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DAY IN THE LIFE

Special section inside and at Kansan.com

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016 | VOLUME 130 ISSUE 19

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN


THE STUDENT VOICE SINCE 1904

Foundation Distinguished Professor takes


pride in teaching diverse group of students
CONNER MITCHELL
@ConnerMitchell0

s the Universitys
first Foundation Distinguished professor
of American Studies, David
Roediger has spent years
educating young minds and
writing about race, class and
social movements. However, education was not always
his chosen career path.
I was all set in the early
'70s to go to law school, but
I had taken an education
degree, so I student-taught
high school a little bit, and
I liked it, he said. When
I got in the classroom at
Northwestern as a [teaching
assistant], I figured out that
I enjoyed it a lot, and just
kept doing it.
Roediger, who divides his
time between teaching, writing and researching, said
being an educator resonates
with him because of the diverse group of students he is
continually exposed to in a

college environment.
The teaching part [that I
like] is that its different every day, and its a different
group of students, and I particularly like Kansas because
the students come from a lot
of different backgrounds
and a lot of different abilities. Its a very, very interesting group of students, he
said. The writing I dont always enjoy, and sometimes
it is kind of hard. But it lets
me think about what I am
thinking about the present
at the same time that Im
writing history.
Roediger has penned
nearly a dozen novels, and
has a new book coming out
this summer. He said his
current project is a book focusing on the middle class
and examining what politicians really mean when they
say, I am going to save the
middle class.
Sometimes they think
90 percent of Americans are
middle class, which is giant.

Kelcie Matousek/KANSAN
David Roediger, an American Studies professor at the University, studies student movements and offered some insight into the recent student protests.

So I end up trying to think


about when people started
using the term middle class
and why they started to use
it and keep using it, he said.
Im trying to think about
what it is to be middle class
now, and whether we should
want to save the middle
class, or whether we should
want to say, Well, thats always been kind of a precarious place to be.
Roediger also focused
extensive research on social movements and said he

was inspired by the efforts


of student activist group
Rock Chalk Invisible Hawk
last semester. However,
while he said the Invisible
Hawk movement was likely
inspired by student movements at the University of
Missouri, the two movements had different motivations.
I was inspired here, the
question is how do you take
that moment of passion
and translate it into institutional changes? he said. I

wouldnt draw too sharp of


a line between the Missouri
experience and the Kansas
experience. One of the reasons that Invisible Hawk
was so successful in the fall
is that they were resisting
this story that Kansas is different, and Missouri has always been backwards.
Natalia
Ramos-Thaw,
a freshman from Newton,
took Roedigers American
Studies 110 course last semester, and said his availability and passion for what

he teaches sets him apart.


I really enjoyed having
Roediger as my American
Studies professor, she said.
He always made himself
available to help for students who needed it. He is
definitely one of the nicest
professors I've had so far,
and you can really tell that
he actually cares and is passionate about what he is
teaching his students.
Edited by Ryan Wright

KU debate teams continue


49-year winning streak
COURTNEY BIERMAN
@courtbierman

Alex Robinson/KANSAN
Jammie Johnson, graudate advisor in the School of Journalism, speaks to a student at the School of Journalisms
Diversity Town Hall meeting on Tuesday night in Stauffer-Flint.

Journalism school Town Hall


focuses on minority inclusivity
LARA KORTE
@lara_korte

About 10 sheets of paper


with tactics for handling diversity and inclusion were
pinned to the walls of the
Clarkson Gallery in StaufferFlint Hall for the School of
Journalisms Diversity Town
Hall meeting Tuesday evening. Roughly 20 students
milled around the gallery
writing down suggestions or
comments.
The Town Hall meeting
was held to get student and
faculty feedback on diversity
and inclusion issues within
the School of Journalism.
Ann Brill, the dean of the
school, said as the school approaches re-accreditation in
the fall of 2016, it's looking at
plans for the future.
So were looking at all
of our plans, our strategic
plan, our diversity plan, our
assessment plan and as we
looked at our diversity plan
and we looked at the other
things happening around
campus, we appointed a
committee to look at it and
the committee decided this
would be a really great way
to get feedback, Brill said.
The
papers
posted
around the room listed three
goals the School of Journal-

ism has for diversity and


inclusion and some tactics
to achieve them. The goals
included developing an academic environment fostering cultural competence and
social justice, developing a
culture based on intellectual
curiosity and inclusiveness
and developing a structure
to hold the school accountable.
Jordan Winter, a freshman from Overland Park,
took careful time to read all
the tactics. Below one suggestion, Winter commented
that she thinks the school
should worry more about
maintaining diverse faculty
rather than recruiting them.
I just thought that we
should be focusing more
on educating the current
staff and talk about just like
maintaining the good environment for them rather
than attracting new people,
Winter said.
Shelby Bettles, a junior
from Wichita, commented
below a tactic that suggested
showcasing the diverse work
of graduate students. Bettles
said she wasnt sure how effective advertising a showcase would be in a school full
of media students.
A lot of the big things
that we put up here in the

J-School dont get enough


traffic to impact the way that
students look at the things
that were presenting, and I
think thats a great idea that
we should be promoting
that students want to learn
more and teach other people about diversity, Bettles
said. Im just more not sure
if another poster or if another showcase is the best way
to do that, just because were
all so attacked by so much
media all the time, and so
many posters everywhere,
that I dont know exactly
what the way is to teach students that its good to understand diversity and to become culturally competent.
Bettles suggested instead
of posters promoting diverse
work, students should get invited to events where diverse
topics and research might be
presented and discussed, or
better yet, give those same
speeches or presentations in
class.
To actually promote
that learning through their
teaching instead of kind of
hoping that students do this
kind of learning on their own
merit, Bettles said. I think
people should be handed
this information.
SEE TOWN HALL
PAGE 2

The trophy cases on the


first floor in Bailey Hall are
full. Silver and gold testaments to the University
debate teams success are
crowded behind the glass,
along with silk banners lining the walls. Since forming
in 1885, the University debate team has become one
of the most prestigious in
the country, program director Scott Harris said.
Next month six debaters, made up of three teams
of two, will represent the
University at the National
Debate Tournament (NDT)
at Binghamton University
in New York April 1-6. Competing teams are selected
through a combination of
evaluating the team's success over the course of the
season and meetings of a
national debate committee.
This is the 49th consecutive year the University
has competed in the NDT,
one of the biggest competitions of the season. Only

one school, the University


of Southern California, has
a longer streak.
Harris attributes the debate programs success to
his incredibly hard-working, incredibly bright students. He draws an analogy
between University debate
and the University basketball team.
What is it that makes
KUs basketball program
so successful that it wins 12
consecutive Big 12 titles?
Its that tradition of bringing