitt, of Philadelphia.

-

20

LIST OF THE MEMBERS OF THE

1823.
Jan. 17.

Baron Coquebert de Montbret.
Gaspard Deabbate, Consul General of Sardinia.
Samuel Jackson, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Apr. 18. Benjamin H. Coates, M.D., of Philadelphia.
James Fenimore Cooper, of New York.
Jason O'B. Lawrance, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Lucien, Prince of Canino, of Rome.

Died

- Aug. 19, 1823, aet. 32.

-

Joseph, Count de Survilliers, of Philadelphia.
Paul de Lövenorn, Rear Admiral, &c., Denmark.
H. C. Schumacher, of Copenhagen.

-

1826, aet.

William Darlington, M.D., of West Chester, Penn.
Rev. Dr. William Bengo Collyer, LL.D., of London.
July 18. William Lawrence, F.R.S., of London.
Oct. 17.

Stephen H. Long, Major of U.S. Topog. Engineers.
William James

£ M.D., of New York.

Major Nathaniel A. Ware, of Philadelphia.
Chev. John M. Du Ponceau, of France.
– July 9, 1835, aet.

1824.
Jan. 16.

Rev. Moses Stuart, of Andover, Mass.
Henry Scybert, of Philadelphia.
Julius Klaproth, of Paris.
Joseph B. McKean, of Philadelphia.
Alexander Pearson, M.D., of Canton, China.
Apr. 16. A. I. von Krusenstern, of the Russian Navy, St.
Petersburg.

Charles Bonaparte, Prince of Musignano, of Phila
delphia.
July 16. Conrad I. Temminck, of Paris.

Severin Lorich, Chargé d'Affaires, &c. of Sweden
and Norway.
1825.

- Mar. 11, 1837, aet.

Jan. 21. Count Nicholas De Romanzoff, of Russia.
Count John Laval, of Russia. .

John J. Bigsby, M.D., of England.
Apr. 15. M. Flourens, M.D., of Paris.
Count Real, of France.

Thomas Cadwalader, of Philadelphia.
John K. Kane, of Philadelphia.
John D. Godman, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Charles N. Bancker, of Philadelphia.

-

1834, aet.

- Apr. 17, 1830, aet. 31.

Edward Livingston, of Louisiana.

July 15. Don José da Silva Lisboa, of Rio Janeiro.
Joseph R. Ingersoll, of Philadelphia.
Count Miot de Melito, of France.
Philip Tidyman, M.D., of Charleston, S.C.
1826.

Jan. 20. Samuel Humphreys, of Philadelphia.

Don Pablo de la Llave, Min. of Justice, Mexico.
Dr. John Lewis Tiarks, of Iever, East Friesland,

Apr. 21. Charles D. Meigs, M.D., of Philadelphia.
William McIlvaine, of Philadelphia.
Jacopo Gråberg di Hemso, of Sweden.
Oct. 20. Henry De Struvé, Counsellor of State, Russia.
Lewis Cass, of Ohio.

– May 1, 1837, aet.

William Shaler, Consul General at Algiers.
1827.

Jan. 19.

Honoré Torombert, of Lyons.
Joel R. Poinsett, of South Carolina.

-

1829, aet.

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.

21

1827
Jan.

iš. René La Roche, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Apr. 20. John Price Wetherill, of Philadelphia.
George Emlen, of Philadelphia.
Charles Tait, of Alabama.

Died Oct. 7, 1835, aet, 67.

Marcus Bull, of Philadelphia.
John Wilhelm Dalman, M.D., of Stockholm.

July 20.

-

Dr. Geo. Maria Zecchinelli, of Padua.
J. P. C. Cassado de Giraldes, of Lisbon.

James Rush, M.D., of Philadelphia,
John K. Mitchell, M.D., of Philadelphia.

Resigned Aug. 17, 1827.
-

James Brown, of Louisiana.
Oct. 19. Noah Webster, LL.D., of New Haven, Conn.

Jim is

Died Apr. 7, 1835, aet. 68.

Don José Maria Bustamente, of Mexico.
Don José Maria Salazar, of Colombia.

-

-

Thomas Harris, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Robert E. Griffith, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Charles Pickering, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Samuel George Morton, M.D., of Philadelphia.

Resigned Sep.15, 1837.

Apr. 18. Admiral José Maria Dantes Pereira, of Lisbon.
Henry J. Anderson, M.D., Professor of Mathe
matics, New York.

Isaac Lea, of Philadelphia.
July 18. Samuel Betton, M.D., of Germantown, Penn.
George Ticknor, of Boston.
Oct. 17. James Renwick, of Columbia College, New York.
1829.

Jan. 16. Thomas Biddle, of Philadelphia.

Rev. William H. De Lancey, D.D., of Philadelphia.
Hans Christian Oersted, of Copenhagen.
Baron Hyde de Neuville, of France.
Carls Christian Rafn, of Copenhagen.
Henry Wheaton, of New York.
Apr. 17. Alexander Dallas Bache, of Philadelphia.

Philip Houlbrooke Nicklin, of Philadelphia.
James Kent, LL.D., of New York.
Josiah Quincy, of Boston.

Washington Irving, of New York.
Joseph Roberts, of Philadelphia.

Died Aug. 25, 1835, aet. 42.

July 17. R. K. Rask, of Copenhagen.

Joseph N. B. V. Abrahamson, of Copenhagen.
George B. Wood, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Oct. 16. Chev. Charles Pougens, of Paris.

- Dec. 19, 1833, aet. 77.

Don Francisco de Paula Quadrado, of Madrid.
M. Jomard, of Paris.

Henry S. Tanner, of Philadelphia.
Daniel B. Smith, of Philadelphia.
Dr. Thomas Horsfield, of Pennsylvania.
1830.

Jan. 15.

Bishop Münter, of Copenhagen.

-

J. P. Abel Remusat, of Paris.

-

William Yarrel, of London.
John Marshall, Chicf Justice of the U.S.

- July 6, 1835, tet. 79:

Jules de Wallenstein, of Russia.
Thomes McEuen, of Philadelphia.
Apr. 16. Duke Bernard, of Saxe Weimar.

William B. Hodgson, of Virginia.
Isaac Hays, M.D., of Philadelphia.

LIST OF THE MEMBERS OF THE
1830.

Apr. 16. Hon. Jonathan Sewell, Ch. Justice of Lower Canada.
William Waughan, of London.
July 16. Thomas I. Wharton, of Philadelphia.
Oct. 15. Lorenzo Martini, of Turin.

Andres del Rio, Prof. of Mineralogy, Mexico,
Marc Antoine Jullien, of Paris.
1831.
Jan. 21.

Prosper, Count Balbo, of Turin.

Hyacinth Carena, of Turin.
Louis Phillippe, King of the French.
Thomas P. Jones, M.D., of Washington.
Apr. 15. Henry Vethake, of Philadelphia.
Samuel L. Southard, of New Jersey.
Edward Everett, of Massachusetts.
Louis McLane, of Delaware.

William C. Rives, of Virginia.
Alexander Everett, of Massachusetts.

July 15. Martin Fernandez Navarrete, of Madrid.
Francisco Antonio Gonzales, of Madrid.
John James Audubon, of Louisiana.
Oct. 21.

Died Oct. 22, 1833, at 60.

Hartman Bache, Major of U.S. Topog, Engineers.
Baron Larrey, of Paris.

1832.
Jan. 20.

Julius T. Ducatel, M.D., of Baltimore.
Henry D. Gilpin, of Philadelphia.
John P. Hopkinson, M.D., of Philadelphia.
- Mar. 6, 1836, aet.35
John Bell, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Robley Dunglison, M.D., of Philadelphia.
M. Steen Billé, Chargé d'Affaires of Denmark.
Thomas Sergeant, of Philadelphia.
Apr. 20. Theodore Lorin, of Paris.
Hugh L. Hodge, M.D., of Philadelphia.
J. J. Abert, Col. of U. S. Topog. Engineers.
Don José Martinez, of Spain.
Duke of Sussex, Pres, of the Roy. Society of London.
July 20, E. S. Bring, Prof. in the Univ. of Lund, Sweden.
1833.

Jan. 18.

Prof. Bujalsky, of St. Petersburg.
Marmaduke Burrough, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Matthias W. Baldwin, of Philadelphia.
Edwin James, M.D., of Albany.
Moncure Robinson, of Virginia.

Apr. 19. M. J. Labouderie, of Paris.
Charles Nagy, of Pestk, Hungary.
Jacob Randolph, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Joshua Francis Fisher, of Philadelphia.

Gouverneur Emerson, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Henry C. Carey, of Philadelphia.
July 19. Henry R. Schoolcraft, of Ohio.
Viscount Santarem, of Portugal.
Titian R. Peale, of Philadelphia.
Oct. 18. Franklin Peale, of Philadelphia.
Samuel W. Merrick, of Philadelphia.
Henry J. Williams, of Philadelphia.
1835.
Jan. 2.

Henry D. Rogers, of Philadelphia.
James P. Espy, of Philadelphia.

Edward H. Courtenay, of the Univ. of Pennsylvania.

- * *
*

----- *--

--

-

-

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY.
1835.
Jan. 2.

23

Charles W. Short, M.D., of Lexington, Ky.
John Brockenbrough, of Richmond, Va.
John Wickham, of Richmond, Va.

John Torrey, M.D., of New York.

Joseph Henry, Professor of Natural Philosophy,
Princeton, N. J.

D. Francis Condie, M.D., of Philadelphia.
William Drayton, late of South Carolina.
July 17. William B. Rogers, of the Univ. of Virginia,

Thomas Sully, of Philadelphia.
Charles A. Agardh, of Lund, Sweden.
1836.
Jan. 15.

C. C. Von Leonhard, of Heidelberg.
C. G. C. Reinwardt, of Leyden.
Don Manuel Naxera, of Mexico.
Chev. Morelli, Consul General of Naples.
Job R. Tyson, of Philadelphia.
Nathan Dunn, of Philadelphia.
John Griscom, Prof. of Chemistry, &c.

Apr. 15. J. S. Da Costa Macedo, of Lisbon.
Nicholas Carlisle, LL.D., of London.
Oct. 21.

Granville Penn, Esq., of Stoke Park, Eng.
Joseph G. Totten, Col. of U. S. Engineers.
M. Roux de Rochelle, of Paris.
Dr. Mariano Galvez, Governor of Guatemala.

Edward Turner, M.D., F.R.S., of London.

Died Feb. 12, 1837, aet. 40.

1837.

Apr. 21. George Campbell, of Philadelphia.

John Green Crosse, Esq., Surgeon, of Norwich, Eng.
Jared Sparks, of Boston.
Charles R. Leslie, of London.

James Cowles Prichard, M.D.F.R.S.,of Bristol, Eng.
Thomas L. Winthrop, LL.D., of Boston.

George Tucker, of the Univ. of Virginia.
July 21. Rev. William Jenks, D.D., of Boston.
Oct. 20.

Sears C. Walker, of Philadelphia.
Joseph Saxton, of Philadelphia.

William Morris Meredith, of Philadelphia.
Thomas Dunlap, of Philadelphia.
Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts.
1838.

Jan. 19.

Andrew Talcott, late Capt. of U.S. Engineers.
Thomas W. Griffith, of Baltimore.

-

Charles G. B. Daubeny, M.D., of the University of
Oxford.

Henry Reed, of Philadelphia.

William Norris, of Philadelphia County.
William Sullivan, of Boston.

Apr. 20. William Harris, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Robert Treat Paine, of Boston.

John P. Emmet, M.D., of the Univ. of Virginia.
Hugh S. Legaré, of Charleston, S.C.
Samuel Breck, of Philadelphia.

Sylvanus Thayer, Lt.Col. of U. S. Engineers.
Francis Wayland, D.D., of Brown University.
Henry Baldwin, of Pennsylvania.
William H. Prescott, of Boston,

Philadelphia, July 21, 1838.

- -

- -

-

- --

-

-

LIST OF

THE MEMBERs
*

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY,
HELD AT PHILADELPHIA,

FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE,
Formed on the 2d of January, 1769, by a Union of the “American
Philosophical Society,” and the “American Society held
at Philadelphia for Promoting Useful Knowledge.”

ORIGINAL MEMBERS,
OR MEMBERS AT THE TIME OF UNION.

I. Members common to the two Component Societies.
1. Benjamin Franklin. Original member of the A. P. S. 1743. Elected
member of the A. S. Feb. 19, 1768. Died April 17, 1790, aet. 84.
2. John Bartram, F.R.S and Botanist to his Majesty, orig. mem. A. P. S.
1743. Mem. A. S. Feb. 19, 1768. Died Sept. 1777, aet. 76.

3. Dr. Cadwaalder Evans. A. P. S. Nov. 1767. A. S. Jan. 19, 1768.
Died 1773, aet. 57.
4. John Lukens, Surveyor-General of Pennsylvania.
1768.
5.

A. S. Oct. 3, 1766.

A. P. S. Jan. 12,

Died

Joseph Galloway, Speaker of the Assembly of Pennsylvania.
Jan. 19, 1768. A. S. Dec. 2, 1768. Died 1803, aet. 74.

A. P. S.

6. Dr. Thomas Cadwalader. A. P. S. Jan. 19, 1768. A. S. Oct. 14,
1768. Died Nov. 14, 1779, aet. 72.
7. Dr. John Redman. A. P. S. Jan. 19, 1768. A. S. Oct. 14, 1768.
March 19, 1808, aet. 86.
8. John Dickinson. A. P. S. Jan. 19, 1768. A. S. Jan. 19, 1768.

Died

-

Died

Feb. 14, 1808, aet. 75.

9. Dr. Charles Moore.

A. P. S. Jan. 26, 1768.

A. S. April 8, 1768.

Died

10. Francis Hopkinson. A. P. S. Jan. 26, 1768. A. S. April 8, 1768.
Died May 9, 1791, aet. 53.
11. Dr. Alexander Garden, of Charleston, S. C. A. P. S. Jan. 26, 1768.
A. S. April 15, 1768. Died April 15, 1792, aet. 64.
1

2
12. John Kidd, of Bucks Co. Pennsylvania. A. P. S. March 8, 1768. A.
S. April 1, 1768. Died
13. William Franklin, Governor of New Jersey. A. P. S. March 8, 1768.
Orig. mem. A. S. 1758. Died Nov. 17, 1813, aet. 82.
14. Stephen Watts. A. P. S. March 8, 1768. A. S. April 8, 1768. Died
15. Rev. Jacob Duche. A. P. S. March 8, 1768. A. S. April 8, 1768.
-

Died Jan. 1798, at 60.
16. John Foxcroft. A. P. S. March 8, 1768. A. S. April 8, 1768.
-

Died

17. John Sellers, Surveyor, of Derby, Chester Co. Pa. A. P. S. March 8,
1768. A. S. April 1, 1768. Died
18. Dr. Thomas Graeme. A. P. S. March 8, 1768. A. S. Oct. 14, 1768.
Died 1794.

19. Capt. Oswell Eve.

A. P. S. March 22, 1768.

Died.

A. S. Feb. 26, 1768.
f

20. James Wright, of Lancaster Co. Pennsylvania. A. P. S. May 18, 1768.
A. S. April 8, 1768.

Died

21. Hon. Charles Reade, Esq., of Burlington, N. J. A. P. S. May 18,
1768.

A. S. June 3, 1768.

Died

22. John Smith, of Burlington, N.J. A. P. S. May 18, 1768. A. S. June 3,
1768.

Died March 26, 1771, aet. 49.

23. Hon. Edward Antill, Esq. of New Jersey.
A. S. April 8, 1768. Died.

A. P. S. Aug. 16, 1768.

24. Dr. Benjamin Gale, of Killingsworth, Conn. A. P. S. Aug. 16, 1768.
A. S. Aug. 13, 1768.

Died 1790, aet. 75.

25. Dr. Ashton Warner, of Antigua. A. P. S. Aug. 16, 1768. A. S. April
15, 1768. Died
26. William Cullen, M.D., of Edinburgh.
April 15, 1768. Died

A. P. S. Oct. 18, 1768.

A. S.

II. Members belonging exclusively to the American Philosophical
Society.
27. William Coleman. Original member. Died
28. Dr. Thomas Bond. Original member. Died March 26, 1784, aet. 72.
29. Dr. Phineas Bond. Original member. Died June, 1773, aet. 56.
30. Samuel Rhoads. Original member. Died April? 29, 1784.
31. Hon. Cadwalader Colden, Lt. Governor of New York. Original mem
ber. Died Sept. 28, 1776, aet. 88.
32. Rev. Dr. Francis Alison, Vice-Provost of the College of Philadelphia.

Original member. Died Nov. 28, 1779 (1780?), at 72.
Elected November, 1767.
33. Dr. William Shippen. Died Nov. 4, 1801, at 89.
34. Dr. William Shippen, Jr., Prof. Anat. Coll. Phil. Died July 11, 1808.

Elected January 12, 1768.
35. Philip Syng, Sen. Died May 8, 1789, aet. 85.
36. Rev. Dr. William Smith, Provost C. Phila. Died May 14, 1803, aet. 76.

3
37 .
38.
39.

George Bryan, Esq. Died Jan. 28, 1791, aet. 60.
Rev. John Ewing. Died Aug. 28, 1802, aet. 70.
Edward Shippen, Jr. Esq. Died April 16, 1806, aet. 77.

Elected January 19, 1768.
0.
.
.
.
.
.
47.
.
.
.
.
.
.

-

David Rittenhouse. Died June 26, 1796, aet. 64.
Hugh Roberts. Died July 23, 1786, aet. 80.
Israel Pemberton. Died April 22, 1779, aet. 64.
James Tilghman, Esq. Died
William Logan, Esq. Died Oct. 28, 1776, aet. 58.
Joseph Shippen, Jr. Esq. Died Feb. 11, 1810, aet. 78.
Thomas Willing, Esq. Died Jan. 19, 1821, aet. 89.
Benjamin Chew, Esq. Died Jan. 10, 1810. aet. 87.
Dr. Adam Kuhn, Prof. Bot. and M. M. C. Phil. Died July 5, 1817, aet. 75.
James Pemberton. Died Feb. 9, 1809, aet. 86.
Thomas Pryor. Died
Dr. Hugh Williamson. Died May 22, 1819, aet. 85.
Hon. John Penn, Esq. Died February, 1795.
Hon. James Hamilton, Esq., Chief Justice of Pennsylvania. Died

. Hon. William Allen, Esq. Died September, 1780.

Elected January 26, 1768.
. Rev. Ebenezer Kinnersley, Prof. Eng., &c., Coll. Pennsylvania. Died
56.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
5.
.
'.
69.

John Reynell. Died Sept. 3, 1784.
Lynford Lardner, Esq. Died Oct. 6, 1774, aet. 59.
Joseph Richardson, Merchant. Died
Richard Penn, Esq. Died
John Ross, Esq. Died May? 6, 1776.
Andrew Allen, Esq. Died
Thomas Coombe, Esq. Died
James Allen, Esq. Died
Jonathan B. Smith. Died June 16, 1812, act. 71.
John Allen, Esq. Died
Alexander Stedman, Esq. Died
Daniel Dulaney, Esq., of Annapolis, Md. Died.
Dr. Arthur Lee, of Virginia. Died Dec. 14, 1792, act. 42.
Rev. Dr. Ezra Stiles, of Connecticut. Died

. John Winthrop, Esq., F. R. S.

-

Hollis. Prof. Math. Cambridge, N.Eng.

Died May 3, 1779, aet. 65.

Elected March 8, 1768.
. Edward Duffield. Died July 12, 1803, aet. 73.
. Samuel Mifflin, Esq. Died
3. David Hall, Printer. Died

. Rev. Thomas Barton, of Lancaster, Pa. Died May 25, 1780, aet. 50.
5. Robert Smith, Architect. Died
. Thomas Smith. Died May 23, 1795, aet. 84.

*

. Thomas Barnsley, of Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died

78. Thomas Bond, Jr.
79. William West.
80.
81

Died
Died

Robert Proud. Died July 5, 1813, aet. 86.
Joseph Fox, Esq. Died Dec. 9, 1779, aet. 70.

82. James Dickinson.
83.
84.

Died

John Rhea. Died .
Isaac Jones, Esq. Died

85. Robert Strettell Jones.
86. Samuel Caldwell.
87.
88.
89.

90.

Died

Died

Edward Shippen, Esq., of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Died
Thomas McKean, Esq., of New Castle, Del. Died June 24, 1817, aet. 83.
Rev. Rich. Peters, Rector of Christ Church and St. Peter's, Philadelphia.
Died 1775 (1776 ?).
John Kearsly, Sen.

Died Jan. 11, 1772, aet. 88.

91. Samuel Purviance, Jr.

Died

Elected May 18, 1768.
92.

Rev. Mr. Harding. Died
93. Thomas Potts, of Philadelphia Co. Died
94. Alexander Wilcocks, Esq. Died
95. Thomas Bradford. Died May 7, 1838, at 93.
96. James Biddle, Esq. Died
97. Hon. William Smith, Esq., of N. Y. Died Nov. 22, 1769, aet. 93.
98. William Livingston, Esq., of N. Y. Died July 25, 1790, aet. 67.
99. John Morin Scott, Esq., of N. Y.
Died Sept. 14, 1784.
100. Richard Stockton, Esq., of N. J. Died Feb. 28, 1781, aet. 50.
101. William Peartree Smith, Esq., of N. J.
Died Nov. 20, 1801, aet. 78.
102. Hon. Samuel Smith, Esq. of Burlington, N. J. Died 1776.
-

103.

Joseph Reed, Esq. Died March 5, 1785, at 44.

104.

Richard Hockley, Esq. Died
Rev. James Davidson, Prof. Lang. C. Phil. Died June 28, 1809, aet. 77.

105.

• Elected August 16, 1768.
106.
107.
108.
109.
110.
111.

William Rumsey, Esq., of Maryland. Died 1831?
Henry Holiday, Esq., of Maryland. Died
Rev. John Davis, of Philadelphia Co. Died.
Dr. James Anderson, of Maryland. Died
Dr. Ed. Holyoke, of Massachusetts Bay. Died March 21, 1829, aet. 101.
Dr. Sandiford, of Barbadoes. Died

Elected October 18, 1768.
112.
113.
114.

115.
116.
117.
118.

Dr. John Denormandie, of Bristol, Pennsylvania. Died
Joseph Kirkbride, Esq., of Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died
Dr. Peter Bergius, Prof. Nat. Hist. Stockholm. Died
Rev. Dr. Ch. Magnus Wrangel, of Sweden. Died
Christian Magee, LL.D. of Heidelberg. Died
Monsieur Buffon, of Paris, Died April 16, 1788, aet. 81.
Rev. Ferdinand Farmer, of Philadelphia. Died

5

Elected December 20, 1768.
119 .
120.
121.
122.
123.
124.
125.
126.
127.
128.

Gen. Gage, Commander in Chief of H. M. F. in N. A. Died
Sir William Johnson, Bart. Died July 11, 1774, aet. 60.
William Logan, Jr., of Bristol, Pennsylvania. Died
Gilbert Hicks, Esq., of Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died
Matthias Aspden. Died
Dr. Samuel Duffield. Died Nov. 27, 1814, aet. 82.
Rev. Chauncey Whittlesey, of New Haven. Died
Rev. Nathaniel Hooker, of Hartford. Died
Rev. Samuel West, of Dartmouth. Died April 10, 1808, aet. 69.
Col. Francis Lee, of Virginia. Died

III.

Members belonging exclusively to the American Society held at
Philadelphia for Promoting Useful Knowledge.

129.

Charles Thomson. Died August 16, 1824, aet. 95.

Elected September 22, 1758.
*

Existing Members.
Isaac Paschall. Died 1775, aet. 47.
131. Edmund Physick, Esq.
Died 1804–
132 . Joshua Howell, Esq. Died
133. William Hopkins. Died

130.

Time of Election unknown.
134.

Moses Bartram.

Died 1810 (1811 ?) act. 78 (79?).

Died 1795, aet. 55?

135. Jos. Paschall.

137.

Owen Biddle. Died March 10, 1799, aet. 61.
Paul Fooks, Prof. French and Spanish, College Penn.

138.

Hon. John Vining, Esq., of Dover, on the Delaware.

139.

Dr. Ch. Ridgley, of Dover, on the Del.

136.

141.

Died

James Pearson.

Died August 20, 1813, aet. 78.

Elected March 7, 1760.
142. Samuel Powel.

Died 1793.

Elected Spember 19, 1766.
143. William Bettle.

Died

145.

Samuel Eldridge. Died
Benjamin Davis. Died

146.

Nicholas Waln. Died Sept. 29, 1813, aet. 72. ".

147 .

Clement Biddle.

144.

-

Died August 25, 1785, aet. 48.

Elected February 9, 1759.
140. Isaac Bartram.

Died 1781.

Died

Elected October 3, 1766.
Died August 11, 1814, aet. 74.

6

Elected December 5, 1766.
148.

John Morgan, M.D. F.R.S. Professor of the Theory and Practice of
Physic in the Coll. Penn. Died Oct. 15, 1789, aet. 53.

Elected March 27, 1767.
William Henry, of Lancaster Co., Penn. Died Dec. 15, 1786, at 58.
. William Johnson, of Charleston, S. C. Died
. Charles Mason, Surveyor, London.

Died

. Dr. Sam. Bard, Prof. Prac. Phys. K. C. N. Y. Died May 24, 1821, at 80.

Elected January 19, 1768.
. David Evans. Resigned April 6, 1770.
. Thomas Mifflin. Died Jan. 21, 1800, aet. 56.

Elected February 12, 1768.
. George Roberts. Died Sept. 17, 1801, aet. 64.
. John Morris, Jr., Esq. Died

Elected February 19, 1768.
157 .
158.

William Bartram, son of John Bartram. Died July 22, 1823, at. 84.
Dr. John Chapman, of Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died

Elected February 26, 1768.
159.
160.
161.
162.

Isaac Jamineau, Esq., British Consul at Naples. Died
Rev. Dr. Jonathan Odell, of Burlington, N. J. Died
Richard Wells, of Burlington, N. J. Died

163.

Dr. Hugh Mercer, of Virginia. Died Jan. 3, 1777, aet. 56.
Benjamin Rush, of Philadelphia. Died April 19, 1813, at 67.

164.

Samuel Elliot, of Boston.

Died

Elected March 4, 1768.
165. James Alexander.

Died

Elected April 1, 1768.
166. Samuel Robinson.
167.
168.
169.

Died

Stephen Hopkins, Esq., Gov. Rhode Island. Died July 13, 1785, aet. 77.
Joseph Harrison, of Boston. Died
Peter Harrison, of Rhode Island. Died

170.

Dr. Charles Bensell, of Germantown. Died

171.

Pierre Eugene du Simitiere, of Geneva. Died
Hon. Andrew Oliver, Lieut. Gov. Massachusetts Bay. Died
Hon. Jonathan Belcher, Esq., Chief Justice of Nova Scotia. Died
Jeremiah Dixon, Surveyor, London. Died

172.
173.
174.

Elected April 8, 1768.
. Abel James.

Died Oct. 1790. aet. 64.

. Michael Hillegas.

Died 1804.

7
177.

George Morgan.

178. Thomas Fisher.
179.
180.
181.
182.
183.
184.
185.
186.

Died March 10, 1810, aet. 69.
Died

|

Lewis Nicola, of Northampton, Pennsylvania. Died
William White. Died July 17, 1836, aet. 88.
Peter Miller, of Ephrata, Pennsylvania. Died
Humphrey Marshall, of Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Died
Benjamin Jacobs, of Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Died
James Webb, of Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Died
Chr. Fred. Post, of the Mosquito Shore. Died
John Okely, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Died

Elected April 15, 1768.
187.

190.

Sir George Saville, Bart, York, Eng. Died Jan. 9, 1784, aet. 58.
Professor Famitz, of Naples. Died
Thomas Warner, Solicitor-General of Antigua. Died
Sir Alex. Dick, M.D., Bart., of Edinburgh. Died

191.

John Martin Butt, M.D., of Kingston, Jam. Died

188.
189.

.
.
.
.
6.
.

Sidney George, Esq., of Maryland. Died
Rev. Samuel Stillman, of Boston. Died March 13, 1807, aet. 70.
Samuel Warner, Councillor of Antigua. Died
Paul Bedford, Esq., of Barbadoes. Died
John Francis Oberlin, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Died
Lionel Chalmers, M.D., of Charleston, S. C. Died
-

Elected April 22, 1768.

-

198.
199.

Ralph Izard, Esq., of Charleston, S. C. Died
Rev. Mr. Elliot, of Boston. Died
David Jameson, M.D., of Yorktown, Pennsylvania.
-

200.

Died

Elected April 29, 1768.
201.
202.

Stephen Paschall. Died 1802, aet. 88.
John Gill, M.D., of Kinsale, Ireland. Died

''U3.

Dr. John Paschall, of Derby, Pennsylvania.

204.

Benjamin West, of London. Died March 10, 1820, aet. 82.

205.

Samuel Miles, of Philadelphia. Died

206.

Dr. John Tweedy, of Newport, R. I. Died

207.
208.

Rowland Evans, of Philada. Co., Penn. Died Aug. 18, 1789, aet. 72.
William Pool, of Wilmington, Newcastle Co. Died

209.

Joseph Bringhurst.

Elected June 3, 1768.
Died 1779, aet. 73.

Elected June 10, 1768.

Elected July 1, 1768.

Elected September 23, 1768.
Died

8

Elected October 14, 1768.
. Dr. John Kearsly, Jr., Died
Died

. Dr. Gerardus Clarkson.

. Dr. James A. Bayard. Died
. Dr. Robert Harris. Died
. Dr. Peter Sonmans. Died

. Dr. George Glentworth.

Died

Died

. Dr. Jonathan Potts.

. James Span, M.D., Prof. Mat. Med. Univer. Dublin. , Died
. James Dick, M.D., of Charleston, S. C. Died
. Richard Thick, M.D. F.R.S., of London. Died
. Williams Smibert. of Boston.

.
.
.
.

Died

John Arbo, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Died
William Scull, of Reading, Pennsylvania. Died
Joseph Hutchins, of Barbadoes. Died April 29, 1833, aet. 86.
John Himili, of Charleston, S. C. Died

John Deas, of Charleston, S. C.

Died

Elected October 21, 1768.
226.

Thomas Foxcroft.

Died June 18, 1769, aet. 72.

Elected October 28, 1768.
. John Benezet.

Died 1780.

Elected November 4, 1768.
. Dr. Isaac Smith, of Trenton. Died August 28, 1817, aet. 68.
. John Walker, of Virginia. Died

Elected November 11, 1768.
. Lambert Cadwalader, of Trenton.

Died

Elected November 18, 1768.
. John Cadwalader.

Died

. John Murgatroyd. Died
. James Wilson, Esq., of Reading, Penn. Died Aug. 28, 1798, aet. 55.
. William Hewson, Anatomist, London. Died May 1, 1774, aet. 35.
. Edward Biddle, Esq., Attorney at Law, in Reading. Died 1779?

Elected November 25, 1768.
236.
237.
238.

Jacob Duche, Esq. Died
Edward Penington. Died
Capt. Valentine Gardner, of Lord Howe's Regulars.

239. Dr. Mim, of Yorktown.

Died

Elected December 2, 1768.
240.
241.

Henry Drinker. Died
Matthew Clarkson. Died October 5, 1800, aet. 67.

Died

. Capt. Joseph Stiles. Died
. Thomas Livezey, Esq., of Philadelphia Co. Died Sept. 9, 1790, aet, 74.
. Samuel Wharton.

Died

Elected December 20, 1768.
. Benjamin Wynkoop.
. John Drinker.

Died

Died

. Thomas Gilpin.

Died March 3, 1778.

. Thomas Clifford.

Died

. Levi Hollingsworth.
. James Worral.

Died March, 1821, aet. 85.

Died

. Isaac Wharton.

Died

MEMBERS ELECTED SINCE THE UNION.

Elected April 21, 1769.
. Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon, President of the College of New Jersey.
Died November 15, 1794, aet. 72.
. Rev. Dr. Myles Cooper, Pres. of King's College, New York.
. Col. Landon Carter, of Virginia. Died
. Dr. Otto, of Bethlehem.
. Daniel Clark. Died

Died

Died
-

. Dr. John Lorimer, of West Florida.
. Dr. Brooke, of Maryland. Died.
. Dr. Ebenezer Prime, of New York.
. Dr. John Jones, of New York.

Died
Died

Died

1. Samuel Bowen, of South Carolina. Died
Samuel Shoemaker, Esq., of Philadelphia.

262.

*

Died

Elected between April 21, 1769, and Jan. 18, 1771.
263.

Sir Charles a Linne, M.D., K.P.S., &c., Upsal. Died

Jan No. 1778,

aet. 71.

Elected January 19, 1770.
264.
265.

Dr. John Fothergill, of London. Died 1780, aet. 69.
Lord Sterling, of New Jersey. Died

266.

Dr. John David Hahn, Prof. Chem. Uni. Utrecht. Died 1784, aet. 65.

267.

Edward Nairne, of London. Died
James Ferguson, F.R.S. London. Died 1776, act. 66.
John Morell, of Georgia. Died
Mr. Guald, Surveyor of West Florida. Died
Joel Bailey, of Chester Co., Pennsylvania • Died 1797.
Joseph Ellicot, of Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died
Joseph Gilpin, of Cecil Co., Maryland. Died March 30, 1790.

268.
269.
270.
271.
272.
273.

Elected January 18, 1771.
274.
275.
276.

Dr. Morton, of Jamaica. Died
Dr. James Lloyd, of Boston. Died March, 1810, aet. 82.
Richard Thomas, of Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Died
2

10

Died 1793.
william Parr, Esq. Died
. Samuel Rhoads, Jr. Died

. Henry Hill.

. Dr. Thomas Preston.

Died

Bembridge. Died
7, 17ss, tet. 32.
John Baynto" Esq. pied March 1
Dr. Samuel Preston Moor” Died
. Joseph Otolenge, W.sq., of Georgia. Died
9, 1830, ael. 79.
. Nevil Maskely" Ast. Roy. Greenwich. Died Feb.

. Henry

. Samuel Filsted,

of Jamaica.

Died

Dr. Archibald Gloucester, of Antigua.
. Frederick Marshall, of North Carolina.

Died
Died

Elected
April
17,Artillery.
1772. Tied
Lieut. Stephen Adye,
of the
Royal
289.

Jesse Lukens. " Philadelphia.

290.

Daniel Coxe, " Trentom. Died 1827 or 1828.
Mr.
Lane,
of Londom.
Died60th Regime" Died
Lieut.
Thomas
Hut"

291.

Died

293.

April * 1789.
Peter Dolland, ". Died July 2. 1820, at 99.

2.94.

Arch. McClean, "'

292.

Di ed

Died 1798, aet. 58.
Gerard Bancker, of New York.
296. Capt. John Montresor. of New York. WDied

295.

G. H. Laurens, "' £, plea De'' aet. 69.

297.

Rev. Samuel Williams, of Mass. Bay.

Died January, 1817, aet. 73.

298.
299. Dr. George

Millegan,

of south

Carolina.

Tied

300.

de Klingstedt,
St. Petersbu"
Timothy Baron Elected
Januaryof15,
1773.

Died

Died Aug. 25, 1783, at. 68.
301.

M. Le Roy, Vice-Direc. Acad. S. Paris.

302.
303.

Hon. Andrew Oliv" of Boston. Tied
Dr. Torbern Bergma* Pr. Math.Stockho" Died July 8. 1784, act. 49.

304.

£ small, of "'

305.

Died May 14, 1822, *. 77.
£
Tilton,
of of
Dover,
Delaware.
£. James
Nicholas
Way,
wilming".
Delaware. Died
£ William Ludla" of Leicester. Died

306.
307.

Died

ev. Thomas Coom” of philadelphia.

308.

Died

309.

3.10.
311.

Jam"Died
21, Dec.
1774.14, 1816, et.
£ Hon. EarlElected
of Stanhope.
:
same
X:
arew£a
Duncan,"
Mahon..."
Edinburg". Died

312.
Geor
313.

el Moore, Esq." of London. Died

£ Psq., of Pensacola.

314. Hon. B
315.

Died

Pensacola. Died
Ron £ Edwards, * Died 1806, *

316.
3.17.

Romans, Esq.” of

63.

relan Eme, Esq., of" pied 1776, et. "

63.

11
318. Dr. William

wright, of Jamaica. Died September, 1819, aet. 84.

319. Dr. Walter Jones, of Virginia.

Died

320. Dr. James McClurg, of Virginia. Died July, 1823, aet. 77.
321. Dr. Jonathan Elmer, of New Jersey.

Died

322. Dr. William Bryant, of New Jersey.

Died

323. John Jones, Esq., of Maryland.
324. Dr. John Perkins, of Boston.

Died
Died

325. Sharp Delany, of Philadelphia. Died May, 1799.
326. James Bringhurst, of Philadelphia. Died
327. Benjamin Morgan, of Philadelphia. Died
328. Dr. Thomas Parke, of Philadelphia. Resigned.

Elected January 28, 1775.
329. Dr. Adams, of Barbadoes.

Died

330. Marquis of Condorcet, of Paris.

Died

-

-

331. M. Daubenton, Jr., K. King's Cab. Paris. Died Dec. 31, 1799, aet. s.3.
332. M. J. Barbeu Dubourg, of Paris. Died December, 1779.
333. M. Le Roux, of Paris. Died February 9, 1795, aet. 71.
334. M. Macquer, of Paris. Died 1770? tet. 52.

335. Abbe Raynall, of Paris. Died March 6, 1796, at 83.
336. M. Lavoisier, of Paris.
337. Abbe Rozier, of Paris

Died May 8, 1794, aet. 51.
Died September 29, 1793, act. 59.

338. Capt. Holland, of London. Died
339. Rev. Dr. Thomas Gibbons, of London. Died 1785, aet. 65.
340. Fortunatus de Warris, Esq., M.D. Died
341. Dr. Benjamin Mosely, of Jamaica. Died June 15, 1819, aet. 80.
Elected

April 16, 1779.

342. Hon. M. Conrad A. Girard, Min. Plen. from France. Died
343. Dr. James Hutchinson. Died 1793, aet. 41.
344. Rev. George Duffield. Died February 2, 1790, aet. 58.

Elected between April 16, 1779, an? Jan. 19, 1781?
345.
346.
347.
348.

His Ex. Thomas Jefferson, Min. Plen. Died July 4, 1826, aet. 83.
Rev. Dr. J. C. Kunze, of New York. Died July 24, 1807, aet. 78.
Chev. de la Luzerne, of Paris. Died
M. Barbe de Marbois, Int, of St. Domingo. Died Jan. 14, 1837, aet. 91.

349. Timothy Matlack. Died
350. Rev. Dr. James Madison, President of the College of William and
Mary, Virginia. Died March 6, 1812, aet. 62.
351. Charles Pettit. Died Sept. 6, 1806, aet. 69.
352. M. Sue, Professor Royal of Anatomy, &c., at Paris. Died
353. John Ternaut. Died January, 1834.
354. His Ex. General Washington. Died December 14, 1799, aet. 68.

355. Hon. Anthony Wayne, Gen. U.S. A. Died December, 1796, aet. 51.

Elected January 19, 1781.
356. Marquis de la Fayette, Maj. Gen. U.S. A. Died May 20, 1834, aet. 76.

-

12

358.

Ebenezer Hazard, Esq., Post M. Gen. Died June 13, 1817, *. 73.
Hon. Thomas Bee, Esq., of South Carolina. Died

359.

Dr. Hugh shiell, of Philadelphia Pied

357.

360.
361.
362.

Isaac Gray, of Philadelphia. Died
Chev. de Chastellux, Field Marshal of France. Died 1788, aet. 82.
Jared Ingersoll, Esq. Died Oct. 31, 1822, aet. 71.

Elected January 18, 1788.
363.
364.
365.
366.

Samuel Huntingdon, Esq., of Connecticut. Died Jan. 5, 1796, aet. 63.
John Beale Boardley, Esq., of Maryland. Died Jan. 26, 1804, aet. 76.
Abbe Fontana. Died March 9, 1803, " ".
Chev. Daumours, of Baltimore, Cons of France for the S. Dept.

367. Dr. Coste.
Died
368. Robert Patterson,

Died

Prof. Math. Univ. Pa. Died July 22, 1824, aet. S1.

369.

Rev. Robert Davidson, Prof. Hist. Univ."

370.

Count de Campomanes, Fiscal of the Council of Castile. Died

371.

Rev. Dr. Samuel Magaw. Died December 1, 1812, *t, 77.

Died Dec. 13, 1813.

Elected January 16, 1784.
372.
373.
74.
375.

Samuel vaughan, Esq. Died December 4, 1* * S3.
John vaughan. Died December 30, 1841, * *
Rev. Jeremy Belknap, New Hampshire. Died June 20, 1798, at 54.
Maj. Ferd.
J. S.Prof.
de Brahm.
Gamble,
Eng. Orat.Died
University of Pennsylvania.

376. Arch.
377.

Died

Rev. J. H. C. Helmuth Prof Ger. Un Pa. Died Feb " "," "

378.
379.
380.

James Six, of Canterbury. Died
d'Augeville, of Paris. Died

£
''

de

Vergennes.

Died February 13, 1787, at. 70.

381.
382
383..

Dunlap. Died November 27, 1812, ""
P°ter J. van Berckel, Min. Plen from the Netherlands.

£ Fox.
384.
385.
386. Rev.
387.
Geor
388.
389. Tho
John
390.

Died
-

Died

Dr. #' Foulke.

Atl)ied

£ Blackwell.
Binney. DiedDied
July,February
1787, "*":1831, at 82.
Jena'
-

an Dickinson Sergeant, Esq.

Died

*

£.Gray,
Esq. Died
H. Heywood, Jr., Esq., South Carolina. Died March, 1809, aet. 62.
-

yacinth de Magellan, F.R.S. Died February, """
Elected January 22, 1785.

F. E!

391.
sam
Baron de Beelen Bertholff, Brussels. Died
392.
ust.
Baron Hermelin, Stockholm, Pied May 4, 1820, at 74.
393.
394. *d. Bur Sradford, Esq., Att. Gen. Penn. Died Aug. 23, 1795, aet. 39.
• Esq., Proth. Supreme Court Pennsylvania. Died July, 1833.
395. Dr A.
- Ad
1795, aet. 46.
396.

*

wini

B. :' Crawfora phy's Thom Hop," "

397

Rev. 'Sarson,
of Philadelphia, P:
*nasseh Cutler, of Ipswich. Died July 28, 1823, "t 89.

13
398.

Count de Guichen, Lt. Gen. French Naval Armies. Died 1790, aet. 78.

399.

Andrew Ellicott, Esq., of Maryland. Died 1820, aet. 67.
Samuel Powel Griffiths, M.D., of Phila. Died May 12, 1826, at 67.
Dr. Hugh James, of Montego Bay, Jamaica. Died
Joseph Mandrillon, Merchant, of Amsterdam. Died Jan. 7, 1799.
Br. Gen. Thad. Kosciozko. Died October 16, 1817, aet. 65.

400.
401.
402.
403.
104.

William Herschel, F.R.S., of Bath.

405.

Dr. James McHenry, of Baltimore, Maryland. Died
James Madison, Esq., of Virginia. Died June 28, 1836, aet. 85.
Rev. Henry Muhlenburg, of Lancaster. Died June 24, 1817, aet. 61.
Chr. Fred. Michaelis, M.D., of Gottenberg. Died
William Parker, of London. Died

306.
407.
408.

Died August 23, 1822, at 83.

-

409.

.

4 10.

Hon. Mann Page, of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

4 11.

Died

413.

Thomas Paine, Esq., Auth. of Common Sense. Died June 8, 1809, aet. 72.
Dr. Robert Perceval, Prof. Chem. Trinity College, Dublin. Died
Rev. Dr. Richard Price, F.R.S., London. Died March 19, 1791, aet. 68.

4.14.

Rev. Joseph Priestley, F.R.S., Birmingham. Died Feb 6, 1804, at 71.

415.

Dr. Samuel Smith, V. P. Coll., Princeton. Died Aug. 21, 1819, aet. 69.
Jean Baptiste Sue, Jr., Professor of Amatomy, Paris. Died

412.

416.
417.

Col. George wall, Jr., of Sup. Ex. Council of Pennsylvania. Died

418.

Benjamin workman, Teacher of Math. Univ. Pennsylvania. Died

419.

Hon. Robert Morris, Esq. Died May 8, 1806, et. 71 (72?)

420.

Jonathan Hoge, Esq., Mem. Sup. Ex. Council, Pennsylvania.
George Clymer. Died January 23, 1813, aet. 73.
William Temple Franklin, Esq. Died
Samuel Vaughan, Jr., of Jamaica. Died
Rev. John Andrews, D.D. Died March 30, 1813, at 67.

Elected July 21, 1786.

421.
422.
123.
424.

425. Charles W. Peale.

Died 1826.

426.

Robert Edge Pine.

427.

Dr. Benjamin Duffield. Died December 13, 1799, at 46.

428. Dr. John Morris.

Died
-

Died November 19, 1788.
Died

429.

William Rawle, Esq. Died April 12, 1836, aet. 76.
430. Duke de Rochefoucauld, of the Acad. Sciences, Paris. Died
431 . Marquis de Condorcet, Sec. of the Acad. Sciences, Paris. Died
432. M. Le Roy, Member of the Academy of Sciences, Paris. Died
133. Abbe Soulavie.
434.
435.
436.

Died March, 1813, aet. 62.

Dr. Ingenhousz, of Vienna. Died September 7, 1799, aet. 69.
. Gastellier, M.D., of Montargis. Died
Grivel. Died October 17, 1810, aet. 75.

$37.

. Charles, Lecturer in Experimental Phil, and early aeronaut. Phila.

438.

. Cabanis, M.D. Died 1807, et. 51.
. Le Veillard. Died

i

439.
440.

442.
443.

Thibert Garbier, M.D.

[delphia.

Died

Feutry, Mechanician. Died

Lorenz Crell, M.D., of Helmsted in Brunswick. Died
Count de Castilione, of Milan and Philadelphia. Died

Died
-

14
Dr. Noel, of Paris. Died
Chev. de Granchain, of Paris. Died
Richard Kirwan, F.R.S., of London. Died June 22, 1812.
146.
John whitehurst, F.R.S. of London. Died 1788, tet. 73.
447.
i. Benjamin Vaughan, E. sq., of London. Died Dec. 8, 1835, at S*.
U. Aberdeen. Died Aug.” 1803, aet. 68.
149. Dr. James Beattie, Pr. Mor Ph.
Died Aug. 30, 1804, at ".
450. Dr. Thomas Percival, of Manches".
Died June 18, 1816, *t, *.
451 Dr. Thomas Henry, of Manchester.
Rev. Charles H. wharton, D.P. of Newcastle. Died July, 1833.
452.
144.

445.

Elected January 19, 1787.
3. william Bingham, Esq., of Philadelp". " Died Feb. 7, 1804, tet.*.
Died April 30, 1844: ". 86.
4. Benjamin Chew, Jr., Esq., of phila.
Rec. Gen. Land Off. Died Feb.
Francis Johnston, Esq., of Philar

22,

455.
456

[1815, at 66.

458.

Joseph James, of Philadelphia. " Died November 25, 1806.
Robert
Millegan, Esq., of Philadelp"
William Barton, Esq., of Piyiladelphia. Died

459.

Dr. Thomas Ruston, of Philadelp"

457.

460.
46 l.
16:3.
463.
464.
165.

Died 1801.

Major
Isaac Craig, of Pittsburg. "
Simeon De Witt, Esq., of New York. Died Dec. 3, 1834, et. 78.
His Ex. James Bowdoin, Gov. Mass. Died Nov. 6, 1790, aet. 63.
Lewis w.otto, French Chargé d'A". Died Nov. 9, 1817, tet. 63.
Hon. John Jay, See. For Affairs, N.Y. Died May 17, 1829, aet. 83.

M. Cadet de vaux, of Paris. "

466. M.
467.

Cadet, of Paris.

Died

-

Hon. John Lowell, Judge of APP," Died May 6, 1802, tet. 98.

468.

Sir Edward Newenham, Barone" of Ireland. Died

471

: Crace the Duke of Richmond. Pie''"'. 1785, aet. 55.
r. John Coakley Letsom, of London. Died March 1, 1815, act. 72.
£ Barclay, Esq., of London. Died

472.

5. Vvilliam Thornton, of Lond"

469.
470.

473.

Died

- George Spence, of Jamaica. Died
Elected July 20, 1787.

474.
475.
476.

£: Banks, Pres R. Soc., London.

Died June 19, 1820, * 77.

Hunter, Surgeon, London. Died Oct. 16, 1793, tet. 64.
orge Vaux, Surgeon, London. Died
477.
Baker, Esq., of Bayfordbury, Eng. Died Jan. 28, 1824, *. 80.
478.
Dr.
R. B. Rogers, of Philadelphia. Died

IS.",
£
' wistar, of Philadelphia

479.
T.
Pie" Jan. 22, 1818, act. 56.
,480. Col. J. och Edwards, of Philadelphi" " Died
481.
Dr.
Bayard, of Philadelphia. Died
482.
ev.
White, of Manchester, England. Died
483.
484. Willis homas Barnes, of Manches". England. Died
485.
1793.

*'''

£

*ena' w, smith, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died Feb"
an williams, Jr., Esq. Died May 20, 1*" 64.

15

Elected January 16, 1789.

488.

David Redick, Esq., Member of the Sup. Ex. Coun. Penna. Died
Don Diego de Gardoqui, Envoy from Spain. Died.
Rev. Dr. Nicholas Collin, Rect Sw. Ch., Phila. Died Oct. 7, 1831.

489.

David Brearly, Esq., Chief Justice N. J. Died August, 1790, aet. 45.

490.

504.

M. Steinsky, Prof. Natural Philosophy at Prague. Died.
M. St. Jean Crevecoeur, Consul. of France at N. Y. Died.
John Cox, Esq., of Bloomsbury, N. J. Died.
Dr. Blagden, Sec. R. S., London. Died March 26, 1820, aet. 72.
Petrus Camper, of Friesland. Died April 7, 1789, aet. 67.
Baron de Haynitz, Prof. Acad. Arts, Berlin. Died
Benjamin Smith Barton, M.D. Died Dec. 19, 1815, aet. 49.
M. Arthaud, Pres. Soc. of the Philadelphes, Cape François. Died .
Mederic L. El. Moreau de St. Mery, Cape Francois. Died Jan. 28,
[1819, aet. 69.
Jos. Mig. de Flores, Pres. R. S. H., Madrid. Died
Charles Stuart, M.D., F.R.S., of Edinburgh. Died
William Patterson, Esq., late Att. Gen. N. J. Died
Walter Minto, LL.D., Prof. Math, at Princeton. Died Oct. 21, 1796,
C. C. Pinckney, Esq., of S. C. Died August 16, 1825, aet. 79.
Rev. Ashbel Green, D.D., late of Princeton Coll. Died May 19, 1848.

505.

William Findley, Esq., late Mem. G. Assem. Penn. Died April, 1821.

506.

J. P. Brissot de Warville. Died Oct., 1793, aet. 38.
Rev. Burgess Allison, of Bordentown, N. J. Died
Ben. Rittenhouse, Esq., of Montgomery Co., Penn. Died

486.
487.

-

491.
492.
193
494.
495.
49t.
497.
498.
499.

500.
501.
302.
503.

507.
508.

509. Thomas Pole, M.D.

Died Sept. 28, 1829.

Elected April 17, 1789.

516.

Princess Cath. Romanowna d'Aschkaw. Died Jan. 4, 1810, aet. 65.
John Stephens, Jr., Esq., of New Jersey. Died
Joshua Humphreys, Jr., of Philadelphia. Died Jan. 12, 1838, act. 86.
James Rumsey, late of Virginia. Died
George Monro, M.D., of Newcastle. Died
Winthrop Sargent, Esq., in the New Government, Westward. Died.
John Bleakley, Esq., of Philadelphia. Died

517.

George Buchanan, M.D., Baltimore. Died

3.18.

Samuel Beach, Esq., of Charleston, S. C. Died
Don Francis de Gardoqui, of Castile and Rome.

510.
511.
3.12.
3 13.
3.14.
3.15.

519.

-

Died

Elected July 17, 1789.
. Peter Le Gaux, of Spring Mill.

Died

Elected January 15, 1790.
.
.
.
.

George Turner, Esq., Judge of the Western Territory. Died
Caleb Whitfoord, Esq., Sec. British Commission for Peace. Died
Baron de Hupsch, of Cologne. Died Jan. 1, 1805, at 86.
Dr. John Walker, Prof. Natural History at Edinburgh. Died

Dr. And. Sparman, Prof. N.H., Stockholm. Died July 20, 1820, æt. 73.

16

Elected January 21, 1791.
. Alex. Hamilton, Esq., Sec. Treas. U. S.

Died July 12, 1804, aet. 47.

. Edmund Randolph, Esq., Att. Gen. U.S. Died Sept. 13, 1813.
. Alexander Addison, Esq., of Washington Co., Penn.

Died

. James Ross, Esq., of Washington Co., Penn. Died Nov 27, 1847.
. Dr. Absalom Baird, of Washington Co., Pennsylvania. Died
.
.
3.
.
.
.
:
.
.

John Smilie, Esq., of Fayette Co., Pennsylvania. Died
Albert Gallatin, Esq., of Fayette Co. Died August 13, 1849, aet. 90.
John Hoge, Esq., of Fayette Co. Died
Col. Alexander Anderson, of Philadelphia. Died
Capt. William Ferguson, of the Artillery in the W. Country. Died
Benjamin Gloxin, M.D., of Strasbourg. Died
S. L. Mitchell, M.D., of Long Island. Died Sept. 7, 1831, aet. 66.
Robert Goldsborough, Esq., of Talbot Co., Maryland. Died
James Anderson, M.D., of Madras, East Indies. Died

Elected April 15, 1791.
540.
541.
542.
543.
544.

C. P. Thunberg, Prof. Nat. Hist. Upsal. Died August 8, 1828.
N. L. Burmann, M.D., Prof. Bot., Amsterdam. Died 1793, aet. 59.
J. G. Grosche, M.D., Prof. Nat. Hist. Mittau, Courland. Died
Th. Pennant, Esq., of Downing, England. Died Dec. 16, 1798, aet. 72.
Henry Knox, Esq., Sec. War, U.S. Died October 29, 1806, aet. 55.

Elected July 15, 1791.

:::

|

. John Lusac, Professor of Greek, Leyden University. Died
. John Nicholson, Esq., Comp. Gen., Penn. Died Dec. 5, 1800, aet. 40.
. Andrew Ross, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died 1823.

. Benjamin Waterhouse, M.D., Prof. Med., Cambridge, Mass. Died
John Penington, M.D. Died September, 1793?
. John Beckley, Esq., Clerk H. R., Penn. Died April 8, 1807, aet. 50.

9.

. P. S. Du Ponceau, Esq., Coun. at Law, Phila. Died April 1, 1844, aet.84.

Elected October 21, 1791.
. Andrew Murray, M.D., Prof. Bot. Göttingen University. Died.
. P. S. Pallas, M.D., Prof. N. H., St. Petersburg. Died 1812, aet. 71.

. Dugald Stewart, Prof. Mor. Phil., Edin. Died June 11, 1828, set. 78.
. Alex. J. Dallas, Esq.. Sec. Comm. Penn.

Died Jan. 16, 1817, aet. 57.

Elected January 20, 1792.
Count Paul Andreani, of Milan.

Died

. Rodolph Vall-Travers, Esq., F.R.S., of Hamburgh. Died
. Anthony Fothergill, M.D., of Bath, England.

Died

. Ant. R. C. Mathurin de la Forest, Vice-Con. Gen. to U. S.

50. Joseph Ceracchi, of Rome. Died
561. Palisot de Beauvois, of Cape François,

Died

Died February, 1820.

2. John Rouelle, M.D., of Virginia. Died
. Richard P. Barton, of Mount Airy, Virginia.

Died

17
564. Dr. David Jackson, of Philadelphia. Died
565. Dr. William Smith, of Philadelphia. Died

566. Nicholas B. Waters, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died

Elected July 20, 1792.
667. Erasmus Darwin, M.D., F.R.S., Derby, Eng. Tied April 18, 1802, aet. 71.
568. Dr. William Currie, of Philadelphia. Died 1829, aet. 74.
569. Uno Von Troil, Archbishop of Sweden. Died.

570. John Trumbull, of Conn, Painter. Died November 10, 1843, aet. 88.

Elected January 18, 1793.
571.
572.
573.
574.
575.
576.

M. Coupigny, of Cape François. Died
Louis Valentin, M.D., of Cape François. Died
John Adams, LL.D., Vice-President U. S. Died July 4, 1826, aet. 90.
Dr. David Nassy, of Philadelphia. Died
Dr. George Logan, of Philada. County. Died April 9, 1821, aet. 66.
John W. Kittera, of Lancaster, Pa. Died June 8, 1801, aet. 48.
-

Elected April 19, 1793.

577, william waring, of Philadelphia. Died.
578. Thomas Lee Shippen, of Philadelphia. Died February, 1798.
579. John Reinhold Forster, J. U. D. Died December 9, 1798, aet. 69.

Elected April 18, 1794.
580.
1.
582.
583.
584.
585.
86.

.

Thos. Maun Randolph, of Monticello, Va. Died
James Anderson, LL.D., of Cotfield, Scotland. Died
Earl of Buchan, P. S. S. A., of Scotland. Died April 19, 1829, aet. 87.
Dr. James Greenway, of Dinwiddie Co., Va. Died
Edward Stevens, M.D., F.R.S., Edin., St. Croix. Died Sept. 30, 1834.
John Nancarrow, of Philadelphia. Died
Eberh. A. W. Zimmerman, Prof. at Caroline C. Brunswick. Died
*

©

Elected January 16, 1795.

587. Earl of Dundonald, of Culross, Scotland. Died
588. Samuel Wheeler, of Philadelphia. Died

-

589. Tim. Pickering, Secretary of War, U. S. Died Jan. 29, 1829, aet. 84.
590. Robert Leslie, Watchmaker, of Phila., now London. Died Dec. 25, 1804,
591. Gustaf Von Carleson, of Sweden. Died
[aet. 39.
592. Rev. Valen. Melsheimier, of Hanover, Pa. Died

Elected January 15, 1796.
593. Dr. C. F. A. Grassi, late of Bordeaux, now of Philadelphia.

Died

594. Dr. Deveze, Phys. of the late Hospital on Bush Hill. Died
595. Dr. Nathaniel B. Bedford, of Pittsburg.

Died

596. Isaac Briggs, of Montgomery Co., Maryland. Died
597. F. A. F. de la Rochefoucauld Liancourt.

Died March 28, 1827.

598. Dr. Hugh Hodge, of Philadelphia. Died July, 1798, aet. 43.
3

18
599. Jacques Marie le Fessier de Grandpre. Died
600.
601.
602.
603.
604.
605.
606.

J. F. Mifflin, Esq., of Philadelphia. Died April 13, 1813, aet. 53.
Tench Coxe, Esq., of Philadelphia. Died July 10, 1824, aet. 68.
Rich. Peters Smith, of Philadelphia. Died 1798.
Mr. F. H. Le Comte, of Paris. Died
Jas. Ed. Smith, M.D., F.R.S., Pres, of the Linnaean Soc. Died
P. A. Adet, Plen, from French Republic to U. S. Died March, 1834.
Wm. Dandridge Peck, Esq., of Kittery, N. H. Died Oct. 3, 1822, aet. 59.

607. Jas. Woodhouse, M.D., Prof. Chem. U, Pa. Died June 4, 1809, aet. 38.

Elected April 15, 1796. .
608.
609.
610.
611.

.

Chev. Cyp. Rib. Freire, Minister of Portugal to U.S. Died 1824.
Alex. Lerebours, late of Paris, now of Philadelphia. Died
A. J. Larocque. Died since 1836.
M. Talleyrand Perigord. Died May 17, 1838, aet. 83.

612. Rev. James Abercrombie, of Philada. Died June 26, 1841, aet. 83.

Elected July 15, 1796.
613.
614.
615.
616.
617.

Dr. Isaac Cathrall. Died February 22, 1819, aet. 56.
L. Et. Duhail, M.D., Consul for Maryland. Died
Don Jos. de Jandennes, Int. Gen. of Majorca. Died
Joanne Paptista Cunat, D. C. L., Prof. at Valencia. Died
Don Luis de Urbina, Capt. Gen. of Valencia, &c. Died

Elected October 21, 1796.
618. Dr. Charles Caldwell.

Died July 9, 1853, aet. 90.

Elected January 20, 1797.
619.
620.
621.
622.

Thomas C. James, of Philadelphia. Died July 5, 1835, aet. 69.
Adam Seybert, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died May 2, 1825, aet. 52.
John Newman, M.D., of Salisbury, N. C. Died
And. Eve. Van Braam Houckgeest, now of Bristol, Pa. Died

623. Theo. C. Mozard, Consul of the French Republic at Boston. Dfed
624. Samuel H. Smith, Printer, Philadelphia. Died Nov. 1, 1845, aet. 74.

625. M. Volney, Member of the French Institute. Died April 24,

1820.

Elected April 21, 1797.
26. John Heckewelder, of Bethlehem, Pa. Died Jan. 31, 1823, aet. 80.
627. John Stewart, of Green Briar Co., Virginia. Died August 23, 1823.
628. Rev. Samuel Blair, D.D., of Philada. Died Sept. 24, 1818, aet. 77.
629. Thos. Pinckney, of S. C., late Min. to London. Died Nov. 2, 1828, aet. 77.

Elected July 21, 1797.
630. John Guillemard, A.M., St. John's Coll., Oxford, England. Died 1845.
631. William Bache, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died.
632. Alexander Martin, of N. C., Senator of the U. S. Died
633. William Hamilton, of the Woodlands, near Philadelphia.

Died

19

Elected January 19, 1798.
. Gen. James Wilkinson, Brig. Gen. Com. in Chief, U. S. A.
. Major Francisco de Zach. Died

Died

Elected April 20, 1798.
636.

638.

William Patterson, M.D., of Londonderry, Ireland. Died
J. B. Scandella, M.D., of Venice, now in the U. S. Died
Julien U. Niemcewicz, of Poland, now in U.S. Died in 1841, at 84.

639.

John F. Blumenbach, M.D., F.R.S. Died January 22, 1840, aet. 88.

640.

William Boys, A.M., of Philadelphia. Died
John R. Coxe, M.D., of Philadelphia. Resigned September 21, 1838.
Thos. Peters Smith, of Philadelphia. Died
Joseph Clay, of Philadelphia. Died August 27, 1811, aet. 47.
Samuel Elam, of Newport, R. I. Died

637.

Elected July 19, 1799.
641.
642.
643.
644.
645.
646.

Benjamin H. Latrobe, Engineer and Arch. Died September, 1820.
William Maclure, of Philadelphia. Died March 22, 1840, aet. 77.

Elected January 17, 1800.
647.
648.
649.
650.

Robert Liston, Esq., Envoy Ex. and M. Plen. to U. S. Died July 15,
John R. Smith, A. M., of Philadelphia. Died
[1836, aet. 93.
Justus Erick Bollmann, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died Dec. 9, 1821.
William Dunbar, of the Mississippi Territory. Died Nov. 15, 1819.

Elected April 18, 1800.
651. Samuel Brown, M.D., of Kentucky. Died January 12, 1830, aet. 60.
652.
653.

Samuel Miller, A.M., of New York. Died January 7, 1850, aet. 80.
Dupont de Nemours, late of France. Died August 6, 1817, aet. 78.
-

654.
655.

Elected January 16, 1801.

Samuel Falberg, M.D., Govt. Phys. at St. Bartholomew's. Died
Gustav. Paykull, of Sweden. Died
Alexander Ramirez, First Sec. of the Junta of Guatemala. Died
Dr. Francis Blanchet, of Quebec. Died
Robert R. Livingston, Chan, New York. Died Feb.26, 1813, aet. 66.
William Jones, Math. Inst. Maker, London. Died
-

656.
657.
658.
659.

Elected April 17, 1801.
660.
661.
662.

Thos. Tickell Hewson, of Philadelphia. Resigned January 4, 1839.
Don Joseph Joaquin de Ferrer, of Cadiz. Died
Don Fran. Peyrolon, Sec. R. S. des Amig, del Pais, Valencia. Died

Elected January 15, 1802.
663.
664.
665.

Thomas Cooper, of Northumberland. Died May 11, 1839.
Jarvis Roebuck, M.D., of St. Croix. Died
William Barnwell, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died

20
666.
667.

William Roxburgh, M.D., of Calcutta. Died April 10, 1815, aet. 57.
Chev. Don C. Martinez de Yrujo, Minister from Spain. Died

Elected July 16, 1802.
668.

675.

Peter Bleeker Olsen, Danish Min, and Consul General. Died
Letombe, late Cons. Gen. from the French Republic. Died
William Stephen Jacobs, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died 1844.
Philip Rose Roume, Mem. French Nat. Inst. Died
James Mease, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died May 14, 1846, aet. 75.
Philip Syng Physick, M.D., of Philada. Died Dec. 15, 1837, aet. 69.
John Church, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died
Chev. Dr. Valentin de Feronda, Consul General, France. Died

676.

John Garnett, of New Brunswick, N. J. Died May 11, 1820, aet. 69.

677.

Robert Hare, Jr., of Philadelphia. Died May 15, 1858, aet. 78.
Ben. Count Rumford, of Great Britain. Died August, 1814, aet. 62.

669.
670.
671.
672.
673.
674.

Elected January 21, 1803.
678.

Elected April 15, 1803.
679.
680.
681.
682.
683.

Benjamin Dearborn, of Boston. Died February 22, 1838, aet. 83.
Jean B. Jos. Delambre, See. Inst. France. Died August 19, 1822.
Dan. Melamderhjelm, Prof. of Ast in Sweden. Died January, 1810,
Eric Prosperin, Professor of Astronomy, at Upsal. Died
[aet. 84.
Francis Nichols, of Philadelphia. Died July 7, 1839, aet. 81.

Elected October 21, 1803.
684.
685.
686.

David Ramsay, M.D., Charleston, S. C. Died May 8, 1815, aet. 65.
Capt. Meriwether Lewis, of Virginia. Died Oct. 11, 1809, aet. 35.
Robert Gilmor, Jr., of Baltimore. Died November 30, 1848, aet. 75.

Elected January 20, 1804.
687.
688.

David Humphreys, U. S. Min, at Lisbon. Died Feb. 21, 1818, aet. 65.
Joshua Gilpin, of Philadelphia. Died August 22, 1841, aet. 75.

689.

Sam. Webber, of Har. U, Cambridge, Mass. Died July 17, 1810, aet. 51.

690.

Manuel Godoy, Prince of Peace. Died October 7, 1851, aet. 86.
Don Pedro Cevallos, Prime Minister of State, &c., Spain. Died ?
Don Anto. Jos. de Cavanillas, of the R. Bot. Gar., Madrid. Died
Dr. Edward Jenner, of London. Died January 25, 1823, aet. 74.

Elected April 20, 1804.

691.
692.
693.

-

Elected July 20, 1804.
694.
695.

William Short, Esq., of Virginia. Died December 5, 1849, aet. 91.
Baron A. Von Humboldt, of Prussia. Died May 7, 1859, aet. 89.

696.

Jos. Willard, D.D., Pres. Harvard Coll. Died Sept. 25, 1804, aet. 64.

697.

Zaccheus Collins, of Philadelphia.

698.

John Maclean, Prof. Nat. Phil. in the Coll. N. J. Died Feb. 17, 1814.

Died June 12, 1881, aet. 67.

Elected January 18, 1805.

21
699.

Edward Miller, M.D., of New York. Died March 17, 1812, aet. 51.

700.

Rev. John Prince, of Salem. Died June 7, 1836, aet. 84.
Capt. William Jones, of Philadelphia. Died 1831.
Charles Smith, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Died March 17, 1836.

701.
702.

703. William Hawes, M.D., of London.
704.

Died

Samuel Moore, M.D., of Philadelphia.

-

Died July 17, 1861, aet. 88.

705.

F. A. Vanderkemp, of Oneida Co., New York. Died Sept. 7, 1829, at 77.

706.

Ben. Silliman, New Haven.

707.

William Tilghman, Esq.

Died November 25, 1864, aet. 81.

Elected April 19, 1805.
Died April 30, 1827, aet. 70.

Elected July 19, 1805.
. Bushrod Washington, Esq.

Died November 26, 1829, aet. 70.

Elected January 17, 1806. .
709.

M. Destutt Tracy, Assoc. M. of the French Inst.

710.

Olof Swartz, Prof. Bergian Inst. Sweden. Died Sept. 18, 1817, aet. 57.

711.

Martinus Van Marum, M.D., Haarlem. Died 1838, aet. 87.
Joseph Cloud, of Philadelphia. Died 1845, aet. 75.
Rev. Samuel B. Wylie, of Philadelphia. Died Oct. 13, 1852, aet. 80.

712.
713.

Died March 9, 1836.

Elected April 18, 1806.
714.
715.

Joseph Sansom, of Philadelphia. Died
William Dubourg, D.D., President of St. Mary's, Baltimore.

Died

Elected October 17, 1806.
716.
717.
718.

Samuel F. Conover, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died
Fr. de Borja Garcas Stockler, of Lisbon. Died March 6, 1829.
Adr. Giles Camper, Anatomist, of Franeckes, Friesland. Died

Elected January 16, 1807.

1

. Mahlon Dickerson, C. at Law, of Phila. Died Oct. 5, 1853, aet. 84.
20. Irene Dupont, of Wilmington, Del. Died October 31, 1834.

Elected April 17, 1807.

7

|

. Nathaniel Chapman, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died July 1, 1853, aet. 74.
. John McDowell, Provost of the University of Pennsylvania. Died
. Fer. Rud. Hassler, Math. Prof, West Point. Died Nov., 1843, aet. 73.

4

. George Izard, of Pennsylvania. Died Nov. 22, 1828.
. John Eric Forstroem, of St. Bartholomew's. Died
James Gibson, of Philadelphia. Died July 8, 1856, aet. 87.

6.

727.

Elected October 16, 1807.
Arch. Bruce, M.D., Prof. Mineral. N. Y. University. Died Feb. 22, 1818,

728.

Ch. Phil. de Lasteyrie, of Paris. Died Oct., 1849, aet. 88.

Elected January 16, 1808.
729.

Ed. Penington, of Philadelphia. Died March 16, 1834, aet. 68.

[aet. 41.

22

Elected July 15, 1808.
730.
731.

Horace Binney, of Philadelphia.
Rev. William Staughton, D.D., of Philadelphia.

Died

Elected January 20, 1809.
732.
733
734.

Robert Fulton, of New York. Died February 24, 1815, aet. 50.
Ross Cuthbert, of Lower Canada.
Joel Barlow, of the District of Columbia. Died Dec. 26, 1812, aet. 54.

Elected April 21, 1809.
"35.
736.
737.
738.
739.
740.

Silvain Godon, of Philadelphia. Died October 27, 1840, aet. 66.
George William Featherstonhaugh, of New York.
David B. Warden, of New York. Died Oct. 9, 1845.
Dr. Robert M. Patterson, of Philadelphia. Died Sept. 5, 1854, aet. 68.
Thomas Moore, of Maryland. Died
Hon. James Winthrop, of Cambridge, Mass. Died Sept. 26, 1821.

741.

Nathaniel Bowditch, of Salem, Mass. Died March 16, 1838, aet. 63.

742.

F. Andre Michaux, of Paris.

743.

George Gibbes, of Boston, late of R. I. Died Aug. 5, 1833, aet. 57.

744.

Wm. Johnson, Charleston, S.C., Judge S. Ct. U.S. Died Aug. 4, 1834,
Humphry Davy, of London. Died May 29, 1829, aet. 51.
[aet. 63.
David Hosack, M.D., of New York. Died Dec. 22, 1835, aet. 66.

Died Oct. 23, 1855, aet. 85.

Elected July 20, 1810.

745.
746.
747.
748.

John Haighton, M.D., F.R.S., of London. Died March 23, 1823.
J. H. Brinton, of Philadelphia. Died May 7, 1827, aet. 55.

Elected January 18, 1811.
.
.
.
.
.

John Mason Good, F.R.S., London. Died January 2, 1827, aet. 62.
Rev. William Bentley, of Salem, Mass. Died Dec. 29, 1819, aet. 61.
A. Vauquelin, of Paris. Died 1829.
John Davis, Secretary of the American Academy, Boston.
Charles J. Wister, of Philadelphia.
-

Elected January 17, 1812.
4. Jos. Correa de Serra, Sec. R. S., Lisbon. Died September, 1823.
. Robert Walsh, Jr., of Philadelphia. Died February 7, 1859, aet. 76.

. Benjamin Allen,*LL.D., of Philadelphia. Died July 20, 1836, aet. 64.

Elected July 17, 1812.
757.

Robert Adrain, of New Brunswick.

f

Died August 10, 1843, aet. 68.

Elected April 16, 1813. "
.
.
.
.

And. J. Retzius, Prof. Nat. Hist, &c., in U. Lund, Sweden. Died
Alexander Wilson, of Philadelphia, Ornithologist. Died Aug. 28, 1813,
George Pollok, of Philadelphia. Died April, 1839.
[aet. 47.
Constant Dumeril, of Paris. Died Aug., 1860, aet. 86.

-

762.

23

Benjamin R. Morgan, of Philadelphia. Died Nov. 19, 1840, aet. 75.
John Sergeant, of Philadelphia. Died November 23, 1852, aet. 73.
Nicholas Biddle, of Philadelphia. . Died February 27, 1844.

763.
764.

Elected October 16, 1813.
765.

Dr. W. P. C. Barton, of Philadelphia. Died Feb. 28, 1856, aet. 69.
William Meredith, Esq., of Philadelphia. Died Sept. 26, 1844, aet. 73.
Charles Chauncey, Esq., of Philadelphia. Died Aug. 30, 1849, aet. 73.
Reuben Haines, of Philadelphia. Died Oct. 19, 1831, aet. 45.
William Hembel, Jr., of Philadelphia. Died June 12, 1851, aet. 88.

766.
767.
T68.
"69.

Elected January 21, 1814.
770.

772.

John E. Hall, of Baltimore. Died June 11, 1829, aet. 45.
James Cutbush, of Philadelphia. Died December 15, 1823.
Dr. N. S. Allison, of Burlington. Died

773.

Rev. Frederick Beasley, Prov. U. Penn. Died Nov. 1, 1845, aet. 78.

774.

776.

Rev. James P. Wilson, D.D., of Philadelphia. Resigned Jan. 4, 1828.
Brig. Gen. Joseph G. Swift, Commandant Milit. Academy, U. S.
Thomas Gilpin, of Philadelphia. Died March 3, 1853, aet. 77.

777.

De Witt Clinton, Pres. N. Y. Phil. Soc. Died Feb. 11, 1828, aet. 59.

778.

John Gummere, of Burlington, N. J.

771.

Elected April 15, 1814.
775.

Elected July 15, 1814.
Died May 31, 1845, aet. 62.

Elected October 21, 1814.
779.

John G. Biddle, of Philadelphia.

780.

John Syng Dorsey, M.D. Died November 12, 1818, aet. 35.

781.

Died

Elected April 21, 1815.

785.

Dr. Samuel Calhoun. Died April 7, 1841, aet. 54.
John M. Scott, of Philadelphia. Resigned September 15, 1848.
Dr. Joseph Hartshorne, of Phil. Died August 20, 1850, aet. 71.
Dr. Joseph Parrish, of Phil. Died March 18, 1840, aet. 60
Charles J. Ingersoll, Esq., of Phil. Died May 14, 1862, aet. 79.

786.

Rev. James Gray, D.D. Died

787.

Elected July 21, 1815.
Joseph Hopkinson, of Philadelphia. Died January 15, 1842, aet. 71.

782.
783.
784.

788.
789.

Charles W. Hare, of Philadelphia. Died
Joseph P. Norris, of Philadelphia. Died June 22, 1841, aet. 78.

790. Gerhard

Elected January 19, 1816.
Troost, M.D., of Maryland. Died August

. Joseph Reed, of Philadelphia.

14, 1850.
Died March 4, 1846, aet. 73.

Elected October 18, 1816.
792.

Rev. Abiel Holmes, D.D., Cambridge, Mass. Died June 4, 1857, aet. 73.

24

-

793. Isaiah Thomas, of Worcester, Mass., Pres. Antiquar. S. Died April 4,
794. Carlo Botta, Historian. Died August 10, 1837.
[1831, at 82.
795.

Jared Mansfield, Prof. N. Ph. W. Point.

796.

Dr. William Meade.

797.

Ch. Alex. Lesueur, of Paris. Died December 12, 1846, aet. 68.

*

Died Feb. 3, 1830, at 71.

Elected January 17, 1817.
Resigned February 20, 1824.

798. J. C. Delametrie, of Paris.
799. J. P. F. Deleuze.
Died.

Died

800.

Dr. John C. Otto, of Philadelphia. Died June 26, 1844, at 70.

801.

Richard Rush, Esq., of Philadelphia.

802.

Ed. Troughton, F.R.S., of London.

803.

J. Peter Frank, M.D., Counsellor of State, &c., Vienna. Died

804.
805.

Jos. Baron de Sonnenfels, Counsellor, &c., Vienna.
Jos. Von Hammer, Vienna. Died

-

Died July, 1859.

Elected April 18, 1817.
Died June 12, 1835.

Elected July 18, 1817.
Died

806.

William Gaston, Esq., of North Carolina. Died January 23, 1844.

807.

Charles Fenton Mercer, of Virginia.

808.

814.

Rev. Joh. Severin Vater, D.D., Königsberg. Died March 17, 1826,
Eugenius Nulty, of the Univ. of Penn.
[aet. 55.
Thomas Say, of Philadelphia. Died Oct. 10, 1834, aet. 46.
George Ord, Naturalist, of Philadelphia.
Thomas Nuttall, Botanist, of Philada. Died Sept. 10, 1859, aet. 70.
Rev. Lewis Schweinitz, of North Carolina. Died February 8, 1834.
Rev. H. Steinhauer, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Died

815.

Von Friedrich Adelung, of St. Petersburg.

Died May 4, 1858, aet. 80.

Elected October 17, 1817.
809.
810.
811.
812.
813.

Elected January 16, 1818.

Elected

April 17,

Died

1818.

816.

John Quincy Adams, Sec. of State of the U.S.

817.

M. Noel de la Moriniere, of France. Died 1822.
Josiah Meigs, Commiss. of the Land Office, U. S. Died Sept. 4, 1822.

818.
819.
820.
821.
822.
823.
824.

Died Feb. 23, 1848.

James G. Thomson, Prof. Lang. U. Penn. Died June 18, 1847, aet. 70.
Parker Cleveland, Pr. Ch., &c., Bowdoin C. Died Oct. 15, 1858, aet. 78.
John C. Warren, M.D., Prof, Cambridge, Mass. Died May 4, 1856,
James Jackson, M.D., Prof. Cambridge, Mass.
[at. 78.
Nicholas Fuss, Perp. Sec. Imp. Acad, St. Petersburg. Died
Gotthelf Fischer, I. A., St. Petersburg. Died Oct. 18, 1853, act. 83.

825.

Daniel Drake, M.D., of Cincinnati. Died November 5, 1852, aet. 67.

826.

Jacob Bigelow, M.D., Rumford Professor at Cambridge, Mass.
t

25

Elected January 15, 1819.
827.
828.
829.
830.
831.
832.

John Murray, of Edinburgh. Died July 22, 1820.
Lewis Matthieu Langles. Died January, 1824, aet. 61.
Roberts Vaux. Died January 7, 1836, aet. 49.
L. H. Girardin, St Mary's College, Baltimore. Died
H. M. D. de Blainville, of Paris. Died May, 1850, aet. 73.
Dr. John Eberle. Died February 2, 1838, aet. 54.

Elected April 16, 1819.
833.
834.
835.

Guill. Theophile Tilesius, Mem. Acad. St. Petersburg.
Count Lanjuinais. Died January 13, 1821.
Stephen Elliot, of South Carolina. Died

Died 1832?

Elected June 18, 1819.
836.
837.
838.

Jacob Perkins, of Philadelphia. Died July 30, 1849, aet. 83.
A. G. Demarest, Prof. Nat. Hist, &c., at Paris. Died
P. A. Latreille, of Paris. Died 1833.

Elected October 15, 1819.
839.
840.

Alexander Brongniart, of Paris. Died
Redmond Conyngham, of Nescopec, Pa.

Died June 16, 1846, aet. 64.

841.

Rev. Fred. Chr. Schaeffer, of New York. Died

842.

William P. Dewees, M.D., of Philada. Died May 18, 1841, aet. 74.
William E. Horner, M.D., of Philada. Died March 13, 1853, aet. 60.

843.

844. J. A. Albers, M.D., of Bremen.

Died

Elected January 21, 1820.
. Baron Hormayer, of Vienna. Died

Elected April 21, 1820.
846.

848.

William Marsden, of England. Died October 6, 1836, at 81.
Dr. Franklin Bache, of Philadelphia. Died March 19, 1864, aet. 72.
Dr. William Gibson, Prof. of Surgery in the University of Penn.

849.

Elected October 20, 1820.
Rev. Samuel F. Jarvis, D.D., of N. Y. Died March 26, 1851, aet. 65.

847.

850.

855.

Isaiah Lukens, of Philadelphia. Died November 12, 1846, aet. 69.
John Jacob Berzelius, Prof. Chem., Stockholm. Died Aug. 7, 1848,
J. A. Borgnis, Engineer, &c., of Paris.
[aet. 69.
Matthew Lesseps, Consul of France at Philadelphia. Died
M. de Montgery, Officer of the French Navy.
William Strickland, Archt., of Philada. Died April 6, 1854, aet. 65.

856.

John Pickering, Esq., of Salem, Mass. Died March 17, 1846.

851.
852.
853.
854.

Elected January 19, 1821.
. Langdon Cheves, Esq., Pres. Bank U.S. Died June 25, 1857, aet. 81.
. Levett Harris, Esq., of Philadelphia.

Died September, 1839.

. Hon. John B. Gibson, Judge. Died May 3,
4

1853,

|

26
Elected

*

*

April 20, 1821.

860.

George Alexander Otis, of Boston. Died June 23, 1863, aet. 81.

861.

Clement C. Biddle, of Philadelphia. Died August 20, 1855, aet. 70.
Elisha De Butts, M.D., of Baltimore. Died
James Workman, of New Orleans. Died

862.
863.
864.
865.

Prof. Peter Afzelius, of Sweden. Died 1841, aet. 81.
Sir James Wylie, of St. Petersburg. Died 1853, aet. 85.
*

Elected July 20, 1821.

866.

Gustavus Count Wetterstedt, of Sweden.

867.

Mathew Carey, of Philadelphia. Died September 16, 1839, aet. 79.

868.

Baron Wm. Von Humboldt, of Berlin.

Died 1837, aet. 61.

Elected January 18, 1822.
Died April 8, 1835, aet. 74.

869. Peter Poletica, Minister of Russia to the U. S.

Died

[aet. 80?

870.

P. Pedersen, Minister of Denmark to the U.S. Died Aug. 16, 1851,

871.
872.

Samuel Parkes, Chemist, of London. Died Dec. 23, 1823, aet. 66.
Solomon W. Conrad, of Philadelphia. Died October 2, 1831.

873.

Dr. Richard Harlan, of Philadelphia.

874.

Zacharias Nordmark, Prof. of Mathematics in the Univ., Upsal. Died
Jons Svanberg, Prof. Math. Univ., Upsal Died Jan. 15, 1851, aet. 793.

Elected April 19, 1822.

875.

Died September 30, 1843.

Elected October 18, 1822.
876.
877.
878.

Jose Bonifacio de Andrada e Silva, Sec. of State, Brazil. Died
Gottlob Ernst Schultze, Prof. of Philosophy, Univ. Gött. Died 1834?

880.

Condy Raguet, Con. U.S. at Brazil. Died March 22, 1842, aet. 58.
Wm. H. Keating, Prof. Min. and Chem. Univ. Pa. Died May 17, 1840.
Lardner Vanuxem, Prof. Min. C. Coll.S. C. Died Jan. 25, 1848, aet. 56.

881.

Rev. John Plitt, of Philadelphia. Died August 11, 1824, aet. 61.

879.

Elected January 17, 1823.
882.

Baron Coquebert de Montbret, Member Inst. of France.

883.

Gaspard Deabbate, Consul General of Sardinia to U. S. Died

884.

Dr. Samuel Jackson, Prof. Pharm. and Mat. Med. Coll. Pharm, Phila.

Died

Elected April 18, 1823.
885.
886.
887.
888.
889.
890.
891.
892.
893.

Dr. Benjamin H. Coates, of Philadelphia. .
James Fenimore Cooper, of New York. Died Sept. 14, 1851, aet. 62.
Dr. Jason O'Brien Lawrance, of Phila. Died Aug. 19, 1823, aet. 32.
Lucien, Prince of Canino, of Rome. Died July 29, 1840, aet. 66.
Joseph, Count de Survilliers, of Philadelphia. Died July 28, 1844.
Paul de Lovenorn, Rear Admiral in the Danish Service. Died 1826.
Prof. H. C. Schumacher, of Copenhagen. Died Dec. 28, 1850, aet. 71.
Dr. William Darlington, of Pennsylvania. Died April 23, 1863, aet. 81.
Rev. Dr. Will. Bengo Collyer, LL.D., of London. Died

27

894.

Elected July 18, 1828.
william Lawrence, F.R.S., London. Died
Elected October 17, 1823.

895.
896.
897.
898.

Major Stephen H. Long, of Philadelphia.
Wm. James Macneven, M.D., of New York. Died July 12, 1841, aet. 78.
Major Nathaniel A. Ware, of Philadelphia. Died
Chevalier John W. Duponceau, of France. Died July 9, 1835.

Elected January 16, 1824.
899.

Rev. Moses Stuart, of Andover, Mass. Died Jan. 4, 1852, aet. 71.

900.

Henry Seybert, of Philadelphia.

901. Julius
902.
903.

Klaproth. of Paris.

Died

Joseph B. McKean, of Philadelphia. Died
Dr. Alex. Pearson, Phys. of the British Factory at Canton.

Died

Elected April 16, 1824.
904.
905.

A. J. Von Krusenstern, Capt. in the Russian Navy. Died 1846, aet. 76.
Charles Bonaparte, Prince of Musignano, Phila. Died July 29, 1857,
[aet. 54.

Elected July 16, 1824.
906.
907.

Conrad J. Temminck, of Paris. Died January 30, 1858, aet. 80.
Severin Lorich, Chargé and Cons. Gen. Swed. and Nor. Died March
[11, 1837.

Elected January 21, 1825.
908. Count Nicholas de Romanzoff.
909.

Died

910.

Count John Laval, of Russia. Died May 1, 1846, aet. 87.
John J. Bigsby, M.D., of England.

911.

M. Flourens, M.D., of Paris.

Elected April 15, 1825.
912. Count Real, of France.
913. Thomas Cadwalader,
914.

Died 1834?

of Philadelphia. Died Oct. 25, 1841, aet. 60.

916.

John K. Kane, of Philadelphia. Died February 21, 1858, aet. 63.
John D. Godman, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died April 17, 1830, aet. 31.
Charles N. Bancker, of Philadelphia.

917.

Edward Livingston, of New Orleans. Died May 23, 1836, aet. 71.

918.

Don Jose da Silva Lisboa, of Rio Janeiro,
Joseph R. Ingersoll, of Philadelphia.

915.

Elected July 15, 1825.
.919.

Died

Elected October 21, 1825.
920.
921.

Count Miot de Melito, of the Nat. Inst. of France. Died Jan. 15, 1841.
Philip Tidyman, M.D., of Germantown, Pa. Died June 11, 1850, aet. 73.

28

Elected January 20, 1826.
922. Samuel Humphreys, of Philadelphia. Died August 16, 1846, aet. 68.
923. Don Pablo de la Llave, Minister of Justice, of Mexico. Died 1833.
924. Dr. John Lewls Tiarks, of Jever, East Friesland. Died May 1, 1837.

Elected April 21, 1826.
925. Charles D. Meigs, M.D., of Philadelphia.
926. William McIlvaine, of Philadelphia. Died August 9, 1854, aet. 68.
927. Jacopo Graeberg di Hemso, of Sweden. Died 1848.

Elected October 20, 1826.
928. Henry de Struve, Coun, of State, Russia. Died Jan. 9, 1851, aet. 80.
929. Gen. Lewis Cass, Governor of the U. S. Territory of Michigan.
930. William Shaler, Esq., Consul General of the U.S. at Algiers.

Elected January 19, 1827.

Torombert,

of Lyons, France. Died 1829.
932. Joel R. Poinsett, of Charleston, S. C. Died Dec. 12, 1851, aet. 73.
933. Dr. Rene La Roche, of Philadelphia.
931. Honore

Elected April 20, 1827.
934.
935
936.
937.
938.
939.

John Price Wetherill, of Philadelphia. Died July 24, 1853, aet. 59.
George Emlen, of Philadelphia. Died August 27, 1850, aet. 66.
Charles Tait, of Alabama. Died October 7, 1835, aet. 67.
Marcus Bull, of Philadelphia.
John Wilhelm Dalman, M.D., of Stockholm, Sweden. Died
Dr. George Maria Zecchinelli, of Padua, Italy. Died 1847.

940.
941.
942.
943.

J. P. C. Cassado de Giraldes, of Lisbon.
James Rush, M.D., of Philadelphia. Resigned August 17, 1827.
John K. Mitchell, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died April 4, 1858, aet. 65.
James Brown, Min. Plen. of the U.S. at Paris. Died April 7, 1835,
[aet. 68.

Elected July 20, 1827.

Elected October 19, 1827.

-

944. Noah Webster, LL.D., of New Haven, Ct. Died May 28, 1843, aet. 85.

Elected January 18, 1828.
945.
946.
947.
948.

Don Jose Maria Bustamente, of Mexico. Died
Don Jose Maria Salazar, of Colombia. Died
Thomas Harris, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died March 3, 1861, aet. 68.
Robert E. Griffith, Jr., M.D., of Phila. Died June 27, 1850, aet. 53. •

949. Charles Pickering, M.D., of Philadelphia. Resigned Sept. 15, 1837.
950. Samuel G. Morton, M.D. of Philada.

Died May 15, 1851, aet. 52.

Elected April 18, 1828.
951. Admiral Jose M. Dantes Pereira, Sec. Math. Cl. R. So, Lisbon.

29
. Henry J. Anderson, M.D., Prof. Math. Columbia College, N.Y.
. Isaag Lea, of Philadelphia.

Elected July 18, 1828.
Betton,

M.D., of Germantown.
5. George Ticknor, Esq., of Boston.
. Samuel

Died June 9, 1850, aet. 65.

Elected October 17, 1828.
956.

James Renwick, of Columbia Col., N. Y.

Died Jan. 12, 1863, aet. 70.

Elected January 16, 1829.
Thomas Biddle, Esq., of Philadelphia. Died June 3, 1857, aet. 81.
William H. De Lancey, D.D., of Philadelphia.
Hans Christian Oersted, of Copenhagem. Died March 9, 1851, aet. 74.
Baron Hyde de Neufville, of France.
. Prof. Carls Christian Rafn, of Copenhagen.
. Henry Wheaton, of New York, Chargé d'Aff at Copenhagen. Died

.
.
9.
.

-

Elected April 17, 1829.
963.
964.
965.
966.
967.
968.

Alexander Dallas Bache, of the University of Pennsylvania.
Philip H. Nicklin, of Philadelphia. Died March 2, 1842, aet. 55.
James Kent, LL.D., of New York. Died December 12, 1847, aet. 85.
Josiah Quincy, of Harvard University, Mass. Died July 1, 1864, aet. 92.
Washington Irving. Died November 28, 1859, aet. 76.
Joseph Roberts, of Philadelphia. Died August 25, 1835, aet. 42.

Elected July 17, 1829.
969.
970.

Prof. R. K. Rask, of Copenhagen. Died November 14, 1832, aet. 45.
Joseph N. B. V. Abrahamson, of Copenhagen. Died Jan. 6, 1849.

971.

George B. Wood, M.D., of Philadelphia.

Elected October 16, 1829.
2. Chevalier Charles Pougens, of Paris.

Died Dec. 19, 1833, aet. 77.

. Don Francisco de Paula Quadrada, of Madrid.
974.

M. Jomard, of Paris. Died Sept. 23, 1862, aet. 85.
. Henry S. Tanner, of Philadelphia. Died
976. Daniel B. Smith, of Philadelphia.
977. Thomas Horsfield, M.D., of Pennsylvania. Died 1859.

Elected January 15, 1830.
978.
979.
980.
981.
982.
983.

Bishop Muenter, of Copenhagen. Died
J. P. Abel Remusat, of Paris. Died
William Yarrel, of London. Died August 31, 1856, aet. 72.
Chief Justice John Marshall. Died July 6, 1835, aet. 79.
Jules de Wallenstein, of Russia. Died 1845.
Thomas McEuen, of Philadelphia.

-

30

Elected April 16, 1830.
984.

988.

Duke Bernard, of Saxe Weimar. Died 1862, aet. 70.
William B. Hodgson, of Virginia.
Isaac Hays, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Hon. Jonathan Sewell, Chief Justice of Lower Canada. Died
William Vaughan, Esq., of London. Died May 5, 1850, aet. 98.

989.

Thomas I. Wharton, Esq., of Philada.

990.

Lorenzo Martini, of Turin. Died 1845.
Andres del Rio, Professor of Mineralogy at Mexico.
Marc Antoine Jullien, of Paris. Died 1848, aet. 73.

985.
986.
987.

Elected July 16, 1830.
Died April 7, 1856, aet. 65.

Elected October 15, 1830.
991.
992.

Elected January 21, 1831.
993.
994.
995.
996.

Prosper, Count Balbo, of Turin. Died March 14, 1837.
Hyacinth Carena, of Turin. Died November 2, 1857.
Louis Philippe, King of the French. Died Aug. 26, 1850, aet. 76.
Thomas P. Jones, M.D., of Wash., D.C. Died March 11, 1848, aet. 75.

Elected April 15,

1831.

997.

Henry Vethake, Professor of Natural Philosophy, at Princeton, N. J.
998. Samuel L. Southard, of New Jersey. Died June 26, 1842, aet. 56.
999. Edward Everett, of Massachusetts.
1000 . Louis McLane, of Delaware. Died October 7, 1857, aet. 72.
1001. William C. Rives, of Virginia.
1002. Alexander Everett, of Massachusetts. Died June 29, 1847,
-

Elected July 15, 1831.
1003.

Martin Fernandez Navarrete, of Madrid.

1004.

Francisco Antonio Gonzales, of Madrid. Died Oct. 22, 1833, aet. 60.

1005.

John James Audubon.

Pied October 8, 1846.

Died Jan. 7, 1851, aet. 69.

Elected October 21, 1831.
1006.

Hartman Bache, Major of U. S. Topographical Engineers.

1007.

Baron Larrey, of Paris. Died July 24, 1842, aet. 76.

1008.

Dr. Julius T. Ducatel, of Baltimore.

Elected January 20, 1832.
1009

Died April 23, 1849, aet. 53.

. Henry D. Gilpin, of Philadelphia. Died January, 29, 1860, at 58.

1010.
1011.

Dr. John P. Hopkinson, of Philadelphia. Died March 6, 1836, aet. 35.
Dr. John Bell, of Philadelphia.

1012.

Dr. Robley Dunglison, of Philadelphia.

1013.

M. Steen Bille. Died November 28, 1860, aet. 79.
1014. Thomas Sergeant, Esq., of Philadelphia. Died May 16, 1860.

31

Elected April 20, 1832.
1015. Theodore Lorin, of Paris.
1016. Dr. Hugh L. Hodge, of Philadelphia.
1017.

1019.

Col. J. J. Abert, of Washington, D. C. Died Jan. 27, 1863, aet. 75.
Juan Jose Martinez, of Spain.
The Duke of Sussex. Died April 21, 1843, aet. 70.

1020.

E. S. Bring, Professor of the University of Lund, in Sweden.

1021.

1025.

Professor Bujalsky, of St. Petersburg.
Marmaduke Burrough, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Matthias W. Baldwin, of Philadelphia.
Edwin James, M.D., of Albany.
Moncure Robinson, of Virginia.

1026.

M. J. Labouderie, of Paris.

1018.

Elected July 20, 1832.

\

Elected January 18, 1833.
1022.
1023.
1024.

Died 1844, aet. 46.

Elected April 19, 1833.
1027.

Charles Nagy, of Pesth, in Hungary. Died 1849.

1028.

Jacob Randolph, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died Feb. 29, 1848, aet. 52. *
Joshua Francis Fisher, of Philadelphia.
Gouverneur Emerson, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Henry C. Carey, of Philadelphia.

1029.
1030.
1031.

Elected July 19, 1833.
1032.
1033.
1034.

Henry R. Schoolcraft. Died Dec. 11, 1864, aet. 72.
Viscount Santaren), of Portugal.
Titian R. Peale, of Philadelphia.

Elected October 18, 1833.
1035.
1036.
1037.

Franklin Peale, of Philadelphia.
Samuel V. Merrick, of Philadelphia.
Henry J. Williams, of Philadelphia.

-

Elected January 2, 1835.
1038.
1039.

Henry D. Rogers, of Philadelphia.
James P. Espy, of Philadelphia. Died Jan. 26, 1860, aet. 75.

1040.

Edward H. Courtenay, Prof. Math. Univ. Penn Died Dec.20, 1853.

1041.

Charles w. Short, M.D., Lexington, Ky. Died March 7, 1863, et. 68.

1042.

John Brockenbrough, of Richmond, Va. Died July 3, 1852, aet. 84.

1043.

John Wickham, of Richmond, Va.

1044.
1045.

John Torrey, M.D., Prof. Chem. Coll. Phys and Surg. New York.
Joseph Henry, Prof. Nat. Phil. in the College of Princeton, N.J.

1046.

D. Francis Condie, M.D., of Philadelphia.

1047.

Col. William Drayton, late of S. Carolina. Resigned Feb. 6, 1840.

Died January 22, 1839.

32

Elected July 17, 1835.
1048 .

William B. Rogers, Prof. of N. Phil. William and Mary College, Va.

1049.
1050.

Thomas Sully, of Philadelphia.
Charles A. Agardh, of Lund. Died Jan. 28, 1858, aet. 74.

1051.

C. C. Von Leonhard, of Heidelberg. Died Jan. 23, 1862, aet. 83.

1052.

1056.

C. G. C. Reinwardt, of Leyden. Died
Don Manuel Naxera, of Mexico. Died
Chevalier Morelli, Consul General of Naples.
Job R. Tyson, of Philadelphia. Died June 27, 1858.
Nathan Dunn, of Philadelphia. Died September 15, 1844.

1057.

Prof. John Griscom, uow of Philada. Died Feb. 26, 1852, at 77.

1058.

J. S. Da Costa Macedo, Secretary of the Academy of Lisbon.

Elected January 15, 1836.

1053.
1054.
1055,

Elected April 15, 1836.
1059. Nicholas Carlisle, LL.D., of London.

Died 1848.

1060.

Granville Penn, Esq., of Stoke Park, Eng. Died Sept. 28, 1844.

1061.

Col. Joseph G. Totten, U. S. Engineers. Died 1864.
M. Roux de Rochelle, of Paris. Died June, 1849,

Elected October 21, 1836.
1062.

1063. Dr. Mariano Galvez, Governor of Guatemala.
1064.

Edward Turner, M.D., F.R.S., of London. Died Feb. 12, 1837, at 40.

Elected April 21, 1837.
George Campbell, of Philadelphia. Died June 11, 1855, aet. 73.
1066 . John Green Crosse, Esq., Surg., Norwich, Eng. Died June 9, 1850.

1065.

1067.
1068.
1069.
1070.
1071.

Jared Sparks, Esq., of Boston.
Charles R. Leslie, Esq., of London. Died May 5, 1859.
James Cowles Prichard, M.D., F.R.S., Bris, Eng. Died Dec. 22, 1848,
-

Thomas L. Winthrop, LL.D., of Boston. Died Feb. 21, 1841. [aet. 62.
George Tucker, of the Univ. of Virginia. Died April 10, 1861, aet. 85.
Elected

July 21,

1837.

1072.

Rev. William Jenks, D.D., of Boston.

1073.

Sears C. Walker, of Philadelphia. Died January 30, 1853, aet. 48.
Joseph Saxton, of Philadelphia.
*
William Morris Meredith, of Philadelphia.

Elected October 20, 1837.
1074.
1075.
1076.

Thomas Dunlap, of Philadelphia. Died July 11, 1864, aet. 72.

1077.

Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts.

1078.

Capt. Andrew Talcott, late of the U.S. Engineers.

1079 .

Thomas W. Griffith, Esq., of Baltimore.

Died October 24, 1852, aet. 71.

Elected January 19, 1838.
Died

33
1080.

Charles G. B. Daubeny, M.D., of the University of Oxford.

1081.

Henry Reed, of the Univ. of Penn. Died Sept. 27, 1854, aet. 46.
William Norris, of Philadelphia.
William Sullivan, of Boston. Died

1082.
1083.

-

Elected April 20, 1838.
1084.
1085.
1086.
1087.
1088.
1089.
1090.
1091.
1092.

-

William Harris, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died March 3, 1861, tet. 68.
Robert Treat Paine, of Boston.
John P. Emmet, M.D., of the Univ. of Virginia. Died August 13, 1842,
Hugh S. Legare, of Charleston, S. C. Died June, 1843.
[aet. 46.
Samuel Breck, of Philadelphia. Died Sept. 1, 1862, aet. 91.
Sylvanus Thayer, U.S. Engineers.
Francis Wayland, D.D., of Brown University.
Henry Baldwin, of Pennsylvania. Died April 21, 1844.
William H. Prescott, of Boston. Died January, 1859, aet. 62.
-

Elected January 18, 1839.
1093.

James Prinsep, of Calcutta. Died

1094.

John Edwards Holbrook, M.D., of Charleston, S. C.

1695. John C. Cresson, of Philadelphia.
1096.

James C. Booth, of Philadelphia.

1097. Edward Coles, of Philadelphia.
1098. J. F. Encke, of Berlin.
1099.

A. Quetelet, of Brussels.

1100.

Rev. Humphrey Lloyd, Prof. of Nat. Phil. Univ. of Dublin.

1101.

James K. Paulding, Sec. Navy. Died April 4, 1860, at 81. [aet. 64.

1102.

John Ludlow, D.D., Provost of the Univ. of Penn. Died Sept. 8, 1857,
Benjamin W. Richards, of Philadelphia. Died July 13, 1851, aet. 53.
George W. Bethune, D.D., of Philada. Died April 28, 1862, aet. 57.
George M. Justice, of Philadelphia. Died April 14, 1862, aet. 70.

Elected April 19, 1839.

1103.
1104.
1105.

Elected July 19, 1839.
1106.
1107.

*

T. Romeyn Beck, M.D., of Albany. Died Nov. 19, 1855, aet. 63.
Richard C. Taylor, of Philadelphia. Died October 26, 1851, aet. 62.

Elected October 18, 1839.
1109.

Thomas U. Walter, of Philadelphia.
John Penington, of Philadelphia.

1110.

Eugene A. Vail, of Paris. Died 1842-3.

1111.

Charles Ruemker, of Hamburg.

1108.

1112.

John Washington, Royal Navy. Died 1864, aet. 62.

1113.

Rev. Charles Gutzlaff, of Macao.

1114.

Elias Loomis, of Western Reserve College, Ohio.

1115.

Stephen Alexander, of Princeton, N. J.
5

Died August 9, 1851, aet. 48.

34

Elected January 17, 1840.
1116.
1117.

Judah Dobson, of Philadelphia. Died September 26, 1850.
John Forbes, M.D., of Chichester. Died Nov. 13, 1861, at 74.

11 18.

Michael Faraday, of London.

1119.

Rev. C. R. Demme, of Philadelphia. Died Sept, 1861, at 74.
John J. Vanderkemp, of Philadelphia. Died Dec. 4, 1855, aet. 72.
Rev. Philip Milledoler, of New Jersey. Died Sept. 22, 1852, at 77.

1120.
1121.

*

1122.

Pedro de Angelis, of Buenos Ayres.

1123.

11:25.

Isaac Wayne, of Pennsylvania. Died October 25, 1852, aet. 83.
Samuel D. Ingham, of Pennsylvania. Died June 5, 1860, aet. 80.
George M. Dallas, of Philadelphia. Died Dec. 31, 1864, aet. 72.

11:26.

Martin H. Boye, of Philadelphia.

1127.

Hartman Kuhn, of Philadelphia. Died Nov. 6, 1860, aet. 76.

1128.

F. W. Bessel, of Königsberg.

1129.

William R. Fisher, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died Oct. 26, 1842, at 34.

1124.

-

Elected April 17, 1840.
Died March 17, 1846.

1130.

1132.

Captain Francis Beaufort, of London. Died Dec. 17, 1857, aet.
Paul B. Goddard, M.D., of Philadelphia.

1133.

Prof. W. H. C. Bartlett, of West Point.

113 1.

- 1 134.

84.

George M. Wharton, of Philadelphia. Resigned Nov. 29, 1859.

1135.

George Washington Smith, of Philadelphia.

1136.
11:37.

Robert Were Fox, of Falmouth, England.
John Sanderson, of Philadelphia. Died April 5, 1844.

1138.

Francisco Martinez de la Rosa, of Madrid. Died 1862, act. 73.

1139.

James D. Graham, U. S. Topographical Engineers.
J. B. B. Eyries, of Paris. Died 1846, aet. 79.

Elected July 17, 1840.

1140.

1141.

Elected October 16, 1840.
Charles Bonnycastle, Prof. of Math. Univ. of Va. Died Oct. 31, 1840.

1142.

Francois P. G. Guizot, of France.

1143.

Chev. Bernardo Quaranta, of Naples.
David Irvin, of Wisconsin.
Adolph C. P. Callisen, of Copenhagen.

Elected January 15, 1841.
1144.
1145.

1146.
1147.
1148.
1149.

William Rawle, of Philadelphia. Died August 9, 1858, at 71.
Rev. Benjamin Dorr, D.D., of Philadelphia.
John L. Stephens, of New York. Died October 12, 1852, at 47.
Tobias Wagner, of Philadelphia.
*

-

1150.
1151.

Elected April 16, 1841.

Major Edward Sabine, British Army.
Isaac R. Jackson, of Philadelphia. Died July 27, 1842, aet. 37.

35
1152 .

Roswell Park, of the University of Pennsylvania.
Robert Christison, M.D., of Edinburgh.
1154 . Edward Hitchcock, of Massachusetts. Died Feb. 27, 1864, aet. 70.
1155. William Peter, British Consul at Philadelphia. Died Feb. 6, 1853.
1156. A. P. de Candolle, of Geneva. Died September 9, 1841.
1153 .

Elected July 16, 1841.
. George Bancroft, of Boston.

Elected January 21, 1842.
1158.

Alexis de Tocqueville, of Paris.

Died

1159. Baron de Roenne, of Prussia.
1160. John F. Frazer, of Philadelphia.
1161.
1162.

Resigned December 30, 1858.
E. Otis Kendall, of Philadelphia.
Charles Lyell, of London.
J. N. Nicollet, of Washington. Died September 11, 1843.
Baron de la Doucette, of Paris. Died 1848, aet, 76.
E. W. Brayley, of London.
-

1163.
1164.
1165.

Elected April 15, 1842.
1166.

1168.

Stephen Endlicher, of Vienna. Died 1849.
D. Humphrey Storer, M.D., of Boston.
Simeon Borden, of Boston.

1169.

Petty vaughan, of London. Died July 30, 1854, at 66.

1170.

Frederick Fraley, of Philadelphia.

1167.

Elected July 15, 1842.
Elected October 21, 1842.
1171.

Rev. George Peacock, of Cambridge, England.
1172. J. I. Clark Hare, of Philadelphia.
1173. Benjamin Peirce, of Harvard University.

Elected January 20, 1843.
1174.
1175.
1176.
1177.
1178.
1179.
1180.
1181.
1182.
1183.
1184.

Leopold II., Grand Duke of Tuscany.
Louis Agassiz, of Neufchatel.
William W. Gerhard, M.D., of Philadelphia.
William Reid, Governor of Bermuda. Died
Thomas P. Cope, of Philadelphia. Died Nov. 22, 1854, aet. 87.
John Lenthall, of Philadelphia.
Solomon W. Roberts, of Philadelphia.
Ellwood Morris, of Philadelphia.
Charles Ellett, Jr., of Philadelphia. Died June 11, 1862.
Charles B. Trego, of Philadelphia.
Cavaliere Mustoxidi, of Corfu. Died July 29, 1860.

Elected April 21, 1843.
1185.
1186.

Charles Wilkes, U. S. Navy.
Charles McEuen, of Philadelphia. Died November 18, 1857, aet. 56.

36

-

Elected July 21, 1843.
1187.
1188.

Wm. H. Dillingham, of Philadelphia. Died Dec. 11, 1854, aet. 65.
Count Cancrine, of St. Petersburg. Died Sept. 22, 1845, aet. 70.

1189. Stanislas Julien, of Paris.
1190.

John Downes, of Philadelphia.

1191.

Elected January 19, 1844.
Theodore Strong, of New York.

1201.

Alfred L. Elwyn, of Philadelphia.
Robert Bridges, M.D., of Philadelphia.
John W. Draper, M.D., of New York.
William A. Norton, of Delaware College.
J. W. Francis, M.D., of New York. Died Feb. 8, 1861, aet. 71.
W. C. Redfield, of New York. Died
T. G. Mower, M.D., of the U.S. Army. Died Dec. 7, 1852, aet. 62.
John Locke, M.D., of Cincinnati. Died July 10, 1856, aet. 64.
Rev. Alonzo Potter, D.D., of New York.
Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice of the U.S. Died Oct. 12, 1864, aet.87.

1202.

Joseph Story, of Mass. (Supreme Court of U.S.) Died Sept. 10, 1845,

1203.

Benjamin F. Butler, of New York. Died
Jacob R. Eckfeldt, of Philadelphia.
William E. Du Bois, of Philadelphia.
John C. Trautwine, of Philadelphia.
John S. Hart, of Philadelphia.

1192.
1193.
1194.
1195.
1196.
1197.
1198.
1199.
1200.

1204.
1205.
1206.
1207.

-

-

[aet. 65.

Elected April 19, 1844.
1208.
1209.
1210.

S. S. Haldeman, of Lancaster County, Pa.
George W. Norris, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Joseph Carson, M.D., of Philadelphia.

Elected January 17, 1845.
1211.
1212.

1213.
1214.
1215,
1216.
1217.
1218.

Charles Frederick Beck, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died
Richard Owen, F.R.S., of London.
Sir James Clark, Bart., M.D., of London.
Prince Maximilian, of Wied, Germany.
James Copland, M.D., of London.
William Tell Poussin, of Paris.
J. A. Alexander, of Princeton, N. J. Died Jan. 28, 1860, aet. 50.
Frederick Von Raumer, of Berlin.

Elected April 18, 1845.
. Edward Miller, of Philadelphia.

Elected October 17, 1845.
1220.
1221.
1222.

William B. Carpenter, M.D., F.R.S. of London.
Sir William Jardine, Bart, of Scotland.
Professor Lepsius, of Berlin.

37

Elected January 16, 1846.
. Henry Holland, M.D., of London.
. Johannes Mueller, of Berlin. Died
. James Buchanan, of Lancaster.

Elected April 17, 1846.
. Lewis Walm, of Philadelphia. Died Dec. 20, 1863.
. James B. Rogers, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died June 15, 1852, aet. 50.

Elected October 16, 1846.
1228.
1229.

Richard S. McCulloh, of Philadelphia.
Ceva Grimaldi, Marquis of Pietracatella, Naples.

1230.

A. T. Kupffer, of St. Petersburg.

Elected April 16, 1847.
1231. U. J. Leverrier, of Paris.
1232.
1233.
1234.

John Y. Mason, of Virginia. Died Oct. 3, 1859.
Richard A. Tilghman, of Philadelphia.
William Procter, Jr., of Philadelphia.

Elected January 21, 1848.
1235.

John F. James, of Philadelphia.
1236. Robert Baird, D.D., of New York. Died
1237. J. Melville Gilliss, of Washington.
1238. J. C. Adams, St. John's College, Cambridge, England.
1239. Asa Gray, of Cambridge, Massachusetts.
1240. Gustav. Adolph Jahn, of Leipsic. Died 1862.

Elected April 21, 1848.
1241.
1242.

Simon Greenleaf of Harvard University. Died October, 1853.

1243.

William Kent, of New York. Died Jan. 4, 1861.
William L. Storrs, of Connecticut.
Joel Jones, Prest. of Girard Coll., Philada. Died Feb. 2, 1860, aet. 54.
John Reed, H.
of Dickinson
Alexander
Stephens,College.
M.D., of Died
New January
York. 19, 1850, aet. 64.

1244.
1245.
1246.

1247.
1248.
1249.

Harmar Denny, of Pittsburg, Penn.
Ralph J. Ingersoll, of Connecticut.

Died Jan. 29, 1852, aet. 58.

1250.

John N. Conyngham, of Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania.

1251.

Charles Picot, of Philadelphia.

1252.

E. Geddings, M.D., of Charleston, South Carolina.

Died June 26, 1852, aet. 60.

1253.

Calderon de la Barca, of Washington. Died May 31, 1861, act. 70.
F. A. Pouchet, M.D., of Rouen, France.
1255 . Miers Fisher Longstreth, of Philadelphia.
1256. Samuel F. B. Morse, of New York.
1254.

Elected January 19, 1849.
. E. N. Horsford, of Harvard University.

38
1258.

George P. Marsh, of Vermont.

1259.

John Goodsir, Esq., of Edinburgh.
John Hughes Bennett, M.D., of Edinburgh.
Francis Kiernan, Esq., of London.

Elected October 19, 1849.
1260.
1261.

-

1262. A. A. Gould, M.D., of Boston, Mass.
1263. Joseph Leidy, M.D., of Philadelphia.
1264.

W. S. W. Ruschenberger, M.D., U.S. Navy, Philadelphia.

1265.

1273.

Stephen Colwell, of Philadelphia.
John H. Towne, of Philadelphia.
Charles M. Wetherill, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Joel B. Reynolds, of Philadelphia. Died May 16, 1851, aet. 25.
Thomas S. Kirkbride, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Lucas Alaman, of Mexico. Died June 2, 1853.
Benjamin Apthorp Gould, Jr., of Cambridge, Mass.
George M. Totten, of Philadelphia.
Joseph W. Farnum, M.D., of New York.

1274.

Rev. Henry A. Boardman, D.D. Resigned November 30, 1859.

1275.

Thomas D. Muetter, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died March 16, 1859.

Elected January 17, 1851.
1266.

-

1267.
1268.
1269.
1270.
1271.
1272.

Elected April 18, 1851.

1276.

Caspar Morris, M.D., of Philadelphia.

1277.

William Pepper, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died Oct. 15, 1864, aet. 54.

1278.

Isaac Hazlehurst, of Philadelphia. Resigned July 15, 1859.
Peter McCall, of Philadelphia.
Joseph Pancoast, M.D., of Philadelphia.

1279.
1280.

Resigned Dec. 21, 1860.

1281.

Jacob G. Morris, of Philadelphia. Died Sept. 27, 1854, at 54.

1282.

Robert Patterson, of Philadelphia.

1283. Francesco Cav. Zantedeschi, of Padua.
1284. Daniel Kirkwood, of Pottsville.
1285. William Chauvenet, of U.S. Naval

Academy, Annapolis.

Elected October 17, 1851.
1286.

Hon. George Sharswood, of Philadelphia.

1287.

John Le Conte, of New York. Died Nov. 21, 1860, aet. 77.
Edward Hallowell, M.D., of Philada. Died Feb. 20, 1860, aet. 51.

1288.
1289.
1290.

Elisha K. Kane, M.D., of Philadelphia.
James Dundas, of Philadelphia.

Died Feb. 16, 1857, aet. 37.

1291.

Isaac R. Davis, of Philadelphia. Died February 4, 1857, aet. 48.

1292.

Francis Gurney Smith, M.D., of Philadelphia.
John Forsyth Meigs, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Hon. Edward King, of Philadelphia.

Elected January 16, 1852.
1293.
1294.
1295.

39
1296.

Charles Henry Davis, U.S. Navy.

1297. J. W. Bailey, of West Point Military Academy. Died Feb. 26, 1857.
1298 . Michel Chevalier, of Paris.
1299 . Alfred Stille, of Philadelphia.

Elected May 7, 1852.
1300 .

John Neill, M.D., of Philadelphia.
1301 . John J. Reese, M.D., of Philadelphia. Resigned August, 1861.
1302. J. S. Hubbard, of National Observatory, Washington. Died 1863.
1303. W. C. Bond, of Cambridge, Mass. Died January, 1859.
1304. Thomas B. Wilson, M.D., of Philadelphia.
1305. John Cassin, of Philadelphia.
1306. John H. Alexander, of Baltimore.

Elected November 5, 1852.
1307.

M. F. Maury, U.S. Navy. Expelled March 21, 1862.

Elected January 21, 1853.
1308. A. L. Crelle, of Berlin. Died 1856.
1309. C. F. Gauss, of Göttingen. Died February
1310.
1311.

B. Augustin Cauchy, of Paris.
J. Liouville, of Paris.

23, 1855, aet. 77.
Died May 23, 1857, wet, 67.

1312.

Dr. J. G. Fluegel, U.S. Consul at Leipsic. Digd

1313.

1319.

O. M. Mitchell, of Cincinnati. Died Oct., 1862, aet. 52.
Robert M. Bird, M.D., of Philadelphia. Died Jan. 23, 1854, aet. 48.
John L. Le Conte, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Edward E. Law, of Philadelphia. Resigned Sept. 16, 1864.
W. F. Lynch, of U.S. Navy. Expelled March 21, 1862.
John P. Kennedy, Secretary of the Navy.
Alfred Mordecai, of U.S. Army.

1320.

Thomas L. Patterson, Chief Engineer Chesapeake and Ohio Canal.

1314.
1315.
1316.
1317.
1318.

Żlected April 15, 1853.
1321.

Henry Grinnell, of New York.

1322.

John B. Biddle, M.D., of Philadelphia.

1323.

Elected July 15, 1853.
Dr. Marshall Hall, F.R.S., London and Edinburgh. Died August 11,
[1857, aet. 68.

1324.

Elected October 21, 1853.
Dr. Alexander Fischer von waldheim, of Moscow.

1325. Dr. Basile Sakharoff, of St. Petersburg.
1326. Dr. Peter Strelkowsky, of St. Petersburg.
1327.
1328.
1329.

Dr. Charles Dworjak, of St. Petersburg.
Fred. Geo. Wm. de Struve, of St. Petersburg. Died Nov. 1864, aet. 71.
Charles D. Arfwedson, of Stockholm.

40

Elected January 20, 1854.
1330.

Edward Stanley, F.R.S., of London. Died May 24, 1862, aet. 69.

James Paget, F.R.S., of London.
Sir J. F. W. Herschel, of London.
1333. E. Brown Sequard, M.D., of Paris.
1334. John H. B. Latrobe, of Baltimore.
1335. Montgomery C. Meigs, U.S. Army, Washington.
1336. Benjamin Hallowell, of Alexandria, Virginia.
1337. George Harding, of Philadelphia.
1338. Francis West, M.D., of Philadelphia.
1339. Frederick A. Genth, Ph.D., of Philadelphia.
11340. George A. McCall, of Philadelphia.
1341. Samuel M. Felton, of Philadelphia.
1342. Samuel D. Gross, M.D., of Louisville, Kentucky.
1331.

1332.

1343. Dr. Charles Renard, of Moscow.
1344. C. A. Dohrn, of Stettin.
1345.

Rev. William Bacon Stevens, D.D., of Philadelphia.

1346.

Benjamin Gerhard, of Philadelphia. Died June 18, 1861.
Elias Durand, of Philadelphia.
William V. Keating, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Joshua J. Cehen, M.D., of Baltimore.
Lord Mahón, of England.
James Lennox, of New York.
Eli K. Price, of Philadelphia.
Constant Guillou, of Philadelphia.

Elected April 21, 1854.
1347.
1348.
1349.
1350.
1351.
1352.
1353.

Elected July 21, 1854.
54. James D. Dana, of New Haven.
. Oliver Wolcott Gibbs, M.D., New York.
. James Hall, of Albany, New York.

Elected October 20, 1854.
. William Parker Foulke, of Philadelphia.

Elected January 19, 1855.
1358.

Spencer F. Baird, of Washington City, D.C.

1359.

C. Fr. Ph. von Martius, of Munich.

1360. William Haidinger, of Vienna.
1361. Victor Regnault, of Paris.

Elected April 20, 1855.
1362. Samuel Powel, of Newport, Rhode Island.
1363. Elisha J. Lewis, M.D., of Philadelphia.
1364. Rev. E. P. Rogers, D.D., of Philadelphia.
\

41

Elected July 20, 1855.
1365.

Robert E. Rogers, M.D., of Philadelphia.

1366.

Rev. Albert Barnes, of Philadelphia.

1367.

Henry Coppee, of Philadelphia.
George Allen, of Philadelphia.
Strickland Kneass, of Philadelphia.
Henry William Field, of London.
John P. Brown, of Constantinople.
George Augustus Matile, of Philadelphia.
Thomas L. Kane, of Philadelphia.
William B. Reed, of Philadelphia.
Clement A. Finley, U.S. Army, of Philadelphia.
Albert S. Letchworth, of Philadelphia.

Elected October 19, 1855.

Elected January 18, 1856.
1368.
1369.
1370.
1371.
1372.
1373.
1374.
1375.
1376.

Elected April 18, 1856.
1377.
1378.
1379.
1380.

Theodore Lacordaire, of Liège.
Dr. Hermann Burmeister, of Halle.
Samuel L. Hollingsworth, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Christian Olrik, of Denmark.
-

Elected July 18, 1856.
1381.

1383.

John C. Adamson, D.D., of Philadelphia.
Peter Lesley, of Philadelphia.
Rev. John Leyburn, of Philadelphia.

1384.

Hugh Blair Grigsby, LL.D., of Virginia.

1385.

Robert P. Harris, M.D., of Philadelphia.

1386.

Thomas F. Betton, M.D., of Germantown.
Theodore Cuyler, of Philadelphia.
Thomas P. James, of Philadelphia.
Nathaniel P. Shurtleff, M.D., of Boston.
Fairman Rogers, of Philadelphia.

1382.

Elected October 17, 1856.

Elected January 16, 1857.
1387.
1388.
1389.
1390.

Elected April 17, 1857.
1391.
1392.
1393.

B. Howard Rand, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Charles M. Cresson, M.D., of Philadelphia.

1394.

Rev. Kingston Goddard, of Philadelphia.

1.395 .

J. Lawrence Smith, M.D., of Louisville.
6

42

Elected July 17, 1857.
1396.

E. Spencer Miller, of Philadelphia.

1397.

A. A. Humphreys, U. S. Topographical Engineers.

1398.
1399.

Elia Lombardini, Civil Engineer, of Milan, Italy.
Henry C. Wayne, U.S. Army.

1400.

W. H. Allen, President of Girard College, Philadelphia.

1401.

William M. Uhler, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Charles E. Smith, of Philadelphia.
Edward Hartshorne, M.D., of Philadelphia.

Elected October 16, 1857.

Elected January 15, 1858.

Elected April 16, 1858.
Elected October 15, 1858.
1402.
1403.

Elected January 21, 1859.
1404.
1405.
1406.

Oswald Thompson, of Philadelphia.
Edmund C. Evans, M.D., of Chester County, Pennsylvania.
Caspar Wister, M.D., of Philadelphia.

Elected April 15, 1859.

1409.

Walter H. Lowrie, Judge of Supreme Court of Pennsylvania.
William S. Vaux, of Philadelphia.
Wm. R. Palmer, U. S. T. E. Died 1862.

1410.

Samuel H. Dickson, M.D., Prof. Med. Jeffer. Coll., Phil.

1411.

Henry Carleton, of Philadelphia. Died March 21, 1863, aet. 76.
William A. Hammond, M.D., U. S. Army.

1407.
1408.

Elected July 15, 1859.
Elected October 21, 1859.
1412.

Elected January 20, 1860.
1413.
1414.
1415.

P. Angelo Secchi, Professor of Astronomy at Rome.
Aubrey H. Smith, Attorney-at-Law, of Philadelphia.
Francis W. Lewis, M.D., of Philadelphia.

Elected July 20, 1860.
1416.
1417.

Francis V. Hayden, M.D., of Washington.
Sidney George Fisher, of Philadelphia.

1418. Sir Roderick I. Murchison, of London.
1419.
1420.

Rev. Adam Sedgewick, of England.
Leonce Elie de Beaumont, of Paris.

43
Henry Milne Edwards, of Paris.
Henry D. Bronn, of Heidelberg. Died July 5, 1862, aet. 62.
1423. Theodore L. W. Bischoff, of München.
1424. Hermann Von Meyer, of Frankfort am Main.
1425. Andreas Wagner, of München.
1426. Joseph Hyrtl, of Vienna.
1427. Sir William E. Logan, of Montreal.
1428. Heinrich Rose, of Berlin. Died Jan. 27, 1864, aet. 68.
1429. George Jaeger, of Stuttgardt.
1430. M. St. Claire Deville, of Paris.
1431. William H. Harvey, of Dublin.
1432. Jean Baptiste Dumas, of Paris.
1433. Edouard de Verneuil, of Paris.
1434. Claude Bernard, of Paris.
1421.

1422.

Elected January 18, 1861.
1435.
1436.

Daniel R. Goodwin, Provost Univ. Penna., Philadelphia.
Leo Lesquereux, of Columbus, Ohio.

Elected April 19, 1861.
1437.
1438.

John Lothrop Motley, Minister U.S. at Vienna.
Pasqual de Gayangos, of Madrid.

1439. John Curwen, M.D., of Harrisburg.

1441.

Charles Des Moulins, of Bordeaux.
Thomas Sterry Hunt, of Montreal.

1442.

Paolo Volpicelli, of Rome.

1443.

Mirza Alexander Kasem Beg, of St. Petersburg.
Otto Boehtlingk, of St. Petersburg.
G. Forchhammer, of Copenhagen.
J. S. Steenstrup, of Copenhagen.
C. J. Thomsen, Director R. Mus, Copenhagen.
Andrew C. Ramsay, of England.
Edouard Desor, of Neufchâtel.
L. G. De Koninck, of Liège.

1440.

Elected October 18, 1861.
Elected January 17, 1862.
1444.
1445.
1446.
1447.
1448.
1449.
1450.

1451. Joachim Barrande, of Prague.
1452. Robert W. Bunsen, of Heidelberg.

,

1453.

William Hofmann, of London.

1454.

Heinrich R. Goeppert, of Breslau.

Alexander Braun, of Leipsig,
William J. Hamilton, of London.
1457. Sir William J. Hooker, of London.
1458 . J. I. Kaup, of Darmstadt.
1459 . J. A. Froude, of Oxford.

1455.

1456.

44
1460.
1461.

Hermann Lebert, M.D., of Breslau.
S. Wier Mitchell, M.D., of Philadelphia.

Elected April 18, 1862.
1462.
1463.
1464.
1465.
1466.
1467.

F. L. Otto Roehrig, M.D., of Philadelphia.
Henry L. Abbot, U. S. T. E.
Oswald Heer, of Zurich.
John Lindley, of London.
Justus Von Liebig, of Munich.
Frederick Woehler, of Göttingen.

1468. James W. Dawson, of Montreal.
1469.
1470.
1471.

Samuel F. Dupont, U.S. Navy.
George Engelman, Prof. N. H., St. Louis.
William S. Sullivant, of Columbus, Ohio.

Elected October 17, 1862.
1472.
1473.
1474.

Evan Pugh, Pres. Agri. Coll. Penna. Died April, 1864.
Andrew A. Henderson, M.D., U. S. N.
Robert Cornelius, of Philadelphia.

1475. Rudolf Virchow, of Berlin.
1476. Fred. T. Frerichs, of Berlin.
1477.

Thomas J. Lee (formerly U.S. T. E.), of Maryland.

1478.

Louis Stromeyer, of Hanover.
Karl Rokitansky, of Vienna.
Henry Winsor, of Philadelphia.

1479.
1480.

Elected January 16, 1863.
1481.
1482.
1483.
1484.
1485.
1486.
1487.
1488.
1489.
1490.

James Y. Simpson, of Edinbro'.
Theodore Schwann, of Liège.
Jacob Grimm, of Berlin. Died 1863.
Franz Bopp, of Berlin.
Ernest Renan, of Paris.
Max Mueller, of Cambridge.
Josiah D. Whitney, Geologist, of California.
Andrew H. Worthen, Geologist, of Illinois.
Daniel Wilson, of Toronto, C. W.
Frederick Troyon, of Lausanne.

1491. M. Boucher des Perthes, of Abbeville.
1492.
1493.
1494.
1495.

Pliny E. Chase, of Philadelphia.
I. I. Hayes, M.D., of West Philadelphia.
George Smith, M.D., of Delaware Co., Pa.

1496.

John M. Read, of Philadelphia.
Edward Jarvis, M.D., of Dorchester, Mass.

1497.

J. E. Hilgard, Ass. U. S. C. Sur., of Washington.

1498.

Charles A. Schott, Ass. U.S. C. Sur., of Washington.
Thomas E. Blackwell, of Montreal. Died 1863.

Elected April 17, 1863.

1499.

45
1500.

Benjamin W. Richardson, M.D., of London.
Thomas Hill, Pres. Harvard Coll., Cambridge.
1502. William D. Whitney, Prof. Yale Coll, New Haven.
1503. Chester Dewey, Prof. Rochester University, N. Y.
1504. William H. Green, Prof. Theo. Sem., Princeton, N. J.
1505. Hon. James Pollock, Direc. U. S. Mint, Philadelphia.
1506. E. A. Washburne, Rector of St. Mark's, Philadelphia.
1507. James McClune, Prof. Ast. C. High School, Philadelphia.
1508. Calvin Pease, D.D., of Rochester. Died Sept. 17, 1863.
1501.

Elected July 17, 1863.
1509.

John Biddle, of Philadelphia.
1510. Henry Hartshorne, M.D., of Philadelphia.
1511. David F. Eschricht, M.D., of Copenhagen.
1512. C. G. N. David, M.D., of Copenhagen.
1513. Frederick Keller, M.D., of Zurich.
1514. Peter W. Sheafer, Geologist, of Pottsville, Pa.
1515. A. Delesse, Prof. Ecole des Mines, Paris.
1516. A. Daubree, Prof. Acad. of Strasburg.
1517. R. M. S. Jackson, M.D., of Cresson, Pa.
1518. R. A. F. Penrose, M.D., of Philadelphia.

Elected October 16, 1863.
1519.
1520.

Robert Briggs, of Philadelphia.
Joseph Lesley, of Philadelphia.

Elected January 15, 1864.
21. A. Morlot, Prof. of Acad. Lausanne.

1522. Thomas Chase, Prof. Nat. Hist. Haverford College, Pa.

Elected April 15, 1864.
1523.

1534.

Benjamin V. Marsh, of Philadelphia.
James T. Hodge, Geologist, of New York.
George Kirchoff, Prof. Univ. Heidelberg.
Francois J. Pictet, Prof. Acad. of Geneva.
Benjamin Studer, Prof. Univ. Berne.
Alphonse Count de Gasparin, of Paris.
Peter Tunner, Prof. School of Mines, of Leoben.
A. Thury, of Geneva.
A. Tholuck, Prof. Theol. Halle an der Saale.
Carl Schinz, M.D., of Strasburg.
William Sellers, of Philadelphia.
R. S. Smith, Pres. Girard College, Philadelphia.

1535.

Alexander wilcocks, M.D., of Philadelphia.

1536.

Joseph Harrison, of Philadelphia.

1524.
1525.
1526.
1527.
1528.
1529.
1530.
1531.
1532.
1533.

Elected July 15, 1864.

46
1537 .
1538 .

John Foster Kirke, of Massachusetts.
Geo. H. Cooke, Prof. Geology, N. Brunswick, N. J.

Elected October 21, 1864.
1539 .

Thomas C. Porter, Prof. of Theology, Lancaster, Pa.
1540 . John Bost, Pasteur à Laforce, près de Bergerac, France.
1541 . Charles T. Krauth, D.D., Prof. Theol., of Philadelphia.
1542 . R. H. Lamborn, Metallurgist, of Philadelphia.

IND EX.
*...*

Abbot, H. L.
1463
Abercrombie, Jas. 612
Abert, J. J.
101.7
Abrahamson, J. N. B. 970
Adams, Dr.
329
Adams, John,
573
Adams, John Q.
816
Adams, J. C.
1238
Adamson, John C. 1381
Addison, Alexander, 528

Adelung, Fred. Won 815
Adet, P. A.

605
757
289
864

Adrain, Robert,
Adye, Stephen,
Afzelius, Peter,

Agardh, Charles A. 1050
Agassiz, Louis,
1175
Alaman, Lucas,
1270
Albers, J. A.
84.4
Alexander, James, 165
Alexander, Stephen, 1115
Alexander, J. A.
1217
Alexander, John H. 1306

Alison, Francis,
Allison, Burgess,

Allison, N. S.
Allen, Andrew,
Allen, Benjamin,

32
507
772
61
756
1368
63
65
54

Allen, George,
Allen, James,
Allen, John,
Allen, William,
Allen, William H. 1490
Anderson, Alex.
534
Anderson, Henry J. 952
Anderson, Jas.
109
Anderson, J., LL.D. 581
Anderson, Jas., M.D. 539
Andrada e Silva, J.de 876
Andreani, Paul,
556
Andrews, John,
424

£)

Angelis, P. de
Antill, Edward,

1122
23
221

Arbo, John,
Arfwedson, Chas.D. 1329

Arthaud, M.
497 Beattie, James,
449
Aspden, Matthias, 123 Beaufort, Francis, 1131
Audubon, John Jas. 1005 Beauvois, Palisot de 561
Beck, T. Romeyn, 1106
1211
Bache, Alex. Dallas, 963 Beck, Charles F.
Bache, Franklin,
847 Beckley, John,
550
595
Bache, Hartman,
1006 Bedford, Dr.
Bache, William,
631 Bedford, Paul,
195
358
Bailey, Joel,
*271 Bee, Thomas,
173
Bailey, J. W.
1297 Belcher, Jonathan,
Baird, Absalom,
530 Belknap, Jeremy,
374
Baird, Robert,
1236 Bell, John,
1011
Baird, Spencer F. 1358 Bembridge, Henry, 281
Baker, William,
477 Benezet, John,
227
Balbo, Pros. Count 993 Bennett, John H.
1260
170
Baldwin, Matt. W. 1023 Bensell, Charles,
750
Baldwin, Henry,
1091 Bentley, William,
Bancker, Charles N. 916 Bergius, Peter,
114
Bancker, Gerard,
296 Bergmann, Torbern, 304
1434
Bancroft, George, 1157 Bernard, Claude,
391
Banks, Joseph,
474 Bertholff, Baron de
Barca, Cald'n de la 1253 Berzelius, John J.
851
1128
Barclay, Robert,
471 Bessel, F. W.
Bard, Samuel,
152 Bethune, Geo. W. 1104
143
Barlow, Joel,
734 Bettle, William,
954
Barnes, Albert,
1366 Betton, Samuel,
Barns, Thomas,
483 Betton, Thomas F. 1386
147
Barnsley, Thomas,
77 Biddle, Clement,
Barnwell, William, 665 Biddle, Clement C. 861
Barrande, Joachim, 1451 Biddle, Edward,
235
Bartlett, W. H. C. 1133 Biddle, James,
96
1509
Barton, Benj. Smith, 496 Biddle, John,
Barton, Richard P. 563 Biddle, John B.
1322
Barton, Thomas,
74 Biddle, John G.
779
Barton, William,
458 Biddle, Nicholas,
764
Barton, W. P. C.
765 Biddle, Owen,
136
Bartram, Isaac,
140 Biddle, Thomas,
957
Bartram, John,
2 Bigelow, Jacob,
826
Bartram, Moses,
134 Bigsby, John J.
910
Bartram, William, 157 Billé, Steen,
1013
Bayard, James A.
212 Bingham, William, 453
Bayard, John,
481 Binney, Barnabas,
385
Baynton, John,
282 Binney, Horace,
730
Beach, Samuel,
518 Bird, Robert M.
1314
Beasley, Frederick, 773 Bischoff, T. L. W. 1423

48
Blackwell, Robert, 386
Blackwell, T. E.
1499
Blagden,
493
Blainville, H. M. de 831
Blair, Samuel,
628
Blanchet, Francis,
657
Bleakley, John,
516
Blumenbach, J. F. 639
Boardley, J. B.
364

Bujalsky,
Bull, Marcus,

1021
937

Bunsen, Robt. W.

1452 Clay, Joseph,

Burd, Edward,
Burmann, N. L.

Boardman, H. A.

1274

Butt, J. Martin,

394
541
1378
1022
945
1203
19 |

Böhtlingk,

1444
649

Cabanis, M.

Bollmann, J. E.

Bonaparte, Charles,
Bonaparte, Lucien,
Bond, Phineas,
Bond, Thomas,
Bond, Thomas, Jr.
Bond, W. C.
Bonnycastle, C.
Booth, James C.
Bopp, Franz,
Borden, Simeon,
Borgnis, J. A.
Bost, John,
Botta, Carlo,

Burmeister, H.

Burrough, Marm.
Bustamente, J. M.
Butler, Benj F.

905 Cadet, M.
888 Cadwalader, John,

4.38
466

231

Cadwalader, Lamb. 230
28 Cadwalader, Dr. Thos. 6
29

78 Cadwalader, Thos.

913

Caldwell, Charles, 618
Caldwell, Samuel,
St.
1096 Callison, A. C. P. 1145

1303
1141

Campbell, George, 1065
1168 Camper, Adrian G. 718
494
852 Camper, Petrus,
1540 Campomanes, Count 370

1484

Clarkson, Gerardus, 211
Clarkson, Matthew, 241
643

Cleaveland, Parker, 820
Clifford, Thomas,
248
Clinton, De Witt,
777
Cloud, Joseph,
712
Clymer, George,
421
Coates, Benjamin H. 885
Cohen, Joshua J.
1349
Colden, Cadwalader, 31
Coleman, William, 27
Coles, Edward,
1097
Calhoun, Samuel,
781
Collin, Nicholas,
488
Collins, Zaccheus, 697
Collyer, Wm. Bengo, 893
Colwell, Stephen, 1265
Condie, D. Francis, 1046
Condorcet, Marquis, 330
Conover, Samuel F. 716
Conrad, Solomon W. 872
Conyngham, J. N. 1250
Conyngham, R.
840

1188 Cooke, G. H.
1538
794 Cancrine, Count
Boucher des Perthes, 1490 Candelle, A. P. de 1156 Coombe, Thomas,
62
888 Coombe, Rev. Thos. 309
Bowditch, Nathaniel, 741 Canino, Prince of

Bowdoin, James,
Bowen, Samuel,
Boyé, Martin H.
Boys, William,

Carena, Hyacinth, 994
Carey, Henry C.
1031
1126 Carey, Matthew,
867
640 Carlisle, Nicholas, 1049
Bradford, Thomas,
95 Carpenter, W. B.
1220
396
Bradford, William, 393 Carson, John,
1210
Brahm, F. J. S. de 375 Carson, Joseph,
254
Braun, Alexander, 1455 Carter, Landon,
9:29
Brayley, E. W.
1165 Cass, Lewis,
1305
Brearly, David,
489 Cassin, John,
Breck, Samuel,
1088 Castilione, Count de 443
Bridges, Robert,
119.3 Cathrall, Isaac,
613
Briggs, Isaac,
596 Cauchy, B. A.
1310
691
Briggs, Robert,
1519 Cavalos, Pedro,
692
Bring, E. S.
1020 Cavanillas, A. J.
Bringhurst, James, 326 Ceracchi, Joseph,
560
Bringhurst, Jos.
209 Chalmers, Lionel,
197
Brinton, J. H.
748 Chapman, John,
158
Brissot, de Warville, 506 Chapman, Nathaniel, 721
437
Brockenbrough, J. 1042 Charles, M.
Brongniart, Alex.
830 Chase, Pliny E.
1492
Bronn, Hein. D.
14:22 Chase, Thomas,
1522
Brook,
258 Chastellux, Chev. de 361
Brown, James,
943 Chauncey, Charles, 767
Brown, John P.
1371 Chauvenet, Wm.
1285
Brown, Samuel,
651 Chevalier, Michel, 1298
Bruce, Archibald,
727 Cheves, Langdon, 857
47
Bryan, George,
37 Chew, Benjamin,
Bryant, William,
322 Chew, Benjamin, Jr. 454
Buchanan, George, 517 Christison, Robert, 1153
Buchanan, James, 1225 Church, John,
674
Buchan, Earl of
582 Clark, Daniel,
256
Buffon,
117 Clark, Sir James,
1213
462
261

Cooper, James F.
Cooper, Myles,
Cooper, Thomas,
Cope, Thomas P.
Copland, James,
Coppee, Henry,
Coquebert, Baron,
Cornelius, Robert,

886
253
663

1178
1215
1367

882
1474

Correà de Serra, Jos. 754
Coste,
Coupigny,

367
57.1

Courtenay, Ed. H. 1040
Coxe, Daniel,

291

Coxe, John Redman, 641
Coxe, Tench,
601
Cox, John,
492
Craig, Isaac,
Crawford, Adair,

Crell, Lorenz,

460
395
442
1308

Crelle, A. L.
Cresson, John C.
1095
Cresson, Charles M. 1393

Crevecoeur, St. Jean, 491
Crosse, John Green, 1066
Cullen, William,
26
Cunat, Joanne Papt. 616
Carleton, Henry,
1411
Currie, William,
568
Curwen, John,
1439
Cutbush, James,
771
Cuthbert, Ross,
733
Cutler, Manasseh,
397
Cuyler, Theodore, 1387

49
1344 Endlicher, Stephen, 1166
Da Costa, Macedo, 1058 Dohrn C. A.
294 Engelmann, George, 1470
Dallas, Alex J.
555 Dolland. Peter,
1511
Dallas, George M. 1125 Dorr, Benjamin,
1147 Eschricht, D. F.
Dalman, J. W.
938 Dorsey, John Syng, 780 Espy, James P.
1039
3
1164 Evans, Cadwalader,
Dana, James D.
1354 Doucette, De la
153
11.90 Evans, David,
D'Angeville,
379 Downes, John,
825 Evans, Edmund C. 1405
Danmours,
366 Drake, Daniel,
207
Dantes Pereira, J. M. 951 Draper, John W. 1194 Evans, Rowland,
19
Darlington, William, 892 Drayton, W.
104.7 Eve, Oswell,
Darwin, Erasmus, 567 Drinker, Henry,
240 Everett, Alexander, 1002
246 Everett, Edward,
999
D'Aschkow, Princess, 510 Drinker, John,
38
Daubenton,
331 Du Bois, W. E.
1205 Ewing, John,
1140
332 Eyries, J. B. B.
Daubeny, C. G. B. 1080 Dubourg,
Daubrée, A.
1516 Dubourg, William,
715
654
1008 Falberg, Samuel,
David, C. G. N.
1512 Ducatel, Julius T.
188
236 Famitz, Professor,
Davidson, James,
105 Duché, Jacob,
369 Duché Rev. Jacob,
Davidson, Robert,
15 Faraday, Michael, 1118
1273
145 Duffield, Benjamin, 427 Farnum. Jos. W.
Davis, Benjamin,
Davis, Charles H. 1296 Duffield, Edward,
71 Farmer, Ferdinand, 118
1291 Duffield, George,
Davis, Isaac R.
344 Fayette, Marq de la 356
752 Duffield, Samuel,
Davis, John,
124 Featherstonhaugh, G. 730
Davis, Rev. John,
108 Duhail, Louis Étien, 614 Felton, Samuel M. 1341
268
67 i'erguson, James,
Davy, Humphrey,
745 Dulaney, Daniel,
1432 Ferguson, William, 535
Dawson, James W. 1468 Dumas, J. B.
661
Deabbate, Gaspard, 883 Dutneril, Constant, 761 Ferrer, J. J. de
441
650 Feutry, M.
Dearborn, Benjamin, 679 Dunbar, William,
312 Field, Henry Wm. 1370
Deas, John,
225 Duncan, Andrew,
1290 Filsted, Samuel,
286
De Beaumont, E.
1420 Dundas, James,
505
De Butts, Elisha,
862 Dundonald, Earl of 587 Findley, William,
De Gasparin, A.
1528 Dunglison, Robley, 1012 Finley, Clement A. 1375
381 Fischer, Dr. Alex. 1324
De Guyangos, P.
1438 Dunlap, John,
De Koninck, L. G. 1450 Dunlap, Thomas, 1076 Fisher, Joshua Fr. 1029
1417
1056 Fisher, S. G.
Delambre, J. Babt. J. 680 Dunn, N.
89 Fisher, Thomas,
178
Delamétrie, J. C.
798 Du Ponceau, J. M.
De Lancy, Wm. H. 958 Du Ponceau, Pet. S. 551 Fisher, William R. 1129
7:20 Flores, Jos. Mig. de 499
Delany, Sharp,
325 Dupont, Iréné,
911
Delesse, A.
1515 Dupont, S. F.
1469 Flourens, M.
1312
1347 Flügel, J. G.
Deleuze, J. P. F.
799 Durand, Elias,
365
Del Rio, Andres,
991 Dworjak, Charles, 1327 Fontana, Abbe,

Demarest, A. G.

Fooks, Paul,

837

137

832 Forbes, John,
1117
Demmé, C. R.
1119 Eberle, John,
1445
1295 Forchhammer,
Denny, Harmar,
1248 Eckert, Geo. N.
Denormandie, John, 112 Eckfeldt, Jacob R. 1204 Forest, A. R. de la 559
Des Moulins, C.
1440 Edwards, Bryan,
316 Foronda, Valent de 675
480 Forster, J. Reinhold, 579
Desor, Edouard,
1449 Edwards, Enoch,
De Verneuil, E.
1433 Elam, Samuel,
644 Forstrom, John Erie, 725
Deveze,
594 Eldridge, Samuel,
144 Fothergill, Anthony, 558
264
Deville, St. Claire, 1430 Ellet, Charles, Jr. .1182 Fothergill, John,
384
Dewees, William P. 842 Ellicot, Andrew,
399 Foulke, John,
272 Foulke, W. Parker, 1357
Dewey, Chester,
1503 Ellicott, Joseph,
16
De Witt, Simeon,
461 Elliot, Rev. Mr.
199 Foxcroft, John,
226
Dick, Alexander,
190 Elliot, Samuel,
164 Foxcroft, Thomas,
383
Dick, James,
218 Elliot, Stephen,
835 Fox, George,
81
Dickerson, Mahlon, 719 Ellis, John,
317 Fox, Joseph,
1136
321 Fox, Robert W.
Dickinson, James,
82 Elmer, Jonathan,
Dickinson, John,
8 Elwyn, A. L.
1.192 Fraley, Frederick, 1170
1196
Dickson, S. H.
1410 Emerson, Gouvern'r, 1030 Francis, J. W.
803
935 Frank, J Peter,
Dillingham, W. H. 1187 Emlen, George,
1
1086 Franklin, Benjamin,
Dixon, Jeremiah,
174 Emmet, John P.
13
1098 Franklin, William,
Dobson, Judah,
1116 Encke, J. F.

7

50
Franklin, William T.422
Frazer, John F.

1160

Gould, A. A.
1262 Harris, Thomas,
Gould, Ben. A., Jr. 1271 Harris, William,

Freire, Cypr. Ribero, 608 Gråberg di H. J.

927

Harrison, Joseph,

Graeme, Thomas,
18 Harrison, Joseph,
Graham, James D. 1139 Harrison, Peter,
Granchain, Chev. de 445 Hart, John S.
Fulton, Robert,
Furness, William H. 1130 Grandpré, J. M. de 599 Hartshorne, Edwd.
593 Hartshorne, H.
Fuss, Nicholas,
823 Grassi,

Frerichs, F.T.
Froude, J. A.

1476
1459
732

947

1084
168

1536
169
1207

1403
1510

Hartsborne, Joseph, 783
Gage, General,
119
Harvey, W. H.
1431
Hassler, Ferd. Rud. 723
Gale, Benjamin,
24
Gallatin, Albert,
532
703
Hawes, William,
Hayden, F. V.
1416
Galloway, Joseph,
5
Galvez, Mariano, 1063 Green, W. H.
Hayes, I. I.
1493
Gamble, Archibald, 376 Greenleaf, Simon, 1242 Hays, Isaac,
986
Garbier, Hubert,
44() Greenway, James,
583 Hazard, Ebenezer, 357
1241 Hazlehurst, Isaac, 1278
Garden, Alexander, 11 Grier, Robert C.
Gardner, Valentine, 238 Griffith, Robert E.
948 Heckewelder, John, 626
1079 Heer, Oswald,
1464
Gardoqui, Diego de 487 Griffith, T. W.
Gardoqui, Francis de 519 Griffitts, Samuel P. 400 Helmuth, Just. H. C. 377
Garnet, John,
67t, Grigsby, Hugh B.
769
1384 Hembel, Wm., Jr.
1473
Gastellier,
435 Grimaldi, Ceva,
1229 Henderson, A. A.
Gaston, William,
S06 Grimm, Jacob,
1045
1483 Henry, Joseph,
451
Gauld, Geo. 314; see 270 Grinnell, Henry,
1321 Henry, Thomas,
Gauss, C. F.
1309 Griscom, John,
149
1057 Henry, William,
Gray, Asa,
Gray, George,
Gray, Isaac,
Gray, James,
Green, Ashbel,

Geddings, E.

1252

Grivel, M.

1239
388
360
786
504
1504

36

Herschel, John,

1332

Herschel, William, 404

Genth, Fred. A.
1339 Grosche, John Gottl. 542
1342
George, Sidney,
192 Gross, Samuel D.
Gerard,
342 Guald, George, 270, 314
Gerhard, Benjamin, 1346 Guichen, Count de 398
Gerhard, W. W.
1176 Guillemard, John, 630
Gibbes, George,
743 Guillou, Constant,
1353
Gibbons, Thomas, 339 Guizot, Fran. P. G. 1142
Gibbs, O. Wolcott, 1355 Gummere, John,
778
Gibson, James,
726 Gutzlaff, Charles,
1113

Heymitz, Baron de 495
Heywood, Thos. Jr. 389
Hicks, Gilbert,
122
Hilgard, J. E.
1497
Hill, Henry,
277

Gibson, John B.

Hill, Thomas,

Gibson, William,

859
848
202

Hermelin, Baron,

392

Hewson, Thomas F. 660
Hewson, William,

234

1501

Hahn, John David, 266 Hillegas, Michael, 176
Gill, John,
224
Haidinger, William, 1360 Himili, John,
747 Hitchcock, Edward, 1154
Gillis, J. Melville, 1237 Haighton, John,
768 Hockley, Richard,
104
Gilmor, Robt, Jr.
686 Haines, Reuben,
1208 Hodge, Hugh,
598
Gilpin, Henry D. 1009 Haldeman, S. S.
73 Hodge, Hugh L.
1016
Gilpin, Joseph,
273 Hall, David,
1356 Hodge, J. T.
1524
Gilpin, Joshua,
688 Hall, James,
770 Hodgson, William B. 985
Gilpin, Thomas,
247 Hall, John E.
1323 Hofmann, William, 1453
Gilpin, Thomas,
776 Hall, Marshall,
533
1336 Hoge, John,
Giraldes, J. P. C. de 940 Hallowell, Benj.
420
Girardin, L. H.
830 Hallowell, Ed, M.D. 1288 Hoge, Jonathan,
Glentworth, George, 215 Hamilton, Alexander, 526 Holbrook, John Ed. 1094
Gloucester, Arch.
287 Hamilton, James,
53 Holiday, Henry,
107
Gloxin, Beujamin, 536 Hamilton, William, 633 Holland, Capt.
338
1456 Holland, Henry,
Goddard, Paul B., 1132 Hamilton, W. J.
1223
Goddard, Kingston, 1394 Hammond, Wm. A. 1412 Hollingsworth, Levi, 249
Godman, John D.
915 Harding, George, 1337 Hollingsworth, S.L. 1379
Godon, Silvain,
735 Barding, Rev. Mr.
92 Holmes, Abiel,
792
Goldsborough, Robt. 538 Hare, Chas. W.
788 Holyoke, Edward,
110
Gonzales, Francis A.1004 Hare, J. I. Clark, 1172 Hooker, Nathaniel, 126
Good, John Mason, 749 Hare, Robert, Jr.
677 Hooker, William,
1457
Goodsir, John,
1259 Harlan, Richard,
873 Hopkins, Stephen, 167
Goodwin, D. R.
1435 Harris, Levett,
858 Hopkins, William,
133
1385 Hopkinson, Francis, 10
Göppert, H. R.
1454 Harris, Robert P.

51
Hopkinson, John P. 1010
Hopkinson, Joseph, 787
Hormayer,
845
Horner, William E. 843
Horsfield, Thomas 977
Horsford, E. N.
1257
Hosack, David,
746
Howell, Joshua,
132
Hubbard, J. S.
1302
Huck, Richard,
219

Jenks, William,
Jenner, Edward,
Johnson, Wm.
Johnson, William,

1072
693
120

150

Johnson, W. (Judge), 744
Johnston, Francis,
Jomard,

Jones, Isaac,
Jones, Joel,

455
974
84
1245.
260
323

Jones, John,
Humboldt, Alex. de 695 Jones, John,
Humboldt, Wm. von 868 Jones, Robt. Strettell, 85
996
Humphreys, A.A. 1397 Jones, Thomas P.
3.19
Humphreys, David, 687 Jones, Walter,
659
Humphreys, Joshua, 512 Jones, William,
Humphreys, Samuel, 922 Jones, William, Capt. 701
Hunt, T. S.
1441 Julien, Marc A.
992
Hunter, John,
475 Julien, Stanislaus, 1189
Huntington, Samuel, 363 Justice, George M. 1105
Hupsch, Baron de 523
1289
Hutchins, Joseph, 223 Kane, Elisha K.
914
Hutchins, Thomas, 293 Kane, John K.
Hutchinson, James, 343 Kane, Thomas L. 1373
1443
Hyrtl, Joseph,
1426 Kasem Beg, A.
Kaup, J. J.
1458
Ingenhausz,
434 Kearsly, John, Sr.
90
Ingersoll, Charles J. 785 Kearsly, John, Jr. 210
Ingersoll, Jared,
362 Keating, William H. 879
Ingersoll, Joseph R. 919 Keating, William W. 1348
Ingersoll, Ralph I. 1249 Keller, Frederick, 1513
Ingham, Samuel D. 1124 Kendall, E. Otis, 1161
Irving, David,
11:44 Kennedy, John P. 1318

965
Irving, Washington, 967 Kent, James,
Izard, George,
724 Kent, William,
1243
12
Izard, Ralph,
198 Kidd, John,
Kiernan, Francis, 1261
Jackson, David,
564 King, Edward,
1294
Jackson, Isaac R. 1151 Kinnersly, Ebenezer, 55
1525
Jackson, James,
822 Kirchhoff, G.
Jackson, R. M. S. 1517 Kirkbride, Joseph, 113

Lane,

292

Langles, Lewis M. 828
Lanjuinais, Count, 834
Lardner, Lynford,
57
La Roche, Réné,
933
Larocque, A. J.
610
Larrey, Baron,
1007
L'Asteyrie, C. P.
728
Latreille, P. A.
838
Latrobe, Benj. H.
645
Latrobe, John H. B. 1334
Laurens, Henry,
298
Laval, John,
909
Lavoisier,
336
Law, Edward E. 1316
Lawrance, J. O’B. 887
Lawrence, William, 894
Lea, Isaac,

953

Lebert, H.
1460
Le Comte, M. F. H. 603
Le Conte, John,
1287
Le Conte, John L. 1315
Lee, Arthur,
68
Lee, Francis,
128
Lee, T. J.

1477

Legare, Hugh S.
1087
Le Gaur, Peter,
520
Leidy, Joseph,
1263
Lenox, James,
1351
Lenthall, John,
1179
Leopold II. G. D. 1174
Lepsius,
1222
Lerebours, Alex.
609
Le Roux,
333
Le Roy,
302, 432
Le Roy,
432, 302
Lesley, Joseph,
1520
Lesley, Peter,
1382
Leslie, Charles R. 1068
Leslie, Robert,
590
Kirkbride,
T.
S.
1269
Jackson, Samuel,
884
Lesquereux, L.
1436
Jacobs, Benjamin,
183 Kirke, John F. , 1537 Lesseps, Mathieu, 853
Jacobs, William S. 670 Kirkwood, Daniel, 1285 Leseuer, Charles A. 797
446 Letchworth, A. S. 1376
Jäger, George,
1429 Kirwan, Richard,
576 Letombe,
669
Jahn, Gust. Adolph, 1240 Kittera, John W.
470
James, Abel,
175 Klaproth, Julius,
901 Letsom, John C.
439
James, Edwin,
1024 Klingstedt, Baron de 301 Le Veillard,
1231
James, Hugh,
401 Kneass, Strickland, 1369 Leverrier, U.J.
1363
James, John F.
1235 Knox, Henry,
544 Lewis, Elisha J.
403 Lewis, Francis W. 1415
James, Joseph,
456 Kosciozko, Thad.
1541 Lewis, Merewether, 685.
James, Thomas C. 619 Krauth, Ch. T.
James, Thomas P. 1388 Krusenstern, A. J. 904 Leyburn, John,
1383
597
48 Liancourt, la R.
Jameson, David,
200 Kuhn, Adam,
1127 Lindley, John,
Jamineau, Isaac,
159 Kuhn, Hartman,
1465
Jandennes, Jos. de 615 Kunze, John C.
346 Linné, Charles 4,
263
Jardine, Win.
1221 Kupffer, A. T.
1311
1230 Liouville, J.
Liston, Robert,
647
Jarvis, Edward,
1496
Jarvis, Samuel F.
849 Labouderie, M. J. 1026 Livezey, Thomas, 243
1377
Livingston, Edward, 917
Jay, John,
464 Lacordaire, Theo.
1542 Livingston, Robt. R. 658
Jefferson, Thomas, 345 Lamborn, R. H.

52
1307| Morell, John,
Livingston, William, 98 || Maury, M. F.
Llave, Pablo de la 923 |Maximilian, Prince, 1214 || Morelli, Chevalier,
Lloyd, Humphrey, 1100 | McCall, George A. 1340 Morgan, Benjamin,
1279 Morgan, Benj. R.
275 | McCall, Peter,
Lloyd, James,
1199 || McClean, Archibald, 295 Morgan, George,
Locke, John,
575 | McClune, James, 1507 || Morgan, John,
Logan, George,
320 Moriniere, N. de la
44 | McClurg, James,
Logan, William,
Logan, William, Jr. 121 | McCulloch, Rich. S. 1228 Morlot, A.
722 || Morris, Caspar,
1427 | McDowell, John,
Logan, W. E.
Lombardini, Elia, 1398. McEuen, Charles, 1186 Morris, Elwood,
895 | McEuen, Thomas, 983 | Morris, Jacob G.
Long, Stephen H.
405 | Morris, John,
Longstreth, M. F. 1255 |McHenry, James,
1114 McIlvaine, William, 926 Morris, John, Jr.
Loomis, Elias,
907 | McKean, Joseph B. 902 || Morris, Robert,
Lorich, Severin,
88 Morse, Sam. F.B.
257 | McKean, Thomas,
Lorimer, John,
1000 Morton,
1015 McLane, Louis,
Lorin, Theodore,
796 || Morton, Henry J.
995 || Meade, William,
Louis Philippe,
Lovenorm, Paul de

890 Mease, James,

467 || Meigs, Charles D.
Lowrie, Walter H. 1407 || Meigs, J. Forsyth,
Lowell. John,

Ludlam, William,

Ludlow, John,
Lukens, Isaiah,

308 || Meigs, Josiah,
1102 || Meigs, Mont. C.

269

1054
327
762
177
148

817
1521
1276

1181
1282
428
156
419

1256
274

1391

672 Morton, Samuel G.

950

925 | Mosely, Benjamin,
1293 Motley, J. L.
818 Mower, T. G.

341

1335 | Mozard, T. C.

1437
1198
623

850 Melamderhjelm, D. 681 Muhlenberg, Henry, 407
1224
920 Müller, John,
290 Melito, Miot de
Lukens, Jesse,
1486
4|| Melscheimer, Valen. 592 Müller, Max
Lukens, John,
978
545 || Mercer, Charles F. 807 || Munter, Bishop,
Lusac, John,
1418
162 | Murchison,
Luzerne, Chev. de la 347 || Mercer, Hugh,
1162 Meredith, William, 766 || Murgatroyd, John, 232
Lyell, Charles,
552
1317| Meredith, Wm. M. 1075 Murray, Andrew,
Lynch, W. F.
S27
Merrick, Samuel V. 1036 || Murray, John,
1184
698 | Michaelis, Chris. F. 408 || Mustoxidi,
Maclean, John,
1275
Maclure, William, 646 | Michaux, F. Andre, 742 || Mutter, T. D.
Macneven, Wm. J.

896 || Mifflin, John F.

600

1027
72 | Nagy, Charles,
267
154 Nairne, Edward,
585
205 | Nancarrow, John,
Madison, Rev. Dr. J. 350 | Miles, Samuel,
574
371 ||Milledoler, Philip, 1121 | Nassy, David,
Magaw, Samuel,
116 | Millegan, George, 300 | Navarrete, Mart. F. 1003
Magee, Christian,
1053
457 | Naxera, Manuel,
Magellan,John H. de 390 | Millegan, Robert,
1300
1219 | Neill, John,
311 ||Miller, Edward,
Mahon, Lord,
699 || Nemours, Dupont de 653
1350 | Miller, Edward,
Mahon, Lord,
Mandrillon, Joseph, 402 |Miller, E. Spencer, 1396 | Neufville, Hyde de 960
181 | Newenham, Edward,468
795 Miller, Peter,
Mansfield, Jared,
621
652 | Newnam, John,
Marbois, Barbe de 348 Miller, Samuel,
683
1421 | Nichols, Francis,
Marsden, William, 846 Milne Edwards,

Macquer, M.

334|Mifflin, Samuel,

Madison, James,

406 | Mifflin, Thomas,

Marsh, B. V.

1523 || Mirn,

Marsh, George P.

1258 Minto, Walter,

Marshall, Frederick, 288 Mitchell, John K.
182 | Mitchell, O. M.
Marshall, H.
981 | Mitchell, S. L.
Marshall, John,
Martin, Alexander,

632 Mitchell, S. W.

239 || Nicholson, John,

Martinez, de la R. F. 1138|| Monro, George,

514 | Nordmark, Zach.

Martinez, Juan J. 1018 Montgery, M. de

854 | Norris, Geo. W.
297 | Norris, Joseph P.
9| Norris, William,
704 | Norton, W.A.
313|Nulty, Eugenius,
283|Nuttall, Thomas,

990 Montressor, John,
Martini, Lorenzo,
Martius, C. Fr Ph. 1359 Moore, Charles,
Maskelyne, Nevil, 285 Moore, Samuel,
151 Moore, Samuel,
Mason, Charles,
1232 Moore, Samuel P.
Mason, John Y.
Matlack, Timothy, 349 Moore, Thomas,
Matile, George A. 1372 Mordecai, Alfred,

546

502 | Nicklin, Philip H. 964
179
942 | Nicola, Lewis,
1163
1313| Nicollet, J. N.
537 || Niemcewicz, Jul. W.638
444
1461 | Noel,
874
1209
789

1082
1195
809
812

739

1319| Oberlin, John Fr.

196

53
Odell, Jonathan,

Penn, Richard,
59 Raguet, Condy,
878
Penrose, R. A. F. 1518 Ramirez, Alexander, 650
Okely, John,
Pepper, Wm.
1277 Ramsay, A. C.
1448
412 Ramsay, David,
Oliver, And, 172; see 303 Perceval, Robert,
684
Oliver, And.303; see 172 Percival, Thomas, 450 Rand, B. Howard, 1392
S36 Randolph, Edmund, 527
1380 Perkins, Jacob,
Olrick, Christian,
Olsen, Peter B.
668 Perkins, John,
324 Randolph, Jacob,
1028
Ord, George,
811 Peter, William,
1155 Randolph, Thos. M. 580
89 Rask, R. K.
969
Otis, George A.
860 Peters, Richard,
351 Rawle, William,
429
Otolenge, Joseph,
284 Pettit, Charles,
Otto,
255 Peyrolan, Francisco, 662 Rawle, William,
1146
Otto, John C.
800 Physic, Edmund,
131 Raynall, Abbé,
335
Otto, Lewis William, 463 Physic, Philip S.
1495
673 Read, John M.
Owen, Richard,
1212 Pickering, Charles,
949 Reade, Charles,
21
Pickering, John,
856 Reade, Joseph,
103
Bage, Mann,
410 Pickering, Timothy, 589 Real, Count,
912
1197
1251 Redfield, W. C.
Paget, James,
1331 Picot, Charles,
Paine, Robert T.
1085 Pictet, F. J.
1526 Redick, David,
486
Paine, Thomas,
411 Pinckney, C. C.
7
503 Redman, John,
Pallas, Peter Simon, 553 Pinckney, Thomas, 629 Reed, Henry,
1081
1409 Pine, Robt. Edge,
Palmer, Wm. R.
1246
426 Reed, John,
Pancoast, Jos.
1281 Plitt, John,
881 Reed, Joseph,
791
160
959
186

Oersted, Hans C.

*

Park, Roswell,

Parke, Thomas,
Parker, William,
Parkes, Samuel,

*

1152 Poinsett, Joel R.
328 Pole, Thomas,
409 Politeca, Peter,
871 Pollock, J.
278 Pollok, George,
784 Pool, William,
130 Porter, T. C.
203 Post, Frederick,
135 Potter, Alonzo,

Parr, William,
Parrish, Joseph,
Paschall, Isaac,
Paschall, John,
Paschall, Joseph,
Paschall, Stephen, 201
Patterson, Robert,
368
Patterson, Robert, 1283
Patterson, Robert M. 738

Potts, Jonathan,
Potts, Thomas,
Pouchet, F. A.

Pougens, Charles,

932
509
869
1505
760
208
1539
185
1200
216
93
1254

972

Patterson, Thos. L. 1320 Poussin, Wm. Tell, 1216

Patterson, Wm.,
501 Powel, Samuel,
Patterson, Wm.,
636 Powel, Samuel,
Paulding, James K., 1101 Prescott, Wm. H.
Paykull, Gustavus, 655 Preston, Thomas,
Peace, Prince of,
690 Price, Eli K.
Peacock, George,
1171 Price, Richard,
Peale, Charles W.
425 Prichard, James C.
Peale, Franklin,
103.5 Priestley, Joseph,
Peale, Titian R.

1034

Prime, Ebenezer,

142
1362

1092
280
1352
413

1069
414
259

Pearson, Alexander, 903 Prince, John,
700
Pearson, James,
141 Prinsep, James,
1093
Pease, Calvin,
1508 Proctor, Wm., Jr.
1234
Peck, Wm. D.
606 Prosperin, Eric,
682
Pedersen, P.
870 Proud, Robert,
80
Peirce, Benjamin, 1173 Pryor, Thomas,
50
Pemberton, Israel,
42 Pugh, Evan,
1472
Pemberton, James,
49 Purviance, Sam, Jr. 91
Pennant, Thomas,

543

Penington, Edward, 237 Quadrado, F. de P. 973

Penington, Edward, 729
Penington, John,
Penington, John,
Penn, Granville,
Penn, John,

Quaranta, Bern.

549 Quetelet, A.

1109 Quincy, Josiah,
1060
52 Rafn, Carls Chris.

1143
1099
966

961

Reed, William B.

1374

Reese, John J.
1301
Regnault, W.
1361
Reid, Lt. Col. Wm. 1177
Reinwardt, C. G. C. 1052
Remusat, J. P. Abel, 979
Renan, Ernest,
1485
Renard, Charles,
1343
Renwick, James,
956
Reynell, John,
56
Reynolds, Joel B. 1268
Rezius, John And. 758
Rhea, John,
83
Rhoads, Samuel,
30
Rhoads, Samuel, Jr. 279
Richards, Benj. W. 1103
Richardson, B. W. 1500
Richardson, Joseph, 58
Richmond, Duke of 469

Ridgley, Charles,
139
Rittenhouse, Benj. 508
Rittenhouse, David, 40
Rives, William C. 1001
Roberts, George,
155
Roberts, Hugh,
41
Roberts, Joseph,
968
Roberts, Sol. W.
1180
Robinson, Moncure, 1025
Robinson, Samuel, 166
Rochefoucauld, de 430
Roebuck, Jarvis,
664
Roenne, Baron de 1159
Röhrig, F. L. O.
1462
Rogers, Rev. E. P. 1364
Rogers, Fairman, 1390
Rogers, Henry D. 1038
Rogers, James B. 1227
Rogers, John R. B. 478

54
Rogers, R. E.,
1365
Rogers, William B. 1048
Rokitansky, K.
1479
Romans, Bernard,
315
Romanzoff, Nich. de 908
1428
Rose, H.
Ross, Andrew,
547
Ross, James,
529
Ross, John,
Rouelle, John,

60
562

Sharswood, George, 1286
Sheafer, P. W.
1514
Shiell, Hugh,
359
Shippen, Edward,
87
Shippen, Edward, Jr. 39
Shippen, Joseph, Jr. 45
Shippen, Thos. Lee, 578
Shippen, William,
33
Shippen, William, Jr. 34

Steinsky, M.
Stephens, John L.
Sterling, Lord,

1148

Stevens, Alex. H.

1247

Stewart, John,
Shoemaker, Samuel, 262 Stiles, Ezra,

Roume, Philip Rose, 671 Short, Charles W.

Rozier, Abbe,
Rumford, Count

337
678

Rumker, Charles, 1111
Rumsey, James,
513
Rumsey, William, 106
Ruschenberger,
1264
Rush, Benjamin,
163
Rush, James,
941
Rush, Richard,
801
Ruston, Thomas,
459
Sabine, Edward,
Sakharoff, Basile,

1150
1325

Salazar, Jose Maria, 946
Sanderson, John, 1137
Sandiford,

Sansom, Joseph,
Santarem, Wiscount,
Sargent, Winthrop,
Saville, George,
Saxe Weimar,
Saxton, Joseph,
Say, Thomas,
Scandella, J. B.
Schaeffer, Fred. C.
Schinz, C.
Schoolcraft, H. R.
Schott, C. A.

111
714

1033
515
187

984
1074
810
637

841
1532

1032
1498

Schultze, Gottlob E. 877
Schumacher, H. C.

891

Schwann, Theo.
Schweinitz, Lewis,
Scott, John Morin,
Scott, John M.
Scull, William,
Secchi, P. Angelo,
Sedgewick, A.
Sellers, John,
Sellers, W.
Séquard, E. Brown
Sergeant, John,
Sergeant, Jona. D.
Sergeant, Thomas,
Sewell, Jonathan,
Seybert, Adam,
Seybert, Henry,
Shaler, William,

1482
813
99

w;

782
222

265

Stevens, Edward,
584
Stevens, John, Jr.
511
Stevens, W. Bacon, 1345
554
Stewart, Dugald,
627
69
242
1299

1041 Stiles, Joseph,
694 Stille, Alfred,
Shurtleff, Nath. P. 1389 Stillman, Samuel,
193
Silliman, Benjamin, 706 St. Mery, Moreau de 498
Silva Lisboa, J. da 918 Stockler, Francisco, 717.
Simitiere, P. E. du 171 Stockton, Richard, 100
1167
Simpson, J. Y.
1481 Storer, D. H.
Six, James,
78 Storrs, William L. 1244
Small, Alexander,
305 Story, Joseph,
1202
Smibert, Williams, 220 Strelkowsky, Peter, 1326
Smilie, John,
531 Strickland, William 855
Smith, Aubrey H. 1414 Stromeyer, L.
1478
Smith, Charles,
702 Strong, Theodore, 1191
Smith, Charles E. 1402 Struve, F. G. W. de 1328
Smith, Daniel B.
0.76 Struve, Henry de
928
500
Smith, F. Gurney, 1292 Stuart, Charles,
Smith, George,
"1494 Stuart, Moses,
899
1527
Smith, George W. 1135 Studer, B.
Smith, Isaac,
228 Sue, Jean Bapt., Jr. 416
Smith, James E.
604 Sue, Monsieur,
352
Smith, John,
22 Sullivan, William, 1083
1471
Smith, John R.
648 Sullivant, W. S.
Smith, Jonathan B.
64 Sully, Thomas,
1049
Smith, J. Lawrence, 1395 Survilliers, Count de 889

Roux de Rochelle, 1062 Short, William,

Roxburgh, William, 666.

490

Smith, Rich. Peters, 602 Sussex, Duke of

Smith, Robert,
75
Smith, R. S.
1534
Smith, Samuel,
102
Smith, Sam., Rev.
415
Smith, Samuel H.
624.
Smith, Thomas,
76
Smith, Thos. Peters, 642
Smith, William, Dr. 565
Smith, William, Hon. 97
Smith, Wm., Rev.
36
Smith, Wm. Peartree, 101
Smith, William W. 484
Sonmans, Peter,
214

Svanberg, Jons,
Swartz, Olof
Swift, Joseph G.

Syng, Philip, Sen.

1019
875
710
775
35

Tait, Charles,
936
Talcott, Andrew, 1078
Talleyrand, P. M.
611
Taney, R. B.
1201.
Tanner, Henry S.
975
Taylor, Richard C. 1107
Temminck, Conrad I. 906
Ternant, John,
353

1413 Sonnenfels, Baron de 804 Thayer, Sylvanus, 1089
1419 Soulavie, Abbe,
433 Tholuck, A.
1531
17 Southard, Samuel L. 998 Thomas, Isaiah,
793
1533 Span, James,
217 Thomas, Richard,
276
1333 Sparman, Andrew, 525 Thompson, Oswald, 1404
763 Spence, George,
473 Thomsen, C. J.
1447
387 Stanhope, Earl of
310 Thomson, Charles, 129
1014 Stanley, Edward, 1330 Thomson, James G. 819
987 Staughton, William, 731 Thornton, Willian, 472
620 Stedman, Alexander, 66 Thunberg, Charles P. 540
900 Steenstrup, J. S.
1446 Thury, A.
1530
930 Steinhauer, H.
814 Tiarks, John Lewis, 924
*\

55
1442
Volpicelli, P.
Von Carleson, Gus. 591
Tilesius, Guill. T.
833 Von Hammer, Jos. 805
Tilghman, James,
43 Won Leonard, C. C. 1051
1466
Tilghman, Rich. A. 1233 Von Liebig,
1424
Tilghman, William, 707 Von Meyer, H.
Tilton, James,
306 Von Raumer, Fred. 1218
569
Tocqueville, Al. de 1158 Von Troil, Uno,
Torombert, Honoré, 931
Torrey, John,
104.4 Wagner, Andreas, 1425
1149
Totten, George M. 1272 Wagner, Tobias,
524
Totten, Joseph G. 1061 Walker, John,
229
Towne, John H.
1266 Walker, John,
1073
Tracy, Destutt,
709 Walker, Sears C.
Trautwine, John C. 1206 Wall, George,
4.17
Trego, Charles B. 1183 Wallenstein, Jules de 982

Ticknor, George,
Tidyman, Philip,

955
921

Troost, Gerhard,

T90

Waln, Lewis,

1226

146
Troughton, Edward, 802 Waln, Nicholas,
755
Troyon, Fred.
1490 Walsh, Robert, Jr.
570 Walter, Thomas U. 1108
Trumbull, John,

Tucker, George,
Tunner, Peter,
Turner, Edward,

1071
1529

Warden, David B. 737
Ware, Nathaniel A. 897

1064 Waring, William,
521 Warner, Ashton,

Turner, George,
Tweedy, John,
Tyson, Job R.

206
105.5

Warner, Samuel,
Warner, Thomas,

Uhler, W. M.
Urbina, Luis de

1401
617

Warren, John C.
Warris, Fort. de
Washburne, E. A.

Vail, Eugene A.
Valentine, Louis,

1110
572

Wall-Travers, Rod.

557

Van Berckel, Peter I. 382
Van Braam, H. A. 622
Vanderkemp, F. A. 705
Wanderkemp, J. J. 1120
Wan Marum, Mart. 711
Vanuxem, Lardner, 880

Water, Johann Sev. 808
Vaughan, Benjn.
448
Waughan, John,
373
Waughan, Petty,
1169
Vaughan, Samuel, 372
Vaughan, Sam., Jr. 423
Waughan, William, 988
Vauquelin, A.
751
Vaux, Cadet de
465
Vaux, George,
476
Vaux, Roberts,
829
Vaux, William S. 1408
Wergennes, Count de 380
Wethake, Henry,
997
Wining, John,
138
Virchow, R.
1475
Volney, M.
625

577

Wharton, Thomas I. 989
Wheaton, Henry,
962
Wheeler, Samuel, 588
White, Thomas,
482
White, William,
180
Whitehurst, John, 447
Whitfoord, Caleb,
522
Whitney, J. D.
1487
Whitney, W. D.
1502
Whittlesey, Chaun. 125
Wickham, John,
1043
Wilcocks, Alex.
94
Wilcocks, Alex.
1535
Wilkes, Chas.
1185
Wilkinson, James, 634
Willard, Joseph,
696
Williams, Henry J. 1037
Williams, Jon, Jr. 485
Williams, Samuel, 299
Williamson, Hugh,
51
Willing, Thomas,
46
Wilson, Alexander, 759
Wilson, Daniel,
1489
Wilson, James,
233

25
774
194 Wilson, James P.
189 Wilson, Thomas B. 1304
821 Winsor, Henry,
1480
340 Winthrop, James,
740
1506 Winthrop, John,
70

Washington, Bush. 708 Winthrop, Thos. L. 1070
Washington, George, 354 Wistar, Charles J. 753
479
Washington, John, 1112 Wister, Caspar,
Waterhouse, Ben.
548 Wister, Caspar,
1406
Waters, Nicholas B. 566 Witherspoon, John, 252
1467
Watts, Stephen,
14 Wöhler, Fred.
971
Way, Nicholas,
307 Wood, George B.
Wayland, Francis, 1090 Woodhouse, James, 607
Wayne, Anthony,
355 Workman, Benjamin,418
Wayne, Major H. C. 1399 Workman, James, 863
250
Wayne, Isaac,
1123 Worrall, James,
1488
Webb, James,
184 Worthen, A. H.
Webber, Samuel,
689 Wrangel, Chas. M. 115
20
Webster, Daniel, 1077 Wright, James,
318
Webster, Noah,
944 Wright, William,
865
Wells, Richard,
161 Wylie, James,
713
West, Benjamin,
204 Wylie, Samuel B.
West, Francis,
1338 Wyncoop, Benjamin, 245
West, Samuel,
127
980
West, William,
79 Yarrel, William,
Wetherill, Ch.M. 1267 Yrujo, Carlos M. de 667
Wetherill, John P.

934

Wetterstedt, Count 866
Wharton, Charles H. 452
Wharton, Geo. M. 1134
Wharton, Isaac,
251
Wharton, Samuel, 244

Zach, Francisco de, 635
Zantedeschi,
1284
Zecchinelli, Geo. M. 939
Zimmerman, E. A.W.586

56

LIST OF

ME M B E R S

RESIDING WITHIN TEN MILES OF THE HALL,
JANUARY, 1865.

Elected A.D.

1808.
1811.
*1817.
1817.

Binney,
Wister C. J.,
Nulty,
Ord,

1820. Gibson,

1823.
1823.
1824.
1825.
1825.
1826.
1827.
1828.
1829.
1829.
1830.
1830.
1831.
1831.
1832.
1832.
1832.
1833.
1833.
1833.
1833.
1833.
1833.
1833.
1833.
1835.
1835.
1837.
1838.
1839.
1839.
1839.
1839.
1840.
1840.
1841.
1841.
1842.
1842.
1842.
1843.
1843.

Jackson S.,
Coates B. H.,
Seybert,
Bancker,
Ingersoll,
Meigs C.,
La Roche,
Lea,
Wood,
Smith D. B.,
McEuen,
Hays,
Vethake,
Bache,
Bell,
Dunglison,
Hodge,
Baldwin,
Robinson,
Fisher J. F.,
Emerson,
Carey,
Peale,
Merrick,
Williams,
Condie,
Sully,
Meredith,
Norris W.,
Cresson J. C.,
Booth,
Coles,
Penington,
Goddard,
Smith G. W.,
Dorr,
Wagner,
Kendall,
Fraley,
Hare J. I. C.,
Gerhard W. M.,
Roberts,

1843. Trego,
1844. Elwyn,

-

1844. Bridges,

1856. Reed W. B.,

1844.
1844.
1844.
1844.
1844.
1844.
1845.
1847.
1847.
1848.
1848.
1849.
1851.
1851.
1851.
1851.
1851.
1851.
1851.
1851.
1852.
1852.
1852.
1852.
1852.
1852.
1852.
1853.
1853.
1853.
1854.
1854.
1854.
1854.
.1854.
1854.

1856. Finley C.A.,
1856. Letchworth,

Potter,
Eckfeldt,
Dubois,
Trautwine,
Norris G. W.,
Carson,
Miller E.,
Tilghman,
Procter,
James J. F.,
Longstreth,
Leidy,
Colwell,
Towne,
Kirkbride,
McCall P.,
Pancoast,
Patterson,
Sharswood,
Dundas,
Smith F. G.,
Meigs J. F.,
King,
Stillé A.,
Neill,
Wilson T. B.,
Cassin,
Le Conte,
Mordecai,
Biddle J. B.,
Harding,
West,
Genth,
McCall G. A.,
Felton S. M.,
Gross,

1854. Stevens W. B.,

1854.
1854.
1854.
1854.
1854.

Durand,
Keating,
Price E. K.,
Guillou,
Foulke,

1855. Powel,
1855. Lewis E. J.,

1855. Rogers R. E.,
1855. Barnes,

1856. Coppée,
1856. Allen G.,
1856. Kneass,

1856. Hollingsworth,
1856.
1856.
1857.
1857.
1857.
1857.
1857.

Lesley J. P.,
Harris R. P.,
Betton T. F.,
Cuyler,
James T. P.,
Rogers F.,
Rand,

1857. Cresson C. M.

1857.
1857.
1858.
1858.
1858.
1858.
1859.
1859.
1859.
1859.
1860.
1860.
1860.
1861.
1862.

Goddard K.,
Miller E. S.,
Allen W. H.,
Uhler,
Smith C. E.,
Hartshorne E.,
Thompson,
Wister C.,
Vaux W. S.,
Dickson,
Smith A. H.,
Lewis F. W.,
Fisher S. G.,
Goodwin D. R.,
Mitchell S. W.,

1862. Röhrig,
1862.
1862.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.

Cornelius,
Winsor,
Chase P. E.,
Hayes I. I.,
Read J. M.,
Pollock J.,
Washburne,
McClune,
Biddle John,
Hartshorne H.,
1863. Penrose,
1863 Briggs R,
1863. Lesley J.,
1864. Chase T.,
1864. Marsh B. V.
1864. Sellers W.,

1864.
1864.
1864.
1864.

Smith R. S.,
Wilcocks,
Harrison,
Krauth;-

1864. Lamborn.

LIST OF THE SURVIVING MEMBERS
oF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
JANUARY 1865

In the order of their Election to Membership.

*

Horace Binney, Philadelphia,
George W. Featherstonhaugh,
John Davis, Boston,

Charles J. Wister, Germantown,
Joseph G. Swift. New York,
Eugenius Nulty, Philadelphia,
George Ord,
-

James Jackson, Boston,
Jacob Bigelow,
* ,
William Gibson,
J. A. Borgnis, Paris,
M. de Montgery, Paris,
Samuel Jackson, Philadelphia,

Benjamin H. Coates, “
Stephen H. Long, U. S.A.,
Henry Seybert, Philadelphia,

John J. Bigsby, England,
M. Flourens, Paris,
CharlesR.
N.Ingersoll,
Bancker, Philadelphia,
Joseph
i-

1808 Robley Dunglison, Philadelphia,
1809 Hugh L. Hodge, Philadelphia,
1811 Theodore Lorin, Paris,
-

1814
1817
**

1818
* *

1820

*44

Juan J. Martinez, Spain,

*4

E. S. Bring, Lund, Sweden,

44

M. Bujalsky, St. Petersburg,
1833
Matthias W. Baldwin, Philadelphia, “
Edwin James, Albany,
Moncure
Robinson,Paris,
Philadelphia, “
M.
J. Labouderie,
J. Francis Fisher, Philadelphia,
Gouverneur Emerson, Philadelphia, “
Henry C. Santarem,
Carey,
Wiscount
Portugal,
Titian R. Peale, Washington,
Franklin Peale, Philadelphia,
4*

4t

st

**
**

1823

* *

it.

4 4
**

44

1824
1825 Samuel W. Merrick,
-


**

Charles D. Meigs,
44
1826
Lewis Cass, Michigan,
**
René La Roche, Philadelphia,
1827
Marcus Bull, New York,
J. P. C. Cassado de Giraldes, Lisbon, “
Jose M. Dantes Pereira, Lisbon,
1828

HenryLea,
J. Anderson,
New York,
Isaac
Philadelphia,
George Ticknor, Boston,

1832

Henry J. Williams,

**


44
**

Henry D. Rogers, Glasgow,
John Torrey, New York City,
Joseph Henry, Washington,

1835
*
-

D. Francis Condie, Philadelphia,
William B. Rogers, Boston,

Thomas Sully, Philadelphia.

**
44
-

Chev. Morelli, Naples,
J. S. Da Costa Macedo, Lisbon,

1836

1837

**

Mariano Galvez, Guatemala,
Jared Sparks, Boston,
William Jenks, “

*-

William Norris, Philadelphia,

4*
4t

f :

**

**

st
Wm. H. Delancey, Geneva, N.Y., 1829 Joseph Saxton, Washington,
Hyde de Neufville, France,
44
William
M.
Meredith,
Philadelphia,

Carl C. Rafn, Copenhagen,
t i
Andrew Talcott, U. S.A.,
1838
Charles G. B. Daubeny, Oxford,
st
Alex. Dallas Bache, Washington,

George B. Wood, Philadelphia,

**

Francisco de P. Quadrada, Madrid, “
Daniel B. Smith, Germantown,
st

Robert Treat Paine, Boston,
Sylvanus Thayer, U. S. E.,

Thomas McEuen, Philadelphia,
William B. Hodgson, Georgia,
Isaac Hays, Philadelphia,

* *

Francis Wayland, Providence, R. I. “
John E. Holbrook, Charleston,
1839
John C. Cresson, Philadelphia,

Andres del Rio, Mexico,

**

Henry Wethake, Philadelphia,
William C.Bache,
Rives,Philadelphia,
Virginia,
Hartman
John Bell, Philadelphia,

ft

* *
**

**

James C. Booth,
Edward Coles,
J. F. Encke, Berlin,
A. Quetelet, Brussels,

-

**

4-

Humphrey Lloyd, Dublin,

**
**
-

**
* *

2
Thomas U. Walter, Washington,
John Penington, Philadelphia,
Elias Loomis, New Haven, Conn.,
Stephen Alexander, Princeton,
*Michael Faraday, London,
Pedro de Angelis, Buenos Ayres,

1839 Richard S. McCulloch,

1846

Ceva Grimaldi, Naples,

**

A. T. Kupffer, St. Petersburg,

1847

U. J. Leverrier, Paris,
Richard A.
Tilghman,
“ii
William
Procter,
Jr., Philadelphia,
**

1

Martin H. Boyé, Lehigh Co., Pa.,
Paul B. Goddard, Philadelphia,

John F. James,

1848

44

J. Melville Gilliss, Washington,
**
i
J. C. Adams, Cambridge, England, **
George W. Smith, Philadelphia,
- Asa Gray, Cambridge, Mass.,
William L. Storrs, Connecticut,
**
Robert Were Fox, Falmouth, Eng.,
Alexander H. Stevens, New York, “
James D. Graham, U. S. T. E.,
**
François P. G. Guizot, France,
Ralph J. Ingersoll, New Haven,
44
44
1841 John N. Conyngham, Pa.,
Bernardo Quaranta, Naples,
ti
David Irvin, Wisconsin,
E. Geddings. South Carolina,
it.
Adolph C. P. Callisen, Altona,
F. A. Pouchet, Rouen,
**
Miers Fisher Longstreth, Philada.,
Benjamin Dorr, Philadelphia,
Samuel F. B. Morse, New York City, “
Tobias Wagner,
**
Edward Sabine, London,
E. N. Horsford, Cambridge, Mass., 184
Roswell Park, Wisconsin,
George P. Marsh, Vermont,
**
John Goodsir, Edinburgh, Scotland, “
Robert Christison, Edinburgh,
John Hughes Bennett, Scotland,
**
George Bancroft, New York City,
is
1842 Francis Kiernan, London,
Baron de Roenne, Dresden,
**
A. A. Gould, Boston, Mass.,
**
E. Otis Kendall, Philadelphia,
**
ti
Joseph Leidy, Philadelphia,
Sir Charles Lyell, London,
**
*i.
W.
S.
W.
Ruschenberger,
U.
S.
N.,
E. W. Brayley,
4
*1851
D. Humphreys Storer, Boston,
Stephen Colwell, Philadelphia,
**
John H. Towne,
**
Simeon Borden,
**
**
Charles M. Wetherill, Washington, “
Frederick Fraley, Philadelphia,
•*
George Peacock, Cambridge, Eng., - Thomas S. Kirkbride, Philadelphia, “
W. H. C. Bartlett, West Point,

J. I. Clark Hare, Philadelphia,
Benjamin Pierce, Cambridge, Mass.,
1843
Leopold II, of Tuscany,
Louis Agassiz, Cambridge, Mass.,
William W. Gerhard, Philadelphia,
John Lenthall, Washington,
Solomon W. Roberts, Philadelphia,

Benj. A. Gould, Jr., Camb., Mass.,

**

Charles B. Trego,
Charles Wilkes, U. S. N.
Stanislaus Julien, Paris,

-

George M. Totten, Panama,
Joseph W. Farnum, New York City, “
Peter McCall, Philadelphia,
4
Joseph Pancoast,
-4
Robert Patterson,
Fran. Zantedeschi, Padua,
Daniel Kirkwood, Bloomington, Ind., “
William Chauvenet, St. Louis, Mo., “
George Sharswood, Philadelphia, . “
James Dundas,
**

John Downes, Washington,
Theodore Strong, New Brunswick, 1844 Francis Gurney Smith, “
Alfred L. Elwyn, Philadelphia,
John Forsyth Meigs, “
Edward King,
Robert Bridges,
John W. Draper, New York City,
Charles Henry Davis, U.S. N.,

-

1852

4*

it

(*

W. A. Norton, New Haven, Conn.,
Alonzo Potter, Philadelphia,

Jacob R. Eckfeldt, Philadelphia,
William E. Dubois,
* *
John C. Trautwine,
John S. Hart, Trenton,
Samuel S. Haldeman, Columbia, Pa.,

George W. Norris, Philadelphia,
Joseph Carson, Philadelphia,
Richard Owen, London,
Sir James Clark, “
James Copland,

William Tell Poussin, Paris,
Frederick von Raumer, Berlin,
Edward Miller, Philadelphia,

William B.

Carpenter, London,

Sir William Jardin, Scotland,
Professor Lepsius, Berlin,
Sir Henry Holland, London,

James Buchanan, Lancaster,

Michael Chevalier, Paris,

Alfred Stillé, Philadelphia,
John Neill,
**
Thomas B. Wilson, “
John Cassin,
**

John H. Alexander, Baltimore,
1853

J. Liouville, Paris,

John L. Le Conte, Philadelphia,
John P. Kennedy, Baltimore,
Alfred Mordecai, U.S.A., Philada.,

**
**

Thomas L. Patterson,

*
**

Henry Grinnell, New York City,
John B. Biddle, Philadelphia,
Alex.Fischer von Waldheim, Moscow, “
Basile Sakharoff, St. Petersburg, “
Peter Strelkowsky,
4.
Charles Dworjak,
**
**
Charles D. Arfwedson, Stockholm, “

James Paget, London,
Sir J. F. W. Herschel, London,

1854

3
*

1854
E. Brown-Séquard, London,
John H. B. Latrobe, Baltimore,
Mont. C. Meigs, Washington, D.C.,
Benj. Hallowell, Sandy Springs, Md.,

George Harding, Philadelphia,

| Edmund C. Evans, Chester Co., Pa., “

Francis West,
**
Frederick A. Genth,
4
George A. McCall,
Samuel M. Felton,
Samuel D. Gross,
Charles Renard, Moscow,
C. A. Dohrn, Stettin,
Wm. Bacon Stevens, Philadelphia,
Elias Durand,

Caspar Wister, Philadelphia,
Walter H. Lowrie, Pittsburg,
William S. Vaux, Philadelphia,
Samuel H. Dickson,
**
William A. Hammond, U. S. A.,
P. Angelo Secchi, Rome,

**

Spencer F. Baird, Washington,

is
*{

1860

Aubrey H. Smith, Philadelphia,

William W. Keating,
Joshua J. Cohen, Baltimore,
Lord Mahon, England,
James Lenox, New York City,
Eli K. Price, Philadelphia,
Constant Guillou,

James D. Dana, New Haven, Conn.,
Oliver Wolcott Gibbs, Camb., Mass.,
James Hall, Albany,
William Parker Foulke, Philada.,
C. Fr. Ph. von Martius, Munich,
William Haidinger, Vienna,

William H. Allen, Bellefonte, Pa., 1858
William M. Uhler, Philadelphia,
* *
Charles E. Smith,
**
**
st
Edward Hartshorne,
ti
1859
Oswald Thompson,

Francis W. Lewis,
**
Francis W. Hayden, Washington,
Sidney George Fisher, Philadelphia,
Sir Roderick I. Murchison, London,

Adam Sedgwick,

* *

*

Leonce Elie de Beaumont, Paris,
Henry Milne-Edwards,
**
Theo. L. W. Bischoff, München,
Herm. von Meyer, Frankfort a M.,
i
Andreas Wagner, München,
**
Joseph Hyrtl, Vienna,
1855 Sir William E. Logan, Montreal,

George Jäger, Stuttgard,

St. Clair Deville, Paris,
William H. Harvey, Dublin,
V. Regnault, Paris,
Jean
Baptiste Dumas, Paris,
Samuel Powel, Philadelphia,
Elisha J. Lewis,
**
Edouard de Verneuil,

Claude Bernard,
E. P. Rogers, Albany, N. Y.,
Daniel R. Goodwin, Philadelphia, 1861
Robert E. Rogers, Philadelphia,
Leo Lesquereux, Columbus, Ohio,
Albert Barnes,
4 4
* :
I
856
John Lothrop Motley, Vienna,
Henry Coppée,
* * {
Pasqual de Guyangos, Madrid,
George Allen,
**
* *
Strickland Kneass,
John Curwen, Harrisburg, Pa.,
Charles Des Moulins, Bordeaux,
Henry William Field, London,
Thomas Sterry-Hunt, Montreal,
John P. Brown, Constantinople,
Paolo Volpicelli, Rome,
Geo. Augustus Matile, Washington,
Thomas L. Kane, McKean Co., Pa.,
Alexander
Kasem Beg, Peterss burg,
1862
*
* *
Otto
Boehtlingk,
William B. Reed, Philadelphia,
G. Forchhammer, Copenhagen,
Clement A. Finley, U. S. A.,
J. S. Steenstrup,
**
Albert S, Letchworth, Philadelphia,
C. J. Thomsen,
Theo. Lacordaire, Liège,
Andrew C. Ramsay, England,
Hermann Burmeister, Buen. Ayres,
Edouard Desor, Neuchâtel,
Samuel L. Hollingsworth, Philada.,
L. G. de Koninck, Liège,
Christian Olrik, Copenhagen,
Joachim Barrande, Prague,
J. C. Adamson, Cape Town, Africa,
Robert W. Bunsen, Heidelburg,
Peter Lesley, Philadelphia,
William Hofmann, London,
John Leyburn, Richmond, Va.,
H. R. Göppert, Breslau,
Hugh Blair Grigsby, Virginia,
Alexander Braun, Leipsig,
Robert P. Harris, Philadelphia,
Thomas F. Betton, Germantown, 1857 William J. Hamilton, London,
* *
Sir William J. Hooker.

Theodore Cuyler, Philadelphia,
J. J. Kaup, Darmstadt,
Thomas P. James,
**
Nathaniel P. Shurtleff, Boston,
J. A. Froude, Oxford, Eng.,
Hermann Lebert, Breslau,
Fairman Rogers, Philadelphia,
B. Howard Rand,
4.
S. Weir Mitchell, Philadelphia,
F. L. Otto Roehrig, Philadelphia,
Charles M. Cresson, Philadelphia,
H. L. Abbot, U. S. T. E.,
Kingston Goddard,
4*
Oswald Heer, Zurich,
J. Lawrence Smith, Louisville, Ky.,
John Lindley, London,
E. Spencer Miller, Philadelphia,
J. von Liebig, München,
Andrew A. Humphreys, U. S. T. E.,
Elia Lombardini, Milan,
Frederick Wöhler, Göttingen,
James W. Dawson, Montreal,
Henry C. Wayne, Georgia,

-

Samuel F. Dupont, U. S. N.,
George Engelmann, St. Louis,

Henry Hartshorne, Philadelphia,
D. F. Eschricht, Copenhagen,

Wm. S. Sullivant, Columbus, 0.,

C. G. N. David,
**
Frederick Keller, Zurich,
Peter W. Sheafer, Pottsville, Pa.,
A. Delesse, Paris,
A. Daubrée, Strasburg,
R. A. F. Penrose, Philadelphia,
Robert Briggs,
**

Andrew A. Henderson, Norfolk,
Robert Cornelius, Philadelphia,
Rudolf Virchow, Berlin,

Fr. Theo. Frerichs, Berlin,
Thomas J. Lee, Maryland,
Louis Stromeyer, Hanover,
Karl Rokitansky, Vienna,

Henry Winsor, Philadelphia,

Joseph Lesley,

**

-

A. Morlot, Lausanne,

1864
-

James Y. Simpson, Edinburgh,

Theodore Schwann, Liège,

| Thomas Chase, Haverford, Pa.,
| Benjamin V. Marsh, Philadelphia,

***

Franz Bopp, Berlin,
Ernest Renan, Paris,
Max Mueller, Cambridge, England,
Josiah D. Whitney, San Francisco,
A. H. Worthen, Springfield, Ill.,
Daniel Wilson, Toronto, C. W.,
Frederick Troyon, Lausanne,
M. Boucher des Perthes, Abbeville,
Pliny E. Chase, Philadelphia,
I. I. Hayes,
**

| James T. Hodge, S. Barbara, Cal.,
*i.

George Kirchhoff, Heidelburg,
Francis J. Pictet, Geneva,
Bernard Studer, Berne,
Alphonso de Gasparin, Paris,
Peter Tunner, Leoben, Styria,
A. Thury, Geneva,
A. Tholuck, Halle an der Saale,

Carl Schinz, Strasburg,
William Sellers, Philadelphia,

George Smith, Del. Co., Pa.,

R. S. Smith,

John M. Read, Philadelphia,
Edward Jarvis, Dorchester, Mass.,
J. E. Hilgard, Washington,
Charles A. Schott,

B. W. Richardson, London,
Thomas Hill, Cambridge, Mass.,
W. D. Whitney, New Haven,
Chester Dewey, Rochester, N.Y.,
William H. Green, Princeton, N.J.,

Alexander Wilcocks, “

Joseph Harrison,

**

John Foster Kirke, Boston,
G. H. Cook, New Brunswick, N.J.,
Thomas C. Porter, Lancaster, Pa.,
John Bost, La Force, France,

Charles T. Krauth, Philadelphia,
R. H. Lamborn,
**
Ovide Brunet, of Quebec,

James Pollock, Philadelphia,

Goldwin Smith, Oxford, England,

E. A. Washburne,
James McClune,
John Biddle,

A. Winchell, Michigan,
W. E. Whitman, Philadelphia,


**
ti

George J. Brush, New Haven,

1865
-

5

ALPHABETICAL LIST of MEMBERS
RESIDING WITHIN TEN MILES OF THE HALL
-

JANUARY 1865,

Elected A.D.

1858.
1856.
1855.
1831.
1833.
1825.
1832.
1857.
1853.
1863.
1808.
1839.

Allen W. H.,
Allen G.,
Barnes,
Bache H.,
Baldwin,
Bancker,
Bell,
Betton,
Biddle J. B.,
Biddle J.,
Binney,
Booth,

1844. Bridges,
1863.
1865.
1844.
1852.
1833.
1863.
1864.
1823.

1856.
1839.
1851.
1862.
1835.
1839.

1860.
1833.
1854.
1854.
1843.

1840.
1857.
1820.
1861.

Gross,
* f | 1851. Pancoast,
Guillou,
f 1851. Patterson,
Hare,
t | 1833. Peale,
Harding,
t | 1839. Penington,
Harris R. P., * f | 1863. Penrose,
Harrison,
1863. Pollock,
Hartshorne H.,
f | 1844. Potter,
Hartshorne E.,
1855. Powel,
Hayes I. I.,
1854. Price,
Hays I.,
* f | 1847. Procter,
Hodge,
t | 1857. Rand,
Hollingsworth,
f 1856. Reed W. B.,

t | 1825. Ingersoll J. R.,
* f
f
f
*f

| 1823.
1848.
1857.
| 1842.

Briggs,
Brush,
Carson,
Cassin,
f 1854.
Carey,
* f | 1852.
Chase P. E.,
* f | 1851.
Chase T.,
f 1856.
Coates, B. H., * f | 1864.
Coppée,
* f | 1864.
Coles,
* f | 1827.
Colwell,
| f | 1828.
Cornelius,
f 1853.
Condie,
* f | 1849.
Cresson J. C., * f | 1848.

1857. Cresson C. M.,
1857.
1859.
1841.
1844.
1851.
1832.
1854.
1833.
1844.
1844.
1842.
1854.
1856.

1854.
f 1854.
f 1842.
* f | 1854.
t| 1856.
f 1864.
* f | 1863.
t | 1858.
t| 1863.
t | 1830.
t | 1832.
f 1856.

f
f
f
t |

Keating, W. D.,

f | 1857. Rogers F.,

f | 1856. Lesley J. P.,

+
f
* f
f
t
+
*f
* f
t

1843.
1833.
1862.
1855.

| 1864.
1824.
| 1851.
1860.
| 1858.
| 1829.
| 1852.
| 1840.
| 1864.

Roberts,
Robinson,
Röhrig,
Rogers R. E.,
Sellers W.,
Seybert,
Sharswood,
Smith A. H.,
Smith C. E.,
Smith D. B.,
Smith F. G.,
Smith G. W.,
Smith R. S.,

t | 1854. Stevens,
*t | 1852. Stillé,

Cuyler, .
Dickson,
Dorr,
Dubois,
Dundas,
Dunglison,
Durand,
Emerson,
Elwyn,
Eckfeldt,
Fraley,
Felton, S. M.,
Finlay,

t | 1863. Lesley J.,
* f | 1835. Sully,
f 1856. Letchworth,
*
1859. Thompson,
* f | 1860. Lewis F. W.,
1847. Tilghman,
f 1855. Lewis E. J.,
+ | 1851. Towne,
1864. Marsh,
+ | 1844. Trautwine,
+ | 1854. McCall G. A.,
t | 1843. Trego,
* f | 1851. McCall P.,
+ | 1858. Uhler,
* f | 1863. McClune,
+ 1859. Vaux,
* f | 1830. McEuen,
+ | 1831. Vethake,
f 1826. Meigs C. D.,
t | 1841. Wagner,
* f | 1852. Meigs J. F.,
f 1863. Washburne,
f | 1837. Meredith,
1854. West, ,
+ | 1833. Merrick,
f i 1865. Whitman,
Fisher S. G.,
1862. Mitchell S. W.,
1864. Wilcocks,
Fisher J. F.,
+ 1845. Miller E.,
* f | 1833. Williams,
Foulke,
+ | 1857. Miller E. S.,
f 1852. Wilson T. B.,
Genth,
* f | 1853. Mordecai,
1862. Winsor,
Gerhard W. M.,
1852. Neill,
+ | 1811. Wister C. J.,
Goddard P. B., f | 1844. Norris G. W.,
+ | 1859. Wister C.,
Goddard K.,
t | 1838. Norris W.,
t | 1829. Wood,
Gibson,
f 1817. Nulty,
f
Goodwin,
+ | 1817. Ord,
* +
* Photograph received for the Album.

* +
*

f
f
f
* +
f

* +
f

f | 1863. Read J. M.,

Jackson S.
James J. F.,
James T. P.,
Kendall,
King,
Kirkbride,
Kneass,
Krauth,
Lamborn,
La Roche,
Lea,
Le Conte,
Leidy,
Longstreth,

f
f

t Has signed the Constitution.

*

* {
*

f

t
f
f

* +

f
*t
f
t

*+
t
t
f

f
f

f
t
f

f

* +
f
t
t
t
*
f

ALPHABETICAL LIST
or

MEMBERS'

Agassiz, Louis,
Alexander, K. Beg.,
Bache, A. D.,
Baird, S. F.,
Bancroft, Geo.,
Bancker, C. N.,
Barnes, Albert,

Bigelow, Jacob,
Blackwell, T. C.,
Böhtlingk, 0.,

Brayley, E. W.,
Bridges, Robert,
Brush, George J.,
Buch, Leo. Won,
Carson, Joseph,
Cary, H. C.,
Chase, P. E.,
Chauvenet, W.,
Coates, B. H.,
Cohen, J. J.,
Coles, Edward,
Condie, D.,

Coppée, H.,
Cresson, J. C.,
Dana, J. D.,

Darlington, W.,
Dawson, J. W.,
De Candolle, A.,
De Crevecöeur,
De Koninck,
Delesse, A.,
Desor, Edouard,
Dorr, Benjamin,
Durand, Elias,

PHOTOGRAPHS

Elwyn, A. L.,
Emerson, Geo.,
Encke,
Faraday,
Farnham, J. W.,
Field, H. W.,

Fraley, Fred.,
Genth, F. A.,
Gray, Asa,
Gross, S. D.,
Haer, Oswald,
Haidinger, W.,
Harris, R. P.,
Hayden, F. W.,

Hays, Isaac,
Henderson, A.A.,
Hershel, J. F. W.,
Hill, Thomas,
Hitchcock, Ed.,
Hofmann, A. W.,
Humboldt,

Hunt, T. S.,
Hyrtl, J.,
Jackson, Jas.,
Jackson, R. M. S.,
Jäger, Geo.,
Kneass, Strick.,
Lea, Isaac,
Le Conte, J. L.,
Lepsius, Rich.,
Lesley, Joseph,
Lesley, Peter,
Lesquereux, Leo,

Logan, W. E.,

RECEIVED.

Lombardini,
Loomis, Elias,
Miller, Ed.,
Morlot, A.,
Moore, Sam.,
Morse, S. F. B.,
Ord, Geo.,
Peale, Franklin,
Penington, Jno.,
Price, Eli K.,
Quetelet, A.,
Quincy, Josiah,
Rand, H. B.,
Roberts, S. W.,
Roehrig, F. L. O.,
Robinson, Mon.,
Rokitansky, C.,
Ruschenberger,
Schinz, Charles,

2

2

. Sharswood, Geo.,
Sheafer, P. W.,
Silliman, Ben.,
Smith, Fr. G.,
Sparks, Jared,
Stevens, W. B.,
Stromeyer,

Swift, J. G.,
Troyon, Fr.,
Tunner, Peter,
Wayland, Francis,
West, Francis,
Wilkes, Charles,
Wister, C. J.,
Zantedeschi.

N. B.—Members of the Society are requested to aid in the completion of the
album.

3mtritan #ilosophical $ntity.
1865.
JANUARY 6, ANNUAL ELECTION 0F 0FFICERS.
Between the hours of 2 and 5 o'clock, P.M.
Stated Meetings of the
OFFICERS |

SOCIETY

-

STATED BUSINESS OF THE MEETING.

AND

AT

COUNCIL.

7 O’C. P.M.

Jan. 6.
Jan. 20.
Feb. 3.
Feb. 10.
Feb. 17.
March 3.
March 17.

Election of officers reported. Librarian nominated.

Tibrarian and Standing Committees chosen. Cata
logue of members read. Candidates for member
ship balloted for.

Proceedings of Officers and Council submitted.

April 7.
April 21.
May 5.

Candidates for membership balloted for.

May 19.

Proceedings of Officers and Council submitted.

May 12.
June 16.

July 21.

Candidates for membership balloted for.

Aug. 18.
Sept. 15.

Proceedings of Officers and Council submitted.

Aug. 11.
Oct. 6.
Oct. 20.
Nov. 3.
Nov. 10.

Candidates for membership balloted for.

-

Nov. 17.
Dec. l.

Dec. 15.

Proceedings of Officers and Council submitted.
Reports of Treasurer and Publication Committee.
Communications for Magellanic Premium consi
dered at this or the next stated meeting.
Report of Finance Committee. Appropriations for
the succeeding year passed.

OFFICIATING SECRETARIES AND CURATORS.
Secretaries.—C. B. TREGo, J. L. LE CoNTE, for Jan. Mar. May, July, Sept. Nov.
E. O. KENDALL, J. P. LESLEY, for Feb. Apr. June, Aug. Oct. Dec.
Curators.—FRANKLIN PEALE, for January, April, July, October.
ELIAs DURAND, for February, May, August, November.
JosepH CARson, for March, June, September, December.
Bay- 1866, Jan.5, ANNUAL ELECTION of OFFICERs, between the hours of
2 and 5 o'clock, P.M.

Ameritan philosophical $oriety.
0 FFICERS F0 R 1865.
PR E S I DE N T.

George B. Wood.
WIC E-PR E SID E N T S.

John C.

Isaac Lea,

Cresson,

George Sharswood.

S E. C. R. E.T A. R. I E S.

John L. Le Conte,
J. P. Lesley.

Charles B. Trego,
E. Otis Kendall,
C U R A To R. S.

Elias Durand,

Franklin Peale,

Joseph Carson.

T R. E. As U. R. E. R.

Charles B. Trego.
C O U N S E L L OR S.
Elected in 1863.

Elected in 1864.

Elected in 1865,

Frederick Fraley,
Robert Patterson,
Daniel R. Goodwin,

Alfred L. Elwyn,

Isaac Hays,
Robert E. Rogers,
. Henry C. Carey,
Robert Bridges.

W. Parker Foulke.

John Bell,

Henry Coppée,
Oswald Thompson.

STANDING COMMITTEES.
F IN A N C E.

Mr. Fraley,
Mr. J. F. James,
Mr. Powel.

P. U B L I CAT I o N.

Dr. Bridges,
Mr. T. P. James,
Dr. Carson,
Mr. Marsh,
Dr. Wistar.

.

HAL L.

L i B R A R Y.

Mr. Peale,

Dr. Bell,

Judge King,
Prof. Coppée.

Mr. Price,

Dr. Coates,
Mr. Barnes,

Mr. Briggs.

LIST OF THE SURVIVING MEMBERS
OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
JA NUARY, 1872,

In the order of their Election to Membership.

Horace Binney, Philadelphia,
G. Swift, New York,
Jacob Bigelow, Boston,
J. A. Borgnis, j'aris,
M. de Montgery, Paris,
Samuel Jackson, Philadelphia,
Benjamin H. Coates, “
Henry
4,
John J. Bigsby, England
-

'

#

-

item: La Roche Fiiladelphia,
J. P. C. Cassado de Giraldes. Lisbon

Jose M. Dantes Pereira, Lisbon,
Henry J. Anderson, New York,

1808. | Pedro de Angeli
1814. Martin H. Boyé

Buenos Apres,
high Co., Pa.,

isis. W. H. C. Bartlett, West Point,
1820. George W. Smith, Philadelphia,
“. . Robert Were Fox, Falmouth, Eng.
1823. François P. G. Guizot, France,
“. . . Bernardo Quaranto, Naples,

1824. David Irving, Wisconsin,
Edward Sabine, London
1827. Roswell Parke, Wisconsin,

1s:0.
4
•*
|
-

1:1.

1825.

"

-

Robert Christison, Edinburgh,

|

1828. George Bancroft, Berlin, Prussia,

John F. Frazer, Philadelphia,

1842.

4

Isaac Lea. Philadelphia,
Hyde de Neufville
nce,

George B.Wood, Philadelphia,
Francisco de P. Quadrada, Madrid
Daniel B. Smith, Germantown

E. Otis Kendall

**

1829. | Sir Charles Lyell, London
* *
D. Humphreys Storer, Boston,
4
Simeon Borden,
**

Thomas McEuen, Philadelphia,
William B.
Georgia,
Isaac Hays, Philadelphia,
Andres del Rio, Mexico,
Hartman Bache, Philadelphia,

Frederick Fraley, Philadelphia,
1830. George Peacock, Cambridge, Eng.,
“. . J. I. Clark Hare, Philadelphia,
Benjamin Pierce, Cambridge, Mass,
“. . Leopold II, Qf Tuscany,
1831. Louis Agassfz, Cambridge, Mass.

John Bell

is32. William W. Gerhard, Philadelphia,

#

Hugh L. Hodge.

**

Theodore Lorin, Paris,
Juan J. Martinez, Spain.
M. Bujalsky, St. Petersburg.
Moncure Robinson, Philadelphia,

John Lenthall. Washington,
Solomon W. Roberts, Philadelphia,
“. . Charles B. Trego.
**
1833. Charles Wilkes, U. S. N.,
**

Stanislaus Julien, Paris,
John Downes, Washin 0n,

M. J. Labouderie, Paris,

J. Francis Fisher, Philadelphia,
Gouverneur Emerson, “
Henry C. Carey,
Viscount Santarem, Portugal,
Titian R. Peale, Washington,

Henry J. Williams, Philadelphia,
John Torrey, New York City,
Joseph Henry, Washington,
Thomas Sully, Philadelphia,
Chev. Morelli, Naples,
J. S. Da Costa Macedo, Lisbon,

Theodore Strong, New Brunswick.
Alfred L. Elwyn, Philadelphia,
Robert Bridges,
**
John W. Draper, New York City,
W. A. Norton, New Haven, Conn.


**

“. . Jacob R. Eckfeldt Philadelphia,
1835. William E. Dubois," ":
**

John C. Trautwine,
John S. Hart, Trenton,

-

1836.

Samuel S. Haldeman, Columbia, Pa.,
£ W. Norris, Philadelphia,
Joseph Carson,
-

187.

Richard Owen, London,

Mariano Galvez, Gautemala,

Joseph Saxton, Washington,

• *

-

William M. Meredith, Philadelphia,
18:8.
Andrew Talcott, U. S. E.
Robert Treat Paine, Boston,
**
Sylvanus Thayer, U.S. E.,
1839
John C. Cresson, Philadelphia,

William Tell Poussin, Paris,
Frederick von Raumer, Berlin,
William B. Carpenter, London,
Sir William Jardine, Scotland,
Prof. Lepsius, Berlin,

James C. Booth*

Sir Henry Holland, i.ondon,

--

** . .

A. Quetelet, Brussels,
Humphrey Lloyd, Dublin,
Thomas U. Walter, Germantown, Pa.
Elias Loomis, New Haven, Conn.,
‘.
Stephen Alexander, Princeton,

Rich'd S. McCulloh, Lexington, Va.
Ceva Grimaldi, Naples,
U.J. Leverrier, Paris,
. Richard A. Tilghman, Philadelphia,

| Wii' froc'

-

**

1847.

2
J. C. Adams. Cambridge. England,

1849. Albert S. Letchworth, Philadelphia,

18.

Theo. Lacordaire, Liège,

Asa Gray, Cambridge, Mass.
Ralph J. Ingersoll, New Haven,
E. Geddings, South Carolina,

**

Hermann Burmeister, Buenos Ayres, "
Samuel L. Hollingsworth, Philada,

**

F. A. Pouchet, Rouen,
Miers Fisher Longstreth, Del. Co. Pa.

Christian Olrik, Copenhagen,
J. C. Adamson, Cape Town, Africa,
J. Peter Lesley, Philadelphia,

**

Samuel F. B. Morse, New York City,
E. N. Horsford, Cambridge, Mass.
George P. Marsh, Vermont,

1849. John Leyburn, Baltimore, Mil.,

John Hughes Bennett, Scotland,

Robert P. Harris, Philadelph a.

Francis Kiernan, London,

Thomas F. Betton. Germantown,

A'
Leidy, Philadelphia,
W. S. W. Ruschenberger, U. S. N.

Theodore Cuyler, Philadelphia,
1831.

John H. Towne, Philadelphia,

--

Hugh Blair Grigsby. Virginia,
•*

Thomas P. James.
**
Nathaniel P. Shurtleff, Boston,

1857.
-

-**

Thomas S. Kirkbride,

Fairman Rogers. Philadelphia,

Benj. A. Gould, Jr., Cordova, S. Am.

**

George M. Totten, Panama,

**

B. Howard Rand,

Charles M. Cresson,
Kingston Goddard,
J. Lawrence Smith, Louisville, Ky.,

-

Joseph W. Farnum, London,
Peter McCall, Philadelphia,

**

**
-

E. Spencer Miller, Philadelphia,

Joseph Pancoast, "
Robert Patterson. “
Fran. Zantedeschi, Padua,
Daniel Kirkwood, Bloomington, Ind.

-

Andrew A. Humphreys, U. S. E.,
**

Elia Lombardini, Milan,
**

Henry C. Wayne, Georgia.
William H. Allen, Philadelphia,

**

George Sharswood, Philadelphia,
Francis Gurney Smith,

1852.

John Forsyth Meigs.
Edward King,
**
Charles Henry Davis, U.S. N.

-

Michael Cheva ier, Paris,

**

Alfred Stillé, Philadelphia,

*

William S. Vaux, Philadelphia,

18:3.

A., Philada.

-

William A. Hammond, U.S. A.,
P. Angelo Secchi, Rome.
Aubrey H. Smith, Philadelphia,
Francis W. Lewis,

-

-

•*

Ferdinand V. Hayden, Washington,

-

Henry Grinnell, New York City,
John B. Biddle, Philadelphia,
Alex. Fischer von Waldheim, Moscow,

Adam Sedgwick, Cambridge, Eng.,

Leonce Elie de Beaumont, Paris,
| Henry
| Theo. L. W. Bischoff, München,
Herm. von Meyer, Frankfort a M.,
Andreas Wagner, München,

M'il

Basile Sakharoff, St. Petersburg,

Peter Strelkowsky,
Charles Dworjak,
**
Charles D. Arfwedson, Stockholm,
-

Hyrtl, Vienna,
4. Joseph
''W'.
Sir
William E. Logan, Montreal,

James Paget, London.

E. Brown Séquard, Paris, France,

St. Clair Deville, Paris,

John H. B. Latrobe, Baltimore,
Mont. C. Meigs, Washington, D.C.,
Benj. Halloweli, Sandy
Md.,

Jean Baptiste Dumas, Paris,

George Harding, Philadelphia,

Daniel R. Goodwin, Philadelphia,

Frederick A. Genth
**
Samuel M. Felton. ijelaware,

Leo Lesquereux, Columbus. Ohio,

Edouard de Verneuil,
Claude Bernard,

£

-


**

John Lothrop Motley. La Hague,
Pascal de Gayangos, Madrid,

Samuel D. Gross, Philadelphia,
Charles Renard, Moscow,

John Curwen, Harrisburg, Pa.,
Charles des Moulins, Bordeaux,
| Thomas Sterry-Hunt, Montreal,

C. A. Dohrn, Stettin,

Wm. Bacon Stevens Philadelphia,
Elias Durand,
William
W. Keating,

Lord Mahon, England.
James Lenox, New York City,
Eli K. Price, Philadelphia,

Paolo Volpicelli, Rome,
Alexander Kasem Beg, St. Petersb'g,
Otto Boehtlingk,
J. S. Steenstrup, Copenhagen,
C. J. Thomsen,
Andrew C. Ramsey, England,
Edouard Desor, Neuchâtel,
L. G. de Koninck, Liège,
Joachim Barrande, Prague.
-

Constant Guillou, “
James D. Dana, New Haven, Conn.,
-

Oliver Wolcott Gibbs, Camb., Mass.,
James Hall, Albany, N. Y.

''
F. Baird. Washington,
. Regnault, Paris,
''
R. I.,
'W',

1855.
**

E. P. Rogers, Albany, N.Y.,
Robert E. Rogers, Philadelphia,
Henry
Bethlehem, Pa.,
George Allen, Philadelphia,

*

£

Strickland Kneass, “

Robert W. Bunsen, Heidelberg,
Wm. Hofmann, London,

Samuel Powel,
Elisha J. Lewis, Phi

H. R. Goppert, Breslau, ,
**

Alexander Braun, Leipsig,

J. J. Kaup, Darmstadt.

**

J. A. Froude, Oxford, Eng.,

1856
*

Hermann Lebert, Breslau.
| S. Weir Mitchell. Philadelphia,

44
*-

Henry William Field, London,
John P. Brown, '''

**

Geo. Augustus Matile, Washington,
Thomas L. Kane, Mckean Co., Pa.,

-

Clement A. Finley, U.S.A.,

1859.

Walter H. Lowrie, Erie, Pa.,
Samuel H. Dickson,

John L. Le Conte, Philadelphia,
John P. Kennedy, Baltimore.

Alfred Mordecai,
U. S.
Thomas
L. Patterson.

-

Edmund C. Evans Montgomery Co.,
Caspar Wister, Philadelphia,

**

John Neill,
J. Liouville, Paris,

Charles E. Smith,
Edward Hartshorne,

F. L. Otto Roehrig, Ithaca, N.Y.,
H. L. Abbot, U. S. E.,
Oswald Heer, Zurich
J. von Liebig,

**

München.

Frederick Wöhler, Göttingen,
J. W. Dawson, Montreal,

1852.
**

3
George Engelmann, St. Louis,

1860.
Jacob M. Da Costa, Philadelphia,
Ralph Waldo Emerson,Concord, Mass.1867.
**
Charles Sumner, Boston, Mass,
John Cadwalader, Philadelphia,
**

1862.

Wm. S. Sullivant, Columbus 0 ,
•*
Andrew A. Henderson, Rrooklyn, N.Y. * *
Robert Cornelius. Philadelphia,
Rudolf Virchow, Berlin,
Fr. Theo. Frerichs, Berlin,
Thomas J. Lee, Maryland.

| Harrison Allen,
**

Lewis Stromeyer, Hanover,
Karl Rokitansky. Vienna.

Henry Winsor, Philadelphia,
. Theodore Schwann, Liège,
Ernest Renan, Paris,

**

Andrew Mason, New York City,
| George F. Dunning “
**
B. F. Shumard, St. Louis, Mo.
J. S. Newberry, New York City

**

| M. B. Anderson, £ York,
Hoboken, N.
1s: £
J. H. Packard, Philadelphia,

iMax Müller. Öxford. England,

**

**
-

“. . Charles J. Stillé, Philadelphia,
4*

Josiah D. Whitney, Cambri ige, Mass.,
A. H. Worthen, Springfield, Ill.,

Henry Osborne, Easton, Pa.
| Hubert A. Newton, New Haven, Conn.

IDaniel Wilson, Toronto, C. W.,
Chase, Philadelphia,
I. I. ayes.
*4
George Smith, Del. Co., Pa.,
..john M. Read, Philadelphia,
Edward Jarvis, Dorchester, Mass.,
J. E. Hilgard, Washington,
Charles A. Schott,
*
B. W. Richardson London,

'''',

Thomas Hill, Cambridge, Mass.,

W. F. Reynolds, U.S. A.

Morton McMichael, Philadelphia,
Theodore N. Gill, Washington. D. C.
Nathaniel B. Browne, Philadelphia,
John Welsh,
G. K. Warren, U. S. E.

**

John Meredith Read, Albany, N.Y.

“ - J. Sergeant Price, Philadelphia,

W. D. Whitney, New Haven.

Ario Pardee, Hazleton, Pa.

William H. Green, Princeton, N.J.,

John Stuart Mill, London, Eng.
Henry C Lea, Philadel Shia,

E. A. Washburne,

*4.

James McClune,

Samuel J. Gummere,

-

averford, Pa. 1888.

**

John Biddle,

Jos B. Townsend, Montgomery Co., Pa.
Edward Shippen, Philadelphia,

Henry Hartshorne, 44
C. G. N. David, Copenhagen,
Frederick Keller, Zurich.

Peter W. Sheafer, Pottsville, Pa.,
A. Delesse, Paris,
A. Daubrée,
R.
A. F.Bri
Penrose, Philadelphia,
Robert
•4
Joseph Lesley
st
Thomas Chase, Haverford. Pa.

£

Benjamin V. Marsh, Philadelphia,
George Kirchhoff, Heidelberg,
Francis J. Pictet, Geneva,
Bernard Studer, Berne,
Peter Tunner, Vienna,
.4. Thury, Geneva,
A. Tholuck, Halle an der Salle,
Carl Schinz. Strasburg.

-

Arnold Guyot, Princeton. N. J.
F. B. Meek, Washington, D.C.

Frederick Graff,

.

**

Ulysses S. Grant, Washington, D.C.
| John Tyndall, London, Elig.
Charles E. Arthur, New York City,
O. C. Marsh, New Haven, Ct.
| Traill Green, Easton, Pa.

**

4
* ,

| William M. Canby, Wilmington, Del.
George H. Horn, Philadelphia,
. . Wm. M. Gabb, Philadelphia,
Hakakian Bey, Cairo, Egypt,
Linant

''

1869.
**
**

**

**
**

Auguste Mariette Bey, Cairo, Egypt,
Dr. Ceselli, Rome,
|

#

-

#mmanuel de Rougé, Paris, France,
Henry Brugsch, berlin, Prussia,

--

**

Johannes Dümichen, Berlin, Prussia,
| M. F. Chabas, Chalons sur Saône,

•*
-

William Sellers, Philadelphia.
R. S. Smith

**

Alexander Wilcocks, “
Joseph Harrison,
*-

| Samuel Birch, London, England,
Joseph Prestwich, '' England,
| Cari'í. Riitimeyer, Basel, Switzerl’d,

G. H. Cook, New Brunswick, N.J.,
Thomas C. Porter, Lancaster, Pa.,
John Bost, La Force, France.

Charles T. Krauth, Philadelphia,

Wm. H. Flower, London, England,
| Geo. Rolliston, Oxford,
-

| Thomas H. Huxley, London, Eng.,
Joseph D. Hooker, Kew,
John Phillips, Oxford,
J. J. A. Worsaae, Copenhagen. Den.,
I von Nillson, Lund, Sweden,

Goldwin Smith, Oxford. England,

Auguste Carlier, Paris, France,
Benj. S. Lyman. Philadelphia,
Henry C. Baird,
**

£

W. E. Whitman, Philadelphia,
George J. Brush, New Haven,
Samuel F. Haven, Worcester, Mass,
James B. Francis, Lowell, Mass.

Geo. Chr. Shaeffer, Washington. D, C.
Timothy A. Conrad, Trenton, N.J.,
Thomas S Blair, Pittsburgh
Edward D. Cope, Haddon eld, N.J.,

iíoratio C. Wood, Philadelphia,
George Davidson, U.S. Coast Survey,
Charles Hale, Washington, D.C.,
William Strong,
Pliny Earle, Northampton, Mass.,
Owen Jones Wister, Germantown,
-

isri

hton, Eng.

-

-

-

Ovide Brunet, Quebec,

Thomas Davidson,

**
-*

John Foster Kirke, Boston.

A. Winchell,

*

Samuel J, Reeves,

**
*

**

Hector Tyndale, .
*
Joshua B. Lippincott, “
Wm. Blackmore, Salisbury, Eng.,
D. G. Brinton, Philadelphia,
A. D. White, Ithaca, N. Y.

J. H. C. Coflin, U.S. N.,
Joseph Wharton, Philadelphia,
Maria Mitchell,

Poughkeepsie, N.Y.,

Mary Somerville, England,
Elizabeth Agassiz, Cambridge, Mass,
Charles Darwin, England,
Geo. Rawlinson

*

44

Fridolin Sandberger, Würtzberg, Ba.,

Louis Gruner, Paris, France,
Carl Vogt, Geneva, Switzerland,

Wm. P. Schimper, Strasburg, Ger.

Carl T. E. von Siebold, Munich, Ba., • *
Carl Fried. Naumann, i.eipzig, Saxony, “

Jeffries Wyman, Cambridge, Mass.

4
Fr. von Hochstetter. Vienna, Austria, 1869.
Georg von Frauenfield.

-

Charles Bullock.

"

-

Esquiros de Parieu. France.

1871.

W. D. Roepper, Bethlehem, Pa.,

-

Philip T. Tyson, Baltimore, Md.,
Edward Hopper, Philadelphia,

W. C. Cattell, Easton, Pa.,
H. M. Phillips, Philadelphia,
. Thomas Meehan, Germantown,
George G.
hia.

£

---

Alfred M. Mayer, Bethlehem, Pa.,

-Geo. W. Anderson, W. Haverford, Pa."
Clara E. Dutton, Frankford,
Oswald Seidensticker, Philadelphia, 1870. Edward Goodfellow, Philadelphia,
Wm. M. Tilghman,
Hermann Haupt,
**
E. E. Hale, Boston, Mass.,
**
E. B. Andrews, Marietta, O,
John G. Whittier. A mesbury, Mass., “ | F. A. P. Barnard, New York City,
**
T. B. Woolsey, New Haven, Conn.,
Emma Seiler, Philadelphia,
R. S. Williamson, U. S. E.,
ames T. McCosh, Princeton, N.J.
J. D. Cox, Cincinnati, O.,
**
'harles W. Eliot, Cambridge, Mass., “
Charles H. Hitchcock, Hanover. N. H.,"
Cleveland Abbe, Washington, D.C., “
Edmund Quincy, Dedham, Mass.,

Benj. C. Tilghman, Philadelphia,
p
C. W. Boekh, Christiana, Norway,
" | Herman Haupt, Philadelphia,
Wm. Pepper, Philadelphia,

E. B. Andrews, Columbus, O.,
E. R. Beadle
**
“ . F. A. P. Barnard, Columbia Coll., N.Y. “
Henry F. Q.
N. York City, “
T. B. Woolsey, D. D., New Haven,
Wm. P. Blake, New Haven, Conn.,
“. . James McCosh, D. D., Princeton, N.J., “
George L. Vose, Salem, Mass.,
Charles W. Eliot, Cambridge,

-

-

-

'''};

J. Imbrie Miller, Penn'a.,

Lckley B. Coxe,

Philadelphia,

-

*-

Cleveland Abbe, Cincinnati, O.,

-

-

Ben. Chew Tilghman, Philadelphia,

Photographs of the Following have been Received,
Abbot, H. L.
Davidson, Th.
Agassiz, L.
Davis, C. H.
Arfwedson, C. D. R Dawson, J. W.
Adams, J. C.
Bache, A. D.

Bache, Franklin
Baird, C. H.
Baird, S. F.

Delesse, A.
1)esor, E.
Dorn, C. A.
IDorr, B.

Dupont, S. F.

Bancker, C. N.

Durand, E.

Barnes Albert
Bancroft, John
Bancroft, Geo.
Beadle, E. R.

Elwyn A. L.

Bigelow, Jacob

Binney, Horace ...

Dewey, C.
Emerson, G.

Encke, J. F.
Everett, E.
Faraday, M.

Blackwell, C. T. E.

Farnum, J. W.

Böhtlingk, O.
Brayley, E. W.
Bridges. Robert
Bronn, A.
Briggs, R.
Brushi, G. J.
Buch, Leon von
Candolle, A. de
Carson, Jos.
Carey, H. C.
Casem,
A.
Chase, P. E.
Chauvenet, W.
Clymer, Geo
Coates, B. H.
Coffin, J. H. C
Cohen, J. I
Coles, Ed
Condie, D. F.

Field. H. W.

#

Copped, W.
Clevecoeur, de
Cresson, J. C.
Cope, E. D.

Foulke, W. P.
Fox, R. W.

Fraley, Fred.
Franklin, B.
Genth, F. A.
Gould, A. A.
Graham, J. D.
Gray, Asa
Gross, S. D.
Graeff, F.
Harrison, J.
Heer. O.

Hoffman, A. W.

Hornford. E. N.
Humboldt, A. de

Humphreys, A. A.
Hunt, T. S.

Hyrtl, J.
James, T. P
James, J. F
Jackson, J.
Jackson, R. M. S.
Jäger, G.
Jenks, W.

Jarvis, E.
Julien, St.
Kendall, E. O.
Kne
St
Koninck, L. de

Sharswood, Geo.
Sheafer, P. W.
Short, G. W.
Shurtleff, N. B.
Shumard, B. F.

Schintz.C.

Lesley, Jos
Lesley, J. P.

Strohmeyer, A
Swift, H. G.

Silliman, B.
Smith, F. G.

Logan, W. E.

Torrey, John

Lombardini, E.
#
S. H.

Totten. J. G.
Troyon, Fr.

Lepsius, R.
Loomis, E.

Tunner, P.

Miller, E.
Moore, S.
Morgan, J.
Morlot, A

Morse, S. F. B.

Cook, G. H.
Chabas. F.
Darlington. W.

Hartshorne, H.

Hodge, H. L.

Newton, H. A.
Norton, W. A.
Ord, Geo.
Peale, Fr.
Pennington, J.
Price, E. K.

Dana, J. D.

Horn, G. H.

Quincy, Jos.

iioland. H.

Saxton, Jos.
Seidenstriker. O.
Schott, C.A.

Sparks, J.
Strong, W. B.

Maximilian,

Hitchcock, E.

Rokitansky, C.
Rushenberger, W.

Sandberger, D. F.

Haldemann, S. S.
Harris, R. P.

Henderson, A. A.

Robinson, M.

a, I.
Lee, T. J
Le Conte. J. L.
Lesquereux, L.

Müller, M.

Hill. Thomas

Röhrig, F. L. O.
Roberts, S. W.

Kupffer, A,

Haidinger, W.
Hayden, F. V.
Hayes, 1.
Haven, S. F.
Herschel, J. F. W.

Quetelet, A.
hhoads, E.
Rand, B. H.

Walter, P. T.
Wayland, Fr.
Wood, G. B.

Wilson, T. B.
Wharton, Jos
West. F.

Wetherill, C. M.
Whitney, J. D.
Whitney, W. D.
Wilcox, A.
Wilkes, Ch.
Wistar, C. J.
Winchell, A.
Zantedeschi, F

LIST OF SURVIVING MEMBERS

OF THE

AMERICAN

PHILOSOPHICAL

AT

PHILADELPHIA.

SOCIETY

List of surviving members of the American Philosophical Society
at Philadelphia.
(Read at the regular Meeting, January 18, 1878.)

Corrections of this list are respectfully solicited from Members of the So
ciety at home and abroad, and from secretaries of corresponding societies;
Christian name and middle name in full ; Civil, professional or other titles

in full; Present address in full.

The Society can then publish a revised

edition of its list, and be able to keep it correct in future editions.

The al

ternate pages of this copy are left blank to receive such corrections; and
duplicate copies are forwarded by mail, one of which may be returned with
such corrections.

The Society is happy to possess in its Album photograph cartes de visite
of many of its members and desires to possess portraits of them all.
Members.

Elected.

775. SWIFT, Jose:PH G . . . . . . . .
826. BIGELow, JACOB, M.D. . . . . .

852. BoRGNIS, J. A., Engineer . . . .
854. MoMTGERY, M. DE. . . . . . . .

Address.

April 15, 1814, New York.
April 17, 1818, 59 Mt. Vernon St., Boston.
Oct’r 20, 1820, France.
**

France.

**

Officer of the French Navy.

885. COATES, BENJAMIN H., M.D. . .

Jan'y 23, 1823,
44
1824,
BIGSBY, JoHN J., M.D. F.G.S. .
44
1825,
BULL, MARCUS. . . . . . . . . . April 20, 1827,
GIRALDES, J. P. C. CASSADO DE July 20, 1827,
PEREIRA, JOSE MARIA DANTES. April 18, 1828,

900. SEYBERT, HENRY . . . . . . . .
910.

937.
940.
951.

801 Spruce St., Phila.
926 Walnut St., Phila.
Care of Geol. Soc. London.
(Deceased ?)
Lisbon.
Lisbon.

Admiral.

953. LEA, ISAAC, LL.D. . . . . . . . .

**

1622 Locust St., Phila.

960. NEUFVILLE, LEBARON HYDE DE Jan'y 16, 1829, Paris.
971. WooD, GEORGE B., M.D. . . . . July 17, 1829, 1117 Arch St., Phila.
973. QUADRADA, DoN FRANCISCO DE
PAOLO . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oct'r 16, 1829, Madrid.
976. SMITH, DANIEL B. . . . . . . .
**
i4
4717 Germantown Av., Phil.
*

985. HoDGSON, WILLIAM B . . . . .
986. HAYS, ISAAC, M.D. . . . . . .

991. RIO, DON ANDRES DEL . . . . .
Professor of Mineralogy at
Mexico.
1015. LORIN, M. THEODORE. . . . . .
1018. MARTINEz, DON JUAN JOSE . .

1025. RoBENSON, MONCURE. . . . . .

April 16, 1830, Georgia. (?)
**
**
1525 Locust St., Phila.
Oct'r 15, 1830, Mexico.

April 20, 1832, Paris.
-

44

Jan 'Y. 18, 1833,

Spain.

1319 Spruce St., Phila.

2
Elected.

Members.
1026. LABOUDERIE, M. J. . . .

April 19, 1833,
**

1031. CAREY, HENRY C. . . . . .
1033. SANTAREM, VISCOUNT. . .

Address.
Paris.

**

1102 Walnut St., Phila.

July 19, 1833, Portugal. Care of Mr. Ber
nard Quaritch, Book
seller, London.
**

**

1034. PEALE, TITIAN R. . .

Holmesburg, Pa.

1037. WILLIAMS, HENRY J. . . . . .

Oct'r 18, 1833, 712 Walnut St., Phila.

1045. HENRY, JOSEPH. . . . .
Secretary Smithsonian Inst.

Smithsonian Institution,
Washington, D.C.
July 17, 1835. Boston, Mass.
Jan'y 15, 1836, Naples.
April 15, 1836, Lisbon. Care of Bernard
Quaritch, Bookseller,

1048. ROGERS, PROF. W.M. B. . . . . .

1054. MoRELLI, LE CHEV . . .
1058. MACEDO, J. L. DACOSTA. .

Jan'y 2, 1835,

London.
Governor of Gautemala.

1063. GALVEz, DON MARIA No. .

Oct'r 21, 1836,

1078. TALCOTT, ANDREW, U. S. A. .

Jan'y 19, 1838, U.S. Army.
April 20, 1838, P.O. Box (new)2616, Boston.

1085. PAINE, ROBERT TREAT. . . .
1096. Boot H, JAMES C. . . . . . .

-

*

Jan'y 18, 1839, U. S. Mint, Phila.

1100. LLOYD, REV. HUMPHREY. . . . April 19, 1839, Dublin, Ireland.
Professor Natural Philosophy
in the University.
1108. WALTER, THOS. U. . . . . . . .
Architect.

Oct'r 18, 1839, 720 N. Broad St., Phila.
**

1114. LOOMIS, ELIAS. . . . .
Professor of Astronomy and

--

New Haven, Conn.

Mathematics at Yale College.
1115. ALEXANDER, STEPHEN . . . . .
Professor of Astronomy.

Oct'r 18, 1839, Princeton, N. J.

1122. ANGELIS, PEDRO DE. . . .

Jan'y 17, 1840, Buenos Ayres.
Saucon Val., Lehigh Co, Pa.

1126. BOYE, MARTIN H . . . . . . . .
1133. BARTLETT, W. H. C. . . . . . .
Professor of Mathematics at
West Point.

Yonkers, West Chester Co.,
New York.

1143. QUARANTA, LECHEV.BARNARDO Jan'y 15, 1841, Naples.
Address unknown.
1144. IRVIN, DAVID . . . . . . . . . .
1150. SABINE, GEN. SIR EDWARD
April 16, 1841, 13 Ashley Place, Westmin
ster, London.
1152. PARK, REV. ROSWELL. .

Pomphret Co., Wisconsin.
1153. CHRISTISON, RoBT., M.D. . .
Edinburgh, Scotland.
1157. BANCROFT, GEORGE . . .
July 16, 1841, Washington, D.C.
1161. KENDALL, E. OTIS . . . . . . . . Jan'y 21, 1842, 3826 Locust St., West Phila
Professor of Mathematics in
delphia.
the University of Penna.

1167. StoRER, D. HUMPHREYs, M.D.
1168. BoRDEN, SIMEON

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1170. FRALEY, FREDERICK . . . . . .
1173. PIERCE, BENJAMIN . . . .
Professor, Harvard College.
1174. LEOPOLD II. .
Grand Duke of Tuscany.

April 15, 1842, 182 Boylston St., Boston.
**
4
Fall River, Mass.
July 15, 1842, 2017 Delancy Place, Phila.
Oct. 21, 1842, 4 Kirtland Place, Cam
bridge, Mass.
Jan'y 20, 1843,

3
Members.

1179. LENTHALL, JoHN . . . . . . . .

Elected.

Address.

1180. ROBERTS, SOL'N W . .

Jan'y 20, 1843, Washington, D.C.
*
1830 S. Rittenhouse Square,

1189. JULIEN, STANISLAUS . . . . . .

July 21, 1843, Paris, France.

Philadelphia.
Memb. de l’Institute.
i4
**
1190. DOWNES, JoHN. . . . . . . . . .
U.S. Coast Survey.
1191. STRONG, THEODORE . . . . . . . Jan'y 19, 1844,
Professor in Rutgers' College.
1192. ELWYN, ALFRED L., M.D. . . .
1193. BRIDGES, ROBERT, M.D. . . . .
1194. DRAPER, JoHN W., M.D . . . .
Professor of Chemistry in the
University of the City of New
York, Washington Square.
1195. NORTON, WM. A. . . . . . . . . .
Professor of Astronomy.
1205. DUBOIS, WM. E . . .

Washington, D.C.
New Brunswick, N. J.
1422 Walnut St., Phila.
119 S. 20th St., Phila.
Home,
Hastings-on-the
Hudson, N. Y.

New Haven, Conn.
211 N. 13th St., Phila.

U.S. Mint, Phila.

1206. TRAUTWINE, JOHN C . . . . . .
Civil Engineer.
1208. HALDEMAN, SAMUEL S. . . . .
Professor of Comp. Philol.
1212. Owen, RICHARD, F.R.S. . . . .

530 N. 6th St., Phila.
April 19, 1844, Chickies, Lancaster Co., Pa.
Jan'y 17, 1845, British Museum, London,
*4

4

1216. PoussIN, MAJOR WM. TELL. . .

Paris, France.

1220. CARPENTER, WM. B., M.D., F.R.S Oct.
-

17, 1845, University of London, Eng.
*

1222. LEPSIUS, RICHARD . . . . . . .

1228. MCCULLOH, RICHARD S. . . . .
1229. GRIMALDI, CIVA . . . . . . . . .

University of Berlin.

Oct. 16, 1846, Lexington, Va.
**

**

Naples, Italy.

Marquis of Pietra Catella.
1233. TILGHMAN, RICHARD A. . . . .

April 16, 1847, 321 S. 11th St., Phila,

1238. ADAMS, J. C. . . . .

Jan'y21, 1848, St. John's College,

Cam

bridge, Eng.
1239. GRAY, ASA. . . . . . . . . . . .
1249. INGERSOLL, RALPH. T. . . . . .

Cambridge, Mass.

April 21, 1848, New Haven, Conn.
**

--

1252. GEDDINGS, E., M.D. . . . . . .
1255. LONGSTRETH, MIERS FISHER . .

1257. HoRSFORD, E. N. . . . . . . . .

South Carolina.

Darby, Delaware Co., Pa.
Jan'y 19, 1849, Cambridge, Mass.
**

1258. MARSH, HON. GEORGE R. . . . .

14

Vermont.

1263. LEIDY, JOSEPH, M.D. . . . . . . Oct'r 19, 1849, 1302 Filbert St., Phila.
44
1264. RUSCHENBERGER, WM.S.W., MD
1932 Chestnut St., Phila.
1269. KIRKBRIDE, THOS. S., M.D. . . Jan'y 17, 1851, Penna. Hospital for the In
sane, Phila.
Cordova, Argentine Repub
1271. GoulD, BEN.I. APTHoRP, M.D .
Astronomical Observatory.
lic, S. America.
44
(?)
1272. TOTTEN, GEORGE M., C.E. . . .
444
New York City.
1273. FARNUM, Jose:PH. W., M.D. . .
1279. MCCALL, PETER . .
April 18, 1851, 229 S. Fourth St., Phila.
-

4
Members.

Elected.

1280. PANCOAST, JOSEPH, M.D . . . .

April 18, 1851,

1282. PATTERSON, ROBERT. . . . . . .
1284. KIRKWOOD, DANIEL . . . . . . .
Professor in the State University
of Indiana.

1286. SHARSwood, HON. GEORGE .
1293. MEIGs, JoHN FORSYTH, M.D.
1296. CHEVALIER, MICHEL. . . . .
1299. STILLE, ALFRED, M.D. . . . .
1300. NEILL, JOHN, M.D . . . . . .
1311, LIOUVILLE, J . . . . . . . . .

.
.
.
.
.
.

Address.

1032 Chestnut St., Phila.
329 Chestnut St., Phila.
Bloomington, Monroe Co.,
Indiana.

Oct'r 17, 1851, 336 S. 13th St. Phila.
Jan'y 16, 1852, 1208 Walnut St., Phila.
Paris.

3900 Spruce St., W. Phila.
May 7, 1852, 258 S. 18th St., Phila.
Jan'y 21, 1853, Paris.

Memb, de l’Institute.

1315. LECONTE, JOHN L., M.D . .4. .
1319. MoRDECAI, ALFRED, U.S.A. . .
1320. PATTERSON, THOS. L., C.E. . . .

1625 Spruce St., Phila.

1321. GRINNELL, HENRY . . . . . . .

No. 17 Bank St., N. Y. City.
331 S. 17th St., Phila.

1322. BIDDLE, JOHN B., M.D. . . . . .
1324. WALDHEIM, ALEx-FISCHERVON Oct'r 21, 1853,
*4
is
1329. ARFWEDSON, CHAS. D. . . . . .
1331. PAGET, JAMES, F.R.S. . . . . . Jan'y 20, 1854.
si

**

1333. BROWN-SEQUARD, E., M.D. . .
il

1334. LATROBE, JOHN H. B., C.E. . .

1335. MEIGs, MONTGOMERY C., U.S.A.
1337. HARDING, GEORGE. . . . . . .
-

1339. GENTH, FRED’K A., PH.D. . . .

Moscow, Russia.
Stockholm.

1 Harewood Place, Hanover
Square, London.
Paris.

**

Baltimore, Md.
Washington, D.C.
S.W. cor. 9th and Chestnut
Sts., Phila.

1212 Fairmount Ave., Phila.

Professor of Chemistry in the
University of Penna.

1341. FELTON, SAMUEL M.
1342, GROSS, SAMUEL. D., M.D. . . . .
1343. RENARD, CHARLES, M.D. . . .

201 S. 11th St.

1844. DoHRN, C. A... .

Stettin, Prussia.

1845. STEVENS. R.T. REV. WM. BACON.

Episcopal Rooms, 708 Wal

Bishop of Pennsylvania.
1348. KEATING, WM. V., M.D. . . . .
1350. MAHON, LORD . . . . . .

1351. LENOx, JAMES . . . . . .
1352. PRICE, ELI K. . . . . . .
1354. DANA, JAMES D. . . . .
Professor of Geology.

125 S. Fifth St., Phila.
Moscow.

nut St., Phila.

April 21, 1854, 1612 Locust St., Phila.
.
London, England.
. . . .
No.53 Fifth Ave., N.Y. City.
. . .
413 S. 15th St., Phila.
. . . .
New Haven, Conn.

*

*

1355. GIBBS, OLIVER WOLCOTT.. . . .

Cambridge, Mass.

Professor of Chemistry.
1356. HALL, JAMES... .

Geological Museum, Al
bany, N. Y.

1358. BAIRD, SPENCER F . . . . .

-

-

Jan'y 19, 1855, Smithsonian Institution,or
1445 Massachusetts Ave.

Washington, D.C.

5
Members.

Address.

Elected.

*1361. REGNAULT, V., M. DE L'INST..
1362. POWEL, SAMUEL. . . . . . . . .
1364. Rog ERS, REV. E. P., D.D. . . .

1365. Rog ERs, RoBERT E., M.D. . . .
1367. COPPEE, HENRY, PROF. . . . .
1369. KNEASS, STRICKLAND, C.E. . .

Jan'y 19, 1855, Paris, France.
April 20, 1855, Newport, R. I.
**

**

July 20, 1855, 1004 Walnut St., Phila.
Jan'y 18, 1856, Bethlehem, Pa.
-

**

Office of the Penna. R. R.

1370. FIELD, HENRY WM . .

Co., Room No. 4, Phila,
London, England.

1371. MATILE, GEO. AUGUSTUS. . . .

Geologist Museum, Prince

1378.

ton, N. J.
Kane, McKean Co., Penna.
No. 5 Woodland Terrace,

KANE, THOS. LEIPER . . . . . .

1375. FINLEY. CLEMENT A., U.S.A. .

44

W. Phila.
1376. LETCHWORTH, ALBERT S. . . .
1378. BURMEISTER, DR. HERMANN. .
Director of the Museum.
1381. ADAMSON, JOHN C., D.D. . . . .
1382. LESLEY, PETER . . . . .

-

44

430 Walnut St., Phila.
April 18, 1856, Buenos Ayres, Argentine
Republic, S. America.
July 13, 1856, Cape of Good Hope. (?)
**
1008 Clinton St., Phila.

Professor of Geology in the
University of Penna.
1388. LEYBURN, REV. JOHN. . . . . .
1384. GRIGSBY, HUGH BLAIR, LL. O.
1385. HARRIS, ROBERT P., M.D. . . .
1388. JAMES, THOS. P. . . . . . . . . .

Baltimore.

Virginia.
Oct'r 17, 1856, 815 Locust St., Phila.
44
44
94 Brattle St., Cambridge,
Mass.

1390. ROGERS, FAIRMAN. . . . . . . .
1392. RAND, B. HowARD, M.D. . . .
1893. CRESSON, CHARLES M., M.D. .

4-

44

202 S. 19th St., Phila.
April 17, 1857, 1615 Summer St., Phila.
**

4

**

-

417 Walnut St., Phila.

1895. SMITH, J. LAWRENCE . . . . . .

Louisville, Ky.

Professor. of Chemistry.
1396. MILLER, E. SPENCER . . . . . .
1897. HUMPHREYS, ANDREW A. . . .
Gen. U. S. T. E.

July 17, 1857, 631 Walnut St., Phila.
Oct'r 16, 1857, 1822 I St., Washington, D.C.

1398. LoMBARDINI, ELIA, C.E. . . . .

Jan'y 15, 1858, Milan, Italy.

1399. WAYNE, HENRY C., U.S.A . . .
1400, ALLEN, WM. H. . . . . .

April 16, 1858, Girard College, Phila.

-

-

4

(?)

President of Girard College,
1403. HARTSHORNE, EDWARD, M.D..

Oct'r 15, 1858,
EvANS, EDMUND C., M.D. . . . Jan'y 21, 1859,
44
1406. WISTER, CASPAR, M.D. . . . . .
44
1408. VAUX, WM. S. . . . . . . . . . . April 15, 1859,
1412. HAMMOND, WM. A., M.D., U.S.A. Oct'r 21, 1859,
1405.

1413. SECCHI, PAOLO ANGELO. . . . .
Professor of Astronomy.

-

**

1415. LEWIS, FRANCIS. W., M.D. . . .

**

44

* Died Jan. 19, 1878.

Montgomery Co., Phila.

1303 Arch St., Phila.
1702 Arch St., Phila.
43 West 54th St., New York
City.
Jan'y 20, 1860, Rome, Italy.

1414. SMITH, AUBREY H. . . . . . . .

1416. HAYDEN, FERDINAND V . . . .
U. S. Geologist.

1601 Walnut St., Phila.

1516 Pine St., Phila.
2016 Spruce St., Phila.

July 20, 1860. Smithsonian Institution,
Washington, D. C.

6
Elected.

Members. .
1421. MILNE-EDWARDS, HENRY . . .

July 20, 1860,

Address.

Paris, France.

Memb, de l’Institute.
-

Munich, Bavaria.

1423. BISCHOFF, DR. THEODORE L. W.
1425. WAGNER, DR. ANDREAS . . . .
1426. HYRTLE, PROF. JOSEPH . . . . .

Munich, Bavaria.
K. K. Akad. der Wissen

schaften, Stadt, Univer
sitätsplatz 2, Vienna.
Paris, France.

1430. DEVILLE, HENRY ST. CLAIRE. .
Memb. de l’Institute.

1432. DUMAS, JEAN BAPTISTE. . . . .
1433. DE VERNEUIL, EDO UARD. . . .

Paris, France.
Paris, France.

Memb. de l'Institute.
1435. GOODWIN, REV. DANIEL R. . .

Jan'y 18, 1861, Episcopal Seminary, West

1436. LESQUEREUX, LEO. . . . . . . .
1438, GUYANGOS, PASCUAL DE . . . .
1439, CURWEN, JOHN, M. D. . . . . .

Phila., or 3921 Locust St.
Columbus, Ohio.
April 19, 1861, Madrid, Spain.
Harrisburg, Penna.
Boston, Mass.
44

1441. HUNT, THOS, STERRY . . . . . .

Professor of Geology in the
Institute of Technology.
1442. VOLPICELLI, PROF. PAOLO . . .
1444. BöHTLING, OTTO. . . . . . . . .

1446. STEENSTRUP, J. S. . . . . . . . .

Oct'r 18, 1861, Rome.
Jan'y 17, 1862, University at Jena.
**
Copenhagen.
**

1448. RAMSAY, ANDREW C. . . . . . .

Jermyn St. Museum of Ge

Chief of the Geological Sur

ology, London, Eng.

vey of Great Britain.

1451. BARRANDE, JOACHIM . . . . . .

Neufchâtel, Switzerland,
Liège, Belgium.
419 Choteksgasse - Klein

1452. BUNSEN, PROF. RoBERT W . . .

Heidelburg.

1453. HoFMANN, PROF. AUGUST W.M.
1454. GöPPERT, H. R., PROF. DR . . .

Berlin.

1459. FROUDE, PROF. J. A. . . . . . . .

London. (?)

1449. DESOR, EDO UARD . . . . . . . .
1450. DE KONINCK, LOUIS G. . . . . .

seite, Prague, Bohemia.

Breslau.

1460. LEBERT, DR. HERMANN. . . . .

Breslau.

1461. MITCHELL, S. WEIR, M.D. . . .
1462. RöHRIG, F. L. OTTO . . . . . . .
Prof. of Sanscrit, in Cornell

1524 Walnut St., Phila.
Ithaca, N. Y.

University.
1463. ABBOTT, H. L. . . . . .

-

-

-

-

Willet's Point, whitestone
P.O., Queens Co., N.Y.

-

Bvt. Brig. Gen. U.S.A.
1464. HEER, PROF. OswalD. . . . . .

Zurich, Switzerland.

1467. WöHLER, PROF. DR. FREDERICK
1468. DAw8oN, JOHN WILLIAM. . . .
Pres’t of McGill University.
1470. ENGLEMAN, D.R. GEORGE. . . .

Göttingen, Germany.

1474. CoRNELIUS, ROBERT. . . . . . .

Montreal, Canada.
3003 Locust St., St.Louis, Mo.
Oct'r 17, 1862, 827 Cherry St., Phila.
*

1475. VIRCHow, DR, PROF. RUDOLPH

4

Berlin, Germany.

7
Members.

Elected.

Address.

1476, FRERICHS, DR, PROF. FRED'K
THEODORE.

. . . . . . . . . .

Oct'r 17, 1862, Berlin, Germany.
44

1477. LEE, CAPT. THOS. JEFFERSON. .

U. S. Top. Eng.

Office of the Chief of En.

gineers, U.S.A., 16 Win
der Building, Washing
ton, D.C.

1479. RoKITANSKY, DR. KARL VON . .
President of the K. K. Akad.
der Wissenschaften.

1480. WINSOR, HENRY . . . . . . . . .
1482. SCHWANN, DR. THEODORE . . .
1485. RENAN, PROF. ERNEST . . . . .
1486, Mt.LLER, DR. PROF. MAx. . . .
1487. WHITNEY, JosrAH DWIGHT . .
Professor of Geology at Har

Vienna, Austria.

Pine St. Wharf, Phila.
Jan'y 16, 1863, Liège, Belgium.
**
**
Paris, France.
**
Oxford, England.
-Cambridge, Mass.

vard College, and Chief of the
California Geological Survey.
1488. WORTHEN, PROF. A. H. . . . . .
State Geologist of Illinois.

Warsaw, Hancock Co., Ill.

1489, WILSON, PROF. DANIEL. . . . .

117 Bloor St., Toronto, Up

1492. CHASE, PLINY E. .
Professor at Haverford College.

903 Clinton St., Phila.

1498. HAYES, I. I., M.D. . . .

Studio Building, 51 W. 10th

1494. SMITH, GEORGE, M.D. . . . . .

Garretsford P.O., Delaware

1496. JARVIS, EDWARD, M.D. . . . .

Dorchester, Mass.

1497. HILGARD, J. E. .
Assistant in Charge of Office,

Washington, D.C.

per Canada.

St., New York City.
Co., Pa.

U. S. Coast Survey.
1498. SCHOTT, CHARLES A. . . . . . .
Assistant on the U. S. Coast
Survey.

Washington, D.C.

1500. RICHARDSON, B. W., M.D. . . . .

London, England.

1501. HILL, REV. THOMAS. . . . . . . .

109 State St., Portland, Me.

1502. WHITNEY, WM. Dw IGHT. . . .
Professor of Sanscrit.

New Haven, Conn.
*i.

1504. GREEN, WM. H., D.D. . . . . .
Professor of Theology.

Princeton, N. J.
**

103 East 21st St., N. Y. City.

1506. WASHBURNE, E. A., D.D. . . .
**

1507. MACLUNE, JAMES, Prof. . . . .
1509. BIDDLE, JOHN . . .
1510. HARTSHORNE, HENRY, M.D. . .

Central High School, Phila.

July 17, 1863, 1844 Pine St., Phila.
Union Springs, Cayuga Co.,
N. Y.

1512. DAVID, C. G. N., PH.D. . . . . .

Copenhagen, Denmark.

1513. KELLER, FREDERICK, PH.D. . .

Zurich, Switzerland.

1514. SHEAFER, PETER W., C.E. . . .
1515. DELESSE, PROF. A. . . . . . . . .

Ecole des Mines,

Pottsville,Schuylk'l Co. Pa.
France.

Paris,

8
Elected.

Members.

1516. DAUBREE, PROF. A. . . . . . .
1518. PENROSE, R. A. F., M.D. . . . .
1519. BRIGGS, ROBERT, M.E. . . . . .
1520. LESLEY, JOSEPH. . . . . . . . .
Secretary Penna. R. R. Co.

1522. CHASE, PROF. THOMAS . . . . .
1523. MARSH, BENJAMIN V. . . . . . .
1525. KiRCHHoFF, PROF. GEORGE . .

Address.

July 17, 1863, Strasburg, Paris.
**
**
1331 Spruce St., Phila.
Oct'r 16, 1863, 6th and Tasker Sts., Phila.
**
**
Penna. R. R. Office, Phila.
Jan'y 15, 1864, Haverford College, Mont
gomery Co., Pa.
April 15, 1864, 309 Market St., Phila.
**
**
Heidelburg University,
Germany.

1527. STUDER, BENJAMIN, PH.D . . .
1529. TUNNER, PETER. . . . . . . . .
1530. THURY, PROF. A. . . . . . . . . .

1532. SHINZ, CARL, PH.D . . . . . . .
1533. SELLERS, WILLIAM . . . . . .

-

1535. WILCOCKS, ALEXANDER, M.D. .

*-

*-

**

**

**

**

*-

**

**

**

Berne, Switzerland.

Vienna, Austria.
Geneva, Switzerland.

**

Strasburg, Germany.
1819 Vine St., Phila.

--

2133 Walnut St., Phila.

July 15, 1864, Boston, Mass.
**
**
New Bruswick, N. J.

1537. KIRKE, JOHN FOSTER. . .

1538. Cook, GEO. H., PROF. GEOL. . .
State Geologist of New Jersey.
1539. PoRTER, REV. THOS. C. . . . . . Oct'r 21, 1864, Easton, Pa.
Professor of Natural History

at Lafayette College.
1540. BOST, REV. JOHN. . . . . . . . .

*-

**

1541. KRAUTH, REV. CHARLEST. . .

**

**

Vice Provost of the Univer
sity of Penna. .

1543. BRUNET, L’ABB £ OVIDE . . . .
1544. SMITH, PROF. GOLDWIN . . . .
1545. WINCHELL, PROF. ALEXANDER.
Chancellor of the University
at Syracuse.

1547. BRUSH, GEORGE.J. . . . .
Professor of Chemistry,
College.
1549. HAVEN, SAMUEL F. . . . .
1551. FRANCIS, JAMES B. . . . .
1554. BLAIR, THOS. S. . . . . . .

. . .
Yale
. . .
. . .
. . .

1555. CoPE, EDWARD D. . . . . . . .
1556. Wood, PROF. HoRATIO C., M.D.
1557. DAVIDSON, GEORGE . . . . . . .
Assistant on the U. S. Coast
Survey

1558. HALE, HON. CHARLES. . . . . .

**

**

**

**

**

Laforce, près de Bergerac,
Dordogne, France.
University of Penna., West
Phila.

Quebec, Canada.
Ithaca, N. Y.
Syracuse, N. Y.

New Haven, Conn.

April 21, 1865, Worcester, Mass.
Lowell, Mass.
444
Jan'y 19, 1866, 13 Smithfield St.,
burg, Pa.
2100 Pine St., Phila.
**
**
1631 Arch St., Phila.
**
**
San Francisco, Cal.
**
**

*-

**

Pitts

39 Highland St., Roxbury,
Mass.

Washington, D.C.
1559, STRONG, HoN. W.M. . . . . . . .
**
1560. EARLE, PLINY, M.D. . . . . . . . April 20, 1866, Northampton, Mass.
Director of the Insane Asylum

9
Members.

Elected.

1561. WISTER, Owen JoNES, M.D. . .

Address.

April 20, 1866, Butler Place, Branchtown
P.O., Phila.

1562. DAVIDSON, THOMAS. . . . . . .
1563, SANDBERGER, PROF. FRIDOLIN,
Ph.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

**

*4

Brighton, England.

**

Würtzburg, Bavaria.

**

1564. SCHIMPER, DR. W.M. P., PH.D..
1567. DACOSTA, JACOB M., M.D. . . .

Oct'r 19, 1866, Strasburg, Germany.
**
44
1609 Walnut St., Phila.

1568. EMERSON, RALPH WALDo . . .
1570. CADWALADER, HoN. JoHN . . .
1571. ALLEN, HARRISON, M.D. . . . .

Jan'y 18, 1867, Concord, Mass.
**
**
252 S. 4th St., Phila.
**
**
117 S. 20th St., Phila.
**
**
U. S. Assay Office, 30 and 32
Wall St., N.York City.
**
**
242 Carroll St., Brooklyn,

1572. MASON, ANDREW . . . . . . . .

-

1573. DUNNING, GEORGE F. . . . . .

New York.

1575. NEWBERRY, J. S., M.D. . . . . .
Professor of Geology in Columbia College.

**

**

Columbia College, New
York City.

-

1576. ANDERSON, REV. M. B. . . . . .

**

**

1577. MoRTON, PROF. HENRY . . . . .

**

**

Rochester, N. Y.
Hoboken, N.J.

President of the Stevens In
stitute.

1578. PACKARD, J. H., M.D. . . . . .
1579. STILLE, CHARLES J. . . . . . .
Provost of the University of

**

4-

1928 Spruce St., Phila.

**

**

N.W. corner of 22d and St.

is

is

Oxford, Butler Co., Ohio.

James Place, Phila.

. Penna.

1581. OSBORNE, REV. HENRY S . . . .
1582. NEwTON, HUBERTA. . . . . . .
Professor of Astronomy

April 19, 1867, 135 Elm St., New Haven,

at

Conn.

Yale College.
1584. GUYOT, ARNOLD. . . . . . . . .
Professor of Geology.

**

*-

1585. RAYNoLDS, GEN. W.M. F., U.S.A.
1586. MCMICHAEL, HON. MoRTON . .
1587. GILL, THEODORE N . . . . . . .

**

Princeton, N. J.
532 Walnut St., Phila.
1841 Spruce St., Phila.
Smithsonian

Institution,

Washington, D.C.
1589. WELSH, JOHN . . . . . . . . . .
U. S. Minister to England.
1590. WARREN, GEN.GOUVERNEUR K.

London, England.

**

-

Newport, R. I.

**

**

Athens, Greece.

U. S. Eng.

1591. READ, GEN. JoHN MEREDITH .
1592. PRICE, J. SERGEANT. . . . . . .
1593. PARDEE, ARIO. . . . . . . . . .

1595. LEA, HENRY CAREY. . . . . . .

Oct'r 18, 1867, 709 Walnut St., Phila.
*44
Hazleton, Pa.
.“
426 Walnut St., Phila.
-

1597. Townsen D, JosepH B. . . . . . Jan'y 17, 1868, 709 Walnut St., Phila.
1598. SHIPPEN, EDWARD . . . . . . .
1599. GRAEFF, FREDERICK . . . . .

1601. GRANT, ULYsses S. . . . . . . .

**

**

Philadelphia.

--

**

1337 Arch St.

April 17, 1868,

Ex President of the U.S.

1602. TYNDALL, PROF. JoHN . . . . .

**

**

Royal Institution, London.

10
Elected.

Members.

Address.

1603. ANTHON, CHAS. E., LL.D. . . . Oct'r 16, 1868, New York City.
Professor of History & Belles
Lettres at the College of the
City of New York.

1604. MARSH, O.C. . . . . . .
Professor of Palaeontology.
1605. GREEN, DR. TRAILL. . . . . . .
Professor of Chemistry.
1606. CANBY, WM. M. . . . . . . .
1607. HoRN, GEORGE H., M.D. .

New Haven Conn.

Easton, Pa.
1101 Delaware Ave., Wil
mington, Del.

.

874 N. 4th St., Phila.
Care ofthe Academy of Nat
ural Sciences, Phila.

1608. GABB, WM. M., M.D. . . . . . .

1609. HAKAKIAN BEY, T. . . . .

Cairo, Egypt.

1610. LINANT PASHA. . . . . . . . . .

Cairo, Egypt.

1611. MARIETTE BEY, AUGUSTE. . .
1613. DE ROUGE, VICOMTE EMMAN

Cairo, Egypt.

Paris, France.
Conservateur du Gall. Egypt.
du Louvre.

1614. BRUGSH, HENRI, PH.D. . . . .
1615. DUMICHEN, DR. JoHANNES. . .
Professor at Strasburgh.

Cairo, Egypt or Göttingen.(?)
Strasbourg, Germany.

1616. CHABAS, M. F. . . . . . . . . . .

Chalons sur Saone, France.

1617. BIRCH, SAMUEL . . . . . . .

British Museum, London.

1619. PRISTw ICH, JosepH, F.R.S. . .

London, Eng.

1620. Rt. TIMEYER, PROF. DR. CARL L.

Basel, Switzerland.

1621. FLOWER, WM. HENRY, M.D. . .

Museum of College of Sur

geons, Lincoln Inns
Fields, London, Eng.
Museum, Oxford, England.
School of Mines, Jermyn
St., London, Eng.

1622. RoLLESTON, GEORGE, M.D. . . .
1623. HUxLEY, PROF. THOMAS W. . .
1624. HookER, JOSEPH D., M.D. . . .

London, England.

Curator of Kew Gardens.

1626. WARSAAE, PROF. J. J. A. . . . .

Copenhagen, Denmark.

1627. NILLSON, PROF. SVEN. . . . . .

Lund, Sweden.

1628. CARLIER, M. AUGUSTE . . .

Care of A. Brognard, Jardin

1629. LYMAN, BEN.J. SMITH

Care of Mourilyan Heiman
G Co., Yokohama, Japan.
810 Walnut St., Phila.
410 Walnut St., Phila.
1021 Clinton St., Phila.
715 Market St., Phila.
Salisbury, England.

des Plants, Paris.

. . .

Geologist of Japan.

1630. BAIRD, HENRY CAREY . . .
1631. REEVES, SAMUEL J . . . . .
1632. TYNDALE, GEN. HECTOR . .
1633. LIPPINCOTT, Jos HUA B . . .
1635. BLACKMORE, WILLIAM . .
1636. BRINTON, DANIEL G., M.D.
1637. WHITE, PROF. ANDREw D .

. .
. .
.
. .
. .

President of Cornell Univer

sity.

April 16, 1869, 2027 Arch St., Phila.
**

Ithaca New York.

11
Members.

Elected.

1638. CoFFIN, J. H. C. . . . . . . . . .
Superintendent of the U.S.
Naut. Almanac Office.

1639. WHARTON, JOSEPH . . . . . . .

Address.

April 16, 1869, Washington, D.C.
-

44

44

P. O. Box 2786, Phila., or
Camden Nickel Works.

1640. MITCHELL, MISS MARIA . . . . Oct'r 15, 1869, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
Professor of Astronomy, Vas
Sar College.
1642. AGASSIZ, MRS, ELIZABETH. C. .
1643. DARWIN, CHARLES . . . . . . .

**

**

Quincy St. Cambridge, Mass

**

is

6 Queen Anne St., Caven

**

**

England.

**

*-

90 Rue d’Assas, Paris.

dish Sq. W. London, Eng.

1644. RAWLINSON, GEORGE . . . . . .
1645. GRUNER, PROF. Lou Is. .

-

Inspector General of Mines.
1646. Vogt, PROF. CARL . . . . . . . .

4-

1647. SIEBOLD, PROF. CARL T. E. VON
1649. HooHSTETTER, DR. FRANz Von
1650. FRAUENFELD, HERR GEORGVoN



**

-

44

Geneva, Switzerland.
Munich, Bavaria.

**

Vienna, Austria.

**

Vienna, Austria.

1651. TYSON, PHILLIP T. . . . . . . .
1652. HoPPER, EDWARD. . . . . . . .

44

**

Baltimore, Md.

**

**

323 Walnut St., Phila.

1653. BULLOCK, CHARLES. . . . . . .

**

14

1654. MAYER, ALFRED M . . . . . . .

44

44

528 Arch St., Phila.
Hoboken, N. J.

Professor of Physics. Stevens
Institute.

1655. ANDERSON, GEO. W., D.D. . . .

44

*4

1656. SEIDENSTICKER, OSWALD . . . Jan'y 21, 1870,
Prof. German in Univ. Penna.

Bryn Mawr, Montg'y Co. Pa.
1016 Cherry St., Phila.

1657. TILGHMAN, WM. M. . . . . . .

**

**

1114 Girard St., Phila.

1658. HALE, REv. EDWARD EVERETT.

-

39 Highland St., Roxbury,

*4

**

i4

**

Mass.

1659. WHITTIER, JoHN GREENLEAF.
1660. SEILER, MRS. EMMA. . . . . . .

Amesbury, Essex Co., Mass.
1337 Spruce St., Phila.

1661. WILLIAMSON, LIEUT. CoI. R. S. April 15, 1870, Corps of Engineers, San
U. S. Eng.

Francisco, Cal.

1662. Cox, HON. J. D. . . . . . . . . .

4-

-

Toledo, Ohio.

1663. HITCHCOCK, PROF. CHARLES H.

4-

**

Hanover, N. H.

State Geologist of New Hamp
shire.

1666. PEPPER, WILLIAM, M.D. . . . .
1667. BEADLE, REV. E. R., D.D. . . .
1668. D'ALIGNY, HENRY F. Q. . . . .

July 15, 1870, 1811 Spruce St., Phila.
44

-

1669. BLAKE, WILLIAM P. . . . . . .

**

44

1670. VOSE, GEORGE L. . . . . . . . .

**

-

1671. MILLER, J. IMBRIE, C.E. . . . .

44

**

1672. CoxE, ECKLEY B., C.E. . . . . .
1673. PARIEU, M. ESQUIRON DE . . .
1674. RoePPER, WM. T., CHEMIST . .

1824 DeLancy Place, Phila.

Oct'r 21, 1870,
New Haven, Conn.
Brunswick, Cumberland
Co., Maine.
4039 Baltimore Av., W.Phil.

**
206 S. 4th St., Phila.
Jan'y 20, 1871, Paris.
*
Bethlehem, Pa.
44

12
Members.

JElected.

1675. CATTELL, REv. W.M.C. . . . . .

Jan'y 20, 1871,

President of Lafayette College
1676. PHILLIPs, HENRY M . .6

-

Address.
Easton, Pa.

1325 Walnut St., Phila.
Germantown (Phila.), Pa.

-

1677. MEEHAN, THOMAS. . . . . . . .
1679. DUTTON, LIEUT. CLARENCE E .

Washington Arsen’1, Wash
ington, D.C.
Coast Survey Office, Wash

U. S. A.

-

1680. GOODFELLOW, EDWARD. . . . .
Assistant U. S. Coast Survey.
1681. HAUPT, HERMANN, C.E. . . . .
1682. ANDREWS, PROF. E. B. . . . . .

ington, D.C.

110 Friedlander St., Phila.
Lancaster, Fairfield Co.,
Ohio.

1683 BARNARD, REv. DR. F. A. P. .
President of Columbia College
1684 Wools EY, REv. T. D., D.D. . .
President of Yale College.
1685 MCCoSH, REv. JAMES, D.D. . . .

New York City.
New Haven, Conn.

Princeton, N. J.

President of Princeton Col
lege.

1686 ELIOT, CHARLES W . . . . . . .

17 Quincy St., Cambridge,
Mass.

President of Harvard College.

1687 ABBE, PROF. CLEVELAND . . . .

June 21, 1871, Army Weather Bureau,
Washington, D.C.
**

1688 TILGHMAN, GEN. BENJAMIN C.
1689 KERR, WM. C. . . . . . . . . . .

44

1114 Girard St., Phila.
Jan'y 19, 1872, Raleigh, N.C.

State Geologist of N. Carolina.
1690 DUPONT, LAMoTTE. . . . . . . .

Wilmington, Del.

1691 TRow BRIDGE, WM. P. . . . . . .
Prof. of Mechanics.

Columbia College, N.York.

1692 ELDER, W.M., M.D. . . . . . . . .

Washington, D.C.

1693 MILLER, FRANCIS BOWYER. . . .
Director Roy. Brit. Branch
Mint at Melbourne.

Melbourne, Australia.

1694 LAMBERT, PROF. GUILLAUME.

Louvain University,
gium.

1695 FRAZER, PROF. PERSIFOR, JR. .

917 Clinton St., Phila.

Bel

1696 HouGH, PROF. GEORGE W. . . .

Rockford, Illinois.

1698 HOUSTON, EDWIN J. . . . . . . .
Prof. Phys. High School.

20th and Ontario Av., Phila.

1699 SAY, M. JEAN BAPTISTE LEON .

Paris, France.

1700 BLODGET, LORIN. . . . . . . . . .
1701 AGNEW, D. HAYES, M.D. . . . .

1329 S. Broad St., Phila.

1702 BORIE, ADOLPH E . . . . . . . .

1025 Spruce St., Phila.

1703 NICHOLS, STARR HOYT . . . . .

415 S. 15th St., Phila.

1704 SELLERS, COLEMAN. . . . . . . .
1705. PETER, ROBERT, M.D. . . . . . .

Chem. Geol. Survey, Lex

Chemist of Kentucky.

1706, LEVIS, RICHARD J., M.D. . . .
1707. CASSATT, ALEx. JoHNSON. . . .
Vice-Prest. Penna. R. R.

1611 Chestnut St., Phila.

1600 Hamilton St., Phila.
ington, Ky.
1301 Arch St., Phila.
Oct'r 18, 1872, 2030 DeLancy Place, Phila.

13
Members.

1710. BROCA, PAUL, M.D. .

Address.

Elected.

1708. KING, CLARENCE . . . . . . . .
U. S. Geologist.
1709. HALE, HoRATIO. . . . . . . . .

.*

Oct'r 18, 1872, 23 Fifth Ave., New York
City.
**

Clinton, Ontario Co. Can'da
**

-

-

-

**

**

Paris, France.

-

General Secretary of the An
thropological Society.
--

1711. LAUTH, PROF. FRANZ JOSEPH
**

1712. NORRIS, ISAAC, J.R., M.D. . . .
1713. ACLAND, SIR HENRY W., M.D.

Munich, Bavaria.
1424 Walnut St., Phila.

1714. BURROWS, GEORGE, M.D. . . . .

Jan'y 17, 1873, Oxford, Eng.
No. 18 Cavendish Square,

1715. OLIVER, JAMES E . . . . . . . .

Cornell University, Ithaca,

*

London.
Professor of Mathematics.

N. Y.

1716. FRAZER, ROBERT, C.E. . . . . . .
1717. CLARKE, THOMAS, C.E. . . . . .
1718. ROTHERMEL, PETER F. . . . . .

1841 Chestnut St., Phila.
926 Spruce St., Phila.
Limerick P.O., Pa.

1719. ZENTMEYER, JOSEPH . . . . . .

147 S. 4th St., Phila.

1720. SPOFFORD, A. H. . . . . . . . . .

Washington, D. C.

Librarian of Congress.

1721. LARoCHE, C. PERCY, M.D. . . .
1722. PEMBERTON, HENRY . . . . . .
1723. THOMSON, SIR. W.M. KNT. F.R.S.
Professor of Natural Philoso

phy, University of Glasgow.
1724. WALLACE, ALFRED R. . . . . .
1725. ScLATER, PHILLIP LUTLEY. . .

1501 Spruce St., Phila.
1947 Locust St., Phila.
Glasgow, Scotland.

The Dell, Grays, Essex, Eng.
London, England.

Secretary of the Zoological
Society.

1726. THOMPSON, SIR HENRY, M.D. .
*.

1727. DUPONT, M. EDOUARD. . . . . .
1728. LONGCHAMPS,

BARON SELY'S

DE

1729. GougAIN, M. THEODORE M. . .
1730. SAUSSURE, HENRI DE. . . . . .
1731. CAPELLINI, GIov ANNI . .

1732.
1734.
1736.
1737.

Professor in the University.
RossI, GIovANNI BATTISTA . .
HELMHOLTZ, PROF. HEINRICH.
RAND, THEODORE D. . . . . . .
LECONTE, PROF. Jose:PH. . . . .

1738. LECONTE PROF. JoHN. . . . . .
1739. FULTON, JOHN, M.E. . . . . . .

University Hospital, Lon
don, England.
Royal Museum, Brusselles.
Liège, Belgium.
Bayeux, Calvados, France.

Geneva, Switzerland.
Bologna, Italy.
Rome, Italy.
University of Berlin, Ger.
17 S. 3d St., Phila.

University of California,
Berkeley, Cal.
University at Berkeley,
Alameda Co., Cal.
Cambria Iron W’ks, Johns
town, Cambria Co., Pa.
3909 Locust Street, West

1741. BARKER, GEORGE F., M.D. . .
Phila.
Professor of Physics in the
University of Penna.
1742. SNOWDEN, A. LOUDON. . . . . . Oct'r 17, 1873, Post Office, Phila.

14
Members.

Elected.

1743. HAINES, JoHN S. . . . . . . . .
1744. MESSCHERT,

Address.

Oct'r 17, 1873, Haines St. Germ'ntown, Pa.

MATTHEw HUI

ZINGA. . . . . . . . . .

-

-

-

Douglassville, Berks Co. Pa.
339 Walnut St., Phila.
3743 Centre St., W. Phila.

-

1745. BRITTON, J. BLODGET . . . . . .
1746. HARDEN, JOHN W., M. E.

1747. WILSON, JOSEPH M., C.E. . . .
1748. WAHL, WILLIAM. H., PH.D . .

410 Walnut St., Phila.

Franklin Institute, Phila.

Secretary of the Franklin In
stitute.

1750. KOLBE, HERMANN, PH.D. . . .

University of Leipsig, Ger

Professor of Chemistry.

many.

1751. WoOTTEN, J. E. . . . . . . . . .
Mechanical Engineer of the

226 N. 6th Av., Reading, Pa.

Reading R. R.
1752. CAMAC, W.M., M.D. . . . . . . .

1754. THOMSON, FRANK, C.E. . . . . .
1755. THOMPSON, PROF. RoBT. ELLIS,
1756. LoCKYER, Jose.PH NORMAN. . .
F.R.S., F.R.A.S.
1757. PROCTOR, RICHARD A. . . . . .
1758. PUMPELLY, RAPHAEL. . . . . .

April 17, 1874, 416 Chestnut St., Phila.
**
**
Penna. R.R. Office, Phila.
University of Pa., W.Phila.
5 Alexandra Road, Finch
ley Road, N.W.London.

England.

1759. YoUNG, CHARLES A . . . . . . .
Professor of Astronomy.

Princeton, N. J.

1760. PLATT, FRANKLIN. . . . . . . . July 17, 1874, 615 Walnut St., Phila.
Assistant Geologist, Survey of
Penna.

1761. ARMSTRONG, SIR W.M. GEORGE.
1762. WooDWARD, HENRY, F.G.S. . .

Newcastle-on-Tyne, Eng.

British Museum, London,
England.
Jamaica Plains, near Bos
ton, Mass.

1763. CLARKE, JAMES FREEMAN, D.D.
1764. HAUER, FRANZ RITTER VON . .
Director of the Geological In
stitute, Vienna.
1765. RAWSON, RAWSON W . . . . . .
1766. SADTLER, SAMUEL P. . . . . . .
Ass’t Professor of Chemistry.

Vienna, Austria.

Barbadoes.

University of Penna., W.
Phila.

1767. KöNIG, DR. GEORGE A . . . . .
Ass’t Professor of Chemistry.

University of Penna., W.

1768. HIMES, C. F. . . . . . . . . .
Professor of Chemistry.

Dickerson College, Carlisle,
Penna.

-

Phila.

-

1769. KENDERDINE, R. S., M.D. . . .
1770. SELwYN, ALFRED R. C. .
Director of the Geological
Survey of Canada.
1772. PEARSE, JOHN B. . . . . . . . .

1773. INGHAM, WM. A. . . . . . . .

-

-

1523 Green St., Phila.

Montreal, Canada.

Jan'y 15, 1875, Hotel Pelham, Boston Mass
April 16, 1875, 320 Walnut St., Phila.

1774. VIOLLET LE DUC. . . . . . . . .

4

Paris.

1775. MCARTHUR, JoHN. . . . . . . .

44

4201 Chestnut St., Phila.

Architect of the Public Build
ings, Phila.

-->

--- -

15
Members.

Elected.

1776. ALLISON, JUDGE JoSEPH . . . .
1777. PENNINGTON, EDWARD. . . . .

1778. CHAPMAN, HENRY CADWALA
DER, M.D. . . . . . . . . .

Address.

April 16, 1875, 4207 Walnut St., Phila.
**
44
1414 Pine St., Phila.
.107 S. 13th St., Phila.
Cambridge, Mass.

**

*-

-4

i4

**

**

No. 306 S. 10th St., Phila.

1781. LANGLEY, PROF. STEPHEN P . .

**

**

Alleghany City, Pa.

Director of the Observatory.
1782. HAGERT, H. S. . . . . . . . . .

**

**

532 Walnut St., House 2125

1783. CHANDLER, C. F. . . . . . . . .
Prof. of Chemistry.

**

**

School of Mines, Columbia
College, or 49th St., cor.

1784. RAYMOND, Ross ITER W. . . . .
U. S. Commissioner on the
Mineral Resources of the Ter
ritories.

-

4-

-

-

1779. AGASSIZ, ALEXANDER. . . . . .

1780. PRIME, PROF. FREDERICK, JR .
Asst. Geol. Sur. Pa.

Spring Garden St., Phil.

1786. TATHAM, WM. P. . . . . . . . .
1787. DROWN, THOMAS M., M.D. . . .

Professor of Chemistry.
1788. CAMPBELL, JOHN L., LL.D. . . .

City.

44
44
1002 Walnut St., Phila.
July 16, 1875, Lafayette College, Easton,

Penna.
*4

*4

Professor of Mathematics.

1789. SMITH, STEPHEN, M.D. . . . . .

4th Ave., N. York City.
27 Park Place, New York

Wabash University, Craw
fordsville, Indiana.

Oct'r 15, 1875, 57 W. 42d St., N. York City.

President of the American
Public Health Association.

1790. BLASIUS, WILLIAM . . . . . .

Box 2476 P.O., Phila.
Passaic Zinc Works, Jersey
City, N. J.
717 Walnut St., Phila.

**

**

1791. MOORE, GIDEON E. . . . . . . .

*-

**

1792. SHEPPARD, FURMAN . . .
District Attorney of the City

**

**

4-

**

**

**

Fairmount Park, Phila.
Cambridge, England.

4-

**

3940 Pine St., West Phila.

**

**

Pleasantville, Venango Co.,

of Philadelphia.
1793. THAYER, RUSSELL, JR . . . . .
1194. MAxwell, J. CLERK, F.R.S. . .
Professor of Experimental
Physics.

1795. HALL, CHARLES EDWARD . . .
Palaeontological Assistant on
the 2d Geol. Survey of Penna.

1796. CARLL, JOHN F. . . . . . . . . .
Assistant Geologist, 2d Geol.

Penna.

Survey of Penna.

1797. SHERwooD, ANDREW... . . . . .

*-

-

Mansfield, Tioga Co., Pa.

Assistant Geologist, 2d Geol.
Survey of Penna.

1799. ETTING, COL. FRANK M. . . . . April 21, 1876, 1315 Spruce St.
44
44
25 N. Charles St., Baltimore,
1800. GILMAN, DR. DANIEL C. . . . .
Md.
President of the Johns Hop
kins University.
1801. Owen, P. CUNLIFFE. . . . . . .
Director of the South Ken

sington Museum.

44

--

London, England.

16
Members.

Elected.

Address.

1802. BELL, I. Low THIAN, F. R. S. . .
1803. GEIKIE, JAMES.. . . . . . . . . .

April 21, 1876, Newcastle upon Tyne, Eng.
Geological Survey Office,
Chief of the Geological Sur
Indian Buildings, Vic
toria St., Edinburgh.
vey of Scotland . . . . . . . .
Edinburgh, Scotland.

1804. ARCHER, PROF.THOS.C., F.R.S.E
Centennial Commissioner.
1805. NoRDENSKIOLD, PROF. ADOLPH

Stockholm, Sweden.
Stockholm, Sweden.

ERIC, PH.D., Centennial Com.
1806. DANNFELDT, C. JUHLIN. . . . .
Centennial Commissioner.

1807. THOMPSON, ELIHU, A.M. . . . .
Professor of Chemistry.
1808. RILEY, CHARLES V . . . . . . .

High School, Phila.
Room 42, corner 6th and

State Entomologist and Presi
dent of the St. Louis Acade

Locust, St. Louis, Mo.

my of. Sciences.
1809.

AKERMAN,

PROF. RICHARD. . .

July 21, 1876, Stockholm, Sweden.
Wesleyan University, Mid
Professor of Natural Science.
dletown, Conn.
1811. DAVENPORT, SAMUEL. . . . . . . Oct'r 20, 1876, Adelaide, S. Australia.

1810. JoHNSTON, JOHN, LL.D . . . . .

Commissioner to Centennial.
1812. DOM PEDRO D'ALCANTARA.. . .
-*
Emperor of Brazil.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

1813. HARTRANFT, GEN. JoHN F. . .
Governor of Pennsylvania.

Harrisburg, Pa.

1814. ROBERTS, W. MILNOR, C.E. . .
1815. GROTE, A.U.G. R. . . . . . . . . .

235th Ave., New York City.
Buffalo, N. Y.

Director of the Museum of the

Natural History Society.
1816. REULEAUX, F. . . . . . . . . . .

Berlin, Germany.

Professor in the Polytechni
cum.

Würtzburg, Germany.

1817. WAGNER, RUDOLF VON. . . . .
Prof. of Chemistry.
1818. BARCENA, DON MARINo. . . . .
Professor in the School of
Mines.

Mexico.

1819. BAUMHAUER, E. H. VoN . . . .

Harlem, Holland.

Centennial Commissioner.

1528 N. 18th St., Phila.

1820. STUART, GEORGE . . . . . . . .
Professor of Languages in the

High School.
Sixth and Chestnut, Phila.
Theological Seminary,
Princeton, N. J.

1821. McKEAN, WILLIAM V . . . . .

1822. SHIELDS, CHAS. W., D.D . . . .
Prof. of Theology.
1823. Gow EN, FRANKLIN B. . . . . .
President of the Reading R.R.
1824. PHILLIPS, HENRY, JR. . . . . .

Main St. near Allen's Lane,
Mt. Airy, Phila.

428 Library St., Phila.

U. S. Commissioner.
-

1825. EDDY, HENRY TURNER, C.E. .
Prof. of Mathematics.

University of Cincinnati,
Ohio.

17
Members.

1826. BRACKETT, CY RUS Fogg, M.D.

Elected.

Address.

Feb'y 2, 1877, Princeton, N. J.

Professor of Physics.

1827. HART, PROF. JAMES MORGAN. .

44

--

University of Cincinnati,
Ohio.

1828. BRow N, HENRY ARMITT . . .

204S. 7th St., Phila.
12 Queen Anne's Gate,West
minster, S. W. London,

1829. SIEMENS, CHARLES WM. . . . .

England.

1830. THAYER, HoN. M. RUSSELL. . .

No. 4 Summit, near R. R.
Chestnut Hill, Phila.

Judge of the Court of Common
Pleas.

2033 Pine St., Phila.
233 S. 13th St., Phila.
2100 Arch St., Phila.

1831. BIDDLE, HON. CRAIG . . . . . .

1832. BACHE, THOMAS HEWSON, M.D
1833. MCQUILLEN, JOHN H., M.D. . .
1834. STRAwBRIDGE, GEORGE, M.D. .
1835. GooDELL, WM., M.D. . . . . . .

1616 Chestnut St., Phila.
Preston Retreat, 20th and

1836. CRANE, THOS. FREDERICK . . .

Ithaca, N. Y.

Hamilton St., Phila.

Prof"r of Modern Languages
1837. DRAPER, HENRY, M.D. . . . . .

271 Madison Avenue, New
York City.

Professor of Anal. Chemistry

in the University of N. Y.
1838. Roth ROCK, DR. J. T. . . . . . .
Professor of Botany in the
University of Penna,

University of Penna., West

1839. Dou GLASS, JAMES . . . . . . . .

Phoenixville, Pa.

1840. STEVENSON, PROF. J. J. . . .
Assistant Geologist, 2d Geol.
Survey of Penna.
1841. MoREHOUSE, GEORGE R., M.D.
**
1842. REED, T. B., M.D. . . . . . . . .
July 20, 1877,
1843. HUMPHREY, H. C. . . . . . .

314 West 30th St., New York
City.

1844. SYLVESTER, PROF. J. J . . . . .

1845. ERICSSON, JOHN . . . . . . . . .

1846. TAYLOR, WILLIAM B . . . . . .

Phila.

227 S. 9th St., Phila.

1427 Walnut St., Phila.
113 Walnut St., Phila.
44
ti
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Md.
**
**
36 Beach St., New York.
Oct'r 19, 1877, Patent Office, Washington,
D. C.

1847. MANSFIELD, I. F. . . . . . . . .

Jan'y 18, 1878, Cannelton, Beaver Co., Pa.
4West Virginia University,
*

1848. WHITE, I. C. . .
Professor of Geology

1849. RANDALL, DR. F. A. . . . . . .
1850. WETHERILL, JoHN PRICE . . .
1851. GRAY, ELISHA. . . . . . . . . .

1852. NEwcoyi B, SIMON. . . . . . . .
Superintendent of the U.S.

Morgan town, W. Va.

Warren, Pa.
430 Walnut St., Phila.
220 Kinzie St., Chicago, Ill.

washington, D. C.

Nautical Almanac Office. .
1853. HALL, ASAPH . . . . . . . . . .

U. S. Observatory, Wash
ington, D.C.

18
Address.

Elected.

Members.

1854. WoRMLEY, THEoDoRE G., M.D. Jan'y 18, 1878, 37th and Locust Sts., West
Professor of Chemistry, Medi
Philadelphia.
cal Department of the Uni
versity of Penna.

1855. PETERS, DR. C. H. F. . . . . . .

Hamilton College, Clinton
N. Y.

Professor of Astronomy.
1856. WATSON, JAMES F. . . . . . . .
Professor of Astronomy.

Michigan University, Ann
Arbor, Michigan.
**

4

1857. MARCH, FRANCIS ANDREW. . .
Professor of Languages.

Lafayette College, Easton,

1858. LANDRETH, BURNET.T. . . . . .

Bristol, Pa.

Pa.

ALPHABETICAL INDEX.
1687. Abbe, Cleveland.
*1463.
2809.
1713.
*1238.

1831. Biddle, Craig.
1322. Biddle, John B.
1509. Biddle, John.

Abbott, H. L.
Akerman, Richard.
Acland, Henry W.
Adams, J. C.

* 826. Bigelow, Jacob.
910. Bigsby, John J.

1381. Adamson, John C.
1779. Agassiz, Alexander.
1642. Agassiz, Mrs. Elizabeth C.
1701. Agnew, D. Hayes.

1115. Alexander, Stephen.
1571. Allen, Harrison.

1617. Birch, Samuel.
1423. Bischoff, Theodore L. W.
1635.
1554.
1669.
1790.

Blackmore, William.
Blair, Thos. S.
Blake, William P.
Blasius, William.

1400. Allen, Wm. H.
1776. Allison, Joseph.

*1700. Blodget, Lorin.
*1444. Böhtling, Otto.

1576. Anderson, M. B.

*1096. Booth, James C.
1168. Borden, Simeon

1655. Anderson, George W.
1682. Andrews, E. B.

852. Borgnis, J. A.

1122. Angelis, Pedro de.
1603.
*1804.
*1329.
1761.
1832.

1702. Borie, Adolph E.

Anthon, Charles E.
Archer, Thomas C.
Arfwedson, Charles D.
Armstrong, Wm. George.
Bache, Thomas Hewson.

*1630. Baird, Henry Carey.

1540.
1126.
1826.
*1193.

Bost, John.
Boyé, Martin H.
Brackett, Cyrus Fogg.
Bridges, Robert.

*1519. Briggs, Robert.

1636. Brinton, Daniel G.
1745. Britton, J. Blodget.

*1358. Baird, Spencer F.

*1157. Bancroft, George.

1710. Broca, Paul.

*1818. Barcena, Don Marino.

1828. Brown, Henry Armitt.
1333. Brown-Sequard, E.

1741. Barker, George F.
1683. Barnard. F. A. P.
1451. Barrande, Joachim.

1614. Brugsh, Henri.

1133. Bartlett, W. H. C.

-

1819. Baumhauer, E. H. Von.

*1667. Beadle, E. R.
1802. Bell, I. Lowthian.

-

1543. Brunet, L'Abbé Ovide.
*1547. Brush, George J.
937. Bull, Marcus.
1653. Bullock, Charles.

1452. Bunsen, Robert W.

* Photograph carte de visite has been received.

19
1378. Burmeister, Hermann.
1714. Burrows, George.
1570. Cadwalader, John.
1752. Camac, William.
1788. Campbell, John L.

1606. Canby, William M.
1731. Capellini, Giovanni.
*1031. Carey, Henry C.
1628. Carlier, M. Auguste.
1796. Carll, John F.

1220. Carpenter, William B.
1707. Cassatt, Alex. Johnson.
1675. Cattell, William C.
*1616. Chabas, M. F.
1783. Chandler, C. F.

1778. Chapman, Henry Cadwalader.
*1492. Chase, Pliny E.
*1522. Chase, Thomas.
1296. Chevalier, Michel.
1153. Christison, Robert.
1763. Clarke, James Freeman.
1717. Clarke, Thomas.

* 885. Coates, Benjamin H.
*1638. Coffin, J. H. C.

*1538. Cook, George H.
*1555.
*1367.
1474.
1662.
1672.
1836.

Cope, Edward D.
Coppée, Henry.
Cornelius, Robert.
Cox, J. D.
Coxe, Eckley B.
Crane, Thos. Frederick.

*1393. Cresson, Charles M.
1439. Curwen, John.
1567. DaCosta, Jacob M.

1668. D'Aligny, Henry F. Q.
*1354. Dana, James D.

1806. Dannfeldt, C. Juhlin.
1643. Darwin, Charles.
1516. Daubrée, A.
1811. Davenport, Samuel.

1512. David, C. G. N.
*1562. Davidson, Thomas.
*1557. Davidson, George.

*1468. Dawson, John William.
*1450. DeKoninck, Louis G.

*1515.
1613.
*1449.
1433.
1430.
*1344.

Delesse, A.
DeRougé, Emmanuel.
Desor, Edouard.
DeVerneuil, Edouard.
Deville, Henri St. Claire.
Dohrn, C. A.

1812. Dom Pedro D'Alcantara.
1839. Douglass, James.

1190. Downes, John.
1837. Draper, Henry.
1194. Draper, John W.

1787. Drown, Thomas M.
1205. Dubois, William E.
1432. Dumas, Jean Baptiste.
1615. Dumichen, Johannes.
1573. Dunning, George F.
1727. Dupont, M. Edouard.
1690. DuPont, LaMotte.
1679. Dutton, Clarence E.
1560. Earle, Pliny.
1825. Eddy, Henry Turner.
1692. Elder, William.

1686. Eliot, Charles W.
*1192. Elwyn, Alfred L.

1568. Emerson, Ralph Waldo.
1470. Engelmann, George.
1845. Ericsson, John.

1799. Etting, Frank M.
1405. Evans, Edmund C.
*1272.
1341.
*1370.
1375.

Farnum, Joseph W.
Felton, Samuel M.
Field, Henry Wm.
Finley, Clement A.

1621. Flower, Wm. Henry.
*1170. Fraley, Frederick.
1551. Francis, James B.

1650. Frauenfeld, Georg Von.
1695. Frazer, Persifor, Jr.
1716. Frazer, Robert.

1476. Frerichs, Frederick Theodore.
1459. Froude, J. A.

1789. Fulton, John.
*1608. Gabb, William M.

1063. Galvez, Don Mariano.
1252. Geddings, E.

*1803. Geikie, James.
*1339. Genth, Frederick A.

1355. Gibbs, Oliver Wolcott.
1587. Gill, Theodore N.
1800. Gilman, Daniel C.
940. Giraldes, J. P. C. Cassado de.

1835. Goodell, William.
1680. Goodfellow, Edward.
1435. Goodwin, Daniel R.

*1454. Göppert, H. R.
1729. Gougain, Théodore M.
1271. Gould, Benj. Apthorp.
1823. Gowan, Franklin B.

*1599. Graeff, Frederick.
1601. Grant, Ulysses S.
*1239. Gray, Asa.

1851. Gray, Elisha.
*1605. Green, Trail1.
1504. Green, William H.
1384. Grigsby, Hugh Blair.

1229. Grimaldi, Civa.
1321. Grinnell, Henry.

* Photograph carte de visite has been received.

20
Gross. Samuel D.
1815. Grote, Aug. R.
1645. Gruner, Louis.
1438. Gugangos, Pascual de.
1584. Guyot, Arnold.
1782. Hagert, H. S.
1743. Haines, John S.

*1342.

1609.

Hakakian Bey, T.

*1208.

Haldeman. Samuel S.
15.58. Hale, Charles.
1658. Hale, Edward Everett.
1709. Hale, Horatio.
1853. Hall, Asaph.
1795. Hall, Charles Edward.
1:56. Hall, James,
1412. Hammond, William A.
1746. Harden, John W.
1337. Harding. George.
*1385. Harris, Robert P.
1827. Hart, James Morgan,
1813. Hartranft, John F.
1408. Hartshorne, Edward.
*1510. Hartshorne, Henry.
7t;4. Hauer, Franz Ritter Von.
16>1. Haupt, Hermann,
1549. Haven. Samuel F.
*1416. Hayden, Ferdinand V.
1493. Hayes, I. I.
* 986. Hays, Isaac.
*1464. Heer. Oswald.
1734. Helmholtz, lieinrich.
1045. Henry, Joseph.
*1497. Hilgard, J. E.
*1501. Hill, Thomas.
1768. Himes, C. F.
*1663. Hitchcock, Charles H.
1649. Hochstetter, Franz Von.
98.3. Hodgson, William B.
*1453.

Hofmann, August Wm.

1624.

Hooker, Joseph D.
1652. Hopper, Edward.
*1607. Horn, George H.
*1257. Horsford, E. N.
1696.

Hough, George W.

1698.

1373.
1348.
1513.
*1161.

Kane, Thos. Leiper.
Keating, William V.
Keller, Frederick.
Kendall, E. Otis.
1769. Kenderdine, R. S.
1689. Kerr, William C.
1708. King, Clarence.
1525. Kirchhoff, George.
1269. Kirkbride, Thos. S.
1537. Kirke, John Foster.
1284. Kirkwood. Daniel.
*1369. Kneass, Strickland.
1750. Kolbe, Hermann.
1767.

1781.

Langley, Stephen P.

1721. LaRoche, C. Percy.
1334. Latrobe, John H. B.
1711. Lauth, Franz Joseph.
1595. Lea, Henry Carey.
Lea, Isaac.
t
* 953.
1460. Lebert. Hermann.
*1477. Lee, Thos. Jefferson.
*1315. Leconte, John L.
1738. Leconte, John.
1737. Leconte, Joseph.
1263. Leidy, Joseph.
1351. Lenox, James.
1179. Lenthall, John.
1174. Leopold II, Grand Duke.
*1222. Lepsius, Richard.
*1520. Lesley, Joseph.
*1382. Lesley, Peter.
*1436. Lesquereux, Leo.
1876. Letchworth, Albert S.
1706. Lewis, Richard J.
1413. Lewis, Francis W.
1383. Leyburn, John.
1610. Linant Pasha.
1311. Liouville, J.
1633. Lippincott, Joshua B.
1100.

Lloyd, Humphrey.

1756.

Lockyer, Joseph Norman.
Lombardini, Elia.
Longchamps, Selys de
Longstreth, Miers Fisher.
Loomis, Elias.
Lorin, Theodor.
Lyman, Benj. Smith.
Macedo, J. L. DaCosta.
Maclune, James.
Mahon, Lord.
Mansfield, I. F.

Houston, Edwin J.
1843. Humphrey, H. C.
*1397. Humphreys, Andrew A.
*1441. Hunt, Thos. Sterry
1623. Huxley, Thos. W.

*1398.

*1426.

*1114.

Hyrtle, Joseph.
1249. Ingersoll, Ralph T.
1773. Ingham, William A.
1144. Irvin, David.
*1388. James, Thomas P.
*1496. Jarvis, Edward.
1810. Johnston, John.
*1189. Julien, Stanislaus.

König, George A.

Krauth, Charles T.
1026. Labouderie, M. J.
1694. Lambert, Guillaume.
1858. Landreth. Burnett.

1541.

1728.
1255.

1015.
1629.
1058.

1507.
1350.
1847.
1857. March, Francis Andrew.

* Photograph carte de visite has been received.

21
1611. Mariette Bey, Auguste,
1523. Marsh, Benjamin V.
1258. Marsh, George R.
*1604. Marsh, O. C.
1018. Martinez, Juan José,
1572. Mason, Andrew.
1371.
1794.
*1654.
1775.
1279.

1685.
1228.
1821.
1586.
1833.

1772. Pearse, John B.

1722. Pemberton, Henry.
1777. Penington, Edward.
1518. Penrose, R. A. F.
1666. Pepper, William.

951. Pereira, Jose Maria Dantes
*1705. Peter, Robert.
1855. Peters, C. H. F.

Matile, Geo. Augustus.
Maxwell, J. Clerk.
Mayer, Alfred M.
McArthur, John.
McCall, Peter.

McCosh, James.
McCulloh, Richard S.
McKean, William V.
McMichael, Morton.
McQuillen, John H.

1824. Phillips, Henry, Jr.

*

1362. Powel, Samuel.

1619. Prestwich, Joseph.

*1677. Meehan, Thomas.

*1352. Price, Eli K.
1592. Price, J. Sergeant.

1293. Meigs, John Forsyth.
1335. Meigs, Montgomery C.

*1780. Prime, Frederick, Jr.
1757. Proctor, Richard A.
1758. Pumpelly, Raphael.
73. Quadrada, Fran. de Paolo
1143. Quaranta, Bernardo.

1744. Messchert, Matthew H.

1396. Miller, E. Spencer.
1693. Miller, Francis Bowyer.
1671. Miller, J. Imbrie.

1421. Milne-Edwards, Henry.

1448. Ramsay, Andrew C.
*1392. Rand, B. Howard.
1736. Rand, Theodore D.

1640. Mitchell, Miss Maria.

1461.
854.
1791.
1319.

Mitchell, S. Weir.
Montgéry, M. De
Moore, Gideon E.
Mordecai, Alfred.

1841. Morehouse, &eorge R.
1054. Morelli, Chev.

1577. Morton, Henry.
*1486. Muller, Max.
1300. Neill, John.
960. Neufville, Hyde de.
1575. Newberry, J. S.
1852. Newcomb, Simon.

1582. Newton, Hubert A.
1703.
1627.
1805.
1712.
*1195.
1715.

Nichols, Starr Hoyt.
Nillson, Sven.
Nordenskiold, Adolf Eric.
Norris, Isaac.
Norton, William A.
Oliver, James E.

1581. Osborn, Henry S.
1801. Owen, P. Cunliffe.

1212. Owen, Richard.
1578. Packard, J. H.
1331. Paget, James.
1085. Paine, Robert Treat.

1280. Pancoast, Joseph.
1593. Pardee, Ario.
1673. Parieu, M. Esquirou De,
1152. Park, Roswell.

1282. Patterson, Robert.
1320. Patterson, Thos. L.
1034. Peale, Titian R.

*1676. Phillips, Henry M.
1173. Pierce, Benjamin.
1760. Platt, Franklin.
1539. Porter, Thomas C.
1216. Poussin, Wm. Tell.

-

1849. Randall, F. A.
1644. Rawlinson, George.
1765. Rawson, Rawson W.
1784. Raymond, Rossiter W.

1585. Raynolds, Wm. F.
1567. Read, John Meredith.
1842. Reed, T. B.
1631. Reeves, Samuel J.
1361. Regnault, V.
1485. Renan, Ernest.
1343. Renard, Charles.
1816. Reuleaux, F.
1500. Richardson, B. W.

1808. Riley, Charles V.
991. Rio, Andres Del.

*1180. Roberts, Solomon W.
1814. Roberts, W. Milnor.

*1025. Robinson, Moncure,
1674. Roepper, William T.
1364. Rodgers, E. P.
*1390. Rogers, Fairman.

1365. Rogers, Robert E.
1048. Rogers, Wm. B.

*1462. Röhrig, F. L. Otto.
*1479. Rokitansky, Karl Von.

1622. Rolleston, George. .
1732. Rossi, Giovanni Battista.
1718. Rothermel, Peter F.
1838. Rothrock, J. T.
*1264. Ruschenberger, Wm. S, W
1620. Rútimeyer, Carl L.

*Photograph carte de visite has been received.

22
1150. Sabine. Edward.
$1766.

Sadtler, Samuel P.

*1563.

Sandberger, Fridolin.

1033. Santarem.
*1730. Saussure, Henri De.
1699. Say, Jean Baptiste Léon.
1561.

Schimper, William P.
Schott, Charles A.
1482. Schwann, Theodore.
1725. Sclater, Phillip Lutley.

*1498.

1413.

Secchi, Paolo Angelo.

*1656, Seidensticker, Oswald.
1660. Seiler, Mrs. Emma.
1704. Sellers, Coleman.
1533. Sellers, William.
1770. Selwyn, Alfred R. C.
90'). Seybert, Henry.
*12=6. Sharswood, George,
*1514. Sheafer, Peter W.
792. Sheppard, Furman.
17try. Sherwood, Andrew.
1822.

Shields, Charles W.

*1532. Shinz, Carl.
1508. Shippen, Edward,
l647. Siebold. Carl T. E. Von.
1829. Siemens, Charles Wm.
1414.

Smith, Aubrey H.
* 976. Smith, Daniel B.
1494. Smith, George.
1544. Smith. GoldWin.
1395. Smith, J. Laurence.
1789. Smith, Stephen.
1742.

Snowden, A. Loudon.

1720. Spofford, A. H.
1446. Steenstrup, J. S.
*1345.
1840.

Stevens, Wm. Bacon.

1292.

Stevenson, J. J.
Stillé, Alfred.

1579.

stillé, Charles J.

1167.

Storer, D. Humphreys.

1834. Strawbrige, George.
1191. Strong Theodore.
1559.

Strong, William.

1820. Stuart, George.
1527. Studer, Benjamin.
* 775 . Swift, Joseph G.
1844. Sylvester, J. J.
1078. Talcott, Andrew.
1786. Tatham, William P.
1846. Taylor, William B.
1830. Thayer, M. Russell.
1703. Thayer, Russell, Jr.
1807. Thompson, Elihu.
1726. Thompson, Henry.
*1755. Thompson, Robert Ellis.
1754. Thomson, Frank.
1728. Thomson, William.

15:0.

Thury. A.
Tilghman, Benjamin C.
1233. Tilghman, Richard A.

1688.

1657.

Tilghman, Wm. M.

**

Totten, George M.
1597. Townsend, Joseph B.
1206. Traut wine, John C.
1691. Trowbridge, William P.
*1520. Tunner, Peter.
1632. Tyndale, Hector.
1602. Tyndall, John.
1651. Tyson, Phillip T.
1408. Vaux, William S.
1774. Viollet le Duc.
1475.

Virchow, Rudolph.
Vogt, Carl.
1442. Volpicelli, Paolo.
1670. Vose, George L.
1425. Wagner, Andreas.
1817. Wagner, Rudolf Von.
1646.

1748.

Wahl, William H.

1324. Waldheim, Alex. Fischer Von.
1724. Wallace, Alfred R.
1.390.

Walter, Thomas U.
Warren, Gouverneur K.

1626.

Warsaae. J. J. A.

*110s.

1506.

Washburne, E. A.
1856. Watson, James F.
1399. Wayne. Henry C.
1589. Welsh, John.
1850. Wetherill, John Price.
*1639. Wharton, Joseph.
1637. White, Andrew D.
1848. White. J. C.
*1487.

Whitney, Josiah Dwight.

*1502. Whitney, Wm. Dwight.
1659. Whittier, John Green leaf.
*1535. Wilcocks, Alexander.
1037. Williams, Henry J.
*1661.

Williamson, R. S.

*1489.

Wilson, Daniel.
1747. Wilson, Joseph M.
*1545. Winchell, Alexander.
1480. Winsor, Henry.
1406. Wister, Caspar.
1561. Wister, Owen Jones.
1467. Wöhler, Frederick.
* 971. Wood, George B.
1556. Wood, Horatio C.
1762. Woodward, Henry.
1684.

Woolsey, T. D.

1751.

Wootten, J. E.
Wormley, Theodore G.
*1488. Worthen, A. H.
1759. Young, Charles A.
1719. Zentmeyer, Joseph.
1854.

* Photograph carte de visite has been received.

LIST OF THE MEMBERS

OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY

March 15, 1880.

LIST OF THE MEMEERS
OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY,
HELD AT PHILADELPHIA,

FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE,
Formed on the 2d of January, 1769, by a Union of the “Ameri
can Philosophical Society,” and the “American Society held

at Philadelphia for Promoting Useful Knowledge.”
*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.**.**********, *.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*****

ORIGINAL MEMBERS,
OR MEMBERS AT THE TIME OF UNION.

I. Members common to the two Component Societies.
1. Benjamin Franklin. Original member of the A. P. S. 1743. Elected
member of the A. S. Feb. 19, 1768. Died April 17, 1790, aet. 84.
2 . John Bartram.
F. R. S. and Botanist to his Majesty, orig. mem. A. P. S.
1743. Mem. A. S. Feb. 19, 1768. Died Sept. 1777, aet. 76.
3. Dr. Cadwalader Evans. A. P. S. Nov. 1767. A. S. Jan. 19, 1768.
Died 1773, aet. 57.
4. John Lukens. Surveyor-General of Pennsylvania. A. P. S. Jan. 12, 1768.
A. S. Oct. 3, 1766. Died 1789.
5. Joseph Galloway, Speaker of the Assembly of Pennsylvania. A. P. S.
Jan. 19, 1768. A. S. Dec. 2, 1768. Died 1803, aet. 74.
6. Dr. Thomas Cadwalader. A. P. S. Jan. 19, 1768. A. S. Oct. 14, 1768.
Died Nov. 14, 1779, aet. 72.
7. Dr. John Redman. A. P. S. Jan. 19, 1768. A. S. Oct. 14, 1768. Died
March 19, 1808, aet. 86.
8. John Dickinson. A. P. S. Jan. 19, 1768. A. S. Jan. 19, 1768. Died
Feb. 14, 1808, aet. 75.
9. Dr. Charles M. Moore. A. P. S. Jan. 26, 1768. A S. April 8, 1768.
Died Dec. 15, 1778, aet. 66.

2
-

IO.

Francis Hopkinson. A. P. S. Jan. 26, 1768. A.S. April 8, 1768. Died
May 9, 1791, act. 53.

Dr. Alexander Garden, Charleston, S.C. A. P. S. Jan. 26, 1768. A. S.
April 15, 1768.

Died April 15, 1792, aet. 64.

I 2.

John Kidd, Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. A. P. S. March 8, 1768. A. S.

I3.

William Franklin, Governor of New Jersey.

April 1, 1768.

Died

Orig. mem. A. S. 1758.

A. P. S. March 8, 1768.

Died Nov. 17, 1813, aet. 82.

Stephen Watts. A. P. S. March 8, 1768. A. S. April 8, 1768. Died
. Rev. Jacob Duche. A. P. S. March 8, 1768. A. S. April 8, 1768. Died

I4.

16.

Jan. 3, 1798, aet. 60.
John Foxcroft. A. P. S. March 8, 1768.

17.

John Sellers, Surveyor, Derby, Chester Co., Pa. A. P. S. March 8, 1768.

18.

A. S. April 1, 1768. Died Feb. 2, 1804, aet. 76.
Dr. Thomas Graeme. A. P. S. March 8, 1768.
Died Sept. 4, 1772, act. 84. (1794 P)

I9.

Capt. Oswell Eve. A. P. S. March 22, 1768. A. S. Feb. 26, 1768.

2O.

James Wright, Lancaster Co., Pa. A. P. S. May 18, 1768. A. S. April 8,

2I.

Hon. Charles Read, Esq., Burlington, N. J. A. P. S. May 18, 1768. A.

A. S. April 8, 1768.

Died

A. S. Oct. 14, 1768.

Died

1768.

Died

S. June 3, 1768. Died
. John Smith, Burlington, N. J. A. P. S. May 18, 1768. A. S. June 3,
1768. Died March 26, 1771, aet. 49.
23. Hon. Edward Antill, Esq., New Jersey. A. P. S. Aug. 16, 1768. A. S.
April 8, 1768. Died
24. Dr. Benjamin Gale, Killingsworth, Conn. A. P. S. Aug. 16, 1768. A. S.
Aug. 13, 1768. Died 1790, aet. 75.
25.

Dr. Ashton Warner, Antigua.

26.

1768. Died
William Cullen, M. D., Edinburgh.
April 15, 1768. Died

II.

A. P. S. Aug. 16, 1768. A. S. April 15,
A. P. S. Oct. 18, 1768.

A. S.

Members belonging exclusively to the American Philosophical
Society.

30.

William Coleman. Original member. Died
Dr. Thomas Bond. Original member. Died March 26, 1784, act. 72.
Dr. Phineas Bond. Original member. Died June, 1773, aet. 56.
Samuel Rhoads. Original member. Died April 2 29, 1784.

3I.

Hon. Cadwalader Colden.

27.
28.
29.

ber.
32.

Lt. G vernor of New York. Original mem.

Died Sept. 28, 1776, aet. 88.

Rev. Dr. Francis Alison, Vice-Provost of the College of Philadelphia.
Original member. Died Nov. 28, 1779 (1780?), aet. 72.

33.

A:/ec/ed Aovember, 1767.
Dr. William Shippen. Died Nov. 4, 1801, et. 89.

34.

Dr. William Shippen, Jr., Prof. Anat, Coll. Phil. Died July 11, 1808.

-

3
Elected January 12, 1768.
35. Philip Syng, Sen.
Died May 8, 1789, aet. 85.
36. Rev. Dr. William Smith, Provost C. Phila. Died May 14, 1803, aet. 76.
37. George Bryan, Esq.
Died Jan. 28, 1791, aet. 60.
-*. Rev. John Ewing.
Died Aug. 28, 1802, aet. 70.
39. Edward Shippen, Jr., Esq.
Died April 16, 1806, aet. 77.

Elected January 19, 1768.
4O.

David Rittenhouse. Died June 26, 1796, aet. 64.
Hugh Roberts. Died July 23, 1786, aet. 80.
42. Israel Pemberton.
Died April 22, 1779, aet. 64.
43. James Tilghman, Esq. Died Aug. 24, 1793, aet. 76.
44. William Logan, Esq. Died Oct. 28, 1776, aet. 58.
45. Joseph Shippen, Jr., Esq. Died Feb. 11, 1810, aet. 78.
46. Thomas Willing, Esq. Died Jan. 19, 1821, aet. 89.
47. Benjamin Chew, Esq.
Died Jan. Io, 1810, aet. 87.
4 I.

48.

Dr. Adam Kuhn, Prof. Bot. and M. M. C. Phil. Died July 5, 1817, aet. 75.

49.
5.o.

James Pemberton. Died Feb. 9, 1809, aet. 86.
Thomas Pryor. Died

5 I.

Dr. Hugh Williamson.

52. Hon. John Penn, Esq.
53.
54.

Died May 22, 1819, aet. 85.
Died February, 1795.

Hon. James Hamilton, Esq. I)ied Aug. 14, 1783.
Hon. William Allen, Esq., Chief Justice Penna. Died September, 1780.
Elected january 26, 1768.

55. Rev. Ebenezer Kinnersley, Prof. Eng., &c., Coll. Pennsylvania.

69.

Died
July 4, 1778, aet. 67.
John Reynell. Died Sept. 3, 1784.
Lynford Lardner, Esq. Died Oct. 6, 1774, aet. 59.
Joseph Richardson, Merchant. Died
Richard Penn, Esq. Died Jan. 29, 1771, aet. 67.
John Ross, Esq. Died May? 6, 1776.
Andrew Allen, Esq. Died March 7, 1825, aet. 75.
Thomas Coombe, Esq. Died Sept. 29, 1799, aet. 78.
James Allen, Esq. Died Sept. 18, 1778.
Jonathan B. Smith. Died June 16, 1812, aet. 71.
John Allen, Esq. Died Feb., 1778.
Alexander Stedman, Esq. Died
Daniel Dulaney, Esq., Annapolis, Md. Died March 19, 1797, aet. 76.
Dr. Arthur Lee, Virginia. Died Dec. 14, 1792, aet. 42.
Rev. Dr. Ezra Stiles. Died May 12, 1795, aet. 68.

70.

John Winthrop, Esq., F. R. S. Hollis. Prof. Math. Cambridge, N. Eng.

56.
57.

58.
59.
60.
61.
62.

63.
64.

65.
66.

67.
68.

Died May 3, 1779, aet. 65.

4
Elected March 8, 1768.
. Edward Duffield. Died July 12, 1803, aet. 73.
. Samuel Mifflin, Esq. Died
. David Hall, Printer. Died 1773.

. Rev. Thomas Barton, Lancaster, Pa. Died May 25, 1780, et. 50.
Died

. Robert Smith, Architect.

. Thomas Smith. Died May 23, 1795, aet. 84.
. Thomas Barnsley, Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died
. Thomas Bond, Jr. Died (between 1777 and 1789?)
79.

William West.

. Robert Proud.

Died (during the Revolutionary War?)
Died July 5, 1813, aet. 86.

81.

Joseph Fox, Esq. Died Dec. 9, 1779, aet. 70.

82.

James Dickinson.

Died .

83. John Rhea. Died
84. Isaac Jones, Esq. Died

85. Robert Strettell Jones. Died March 16, 1792, aet. 65.
86. Samuel Caldwell.
Died 1794.
87. Edward Shippen, Esq., Lancaster, Pennsylvania Died
88. Thomas McKean, Esq., Newcastle, Del. Died June 24, 1817, aet. 83.
89. Rev. Rich. Peters, Rector of Christ Church and St. Peter's, Philadelphia.
90.

Died 1775 (1776?).
John Kearsley, Sen.

Died Jan. 11, 1772, aet. 88.

91. Samuel Purviance, Jr.

Died

Elected May 18, 1768.
Rev. Robert Harding. Died Aug., 1772.
Died March 22, 1785.
93. Thomas Potts, Philadelphia Co.
94. Alexander Wilcocks, Esq. Died July 22, 1801, aet 59.
Died May 7, 1838, aet. 93.
95. Thomas Bradford.
96. James Biddle, Esq. Died
97. Hon. William Smith, Esq., N. Y. Died Nov. 22, 1769, aet. 93.
98. William Livingston, Esq., N. Y. Died July 25, 1790, aet. 67.
99. John Morin Scott, Esq., N. Y. Died Sept. 14, 1784.
Died Feb. 28, 1781, aet. 50.
iOO. Richard Stockton, Esq., N. J.
Died Nov. 20, 1801, aet. 78.
IOI. William Peartree Smith, Esq., N. J.
Died 1776.
IO2. Hon. Samuel Smith, Esq., Burlington, N. J.
92.

IQ3.

Joseph Reed, Esq. Died March 5, 1785, aet. 44.
Died

iO4.

Richard Hockley, Esq.

IoS.

Rev. James Davidson, Prof. Lang. C. Phil. Died June 28, 1809, aet. 77.

1 off.

Plected August 16, 1768.
William Rumsey, Esq., Maryland. Died 1831 ?
Henry Holiday, Esq., Maryland. Died

107.
Io8.

i IO.

Rev. John Davis, Philadelphia Co. Died Dec. 13, 1772, aet. 36.
Dr. James Anderson, Maryland. Died Dec. 8, 1820, aet. 69.
Dr. Ed. Holyoke, Massachusetts Bay. Died March 21, 1829, et. 101.

i i 1.

Dr. Sandiford, Barbadoes.

Io9.

Died

5
Elected October 18, 1768.
U 12.

II 3.
I 14.
II 5.
I 16.
117.
118.

I 19.
12O.
I2 I.
I 22.

I23.
I 24.
125.
126.
127.
128.

III.

Dr. John A. DeNormandie, Bristol, Pennsylvania. Died 1803.
Joseph Kirkbride, Esq., Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died
Dr. Peter Bergius, Prof. Nat. Hist. Stockholm. Died
Rev. Dr. Ch. Magnus Wrangel, Sweden. Died
Christian Magee, LL.D., Heidelberg. Died
Monsieur Buffon, Paris. Died April 16, 1788, aet. 81.
Rev. Ferdinand Farmer, Philadelphia. Died
Elected December 20, 1768.
Gen. Gage, Commander-in-Chief of H. M. F. in N. A. Died April, 1787.
Sir William Johnson, Bart. Died July 11, 1774, aet. 60.
William Logan, Jr., Bristol, Pennsylvania. Died 1776.
Gilbert Hicks, Esq., Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died in exile after 1776. ?
Matthias Aspden. Died Aug., 1824.
Dr. Samuel Duffield. Died Nov. 27, 1814, aet. 82.
Rev. Chauncey Whittlesey, New Haven. Died 1787.
Rev. Nathaniel Hooker, Hartford. Died 1770.
Rev. Samuel West, Dartmouth. Died April 10, 1808, aet. 69.
Col. Francis Lightfoot Lee, Virginia. Died 1797.

AMembers belonging exclusively to the American Society held
at Philadelphia for Promoting Useful Knowledge.
Elected September 22, 1758.
Died August 16, 1824, act. 95.

129.

Charles Thomson.

I30.

Isaac Paschall. Died 1775, aet. 47.
Edmund Physick, Esq. Died 1804.
Joshua Howell, Esq. Died
William Hopkins. Died

Existing Members.
I31.
I 32.
133.

Time of Election unknown.
I 34. Moses Bartram. Died 1810 (1811?), aet. 78 (79?).
I35. Jos. Paschall. Died 1795, aet. 55?
136. Owen Biddle. Died March 10, 1799, aet. 61.
137. Paul Fooks, Prof. French and Spanish, College Penn. Died 1781.
138. Hon. John Vining, Esq., Dover, on the Delaware. Died
Died August 25, 1785, aet. 48
139. Dr. Ch. Ridgley, Dover, on the Del.

Elected February 9, 1759.
14O. Isaac Bartram.

Died

141.

James Pearson.

Died August 20, 1813, aet. 78.

I42.

Samuel Powel.

Died Sept. 29, 1793.

Elected March 7, 1760.

6
Elected September 19, 1766.
143. William Bettle.
I44.

Died

Samuel Eldridge.

Died

145. Benjamin Davis.

146. Nicholas Waln.

Died

Died Sept. 29, 1813, act. 72.

Elected October 3, 1766.
. Clement Biddle. Died August 11, 1814, aet. 74.
Elected December 5, 1766.
John Morgan, M.D., F.R.S. Professor of the Theory and Practice of
Physic in the Coll. Penn. Died Oct. 15, 1789, aet. 53.
Elected March 27, 1767.
149.

William Henry, Lancaster Co., Pa. Died Dec. 15, 1786, act. 58.

I 50. William Johnson, Charleston, S. C.
I51.
I52.

Died

Charles Mason, Surveyor, London. Died February 1787.
Dr. Sam. Bard, Prof. Prac. Phys. K. C. N. Y. Died May 24, 1821, aet. 80.

Elected january 19, 1768.
I53.

David Evans.

154.

Thomas Mifflin. Died Jan. 21, 1800, aet. 56.

Resigned April 6, 1770.

Elected February 12, 1768.
I55. George Roberts.

Died Sept. 17, 1801, aet. 64.
156. John Morris, Jr., Esq. Died

Elected February 19, 1768.
William Bartram, son of John Bartram. Died July 22, 1823, aet. 84.
158. Dr. John Chapman, Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died

157.

Elected February 26, 1768.
Isaac Jamineau, Esq., British Consul at Naples. Died
I too. Rev. Dr. Jonathan Odell, Burlington, N. J.
Died 1818.
161. Richard Wells, Burlington, N. J.
Died
162. Dr. Hugh Mercer, Virginia.
Died Jan 3, 1777, aet. 56.
163. Benjamin Rush, Philadelphia. Died April 19, 1813, aet. 67.
164. Samuel Eliot, Boston. Died 1820, aet. 81.
I59.

Elected March 4, 1768.
165. James Alexander.

Died

Elected April 1, 1768.
166. Samuel Robinson.

Died

167.

Stephen Hopkins, Esq., Gov. Rhode Island.

168.

Joseph Harrison, Boston.

Died

Died July 13, 1785, et, 77.

7
169. Peter Harrison, Rhode Island. Died
Dr. Charles Bensell, Germantown. Died
171. Pierre Eugene du Simitiere, Geneva. Died Philadelphia, 1788.

17o.

I72.

Hon. Andrew Oliver, Lieut. Gov. Massachusetts Bay. Died March 3,

I73.

Hon. Jonathan Belcher, Esq., Chief Justice of Nova Scotia.
1776, aet. 65.
Jeremiah Dixon, Surveyor, London. Died. 1777.

1774, aet. 67.

-

Died March

-

I74.

Elected April 8, 1768.
175. Abel James. Died Oct. 1790, aet. 64.
176. Michael Hillegas. Died 1804.
177.

George Morgan

178.

Thomas Fisher.

Died March Io, 1810, aet. 69.
Died

Lewis Nicola, Northampton, Pennsylvania. Died Aug. 9, 1807, aet. 9o.
William White. Died (Bishop of Penna.) July 17, 1836, aet. 88.
18I. Peter Miller, Ephrata, Pennsylvania. Died
182. Humphrey Marshall, West Bradford, Chester Co., Pennsylvania.
Died
Nov. 5, 1801, aet. 79.
183. Benjamin Jacobs, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Died
184. James Webb, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Died
185. Chr. Fred. Post, of the Mosquito Shore. Died May 1st, 1785, aet. 75.
186. John Okely, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Died
179.
18o.

-

Klected April 15, 1768.
187. Sir George Saville, Bart., York, Eng.

Died Jan. 9, 1784, act. 58.
Professor Famitz, Naples. Died
189. Thomas Warner, Solicitor General of Antigua. Died

188.

I 90.

Sir Alex. Dick, M.D., Bart., Edinburgh. Died.

John Martin Butt, M.D., Kingston, Jam. Died
Sidney George, Esq., Maryland. Died
I93. Rev. Samuel Stillman, Boston. Died March 13, 1807, aet. 7o.
I94. Samuel Warner, Councillor of Antigua.
Died
I95. Paul Bedford, Esq., Barbadoes. Died
196. John Francis Oberlin, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Died
197. Lionel Chalmers, M.D., Charleston, S. C. Died 1777, aet 62.
191.
192.

Elected April 22, 1768.
198. Ralph Izard, Esq., Charleston, S. C. Died May 30, 1804, aet. 62.
I99. Rev. Mr. Eliot, Boston. Died Sept. 13, 1778, aet. 59.
2OO. David Jameson, M.D., Yorktown, Pennsylvania.
Died

Elected April 29, 1768.
2Ol.

Stephen Paschall.

2O2.

John Gill, M.D., Kinsale, Ireland.

Died 1802, aet. 88.
Died

S
Elected June 3, 1768.
2O3.

Dr. John Paschall, Derby, Pennsylvania.

2O4.

Benjamin West, London.

205.

Samuel Miles, Philadelphia.

Died 1779, aet. 73.

Elected June 10, 1768.
Died March 10, 1820, aet. 82.

Died Dec. 29, 1805, aet. 66.

Elected July 1, 1768.
2O6.

Dr. John Tweedy, Newport, R. I. Died
Rowland Evans, Philadelphia Co., Penn. Died Aug. 18, 1789, aet. 72.
William Poole, Wilmington, Newcastle Co. Died

207.
208.

Elected September 23, 1768.
209.

Joseph Bringhurst.

Died

Elected October 14, 1768.
21 O.

Dr. John Kersley, Jr.

2II.

Dr. Gerardus Clarkson. Died Oct., 1790, at 53. (Sept. 19, at 5:3)
Dr. James A. Bayard. Died June 8, 1770.

2 I 2.

213. Dr. Robert Harris.
2I4.
2 [5.
216.

Died 1777.

Died

Dr. Peter Sonmans. Died March 15, 1776, et. 67.
Dr. George Glentworth. Died
Dr. Jonathan Potts.

Died Oct., 1781.

217.

James Span, M.D., Prof. Mat. Med. Univer, Dublin.

218.

James Dick, M.D., Charleston, S. C.

219.

Richard Thick, M.D., F.R.S., London. Died

22O.

Williams Smibert, Boston.

22I.

John Arbo, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Died Dec. 11, 1772, at 60.
William Scull, Reading, Pennsylvania. Died
Joseph Hutchins, Barbadoes. Died April 29, 1833, act. 86.

222.

223.
224.
225.

Died

Died

Died

John Himili, Charleston, S. C. Died
John Deas, Charleston, S. C. Died
Elected October 21, 1768.

. Thomas Foxcroft.

Died June 18, 1769, aet. 72.
Elected October 28, 1768.

227.

John Benezet.

Died 1780.

Elected November 4, 1768.
228.

Dr. Isaac Smith, Trenton.

229.

John Walker, Virginia.

Died August 28, 1817, act. 68.
Died

Elected Movember 11, 1768.
230.

Lambert Cadwalader, Trenton.

Died Sep. 13, 1823.

9
Klected Movember 18, 1768.
2

:::
2

.
.
.
.
.

John Cadwalader. Died Feb. Io, 1786.
John Murgatroyd. Died June 24, 1782.
James Wilson, Esq., Reading, Penn. Died Aug. 28, 1798, aet. 55.
William Hewson, Anatomist, London. Died May 1, 1774, aet. 35.
Edward Biddle, Esq., Attorney at Law, in Reading. Died Sept. 5, 1779,
aet. 4O.

Elected November 25, 1768.
236. Jacob Duche, Esq. Died
Edward Penington. Died 1796.
238. Capt. Valentine Gardiner, of Lord Howe's Regulars.

237.

239. Dr. Mim, Yorktown.

Died

Died

Elected December 2, 1768.

242.

Henry Drinker. Died Aug, 14, 1809.
Matthew Clarkson. Died October 5, 1800, aet. 67.
Capt. Joseph Stiles. Died

243.

Thomas Livezey, Esq., Philadelphia Co.

244.

Samuel Wharton.

240.
24 I.

Died Sept. 9, 1790, aet. 74.

Died March, 18oo, aet. 68.

Elected December 20, 1768.
245.

Benjamin Wynkoop. Died Sept. 2, 1803, aet. 69.
Died July, 18oo.
Thomas Gilpin. Died March 3, 1778.

246. John Drinker.
247.

248. Thomas Clifford.
249.

250. James Worral.
25 I.

Died

Levi Hollingsworth. Died March, 1824, aet. 85.
Died

Isaac Wharton. Died March 31, 1808, aet. 63.

MEMBERS ELECTED SINCE THE UNION,
Elected April 21, 1769.
Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon, President of the College of New Jersey.
Died November 15, 1794, aet. 72.
253.

Rev. Dr. Myles Cooper, Pres. of King's College, New York.

Died

May, 1785, aet. 50.
254.

Col. Landon Carter, Virginia. Died May 1, 1785, aet. 50.

Dr. Otto, Bethlehem. Died April 29, 1793.
256. Daniel Clark. Died
257. Dr. John Lorimer, West Florida. Died
258. Dr. Brooke, Maryland. Died
259. Dr. Ebenezer Prime, New York. Died

255.

26o.

Dr. John Jones, New York. Died June 23, 1791, act. 63.

261. Samuel Bowen, South Carolina.
262.

Died

-

Samuel Shoemaker, Esq., Philadelphia. Died Oct. 10, 18o3, at 79.

10
Elected between April 21, 1769, and jan. 18, 1771.
263. Sir Charles a Linne, M.D., K.P.S., &c., Upsal. Died Jan. 10, 1778,
aet. 7 I.

Elected January 19, 1770.
Died 1780, aet. 69.
265. Lord Stirling (Wm. Alexander), New Jersey. Died Jan. 15, 1783,

264. Dr. John Fothergill, London.
aet. 57.
266.

Dr. John David Hahn, Prof. Chem. Uni. Utrecht.

267. Edward Nairne, London.
268.

Died 1784, aet. 55.

Died

James Ferguson, F.R.S., London. Died 1776, aet. 66.
Died
Mr. Guald, Surveyor of West Florida. Died
Joel Bailey, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Died 1797.
Joseph Ellicott, Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. Died Oct. 15, 1780.
Joseph Gilpin, Cecil Co., Maryland. Died March 30, 1790.

269. John Morell, Georgia.
27o.
271.
272.
273.

Elected January 18, 1771.
Dr. Morton, Jamaica. Died
275. Dr. James Lloyd, Boston. Died March, 1810, aet. 82.
276. Richard Thomas, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Died Jan. 19, 1832, aet.87.
277. Henry Hill, Died 1793.
278. William Parr, Esq. Died
279. Samuel Rhoads, Jr. Died
274.

Died

28o. Dr. Thomas Preston.
281.
-

282.

Henry Bembridge. Died about 1820?
John Baynton, Esq. Died March 17, 1788, act. 32.

283. Dr. Samuel Preston Moore,

Died

Died
285. Nevil Maskelyne, Ast. Roy. Greenwich. Died Feb. 9, 1830, aet. 79.
286. Samuel Filsted, Jamaica. Died
287. Dr. Archibald Gloucester, Antigua. Died

284. Joseph Otolenge, Esq., Georgia.

-

Died 1So2.

288. Frederick Marshall, North Carolina.

Elected April 17, 1772.
289. Lieut. Stephen Adye, of the Royal Artillery.
Jesse Lukens, Philadelphia. Died
291. Daniel Coxe, Trenton. Died 1827 or 1828.

Died

290.

292. Mr. Lane, London.

Died

293.

Lieut. Thomas Hutchins, 60th Regiment. Died April 28, 1789.

294.

Peter Dolland, London.

Died July 2, 1820, aet. 90.

295. Arch. McClean, York Co. Died
296. Gerard Bancker, New York. Died

1798, aet. 58.
Died

297.

Capt. John Montresor, New York.

298.

Col. Henry Laurens, South Carolina. Died Dec. 8, 1792, aet. 69.

299.

Rev. Samuel Williams, Mass. Bay. Died January, 1817, act. 73.

3OO.

Dr. George Millegan, South Carolina.

Died

|

11
Elected January 15, 1773.
3ol. Timothy Baron de Klingstedt, St. Petersburg. Died
302. M. Le Roy, Vice-Direc. Acad. S. Paris. Died Aug. 25, 1785, act. 68.
303. Hon. Andrew Oliver, Boston. 1)ied Dec. 1799, aet. 68.

3o4. Dr. Torbern Bergmann, Pr. Math. Stockholm. Died July 8, 1784, aet. 49.
305. Alexander Small, London.

306.
397.
308.
309.

Died

Dr. James Tilton, Dover, Delaware. Died May 14, 1822, aet. 77.
Dr. Nicholas Way, Wilmington, Delaware. Died
Rev. William Ludlam, Leicester. Died
Rev. Thomas Coombe, Philadelphia. Died Aug. 15, 1822, act. 75.

Elected January 21, 1774.
310. Right Hon. Earl of Stanhope. Died Dec. 14, 1816, act. 63.
31 I.
312.
313.
314.
3.15.
316.
317.

Right Hon. Lord Mahon. Died
Dr. Andrew Duncan, Edinburgh. Died
Samuel Moore, Esq., London. Died
George Gauld, Esq., Pensacola. Died
Bernard Romans, Esq., Pensacola. Died
Hon. Bryan Eäwards, Esq. Died 1896, act. 63.
Hon. John Ellis, Esq., Jamaica. Died 1776, aet. 65.

3.18. Dr. William Wright, Jamaica.
319.
320.
321.
322.
323.
324.

Died September, 1819, aet. 84.

Dr. Walter Jones, Virginia. Died
Dr. James McClurg, Virginia. Died July, 1823, act. 77.
Dr. Jonathan Elmer, New Jersey. Died 1817, act. 72.
Dr William Bryant, New Jersey. Died about 1783. (?)
John Jones, Esq., Maryland. Died
Dr. John Perkins, Boston. Died

325. Sharp Delany, Philadelphia. Died Muy, 1799.
326. James Bringhurst, Phil delphia. Died 1794. (1799 2) .
327. Benjamin Morgan, Philadelphia.

328. Dr. Thomas Parke, Philadelphia.

Died

Resigned.

Elected January 28, 1775.
329. Dr. Adams, Barbadoes.

330.
331.
332.
333.
334.
335.

Died

Marquis of Condorcet, Paris. Died March 28, 1794.
M. Daubenton, Jr., K. King's Cab., Paris. Died Dec. 31, 1799, aet. 83.
M. J. Barbeu Dubourg, Paris. Died December, 1779.
M. Le Roux, Paris. Died February 9, 1795, aet. 71.
M. Macquer, Paris. Died 177o? aet. 52.
Abbe Reynall, Paris. Died March 6, 1796, aet. 83.

336. M. Lavoisier, Paris.

Died May 8, 1794, aet. 51.

337. Abbe Rozier, Paris.

Died September 29, 1793, aet. 59.

338. Capt. Holland, London.

Died

339. Rev. Dr. Thomas Gibbons, London. Died 1785, act. 65.
340. Fortunatus de Warris, Esq., M.D. Died
341. Dr. Benjamin Mosely, Jamaica. Died June 15, 1819, act. So.

12

Elected April 16, 1779.
342.
343.

Hon. M. Conrad A. Gerard, Min. Plen. from France. Died
Dr. James Hutchinson. Died 1793, at 41.
Rev. George Dutfield. Died February 2, 1799, * 58.

344.

January 19, 1781 :
Died July 4, 1826, * 83.

Elected between April 16, 1779. and
345.

His Ex. Thomas Jefferson, Min. Plen.
Rev. Dr. J. C. Kunze, New York. Died July 24, 1807, aet. 78.

346.
Chev. de la Luzerne, Paris.
347.

Died Sep. 14. 1791.

M. Barbe de Marbois, Int: of St. Domingo. Died Jan. 14, 1837, aet. 91.

348.
349.

Die" April
15, 1829,
Timothy
Rev. Dr. Matlack.
James Madison.
"
of et.
the99.College of William

and

35o.

Mary, Virginia.
351.

Died March 6, 1812, act. 62.

Charles Pettit Died Sept. 6." 69. .
M. Sue, Professor Royal of Ana". &c., at Paris. Died

• 352.
353.

354.

John
Ternaut.
January, "3".
His Ex.
GeneralDied
Washington.
Died December 14, 1799, act. 68.
Gen. Anthony wayne, U. S. A. Died December, 1796, act. 51.

355.

356.
357.

358.
359.

Elected January 19, 1781.
A. Died May 20, 1834. act. 76.
Marquis de la Fayette, Maj. Gen. U.S.
Hazard, Esq., * * Gen. Died June 13, 1817, aet. 73.
D on. Thomas Bee, Esq., so" Carolina. Died

£

: Hugh shiel, Philadelphia. ."
' Gray, Philadelphia.
Field"
Marshal of

360.
C
361. J ev. de Chastellux,
362.

France.

Died 1788, at $2.

ared Ingersoll, Esq. Die!" 3" 1822, act. 71.

S
Elected January 18, 1783.
363. Joh uel Huntington, Esq.” Connecticut. Died Jan. 5, 1796, at. 63.
Beale Bordley, Esq." Maryland. Died Jan. 26, 1804, * 76.
364.
"365.
Daumours,Died
Baltimore,
of "
France
Ch.ev.
e Fontana.
MarchCons,
9, *5.
76. for the S. Dept. Died

A'.

-

366.

367.

D

36S.

#'.
Died Prof. Math. Univ. Pa.
ert Patterson,

369.

ReV. Robert Davidson, Prof. Hist.

Died July 22, 1824, act. St.

Univ. Pa.

Died Dec. 13, 1813.

Elected January 16, 1784.

'e Campomanes, Fiscal of the Council of Castile.

37O. Co
371.

Died

Died December 1, 1812. " 77.
, Esq. Died December 4, 1802, *. 83.

r. Samuel MagaW.
372.

373.

Rev.
374.

Maj.

J. aughan.
Died December 30, 1841, *. 86.
*'my
Belknap, New Hampshire. Died June 20, 1798, act. 54.

375.

era. J. s. de Brahm. Die"

13
376. Arch. Gamble, Prof. Eng. Orat., University of Pennsylvania. Died 1784.
Rev. J. H. C. Helmuth, Prof. Ger. Un. Pa. Died Feb. 5, 1825, aet. 79.
378. James Six, Canterbury. Died
379. Marquis d'Augeville, Paris.
Died
380. Count de Vergennes. Died February 13, 1787, aet. 70.
381. John Dunlap. Died November 27, 1812, act, 66.
382. Peter J. Van Berckel, Min. Plen. from the Netherlands. Died
383. George Fox. Died
384. Dr. John Foulke. Died
385. Dr. Barnabas Binney. Died July, 1787, aet. 36.
386. Rev. Robert Blackwell. Died February 12, 1831, aet. 82.
387. Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant, Esq., Newark, N. J. Died 1793, aet. 47.
388. George Gray, Esq. Died
389. Thomas Heyward, Jr., Esq., South Carolina. Died March, 1809, aet. 62.
390. John Hyacinth de Magellan, F. R. S. Died February, 1790, aet. 67.
377.

Elected january 22, 1785.
39 I. F. E. F. Baron de Beelen Bertholff, Brussels.
392.

Died

Sam. Gust. Baron Hermelin, Stockholm. Died May 4, 1820, act. 74.

393.

William Bradford, Esq., Att. Gen. Penn.

394.

Ed. Burd, Esq., Proth. Supreme Court Pennsylvania. Died July, 1833.

Died Aug. 23, 1795, aet. 39.

Dr. Adair Crawford, Phys. St. Thom. Hosp., Lond. Died 1795, aet. 46.
396. Dr. John Carson, Philadelphia. Died either 1794 or Jan. 16, 1825 (?)
397. Rev. Manasseh Cutler, Ipswich. Died July 28, 1823, aet. 80.
398. Count de Guichen, Lt. Gen. French Naval Armies. Died 1790, aet. 78.
399. Andrew Ellicott, Esq., Maryland.
Died 1820, aet. 67.
4OO. Samuel Powel Griffiths, M.D., Phila.
Died May 12, 1826, aet, 67.
4O1. Dr. Hugh James, Montego Bay, Jamaica. Died
4O2. Joseph Mandrillon, Merchant, Amsterdam. Died Jan. 7, 1799.
4O3. Br. Gen. Thad. Kosciozko. Died October 16, 1817, aet. 65.
4O4. William Herschel, F.R.S., Bath. Died August 23, 1822, aet. 83.
4O5. Dr. James McHenry, Baltimore, Maryland. Died May 8, 1816, aet. 63.
4O6. James Madison, Esq., Virginia. Died June 28, 1836, aet. 85.
4O7. Rev. Henry E. Muhlenberg, Lancaster. Died June 24, 1817, aet. 61.
408. Chr. Fred. Michaelis, M.D., Gottenberg. Died
395.

4O9. William Parker, London.

Died

41 O.

Hon. Mann Page, Fredericksburg, Virginia.

4 II.

Thomas Paine, Esq., Auth. of Common Sense. Died June 8, 1809, act. 72.

Died

Dr. Robert Perceval, Prof. Chem. Trinity College, Dublin. Died
Rev. Dr. Richard Price, F.R.S., London. Died March 19, 1791, act, 68.
4I4. Rev. Joseph Priestley, F.R.S., Birmingham.
Died Feb. 6, 1804, act. 71.
415. Rev. Dr. Samuel Stanhope Smith, V. P. Coll., Princeton. Died Aug.
21, 1819, aet. 69.
416. Jean Baptiste Sue, Jr., Professor of Anatomy, Paris. Died
417. Col. George Wall, Jr., Sup. Ex. Council of Pennsylvania. Died
418. Benjamin Workman, Teacher of Math. Univ. Pennsylvania. Died

412.
413.

14
Elected July 21, 1786.
Hon. Robert Morris, Esq. Died May 8, 1806, aet. 72.
420. Jonathan Hoge, Esq., Mem. Sup. Ex. Council, Pennsylvania. Died
42 I. George Clymer. Died January 23, 1813, aet. 73.
. William Temple Franklin, Esq. Died May 25, 1823, aet. 63.
. Samuel Vaughan, Jr., Jamaica. Died
. Rev. John Andrews, D.D Died March 30, 1813, act. 67.
419.

. Charles W. Peale.

Died 1826.

. Robert Edge Pine.

Died November 19, 1788.

Dr. Benjamin Duffield.
. Dr. John Morris.

William Rawle, Esq.
.
.
.
.
.

Died December 13, 1799, aet. 46.

Died Sept. 8, 1793, act. 34.

Died April 12, 1836, aet. 76.

Duke de Rochefoucauld, of the Acad. Sciences, Paris. Died
Marquis de Condorcet, Sec. of the Acad. Sciences, Paris. Died
M. Le Roy, Member of the Academy of Sciences, Paris. Died
Abbe Soulavie. Died March, 1813, aet. 62.
Dr. Ingenhousz, Vienna. Died September 7, 1799, aet. 69.
Gastellier, M.D., Montargis. Died
. Grivel. Died October 17, 1810, at. 75.
. Charles, Lecturer in Experimental Phil. and early aeronaut. Phila
. Cabanis, M.D. Died 1807, act. 51.
[delphia. Died

i

-

. Le Veillard.

Died

452.

. Thibert Garbier, M.D. Died
. Feutry, Mechanician. Died
Lorenz Crell, M.D., Helmsted in Brunswick. Died
Count de Castilione, Milan and Pailadelphia. Died
Dr. Noel, Paris. Died
Chev. de Granchain, Paris. Died
Richard Kirwan, F.R.S., London. Died June 22, 1812.
John Whitehurst, F.R.S., London. Died 1788, aet. 73.
Benjamin Vaughan, Esq., London. Died Dec. 8, 1835, aet. 85.
Dr. James Beattie, Pr. Mor. Ph. U. Aberdeen. Died Aug., 1803, aet. 68.
Dr. Thomas Percival, Manchester. Died Aug. 30, 1804, aet. 64.
Dr. Thomas Henry, Manchester. Died June 18, 1816, aet. 82.
Rev. Charles H. Wharton, D.D., Newcastle. Died July, 1833.

453.

Elected January 19, 1787.
William Bingham, Esq., Philadelphia. Died Feb. 7, 1804, act. 52.

.
443.
444.

445.
446.
447.

448.
449.
450.
451.

Esq., Phila. Died April 30, 1844, act. 86.
Francis Johnston, Esq., Phila., Rec. Gen. Land Off. Died Feb. 22,
456. Joseph James, Philadelphia. Died
[1815, act. 66.

454. Benjamin Chew, Jr.,
455.

457.

Robert Milligan, Esq., Philadelphia. Died November 25, 1806.

458. William Barton, Esq., Philadelphia.
459.

460.
461.

Died
Dr. Thomas Ruston, Philadelphia. Died 1804.
Major Isaac Craig, Pittsburgh. Died
Simeon De Witt, Esq., New York. Died Dec. 3, 1834, aet. 78.

-

-

--------"

15
462. His Ex. James Bowdoin, Gov. Mass. Died Nov. 6, 1790, aet. 63.
463. Lewis W. Otto, French Chargé d'Affaires. Died Nov. 9, 1817, act. 63.
464. Hon. John Jay, Sec. For. Affairs, N. Y. Died May 17, 1829, aet. 83.
465. M. Cadet de Vaux, Paris. Died
466. M. Cadet, Paris. Died
467. Hon. John Lowell, Judge of App., Boston. Died May 6, 1802, act. 58.
468. Sir Edward Newenham, Baronet, Ireland. Died
469. His Grace the Duke of Richmond. Died March 5, 1785, aet. 55.
47o. Dr. John Coakley Letsom, London. Died M arch 1, 1815, act. 72.
47 I. Robert Barclay, Esq., London.
Died
472. Dr. William Thornton, London. Died
473. Dr. George Spence, Jamaica.
Died

Elected July 20, 1787.
474.

475.

476.
477.

478.
479.

-

480.
481.
482.

483.
484.
485.

Sir Jos. Banks, Pres. R. Soc., London. Died June 19, 1820, aet. 77.
John Hunter, Surgeon, London. Died Oct. 16, 1793, aet. 64.
George Vaux, Surgeon, London. Died May 23, 1820, aet. 73.
Wm. Baker, Esq., Bayfordbury, Eng. Died Jan. 28, 1824, aet. 80.
Dr. John R. B. Rogers, Philadelphia. Died
Dr. Caspar Wistar, Philadelphia. Died January 22, 1818, aet. 56.
Dr. Enoch Edwards, Philadelphia Co. Died
Col. John Bayard, Philadelphia. Died
Dr. Thomas White, Manchester, England. Died
Rev. Thomas Barnes, Manchester, England. Died
William W. Smith, M.D., Philadelphia. Died February, 1793.
Jonathan Williams, Jr., Esq. Died May 20, 1815, aet. 64.

Blected January 16, 1789.
486. David Redick, Esq., Member of the Sup. Ex. Coun. Penna.

Died
487. Don Diego de Gardoqui, Envoy from Spain. Died
488. Rev. Dr. Nicholas Collin, Rect. Sw, Ch., Phila. Died Oct. 7, 1831.
489. David Brearly, Esq., Chief Justice N. J. Died August, 1790, aet. 45.
490. M. Steinsky, Prof. Natural Philosophy at Prague.
Died
49 I. M. St. Jean Crevecoeur, Consul of France at N. Y.
Died
492. John Cox, Esq., Bloomsbury, N. J.
Died
493.

Dr. Blagden, Sec. R. S., London. Died March 26, 1820, aet. 72.

494.

Petrus Camper, Friesland.

Died April 7, 1789, aet. 67.

495. Baron de Haynitz, Prof. Acad. Arts, Berlin.

496. Benjamin Smith Barton, M.D.
497.

498.
499.
500.
50 I.

Died
Died Dec. 19, 1815, aet. 49.

M. Arthaud, Pres. Soc. of the Philadelphes, Cape François. Died
Mederic L. El. Moreau de St. Mery, Cape François. Died Jan. 28,
Jos. Mig. de Flores, Pres. R. S. H., Madrid. Died
Charles Stuart, M.D., F.R.S., Edinburgh. Died

[1819, aet. 69. .

502.

William Paterson, Esq., late Att. Gen. N. J. Died Sept. 19, 1806, aet. 63.
Walter Minto, LL.D., Prof. Math. at Princeton. Died Oct. 21, 1796.

503.

C. C. Pinckney, Esq., S. C.

Died August 16, 1825, at 79.

16
Rev. Ashbel Green, D.D., late of Princeton Coll. Died May 19, 1848.
William Findley, Esq., late Mem. G. Assem. Penn. Died April, 1821.
506. J. P. Brissot de Warville. Died Oct., 1793, aet. 38.
507. Rev. Burgiss Allison, Bordentown, N. J.
Died Feb. 20, 1827, aet. 74.
508. Ben. Rittenhouse, Esq., Montgomery Co., Penn. Died
Died Sept. 28, 1829.
509. Thomas Pole, M.D.
504.

505.

5 Io.

Elected April 17, 1789.
Princess Cath. Romanowna d'Aschkaw. Died Jan. 4, 1810, aet. 65.

5 II.

John Stevens, Jr., Esq., New Jersey.

512.

Joshua Humphreys, Jr., Philadelphia. Died Jan. 12, 1838, aet. 86.
James Rumsey, late of Virginia. Died Dec. 3, 1792, aet. 48 or 49 (?)

513.

Died 1838, aet. 89.

George Monro, M.D., Newcastle. Died
Winthrop Sargent, Esq., in the New Government, Westward.
June 3, 1820, aet. 67.
516. John Bleakley, Esq., Philadelphia. Died
517. George Buchanan, M.D., Baltimore. Died
518. Samuel Beach, Esq., Charleston, S. C. Died
514.

5 i 5.

519.

Don Francis de Gardoqui, Castile and Rome. Died

520.

Peter Le Gaux, Spring Mill.

52I.

Elected 9anuary 15, 1790.
George Turner, Esq., Judge of the Western Territory.

522.

1843, aet. 93.
Caleb Whitefoord, Esq., Sec. British Commission for Peace.

523.

Baron de Hupsch, Cologne.

Died

Blected july 17, 1789.
Died

Died 1810.

Died Jan. 1, 1805, aet. 86.

524. Dr. John Walker, Prof. Natural History at Edinburgh.
525.

Died March 16,

Died

Dr. And, Sparman, Prof. N. H., Stockholm. Died July 20, 1820, act. 73.
Elected January 21, 1791.

526. Alex. Hamilton, Esq., Sec. Treas. U.S.
527.

Died July 12, 1804, act. 47.

Edmund Randolph, Esq., Att. Gen. U. S.

Died Sept. 13, 1813.

528. Alexander Addison, Esq., Washington Co., Penn.

Died Nov. 24, 1807,

act. 48.
529.

James Ross, Esq., Washington Co., Penn. Died Nov. 27, 1847.

530.

Dr. Absolom Baird, Washington Co., Penn.

531.

John Smilie, Esq., Fayette Co., Penn. Died

532.

Albert Gallatin, Esq., Fayette Co.

533.

John Hoge, Esq., Fayette Co. Died

534.

Col. Alexander Anderson, Philadelphia.

535.

Capt. william Ferguson, of the Artillery in the W. Country. Died

536. Benjamin Gloxin, M.D., Strasburg.

Died

Died August 13, 1849, aet. 90.
Died

Died
S. L. Mitchell, M.D., Long Island. Died Sept. 7, 1831, aet. 66.
538. Robert Goldsborough, Esq., Talbot Co., Maryland. Died
539. James Anderson, M.D., Madras, East Indies.
Died
537.

17
Elected April 15, 1791.

544.

C. P. Thunberg, Prof. Nat. Hist, Upsal. Died August 8, 1828.
N. L. Burmann, M.D., Prof. Bot., Amsterdam. Died 1793, act. 59.
J. G. Grosche, M.D., Prof. Nat. Hist., Mittau, Courland. Died
Th. Pennant, Esq., Downing, England. Died Dec. 16, 1798, aet. 72.
Henry Knox, Esq., Sec. War, U.S. Died October 29, 1806, aet. 55.

545.

Elected july 15, 1791.
John Lusac, Professor of Greek, Leyden University. Died

540.
541.
542.
543.

546. John Nicholson, Esq., Comp. Gen. Penn.
547.

Andrew Ross, M.D., Philadelphia.

Died Dec. 5, 1800, aet. 40.
Died 1823.

548. Benjamin Waterhouse, M.D., Prof. Med., Cambridge, Mass. Died Oct.
2, 1846, aet. 92.
549. John Penington, M.D. Died September, 1793.
550. John Beckley, Esq., Clerk H. R., Penn. Died April 8, 1807, aet. 50.
551. P. S. Du Ponceau, Esq., Coun. at Law, Phila. Died April 1, 1844, aet. 84.

Elected October 21, 1791.
552.
553.
554.
555.

Andrew Murray, M.D., Prof. Bot. Göttingen University. Died
P. S. Pallas, M.D., Prof. N. H., St. Petersburg. Died 1812, aet. 71.
Dugald Stewart, Prof. Mor. Phil., Edin. Died June 11, 1828, aet. 78.
Alex. J. Dallas, Esq., Sec. Comm. Penn. Died Jan. 16, 1817, aet. 57.

Plected January 20, 1792.
556. Count Paul Andreami, Milan. Died
Rodolph Vall-Travers, Esq., F.R.S., Hamburgh. Died
558. Anthony Fothergill, M.D., Bath, England. Died
557.

559. Ant. R. C. Mathurin de la Forest, Vice-Con. Gen. to U.S.

560.
561.
562.
563.
564.
565.
566.

Died

Joseph Ceracchi, Rome. Died Jan. 30, 1802, aet. 62.
Palisot de Beauvois, Cape François. Died February, 1820.
John Rouelle, M.D., Virginia. Died
Richard P. Barton, Mount Airy, Virginia. Died
Dr. David Jackson, Philadelphia. Died
Dr. William Smith, Philadelphia. Died
Nicholas B. Waters, M.D., Philadelphia. Died 1796, act. 32.

E/ected july 20, 1792.
567. Erasmus Darwin, M.D., F.R.S., Derby, Eng. Died April 18, 1802, aet. 71.
568. Dr. William Currie, Philadelphia. Died 1829, aet. 74.
569. Uno Von Troil, Archbishop of Sweden. Died
570. John Trumbull, Conn., Painter. Died November 10, 1843, aet. 88.

Elected January 18, 1793.
572.

M. Coupigny, Cape François. Died
Louis Valentin, M.D., Cape François.

573.

John Adams, LL.D., Vice-President U.S. Died July 4, 1826, aet. 90.

571.

Died

18
Dr. David Nassy, Philadelphia. Died
Dr. George Logan, Philada. County. Died April 9, 1821, aet. 66.
576. John W. Kittera, Lancaster, Pa. Died June 8, 1801, aet. 48.

574.
575.

Elected April 19, 1793.
William Waring, Philadelphia. Died
578. Thomas Lee Shippen, Philadelphia. Died February, 1798.
579. John Reinhold Forster, J. U. D. Died December 9, 1798, aet. 69.
577.

Elected April 18, 1794.
580.
581.
582.
583.
584.
585.
586.

Thos. Maun Randolph, Monticello, Va. Died June 20, 1828.
James Anderson, LL.D., Cotfield, Scotland. Died
Earl of Buchan, P. S. S. A. Scotland. Died April 19, 1829, aet. 87.
Dr. James Greenway, Dinwiddie Co., Va. Died

Edward Stevens, M.D., F.R.S., Edin., St. Croix. Died Sept. 30, 1834.
John Nancarrow, Philadelphia.

Died

Eberh. A. W. Zimmerman, Prof. at Caroline C. Brunswick.

Died

B/ec/ed January 16, 1795.
587. Earl of Dundonald, Culross, Scotland. Died
588. Samuel Wheeler, Philadelphia. Died
589. Tim. Pickering, Secretary of War, U.S. Died Jan. 29, 1829, aet. 84.
590.

Robert Leslie, Watchmaker, Phila., now London.

59 I. Gustaf Von Carleson, Sweden. Died
592. Rev. Valen. Melsheimer, Hanover, Pa.
*

Died Dec. 25, 1804,
[aet. 39.

Died

Elected January 15, 1796.

593.

Dr. C. F. A. Grassi, late of Bordeaux, now of Philadelphia. Died

594.

Dr. Deveze, Phys. of the late Hospital on Bush Hill. Died
Dr. Nathaniel B. Bedford, Pittsburg. Died
Isaac Briggs, Montgomery Co., Maryland. Died
F. A. F. de la Rochefoucauld Liancourt. Died March 28, 1827.
Dr. Hugh Hodge, Philadelphia. Died July, 1798, aet. 43.
Jacques Marie le Fessier de Grandpre, Died
J. F. Mifflin, Esq., Philadelphia. Died April 13, 1813, aet. 53.
Tench Coxe, Esq., Philadelphia. Died July 10, 1824, aet. 68.
Rich. Peters Smith, Philadelphia. Died 1798.
Mr. F. H. Le Comte, Paris. Died
Jas. Ed. Smith, M.D., F.R.S., Pres. of the Linnaean Soc. Died
P. A. Adet, Plen, from French Republic to U. S. Died March, 1834.
Wm. Dandridge Peck, Esq., Kittery, N. H. Died Oct. 3, 1822, act. 59.

595.

596.
597.

598.
599.

.
601.
602.

603.
6O4.

605.
606.

-

607. Jas. Woodhouse, M.D., Prof. Chem. U. Pa.

608.

699.

Died June 4, 1809, aet. 38.

Elected April 15, 1796.
Chev. Cyp. Rib. Freire, Minister of Portugal to U. S. Died 1824.
Alex. Lerebours, late of Paris, now of Philadelphia. Died

19
610.
61 I.
612.

A. J. Larocque. Died since 1836.
M. Talleyrand Perigord. Died May 17, 1838, aet. 83.
Rev. James Abercrombie, Philada. Died June 26, 1841, aet. 83.

Elected july 15, 1796.
613. Dr. Isaac Cathrall. Died February 22, 1819, aet. 56.
614. L. Et. Duhail, M.D., Consul for Maryland. Died
615. Don Jos. de Jandennes, Int. Gen. of Majorca. Died
616. Joanne Baptista Cunat, D.C.L., Prof. at Valencia. Died
617. Don Luis de Urbina, Capt. Gen. of Valencia, &c. Died

Elected October 21, 1796.
618.

Dr. Charles Caldwell. Died July 9, 1853, aet. 90.
Plected January 20, 1797.

619. Thomas C. James, Philadelphia. Died July 5, 1835, aet. 69.
62o. Adam Seybert, M.D., Philadelphia.
Died May 2, 1825, aet. 52.
621. John Newnan, M.D., Salisbury, N. C. Died.
622. And. Eve. Van Braam Houckgeest, now of Bristol, Pa. Died
62 . Theo. C. Mozard, Consul of the French Republic at Boston. Died
624. Samuel H. Smith, Printer, Philadelphia. Died Nov. 1, 1845, aet. 74.
625. M. Volney, Member of the French Institute. Died April 24, 1820, aet. 63.

Blected April 21, 1797.
626.

John Heckewelder, Bethlehem, Pa. Died Jan. 31, 1823, aet. 80.
627. John Stewart, Green Briar Co., Virginia. Died Aug 23, 1823.
628. Rev. Samuel Blair, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 24, 1818, aet. 77.
629. Thos. Pinckney, S.C., late Min. to London. Died Nov. 2, 1828, aet. 77.

Elected July 21, 1797.
630.
631.
632.
633.

John Guillemard, A.M., St. John's Coll., Oxford, England. Died 1845.
William Bache, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Nov. 20, 1820.
Alexander Martin, N. C., Senator of the U. S. Died Nov., 1807.
William Hamilton, of the Woodlands, near Philadelphia. Died June 5,
1813, aet. 68.

Elected January 19,

1798.

. Gen. James Wilkinson, Brig. Gen. Com. in Chief, U. S. A.
23, 1825, aet. 68.
. Major Francisco de Zach. Died

Died Dec.

Elected April 20, 1798.
636. William Patterson, M.D., Londonderry, Ireland. Died
637. J. B. Scandella, M.D., Venice, now in the U. S. Died
638. Julien U. Niemcewicz, Poland, now in U. S. Died in 1841, aet. 84.
639. John F. Blumenbach, M.D., F.R.S. Died January 22, 1840, aet. 88.

20
A:/ec/ed 7uly 19, 1799.
.
.
.
.
.
.

William Boys, A.M., Philadelphia. Died
John R. Coxe, M.D., Philadelphia. Resigned September 21, 1838.
Thos. Peters Smith, Philadelphia. Died
Joseph Clay, Philadelphia. Died August 27, 1811, aet. 47.
Samuel Elam, Newport, R. I. Died
Benjamin H. Latrobe, Engineer and Arch. Died September, 1820.
William Maclure, Philadelphia. Died March 22, 1840, aet. 77.

Plected january 17, 18oo.
647.
648.
649.
650.

Robert Liston, Esq., Envoy Ex, and M. Plen. to U. S. Died July 15
John R. Smith, A.M., Philadelphia. Died
[1836, aet. 93.
Justus Erick Bollmann, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Dec. 9, 1821.
William Dunbar, Mississippi Territory. Died Nov. 15, 1819.

Blected April 18, 18oo.
651. Samuel Brown, M.D., Kentucky. Died January 12, 1830, aet. 60.
652. Samuel Miller, A.M., New York. Died January 7, 1850, aet. 80.
653. Dupont de Nemours, late of France. Died August 6, 1817, aet. 78.

Elected January 16, 1801.
654.
655.
656.
657.
658.
659.

Samuel Falberg, M.D., Govt. Phys. at St. Bartholomew's. Died
Gustav. Paykull, Sweden. Died
Alexander Ramirez, First Sec. of the Junta of Guatemala. Died
Dr. Francis Blanchet, Quebec. Died
Robert R. Livingston, Chan., New York. Died Feb. 26, 1813, aet. 66.

66o.

Thos. Tickell Hewson, Philadelphia. Resigned January 4, 1839.
Joseph Joaquin de Ferrer, Cadiz. Died
Fran. Peyrolon, Sec. R. S. des. Amig. del Pais, Valencia. Died

William Jones, Math. Inst. Maker, London.

Died

Elected April 17, 1801.
661.
662.

A lected January 15, 1802.
. Thomas Cooper, Northumberland. Died May 11, 1839.
. Jarvis Roebuck, M.D., St. Croix. Died
. William Barnwell, M.D., Philadelphia. Died

William Roxburgh, M.D., Calcutta. Died April 10, 1815, aet. 57.
. Chev. C. Martinez de Yrujo, Minister from Spain.

Died

A:/ected July 16, 1802.
668. Peter Bleeker Olsen, Danish Min. and Consul General.

Died

669. Letombe, late Cons. Gen. from the French Republic. Died
67o. William Stephen Jacobs, M.D., Philadelphia. Died 1844.
671. Philip Rose Roume, Mem. French Nat. Inst. Died
672.

James Mease, M.D., Philadelphia.

Died May 14, 1846, aet. 75.

21
673.
674.
675.
676.

Philip Syng Physick, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Dec. 15, 1837, act. 69.
John Church, M.D., Philadelphia. Died
Chev. Dr. Valentin de Feronda, Consul General, France.

John Garnett, New Brunswick, N. J.

Died

Died May 11, 1820, aet. 69.

Flected January 21, 1803.
677. Robert Hare, Jr., Philadelphia. Died May 15, 1858, aet. 78.
678. Benjamin Thomson, Count Rumford, Great Britain. Died August 21,
1814, aet. 61.

Elected April 15, 1803.
679. Benjamin Dearborn, Boston. Died February 22, 1838, aet. 83.
68o.

Jean B. Jos. Delambre, Sec. Inst. France.

681.

Dan. Melamderhjelm, Prof. of Ast in Sweden. Died January, 1810,

682.

[aet. 84.

Died August 19, 1822.

Eric Prosperin, Professor of Astronomy, at Upsal. Died
683. Francis Nichols, Philadelphia. Died July 7, 1839, aet. 81.

Elected October 21, 1803.
684.

David Ramsay, M.D., Charleston, S. C.

Died May 8, 1815, aet. 65.

685. Capt. Meriwether Lewis, Virginia. Died Oct. 11, 1809, aet. 35.
686. Robert Gilmor, Jr., Baltimore.
Died Nov. 30, 1848, aet. 75.

Elected january 20, 1804.
687. David Humphreys, U. S. Min. at Lisbon.
688.

Died Feb. 21, 1818, aet. 65.
Joshua Gilpin, Philadelphia. Died August 22, 1841, aet. 75.
Plected April 20, 1804.

689.
690.
691.
692.
693.

Sam. Webber, Har. U., Cambridge, Mass. Died July 17, 1810, aet. 51.
Manuel Godoy, Prince of Peace. Died October 7, 1851, aet. 86.
Pedro Cevallos, Prime Minister of State, &c., Spain. Died
Anto. Jos. de Cavanillas, R. Bot. Gar., Madrid. Died
Edward Jenner, M.D., London. Died January 25, 1823, aet. 74.

Flected july 20, 1804.
694.
695.
696.
697.

William Short, Esq., Virginia. Died December 5, 1849, aet. 91.
Baron A. Von Humboldt, Prussia. Died May 7, 1859, aet. 89.
Rev. Jos. Willard, Pres. Harvard Coll. Died Sept. 25, 1804, aet. 64.
Zaccheus Collins, Philadelphia. Died June 12, 1831, aet. 67.

Elected january 18, 1805.
698. John Maclean, Prof. Nat. Phil. in the Coll. N. J. Died Feb. 17, 1814.
699. Edward Miller, M.D., New York. Died March 17, 1812, aet. 51.
700. Rev. John Prince, Salem. Died June 7, 1836, aet. 84.
7oI. Capt. William Jones, Philadelphia.
Died 1831.
702. Charles Smith, Lancaster, Pennsylvania.
Died March 17, 1836.
703. William Hawes, M.D., London.
7O4.

Died

Samuel Moore, M.D., Philadelphia.

Died July 17, 1861, aet. 88.

-

22
Died Sept. 7, 1829, aet. 77.
Died November 25, 1864, aet. 81.

705. F. A. Vanderkemp, Oneida Co., New York.

706. Ben. Silliman, New Haven.

Plected April 19, 1805.
7O 7 .

William Tilghman, Esq.

Died April 30, 1827, aet. 70.

A:/ected 9tely 19, 1805.
708. Bushrod Washington, Esq.

Died November 26, 1829, aet. 70.

Elected January 17, 1806.
709.
7 Io.
711.
712.
713.

M. Destutt Tracy, Assoc. M. of the French Inst. Died March 9, 1836.
Olof Swartz, Prof. Bergian Inst., Sweden. Died Sept. 18, 1817, aet. 57.
Martinus Van Marum, M.D., Haarlem. Died 1838, aet. 87.
Joseph Cloud, Philadelphia. IDied 1845, act. 75.
Rev. Samuel B. Wylie, Philadelphia. Died Oct. 13, 1852, aet. 80.

Elected April 18, 1806.
714. Joseph Sansom, Philadelphia. Died Oct. 2, 1826, aet. 60.
715. Rev. William Dubourg, President of St. Mary's, Baltimore.

Died

A lected October 17, 1806.
Died
Fr. de Borja Garcas Stockler, Lisbon. Died March 6, 1829.
718. Adr. Giles Camper, Anatomist, Franeckes, Friesland. Died
716. Samuel F. Conover, M.D., Philadelphia.

717.

Elected 9anuary 16, 1807.
. Mahlon Dickerson, C. at Law, Phila. Died Oct. 5, 1853, aet. 84.
. Irene Dupont, Wilmington, Del. Died October 31, 1834.

Elected April 17, 1807.
.
:
.
.

Nathaniel Chapman, M.D., Philadelphia. Died July 1, 1853, aet. 74.
John McDowell, Provost of the University of Pennsylvania. Died
Fer. Rud. Hassler, Math. Prof., West Point. Died Nov., 1843, aet. 73.
George Izard, Pennsylvania. Died Nov. 22, 1828.

. John Eric Forstroem, of St. Bartholomew's.

5. James Gibson, Philadelphia.

Died

Died July 8, 1856, aet. 87.

A:/ected October 16, 1807.
. Arch. Bruce, M.D., Prof. Mineral. N. Y. University. Died Feb. 22, 1818.
[aet, 41.
. Ch. Phil. de Lasteyrie, Paris. Died Oct, 1849, aet. 88.

Elected 9anuary 16, 1808.
729.

Ed. Penington, Philadelphia. Died March 16, 1834, aet. 68.

730.

Plected July 15, 1808.
Horace Binney, Philadelphia. Died Aug. 12, 1875, aet. 95.
Rev. William Staughton, Philada. Died Dec. 12, 1829, aet. 59.

731.

23
Elected January 20, 1809.
732. Robert Fulton, New York.
*.*.d."

Died February 24, 1815, aet. 50.
Ross Cuthbert, Lower Canada. Died about 1861.

734.

Joel Barlow, of the District of Columbia. Died Dec. 26, 1812, aet. 54.
Elected April 21, 1809.

735. Silvain Godon, Philadelphia.

Died October 27, 1840, aet. 66.
736. George W. Featherstonhaugh, New York. Died Sept. 18, 1866, aet. 79.
737. David B. Warden, New York.
Died Oct. 9, 1845.
38. Dr. Robert M. Patterson, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 5, 1854, aet. 68.
739. Thomas Moore, Maryland. Died
74O. James Winthrop, Cambridge, Mass. Died Sept. 26, 1821.
74I.

Nathaniel Bowditch, Salem, Mass. Died March 16, 1838, aet. 63.

742.

F. Andre Michaux, Paris.

743.

Elected Suly 20, 1810.
George Gibbes, Boston, late of R. I. Died Aug. 5, 1833, aet. 57.

Died Oct. 23, 1855, aet. 85.

745.

Wm. Johnson, Charleston, S. C., Judge S. Ct. U. S. Died Aug. 4, 1834,
Humphry Davy, London. Died May 29, 1829, aet. 51.
[aet. 63.

746.

David Hosack, M.D., New York. Died Dec. 22, 1835, aet. 66.

744.

John Haighton, M.D., F.R.S., London. Died March 23, 1823.
748. J. H. Brinton, Philadelphia. Died May 7, 1827, aet. 55.

747.

Elected january 18, 1811.
749.
750.
75 I.
752.
753.

John Mason Good, F.R.S., London. Died January 2, 1827, aet. 62.
Rev. William Bentley, Salem, Mass. Died Dec. 29, 1819, aet. 61.
A. Vauquelin, Paris. Died 1829.
John Davis, Secretary of the American Academy, Boston. Died

754.

Jos. Correa de Serra, Sec. R. S., Lisbon. Died September, 1823.

Charles J. Wister, Philadelphia. Died July 23, 1865, aet. 84.
Elected January 17, 1812.

755. Robert Walsh, Jr., Philadelphia. Died February 7, 1859, aet. 76.
756. Benjamin Allen, LL.D., Philadelphia. Died July 20, 1836, aet. 64.

Flected 9 uly 17, 1812,
. Robert Adrain, New Brunswick.

Died August 10, 1843, aet. 68.

Blected April 16, 1813.
758. And. J. Retzius, Prof. Nat. Hist., &c., in U. Lund, Sweden.
759.

Died

Alexander Wilson, Philadelphia, Ornithologist. Died Aug. 28, 1813,
George Pollok, Philadelphia. Died April, 1839.
[aet. 47.

760.
761. Constant Dumeril, Paris.

Died Aug., 1860, aet. 86.
762. Benjamin R. Morgan, Philadelphia. Died Nov. 19, 1840, aet. 75.
763. John Sergeant, Philadelphia. Died November 23, 1852, aet. 73.
764. Nicholas Biddle, Philadelphia. Died February 27, 1844.

24
Elected October 16, 1813.
765. Dr. W. P. C. Barton, Philadelphia. Died Feb. 28, 1856, aet. 69.
766. William Meredith, Esq., Philadelphia. Died Sept. 26, 1844, act. 73.
767. Charles Chauncey, Esq., Philadelphia. Died Aug 30, 1849, aet. 73.
768. Reuben Haines, Philadelphia. Died Oct. 19, 1831, aet. 45.
769. william Hembel, Jr., Philadelphia. Died June 12, 1851, at 88.

Elected 9anuary 21, 1814.
o, John E. Hall, Baltimore. Died June 11, 1829, aet. 45.
771. James Cutbush, Philadelphia. Died December 15, 1823.
. Dr. N. S. Allison, Burlington. Died

73. Rev. Frederick Beasley, Prov. U. Penn. Died Nov. 1, 1845, aet. 78.
Plected April 15, 1814.
774.

Rev. James P. Wilson, Philadelphia.

775.

Gen. Joseph G. Swift, Commandant Milit. Acad. U.S. A. Died July

23, 1865, aet. 82.
776. Thomas Gilpin, Philadelphia.

Resigned Jan. 4, 1828.

Died March 3, 1853, aet. 77.

Elected July 15, 1814.
777.

De Witt Clinton, Pres. N. Y. Phil. Soc. Died Feb. 11, 1828, aet. 59.
Died May 31, 1845, aet. 62.

778. John Gummere, Burlington, N. J.

Elected October 21, 1814.
779.

John G. Biddle, Philadelphia.

Died

. John Syng Dorsey, M.JD. Died November 12, 1818, aet. 35.
Elected April 21, 1815.
781. Dr. Samuel Calhoun.

Died April 7, 1841, aet. 54.
Resigned September 15, 1848.
Joseph Hartshorne, M.D., Phil. Died August 20, 1850, aet. 71.
Joseph Parrish, M.D., Phil. Died March 18, 1840, aet. 60.
Charles J. Ingersoll, Phil. Died May 14, 1862, aet. 79.
Rev. James Gray. Died

782. John M. Scott, Philadelphia.

.
784.

785.
786.

Elected July 21, 1815.
787. Joseph Hopkinson, Philadelphia.
788.

Died January 15, 1842, act. 71.
Charles W. Hare, Philadelphia. Died April 15, 1827, aet. 49.

789. Joseph P. Norris, Philadelphia.

Died June 22, 1841, aet. 78.

A/ected january 19, 1816.
790,
791.

Gerhard Troost, M.D., Maryland. Died August 14, 1850.
Joseph Reed, Philadelphia. Died March 4, 1846, aet. 73.

2.5
A lected October 18, 1816.
Rev. Abiel Holmes, Cambridge, Mass. Died June 4, 1857, at. 73.
Isaiah Thomas, Pres. Antiq. Soc., Worcester, Mass., Died April 4,
1831, aet. 82.
794. Carlo Botta, Historian. Died August 10, 1837.
795. Jared Mansfield, Prof. N. Ph., West Point, N. Y. Died Feb. 3, 1830,
792.

793.

aet. 7 I.

Elected January 17, 1817.
William Meade, M.D.

Resigned February 20, 1824.

796.
Ch. Alex. Lesueur, Paris. Died December 12, 1846, aet. 68.
798. J. C. Delametrie, Paris. Died
797.

799. J. P. F. Deleuze.

Died

-

Soo.

John C. Otto, M.D., Philadelphia. Died June 26, 1844, act. 70.

80 I.

Richard Rush, Philadelphia.

802.

Ed. Troughton, F.R.S., London.

Died July, 1859.

Elected April 18, 1817.
Died June 12, 1835.

Elected july 18, 1817.
8o3. J. Peter Frank, M.D., Counsellor of State, &c., Vienna. Died
804. Jos. Baron de Sonnenfels, Counsellor of State, &c., Vienna. Died
805. Jos. Von Hammer, Vienna. Died
806. William Gaston, Esq., North Carolina. Died January 23, 1844.
807. Charles Fenton Mercer, Virginia. Died May 4, 1858, aet. 80.

Plected October 17, 1817.
808.

Rev. Joh. Severin Vater, Königsberg. Died Mar. 17, 1826, aet. 55.
809. Eugenius Nulty, of the Univ. of Penn., Philadelphia. Died July, 1871,
81o. Thomas Say, Philadelphia.
Died Oct. 10, 1834, aet. 46.
[aet. 83.
81 I. George Ord, Naturalist, Philadelphia.
Died Feb. 24, 1866, aet. 85.
812. Thomas Nuttall, Botanist, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 10, 1859, aet 7o.
813. Rev. Lewis Schweinitz, North Carolina. Died February 8, 1834.
814. Rev. H. Steinhauer, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Died

Elected january 16, 1818.
815. Von Friedrich Adelung, St. Petersburg.

Died

Elected April 17, 1818.
816.

John Quincy Adams, Sec. of State of the U. S. Died Feb. 23, 1848.
817. M. Noel de la Moriniere, France. Died 1822.
818. Josiah Meigs, Commiss. of the Land Office U. S. Died Sept. 4, 1822.
819. James G. Thomson, Prof. Lang. University Penn. Died June 18, 1847,
aet. 7o.
82O.

821.

Parker Cleveland, Prof. Ch., &c., Bowdoin College. Died Oct. 15,
1858, aet. 78.
John C. Warren, M.D., Prof., Cambridge, Mass. Died May 4, 1856,
act. 78.

26
2.
23.
824.
825.
826.

James Jackson, M.D., Prof., Cambridge, Mass. Died Aug., 1867, aet. 90.
Nicholas Fuss, Perp. Sec. Imp. Acad., St. Petersburg. Died
Gotthelf Fischer, Imp. Ac., St. Petersburg. Died Oct. 18, 1853, aet. 83.
Daniel Drake, M.D., Cincinnati. Died November 5, 1852, aet. 67.
Jacob Bigelow, M.D., Rumford Professor, Cambridge, Mass. Died
Jan. Io, 1879, aet. 92.

Elected January 15, 1819.
827. John Murray, Edinburgh. Died July 22, 1820.
828.
829.
830.
831.
832.

Lewis Matthieu Langles. Died January, 1824, aet. 61.
Roberts Vaux. Died January 7, 1836, act. 49.
L. H. Girardin, St. Mary's College, Baltimore. Died
H. M. D. de Blainville, Paris. Died May, 1850, aet. 73.
John Eberle, M.D. Died February 2, 1838, act. 54.

Elected April 16, 1819.
833. Guill. Theophile Tilesius, Mem. Acad. St. Petersburg. Died 1832?
834. Count Lanjuinais.

Died January 13, 1821.

835. Stephen Elliot, South Carolina. Died March 28, 1830, æt. 58.
Elected june 18, 1819.
836. Jacob Perkins, Philadelphia. Died July 30, 1849, aet. 83.
837. A. G. Demarest, Prof. Nat. Hist., &c., Paris.
838. P. A. Latreille, Paris. Died 1833.

Died

Elected October 15, 1819.

839. Alexander Brongniart, Paris. Died Oct. 14, 1837, act. 76.
840. Redmond Conyngham, Nescopec, Pa. Died June 16, 1846, aet. 64.
841. Rev. Fred. Chr. Schaeffer, New York.

Died

842. William P. Dewees, M.D., Philada. Died May 18, 1841, act. 74.
843. William E. Horner, M.D., Philada. Died March 13, 1853, act. 60.
844. J. A. Albers, M.D., Bremen. Died
Elected january 21, 1820.
Died

845. Baron Hormayer, Vienna.

Elected April 21, 1820.
846. William Marsden, England. Died October 6, 1836, act. 81.
847. Franklin Bache, M.D, Philadelphia. Died March 19, 1864, act. 72.
848. William Gibson, M.D., Prof. of Surgery, University of Penn., Philadelphia. "
Died March 2, 1868, aet. 82.
JE/ec/ed October 20, 1820.

*49. Rev. Samuel F. Jarvis, N.Y. Died March 26, 1851, at 65.
859. Isaiah Lukens, Philadelphia. Died November 12, 1846, aet. 69.
'5". John Jacob Berzelius, Prof. Chem., Stockholm. Died Aug. 7, 1848,
[act. 09.
852. J. A. Borgnis, Engineer, &c., Paris.

27
853.
854.
855.
856.

Matthew Lesseps, Consul of France at Philadelphia. Died
M. de Montgery, Officer of the French Navy.
William Strickland, Architect, Philadelphia. Died April 6, 1854, aet. 65.
John Pickering, Esq., Salem, Mass. Died March 17, 1846.

Elected January 19, 1821.
857. Langdon Cheves, Pres. Bunk U.S. Died June 25, 1857, aet. 81.
858. Levett Harris, Esq., Philadelphia. Died September, 1839.
859. Judge John Bannister Gibson. Died May 3, 1853, aet. 73.

Elected April 20, 1821.
86o.
86 I.

George Alexander Otis, Boston. Died June 23, 1863, aet. 81.
Clement C. Biddle, Philadelphia. Died August 20, 1855, aet. 70.

862. Elisha De Butts. M. D., Baltimore.

Died

863. James Workman, New Orleans. Died
864. Prof. Peter Afzelius, Sweden. Died 1841, aet. 81.
865. Sir James Wylie, St. Petersburg. Died 1853, aet. 85.

Elected july 20, 1821.
866.

Gustavus Count Wetterstedt, Sweden. Died 1837, aet. 61.
867. Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Died September 16, 1839, aet. 79.

Elected January 18, 1822.
868.

Baron Wm. Von Humboldt, Berlin. Died April 8, 1835, aet. 74.
869. Peter Poletica, Minister of Russia to the U. S. Died
870. P. Pedersen, Minister of Denmark to the U.S. Died Aug. 16, 1851, aet.
871. Samuel Parkes, Chemist, London. Died Dec. 23, 1823, aet. 66, [80 °
872. Solomon W. Conrad, Philadelphia. Died October 2, 1831.

Elected April 19, 1822.
873. Richard Harlan, M.D., Philadelphia. Died September 30, 1843.
874. Zacharias Nordmark, Prof. of Mathematics in the Univ. Upsal. Died
875. Jons Svanberg, Prof. Math. Univ. Upsal. Died Jan. 15, 1851, aet. 79.
Elected October 18, 1822.
876.
877.
878.
879.
88o.

Jose Bonifacio de Andrada e Silva, Sec. of State, Brazil. Died
Gottlob Ernst Schultze, Prof. of Philosophy, Univ. Gött. Died 1834 P
Condy Raguet, Con. U. S. at Brazil. Died March 22, 1842, aet. 58.
Wm. H. Keating, Prof. Min. and Chem. Univ. Pa, Philadelphia. Died
May 17, 1840.
Lardner Vanuxem, Prof. Min. C. Coll. of S. C. Died Jan. 25, 1848,
aet. 56.

E/ected 9anuary 17, 1823.
881.

Rev. John Plitt, Philadelphia. Died August 11, 1824, aet. 61.
882. Baron Coquebert de Montbret, Member Inst. France. Died
883. Gaspard Deabbate, Consul General of Sardinia to U. S. Died
884. Samuel Jackson, M.D., Prof. Pharm. and Mat. Med. Coll. Pharm.,

Philadelphia.

Died April 4, 1872, aet. 85.

28
Elected April 18, 1823.
885. Benjamin H. Coates, M.D., Philadelphia.
James Fenimore Cooper, N. Y. Died Sept. 14, 1851, aet. 62.

886.

887.

Dr. Jason O'Brien Lawrance, Phila. Died Aug. 19. 1823, aet. 32.
Lucien, Prince of Canino, Rome. Died July 29, 1840, aet. 66.
889. Joseph, Count de Survilliers, Philadelphia. Died July 28, 1844.
888.

890.
891.
892.
893.

Paul de Lovenorn, Rear Admiral in the Danish Service.

Died 1826.

Prof. H. C. Schumacher, Copenhagen. Died Dec. 28, 1850, aet. 71.
William Darlington, M.D., Pennsylvania. Died April 23, 1863, aet. 81.
Rev. Will. Bengo Collyer, London.

Died

Elected july 18, 1823.
894. William Lawrence, M.D., F.R.S., London.

895.
896.
897.
898.

Died July 5, 1867.

Elected October 17, 1823.
Major Stephen Harriman Long, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 4, 1864, aet. 80.
Wm. James Macneven, M.D., New York. Died July 12, 1841, act. 78.
Major Nathaniel A. Ware, Philadelphia. Died
Chevalier John W. Duponceau, France. Died July 9, 1835.

Elected january 16, 1824.
899. Rev. Moses Stuart, Andover, Mass. Died Jan. 4, 1852, aet. 71.
900. Henry Seybert, Philadelphia.
901. Julius Klaproth, Paris. Died
902. Joseph B. McKean, Philadelphia. Died
903. IDr. Alex. Pearson, Phys. of the British Factory at Canton. Died

Elected April 16, 1824.
904.

A. J. Von Krusenstern, Capt. in the Russian Navy. Died 1846, aet. 76.

905.

Charles Bonaparte, Prince of Musignano, Phila.

Died July 29, 1857,
[act. 54.

Elected july 16, 1824.
906. Conrad J. Temminck, Paris. Died January 30, 1858, aet. So,
907. Severin Lorich, Chargé and Cons. Gen. Swed. and Nor.
Died March
-

[11, 1837.

Elected 9anuary 21, 1825.
908. Count Nicholas de Romanzoff. Died
Count John Laval, Russia. Died May 1, 1846, aet. 87.

909.

9Io.

John J. Bigsby, M.D., England.

9II.

M. Flourens, M.D., Paris. Died Dec. 1867, aet. 72.

912.

Count Real, France.

913.

Thomas Cadwalader, Philadelphia. Died Oct. 25, 1841, aet. 60.

9I4.

John K. Kane, Philadelphia. Died February 21, 1858, at. 63.

Elected April 15, 1825.
Died 1834?

29
915.

John D. Godman, M.D., Philadelphia. Died April 17, 1830, aet. 31.
Died Feb. 16, 1867, aet. 91.
Edward Livingston, New Orleans. Died May 23, 1836, aet. 71.

916. Charles N. Bancker, Philadelphia.
917.

Elected 9tely 15, 1825.
. Jose da Silva Lisboa, Rio Janeiro. Died
919. Joseph R. Ingersoll, Philadelphia. Died Feb. 20, 1868, aet. 82.

Elected October 21, 1825.
. Count Miot de Melito, of the Nat. Inst. of France. Died Jan. 15, 1841.
. Philip Tidyman. M.D., Germantown, Pa. Died June 11, 1850, aet. 73.

Elected January 20, 1826.
922.
923.
924.

Samuel Humphreys, Philadelphia. Died August 16, 1846, aet. 68.
Pablo de la Llave, Minister of Justice, Mexico. Died 1833.
Dr. John Lewis Tiarks, Jever, East Friesland. Died May 1, 1837.

Elected April 21, 1826.
Charles D. Meigs, M.D., Philadelphia. Died June 28, 1869, aet. 77.
926. William McIlvaine, Philadelphia. Died August 9, 1854, aet. 68.
927. Jacopo Graeberg di Hemso, Sweden. Died 1848.
925.

Elected October 20, 1826.
928. Henry de Struve, Coun. of State, Russia. Died Jan. 9, 1851, aet. 80.
929. Gen. Lewis Cass, Governor of the U. S. Territory of Michigan. Died
June 17, 1866, aet. So.
930. William Shaler, Consul General of the U. S. at Algiers.
Died
Elected
93 I.
932.
933.

january 19, 1827.

Honore Torombert, Lyons, France. Died 1829.
Joel R. Poinsett, Charleston, S. C. Died Dec. 12, 1851, aet. 73.
Rene La Roche, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Dec. 9, 1872, aet. 77.

Elected April 20, 1827.
.
.
5.
.
.
.

John Price Wetherill, Philadelphia. Died July 24, 1853, aet. 59.
George Emlen, Philadelphia. Died August 27, 1850, aet. 66.
Charles Tait, Alabama. Died October 7, 1835, aet. 67.
Marcus Bull, Philadelphia. Died
John Wilhelm Dalman, M.D., Stockholm, Sweden. Died
Dr. George Maria Zecchinelli, Padua, Italy. Died 1847.

Elected july 20, 1827.
940.
94I.
942.
943.

J. P. C. Cassado de Giraldes, Lisbon.
James Rush, M.D., Philadelphia. Resigned August 17, 1827.

John K. Mitchell, M.D., Philadelphia Died April 4, 1858, aet. 65.
James Brown, Min. Plen. of the U.S. at Paris. Died April 7, 1835,
[act. 68.

30

944.

Elected October 19, 1827.
Noah Webster, New Haven, Ct. Died May 28, 1843, aet. 85.
Elected January 18, 1828.
Died
Died

945. Jose Maria Bustamente, Mexico.

946. Jose Maria Salazar, Colombia.
947.

948.
950.

Thomas Harris, M.D.. Philadelphia. Died March 3, 1861, aet. 68.
Robert E. Griffith, Jr., M.D., Phila. Died June 27, 1850, aet. 53.
Charles Pickering, M.D., Philadelphia. Resigned Sept. 15, 1837.
Samuel G. Morton, M.D., Philadelphia. Died May 15, 1851, aet. 52.
Elected April 18, 1828.
Admiral Jose M. Dantes Pereira, Sec. Math. Cl. R. So., Lisbon.
Henry J. Anderson, M.D., Prof. Math. Columbia College, N. Y.
Isaac Lea, Philadelphia.

Died

Elected july 18, 1828.
. Samuel Betton, M.D., Germantown. Died June 9, 1850, aet. 65.
. George Ticknor, Boston.

Died Jan. 26, 1871, aet. So.

Elected October 17, 1828.
James Renwick, Columbia Col., N. Y. Died Jan. 12, 1863, aet. 70.
Elected January 16, 1829.
957.

958.
959.

960.
961.
962.

Thomas Biddle, Philadelphia. Died June 3, 1857, aet. 81.
Rev. William H. De Lancey, Philada. Died April 3, 1865, aet. 68.
Hans Christian Oersted, Copenhagen. Died March 9, 1851, aet. 74.
Baron Hyde de Neufville, France.
Prof. Carls Christian Rafn, Copenhagen. Died Oct. 20, 1864.
Henry Wheaton, N.Y., Chargé d'Aff at Copenhagen. Died March 11,
1848, aet. 63.

Elected April 17, 1829.
963. Alexander Dallas Bache, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
Died Feb. 17, 1867, aet. 6o.
964. Philip H. Nicklin, Philadelphia. Died March 2, 1842, aet. 55.
965. James Kent, New York. Died December 12, 1847, aet. 85.
966. Josiah Quincy, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Died July 1,
[1864, aet. 92.
967. Washington Irving. Died Nov. 28, 1859, aet. 76.
968. Joseph Roberts, Philadelphia. Died Aug. 25, 1835, aet. 42.

Elected July 17, 1829.
969. Prof. R. K. Rask, Copenhagen.

Died Nov. 14, 1832, aet. 45.

971.

Joseph N. B. V. Abrahamson, Copenhagen. Died Jan. 6, 1849.
George B. Wood, M.D., Philadelphia. Died March 30, 1879, aet. 82.

972.

Chevalier Charles Pougens, Paris.

970.

Elected October 16, 1829.
Died Dec. 19, 1833, aet. 77.

973. Francisco de Paula Quadrada, Madrid.

31
974 .

M. Jomard, Paris. Died Sept. 23, 1862, aet. 85.
Henry S. Tanner, Philadelphia. Died
976. Daniel B. Smith, Philadelphia.
977. Thomas Horsfield, M.D.. Penna.
Died 1859.
975.

Plected January 15, 1830.
978. Bishop Muenter, Copenhagen. Died
979. J. P. Abel Remusat, Paris. Died
98o. William Yarrel, London. Died August 31, 1856, aet. 72.
981. Chief Justice John Marshall. Died July 6, 1835, aet. 79.
982. Jules de Vallenstein, Russia. Died 1845.
983. Thomas McEuen, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Feb. 27, 1873, aet. 73.

Elected April 16, 1830.
984. Duke Bernard, Saxe Weimar. Died 1862, aet. 70.
985. William B. Hodgson, Virginia. Died 1866. (?)
986. Isaac Hays, M.D., Philadelphia. Died April 11, 1879, aet. 82.
987. Jonathan Sewell, Chief Justice of Lower Canada. Died
988. William Vaughan, London. Died May 5, 1850, aet. 98.

Elected july 16, 1830.
. Thomas I. Wharton, Philadelphia.

Died April 7, 1856, aet. 65.

Elected October 15, 1830.
990.
991.
992.

Lorenzo Martini, Turin. Died 1845.
Andres del Rio, Professor of Mineralogy, Mexico.
Marc Antoine Jullien, Paris. Died 1848, aet. 73.

Elected January 21, 1831.
Prosper, Count Balbo, Turin. Died March 14, 1837.
994. Hyacinth Carena, Turin.
Died Nov. 2, 1857.
995. Louis Philippe, King of the French.
Died Aug. 26, 1850, aet. 76.
996. Thomas P. Jones, M.D., Wash., D. C. Died March 11, 1848, aet. 75.
993.

997.

Elected April 15, 1831.
Henry Vethake, Professor of Natural Philosophy, Princeton, N. J. Died

Dec. 16, 1866, aet. 76.
998. Samuel L. Southard, New Jersey. Died June 26, 1842, act. 56.
999. Edward Everett, Massachusetts. Died Jan. 15, 1865, aet. 70.
IOCO.
Louis McLane, Delaware. Died Oct. 7, 1857, aet. 72.
IOOl. William C. Rives, Virginia.
Died April 25, 1868, aet. 75.
IOO2. Alexander Everett, Massachusetts.
Died June 29, 1847.

A lected 7uly 15, 1831.
Ioo3.
IOO4.
Io95.

Martin Fernandez Navarrete, Madrid. Died Oct. 8, 1846.
Francisco Antonio Gonzales, Madrid. Died Oct. 22, 1833, aet. 6o.
John James Audubon. Died Jan. 7, 1851. aet. 69.

32
Elected October 21, 1831.
1006.

Hartman Bache, Major of U.S. Topog, Engineers. Died Oct. 8, 1872,

1007.

Baron Larrey, Paris.

1008.
Ioog.

Plected January 20, 1832.
Dr. Julius T. Ducatel, Baltimore. Died April 23, 1849, aet. 53.
Henry D. Gilpin, Philadelphia. Died Jan. 29, 1860, aet. 58.

tet. 74.

Died July 24, 1842, aet. 76.

Died March 6, 1836, aet. 35.

IOIO.

John P. Hopkinson, M.D., Philadelphia.

IOI I.

John Bell, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Aug. 19, 1872.

IOI 2.

Robley Dunglison, M.D., Philadelphia. Died April 1, 1869, aet. 71.
M. Steen Bille. Died Nov. 28, 1860, aet. 79.
Thomas Sergeant, Philadelphia. Died May 16, 1860, aet. 78.

IoI3.
IoI4.

Elected April 20, 1832.

IoI9.

Theodore Lorin, Paris.
Hugh L. Hodge, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Feb. 26, 1873, aet. 77.
Col. J. J. Abert, Washington, D.C. Died Jan. 27, 1863, aet. 75.
Juan Jose Martinez, Spain.
The Duke of Sussex. Died April 21, 1843, aet. 70.

IO2O.

E. S. Bring, Prof. Univ. of Lund, Sweden.

IoI5.
IoI6.
IoI7.
Iol 8.

Elected july 20, 1832.
Died in 1866.

Elected 9anuary 18, 1833.
. Professor Bujalsky, St. Petersburg. Died
IO22. Marmaduke Burrough, M.D., Philadelphia.
IO2.I

Io23 .

Died 1844, aet. 46.

Matthias W. Baldwin, Philadelphia. Died Sep. 7, 1866, aet. 70.
Died 1863 (?)

Io24.

Edwin James, M.D., Albany.

1025.

Moncure Robinson, Virginia. (Present address Philadelphia.)

Io26.

M. J. Labouderie, Paris.

1027.
Io28.

IO31.

Charles Nagy, Pesth, Hungary. Died 1849.
Jacob Randolph, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Feb. 29, 1848, aet. 52.
Joshua Francis Fisher, Philadelphia. Died Jan. 21, 1873, aet. 65.
Gouverneur Emerson, M.D., Philadelphia. Died July 2, 1874, aet. 78.
Henry C. Carey, Philadelphia. Died Oct. 13, 1879, aet. 85.

Io92.

Elected July 19, 1833.
Henry R. Schoolcraft. Died Dec. 11, 1864, aet. 72.

IoS3.

Viscount Santarem, Portugal.

Elected April 19, 1833.

Io29.
IO30.

Io.34. Titian R. Peale, Philadelphia.

Blected October 18, 1833.
1035. Franklin Peale, Philadelphia. Died May 5, 1870, aet. 74.
Io96. Samuel V. Merrick, Philadelphia. Died Aug. 18, 1870, aet.
1037.

Henry J. Williams, Philadelphia.

70.

Died March 12, 1879, aet. 87.

-------"-

-

-

-

33
Elected January 2, 1835.
1038.
Io.39 .
IO4o.
IO41 .
IO42 .

Henry D. Rogers, Philadelphia. Died May 28, 1866, aet. 56.
James P. Espy, Philadelphia. Died Jan. 26, 1860, aet. 75.
Edward H. Courtenay, Prof. Math. Univ. Penn. Died Dec. 20, 1853.
Charles W. Short, M.D., Lexington, Ky. Died March 7, 1863, aet. 68.
John Brockenbrough, Richmond, Va. Died July 3, 1852, aet. 84.

Io.43

John Wickham, Richmond, Va. Died January 22, 1839.

IO44.

John Torrey, M.D., Prof. Chem. Coll. Phys, and Surg. N. Y.
March 16, 1873, aet. 75.

IO45

Died

-

Joseph Henry, Prof. Nat. Phil. in the College of Princeton, N. J. (later

Washington, D.C.) Died May 13, 1878, aet. 81.
IO46. D. Francis Condie, M.D., Philadelphia. Resigned Jan. 6, 1871.
1047. Col. William Drayton, late of S. Carolina. Resigned Feb. 6, 1840.

Elected July 17, 1835.
Io.18. William B. Rogers, Prof. of N. Phil., William and Mary College, Va.
(Present address, Boston, Mass.)
IO49 . Thomas Sully, Philadelphia. Died Dec. 6, 1872, aet. 89.
IOSO . Charles A. Agardh, Lund. Died Jan. 28, 1858, aet. 74.

Elected January 15, 1836.
Ios I . C. C. Von Leonhard, Heidelberg.
IO52 .
IoS3.

IoS4.
Io55.

1056.
Ioš7.

Died Jan. 23, 1862, act. 83.
C. G. C. Reinwardt, Leyden. Died.
Manuel Naxera, Mexico. Died
Chevalier Morelli, Consul General of Naples.
Job R. Tyson, Philadelphia. Died June 27, 1858.
Nathan Dunn, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 15, 1844.
Prof. John Griscom, now of Philadelphia. Died Feb. 26, 1852, aet. 77.

Elected April 15, 1836.
IoS8. J. L. Da Costa Macedo, Secretary of the Academy, Lisbon.
IO59. Nicholas Carlisle, London. Died 1848.
1060. Granville Penn, Esq., Stoke Park, Eng.
Died Sept. 28, 1844.

Elected October 21, 1836.
I of 1.

Col. Joseph G. Totten, U. S. Engineers. I)ied 1864.
Io62. M. Roux de Rochelle, Paris. Died June, 1849.
Ioô3. Dr. Mariano Galvez, Governor of Guatemala.
Ioô4. Edward Turner, M.D., F.R.S., London. Died Feb. 12, 1837, aet. 40.

Elected April 21, 1837.
1065. George Campbell, Philadelphia. Died June 11, 1855, aet. 73.
John Green Crosse, Esq., Surgeon, Norwich, Eng. Died June 9, 1850.
1067. Jared Sparks, Esq., Boston. Died March, 14, 1866, aet. 76.
Io68. Charles R. Leslie, Esq., London. Died May 5, 1859.

io96.

34
1069. James Cowles Prichard, M.D., F.R.S., Bris., Eng. Died Dec. 22, 1848,
107o.

Thomas L. Winthrop, Boston.

IoT 1.

George Tucker, Univ. of Virginia.

Died Feb. 21, 1841.

[aet. 62.

Died April 10, 1861, aet. 85.

Elected 9taly 21, 1837.
1072.

Rev. William Jenks, D.D., Boston.

1073.

Klected October 20, 1837.
Sears C. Walker, Philadelphia. Died January 30, 1853, aet. 48.

Died Nov. 13, 1866, aet. 87.

Joseph Saxton, Philadelphia. Died Oct. 26, 1873.
William Morris Meredith. Philadelphia. Died Aug. 21, 1873, aet. 74.
Io?6. Thomas Dunlap, Philadelphia. Died July 11, 1864, aet. 72.
Io?7. Daniel Webster, Massachusetts. Died October 24, 1852, et. 71.
IOT4.
Io?5.

Elected January 19, 1838.
Io?8. Capt. Andrew Talcott, late of the U. S. Engineers.
Io?"). Thomas W. Griffith, Baltimore. Died
IoSo. Charles G. B. Daubeny, M.D., of the

University of Oxford.
Dec. 13, 1867, aet. 72.
Henry Reed, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 27, 1854, aet. 46.
William Norris, Philadelphia. Died Jan. 5, 1867, aet. 64.

Io81.
IoS2.

IoS3. William Sullivan, Boston.

Died

Died

Elected April 20, 1838.
1084. William Harris, M.D., Philadelphia.
Io85. Robert Treat Paine, Boston.

Died March 3, 1861, aet. 68.

John P. Emmet, M.D., Univ. of Virginia. Died Aug. 13, 1842, aet. 46.

IoS6.

1087. Hugh S. Legare, Charleston, S. C.

Died June, 1843.

Samuel Breck, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 1, 1862, act. 91.

IoS8.

1089. Sylvanus Thayer, U.S. Engineers. Died Sep. 7th, 1872, aet. 87.
1090. Rev. Francis Wayland, Brown Univ. R. I. Died Sept. 30, 1865, aet. 69.
109 I. Henry Baldwin, Pennsylvania.
Died April 21, 1844.
Io92.

william H. Prescott, Boston. Died Jan. 1859, St. 62.

Io93.

James Prinsep, Calcutta.

Io94.

John Edwards Holbrook, M.D., Charleston, S. C. Died Sept. 8, 1871.

Io95.

John C. Cresson, Philadelphia.

Elected 9anuary 18, 1839.
Died
Died Jan. 26, 1876, aet. 70.

Io96. James C. Booth, Philadelphia.
Io97.

Edward Coles, Philadelphia. Died July 7, 1868, aet. 81.
Died Aug. 26, 1865, aet. 74.
A. Quetelet, Brussels. Died Feb. 17, 1874, aet. 78.

Io98. J. F. Encke, Berlin.
Io99.

Elected April 18, 1839.
I IOO.
1 1 O i.

Rev. Humphrey Lloyd, Dublin.

. James K. Paulding, Sec. Navy.

Died April 4, 1860, æt. 81.

35
1 IO2.

IIoS.
I 104.
I IOS.

Rev. John Ludlow, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 8, 1857, aet. 64.
Benjamin W. Richards, Philadelphia. Died July 13, 1851, aet. 53.
Rev. George W. Bethune, Philadelphia. Died April 28, 1862, act. 57.
George M. Justice, Philadelphia. Died April 14, 1862, aet. 70.

Z/ected July 19, 1839.
1106.
1107.

T. Romeyn Beck, M.D., Albany. Died Nov. 19, 1855, act. 63.
Richard C. Taylor, Philadelphia. Died Oct. 26, 1851, aet. 62.

Elected October 18, 1839.
IIo8.
IIo9.
II IO.
i i II.
i II 2.

III.3.
III.4.

Thomas U. Walter, Philadelphia.
John Penington, Philadelphia. Died March 18, 1869, aet. 67.
Eugene A. Vail, Paris. Died 1842-3.
Charles Ruemker, Hamburg. Died Dec. 21, 1862, aet. 74.
John Washington, Royal Navy. Died 1864, aet. 62.
Rev. Charles Gutzlaff, Macao. Died Aug. 9, 1851, aet. 48.
Elias Loomis, Western Reserve College, Ohio. (Present address, New

Haven, Conn.)
III.5. Stephen Alexander, Princeton, N. J.

A:/ected January 17, 1840.
II 16.
1 117.
II 18.
IIIQ.
II 20.
II 21.

i i 22.

1123.
II 24.
I 125.
I 126.

Judah Dobson, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 26, 1850.
John Forbes, M.D., Chichester. Died Nov. 13, 1861, aet. 74.
Michael Faraday, London. Died Aug. 25, 1867, aet. 78.
Rev. C. R. Demme, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 1861, aet. 74.
John J. Vanderkemp, Philadelphia. Died Dec. 4, 1855, aet. 72.
Rev. Philip Milledoler, New Jersey. Died Sept. 22, 1852, act. 77.
Pedro de Angelis, Buenos Ayres.
Isaac Wayne, Pennsylvania. Died Oct. 25, 1852, aet. 83.
Samuel D. Ingham, Pennsylvania. Died June 5, 1860, aet. 80.
George M. Dallas, Philadelphia. Died Dec. 31, 1864, aet. 72.
Martin H. Boye, Philadelphia. (Present address, Saucon Valley, Pa.)

A/ected April 17, 1840.
1127.
I 128.
I 129.

Hartman Kuhn, Philadelphia. Died Nov. 6, 1860, aet. 76.
F. W. Bessel, Königsberg. Died March 17, 1846.
William R. Fisher, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Oct. 26, 1842, aet. 34.

1130.
I 131.
II32.
II.33.
II34.
II 35.

Capt. Francis Beaufort, London. Died Dec. 17, 1857, aet. 84.
Paul B. Goddard, M.D., Philadelphia. Died July 5, 1866, aet. 57.
W. H. C. Bartlett, West Point. (Present address, Yonkers, N.Y.)
George M. Wharton, Philadelphia. Resigned Nov. 29, 1859.
George Washington Smith, Philadelphia. Dead.

Elected 9tely 17, 1840.
1136. Robert Were Fox, Falmouth, England. Died July 25,
Died April 5, 1844.
I 137. John Sanderson, Philadelphia.

1877, aet. 88.

36
1138. Francisco Martinez de la Rosa, Madrid.

Died 1862, aet. 73.

II 39.

James D. Graham, U.S. Topographical Engineers. Died Dec. 29, 1865.

I 140.

J. B. B. Eyries, Paris.

I 141.
i 142.

Charles Bonnycastle, Univ. of Va. Died Oct. 31, 1840.
Francois P. G. Guizot, France. Died Sept. 12, 1874, aet. 86.

I 143.

Chev. Bernardo Quaranta, Naples.

Died 1846, aet. 79.

A lected October 16, 1840.

Elected January 15, 1841.
I 144. David Irvin, Wisconsin.

Adolph C. P. Callisen, Copenhagen. Died
Died Aug. 9, 1858, aet. 71.
1147. Rev. Benjamin Dorr, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 18, 1869, aet. 73.
1148. John L. Stephens, New York. Died Oct. 12, 1852, aet. 47.
I I49. Tobias Wagner, Philadelphia. Died Feb. 19, 1868, aet. 75.
I 145.

1146. William Rawle, Philadelphia.

Elected April 16, 1841.
1150. Gen. Sir Edward Sabine, London.
I 15 I.
1152.
II.5.3.
I I54.

Isaac R. Jackson, Philadelphia. Died July 27, 1842, aet. 37.
Rev. Roswell Park, Philadelphia. Died July 16, 1869, aet. 62.
Robert Christison, M.D., Edinburgh.
Edward Hitchcock, Massachusetts. Died Feb. 27, 1864, aet. 70.

1155. william Peter, British Consul at Philadelphia. Died Feb. 6, 1853.
1156. A. P. de Candolle, Geneva.

I 157.

Died Sept. 9, 1841.

Elected July 16, 1841.
George Bancroft, Boston. (Present address, Washington, D.C.)
Elected 9anuary 21, 1842.

1158. Alexis de Tocqueville, Paris. Died
Baron de Roenne, Prussia. Died April 1865, aet. 67.
1160. John F. Frazer, Philadelphia. Resigned Dec. 30, 1858.
1161. E. Otis Kendall, Philadelphia.

II 59.

I 162.

Charles Lyell, London.

Died Feb. 23, 1875.

1163. J. N. Nicollet, Washington. Died Sept. 11, 1843.
1164. Baron de la Doucette, Paris. Died 1848, aet. 76.
1165. E. W. Brayley, London. Died Feb. 1, 1870, aet. 69.

Elected April 15, 1842.
1166.

Stephen Endlicher, Vienna. Died 1849.
D. Humphrey Storer, M.D., Boston.

1167.
i 168 . Simeon Borden, Boston.

Elected 9 uly 15, 1842.
1169 . Petty Vaughan, London. Died July 30, 1854, aet. 66.
117o. Frederick Fraley, Philadelphia.

37
Plected October 21, 1842.
1171.
I 172.
I 173.

Rev. George Peacock, Cambridge, England. Died
J. I. Clark Hare, Philadelphia. Resigned Nov. 27, 1876.
Benjamin Peirce, Harvard University.

Elected January 20, 1843.
Leopold II., Grand Duke of Tuscany. Died
1175. Louis Agassiz, Neufchatel. Died Dec. 14, 1873, aet. 64.
1176. William W. Gerhard, M.D., Philadelphia. Died
II74.

1177. William Reid, Governor of Bermuda.

Died

1178. Thomas P. Cope, Philadelphia. Died Nov. 22, 1854, aet. 87.
1179. John Lenthall, Philadelphia. (Present address, Washington, D.C.)
I 180. Solomon W. Roberts, Philadelphia.
1181. Ellwood Morris, Philadelphia.
Died April 2, 1872, aet. 59 (?)
I 182. Charles Ellett, Jr., Philadelphia.
Died June 11, 1862.
1183. Charles B. Trego, Philadelphia, . Died Nov. 1874, act. 80.
1184.

Cavaliere Mustoxidi, Corfu.

Died July 29, 1860.

A/ected April 21, 1843.
1185. Charles Wilkes, U. S. Navy. Died Feb. 8, 1877, aet. 76.
I 186. Charles McEuen, Philadelphia. Died Nov. 18, 1857, aet. 56.

Elected july 21, 1843.
1187. William H. Dillingham, Philadelphia. Died Dec. 11, 1854, aet. 65.
1 i 88. Count Cancrine, St. Petersburg.
Died Sept. 22, 1845, aet. 70.
1189. Stanislas Julien, Paris.
I 190. John Downes, Philadelphia. (Present address, Washington, D.C.)

A lected January 19, 1844.
Theodore Strong, New York. Died 1871. 4
I IQ2. Alfred Elwyn, Philadelphia.
I 193. Robert Bridges, M.D., Philadelphia.
1 IQ4. John W. Draper, M.D., New York.
I 195. William A. Norton, Delaware College. (Present address, New Haven,
Conn.)
1196. J. W. Francis, M.D., New York. Died Feb. 8, 1861, aet. 71.
I 191.

1197. W. C. Redfield, New York.

Died

1198. T. G. Mower, M.D., U. S. A. Died Dec. 7, 1852, aet. 62.
I I99. John Locke, M.D., Cincinnati. Died July 10, 1856, aet. 64.
I2O.O. Rev. Alonzo Potter, New York.
Died June 4, 1865, aet. 65.
12O i. Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice of the U. S.
Died Oct. 12, 1864, act. 87.
I2O2. Joseph Story, Mass. (Supreme Court U.S.)
Died Sept. 10, 1845, aet. 65.
Died
1203. Benjamin F. Butler, New York.
i2O4. Jacob R. Eckfeldt, Philadelphia. Died Aug. 1872.
1205. William Ewing Du Bois, Philadelphia.
12O6. John C. Trautwine, Philadelphia.
1207. John S. Hart, Philadelphia. Died March, 1877.

*
e.

}S

Elected April 19, 1844.
1208.

Samuel S. Haldeman, Lancaster Co., Pa.

1209.
12 IO.

George W. Norris, M.D., Philadelphia. Died March 4, 1875.
Joseph Carson, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Dec. 30, 1876, aet. 68.

121 1,

Elected January 17, 1845.
ick
Beck, M.D., Philadelphia. Died
Charles Freder
Richard Owen, London.

1212.

Sir James Clark, Bart., M.D., London. Died 1870, et. 82.
Prince Maximilian, Wied, Germany. Died Feb. 3. 1867, aet. 84.
James Copland, M.D., London. Died July 14, 1870, æt. 77.

1213.
1214.
1215.
1216.

William Tell Poussin, Paris.

J. A. Alexander, Princeton, N.J. Died Jan. 28, 1860, aet. 50.
Frederick Von Raumer, Berlin. Died June 14, 1873, aet. 92.

1217.
1218.

Elected April 18, 1845.
Edward Miller, Philadelphia.

1219.

Died Feb. 1, 1872, aet. 61.

Plected October 17, 1845.
1221.

William B. Carpenter, M.D., London.
Sir William Jardine, Bart., Scotland. Died 1876?

I 222.

Richard Lepsius, Berlin.

1220.

Elected January 16, 1846.
,
3 . Henry Holland M.D., London. Died Oct. 28, 1873, aet. 85.

::

Johannes Mueller, Berlin. Died
. James Buchanan, Lancaster. Died Jan., 1868, act. 75.

4.

Elected April 17, 1846.
. Lewis Waln, Philadelphia.

| :.

7.

1228.

Died Dec. 20, 1863.

James B. Rogers, M.D., Philadelphia. Died June 15, 1852, aet. 50.
Elected October 16, 1846.
Richard S. McCulloh, Philadelphia. (Present address Lexington, Va.)

1229. Ceva Grimaldi, Marquis of Pietracatella, Naples.

Elected April 16, 1847.
A. T. Kupffer, St. Petersburg. Died June 4, 1865, aet. 65.

1230.
1231. U.J. Leverrier, Paris. Died Sept. 23, 1877, aet. 66.
1232. John Y. Mason, Virginia. Died Oct. 3, 1859.

1233. Richard A. Tilghman, Philadelphia.
1234. William Proctor, Jr., Philadelphia. Died Feb. 10, 1874.

Elected January 21, 1848.
5. John F. James, Philadelphia. Died Feb. 5, 1871, aet. 69.
*39. Robert Baird, D.D., New York.

Died

39
I
I

:

37 .
8.

J. Melville Gilliss, Washington. Died Feb. 19, 1865, act. 55 to 60.
J. C. Adams, Cambridge, England.
9 . Asa Gray, Cambridge, Mass.
4O . Gustav Adolph Jahn, Leipsic. Died 1862.

::

Elected April 21, 1848.
I 241.
I 242.
1243.

Simon Greenleaf, Harvard University. Died October, 1853.
William Kent, New York. Died Jan. 4, 1861.

I.244. William L. Storrs, Connecticut.
1245.

1246.
1247.

1248.
1249.

1250.
1251.

1252.
1253.
1254.

1255.

1256.

Died

Joel Jones, Girard Coll., Philada. Died Feb. 2, 1860, act. 54.
John Reed, Dickinson College. Died January 19, 1850, aet. 64.
Alexander H. Stephens, M.D., New York. Died
Harmar Denny, Pittsburgh, Penn. Died Jan. 29, 1852, act. 58.
Ralph J. Ingersoll, New Haven, Connecticut.
John N. Conyngham, Luzerne Co., Penna. Died March, 1871.
Charles Picot, Philadelphia. Died June 26, 1852, aet. 6o.
E. Geddings, M.D., Charlestown, South Carolina.
Calderon de la Barca, Washington. Died May 31, 1861, act. 70.
F. A. Pouchet, M.D., Rouen, France. Died Dec. 6, 1872, at. 74.
Miers Fisher Longstreth, Philadelphia. (Present address Darby, Pa.)
Samuel F. B. Morse, New York. Died April 3, 1872, act. 81.

P:/ected january 19, 1849.
E. N. Horsford, Cambridge, Mass.
1258. George P. Marsh, Vermont.
I257.

Elected October 19, 1849.
John Goodsir, Edinburgh. Died March, 1867, aet. 52.
John Hughes Bennett, M.D., Edinburgh. Died
1261. Francis Kiernan, London. Died Dec. 31, 1874.
1262. A. A. Gould, M.D., Boston, Mass. Died Sept. 17, 1866, act. 57.
1263. Joseph Leidy, M.D., Philadelphia.
1264. W. S. W. Ruschenberger, M.D., U.S. Navy, Philadelphia.
I259.
1260.

*

Elected January 17, 1851.
1265. Stephen Colwell, Philadelphia. Died Jan. 15, 1871, aet. 70.
1266. John H. Towne, Philadelphia. Died April 6, 1875, at Paris.
1267. Charles M. Wetherill, M.D., Philadelphia. Died March, 1871.
1268. Joel B. Reynolds, Philadelphia.
Died May 16, 1851, act. 25.
1269. Thomas S. Kirkbride, M.D., Philadelphia.
1270. Lucas Alaman, Mexico.
Died June 2, 1853.
1271. Benjamin Apthorp Gould, Jr., Cambridge, Mass. (Present address
Cordova, Argentine Republic, S. America.)
1272. George M. Totten, Philadelphia.
1273. Joseph W. Farnum, M.D., New York.

40
Elected April 18, 1851.
I 274.
I275.

1276.
1277.

1278.
1279.
1280.
1281.
1282.

1283.
1284.

1285.

Rev. Henry A. Boardman. Resigned November 30, 1859.
Thomas D. Muetter, M.D., Philadelphia. Died March 16, 1859.
Caspar Morris, M.D., Philadelphia. Resigned Dec. 21, 1860.
William Pepper, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Oct. 15, 1864, aet. 54.
Isaac Hazlehurst, Philadelphia. Resigned July 15, 1859.
Peter McCall, Philadelphia.
Joseph Pancoast, M.D., Philadelphia.
Jacob G. Morris, Philadelphia. Died Sept. 27, 1854, aet. 54.
Robert Patterson, Philadelphia.
Francesco Cav. Zantedeschi, Padua. Died March 30, 1873, aet. 76.
Daniel Kirkwood, Pottsville. (Present address Bloomington, Ind.)
William Chauvenet, Annapolis. Died Dec. 13, 1870.

Elected October 17, 1851.
1286.

George Sharswood, Philadelphia.
1287. John Le Conte, New York. Died Nov. 21, 1860, aet. 77.
1288. Edward Hallowell, M.D., Philadelphia.
Died Feb. 20, 1860, aet. 51.
1289. Elisha K. Kane, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Feb. 16, 1857, act. 37.
1290. James Dundas, Philadelphia.
Died July 4, 1865, aet. So.
1291. Isaac R. Davis, Philadelphia. Died February 4, 1857, aet. 48.

P/ected 9anuary 16, 1852.
Francis Gurney Smith, M.D., Philadelphia. Resigned Dec. 15, 1876.
I293. John Forsyth Meigs, M.D., Philadelphia.
1294. Edward King, Philadelphia.
Died May 8, 1873, aet. 79.
I295. George N. Eckert, M.D., Philadelphia. Died
1296. Charles Henry Davis, U.S. Navy. Died Feb. 1877.
1297. J. W. Bailey, West Point. Died Feb. 26, 1857.
1298. Michel Chevalier, Paris. Died Nov. 28, 1879, aet. 74.
I299. Alfred Stille, Philadelphia.
I292.

Elected May 7, 1852.

I 303.

John Neill, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Feb. 12, 1880, aet. 60.
John J. Reese, M.D., Philadelphia. Resigned Aug. 1861.
J. S. Hubbard, National Observatory, Washington. Died 1863.
W. C. Bond, Cambridge, Mass. Died Jan. 1859.

I3O4.

Thomas B. Wilson, M.D., Philadelphia. Died March 15, 1865, aet. 58.

1300.
I3OI.
I 3O2.

I305. John Cassin, Philadelphia.

Died Jan. 10, 1869, aet. 55.
1306. John H. Alexander, Baltimore. Died March 2, 1867, aet. 54.

Elected Movember 5, 1852.
1307.

M. F. Maury, U.S. Navy.

Expelled March 21, 1862.

A/ected 9anuary 21, 1853.
1308.
ISO9.

. L. Crelle, Berlin. Died 1856.
. F. Gauss, Göttingen. Died Feb. 23, 1855, act. 77.

41
1310.

B. Augustin Cauchy, Paris.

Died May 23, 1857, act. 67.

I3 II. J. Liouville, Paris.

Dr. J. G. Fluegel, U.S. Consul at Leipsic. Died
O. M. Mitchell, Cincinnati. Died Oct. 1862, aet. 52.
I314. Robert M. Bird, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Jan. 23, 1854, aet. 48.
1315. John L. Le Conte, M.D., Philadelphia.
1316. Edward E. Law, Philadelphia. Resigned Sept. 16, 1864.
1317. W. F. Lynch, U.S. Navy.
Expelled March 21, 1862.
1318. John P. Kennedy, Secretary of the Navy. Died
I319. Alfred Mordecai, U.S. Army. (Present address Philadelphia.)
I312.

I313.

Elected April 15, 1853.
. Thomas L. Patterson,

. Henry Grinnell, New York. Died
. John B. Biddle, M.D., Philadelphia.

Died Jan. 19, 1879, aet. 66.

Elected 7uly 15, 1853.
. Marshall Hall, M.D., London and Edinburgh. Died Aug. 11, 1857, aet. 68.

Elected October 21, 1853.
Dr. Alexander Fischer Von Waldheim, Moscow. Died ?
I325. Dr. Basile Sakharoff, St. Petersburg.
Dead.
1326. Dr. Peter Strelkowsky, St. Petersburg. Dead.
I327. Dr. Charles Dworjak, St. Petersburg. Dead.
1328. Fred. Geo. Wm. de Struve, St. Petersburg. Died Nov. 1864, aet. 71.
I 329. Charles D. Arfwedson, Stockholm.

I 324.

Elected January 20, 1854.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Edward Stanley, London. Died May 24, 1862, aet. 69.
Sir James Paget, London.
Sir J. F. W. Herschel, London. Died May 12, 1871, aet. 80.
E. Brown-Sequard, M.D., Paris.
John H. B. Latrobe, Baltimore.
Montgomery C. Meigs, U. S. Army, Washington.
Benjamin Hallowell, Alexandria, Virginia. Dead.
George Harding, Philadelphia.
Francis West, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Sept. 24, 1868, act. 58.

. Frederick Augustus Genth, Philadelphia.
. George A. McCall, Philadelphia. Died Feb. 1868.
. Samuel M. Felton, Philadelphia.

. Samuel D. Gross, M.D., Louisville, Kentucky.
Philadelphia.)
Charles Renard, M.D., Moscow.
. C. A. Dohrn, M.D.,
Stettin.
*

. Rev. William Bacon Stevens, Philadelphia.

(Present address,

42
Elected April 21, 1854.
1346. Benjamin Gerhard, Philadelphia. Died June 18, 1864.
347 .

Elias Durand, Philadelphia.

Died Aug. 14, 1873, act. 79.

1348

William V. Keating, M.D., Philadelphia.

I 349 .

Joshua J. Cohen, M.D., Baltimore. Died Nov. 4, 1870, æt. 70.
Lord Mahon, England. Died.
James Lenox, New York. Died Feb. 19, 18So.
Eli K. Price, Philadelphia.
Constant Guillou, Philadelphia. Died

I 350.
I 351.
I 352.
1353.

A/ected 9tely 21, 1854.
. James D. Dana, New Haven.

. Oliver Wolcott Gibbs, M.D., New York.
bridge, Mass.)
. James Hall, Albany, New York.

(Present address Cam

Elected October 20, 1854.
57. William Parker Foulke, Philadelphia.

Died June 29, 1865, aet. 50.

Z/ec/ed 9anuary 19, 1855.
1358. Spencer F. Baird, Washington, D.C.
I 359.

C. Fr. Ph. von Martius, Munich. Died Dec. 13, 1868.

1360. William Haidinger, Vienna.

1361. Victor Regnault, Paris.

Died May 19, 1871.
Died Jan. 21, 1878, act. 68.

A/ected April 20, 1855.
1362. Samuel Powell, Newport, Rhode Island.
1363. Elisha J. Lewis, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Feb. 10, 1877.
1364. Rev. E. P. Rogers, Philadelphia.

Plected 7uly 20, 1855.
. Robert E. Rogers, M.D., Philadelphia.

A:/ected October 19, 1855.
. Rev. Albert Barnes, Philadelphia.

Died Dec. 24, 1870, æt. 72.

Blected 9anuary 18, 1856.
1367. Henry Coppee, Philadelphia. (Present address Bethlehem, Pa.)
1368. George Allen, Philadelphia. Died May, 1876.
1369. Strickland Kneass, Philadelphia.
1370. Henry William Field, London.
I 37 I. John P. Brown, Constantinople.
Died
I 372. George Augustus Matile, Philadelphia.
(Present address Washing
ton, D.C.)
I373. Thomas L. Kane, Philadelphia.
(Present address Kane, McKeau
Co., Pa.)
1374. William B. Reed, Philadelphia. Resigned Nov., 1866.

43
. Clement A. Finley, U.S. Army, Philadelphia.
. Albert S. Letchworth, Philadelphia.

Died Sept., 1879.
-

Elected April 18, 1856.
. Theodore Lacordaire, Liège. Died June, 1871.
. Dr. Hermann Burmeister, Halle.
Amer.)

(Present address Buenos Ayres, S.
-

. Samuel L. Hollingsworth, M.D., Philadelphia.

Died Dec. 14, 1872,

aet. 57.

. Christian Olrik, Denmark.

Died

Elected july 18, 1856.
1381.

1382.
1383.
1384.

Rev. John C. Adamson, Philadelphia.
Peter Lesley, Philadelphia.
Rev. John Leyburn, Philadelphia.
Hugh Blair Grigsby, Virginia.

Elected October 17, 1856.
1385. Robert P. Harris, M.D., Philadelphia.

Plected January 16, 1857.
1386.
1387.
1388.
I 389.
I390.

Thomas Forest Betton, M.D., Germantown. Died May 21, 1875, aet. 65.
Theodore Cuyler, Philadelphia. Died Ap. 5, 1876, aet. 54.
Thomas Potts James, Philadelphia. (Present address Cambridge, Mass.)
Nathaniel P. Shurtleff, M.D., Boston. Died Oct. 17, 1874, aet. 65.
Fairman Rogers, Philadelphia.

Elected April 17, 1857.
I 391.
I 392.
I393.
1394.

B. Howard Rand, M.D., Philadelphia.
Charles M. Cresson, M.D., Philadelphia.
Rev. Kingston Goddard, Philadelphia. Died Oct. 24, 1875, aet. 57.

1395. J. Lawrence Smith, M.D., Louisville.

Elected july 17, 1857.
1396. E. Spencer Miller, Philadelphia.

Died March 6, 1879, act. 61.

Elected October 16, 1857.
. Andrew A. Humphreys, U. S. Topographical Engineers.
address, Washington, D.C.)

(Present

Plected 9anuary 15, 1858.
1398. Elia Lombardini, Civil Engineer, Milan, Italy.
I399. Henry C. Wayne, U. S. Army.

1400.

Died Dec. 21, 1878.

Elected April 16, 1858.
W. H. Allen, President of Girard College, Philadelphia.

44
Elected October 15, 1858.
1401.

William M. Uhler, M.D., Philadelphia. Died Nov. 27, 1865, aet. 45.
14O2. Charles E. Smith, Philadelphia. Resigned Dec. 15, 1876.
1403. Edward Hartshorne, M.D., Philadelphia.

Elected January 21, 1859.
I4O4.

Oswald Thompson, Philadelphia.

Died Jan. 25, 1866, aet. 57.

I405. Edmund C. Evans, M.D., Chester County, Pennsylvania.
1406. Caspar Wister, M.D., Philadelphia.

Elected April 15, 1859.
Walter H. Lowrie, Judge of Supreme Court of Pennsylvania.
delphia. Died Nov. 14, 1876, aet. 69.
1408. William S. Vaux, Philadelphia.
I 409. Wm. R. Palmer, U. S. Topog. Eng. Died 1862.
I407.

Phila

Elected 9 uly 15, 1859.
1410.

Samuel H. Dickson, M.D., Prof. Med. Jeff Coll., Phila.
31, 1872, aet. 72.

Died March

-

Elected October 21, 1859.
I4 II.
I412.

Henry Carleton, Philadelphia. Died March 21, 1863, aet. 76.
William A. Hammond, M.D., U.S. Army. (Present address N. Y.
City.)

Elected January 20, 1860.
1413.

P. Angelo Secchi, Professor of Astronomy at Rome.
1878, act. 59.
Aubrey H. Smith, Philadelphia.
Francis W. Lewis, M.D., Philadelphia.

Died Feb. 26,

-

1414.
I415.

Elected July 20, 1860.
1416. Francis Vandeveer Hayden, M.D., Washington.
Philadelphia.)
1417.

1418.

(Present address

Sidney George Fisher, Philadelphia. Died July 25, 1871, aet. 63.
Sir Roderick I. Murchison, London. Died Oct. 22, 1871, act. 79.

1419.

Rev. Adam Sedgewick, England.

I42O.

Leonce Elie de Beaumont, Paris. Died Sept. 24, 1874, act. 75.

Died Jan. 28, 1873, aet. 88.

Henry Milne Edwards, Paris.
Henry D. Bronn, of Heidelberg. Died July 5, 1862, aet. 62.
I423. Dr. Theodore L. W. Bischoff, München.
I424. Hermann Von Meyer, Frankfort am Main. Died
1425. Andreas Wagner, München.
1426. Joseph Hyrtl, Vienna.
142 I.

1422.

I427.

Sir William E. Logan, Montreal.

Died June 28, 1875, aet. 77.

1428. Heinrich Rose, Berlin. Died Jan. 27, 1864, aet. 68.

45
I429.
I430.

George Jaeger, Stuttgardt. Died Sept. 10, 1866, aet. 80.
Henri St. Claire Deville, Paris.

I431.

William H. Harvey, Dublin. Died May 15, 1866, act. 56.

I432.

Jean Baptiste Dumas, Paris.
Edouard de Verneuil, Paris. Died ?
Claude Bernard, Paris. Died Feb. 10, 1878, aet. 65.

1433.
1434.

Elected january 18, 1861.
I435. Rev. Daniel R. Goodwin, Provost Univ. Penna., Philadelphia.

1436. Leo Lesquereux, Columbus, Ohio.

1437.

Elected April 19, 1861.
John Lothrop Motley, Minister U.S. at Vienna. Died May 29, 1877,

aet. 63.
I438. Pasqual de Guyangos, Madrid.
I439. John Curwen, M.D., Harrisburg.
I44O. Charles Des Moulins, Bordeaux. Died Dec. 23, 1875.
I44 I. Thomas Sterry Hunt, Montreal.
Elected October 18, 1861.
I442.

Paolo Volpicelli, Rome.

Died Ap. 14, 1879.

Elected january 17, 1862.
Mirza Alexander Kasem Beg, St. Petersburg. Died
I444. Otto Boehtlingk, St. Petersburg.
1445. G. Forchhammer, Copenhagen. Died Dec. 14, 1865, act. 71.
1446. J. S. Steenstrup, Copenhagen.
1447. C. J. Thomsen, Director R. Mus., Copenhagen. Died May 21, 1865,

I443.

aet. 76.
1448. Andrew C. Ramsay, London.
I449. Edouard Desor, Neufchâtel. Switz.
I450.

Louis G. De Koninck, Liège.

Belgium.

I45I. Joachim Barrande, Prague.

Robert W. Bunsen, Heidelberg.
August William Hofmann, London. (Present address Berlin, Germ.)
1454. Heinrich R. Goeppert, Breslau.
I455. Alexander Braun, Leipsig, Died March 29, 1877, act. 72.
1456. William J. Hamilton, London. Died Feb. 1871.

I452.
I453.

I457.

Sir William J. Hooker, London. Died Aug. 1865, act. 80.

1458. J. I. Kaup, Darmstadt. Died
1459. J. A. Froude, Oxford.
1460. Hermann Lebert, M.D., Breslau. Died
1461. S. Wier Mitchell, M.D., Philadelphia.

1462.

Elected April 18, 1862
Frederic Louis Otto Roehrig, M.D., Philadelphia. (Present address
Ithaca, N.Y.)

46
1463. Henry L. Abbot, U.S. T. E. (Present address Whitestone P.O., N.Y.)
1464.
I465.
1466.
1467.
1468.

Oswald Heer, Zurich.

I47 I.

William S. Sullivant, Columbus, Ohio. Died April 30 (?), 1873, act. 70.

John Lindley, London. Died Nov. 1, 1865, aet. 66.
Justus Von Liebig, Munich. Died Ap. 18, 1873, act. 70.
Dr. Frederick Woehler, Göttingen.
John. Wm. Dawson, Montreal.
1469. Samuel F. Dupont, U.S. Navy. Died June 23, 1865, aet. 63.
I470. Dr. George Engelman, Prof. N. H., St. Louis.

Elected October 17, 1862.
1472.

Evan Pugh, Pres. Agri. Coll. Penna. Died April, 1864.

I473.

Andrew A. Henderson, M.D., U. S. N.
Robert Cornelius, Philadelphia.
Rudolf Virchow, Berlin.

I474.
I475.

Died Ap., 1875.

1476. Fred. T. Frerichs, Berlin.
I477. Thomas Jefferson Lee (U. S. T. E.), Maryland.
Washington, D. C.)
1478. Louis Stromeyer, Hanover. Died July 15, 1876.
I479. Karl Rokitansky, Vienna. Died July 23, 1878.
1480. Henry Winsor, Philadelphia.

(Present address

Flected January 16, 1863.
1481. James Y. Simpson, Edinburgh. Died 1870.
1482. Theodore Schwann, Liège. Died

1483. Jacob Grimm, Berlin. Died 1863.
1484. Franz Bopp, Berlin. Died Oct. 23, 1867, aet. 76.
1485. Ernest Renan, Paris.
1486. Max Müller, Cambridge. (Present address Oxford, Eng.)
1487. Josiah Dwight Whitney, Geologist, California. (Present address Cam
bridge, Mass.)
-

1488. Andrew H. Worthen, Geologist,
1489. Daniel Wilson, Toronto, C. w.

Warsaw, Ill.

Frederick Troyon, Lausanne. Died Oct. 30, 1866, aet. 52.
M. Boucher des Perthes, Abbeville. Died Aug. 3, 1868, aet. 80.
I492. Pliny E. Chase, Philadelphia. (Present address Haverford College, Pa.)
I493. I. I. Hayes, M.D., Philadelphia. (Present address New York.)
1494. George Smith, M.D., Delaware Co., Pa.
1495. John M. Read, Philadelphia.
Died Nov. 29, 1874, aet. 77.
1496. Edward Jarvis, M.D., Dorchester, Mass.

I490.

I49 I.

-

Elected April 17, 1863.
I497.

J. E. Hilgard, Ass. U. S. C. Sur., Washington.

1498. Charles Anthony Schott, Ass. U. S. C. Sur., Washington.
I499.
I 500.

Thomas E. Blackwell, Montreal. Died 1863.
Benjamin W. Richardson, M.D., London.

47
. Rev. Thomas Hill, Pres. Harvard Coll., Cambridge. (Present address,
Portland, Me.)
1502. William Dwight Whitney, Prof. Yale Coll., New Haven.

Chester Dewey, Prof. Rochester University, N.Y.

1503.

Died Dec. 13, 1869,

aet. 82.

Rev. William Henry Green, Prof. Theo. Sem., Princeton, N. J.
James Pollock, Director U. S. Mint, Philadelphia.

I504.
1505.

1506. Rev. E. A. Washburne, Philadelphia. (Present address New York.)
James McClune, Prof. Ast., C. High School, Philadelphia.
1508. Rev. Calvin Pease, Rochester. Died Sept. 17, 1863.

1507.

Elected July 17, 1863.
1509. John Biddle, Philadelphia.
1510. Henry Hartshorne, M.D., Philadelphia. (Present address Germantown,
Philada.)
Died 1863 *
15 II. David F. Eschricht, M.D., Copenhagen.
I512. C. G. N. David, M.D., Copenhagen.
1513. Frederick Keller, M.D., Zurich.
I514. Peter W. Sheafer, Geologist, Pottsville, Pa.
1515. A. Delesse, Prof. Ecole des Mines, Paris.
1516. A. Daubree, Prof. Acad. of Strasburg.
Died Jan. 18, 1865, act. 51.
1517. R. M. S. Jackson, M.D., Cresson, Pa.
1518. R. A. F. Penrose, M.D., Philadelphia.

Blected October 16, 1863.
. Robert Briggs, Philadelphia.
. Joseph Lesley, Philadelphia.

Plected 9anuary 15, 1864.
. A. Morlot, Prof. of Acad., Lausanne. Died Feb. 10, 1867, act. 46.
. Thomas Chase, Prof. Nat. Hist., Haverford College, Pa.

Elected April 15, 1864.
Benjamin V. Marsh, Philadelphia.
James T. Hodge, Geologist, New York. Died Oct. 22, 1871.
I525. George Kirchoff, Prof. Univ., Heidelberg. (Present address Berlin.)
1526. Francis J. Pictet, Prof. Acad. of Geneva. Died March 15, 1872, aet. 62.
1527. Benjamin Studer, Prof. Univ., Berne.
1528. Alphonse Count de Gasparin, Paris. Died June, 1871.

I523.

I524.

-

I529. Peter Tunner, Prof. School of Mines, Leoben.
1530.
I531.
1532.
I533.
I534.

A. Thury, Geneva.
A. Tholuck, Prof. Theol. Halle an der Saale. Died June 10, 1877, aet. 79.
Carl Schinz, M.D., Strasburg.
William Sellers, Philadelphia.
R. S. Smith, Pres. Girard College, Philadelphia. Died Jan. 23, 1877,

act. 63.
. Alexander Wilcocks, M.D.,

-

Philadelphia.

48
Elected july 15, 1864.
. Joseph Harrison, Philadelphia.

Died March 27, 1874, aet. 64.

. John Foster Kirke, Boston, Mass. (Present address Germantown,
Philadelphia.)

. Geo. H. Cooke, Prof. Geology, N. Brunswick, N. J.
Plected October 21, 1864.
. Rev. Thomas Conrad Porter, Prof. of Theology, Lancaster, Pa.
(Present address Easton, Pa.)
I540. John Bost, Pasteur à Laforce, près de Bergerac, France.
I54I. Rev. Charles P. Krauth, Philadelphia.
I542.

* Elected January 20, 1865.
I543. L'Abbé Ovide Brunet, Quebec, Canada.
I 544.

Goldwin Smith, Toronto, Canada.

I545. Alexander Winchell, Syracuse, N. Y.

1546. William E. Whitman, Philadelphia. Died July 30, 1875, aet. 73.
I547. George J. Brush, New Haven, Conn.

Elected April 21, 1865.
1548.
I549.

Samuel Foster Haven, Worcester, Mass.

1550.

Charles D. Cleveland, Philadelphia. Died Aug. 18, 1869, aet. 67.

James B. Francis, Lowell, Mass.
George C. Shaeffer, Washington, D.C. Died Oct. 4, 1873, aet. 59.
1553. Timothy A. Conrad, Philadelphia. Died Aug. 8, 1877, aet. 74.
I55I.

1552.

Elected january 19, 1866.
Thomas S. Blair, Pittsburg, Pa.
I555. Edward D. Cope, M.D., Philadelphia.
1556. Horatio C. Wood, M.D., Philadelphia.
I557. George Davidson, San Francisco.
1558. Charles Hale, Roxbury, Mass.
I559. Wm. Strong, Washington, D.C.
I554.

Elected April 20, 1866.
1560.
1561.
1562.
1563.

Pliny Earle, M.D., Northampton, Mass.
Owen Jones Wister, M.D., Philadelphia.
Thomas Davidson, Brighton, England.
Fridolin Sandberger, Würtsburg, Bavaria.

Elected October 19, 1866.
1564. Wm. P. Schimper, Strasburg, Germany. Died March 29, 1880, at 72.
1565. Rev. Robert J. Breckenridge, Danville, Ky. Died Dec. 26, 1871,
aet. 71.

-

-

*See note at end of list.

49
1566. Jeffries Wyman, M.D., Cambridge, Mass.
1567. Jacob M. DaCosta, M.D., Philadelphia.

Died Sept. 4, 1874, aet. 6o.

Elected January 18, 1867.
1568. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Concord, Mass.
1569. Charles Sumner, Washington. Died March 12, 1874, aet. 65.
1570. John Cadwalader, Philadelphia.
Died Jan. 16, 1879, aet. 73.
1571. Harrison Allen, M.D., Philadelphia.
1572. Andrew Mason, New York City.
1573. George F. Dunning, Brooklyn, N. Y.
I574. B. F. Shumard, M.D., St. Louis. Died
I575. J. S. Newberry, M.D., New York City.
1576. Rev. M. B. Anderson, Rochester, N. Y.
1577. Henry Morton, Hoboken, N. J.
1578. J. H. Packard, M.D., Philadelphia.
I 579. Charles J. Stillé, Philadelphia.
1580. John F. Frazer, Philadelphia. Died Oct. 12, 1872, aet. 60.
1581. Rev. Henry Stafford Osborn, Oxford, Ohio.

Elected April 19, 1867.
1582. Hubert Anson Newton, New Haven, Conn.
1583.
1584.
1585.
1586.

F. B. Meek, Washington, D.C. Died Dec. 21, 1877, aet. 59.
Arnold Guyot, Princeton, N. J.
Gen. Wm. F. Raynolds, U.S.A., Philadelphia.
Morton McMichael, Philadelphia. Died Jan. 6, 1879, act. 71.

Elected july 19, 1867.
1587. Theodore Nicholas Gill, Washington, D.C.
1588. Nathaniel B. Brown, Philadelphia. Died March 13, 1875, aet. 55.
1589. John Welsh, Philadelphia.
1590. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren, U. S. Eng., Newport, R. I.
I59 I. John Meredith Read, Athens, Greece.

Elected October 18, 1867.
I592. J. Sergeant Price, Philadelphia.
I593. Ario Pardee, Hazleton, Penn.
I 594.

John Stuart Mill, London.

Died May 8, 1873, aet. 67.

I595. Henry Charles Lea, Philadelphia.

Elected january 17, 1868.
1596. Samuel J. Gummere, Haverford College, Pa. Died Oct. 22, 1874, aet. 63.
I597. Joseph B. Townsend, Philadelphia.
1598. Edward Shippen, Philadelphia.
1599. Frederick Graeff, Philadelphia.
-

50
Elected April 17, 1868.
16oo.

Edward Rhoads, M.D., Philadelphia.

1601.

Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, Washington.

1602.

John Tyndall, London, England.

Died Jan. 15, 1871, aet. 29.

Elected October 16, 1868.
1603. Charles E. Anthon, New York City.
1604. O. C. Marsh, New Haven, Conn.
1605. Traill Green, M.D., Easton, Pa.
1606. William Marriatt Canby, Wilmington, Del.

-

Elected january 15, 1869.
1607. George H. Horn, M.D., Philadelphia.
1608. William M. Gabb, Philadelphia. Died May 30, 1878, aet. 39.
1609. T. Hakakian Bey, Cairo, Egypt. Died
16Io. Linant Pasha, Cairo, Egypt.
16II.

Auguste Mariette Bey, Cairo, Egypt.

1612. Dr. Ceselli, Rome.

1613. Vicomte Emmanuel De Rougé, Paris, France.
1614. Henri Brugsh, Cairo, Egypt.
1615. Dr. Johannes Dümichen, Strasburgh, Germany.
1616. M. F. Chabas, Chalons sur Saone, France.
1617. Samuel Birch, London, England.
1618. Edouard Lartét, Paris. Died 1871.
1619. Joseph Prestwich, F.R.S., London, England. (Present address Oxford.)
162o. Dr. Carl L. Rütimeyer, Basel, Switzerland.
1621. Wm. Henry Flower, M.D., London, England.
1622. George Rolleston, M.D., Oxford, England.
1623' Thomas W. Huxley, London, England.
1624. Joseph D. Hooker, M.D., London, England.
1625. John Phillips, Oxford, England. Died April 21, 1874, aet. 73.
1626. J. J. A. Warsaae, Copenhagen, Denmark.
1627. Sven Nillson, Lund, Sweden.
1628. Auguste Carlier, Paris, France.
1629. Benjamin Smith Lyman, Yedo, Japan.
1630. Henry Carey Baird, Philadelphia.
1631. Samuel J. Reeves, Philadelphia. Resigned April, 1876.
1632. General Hector Tyndale, U.S.A., Philadelphia. Died March 19, 1880.
1633. Joshua B. Lippincott, Philadelphia.
1634. Horace Binney, Jr., Philadelphia. Died Feb. 3, 1879, aet. 61.
1635. William Blackmore, Salisbury, England.

Elected April 16, 1869.
1636.
1637.
1638.
1639,

Daniel G. Brinton, M.D., Philadelphia.
Andrew D. White, Ithaca, N. Y.

John Huntingdon Crain Coffin, Washington, D.C.
Joseph Wharton, Philadelphia.

51
Elected October 15, 1869.
1640. Miss Maria Mitchell, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.

1641. Mrs. Mary Summerville, England. Died 1873.
1642. Mrs. Elizabeth C. Agassiz, Cambridge, Mass.
1643. Charles Darwin, Beckenham, Kent, England.
1644. George Rawlinson, Oxford, England.
1645. Louis Gruner, Paris, France.
1646. Carl Vogt, Geneva, Switzerland.
1647. Carl T. E. Von Siebold, Munich, Germany.
1648.

Carl F. Naumann, Leipsig, Germany. Died 1873 (?).

1649.
1650.
1651.
1652.
1653.
1654.
1655.

Franz Von Hochstetter, M.D., Vienna.

1656.
1657.
1658.
1659.

Oswald Seidensticker, Philadelphia.
Wm. M. Tilghman, Philadelphia.
Rev. Edward Everett Hale, Roxbury, Mass.
John Greenleaf Whittier, Amesbury, Mass.
Mrs. Emma Seiler, Philadelphia.

Georg Von Frauenfeld, Vienna. Died 1879 (?)
Philip T. Tyson, Baltimore, Md.
Edward Hopper, Philadelphia.
Charles Bullock, Philadelphia.

Alfred M. Mayer, South Bethlehem, Pa. (Present address Hoboken, N.J.)
Rev. George Washington Anderson, West Haverford, Pa.

Elected 9anuary 21, 1870.

1660.

Elected April 15, 1870.
1661.

Robert Stockton Williamson, U. S. Eng. Corp. San Francisco.
J. D. Cox, Washington, D.C.
1663. Charles H. Hitchcock, New York City.
1664. Edmund Quincy, Dedham, Mass. Died May 17, 1877.
1662.

Elected july 15, 1870.
1665. Dr. C. W. Boekh, Christiania, Norway. Died 1875.
1666. William Pepper. Philadelphia.
1667. Rev. E. R. Beadle, Philadelphia. Died January 6, 1879, aet. 66.
Elected October 21, 1870.
1668.

1669.
1670.
1671.
1672.

Henry F. Q. D'Aligny, New York. Died
William P. Blake, New Haven, Conn.
George L. Vose, Salem, Mass.
J. Imbrie Miller, Pennsylvania. Resigned June, 1878.
Eckley B. Coxe, Philadelphia.

Elected January 20, 1871.
1673. Esquirou de Parieu, France.
1674. W.T. Roepper, Bethlehem, Pa.

Died March 10, 1880, aet. 70.

52
1675.
1676.
1677.
1678.

Rev. W. C. Cattell, Easton, Pa.

Henry M. Phillips, Philadelphia.

Thomas Meehan, Germantown (Phila).
Gen. Geo. G. Meade, U.S.A., Philadelphia. Died November 7, 1872,
aet. 59 (?)
1679. Lieut. Clarence E. Dutton, U.S.A., Frankford (Phila).
16So.

Edward Goodfellow, Philadelphia. (Present address Washington, D.C.)
Elected April 21, 1871.

1681.

Gen. Hermann Haupt, Philadelphia.
E. B. Andrews, Marietta College, Ohio.
1683. Rev. F. A. P. Barnard, New York City.
1684. Rev. T. B. Woolsey, New Haven, Conn.
1685. Rev. James McCosh, Princeton, N.J.
1686. Charles W. Eliot, Cambridge, Mass.
1682.

Elected july 21, 1871.
1687. Cleveland Abbe, Washington, D. C.
1688. Benj. Chew Tilghman, U.S.A., Philadelphia.

Elected January 19, 1872.
1689.
1690.
1691.
1692.
1693.
1694.
1695.
1696.
1697.
1698.

Wm. C. Kerr, Raleigh, N. C.
LaMotte Dupont, Wilmington, Delaware.
Wm. P. Trowbridge, New Haven, Conn.
Wm. Elder, M.D., Philadelphia.
Francis Bowyer Miller, Melbourne, Australia.
Guillaume Lambert, Louvain, Belgium.
Persifor Frazer, Jr., Philadelphia.
George W. Hough, Albany, N. Y.

Wm. A. Stokes, Philadelphia. Died May (?), 1877.
Edwin J. Houston, Philadelphia.

Elected April 19, 1872.
1699. Jean Baptiste Léon Say, Paris, France.
1700. Lorin Blodget, Philadelphia.
17OI. D. Hayes Agnew, M.D., Philadelphia.
1702.

Adolph E. Borie, Philadelphia. Died February 5, 1880, aet. 70.

I703.

Elected july 19, 1872.
Rev. Starr Hoyt Nichols, Philadelphia.

1704.

Coleman Sellers, Philadelphia.

1705.

1706.

Robert Peter, M.D., Lexington, Kentucky.
Richard J. Levis, M.D., Philadelphia.

1707.

A/ected October 18, 1872.
Alexander Johnston Cassatt, Philadelphia.

1708. Clarence King, New York City.

53
1709 . Horatio Hale, Clinton, Canada.
1710.
1711.
1712.

Dr. Paul Broca, Paris, France. Died July 10, 1880.
Franz Joseph Lauth, Munich, Bavaria.
Isaac Norris, Jr., M.D., Philadelphia.
-

Elected January 17, 1873.
1713.
1714.

Henry W. Acland, M.D., Oxford, England.
George Borrows, M.D., London, England.

-

1715. James E. Oliver, Ithaca, N. Y.

1716. Robert P. Frazer, Philadelphia. Died May, 1878, act. 59.
1717. Thomas Clark, Philadelphia.
1718. Peter F. Rothermel, Philadelphia. (Present address Limerick P.O., Pa.)
1719. Joseph Zentmeyer, Philadelphia.
1720. A. H. Spofford, Washington, D. C.
1721. C. Percy LaRoche, M.D., Philadelphia.
1722. Henry Pemberton, Philadelphia.

Elected April 18, 1873.
Sir William Thomson, F.R.S., London. (Present address Glasgow.)
1724. Alfred R. Wallace, Croydon, England.
1725. Phillip Lutley Sclater, London.
1726. Sir Henry Thompson, M.B., London.
1727. Edouard Dupont, Brussels Belgium.
1728. Baron Selys de Longchamps, Liège, Belgium.
1729. Théodore M. Gougain, Bayeux, Calvados, France.
1730. Henri De Saussure, Geneva, Switzerland.
1731. Giovanni Capellini, Bologna, Italy.
I732. Giovanni Battista Rossi, Rome, Italy.
1733. Luigi Palmieri, Naples, Italy. Died
1734. Heinrich Helmholtz, Berlin, Germany.
I735. Theodor Mommsen, Berlin, Germany. Died
1736. Theodore D. Rand, Philadelphia.
,
1737. Joseph LeConte, Oakland, Cal. (Present address Berkeley, Cal.)
1738. John LeConte, Oakland, Cal. (Present address Berkeley, Cal.)
1723.

1739. John Fulton, Saxton, Pa.
1740.
1741.

Lloyd P. Smith, Philadelphia. Resigned Jan. 25, 1875.
George F. Barker, Philadelphia.

Elected October 17, 1873.
A. Loudon Snowden, Philadelphia.
I743. John S. Haines, Germantown, Pa.
744. Matthew Huizinga Messchert, Philadelphia.
I745. J. Blodget Britton, Philadelphia.
1746. John Walter Harden, Philadelphia. Died Nov. 8, 1879, aet. 63.

1742.

1747.

Elected 9anuary 16,
Joseph Miller Wilson, Philadelphia.

1748. William H. Wahl, M.D., Philadelphia.

1874.

54
Increase Allen Lapham, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
1875, aet. 65.
Dr. Hermann Kolbe, Leipsig, Saxony.
J. E. Wootten, Reading, Pa.

1749.

1750.
1751.

Died September 14,

Elected April 17, 1874.
William Camac, Philadelphia.

1752.

I753.

Frank Thomson, Altoona, Pa. (Present address Philadelphia.)

I754.

Rev. Robert Ellis Thompson, Philadelphia.
1756. Joseph Norman Lockyer, London.
1757. Richard A. Proctor, England.
1758. Raphael Pumpelly, Newburgh, N.Y. (Present address Newport, R. I.)
1759. Charles Augustus Young. Princeton, N.J.
1755.

Elected July 17, 1874,
1760. Franklin Platt, Philadelphia, Pa.
1761. Sir William George Armstrong, Newcastle-on-Tyne, England.

1762. Henry Woodward, London, England.
Elected October 16, 1874.
1763. Rev. James Freeman Clarke, Boston, Mass.
1764. Franz Ritter Von Hauer, Vienna, Austria.
1765. Rawson W. Rawson, Barbadoes.
1766. Samuel Philip Sadtler, Philadelphia.
1767. George A. König, Philadelphia.
1768. Charles Francis Himes, Carlisle, Pa.
1769. Robert Stockton Kenderdine, M.D., Philadelphia.
1770.

Alfred R. C. Selwyn, Montreal, Canada.

Plected January 15, 1875.
. Jared P. Kirtland, M.D., East Rockport P. O., Ohio.

Died December

10, 1877, aet. 84.

. John B. Pearse, Philadelphia. (Present address, Boston.)
Plected April 16, 1875.
1773. William A. Ingham, Philadelphia.
1774. Viollet le Duc, France.
1775. John McArthur, Jr., Philadelphia.
1776. Joseph Allison, Philadelphia.
1777. Edward Penington, Philadelphia.

1778.

Henry Cadwalader Chapman, M.D., Philadelphia.

1779.

Alexander Agassiz, Cambridge, Mass.

1780. Frederick Prime, Jr., Easton, Pa. (Present
1781. Samuel P. Langley, Alleghany City, Pa.
1782. Henry S. Hagert, Philadelphia.

address Philadelphia.)

55
1783. C. F. Chandler, New York City.
1784. Rossiter W. Raymond, New York City.

1785. Leonard G. Frank, Philadelphia. Died May (?), 1876.
1786. William P. Tatham, Philadelphia.

Elected July 16, 1875.
1787. Thomas Messinger Drown, M.D., Easton, Pa.
1788. John Lyle Campbell, Crawfordsville, Indiana.

Elected October 15, 1875.
1789. Stephen Smith, M.D., New York City.
1790.
I791.
I792.
I793.
I794.

1795.

William Blasius, Philadelphia.
Gideon E. Moore, Jersey City, N. J.
Furman Sheppard, Philadelphia.
Russell Thayer, Philadelphia.
James Clerk Maxwell, Cambridge, England.
1879, aet. 47.
Charles Edward Hall, Philadelphia.

Died November 4,

1796. John Franklin Carll, Pleasantville, Pa.
1797. Andrew Sherwood, Mansfield, Pa.

Elected January 21, 1876.
Resigned November 17, 1876.

1798. J. Gibbons Hunt, Philadelphia.

Elected April 21, 1876.
I799. Frank M. Etting, Philadelphia.
1800. Daniel C. Gilman, Baltimore, Md.
1801. P. Cunliff Owen, London, England.
1802.

I. Lowthian Bell, Newcastle-on-Tyne, England.
1803. James Geikie, Edinburgh, Scotland.
1804. Thomas C. Archer, Edinburgh, Scotland.
1805. Adolf Eric Nordenskiold, Stockholm, Sweden.
1806. C. Juhlin Dannefeld, Stockholm, Sweden.
1807. Elihu Thompson, Philadelphia.
1808. Charles V. Riley, St. Louis, Mo.

-

Elected Suly 21, 1876.
1809.

Richard Åkerman, Stockholm.

18Io.

John Johnston, Middletown, Conn.

1811.

Samuel Davenport, Adelaide, S. Australia.

1812.

Dom Pedro D'Alcantara. Emperor of Brazil, Rio da Janeiro.

Elected October 20, 1876.

1813. John F. Hartranft, Philadelphia.
1814. W. Milnor Roberts, New York City.
1815. Augustus Radcliffe Grote, Buffalo, N. Y.

56
Elected Feb. 2, 1877.
1816.

F. Reuleaux, Berlin, Germany.
1817. Rudolf Von Wagner, Würtzburg, Germany.
1818. Mariano Barcena, Mexico.

1819. E. H. Von Baumhauer, Harlem, Holland.
1820. George Stuart, Philadelphia.
1821. William V. McKean, Philadelphia.
1822. Charles W. Shields, Princeton, N. J.
1823. Franklin B. Gowan, Philadelphia.
1824. Henry Phillips, Jr., Philadelphia.
1825. Henry Turner Eddy, Cincinnati, Ohio.
1826. Cyrus Fogg Brackett, M.D., Princeton, N. J.
1827. James Morgan Hart, Cincinnati, Ohio.
1828. Henry Armitt Brown, Philadelphia.
Died Aug. 24, 1878, aet. 33.
1829. Charles William Siemens, London, England.
1830. M. Russell Thayer, Philadelphia.
1831. Craig Biddle, Philadelphia.
1832. Thomas Hewson Bache, M.D., Philadelphia.
1833. John Hugh McQuillen, M.D., Philadelphia. Died March 3, 1879, aet. 53.
1834. George Strawbridge, M.D., Philadelphia.
1835. William Goodell, M.D., Philadelphia.
1836. Thomas Frederick Crane, Ithaca, N. Y.

Elected April 20, 1877.
1837. Henry Draper, M.D., New York City.
1838. J. T. Rothrock, M.D., Philadelphia.
I839. James Douglas, Phoenixville, Pa.
1840. John James Stevenson, New York City.
1841. George R. Moorehouse, M.D., Philadelphia.
1842. T. B. Reed, M.D., Philadelphia.

Elected july 20, 1877.
1843. H. C. Humphreys, Philadelphia.
1844. J. J. Sylvester, Baltimore, Md.
1845. John Ericsson, New York City.

Elected October 19, 1877.
1846. William B. Taylor, Washington.

Elected January 18, 1878.
1847.
1848.
1849.
1850.
1851.
1852.

Ira Franklin Mansfield, Cannelton, Pa.
I. C. White, Morgantown, W. Va.
F. A. Randall, M.D., Warren, Pa.

John Price Wetherill, Philadelphia.
Elisha Gray, Chicago, Ill.
Simon Newcomb, Washington, D.C.

57
1853. Asaph Hall, Washington, D.C.
1854. Theodore G. Wormley, M.D., Philadelphia.
1855. Christian Henry Frederick Peters, Clinton, N. Y.
1856. James F. Watson, Ann Arbor, Mich.
1857. Francis Andrew March, Easton, Pa.
1858. Burnet Landreth, Bristol, Pa.

Elected May 3, 1878.
1859. C. Newlin Pierce, DDS., Philadelphia.
1860. Robert Henry Alison, M.D., Philadelphia.
1861. William D. Marks, Philadelphia.
1862. Lewis M. Haupt, Philadelphia.
1863. Burt Green Wilder, M.D., Ithaca, N. Y.

Elected September 20, 1878.
1864. Carl Schurz, Washington, D.C.

1865. Jacob B. Knight, Philadelphia. Died March 10, 1879, aet. 48.
1866. Rev. Fred. Augustus Muhlenberg, Philadelphia.
1867. Elliott Coues, M.D., U.S.A., Washington, D.C.
1868. Alpheus Spring Packard, Jr., M.D., Salem, Mass. (Present address
Providence, R. I.)
1869. Joel Asaph Allen, Cambridge, Mass.
1870. Samuel Hubbard Scudder, Cambridge, Mass.
1871. Rev. William Rudder, Philadelphia. Died Jan. 29, 1880.
1872. Morris Longstreth, M.D., Philadelphia.
Elected October 18, 1878.
1873.
1874.
1875.
1876.
1877.

Albert H. Smith, M.D., Philadelphia.
Rev. Samuel Longfellow, Germantown (Phila).

Rev. Edward Abraham Foggo, Philadelphia.
M. A. Descloizeaux, Paris, France.

C. Schorlemmer, Manchester, England.

Elected January 17, 1879.
1878. Charles Benjamin Dudley, Altoona, Pa.
1879. Philip Howard Law, Philadelphia.

Plected April 18, 1879.
William H. Greene, M.D., Philadelphia.
1881. Arthur Erwin Brown, Philadelphia.
1882. Middleton Goldsmith, M.D., Rutland Vt.
1883. Carl Seiler, M.E)., Philadelphia.
1884. Richard Wood, Philadelphia.

188o.

/.../ected july 18, 1879.
1885. Charles Martins, Montpellier, France.
1886. Sir George Biddle Airy, Greenwich, England.

-

5S
1887. Charles M. Wheatley, Phoenixville, Pa.
1888.

Andrew S. McCreath, Harrisburg, Pa.
1889. Ira Remsen, Baltimore, Md.
1890. E. Reneviers, Lausanne, Switzerland.
1891. Benjamin B. Comegys, Philadelphia.

Elected January 16, 1880.
1892.
1893.
1894.
1895.
1896.

Cavaliere Damiano Muoni, Milan, Italy.
Charles Francis Adams, Boston, Mass.

Henry Wharton, Philadelphia.
Charles A. Ashburner, Philadelphia.
Robert C. Winthrop, Boston, Mass.
1897. Archibald Geikie, Edinburgh, Scotland.
1898. Oliver Wendell Holmes, M.D., Boston, Mass.
1899. George Whitney, Philadelphia.

NoTE.—The names and titles before January 20, 1865, are printed as they appear upon the
records of the Society at the dates of their elections. After No. 1543 no other titles than Rev.
and M.D. are given, as names and titles have already been printed in extenso in the list of the

surviving members of the Society, published January 18, 1878.

IND EX.

1687 Anderson, G. W.
1655 Barlow, Joel,
734
1463 Anderson, Henry J. 952 | Barnard, F. A. P.
1683
109 | Barnes, Albert,
1366
Abercrombie, Jas.
612 Anderson, Jas.
Abert, J. J.
Ioi 7 Anderson, J.
581 | Barnes, Thomas,
483
539 Barnsley, Thomas,
77
Abrahamson, J. N. B. 97o Anderson, Jas.
1576 Barnwell, William, 665
Acland, Henry W. 1713 Anderson, M. B.
Adams, Dr.
329 Andrada e Silva, J. de 876, Barrande, Joachim, 1451
556 Bartlett, W. H. C. 1133
Adams, C. Francis, 1893 Andreani, Paul,
1682 Barton, Benj. Smith, 496
Adams, John,
573 Andrews, E. B.
424 Barton, Richard P.
563
Adams, John Q.
816 Andrews, John,
i i 22 Barton, Thomas,
74
Adams, J. C.
1238 Angelis, P. de
458
Adamson, John C. 1381 Anthon, Charles E. 1603 Barton, William,
765
23 Barton, W. P. C.
Addison, Alexander, 528 Antill, Edward,
140
Adelung, Fred. Von 815 Arbo, John,
221 Bartram, Isaac,
Archer,
Thomas
C.
Adet, P. A.
605
1804 Bartram, John,
2
Abbè, Cleveland,

Abbot, H. L.

Adrain, Robert,

757

Adye, Stephen,

289
Afzelius, Peter,
864
Agardh, Charles A. 105o
Agassiz, Alexander, 1779
Agassiz, Mrs. E. C. 1642
Agassiz, Louis,
1175
Agnew, D. Hayes, 1701
Airy, Sir George B. 1886
Akerman, Richard, 1809
Alaman, Lucas,
127o
Albers, J. A.
844
Alexander, James,
165
Alexander, Stephen, 1115
Alexander, J. A.
1217
Alexander, John H. 1306
Alison, Francis,
32
Alison, Robert II.

Allison, Burgess,
Allison, Joseph,
Allison, N. S.

Allen, Andrew,
Allen, Benjamin,
Allen, George,
Allen, Harrison,
Allen, Joel Asaph,

Allen, James,
Allen, John,
Allen, William,
Allen, William H.
Anderson, Alex.

59

1860
507

1776
772
61

756
1368
1571.

I 34
Arfwedson, Chas. D. I 329 Bartram Moses,
157
Armstrong, Sir W.G. 1761 Bartram, William,
Arthaud, M.
497 Baumhauer, E. H.
Von
1819
Ashburner, Chas. A. 1895
I 23 Bayard, James A.
Aspden, Matthias,
Audubon, John Jas. IOO5 Bayard, John,
Baynton, John,
Bache, Alex. Dallas, 963 Beach, Samuel,
Bache, Franklin,
847 Beadle, E. R.
Bache, Hartman,
IOO6 Beasley, Frederick,
Bache, Thos. H.
1832 Beattie, James,
Bache, William,
631 Beaufort, Francis,
Bailey, Joel,
271 Beauvois, Palisot de
Bailey, J. W.
I297 Beck, T. Romeyn,

Baird, Absalom,

1869
63
65 Barcena, Mariano,
54 Barclay, Robert,
I490
534

530 Beck, Charles F.

Baird, Henry Carey, 1630
Baird, Robert,
1236
Baird, Spencer F.
1358
Baker, William,
477
Balbo, Pros. Count 993
Baldwin, Matt, W. 1023
Baldwin, Henry,
Io91
Bancker, Charles N. 916
Bancker, Gerard,
296
Bancroft, George, 1157
Banks, Joseph,
474
Barca, Cald'n de la 1253
Bard, Samuel,

Barker, George F.

Beckley, John,
Bedford, Dr.
Bedford, Paul,
Bee, Thomas,

2I 2

481
282

518
1667
773
449

1131
561
1106
I2 i I

55o
595

I95

358
173
1802

Belcher, Jonathan,
Bell, I. Lowthian,
Belknap, Jeremy,
374
Bell, John,
IO i i
Bembridge, Henry, 281
Benezet, John,
227
Bennett, John H.
126o
Bensell, Charles,
17o
1818 Bentley, William,
75o
I 14
47 I Bergius, Peter,
I52 Bergmann, Torbern, 3O4
1434
I741 Bernard, Claude,

60
Bertholff, Baron de

391 | Borrows, George,

Berzelius, John J.

851 | Bost, John,

1714|Bustamente, J. M.

945

1540 Butler, Benj. F.
1203
Bessel, F. W.
I 128 Botta, Carlo,
794 Butt, J. Martin,
191
Bethune, George W. 1104 || Boucher des Perthes, 1490
Bettle, William,
143 Bowditch, Nathaniel, 741 Cabanis, M.
438
Betton, Samuel,
954 Bowdoin, James,
462 Cadet, M.
466
Betton, Thomas F. 1386 Bowen, Samuel,
261 Cadwalader, John, 231
Biddle, Clement,
147 | Boyé, Martin H.
1126 Cadwalader, John, 1570
Biddle, Clement C. 861 Boys, William,
64o Cadwalader, Lamb. 230
Biddle, Craig,
1831 Brackett, Cyrus F. 1826 Cadwalader, Thos.
6
Biddle, Edward,
235 | Bradford, Thomas,
95 Cadwalader, Thos. 913
Biddle, James,
96 || Bradford, William, 393 | Caldwell, Charles,
618
Biddle, John,
1509 | Brahm, F. J. S. de 375 Caldwell, Samuel,
86
Biddle, John B.
1322 | Braun, Alexander, 1455 Callison, A. C. P.
1145
Biddle, John G.
779 | Brayley, E. W.
1165 Camac, William,
1752
Biddle, Nicholas,
764 Brazil, Emperor of, 1812 Campbell, George, 1065
Biddle, Owen,
136 Brearly, David,
489 Campbell, John L. 1788
Biddle, Thomas,
957 | Breck, Samuel,
Io88 Camper, Adrian G. 718
Bigelow, Jacob,
826 Breckenbridge, R. J. 1565 Camper, Petrus,
494
Bigsby, John J.
910 || Bridges, Robert,
1193 Campomanes, Count 37o
Billé, Steen,
IoI 3 Briggs, Isaac,
596 Canby, Wm. M.
1606
Bingham, William, 453 Briggs, Robert,
1519 Cancrine, Count
1.188
Binney, Barnabas,
385 Bring, E. S.
1ozo Candolle, A. P. de 1156
Binney, Horace,
730 Bringhurst, James, 326, Canino, Prince of
888
Binney, Horace, Jr. 1634 Bringhurst, Jos.
209 | Capellini, Giovanni, 1731
-

Bird, Robert M.

1314|Brinton, Daniel G. 1636. Carena, Hyacinth,

994

Birch, Samuel,
1617 | Brinton, J. H.
748 Carey, Henry C.
1031
Bischoff, T. L. W. 1423 Brissot de Warville, 506 Carey, Matthew,
867
Blackmore, William, 1635 'Britton, J. Blodget, 1745 Carlier, Auguste,
1628
Blackwell, Robert, 386 Broca, Paul,
171o Carlisle, Nicholas, 1049
Blackwell, T. E.
1499 Brockenbrough, J. 1042 Carll, John Franklin, 1796
Blagden,
493 Brongniart, Alex.
839 Carpenter, W. B.
1220
Blainville, H. M. de 831 Bronn, Hein. D.
1422 Carson, John,
396
Blair, Samuel,
628 Brooke,
258
12 IO
Blair, Thomas S.
1554 Brown, Arthur E. 1881 Carter, Landon,
254
Blake, William P. 1669 Brown, Henry A. 1828 Cass, Lewis,
929
Blanchet, Francis,
657, Brown, James,
943 Cassat, A. Johnston, 1707
Blasius, William,
1790 Brown, John P.
1371 Cassin, John,
1305
Bleakley, John,
516 Brown, Nathaniel B. 1588 Castilione, Count de 443
Blodget, Lorin,
17oo Brown, Samuel
651 Cathrall, Isaac,
6.13
Blumenbach, J. F.
639 Bruce, Archibald
727 Cattell, W. C.
1675
Boardley, J. B.
364 Brugsh, Henri
1614 Cauchy, B. A.
1310
Boardman, H. A.
1274 Brunet L’Abbé Ovide1543 Calvalos, Pedro,
691
Boekh, C. W.
1665 Brush, George J.
1547 Cavanillas, A. J.
692
Böhtlingk,
1444 Bryan, George,
37 Ceracchi, Joseph,
560
Bollmann, J. E.
649 | Bryant, William,
322 Ceselli, Dr.
1612
Bonaparte, Charles, 905 | Buchanan, George, 517 | Chabas, M. F.
1616
Bonaparte, Lucien, 888 || Buchanan, James, 1225 | Chalmers, Lionel,
197
Bond, Phineas,
29 | Buchan, Earl of
582 Chandler, C. F.
1783
Bond, Thomas,
28 Buffon,
117 | Chapman, Henry C. 1778
Bond, Thomas, Jr.
78 Bujalsky,
Io21 Chapman, John,
158
Bond, W. C.
1303 || Bull, Marcus,
937 Chapman, Nathaniel, 721
Bonnycastle, C.
1141 Bullock, Charles, 1653 Charles, M.
437
Booth, James C.
1096 Bunsen, Robt. W. 1452 Chase, Pliny E.
1492
Bopp, Franz,
1484 Burd, Edward,
394 Chase, Thomas,
1522
Borden, Simeon,
I 168 Burmann, N. L.
541 Chastellux, Chev. de 361
Borgnis, J. A.
852 Burmeister, H.
1378, Chauncey, Charles, 767
Borie, Adolph E.
1702 Burrough, Marm.
Ioz2 Chauvenet, Wm.
1285

£

61
Chevalier, Michel, 1298
857
Cheves, Langdon,
47
Chew, Benjamin,
Chew, Benjamin, Jr., 454
Christison, Robert, I 153
Church, John,
674
Clark, Daniel,
256
Clark, Sir James,
1213
Clarke, James F.
1763
Clarke, Thomas,
1717
Clarkson, Gerardus, 211

1672 De Gasparin, A.
Coxe, Eckley B.
1528
1438
Coxe, John Redman, 641 De Guyangos, P.
Coxe, Tench,
601 || De Koninck, L. G. 145o
Craig, Isaac,
460 Delambre, J. B. J.
68o
Crane, Thos. Fred'k 1836 Delamétrie, J. C.
798
Crawford, Adair,
Crelle, Lorenz,
Crelle, A. L.

Clarkson, Matthew, 241
643
Clay, Joseph,
Cleaveland, Parker, 820
Cleveland, Chas. D. 1550
Clifford, Thomas,
248.
Clinton, DeWitt,
777
712
Cloud, Joseph,
Clymer, George,
421 | Cuthbert, Ross,
Coates, Benjamin H. 885 Cutler, Manasseh,
Coffin, J. H. C.
1638 Cuyler, Theodore,
Cohen, Joshua J.
1349
Colden, Cadwalader, 31 Da Costa, Jacob M.
Coleman, William,
27 Da Costa, Macedo,
Coles, Edward,
1097 D'Aligny, H. F. Q.
Calhoun, Samuel,
781 Dallas, Alex. J.
Collin, Nicholas,
488 Dallas, George M.
Collins, Zacheus,
697 Dalman, J. W.

Collyer, Wm. Bengo, 893
Colwell, Stephen,
Comegys, Benj. B.
Condie, D. Francis,
Condorcet, Marquis,

1265
1891
1046
330

Conover, Samuel F. 716
Conrad, Solomon W. 872,
Conrad, Timothy A. 1553
Conyngham, J. N. 1250
Conyngham, R.
84o
Cooke, G. H.
1538
Coombe, Thomas,
62
309
Coombe, Thos.
Cooper, James F.
886
Cooper, Myles,
253
Cooper, Thomas.
663
Cope, Edward D. 1555
Cope, Thomas P.
1178
Copland, James,
1215
Coppeč, Henry,
1367
Coquebert, Baron,
882
367
1867
571

Courtenay, Ed. H.

Iolo

Cox, J. D.
Cox, John,
Coxe, 1)aniel,

1662
492
291

733

Desor, Edouard,

1449

I433
397, De Verneuil, E.
594
1387 Deveze,
Deville, St. Ciaire, 1430
1567 Dewees, William P. 842
IoS8 Dewey, Chester,
1503
1668 De Witt, Simeon,
461
555 Dick, Alexander,
19o
1125 Dick, James,
218
938 Dickerson, Mahlon, 719
Dana, James D.
I354 Dickinson, James,
82
D'Angeville,
379 Dickinson, John,
8
14 IO
Danmours,
366 Dickson, S. H.
Dannefeld, C. J.
1806 Dillingham, W. H. 1187
Dantes Pereira, J. M. 951 Dixon, Jeremiah,
I74
II 16
Darlington, William, 892 Dobson, Judah,
I 344
Darwin, Charles,
1643 Dohrn, C. A.
294
Darwin, Erasmus,
567 Dolland, Peter,
D'Aschkow, Princess, 51o D'Alcantara, Dom P. 1812
Daubenton,
3.31 Dorr, Benjamin,
II.47
I)aubeny, C. G. B. 1080 Dorsey, John Syng, 78o
Daubrée, A.
1516 Doucette, De la
1164
Davenport, Samuel, 1811 Douglas, James,
1839
David, C. G. N.
1512 Downes, John,
11.90
825
Davidson, George, 1557 Drake, Daniel,
Davidson, James,
105 Draper, Henry,
1837
Davidson, Robert, 369 | Draper, John W.
1194
Davidson, Thomas, 1562 Drayton, W.
1047
Davis, Benjamin,
I45 Drinker, Henry,
240
Davis, Charles H. 1296 Drinker, John
246
Davis, Isaac R.
1291 Drown, Thomas M. 1787

Cornelius, Robert, 1474 Davis, John,
Correa de Serra, Jos. 754 Davis, John,
Coste,
Coues, Elliott,
Coupigny,

395 De Lancy, Wm. H. 958

442 Delany, Sharp,
325
1308, Delesse, A.
1515
Cresson, John C.
Io95 Deleuze, J. P. F.
799
Cresson, Charles M. 1393 Del Rio, Andres,
99 I
Crevecoeur, St. Jean, 491 Demarest, A. G.
837
Crosse, John Green, Iob6 Demmé, C. R.
I 119
Cullen, William,
26 Denny, Harmar,
1248
Cunat, Joanne Bapt. 616 Denormandie, John, 112
I41 I De Rougé, Vicomte
Carleton, Henry,
Currie, William,
568
Emmanuel,
1613
1439 Des Cloizeaux, M.A. 1876
Curwen, John,
771 Des Moulins, C.
I44o
Cutbush, James,

752 Du Bois, W. E.
IoS

Dubourg,
Davy, Humphrey,
745, Dubourg, William,
Dawson, James W. 1468 Duc, Viollet le
Deabbate, Gaspard, 883 Ducatel, Julius T.
Dearborn, Benjamin, 679 Duché, Jacob,
Deas, John,
225 Duché, Jacob,
De Beaumont, E.
1420 Dudley, Chas. Benj.
De Butts, Elisha,
802 | Duffield, Benjamin,

1205
332

715
1774

1ooS
236
5I

1878
427

62
Duffield, Edward,
Duffield, George,

71 Evans, Cadwalader,
344
I 24

Duffield, Samuel,
Duhail, Louis Etien. 614

iDulaney, Daniel,
Dumas, J. B.
Dumeril, Constant,

67
I432

761

Evans, David,

Freire, Cypr. Ribero, 608

I 140

312
1290

JDunning, George F.
Du Ponceau, J. M.,
Du Ponceau, Pet. S.
Dupont, Edouard,
Dupont, La Motte,
Dupont, Iréné,
Dupont, S. F.

Falberg, Samuel,
654
188
587 Famitz, Professor,
IoI2 Faraday, Michael, 1118
1273
381 Farnum, Jos. W.
1076 Farmer, Ferdinand, 118
Ioš6 Fayette, Marq. de la 356
1573 Featherstonhaugh, G. 730
898 Felton, Samuel M. 1341 |
551 Ferguson, James,
268
1727 Ferguson, William, 535
661
1690 Ferrer, J. J. de
441
720 Feutry, M.
1469 Field, Henry Wm. 137o

Durand, Elias,

I 347

Dundas, James,
Dundonald, Earl of
Dunglison, Robley,
Dunlap, John,
Dunlap, Thomas,
Dunn, Nathan,

Filstead, Samuel,

286

Frerichs, F.T.

1476

Froude, J. A.
Fulton, John,

I 459
1739
732

Fulton, Robert,
Fuss, Nicholas,

Furness, Wm. H.

1130
823

Gabb, William M.

1608

Gage, General,
Gale, Benjamin,
Gallatin, Albert,

Galloway, Joseph,

Fischer, Alex.

I 324

1560 Fisher, Joshua Fr.
832 Fisher, S. G.

Eckert, Geo. N.

1295

Eckfeldt, Jacob R.
Eddy, Henry T.
Edwards, Bryan,

1204 Fisher, William R. 1129
1825 Flores, Jos. Mig. de 499
911
316 Flourens, M.
48o Flower, Wm. Henry, 1621
644 Flügel, J. G.
1312
1692 Foggo, Edward A. 1875
365
I44 Fontana, Abbé,

Elder, Wm.
Eldridge, Samuel,
Eliot, Charles W.

Ellet, Charles, Jr.
Ellicot, Andrew,
Ellicott, Joseph,

1686
1182
399
272
199

Fooks, Paul,

Forbes, John,
Forchhammer,

Garbier, Hubert,

Emlen, George,
Emmet, John P.

Foxcroft, Thomas,
Fox, George,

935
IoS6

Gauss, C. F.

435
806
1309
1252

Geddings, E.
Geikie, Archibald,
Geikie, James,

1897
1803

Genth, Fred. A.

I 339

Gerhard, W. W.

Gibbes, George,
Gibbons, Thomas,
Gibbs, O. Wolcott,
Gibson, James,
Gibson, John B.
Gibson, William,
Gill, John,
Gill, Theodore Nich.
226 Gillis, J. Melville,
383 Gilman, Daniel C.

81 Gilmor, Robert, Jr.
1098 Fox, Joseph,
1136 Gilpin, Henry D.
Endlicher, Stephen, 1166 Fox. Robert W.
Engelmann, George, 1470 Fraley, Frederick, 1 170 Gilpin, Joseph,
Ericsson, John.
1845 Francis, James B.
1551 Gilpin, Joshua,
Eschricht, D. F.
15 II Francis, J. W.
1196 Gilpin, Thomas,
Espy, James P.
1039 Frank, J. Peter,
8o3 Gilpin, Thomas,
Etting, Frank M. 1799 Frank, Leonard G. 1785 Giraldes, J. P. C. de

Encke, J. F.

11
238

Gauld, Geo. 314; see 270

137 George, Sidney,
1117 Gerard,
I.445 Gerhard, Benjamin,

Emerson, Ralph W. 1568

Elliot, Rev. Mr.

440

| Gardoqui, Diego de 487

178 | Gastellier,
Gaston, William,

Forest, A. R. de la 559
Foronda, Valent de 675
Forster, J. Reinhold, 579
Forstrom, John Eric, 725
Fothergill, Anthony, 558
Fothergill, John,
264
Foulke, John,
384
Foulke, W. Parker, 1357
Foxcroft, John,
16

164
Elliot, Samuel,
835
Elliot, Stephen,
317
Ellis, John,
Elmer, Jonathan,
32 I
Elwyn, A. L.
1 192
Emerson, Gouvern’r, Iojo

5

1063
Gamble, Archibald, 376

1029 | Gardoqui, Francis de 519
1417 , Garnet, John,
676

Earle, Pliny,
Eberle, John,

Fisher, Thomas,

1 19
24
532

Galvez, Mariano,

505 Garden, Alexander,
Dutton, Clarence E. 1679 Findley, William,
Dworjak, Charles, 1327 Finley, Clement A. 1375 Gardner, Valentine,

Edwards, Enoch,
Elam, Samuel,

I

Franklin, William,
13
Evans, Edmund C. 1405 | Franklin, William T. 422
Evans, Rowland,
207 Frauenfeld, G. Von 1650
Eve, Oswell,
19 Frazer, John F.
1160
Everett, Alexander, Iooz Frazer, John F.
1580
Everett, Edward,
999 Frazer, Persifor, Jr. 1695
1716
Ewing, John,
38 Frazer, Robert P.

Dümichen, Johannes, 1615
Dunbar, William,
65o Eyries, J. B. B.
Duncan, Andrew,

Franklin, Benjamin,

3

I53

192
342

1346
1176
743

339
1355
726

859
848
2O2

1587
1237
1Soo
686

1009
273
688
2.47

776
940

63
Girardin, L. H.
830 Guizot, Fran. P. G. 1142 Hayden, F. V.
1416
1493
778 Hayes, I. I.
Glentworth, George, 215 Gummere, John,
Gloucester, Arch.
287 Gummere, Samuel J. 1596 Hays, Isaac,
986
1584 Hazard, Ebenezer, 357
Gloxin, Benjamin,
536 Guyot, Arnold,
Goddard, Paul B.
1132 Gutzlaff, Charles,
1113 Hazlehurst, Isaac, 1278
Goddard, Kingston, 139;
Heckewelder, John 626
1464
1782 Heer, Oswald,
Godman, John D.
915 Hagert, H. S.
Godon, Silvain,
735 Hahn, John David, 266 I lelmholtz, H.
I734
Goldsborough, Robert 538 Haidinger, William, 1360 Helmuth, Just. H. C. 377
Goldsmith, M.
1882 Haighton, John,
747 | Hembel, Wm. Jr.
769
1743 | Henderson, A.A. 1473
Gonzales, Francis A. IOOA Haines, John S.
768 Henry, Joseph,
IO45
Good, John Mason, 749 Haines, Reuben,
45 I
Goodell, William, 1835 Hakakian Bey, T. 1609 | Henry, Thomas,
1208 Henry, William,
I49
Goodfellow, Edw. 1680 Haldeman, S. S.
1558 | Herschel, John,
I 332
Goodsir, John,
1259 Hale, Charles,
Goodwin, D. R.
I435 Hale, Edw. Everett, 1658 . Herschel, William,
404
1709 | Hermelin, Baron,
392
Göppert, H. R.
I454 Hale, Horatio,
1853 Hewson, Thomas F. 660
Gougain, Theo. M. 1729 Hall, Asaph,
Gould, A. A.
1262 Hall, Chas. Edward, 1795 Hewson, William,
234
73 Heymitz, Baron de
495
Gould, Ben. A. Jr. 1271 Hall, David,
Hall,
James,
Gowan, Franklin B. 1823
Heywood, Thos. Jr. 389
I 22
77o Hicks, Gilbert,
Gråberg di Hemso, J. 927 Hall, John E.
Hall,
Marshall,
I
323
Graeff, Frederick, 1599
Hilgard, J. E.
1497
Graeme, Thomas,
18 Hallowell, Benj.
I 336 Hill, Henry,
. 277
12883 Hill, Thomas,
15O1
Graham, James D. 1139 Hallowell, Ed.
Hamilton,
Alex.
526
Hillegas,
Michael,
176
Granchain, Chev. de 445
53 Himes, C. Francis, 1768
Grandpré, J. M. de 599 Hanmilton, James,
224
Grant, Ulysses S.
1601 Hamilton, William, 633 Himili, John,
Grassi,
593 Hamilton, W. J.
1456 Hitchcock, Chas. H. 1663
Hammond,
Wm.
A.
1412
Gray, Asa,
1239
Hitchcock, Edward, 1154
Gray, Elisha,
1851 Harden, John W. 1746 Hochstetter, Franz
Von
1649
1337
388 Harding, George,
Gray, George,
92 Hockley, Richard, 104
Gray, Isaac,
36o Harding, Rev. Mr.
788 Hodge, Hugh,
Gray, James,
786 Hare, Charles W.
598
Green, Ashbel,
504 Hare, J. I. Clark,
1016
1172 Hodge, Hugh L.
Green, Traill,
1605 Hare, Robert, Jr.
677 Hodge, J. T.
1524
Green, W. H.
I 504 Harlan, Richard,
873 Hodgson, William B. 985
Greene, William H. 1880 Harris, Levett,
858 Hofmann, William, 1453
Greenleaf, Simon, 1242 Harris, Robert P. 1385 Hoge, John,
533
947 Hoge, Jonathan,
42O
Greenway, James,
583 Harris, Thomas,
Io84 Holbrook, John Ed. Io94
Grier, Robert C.
I 241 Harris, William,
168 Holiday, Henry,
107
Griffith, Robert E. 948 Harrison, Joseph,
Griffith, T. W.
1536 Holland, Capt.
Io79 Harrison, Joseph,
338
Griffitts, Samuel P. 4OO Harrison, Peter,
169 Holland, Henry,
1223
Grigsby, Hugh B. 1384 Hart, Jas. Morgan, 1827 Hollingsworth, Levi, 249
Grimaldi, Ceva,
1229 Hart, John S.
Hollingsworth, S.L. 1379
Holmes, Abiel,
792
Grimm, Jacob,
1483 Hartranft, John F.
Grinnell, Henry,
I 321 Hartshorne, Edwd. 1403 Holmes, Oliver W. 1898
1510 Holyoke, Edward,
Griscom, John,
Ioj7 Hartshorne, H.
11o
Grivel, M.
436 Hartshorne, Joseph, 783 Hooker, Joseph D. 1624
1431 Hooker, Nathaniel, 126
Grosche, John Gottl. 542 Harvey, W. H.
Gross, Samuel D.
1342 Hassler, Ferd. Rud. 723 Hooker, William, 1457
Hopkins, Stephen, 167
Grote, Augustus R. 1815 Hauer, Franz Ritter
Von
1764 Hopkins, William, 133
Gruner, Louis,
1645
Guald, George, 270, 314 Haupt, Hermann, 1681 Hopkinson, Francis, Io
Guichen, Count de 398 Haupt, Lewis M. 1862 Hopkinson, John P. Iolo
Guillemard, John,
630 Haven, S. Foster, 1549 Hopkinson, Joseph, 787
703 Hopper, Edward,
1652
Guillou, Constant, 1353 Hawes, William,

64
159 Klingstedt, Baron de 301
845 Jamineau, Isaac,
1607 Jandennes, Jos. de 615 Kneass, Strickland, 1369
1865
Horner, William E. 843 Jardine; Wm.
1221 Knight, Jacob B.
544
1496 Knox, Henry,
Horsfield, Thomas, 977 Jarvis, Edward,
1750
849 Kolbe, Hermann,
Horsford, E. N.
1257 Jarvis, Samuel F.
464 König, George A. 1767
Hosack, David,
746 Jay, John,
403
Hough, George W. 1696 Jefferson, Thomas, 345 Kosciozko, Thad.
I541
1072 Krauth, Ch. P.
Houston, Edwin J. 1698 Jenks, William,
904
693 Krusenstern, A. J.
132 Jenner, Edward,
Howell, Joshua,
48
12o Kuhn, Adam,
1302 Johnson, Wm.
Hubbard, J. S.
1127
150 Kuhn, Hartman,
219 Johnson, William,
Huck, Richard,
346
Humboldt, Alex. Von 695 Johnson, W. (Judge), 744 Kunze, John C.
1230
Humboldt, Wm. Von 868 Johnston, Francis,
455 Kupffer, A. T.
1Sio
John,
Johnston,
Humphreys, A.A. 1397
974 Labouderie, M. J. 1026
Humphreys, David, 687 Jomard,
84 Lacordaire, Theo. 1377
Humphreys, H. C. 1843 Jones, Isaac,
1245 Lambert, Guillaume, 1694
Humphreys, Joshua, 512 Jones, Joel,
26o Landreth, Burnet, 1858
Humphreys, Samuel, 922 Jones, John,
292
323 Lane,
Hunt, J. Gibbons, 1798 Jones, John,
828
I441 |Jones, Robt. Strettell, 85 Langles, Lewis M.
Hunt, T. Sterry,
996 Langley, Samuel P. 1781
475 | Jones, Thomas P.
Hunter, John,
834
3.19 Lanjuínais, Count,
Huntington, Samuel, 363 Jones, Walter,
659 Lapham, Increase A. 1749
523 Jones, William,
Hupsch, Baron de
223 Jones, William, Capt. 701 La Roche, C. Percy, 1721
Hutphins, Joseph,
933
992, La Roche, Réné,
Hutchins, Thomas, 293, Julien, Marc A.
61o
Hutchinson, James, 343 Julien, Stanislaus, 1189 Larocque, A. J.
1007
Huxley, Thomas W. 1623 Justice, George M. 1105 Larrey, Baron,
1618
Lartét, Edouard,
1426
Hyrtl, Joseph.
728
1289 L'Asteyrie, C. P.
Kane, Elisha K.
838
914 | Latreille, P. A.
434 Kane, John K.
Ingenhausz,
645
Ingersoll, Charles J. 785 Kane, Thomas L. 1373 || Latrobe, Benj. H.
1443 Latrobe, John H. B. 1334
362 Kasem Beg, A.
Ingersoll, Jared,
298
1458, Laurens, Henry,
Ingersoll, Joseph R. 919 Kaup, J. J.
90 Lauth, Franz Jos. 1711
Ingersoll, Ralph I. 1249 Kearsly, John, Sr.
909
21o Laval, John,
Ingham, Samuel D. 1124 Kearsly, John, Jr.
336
1773 Keating, William H. 879 Lavoisier,
Ingham, Wm. A.
II.44 Keating, William V. 1348. Law, Edward E.
1316
Irving, David,
1879
Irving, Washington, 967 Keller, Frederick, 1513, Law, Philip H.
887
1161 Lawrance, J. O'B.
724 Kendall, E. Otis,
Izard, George,
198 Kenderdine, R. S. 1769 Lawrence, William, 894
Izard, Ralph,

Hormayer,
Horn, George H.

Kennedy, John P.
Jackson, David,
Jackson, Isaac R.
Jackson, James,
Jackson, R. M. S.
Jackson, Samuel,
Jacobs, Benjamin.
Jacobs, William S.
Jäger, George,
Jahn, Gust. Adolph,
James, Abel,
James, Edwin,
James, Hugh,
James, John F.
James, Joseph,
James, Thomas C.
James, Thomas P.
Jameson, David,

564 Kent, James,
1151 Kent, William,
822

Kerr, Wm. C.

1318 . Lea, Henry Chas.

1595

95.3
965 Lea, Isaac,
1460
1243 Lebert, H.
1689 Le Comte, M. F. H. 603
1287
12 Le Conte, John,
1738
1261 | Le Conte, John,
1708, Le Conte, John L. 1315

1517 Kidd, John,
884 Kiernan, Francis,
183 King Clarence,
1294 | Le Conte, Joseph, 1737
67o King, Edward,
68
1429 Kinnersly, Ebenezer, 55 | Lee, Arthur,
128
1525 | Lee, Francis,
1240 Kirchhoff, G.
1477
113 | Lee, T. J.
I75 Kirkbride, Joseph,
1087
1269 Legare, Hugh S.
IO24 Kirkbride, T. S.
520
1537 Le Gaur, Peter,
4ot Kirke, John F.
1263
1235 Kirkwood, Daniel, 1285 | Leidy, Joseph,
I 351
456 Kirtland, Jared P. 1771 Lenox, James,
1179
446 Lenthall, John,
619 Kirwan, Richard,
576 | Leopold II., Grand
1388 Kittera, John W.
II74
Duke
901
Klaproth, Julius,
2OO

65
Lepsius, Richard,
Lerebours, Alex.
Le Roux,

Le Roy,
Le Roy,
Lesley, Joseph,
Lesley, Peter,

1222 Ludlam, William,
609 Ludlow, John,
333
4.32
302
1520

Lukens, Isaiah,

308 McCosh, James,

1685

i iO2

McCreath, And. S. 1888
85o McCulloch, Rich S. 1228

Lukens, Jesse,
290
Lukens, John,
4
Lusac, John,
545
1382 Luzerne, Chev. de la 347
I 162
Leslie, Charles R. 1068 Lyell, Charles,
Leslie, Robert,
590 Lyman, Benj. Smith, 1629
Lesquereux, L.
1436 Lynch, W. F.
I317
Lesseps, Mathieu,
853
Leseuer, Charles A. 797 Maclean, John,
698
Letchworth, A. S. 1376 Maclure, William,
646
Letombe,
669 Macneven, Wm. J. 896
Letsom, John C.
470 Macquer, M.
334
Le Veillard,
439 Madison, James,
406
Leverrier, U.J.
1231 Madison, J.
350
1706 Magaw, Samuel,
37 I
Levis, Richard J.
i 16
Lewis, Elisha J.
1363 Magee, Christian,
Lewis, Francis W. I415 Magellan, John H. de 390
Lewis, Merewether, 685 Mahon, Lord,
31 I
I 350
Leyburn, John,
1383 Mahon, Lord,
Liancourt, F. A. F.
Mandrillon, Joseph, 402
de la R.
1847
597 Mansfield, Ira F.
Lindley, John,
1465 Mansfield, Jared,
795
161o Marbois, Barbe de
Linant Pasha,
348
Linné, Charles à
263 March, Francis And. 1857
Liouville, J.
I311 Mariette Bey, Aug. 1611
Lippincott, Joshua B. 1633 Marks, William D. 1861
Liston, Robert,
647 Marsden, William,
846
I523
Livezey, Thomas,
243 Marsh, B. V.
Livingston, Edward, 917 Marsh, George P.
1258
1604
Livingston, Robt. R. 658 Marsh, O. C.
Livingston William, 98 Marshall, Frederick, 288
Llave, Pablo de la 923 Marshall, Humphrey, 182
Lloyd, Humphrey, 11oo Marshall, John,
981
Lloyd, James,
275 Martin, Alexander, 632
Locke, John,
I 199 Martinez, de la R. F. 1138
Io 18
Lockyer, Joseph N. 1756 Martinez, Juan J.
990
Logan, George,
575 Martini, Lorenzo,
Logan, William,
44 Martins, Charles,
1885
Logan, William, Jr. 121 Martius, C. Fr. Ph. 1359
Logan, W. E.
1427 Maskelyne, Nevil,
285
1572
Lombardini, Elia, 1398 Mason, Andrew,
Mason,
Charles,
15I
Long, Stephen H.
895
Mason, John Y.
1232
Longchamps, Baron
349
Selys de
1728 Matlack, Timothy
Longfellow, S.
1874 Matile, George A. 1372
1307
Longstreth, Morris, 1872 Maury, M. F.
Longstreth, M. F. 1255 Maximilian, Prince 1214
Loomis, Elias,
III.4 Maxwell, Jas. Clerk, 1794
Lorich, Severin,
907 Mayer, Alfred M.
1654
Lorimer, John,
257 McArthur, John, Jr. 1775
Lorin, Theodore,
IoI5 McCall, George A. 134o
1279
Louis Philippe,
995 McCall, Peter,
Lovenorn, Paul de 890 McClean, Archibald, 295
1507
Lowell, John,
467 McClune, James,
Lowrie, Walter H. 1407 McClurg, James,
320

McDowell, John,

722

McEuen, Charles,

1186

McEuen, Thomas,
983
McHenry, James,
405
McIlvaine, William, 926
McKean, Joseph B. 902
McKean, Thomas,
McKean, Wm. V.
McLane, Louis,

88

1821
IOOO

McMichael, Morton, 1586
McQuillen, J. H.
1833
Meade, Geo. G.
1678
Meade, William,
796
Mease, James,
672
Meehan, Thomas, 1677
Meek, F. B.
1583
Meigs, Charles D.
925
Meigs, J. Forsyth, 1293
Meigs, Josiah,
818
Meigs, Mont. C.
I335
Melamderhjelm, D. 681
Melito, Miot de
92O
Melscheimer, Valen. 592
Mercer, Charles F. 807
Mercer, Hugh,
162
Meredith, William, 766
Meredith, Wm. M. 1075
Merrick, Samuel V. 1036
Messchert, Math. H. 1744
Michaelis, Chris. F. 408
Michaux, F. Andre, 742
Mifflin, John F.
6oo
Mifflin, Samuel,
72
Mifflin, Thomas,
I54
Miles, Samuel,
205
Mill, John Stuart, 1594
Milledoler, Philip, 1121
Millegan, George,
300
Millegan, Robert,
457
Miller, Edward,
1219
Miller, Edward,
699
Miller, E. Spencer, 1396
Miller, Francis B. 1693
Miller, J. Imbrie,
1671
Miller, Peter,
181
Miller, Samuel,
652
Milne-Edwards, H. 1421
Mim,
239
Minto, Walter,
502

Mitchell, John K.
Mitchell, Maria,
Mitchell, O. M.
Mitchell, S. L.

942

1640
I 313
537

Mitchell, S. W.
1461
Mommsen, Theodor, 1735

66
Monro, George,
Montgery, M. de .
Montressor, John,
Moore, Charles,
Moore, Gideon E.,

Moore, Samuel,
Moore, Samuel,

514 Newcomb, Simon,

1852
854 Newenham, Edward, 468
621
297 Newnam, John,
9 Newton, Hubert A. 1582

Morgan, Benjamin, 327
Morgan, Benj. R.
762
Morgan, George,
177
Morgan, John,
148
Moriniere, N. de la 817
Morlot, A.

1521

1276 Norton, W. A.
1 i 81 Nulty, Eugenius,

Morris, Robert,

Morse, Sam. F. B.
Morton,

1282

Nuttall, Thomas,

428
156 Oberlin, John Fr.
419 Odell, Jonathan,
1256 Oersted, Hans C.
274 Okely, John,

Paine, Thomas,

102.7

Pearson, Alexander,
809 Pearson, James,
S12 Pease, Calvin,
Peck, Wm. D.
196 Pedersen, P.
16o
959
i86

267 Palmer, Wm. R.

Nancarrow, John,
Nassy, David,

585
574

Neill, John,
1300
Nemours, Dupont de 653
Neufville, Hyde de 960
Newberry, J. S.
1575

41 I

Peirce, Benjamin,
Pemberton, Henry,
Pemberton, Israel,
Pemberton, James,
Pennant, Thomas,

903
141

1508
606

87o
1173
1722
42
49

543

Penington, Edward. 237
Penington, Edward, 729
Penington, Edward, 1777
549
Penington, John,
IIo9
Penington, John,
Penn, Granville,

Penn, John,
Penn, Richard,
Penrose, R. A. F.

Pepper, Wm.
Pepper, William,
Perceval, Robert,
Percival, Thomas,
Perkins, Jacob,
Perkins, John,
Peter, Robert,
Peter, William,
Peters, C. H. F.

Ioôo

52
59

1518
1277
1666
412
450

836
324

1705
1155

1855
Pallas, Peter Simon, 553 Peters, Richard,
89
1409. Pettit, Charles,
35I
Palmieri, Luigi,
1733 Peyrolan, Francisco, 662
Pancoast, Jos.
1281 Phillips, Henry, Jr. 1824
Pardee, Ario,
1593 Phillips, Henry M. 1676
1625
Parieu, Esquiron de 1673 Phillips, John,
Park, Roswell,
1152 Physic, Edmund,
131
Parke, Thomas,
328 Physic, Philip S.
673
Parker, William,
409 Pickering, Charles,
949
Parkes, Samuel,
871 Pickering, John,
856
Parr, William,
278 Pickering, Timothy, 589

Nairne, Edward,

Naumann, Carl F. 1648
Navarrete, Mart. F. Ioos
Naxera, Manuel,
IoS3

Patterson, Thos. L. I 320
Patterson, Wm.
5.of
Patterson, Wm.
636

I 195

172
Morton, Henry,
1577 Oliver, And.
303
Morton, Henry J.
1391 Oliver, And.
1715
Morton, Samuel G. 950 Oliver, James E.
1380
Mosely, Benjamin, 341 Olrick, Christian,
Olsen,
Peter
B.
668
Motley, J. L.
1437
81 I
Mower, T. G.
I 198 Ord, George,
Mozard, T. C.
623 Osborn, H. Stafford, 1581
860
Muhlenberg, F. A. 1866 Otis, George A.
284
Muhlenberg, Henry, 407 Otolenge, Joseph,
255
Müller, John,
I 224 Otto,
Otto,
John
C.
Soo
Müller, Max,
1486
Muenter,
978 Otto, Lewis William, 463
1801
Muoni, Damiano,
1892 Owen, P. Cunliff,
12 12
Murchison, Sir R. I. 1418 Owen, Richard,
Murgatroyd, John, 232 Packard, A. S. Jr. 1868
1578
Murray, Andrew,
552 Packard, J. H.
4 IO
Murray, John,
827 Page, Mann,
I 331
Mustoxidi,
1 184 Paget, James,
1085
Mutter, T. D.
1275 Paine, Robert T.

Nagy, Charles,

130

Paulding, James K. I IOI
Paykull, Gustavus, 655
690
Nordenskiold, A.E. 1805 Peace, Prince of
Nordmark, Zach.
874 Peacock, George, I 171
Norris, Geo. W.
1209 Peale, Charles W.
425
Io35
Norris, Isaac, Jr.
1712 Peale, Franklin,
Peale,
Titian
R.
Io.34
Norris, Joseph P.
789
Norris, William,
IoS2 Pearse, John B.
1772

Morris, Caspar,
Morris, Jacob G.
Morris, John,
Morris, John, Jr.

784

203
Paschall, John,
I 35
Paschall, Joseph,
2O1
683 Paschall, Stephen,
1791 Nichols, Francis,
704 Nichols, Starr Hoyt, 1703 Patterson, Robert,
368
3.13 Nicholson, John,
546 Patterson, Robert, 1283
283 Nicklin, Philip H.
964 Patterson, Robert M. 738

Moore, Samuel P.
179
Moore, Thomas,
739 Nicola, Lewis,
Mordecai, Alfred,
I319 Nicollet, J. N.
1163
Morehouse, Geo. R. 1841 Niemcewicz, Jul. W. 638
1627
Morell, John,
269 Nillson, Sven,
444
Morelli, Chevalier Io;4 Noel,

Morris, Elwood,

Parrish, Joseph,
Paschall, Isaac,

,
Picot, Charles,
Pictet, F. J.
.
Pierce, C. Newlin,
Pinckney, C. C.
Pinckney, Thomas,
Pine, Robert Edge,
Platt, Franklin,
Plitt, John,
Poinsett, Joel R.
Pole, Thomas,

Poletica, Peter,
Pollock, J.
Pollok, George,
Pool, William,

67

1251 Randolph, Edmund, 527
1526 Randolph, Jacob, 1028
1859 Randolph, Thos. M. 58o
969
503 | Rask, R. K.
629 Rawle, William,
429
426 Rawle, William,
1146
1760 Rawlinson, George, 1644
881 Rawson, Rawson W. 1765
932 Raymond, R. W.
1784
509 || Raynall,
3.35
869 Raynolds, Wm. F. 1585
1505 | Read, John M.
I495
76o Read, J. Meredith, 1591

208 | Reade, Charles,

Porter, T. C.
Post, Frederick,

1539 || Reade, Joseph,
185 | Real, Count

Potter, Alonzo,
Potts, Jonathan,

1200 | Redfield, W. C.

216 |
93
1254
Pouchet, F. A.
Pougens, Charles,
972 |
Poussin, Wm. Tell, 1216
Powel, Samuel,
142 |
Powel, Samuel,
1362 |
Potts, Thomas,

Prescott, Wm. H.
Preston, Thomas,

1092 | Reese, John J.

28o
Prestwich, Joseph, 1619
Price, Eli K.
1352
Price, J. Sergeant, 1592 |
Price, Richard,
413 |
Prichard, James C. 1069 |
414 |
Priestly, Joseph,
Prime, Ebenezer,
259 |
Prime, Frederick,
178o
700 |
Prince, John,
Io93 |
Prinsep, James,
Proctor, Richard A. 1757 |
1234
Proctor, Wm. Jr.
682 |
Prosperin, Eric,
Proud, Robert,
8o
50 |
Pryor, Thomas,
1472 |
Pugh, Evan,
Pumpelly, Raphael, 1758 |

Purviance, Sam. Jr.

Redick, David,
Redman, John,
Reed, Henry,
Reed, John,
Reed, Joseph,
Reed, T. B.
Reed, William B.

2I

IoS
912
1197

486
7
IoSI

1246
791

1842

1374
1301

Reeves, Samuel J. 1631
Regnault, Victor,
1361
Reid, Lt. Col. Wm. 1177
Reinwardt, C. G. C. 1052
Remsen, Ira,
1889
Remusat, J. P. Abel, 979
Renan, Ernest,
1485
Renard, Charles,
1343
Reneviers, E.
1890
Renwick, James,
956
Reuleaux, F.
1816
Reynell, John,
56
Reynolds, Joel B.
1268
Rezius, John And.
758
Rhea, John,
83
Rhoads, Edward,
1600
Rhoads, Samuel,
30

Robinson, Samuel,
166
Rochefoucauld, de 430
Roebuck, Jarvis,
664
Roenne, Baron de 1159
Roepper, W. T.
1674
Röhrig, F. L. O.
1462
Rogers, E. P.
1364
Rogers, Fairman, 1390
Rogers, Henry D. 1038
Rogers, James B.
1227
Rogers, John R. B. 478
Rogers, R. E.
1365
Rogers, William B. 1048
Rokitansky, K.
1479
Rolleston, George, 1622
Romans, Bernard,
315
Romanzoff, Nich. de 908
I428
Rose, H.
Ross, Andrew,
547
Ross, James,
529
Ross, John,
6O
Rossi, Giovanni B. 1732
Rothermel, Peter F. 1718
Rothrock, J. T.
1838
Rouelle, John,
562
Roume, Philip Rose, 671
Roux de Rochelle, 1062
Roxburgh, William, 666
Rozier,

337

Rudder, William, 1871
Rumford, Count
678
Rumker, Charles,
IIII
Rumsey, James,
513
Rumsey, William,
106
Ruschenberger, W.
S. W.
1264
Rush, Benjamin,
163
Rush, James,
94 I
Rush, Richard,
Ruston, Thomas,

Soi
459

Rütimeyer, Carl L.

162o

Rhoads, Samuel, Jr. 279 Sabine, Edward,
91 | Richards, Benj. W. 1103 Sadtler, Samuel P.

1 150

Richardson, B. W. 15oo
Quadrada, F. de P.
973| Richardson, Joseph, 58
Quaranta, Bern.
'43| Richmond, Duke of 469
Quetelet, A.
Ridgley, Charles,
I 39
Quincy, Edmund, I #| Riley, Charles v. 1868
Quincy, Josiah,
9" | Rittenhouse, Benj. 508
Rafn, Carls Chris.
961 | Rittenhouse, David, 40
878 Rives, William C.
Iool
Raguet, Condy,
I55
Ramirez, Alexander, 650 Roberts, George,
1448 Roberts, Hugh,
41
Ramsay, A. C.
684 Roberts, Joseph,
968
Ramsay, David,
II So
Rand, B. Howard, 1392 || Roberts, Sol. W.
Rand, Theodore D. 1736 Roberts, W. Milnor, 1814
1849 | Robinson, Moncure, 1025
Randall, F. A.

'

1766
Sakharoff, Bazile,
1325
Salazar, José Maria, 946
Sandberger, Fridolin, 1563
Sanderson, John,
1137
Sandiford,
I I I
Sansom, Joseph,
7 I4
Santarem, Viscount, Io;3
Sargent, Winthrop, 515
Saussure, Henri De 173o
Saville, George,
187
Saxe-Weimar, Duke of 984
Saxton, Joseph,
1054
Say, Jean Baptiste
Léon
1699

68
Say, Thomas,
Scandella, J. B.
Schäffer, George C.

81o Silva Lisboa, J. da

918 | Stevens, W. Bacon, I345
637 | Simitiere, P. E. du 171 Stevenson, Jno. Jas. 1840
I 552 Simpson, J. Y.
1481 Stewart, Dugald,
554
Schaeffer, Fred. C.
841 Six, James,
378, Stewart, John,
627
305, Stiles, Ezra,
69
Schimper, Wm. P. I 504 Small, Alexander,
Schinz, C.
226 Stiles, Joseph,
242
I 532 Smibert, Williams,
Schoolcraft, H. R. Io 32 Smilie, John,
531 Stille, Alfred,
1299
Schorlemmer, C.
1877 Smith, Albert H.
1873 Stillé, Charles J.
I579
Schott, C. A.
1498. Smith, Aubrey H. 1414 | Stillman, Samuel,
I93
Schultze, Gottlob E. 877 Smith, Charles,

Schumacher, H. C.
Schurz, Carl,
Schwann, Theo.
Schweinitz, Lewis,

Sclater, Phillip L.
Scott, John Morin,
Scott, John M.
Scudder, Samuel H.
Scull, William,

Secchi, P. Angelo,
Sedgewick, A.
Seidensticker, O.
Seiler, Carl,
Seiler, Emma,
Sellers, Coleman,

Sellers, John,
Sellers, W.

Selwyn, Alfred R.C.
Séquard, E. Brown
Sergeant, John,
Sergeant, Jona D.
Sergeant, Thomas,
Sewell, Jonathan,
Seybert, Adam,
Seybert, Henry,
Shaler, William,

Sharswood, George,
Sheafer, P. W.

702 St. Mery, Moreau de 498

891 Smith, Charles E.

1402 Stockler, Francisco, 717
1864 Smith, Daniel B.
976 Stockton, Richard,
100
1482 : Smith, F. Gurney, 1292, Stokes, Wm. A.
1697
1494 | Storer, D. H.
1167
813 Smith, George,
1725 Smith, George W.
1135|Storrs, William L. 1244
1544. Story, Joseph,
I2O2
99 Smith, Goldwin,
782 Smith, Isaac,
228 Strawbridge, Geo. 1834
1870 Smith, James E.
604 || Strelkowsky, Peter, 1326
222 Smith, John,
22 |Strickland, William, 855
14 I3 Smith, John R.
648 Stromeyer, L.
1478
I419 Smith, Jonathan B.
64 Strong, Theodore, 1.191
1656 Smith, J. Lawrence, 1395 | Strong, William,
I559
1883 Smith, Lloyd P.
1740 Struve, F. G. W. de 1328
1660 Smith, Rich. Peters, 602 Struve, Henry de
928
75 Stuart, Charles,
500
1704 Smith, Robert,
I 534 Stuart, George,
1820
17 Smith, R. S.
IO2 Stuart, Moses,
899
I533 Smith, Samuel,
415 Studer, Benjamin,
1770 Smith, Samuel,
1527
624 Sue, Jean Bapt. Jr.
I 333 Smith, Samuel H.
416
352
1789 Sue, Monsieur,
763 Smith, Stephen,
76 Sullivan, William, 1083
387 Smith, Thomas,
1471
1o 14 Smith, Thos. Peters, 642 Sullivant, W. S.
987 Smith, William,
565 Sully, Thomas,
Io.49
62o Smith, William,
97 Summerville, Mary, 1641
Smith, William,
36 Sumner, Charles,
1569
930 Smith, Wm. Peartree, Iol Survilliers, Count de 889

.

1286 Smith, William W. 484 Sussex, Duke of
1742 Svanberg, Jons,
I5 I4 Snowden, A. L.
214 Swartz, Olof,
1792 Sonmans, Peter,

Sheppard, Furman,
Sherwood, Andrew, 1797
Shields, Charles W. 1822
Shiell, Hugh,
359
Shippen, Edward,
87
Shippen, Edward, 1598
Shippen, Edward, Jr. 39
Shippen, Joseph, Jr. 45
Shippen, Thos. Lee, 578
Shippen, William,
33
Shippen, William, Jr. 34

IoI9

875
71o

Sonnenfels, Baron de 804 Swift, Joseph G.
775 .
Soulavie, Abbè
433 Sylvester, J. J.
1844
Southard, Samuel L. 998 Syng, Philip, Sen.
35
Span, James,
217
936
Sparman, Andrew, 525 Tait, Charles,
1078
Spence, George,
473 Talcott, Andrew,
Spofford, A H.
1720 Talleyrand, P. M.
611
12on
Stanhope, Earl of
310 Taney, Roger B.
Stanley, Edward,
1330 Tanner, Henry S.
975
Staughton, William, 731 Tatham, William P. 1786
Shoemaker, Samuel, 262 Stedman, Alexander, 66 Taylor, Richard C. 1107
1446 Taylor, William B. 1846
Short, Charles W. 1041 | Steenstrup, J.S.
814 Temminck, Conrad I. 906
Short, William,
694, Steinhauer, H.
Shumhard, B. F.
I574 Steinsky, M.
490 Ternant, John,
353
Shurtleff, Nath. P. 1389 Stephens, John L. 1 148 Thayer, M. Russell, 1830
Siebold, Carl T. E.
Sterling, Lord,
265 Thayer, Russell,
1793
Von
1647 Stevens, Alex. H.
1247 Thayer, Sylvanus, 1089
I531
Siemens, Chas. W. 1829 Stevens, Edward,
584 Tholuck, A.
793
Silliman, Benjamin, 706 Stevens, John, Jr.
51 I Thomas, Isaiah,

69
Thomas, Richard,
276 Van Marum, Mart. 7or
Thompson, Elihu, 1807 Vanuxem, Lardner, 88o
Thompson, Sir H. 1726 Vater, Johann Sev. 808
448
Thompson, Oswald, 1404 Vaughan, Benj.
Thompson, R. E.
1755 Vaughan, John,
373
I447 Vaughan, Petty,
I 169
Thomsen, C. J.
Thomson, Charles,
129 Vaughan, Samuel,
372
Thomson, Frank,
I754 Vaughan, Sam. Jr.
423
Thomson, James G. 819 Vaughan, William, 988
Thomson, Sir Wm. 1723 Vauquelin, A.
75 I
465
Thornton, William, 472 Vaux, Cadet de
470
Thunberg, Chas. P. 540 Vaux, George,
829
Thury, A.
I 530 Vaux, Roberts,
1408
Tiarcks, John Lewis, 924 Vaux, William S.
Ticknor, George,
955 Vergennes, Count de 38o
Tidyman, Philip,
92I Vethake, Henry,
997
Tilesius, Guill. T.
833 Vining, John,
138
Tilghman, Benj. C. 1688 Virchow, Rudolf,
1475
1646
Tilghman, James,
43 Vogt, Carl,
625
Tilghman, Rich. A. 1233 Volney, M.
Tilghman, William, 707 Volpicelli, Paolo,
1442
Tilghman, Wm. M. 1057 Von Carleson, Gus. 591
Tilton, James,
306 Von Hammer, Jos. 805
Tocqueville, Al. de 1158 Von Leonard, C. C. Ios I
1466
Torombert, Honoré, 931 Von Liebig,
I424
Torrey, John,
IO44 Von Meyer, H.
Totten, George M. 1272 Von Raumer, Fred. 1218
569
Totten, Joseph G.
1061 Von Troil, Uno,
167o
Towne, John H.
1266 Vose, George L.
Townsend, Jos B. 1597
Tracy, Destutt,
709 Wagner, Andreas,
1425
Trautwine, John C. 1206 Wagner, Rudolf Von 1817
I 149
Trego, Charles B. 1 183 Wagner, Tobias,
1748
Troost, Gerhard,
790 Wahl, Wm. H.
524
Troughton, Edward, 802 Walker, John,
229
Trowbridge, Wm. P.1691 Walker, John,
IOT3
Troyon, Fred.
1490 Walker, Sears C.
417
Trumbull, John,
57o Wall, George,
Tucker, George,
1071 | Wallace, Alfred R. 1724
Tunner, Peter,
I529 Wallenstein, Jules de 982
1226
Turner, Edward,
1064 Waln, Lewis,
146
Turner, George,
52 I Waln, Nicholas,
755
Tuscany, G. Duke of 1174 Walsh, Robert, Jr.

Tweedy, John,
Tyndale, Hector,
Tyndall, John,
Tyson, Job R.
Tyson, Philip T.
Uhler, W. M.
Urbina, Luis de

2O6

Waterhouse, Ben.
Waters, Nicholas B.
Watson, James F.
Watts, Stephen,
Way, Nicholas,
Wayland, Francis,
Wayne, Anthony,
Wayne, Henry C.
Wayne, Isaac,
Webb, James,
Webber, Samuel,
Webster, Daniel,
Webster, Noah,
Wells, Richard,
Welsh, John,
West, Benjamin,
West, Francis,
West, Samuel,
West, William,
Wetherill, Ch.M.

Wetherill, John P.

548
566
1856
I4
307

Io90
355

1399
I 123

184

689
1077
944
161

1589
2O4

1338
127
79

1267

934

Wetherill, J. Price, 1850
Wetterstedt, Count

866

Wharton, Charles H. 452
Wharton, Geo. M. 1134
Wharton, Henry,
1894
Wharton, Isaac,
25 I
Wharton, Joseph,
1639
Wharton, Samuel,
244
Wharton, Thomas I. 989
Wheatley, Chas, M. 1887
962
Wheaton, Henry,
Wheeler, Samuel,
588
White, Andrew D. 1637
White, I. C.

1848

White, Thomas,
White, William,

482

Whitehurst, John,
Whitfoord, Caleb,

447

Whitman, Wm. E.

1546

Whitney, George,
Whitney, J. D.

1487

Whitney, W. D.

1502

18o

522
1899

Walter, Thomas U. 1 IoS

Whittier, John G. 1659
737 Whittlesey, Chaun. 125

1632 Warden, David B.
Ware, Nathaniel A., 897 Wickham, John,
577 Wilcocks, Alex.
Waring, William,
25 Wilcocks, Alex.
1651 Warner, Ashton,
Warner, Samuel,
I94 Wilder, Burt G.
1401
Warner, Thomas,
189 Wilkes, Chas.
617
Warren, Gouvn'r K. 1590 Wilkinson, James,
82I Willard, Joseph,
I I IO Warren, John C.
1602
IoS5

Vail, Eugene A.
340
Valentine, Louis,
572 Warris, Fort. de
1626
Vall-Travers, Rod. 557 | Warsaae, J. J. A.
Van Berckel, Peter I. 382 Washburne, E. A. 1506
Van Bramm, H. A. 622 Washington, Bush. 708
Vanderkemp, F. A. 705 Washington, George, 354
Vanderkemp, J. J. 112o Washington, John, I 1 I 2

IO43
94

I535

1863
1185

634
696

Williams, Henry J. 1037
Williams, Jon. Jr.
485
Williams, Samuel,
Williamson, Hugh,

299
51

Williamson, Robt. S. 1661

Willing, Thomas,

46

70
Wilson, Alexander, 7.59
Wilson, Daniel,
1489
Wilson, James,
233
Wilson, James P.
774
Wilson, Joseph M. 1747
Wilson, Thomas B. 1304
Winchell, Alex.
I545
Winsor, Henry,
1480
Winthrop, James,
740
Winthrop, John,
7o
Winthrop, Robert C.1896
Winthrop, Thos. L. 107o
Wistar, Charles J.
753
Wister, Caspar,
479
Wister, Caspar,
1406
Wister, Owen Jones, 1561

Witherspoon, John,
Wöhler, Fred.

Wood, George B.
Wood, Richard,
Wood, Horatio C.

Woodhouse, James,
Woodward, Henry,
Woolsey, T. B.
Wootten, J. E.
Workman, Benj.
Workman, James,
Wormley, Theo. G.
Worrall, James,

252 Wright, William,
1467 Wylie, James,
97 I Wylie, Samuel B.
1884 Wyman, Jeffries,
1556 Wyncoop, Benj.

318
865
713

1566
245

607

1762 Yarrel, William,

98o

1684 | Young, Chas. A.

1759

175 I

Yrujo, Carlos M. de 667

418

863 Zach, Francisco de 635
1854 Zantedeschi, Fran. 1284
25o Zecchinelli, Geo. M. 939
Worthen, A. H.
1488 Zimmerman, E. A.W.586.
Wrangel, Chas. M. II 5 Zentmeyer, Joseph, 1719
2O
Wright, James,

71

LIST OF MEMBERS
RESIDING WITHIN TEN MILES OF THE HALL,

MARCH, 1880.

Elected A. D.

1823. Coates, Benj. H.
1824. Seybert, Henry,
1828. Lea, Isaac,

1829.
1833.
1833.
1839.
1839.

Smith, Danl. B.
Robinson, M.
Peale, Titian R.

1842.
1843.
1844.
1844.
1844.
1844.
1847.
1848.
1849.
1849.

Fraley, Fredk.

Booth, James C.

Walter, Thos. U.
1842. Kendall, E. Otis,
Roberts, Sol. W.

Elwyn, Alfred,
Bridges, Robt.
DuBois, Wm. E.
Trautwine, John C.
Tilghman, Rich. A.
Longstreth, M. F.
Leidy, Joseph,
Ruschenberger, W.
S. W.

1851.
1851.
1851.
1851.
1851.
1852.
1852.
1853.
1853.
1854.
1854.
1854.
1854.
1854.
1854.
1854.
1855.
1856.
1856.
1856.
1856.
1857.
1857.
1857.
1858.
1858.

Kirkbride, Thos. S.

McCall, Peter,
Pancoast, Joseph,
Patterson, Robt.
Sharswood, Geo.

Meigs, John F.
Stillé, Alfred,
LeConte, John L.
Mordecai, Alfred,
Harding, Geo.

1859. Wister, Caspar,
1859. Vaux, Wm. S.
1860. Smith, Aubrey H.
1860. Lewis, Francis W.
1860. Hayden, F. V.
1861. Goodwin, D. R.
1862. Mitchell, S. Weir,
1862. Cornelius, Robert,
1862. Winsqr, Henry,

1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1863.
1864.
1864.
1864.
1864.
1864.

Chase, Pliny E.
Smith, Geo.

Pollock, James,
McClune, James,
Biddle, John,
Hartshorne, H.
Penrose, R. A. F.

Briggs, Robt.
Lesley, Joseph,
Chase, Thomas,

Marsh, Benj. V.
Sellers, Wm.
Wilcocks, Alex.
Krauch, Chas. P.

1866. Cope, Edward D.
1866. Wood, Horatio C.
1866. Wister, Owen J.
1866. Da Costa, Jacob M.

1867.
1867.
1867.
1867.
1867.
1867.
1867.

Allen, Harrison,

Keating, Wm. V.

Packard, J. H.
Stillé, Chas. J.
Raynolds, Wm. F.
Welsh, John,
Price, J. Sergeant
Lea, Henry Chas.
1868. Townsend, Jos. B.
1868. Shippen, Edw.

Price, Eli K.

1868. Graeff, Fredk.

Genth, Fred. A.
Felton, Saml. M.
Gross, Saml. D.
Stevens, Wm. B.

Rogers, Robt. E.

1869.
Kneass, Strickland, 1869.
Letchworth, A. S. 1869.
Lesley, Peter,
1869.
Harris, Robt. P.
1869.
Rogers, Fairman, 1869.
Rand, B. H.
1869.
Cresson, Chas. M.
1869.
Allen, W. H.
1870.
Hartshorne, Edw.
1870.

Horn, Geo. H.

1870. Seiler, Mrs. Emma,
1870. Pepper, Wm.
1870. Coxe, Eckley B.
1871. Phillips, Henry M.
1871. Meehan, Thomas,
1871. Haupt, Hermann,
1871. Tilghman, Benj. C.
1872. Frazer, Persifor, Jr.
1872. Houston, Edwin J.
1872. Blodget, Lorin,
1872. Agnew, D. Hayes,
1872. Nichols, S. H.
1872. Sellers, Coleman,
1872. Levis, Rich. J.
1872. Cassatt, Alex. J.
1872. Norris, Isaac, Jr.
1873. Zentmayer, Jos.
1873. La Roche, C. P.
1873. Pemberton, Henry,
1873. Rand, Theo. D.
1873. Barker, Geo. F.
1873. Snowden, A. L.
1873. Haines, John S.
1873. Britton, J. B.
1874. Wilson, J. M.
1874. Wahl, Wm. H.
1874. Camac, Wm.
1874. Thomson, Frank,
1874. Thompson, R. E.
1874. Platt, Franklin,
1874. Sadtler, Saml. P.
1874. König, Geo. A.
1874. Kenderdine, R. S.
1875. Ingham, Wm. A.
1875. McArthur, John, Jr.
1875. Allison, Jos.

. Penington, Ewd.

1875. Chapman, H. C.
1875. Prime, Fredk, Jr.
1875. Hagert, H. S.
Brinton. Daniel G. 1875. Tatham, Wm. P.
Wharton, Jos.
1875. Blasius, Wm.
Hopper, Edw.
1875. Sheppard, F.
Bullock, Chas.
1875. Thayer, Russell,
Anderson, G. W.
1875. Hall, Chas. E.
Seidensticker, O.
1876. Thompson, Elihu,
Tilghman, Wm. M. 1876. Hartranft, John F.
Baird, Henry C.
Lippincott, J. B.

72
1877. Stuart, George,
1877. McKean, Wm. V.
1877. Gowan, Franklin B.
1877. Phillips, Henry, Jr.
1877. Thayer, M. Russell
1877. Biddle, Craig,

1877. Reed, T. B.
1877. Humphreys, H. C.
1878. Wetherill, J. P.
1878. Wormley, Theo. G.
1878. Peirce, C. Newlin,
1878. Alison, Robt. H.
1877. Bache, T. Hewson, 1878. Marks, Wm. D.
1877. Strawbridge, Geo. 1878. Haupt, Lewis M.
1878. Muhlenberg, F. A.
1877. Goodell, Wm.
1878. Longstreth, Morris
1877. Rothrock, J. T.
1877. Moorehouse, G. R. 1878. Smith, Alb. H.

1878. Longfellow, Saml.
1878. Foggo, Edw. A.
1879. Law, Philip H.
1879. Greene, Wm. H.
1879. Brown, A. E.
1879. Seiler, Carl,
1879. Wood, Richard,
1879. Comegys, Benj. B.
1880. Wharton, Henry,
1880. Ashburner, C. A.
1880. Whitney, Geo.

-

-

D R

D U N G L L S. O. N. S.

PUBLIC DISCOURSE

PETER. S. DU PONCEAU, LL.D.
OCTOBER -

1844.

PUBLIC

I) ISC 0 URSE

IN COMMEMORATION OF

PETER S. DUPONCEAU, LL.D.
LATE PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY,

in ELIVE RE to

BEFORE THE SOCIETY PURSUANT TO APPOINTMENT,

ON THE 25th OF OCTOBER, 1844,

BY ROBLEY DUNGLISON, M.D.
One of the Secretaries.

PUBLISHED hY or DER OF THE SOCIETY.

PHILADELPHIA:
PRINTED FOR THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY,

By John C. Clark, 60 Dock Street,
1844.

COMMEMORATIVE DISCOURSE.

MR. WICE-PRESIDENT, AND GENTLEMEN:—

IT has been a custom with the American Philosophical So
ciety, on the death of its highest officer, to appoint one of its
members to deliver a public discourse, with the view of doing
honour to his memory, and of holding up, as an example to
others, the eminent intellectual and moral qualities, and the
honourable course that led to the attainment of such a distinc
tion.

Five discourses have thus far been pronounced; the first on
Franklin, who may justly be regarded as the founder of the
Society, by the Rev. Dr. Smith; the second on Rittenhouse,
by Dr. Rush; the third on Wistar, by Chief Justice Tilghman;
and the fourth on Tilghman, by the lamented subject of this
memoir.

Jefferson, who lived for many years after he had re

signed the presidency of the Society, received the accustomed
tribute at the hands of Mr. Nicholas Biddle. To one only of
the deceased Presidents no such tribute was permitted—to

Patterson, who modestly urged, as a last solemn request, that
he might be an exception; and his request was reluctantly
complied with.
If ever there be an occasion in which self should be disre

garded by an orator, it is when appointed, by an institution
like this, to commemorate the deeds of a distinguished and de
ceased member. The whole object of his appointment is to
illustrate another. Can this be more satisfactorily accom

plished, in the present instance, than by a brief record of the
eventful history of a long life spent in eminent usefulness?
Fortunately for the biographer, his venerable friend, in a series

4

of reminiscences, written partly to a friend now absent,” but

chiefly to a near relative,t had himself depicted his early his
tory, in the felicitous manner so characteristic of him. Much
labour of research has hence been spared; and in the details of
his youth little more has been necessary than to select and ar

range materials, thus happily presented by him who was the
best voucher for their authenticity.
Mr. DU PoNCEAU was born on the third day of June, 1760,
at the town of St. Martins, in the Isle of Ré, on the western

coast of France, where his father held a military command.
All his recollections of his studies, prior to six years of age,
were his having learned, almost entirely by heart, a Latin and

French vocabulary, which he found of great use in the sequel.
At that age he was put to an excellent grammar school, and
was instructed at home by private teachers. His fondness for

language began, at this early period, to develope itself. He
met one day, accidentally, with an English grammar, at a
neighbour's house.

“Childlike,” he says, “I was delighted with the letters K
and W, which my eyes had not been accustomed to see.

I

took the book home, and began to study the English language.
My progress was rapid. There were English and Irish fami
lies in the town; and the Irish regiment of Clare, and after
wards that of Walsh, were quartered there. I had a good ear
and flexible organs. I soon spoke good English, and became
a perfect Anglomane. I devoured Milton, Thomson, Young,
Pope, Shakspeare, and so neglected the French poets, that I
must acknowledge, to this day (1837), I have read but few of

the tragedies of Corneille, Racine, and Voltaire. The English
haut gout had spoiled me from them. I also wrote English
correctly. I have English verses (bad enough to be sure), but
which were addressed to me from Rochelle by a young Eng
lishman, when I was but twelve years of age.

I learned a

great deal of English poetry by heart, much of which I retain
to this day.”
* Mr. Walsh.

! His grand-daughter, Miss Garesché.

5

About this time he acquired Italian in the same manner,

from the officers of an Italian regiment quartered in the town.
Until the age of thirteen, he was at home, without any regu
lar instruction, reading a great deal without choice, and doing
what he pleased. His father had always intended him for the
military profession. As he appeared fond of study, he thought

he would make a good military engineer; and as there was at
the time, on the island, a large body of recruits, who were
drilled there for the service, and afterwards draughted into
regiments for the French colonies; and amongst these, many
young men who had received an excellent education, and were

skilled in various branches of knowledge,—the best informed
amongst the recruits made offers to his father, who had a com
mand over them, to instruct his children in consideration of

some relaxation from military discipline. These offers were
accepted, and young Du Ponceau was taught—superficially, as
a matter of course—mathematics in its various branches, geo

graphy, history, military fortifications, &c. Of these, history
and geography were alone to his taste, but they were not what
he preferred.
His father soon saw, however, that he must abandon the

project of a military life for his son, and especially that of en
gineering, which the youth’s shortness of sight did not permit
him to follow; but he abandoned it with regret.

His mother

was very desirous that he should be educated for the priest
hood, but the proposition met with no favour from his father.
It was at length determined that he should receive a collegiate
education, and that circumstances should afterwards decide as

to what precise use it should be applied. He was accord
ingly, in the autumn of 1773, sent to a College of Benedictine
Monks at St. Jean Angely. He had so profited by his studies
at home, that he was immediately placed in the class of phi
losophy, and when the theses were publicly defended, at the

end of the scholastic year, he obtained all the premiums.
Here he continued his English studies, and was never without
an English classic in his pocket, so that he received the sobri
quet of l’.1nglois. In this college he staid but eighteen
months, when he returned to the Isle de Ré, just entering

6

his sixteenth year.

He found the family in deep affliction

on account of the recent death of his father.

His mother now urged him strongly to embrace the sacred
calling; and in the then distressed condition of the family
there seemed to be no alternative; but his inclination, as his

mother knew well, had been always opposed to it. The fa
mily were, however, all in favour of it; and although he re
sisted for a long time, owing to his having imbibed in the Isle
de Ré (the population of which was half Protestant) the prin
ciples of the Reformation, he was ultimately compelled to sub

mit; “took the tonsure,”—to use his own language—and be
came Monsieur l'.Abbé,

The Bishop of Rochelle was a friend of the family. He
was a nobleman of the ancient house of Crussol, had much in

fluence at court, and many benefices in his gift: he sent the
young Abbé as a Régent to his Episcopal College at Bressiure,
in Poitou, where, at the age of fifteen, he had a class of scho
lars whom he instructed in the rudiments of the Latin lan

guage; but the other regents, who were men twenty-four or

twenty-five years of age and miserable pedants, were jealous
of him, because, owing to his being of a good family and pa
tronized by the bishop, he was treated by the principal with

greater respect than they. They called him Gentilhomme
Bas Breton; excited the boys to pelt him with apples, and

annoyed him in every way they could; until, at length, life
became intolerable, and finding that the principal, although
willing and well disposed, could not effectually check the pro
ceedings of those who were determined to get rid of him, he
finally resolved to satisfy them by quitting the place, and to
throw himself upon the wide world. “For the sake of truth,”
he says, “I must add, that I was also induced to this step by

my religious scruples; and, to be perfectly candid, by a rest
less disposition, and a spirit of adventure, which made me see

every thing in bright colours before me.”
On Christmas day, 1775, leaving all his luggage behind, he
sallied forth at daybreak, with the “Paradise Lost” in one
pocket, and a clean shirt in the other, on his way to the great
capital, where he arrived in the beginning of January, with
the firm resolution of depending, from that moment, on his

7

own exertions alone for subsistence, and for whatever fortune
might await him. “Behold me now in Paris,” he exclaims,

“at the age of fifteen, with a light heart, and a still lighter
purse. But I was full of hope, I had buoyant spirits, and saw
every thing couleur de rose!”
Less than two years before, his father had died at Versailles,
where he was soliciting a place of lieutenant-governor, which
had been promised him, and which, when he died, he was on
the point of obtaining. Young Du Ponceau went thither,
where he was very well received by his father's acquaintances.
Amongst these was the Baron de Montmorency, who was then
Governor of the Province in which the Isle de Ré is situate,
and who knew all his family. By the Baron he was treated

very kindly, although he did not approve of his absconding.
He was desirous of obtaining a clerkship in one of the depart
ments, and might have succeeded, but for his impatience and

utter ignorance of the world.

He wrote what he himself

terms “a most foolish letter” to Monsieur de Sartine, the Se

cretary of the Navy, complaining, in no measured terms, of
the delay of his appointment, and throwing the fault upon his
secretary, who was highly incensed, so that instead of the
place he expected he received a threat of the Bastile.
Disappointed, he left Versailles, and returned to Paris, well
provided with letters from his father's friends. Here he found

himself as independent as he desired to be. He earned his
living principally by translating English works, at so much a
sheet, for professed translators, who made a profit out of his
labours.

He also translated commercial letters for men of

business, and gave lessons in the English and French lan

guages. Among those to whom he was introduced was the
de, Genlis, the husband of the well-known authoress.

Count

The Count had been at the Isle de Ré, and knew his family.
He received him like a true courtier.

He was the intimate

friend of the Duke of Orleans, and resided in his palace. One
day he told Mr. Du Ponceau that the prince wished to have
an English and French vocabulary of the words and phrases
relating to the chase, with dialogues, &c. The subject was
new to him, “but what,” says he, “will not necessity and in

dustry do? I undertook, and with great labour produced the

8

work, which the prince was so much pleased with, that I had
the pleasure to see my manuscript in his library elegantly
bound in red morocco, with gilt edges. I had been promised
a handsome reward; but when, afterwards, I modestly hinted

to M. de Genlis something about a compensation, his answer
was, “Les princes ne donnent rien.” Had I been asking for
an alms, I could not have been answered otherwise.

He was

guillotined in 1793, with Brissot and others of his colleagues.
I did not wish him so severe a punishment. It is said of him
that when he went to the scaffold, he bowed to every body

that he saw, and that his looks seemed to say, -“If, where I’m
going, I could serve you, sir.’ This is a true picture of his
character.”

In the course of a few months, Mr. Du Ponceau became ac

quainted with the celebrated philologer, Court de Gébelin,
whose reputation was then very high. M. Gébelin offered to
take him as secretary, which offer was joyfully accepted.
With him young Du Ponceau remained six or eight months,
until his departure to this country. M. Gébelin was a Pro

testant minister, born in France, but ordained, and officiating
as minister of the Gospel, at Lausanne, in Switzerland.
“I do not know,” says Mr. Du Ponceau, “what circum
stances brought him back to his native country, where he ran
great risk if the law had been rigorously enforced, which was
not the case, as the government shut their eyes, provided the
Protestant ministers abstained from their functions.

M. de

Gébelin resided in Paris as a private citizen, and devoted him

self to the philological science, in which he acquired an im
mense reputation. He was in the zenith of his fame when I
became his secretary. He was an excellent man, and I cannot
but remember with pleasure the time that I spent with him.

He was to me as a father, and when I made known to him

my

engagement with Baron Steuben, and my determination to

come to this country, he did all in his power to persuade me
to remain with him, and even offered to let my name appear
with his on the title-page of his great work. But though I

sincerely loved him, and admired his talents, I did not agree
with him in his philological opinions. He was endeavouring
to find the primitive language, which I considered as impossi

9

ble.

I parted from him with regret; but fate had determined

that I should become an American.

I corresponded with him

until his death, which happened on the 13th of May, 1784.
He died a victim to his confidence in the Charlatan, Mes
mer.”

Among the houses in Paris frequented by Mr. Du Ponceau
was that of the well-known M. Beaumarchais, where he be
came acquainted with Baron Steuben, who was preparing to

set out for America. The Baron was in want of a secretary
who could speak and write the English language; and he soon
found that young Du Ponceau suited him entirely. The ar
rangements were speedily made.

They sailed together from

Marseilles, and landed at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on
the first of December, 1777.

Although one born in a country in which the English lan
guage is not spoken must require some time before he can feel
entirely domiciliated here, Mr. Du Ponceau, it seems, felt at

home from the first moment he landed. The language was,
indeed, familiar to him. “I was only astonished,” he says,
“to find even the milk-maids as learned as I was. My asto
nishment would hardly have been greater if they had spoken
Greek or Latin. As the Baron could not speak one word of

English, I accompanied him every where, and thus I was
thrown at once into the first company in the land.

I was

pleased with every thing around me. We ate our first dinner
at Governor Langdon's, and there we heard, for the first time,
of the capture of General Burgoyne and his whole army. We
hailed it as an omen of future success.”

Mr. Du Ponceau frequently reverted with satisfaction to

this period, and stated his belief, that he then understood and
spoke English as well as he ever did afterwards; and it was
with no little delight, that some years ago, through the kind

ness of Mrs. Langdon Elwyn, of this city, the daughter of
Governor Langdon, he had an opportunity of obtaining a let
ter which he wrote, when seventeen years of age, for Baron

Steuben to General Whipple, of Portsmouth, N. H., Mrs. El
wyn’s relative, the language of which is signally corroborative
of his belief on this point.
B

I0

Boston, December 15, 1777.
HoNou RABLE SIR,—

I have the honour to inform you, as soon as possible, of my arri
val in this town, and to thank you for all the kindnesses you have
been so good as to show me during my stay at Portsmouth. I have
given to Mr. Jackson, at Newberry, the letter you have favoured me
with for him, and had it not been for the difficulty of finding lodgings
here, I should have had the honour of presenting to Messrs. Hancock
and Adams those you have charged me with for them, but my whole
evening was employed in looking for a house where I might lodge;
but I hope to have to-morrow the honour of seeing these gentlemen.
I have the honour to be, with respect, honourable sir,
Your most obedient,
And most humble servant,
STEUBEN.

Judge Pettit has kindly sent me an autograph letter, written
by Mr. Du Ponceau, a few months later, to General Greene,
chief of the quartermaster's department.

Col. Pettit, grand

father of Judge Pettit, was an intimate and confidential friend
of General Greene, and had a large share of the control and
responsibility of the department, whilst General Greene re
tained his rank, and performed duty in the field as a Major
General in the army.
Camp, Valley Forge, April 17, 1778.
SIR,—

Baron Steuben would be much obliged to you if you would be so
good as to give an order to Major Craig to furnish him with two
common tents, and that marquise which Col. Lutterloh had before

his departure, which he has ceded to the Baron. Moreover, sir, you
would oblige him very much by ordering your deputies to furnish
him with three wooden bowls, and four or five wooden trenchers.

Meanwhile the Baron presents his compliments to you.
I have the honour to be, sir,
Your most obedient

And very humble servant,
P. S. DU PONCEAU, A. D. C.
To the HoN. MAJ. GEN. GREENE.

At Portsmouth, Baron Steuben remained about ten days,
and thence went to Boston, where he staid one month.

Here

11

Mr. Du Ponceau became acquainted with some of the most
distinguished persons connected with the Revolution, amongst
whom were John Hancock and Samuel Adams.

He was then

-to use his own expression—a stern republican, and had been
so from the first moment that he began to reflect. “I shall
never forget,” he says, “the compliment paid me by Sa
muel Adams, on his discovering my republican principles.”
“Where,” said he to me, “did you learn all that?” “In
France,” replied I. “In France; that is impossible.” Then
recovering himself, he added, “Well, because a man was born
in a stable, it is no reason why he should be a horse.” “I

thought to myself,” adds Mr. Du Ponceau, “that in matters of
compliment they ordered these things better in France!”
On the 14th of January, 1778, they left Boston, on their
way to Yorktown where the Congress of the United States
then sate; and owing to its being necessary to shape their
course westwardly, to avoid being surprised by hostile bands,
they had to cross the States of Massachusetts, Connecticut,

New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, so that three
weeks were consumed in a journey which at present occupies
but a few days.
The fame of Baron Steuben had preceded him to Yorktown,

where marked attention was paid him by General Gates.
“Congress appointed a committee to confer with him on the
subject of his pretensions, and were not a little surprised when
he informed them, that all his ambition was to serve as a vo

lunteer in their army.” All the favour he asked was, that his
two attendants, MM. Depontière and Du Ponceau, should
have the rank of Captain, which was immediately granted;
and on the 18th of February the subject of this memoir re
ceived the appointment of Captain, by brevet, in the army of
the United States, on which he always prided himself greatly;
and it was as a surviving Captain of Infantry of the Line, of
the Army of the Revolution, that he received a pension until
the day of his death.
On the 19th of February, Baron Steuben and suite departed
from Yorktown for the camp at Valley Forge, where they ar
rived on the 23d, and the next day Mr. Du Ponceau had the
honour of being presented to General Washington, and of

12

dining with him on that and the following day. “He re
ceived the Baron,” says Mr. Du Ponceau, “with great cor
diality, and to me he showed much condescending attention.
I cannot describe the impression that the first sight of that
great man made upon me. I could not keep my eyes from
that imposing countenance-grave, yet not severe; affable,
without familiarity.

Its predominant expression was calm

dignity, through which you could trace the strong feelings of
the patriot, and discern the father as well as the commander of
his soldiers. I have never seen a picture that represents him
to me as I saw him at Valley Forge, and during the campaigns
in which I had the honour to follow him. Perhaps that ex

pression was beyond the skill of the painter; but while I live
it will remain impressed on my memory. I had frequent op
portunities of seeing him, as it was my duty to accompany the
Baron when he dined with him, which was sometimes twice
or thrice in the same week.

We visited him also in the

evening, when Mrs. Washington was at head quarters. We
were in a manner domesticated in the family.”

The privations of the army during the winter spent at Val
ley Forge are matters of history, and were deeply felt by all.
“We,” says Mr. Du Ponceau, “who lived in good quarters,
did not feel the misery of the times so much as the common
soldiers and the subaltern officers; yet we had more than once

to share our rations with the sentry at the door. We put the
best face we could upon the matter.

Once, with the Baron’s

permission, his aids invited a number of young officers to dine
at our quarters, on condition that none should be admitted that

had on a whole pair of breeches. This was of course under
stood as pars pro toto; but torn clothes were an indispensable
requisite for admission, and in this the guests were very rare
not to fail. The dinner took place; the guests clubbed their
rations; and we feasted sumptuously on tough beef steaks and
potatoes, with hickory nuts for our dessert.

In lieu of wine,

we had some kind of spirits, with which we made salaman
ders; that is to say, after filling our glasses, we set the liquor
on fire, and drank it up, flame and all. Such a set of ragged,
and, at the same time, merry fellows, were never before

brought together. The Baron loved to speak of that dinner,

13

and of his sans-culottes, as he called us.

Thus this denomi

nation was first invented in America, and applied to the brave
officers and soldiers of our revolutionary army, at a time when
it could not be foreseen that the name, which honoured the fol

lowers of Washington, would afterwards be assumed by the
satellites of a Marat and a Robespierre.”
Whilst they were at Valley Forge, Baron Steuben was ap
pointed a Major-General and Inspector-General of the armies
of the United States. To the post of Secretary to the Baron,
which Mr. Du Ponceau then held, was added that of Aid-de

camp, which gave him, by courtesy, the rank of Major. This
he preserved until he quitted the military service. Whilst he
was at Valley Forge, he became acquainted with General La
fayette, who showed, from the first, much partiality for him,
which afterwards ripened into a friendship that ceased only
with the General’s life.

-

Mr. Du Ponceau attended Baron Steuben in his various mi

litary movements, and at the close of the campaign of 1779,
they took up their winter quarters in this city, where he had

not been long before he was attacked with symptoms of pul
monary mischief—coughing and spitting of blood, accompa
nied by great emaciation, which induced his physicians to
pronounce, too hastily, that his case was incurable. Mr. Du

Ponceau’s notes are any thing but favourable to the intelli
gence of one of those gentlemen. In May, 1780, his friends
procured for him a lodging at Nicetown, in order that he
might have the advantage which country air and exercise
were capable of affording. He had not been long there before
he received a letter from his physician, which, he says, asto

nished him exceedingly, and was by no means calculated to
raise his spirits. The doctor made an apology for not riding
four miles to visit him occasionally, on the ground that it
would be of no use, as his disease was incurable. “You are a

philosopher,” said he, “therefore I have no doubt that you
will bear this intimation as a philosopher ought to do.” In
the letter was enclosed an impression on sealing-wax of the
Goddess Hygeia; and referring to it he observed, that amulets
sometimes had the effect of restoring health; and that if it did
him no good, it would at least do him no harm. He con

14

cluded by recommending him to sleep in a stable, and inhale
the breath of cows, which, he said, had sometimes been effec
tual.

It is not surprising that the diagnosis of such a therapeutist
should be inaccurate.

The letter excited the disgust of the

patient, and destroyed all his confidence, not in the doctor
only, but—as too frequently happens in such cases—in medi
cine. Having tried an American physician, he now had re
course to one attached to the family of the French minister,
but he also condemned him.

“From that moment,” he playfully remarks, “I gave up
AEsculapius and his disciples, and determined to be my own
physician. I kept to the milk diet, because I had faith in it.
I did not seek the company of cows, because there was other
company that I liked better. I strove, above all things, to
keep up my spirits. I wrote satirical verses on the consump
tion, and determined that it should not consume me.”
He continued at Nicetown till the month of November,

when he seemed to be much improved. His cough had con
siderably abated, and the spitting of blood had become less

frequent. “I felt ashamed,” he says, “to receive the pay of
Congress, and to be idling my time without rendering any
service.”

He was in this disposition of mind when he heard that
Baron Steuben had been ordered to attend General Greene,
who was appointed to the command of the southern army.

The Baron having come to Philadelphia, Mr. Du Ponceau so
licited him to be permitted to accompany him, urging, that he
had tried every remedy without success, that he had heard that

the exercise of riding had often cured consumptive patients,
and that, after all, if he was to die, it was better and more
honourable that he should die in the field, than by the slow
process of an incurable disease. Baron Steuben consented,

and they left Philadelphia, in company with General Greene,
on the 23d of November of the same year (1780), which he
designates in one place “a most dismal year,” and in another,
an “ill-fated year.”
They parted with General Greene somewhere in the State

of Delaware, and pursued their route to Richmond, in Vir

15

ginia, with manifest improvement of Mr. Du Ponceau’s health,
who began to think himself out of danger. Owing, however,
to the fatigue incurred in the removal of public stores, when
Arnold took possession of Richmond, or to some other cause,
he again fell seriously ill; and Mr. Charles Carter, of Shirley,
having offered him an asylum at his hospitable mansion, about

twenty miles below Richmond, the offer was gratefully ac
cepted.

“I removed,” says Mr. Du Ponceau, “to that de

lightful place, where I was received and entertained with the
most liberal hospitality. I shall never forget my obligations
to that excellent family.” And he never did forget them. A
short time only before his decease, he recurred with marked
satisfaction to the kindness which he had experienced from

them between sixty and seventy years before.
He staid at Shirley two or three weeks, when, on the re
commendation of his medical attendants, that he should use

travelling exercise on horseback, he visited various parts of
Virginia, of which, however, he retained but a confused re
membrance, having made no notes thereof at the time.
These rambles, with intervals of repose at the seats of dif

ferent gentlemen, improved his health so much, that he again
became ashamed of his indolence “while an enemy was ra

vaging the country,” and rejoined Baron Steuben some time
before the encounter with General Phillips, whose object was
to get possession of Petersburg.
On the 3d of June, 1781, Mr. Du Ponceau attained the age of
twenty-one.

He was then at a place called the Point of Fork,

in the western part of eastern Virginia, where there was a
state arsenal, a depôt of military stores, which had been placed
there for security, and with the view of being transported
thence to the Carolinas, the principal theatre of the war. Here
they narrowly escaped being captured by Colonel Simcoe's

horse, after which they directed their march rapidly towards
North Carolina.

Mr. Du Ponceau followed the Baron until

they had nearly reached the frontier of that State, when he

was attacked with fever, which was accompanied and suc
ceeded by so much debility, that Baron Steuben, after much

consideration, advised him to proceed to Philadelphia, be
lieving him—as was the general impression—to be incurably

16

consumptive. During the journey, however, his health mate
rially improved; and for this result he considered himself
partly indebted to the violent exercise which he was com
pelled by Col. Simcoe to take, and which was so irksome to
him at the time.

When he left the army, Baron Steuben gave him a strong

letter of recommendation to Congress, soliciting for him an
employment in some civil capacity.
On the 25th of July, 1781, he took the requisite oaths, and

became a citizen—as he expresses it—“of the great Common
wealth of Pennsylvania.”

“Behold me, then,” he adds, “a

citizen of the United States, having entered with them into a
solemn compact, to which I have faithfully adhered, and
which I have never repented.”
For a few months he was engaged in this city in youthful

and social amusements, whilst his friends were watching to
discover some appropriate employment for him. Nor were
they unsuccessful. Mr. Robert R. Livingston, Chancellor of
the State of New York, having been appointed Secretary for
Foreign Affairs, Mr. Du Ponceau was strongly recommended
to him as an assistant.

Amongst those who wrote to Mr. Livingston in his behalf,
were Governor M'Kean and Judge Peters. The original let
ters from these gentlemen have been placed in my hands
through the kindness of Mr. Horace Binney Wallace, of this
city. That of Judge Peters exhibits the high opinion enter
tained by the distinguished functionary of the character and
attainments of the youthful applicant.
October 19, 1781.
DEAR SIR,

It is very seldom I undertake to recommend persons for public
employments, as it is a subject of a delicate and embarrassing na
ture; but I cannot withhold my very hearty recommendation of
Capt. Du Ponceau, who, I understand, has applied to you for some

appointment in your department. I have been acquainted with him
ever since his arrival in this country, and from my own observa
tions, as well as the warm expressions of approbation and esteem I
have heard from Baron Steuben, I have no doubt of his attachment
to our cause, and am convinced of his abilities and unblemished cha

17

racter. The Baron has long wished him to be employed in the
corps diplomatique, as his want of health and shortsightedness will
not admit of his distinguishing himself in the field. He has an ex

ceeding industrious turn, and has a most remarkable facility of ac
quiring languages. French is his native tongue. English he has
acquired perfectly, and he understands German, Italian, and Spa
nish. He can translate Danish and Low Dutch with the help of a
dictionary, but a little application will make him master of these.
He is also a good Latin scholar. From his private history, of which
the Baron has often given me an account, I have reason to believe
his views are entirely confined to this country. I do not pretend to
undertake to point out any particular employment, but am convinced
he can be useful to you in any one you choose to point out for him.
I am, with very sincere esteem,
Your obedient servant,
RICHARD PETERS.
Hon. Mr. LIVINGSTON.

On the 22d of October, Mr. Du Ponceau was sworn in as

Mr. Livingston’s Secretary, and entered upon the duties of

his new office. Subsequently, on the 1st of March, 1782, Mr.
Livingston was allowed two under-Secretaries; one of these,
Mr. Lewis Morris, a nephew of Mr. Gouverneur Morris, and
the other the subject of this memoir. Mr. Morris and he re
ceived each seven hundred and fifty dollars a year during their

continuance in office—the salaries being paid in specie—in
French crowns and louis d’or, which was the money current

at the time. The house, that Mr. Livingston occupied until
his retirement from office, was the one in which Mr. Du Pon
ceau resided until his death. “Here,” he says in his manu

script reminiscences written nearly seven years ago, “in the
society of Mr. Livingston and his amiable family, I enjoyed
the most brilliant period of my life, and here, in my manhood,
and my more advanced age, I have experienced the various
vicissitudes of human life.

Here, in every room, in every

nook, in every corner, in every walk, in our little garden, in
every flower that blossoms in it, I find the memorials of the
scenes of by-gone days. I love to call those scenes to mind,
and to dwell on the melancholy or pleasing recollections
which they excite.”
C

18

The official business of the department was transacted, as is
well known, in a small tenement in Sixth street, adjoining the
office subsequently occupied by Mr. Du Ponceau, and forming
a part of his estate. “I hope,” he remarks, and his hope was
fulfilled, “that at least during my life, this interesting memo
rial of our early history will remain where it now stands, and

that its memory will be preserved after me. It will be the
subject of a noble page for the pen of the future historian.”
In Mr. Livingston’s office Mr. Du Ponceau continued until
the 4th of June, 1783, a period of somewhat less than twenty
months.

At the close of the war he determined to embrace

the profession of the law, which he studied under Mr. William
Lewis, whom he regarded as, at the time, “the most celebrated
lawyer in Philadelphia, and perhaps in the United States.”

In a letter to Mr. Thomas I. Wharton, published by that gen
tleman as an appendix to his Memoir of Mr. Rawle, in the

fourth volume of the Memoirs of the Historical Society of
Pennsylvania, he gives a most interesting sketch of Mr.
Lewis, Mr. Rawle, and others of their contemporaries.
At June term, 1785, Mr. Lewis moved for his admission as
an attorney of the Court of Common Pleas, and on the favour

able report of the examiners he was received. He had been
previously appointed, by the Executive Council, Notary Pub
lic; and in 1791 was made sworn interpreter of foreign lan
guages. His Notary’s office soon kept him well employed;
and his docket for September term, 1785, the first after his ad
mission, showed that he was then concerned in twenty-one
suits either for plaintiff or defendant. In 1786, on the motion

of Mr. Lewis, he was admitted an attorney of the Supreme
Court of the State.

In the year 1788, Mr. Du Ponceau married; and from that
time he began to lead a very retired life, attending only, ac
cording to his own testimony, to the duties of his profession.
In the letter just mentioned, he thus playfully alludes to the
delightful intercourse which existed between the then older
members of the bar.

“In the beginning of the present century, during the reign

of the embargo, non-intercourse, and other restrictive measures
produced by the British orders in council, and the Berlin and

19

Milan decrees, a great number of cases were carried up from
this city to the Supreme Court of the United States.

The

counsel engaged in those causes were in the habit of going to
gether to Washington, to argue their cases before that tribunal.

These were Mr. Ingersoll, Mr. Dallas, Mr. Lewis, Mr. Ed
ward Tilghman, Mr. Rawle, and myself, who am, alas! the

only survivor of that joyous band. We hired a stage to our
selves, in which we proceeded by easy journeys. The court
sat then, as it does at present, or did until lately, in the month
of February; so that we had to travel in the depth of winter,
through bad roads, in the midst of rain, hail, and snow, in no
very comfortable way. Nevertheless, as soon as we were out
of the city, and felt the flush of air, we were like schoolboys
in the play-ground on a holiday; and we began to kill time
by all the means that our imagination could suggest. Flashes

of wit shot their corruscations on all sides; puns of the genuine
Philadelphia stamp were handed about; old college stories
were revived; macaroni Latin was spoken with great purity;
songs were sung—even classical songs—among which I recol
lect the famous Bacchanalian of the Archdeacon of Oxford,

“Mihi est propositum in tabernd mori:” in short, we might
have been taken for any thing but the grave counsellors of the

celebrated bar of Philadelphia.”
“I shall always,” he adds, “remember with pleasure those

delightful journeys, in which we all became intimately ac
quainted with each other; for on such occasions, when free
scope is given to the imagination, men appear in their true
characters, and no art can prevent them from showing them
selves as they really are.

Our appearance at the bar of the

Supreme Court was always a scene of triumph. We entered
the hall together, and Judge Washington was heard to say,
‘This is my bar. Our causes had a preference over all others,
in consideration of the distance we had to travel. The great

est liberality was shown to us by the members of the profes
sion who usually attended that court. It was really a proud
thing, at that time, to be a Philadelphia lawyer.”
Mr. Du Ponceau was now busily engaged in the active ex
ercise of an honourable, laborious, and lucrative avocation, but

– as he himself said—“the life of a lawyer, in the full practice

20

of his profession, offers very little but the dull and dismal
round of attendance upon courts, hard studies at night, and, in
the day, fatiguing exertions, which, however brilliant, are con
fined to a narrow theatre, and leave nothing behind but a blaze

of reputation and the echo of a name.”
The reports of the different courts show, that he was con
stantly engaged, often in most important suits; and on ques

tions of civil and foreign law his opinion was justly held in
the highest estimation.

In the intervals of his arduous occu

pations, he found leisure to translate several valuable foreign
works on law, and to write interesting essays on professional
subjects, some of which were published.

His last published legal opinion, on which he bestowed
much labour, although conceived and written at the advanced

age of eighty-two, is not unworthy of his elevated reputation.
It was given in the case of Mr. Levy, delegate from Florida,
whose seat in Congress was contested in 1841, 1842.”

So lofty was Mr. Du Ponceau’s reputation, at the com
mencement of the present century, as a learned jurist, in the
Roman and French laws more especially, that the important
office of Chief Judge of Louisiana was tendered to him by
President Jefferson; but his prospects and associations in Phi
ladelphia induced him to decline it.
On all occasions, his time, his talents, and his powerful in

fluence, were bestowed freely for the promotion of juridical
knowledge, and the maintenance of peace and harmony
amongst the members of the legal profession. In the year
1820, a society was instituted, called “The Society for the
Promotion of Legal Knowledge and Forensic Eloquence.”
The “Law Academy” was a branch of this, and under its pa
tronage. The first President of the Association was Chief
Justice Tilghman, and the first Provost of the Law Academy,
Mr. Du Ponceau. This office, through the favour of the Aca
demy, he held until the time of his death; and on more than
one occasion, at the close of the Academic session, the mem

bers acknowledged their deep sense of obligation for the “un
remitted exertions and unwearied benevolence of their vene
rable Provost.”t
* See Appendix A

! See Appendix B.

21

Throughout his long life, Mr. Du Ponceau was much at
tached to philological inquiries, and especially to such as con
cerned the analogy and philosophy of languages, in the ac
quiring of which, as remarked by Judge Peters, he possessed
a rare facility. He knew more of the Latin than he did of
the Greek; was acquainted with most of the languages of Eu
rope, and spake several of them; but it was not until his labo
rious services in his profession had secured him a comfortable
competence, that he devoted much of his time to philology.
An impulse in this direction was given him by the establish
ment, by this Society, of the Historical and Literary Commit
tee. “In the year 1815,” he remarks in his letter to Mr.

Wharton, “was received the joyful news of the peace with
Great Britain. Until that period, a colonial spirit had pre
vailed throughout this country, that had checked all efforts at
literary enterprise. The successful issue of the war raised our
spirits, and our minds took a direction towards literature and
science.

The news was received about the middle of Febru

ary. On the 17th of March the American Philosophical So
ciety, which had been long slumbering, resolved, “That a
committee of their body should be added to those before exist

ing, to be denominated ‘The Committee of History, Moral
Science, and General Literature.’”
In the year 1819 was presented by this Committee to the
Society the report of the Committee, of which Mr. Du Pon

ceau was chairman, on the Structure of the Indian Languages,
which was printed in the Transactions of the Committee,

speedily obtained for its author the reputation of being a
learned philologer, and was followed by his receiving the de

gree of Doctor of Laws, and the distinguished honour of being
elected, on the 20th of April, 1827, a corresponding member
of the French Institute, in the Academy of Inscriptions.
At a subsequent period, in May, 1835, the prize of Lin
guistique, founded by the Count De Volney, was awarded to
him by the same learned body, for a Memoir on the Indian

Languages of North America, which was afterwards published
in Paris.
About the same time his attention was directed to the struc

ture of the Chinese language, which has generally been re

22

garded as ideographic,-in other words, the written character
has been considered to represent ideas, not sounds; so that the
Chinese and congenerous nations, it has been conceived, may
be able to correspond with each other in writing, although

their spoken languages may be mutually unintelligible.

Mr.

Du Ponceau boldly, and most ingeniously, and ably, main
tained, from analogy, the opposite opinion,—that the written
language is learigraphic; or, in other words, that the charac
ters represent sounds. This opinion, however, is contested
by distinguished Sinologists.
His Dissertation on the Chinese Language, published in
1838, when he was seventy-eight years old, must be looked
*

upon as the last of his philological productions.
The exalted reputation, which these researches acquired for
him, led to his reception into many of the most learned and
time-honoured institutions of the old world; and on this side
of the Atlantic there were few that did not hasten to illustrate

themselves by enumerating him amongst their associates."
Of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, of which he was
President at the time of his death, he was long an able and en

ergetic member, and enriched its published memoirs by valua
ble contributions.

The Society for the Commemoration of the

Landing of William Penn received his warmest support, as his
published discourses on more than one anniversary testify.
Of the Athenaeum of this city he was President at the time of
his decease, and had been so for years; and often have I heard
him pour forth his grateful acknowledgments to the American

Philosophical Society, and to the others over which he pre
sided, for having annually elected him to honoured offices,
when, as he expressed it, advanced age, and its necessary in
firmities, had subdued, but not destroyed, his usefulness.

The latter feeling induced him, in January, 1843, to tender
his resignation as President of the Athenaeum—a proposition
which was met in that estimable spirit which “blesseth him

that gives and him that takes.” On the motion of Judge Pet
tit, it was resolved—“That the Board have received with

much sensibility the note of Mr. Du Ponceau, in which he
* See Appendix C.

23

tenders his resignation as a Director and President of the In
stitution; and placing a high value upon the influence of his
distinguished reputation and elevated character, earnestly de
sire that his connexion with the Athenaeum, as its President,
may be continued; and while the members will at all times

be most happy to welcome him among them, the Board will
relieve him from the obligation to perform active duties.”
The deep interest which he felt in all these institutions

could not be better shown than in the feeling manner in
which, in his last will and testament, written in 1839, he parts,
as it were, with some of them, after having bequeathed lega
cies to almost all.”

“I take the liberty to recommend to my brethren of the
bar the Law Academy of Philadelphia, that they may take
it under their special protection, so as to make it as useful
as possible to the progress of our noble science. A law pro
fessorship has long been wanted in this city: several of the
states have the advantage of us in this respect.

I recommend

this important subject to the consideration of the friends of the
legal science, and who are desirous of making it redound more
and more to the honour of Pennsylvania.

-

“The Historical Society of Pennsylvania is in danger of
perishing for want of support. While almost every other
State has an historical society, shall it be said that Pennsylva
nia wants one? Under the auspices of its illustrious founder,
William Rawle, it has produced interesting and valuable me
moirs: the honour of the State requires that the work should
be continued.

I recommend to them to increase the number

of their members, and, perhaps, to raise the annual subscrip
tion to five dollars. I would also recommend to them to ap

ply for aid to the Legislature: no one would be better able,
than a committee from their body, to continue the publication
of our ancient records so honourably begun, and which appears
to be suspended. Science and literature are the glory of a
State; canals and rail roads are perishable. The noble aque
ducts, temples, roads, of the Greeks and Romans, have perish

ed, but their literary fame will last forever. If England were
* See Appendix D.

24

n, her fame would be perpetuated by the

philosophe", and poets.
sunken into the ocea
works of her admirable historians, d with these feelings, c**
whose minds * impresse
“I
hope
the and
annual
ert themselves
act. cele"

ILet those,

landing of the great
William Penn will not be discontinue", and that the Society
-

will revive under better auspice" than have for some time at
tended it. Mig" it not be remodeled and united" the His
have only " pursue
“The
American Philosophical
torical
Society?

Society

their present honourable cou" near my hea" I have ven
“The above objects being very

tured to give vent " my feelings upon them.
full, and 1 could
out of place, but "Y heart is
Throughout the whole of his exis as before stated, h
was exceedingly shortsighted: so that, idea of educating "
abandoned the e period, his fath
father, on this account,
and,
as a military eng" About the sa"
took
him toofwalk
" ramparts
his native
tow”
the course
theiron"
asked himofwha"
profession
he wish
to follow. Like a autiful son, the young man replied:—“W h
His father then looked steadfastly "l
him,
and
in
an
angry."'
£d:—“Quele" woulez-vous q"
you
please,
sir.”
donne
à un aveugle."
This put an end to their conversat
-

and they both returne" home in a melancholy mood.
This defect Was

probably the cause of "' of the insta
a of him. * himsel

£
be" man he was extremely
bein. that which
when have
a yo"
relate

£ constantly involve

£

be
under

-

, so that Baron Ste

Th him his Parso" Adams.
In e following anecdote is related
Valle
spring of 1788,

the

dist

by himself:

whilst the

-

army was

Forge, the commander

encam]

dered a

shami

' by two divisions of the troops, one of whi

aid-deorders

e command " Baron Steube"

In the

capacity

'' Mr. Du Ponceau was sent to reconnoit"
enemy .
immediately at full gallop " s"
'c. ould be in sig" ... I rode on,” say” he—"
return

addressed to his

grand-daug" to the dis

25

about a quarter of a mile, when I was struck with the sight of
what I was since informed to be some red petticoats hanging

on a fence to dry, which I took for a body of British soldiers.
I had forgotten, it seems, that the contending parties were all
Americans, and none of them clothed in scarlet regimentals.
Full of my hallucination, I returned in haste to the camp, with

the news that the enemy were marching upon us. Our divi
sion took the road I had indicated, and behold! the sight of

the red petticoats was all the result of their movement. It
excited, of course, a great deal of merriment, to my utter con
fusion and dismay. The adventure was related the same day
at head quarters to General Washington, in my presence; but
such was the conduct of that excellent man, that I retired com

forted, and my mind relieved from the heavy weight that

pressed upon it. I cannot recollect the particulars of that
scene, my mind being so confused at the time. All I remem
ber, is a huge bowl of punch which was handed round to the
company, and of which I took my share. No taunt, no re
proach, came to me from any quarter. The mirth that the

adventure occasioned was mild, and only indulged in kind
ness.”

“This true incident,” he adds, “gave rise, amongst my fel
low-soldiers, to many tales in which there was not a shadow
of truth. It was said, for instance, that I had once rode out to
the adjutant-general's office on a black horse, and returned on

a white one, without perceiving the difference. If you should
ever hear any of those stories, you may safely place them
among the apocrypha. All that can be said of them is—‘se
non è vero è ben trovato; for they are in good keeping with
similar traits of my character at that time.”
Mr. Du Ponceau was under the impression that he had

wholly overcome this “great defect,” as he terms it; and
during the last years of his existence, his apparent absence
could generally be explained by defective sight and hearing.
In addition, indeed, to his original infirmity of vision, and the
diminution in the sensibility of the nerves of sight, owing to
the progress of age, he was affected with cataract; yet, until
the last, he was capable of reading, although with considerable
labour.
D

26

About the year 1829, the even tenor of his life was broken
in upon by his zealous exertions to introduce the production
and manufacture of silk into this country. With the feasi
bility of the project he was most enthusiastically impressed.
In a letter to Mr. Arthur Bronson, of New York, he says—

“My plan is well considered; it is slow, but sure.

I cannot

say in what manner the thing will be done, but that the nation

will, before long, enrich themselves by the sale of raw silk,
and successively afterwards by the manufactured article, I
have no more doubt than of my own existence. I owe a debt
of gratitude to this country, by which I have been kindly re
ceived and treated. I lay hold, with eagerness, of this oppor

tunity to repay it.”
Application was made to Congress, and a bill was presented

in conformity with the views of Mr. Du Ponceau, which failed,
however, and after great inconvenience, for he went to Con
necticut in 1830, and twice to Washington during the session
of Congress of 1831–2, to further the great objects he had in
view; and after the loss of several thousand dollars, he was ul
timately compelled to abandon the scheme altogether.
In a published letter to Mr. Warden, of Paris, dated the
29th of July, 1837, which gives a “history of the silk bill,”—

after having described its fate whilst he was in Washington,
he remarks—“Thus, finally defeated in my patriotic design, I
took leave of my friends, and returned home immediately. I
made no complaints nor appeals to the people in the newspa
pers or otherwise, but turned my thoughts to other objects. I
found that I had lost three years of my time, and about four
thousand dollars of my money, in pursuing a phantom, which

at last eluded my grasp. I awoke as from a dream, and con
soled myself with the proverb, which says that the shortest
follies are the best.”

Still, the agitation of the measure directed the attention of
the public more vividly to the silk culture; yet any imme
diate benefit accruing from it was, perhaps, more than neutral
ized by the morus multicaulis delusion, which gave occasion
to so many absurd and ruinous speculations.
From this time he proceeded smoothly along the downhill
of life, devoting his best attentions to the societies over which

27

he presided; and although the infirmities of age weighed upon
him, the brightness of his intellect, to those who knew him
best, seemed almost untarnished. Until within a day or two
of his death, the condition of European politics was an object

of solicitude with him; and he anticipated with increasing
pleasure the successive arrivals of the transatlantic steamboats.

Often has he expressed to me, that these arrivals became more
and more interesting, inasmuch as, at his time of life, he might
be cut off suddenly, and was, consequently, anxious to keep up

his knowledge of passing events to the last moment.
This feeling of the great uncertainty of his existence is
strongly exhibited in a reminiscence to his grand-daughter,

dictated on the 20th of January last: “Yesterday,” he says,
“I had a surprise, which I was far from expecting. Your
friend, Miss
, coming to pay us the compliments of the
season, wished me, as usual, a happy new year, and many

more to come. To a man of my age, this word many sounds
very much like the mil-anos of the Spaniard. Still, it is not
unpleasant. I answered, that I did not expect to live many
years, but that I hoped this year to ‘see the roses,’—meaning,
of course, the roses in June. To my great astonishment, the

lady replied, ‘then your wish is accomplished, and presented
to me a fine full blown rose; but, alas! it was a winter flower,

and not that which was the object of my wishes. An old Ro
man would have considered this as a bad omen, and an un

lucky anticipation of expected time; but as I am not super
stitious, I still hope, with submission to Divine providence,
‘to see the roses’ on my next birth-day, and present to my fair

friend a fine bouquet of the queen of flowers.”
The same feeling is exhibited in another reminiscence, dic
tated on the 1st of March, exactly one month before his death,
and—as he admits—when in a “romantic vein.”

“The ugly month of February is gone, not to return until
after the expiration of another year. Old winter, with his
snow-capped head, and ice-shod feet, is fast receding from our
shores.

Three weeks more—only three weeks—and the glo

rious sun, emerging from the oozy mansions of the fishes, and
mounted on a splendid ram, will introduce to us the youthful
Spring, leading by the hand his sister Flora, accompanied by a

28

crowd of her lovely nymphs in the various forms of hyacinths,
jonquils, daffodils, violets, daisies, lilies of the valley, and the
lovely primroses. Primroses! I love that word. It reminds
me of the poor primrose-girl, whose simple ditty, in my
younger days, I sang with so much pleasure, as it was coupled
with the remembrance of her from whose lips I first heard it
sung:

“I live by primroses,
Come buy my primroses.
Who'll buy my primroses?
Who'll buy, Who'll buy?"

But enough of those by-gone times. Three months more,
and the roses will appear.

You know that I was born in the

season of roses. On every return of that enchanting season, I
reckon one year added to my frail existence, and I ask myself
the question:—Shall I see the roses once more? That depends

upon the will of Divine providence; yet hope is not forbidden
us. I yet hope, at the end of the ensuing three months, to see
the roses again, and to present you, on the third of June” [his
birth-day], “with a fine bouquet of the queen of flowers.

Pray join in saying, Amen!”
Although not destined to see the third of June, he was ena
bled to see again his favourite roses, which he asked for in
his last illness, and numerous friends hastened to gratify his
wishes. Ten days after the letter was penned, from which
this extract was made, he was attacked with symptoms of
bronchitis—a disease which is often fatal to the aged. For a
time, hopes were entertained by me, that he might success

fully resist its fatal influence. His strength, however, gra
dually yielded, and, on the 29th of March, the depression and
difficulty of breathing became more and more urgent and
alarming. He, himself, from the commencement of the at
tack, had little expectation of recovery. Still, he was anxious
to learn the report which I had to make to him, from time to
time, of his condition, and especially of the evidences that

were afforded by auscultation, on which he seemed to place
great reliance.

On the 31st of March, he said, in reply to a friend, who

39

spoke to him in an encouraging manner,—“C'est la maladie

de mort.” Throughout that day, it was manifest that his ex
istence could not be prolonged many hours. About one
o'clock, in the morning of the first of April, he breathed his
last.

Thus died—in his 84th year—at an age much more ad
vanced than is generally vouchsafed to man, and happily with
out the wonted “labour and sorrow,” one who had raised

himself to a proud eminence; and whose high intellectual en
dowments had made him known not only in every part of this
country, but in the four quarters of the globe. His corres
pondence was extensive, both at home and abroad, and his

letters to and from distinguished literary characters are replete
with valuable and interesting information.

In all these—and

on every occasion—where circumstances called for the expres
sion of his sentiments, he exhibited that he was sincerely and

ardently an American; and was proud that his adopted coun
try should reap the credit and advantage of his intellectual
efforts. I have already remarked, that from an early age he
was imbued with republican principles; yet it would not seem
that these gave the whole impulse to his removal to this coun

try. He says himself, indeed:—“I shall not set up the vain
pretension of having come to this country for the sake of free
dom, or of a republican government. I was, it is true, a friend
to liberty, and hated despotism, but that was not my predo

minant passion at the time. My most anxious desire was that
of travelling. I wished to see different nations, different men,
different manners, and, above all, to learn different languages, of
which I was at that time, and ever since have been, extremely

fond.” In writing of the French alliance, the news of which
burst upon them at Valley Forge, he thus expresses himself:
“The public distress was forgotten amidst the universal joy.
I shall never forget that glorious time. I was not yet an
American. I was proud of being a Frenchman. Rejoicings
took place throughout the army. Dinners, toasts, songs, feux
de-joie, and what not! I thought I should be devoured by
the caresses, which the American officers lavished upon me
as one of their new allies. Wherever a French officer appear

30

ed, he was met with congratulations and smiles.

O! that was

a delightful time! It bound me forever to the country of my
adoption.” And in a subsequent reminiscence, dictated a
little more than three months before his death, in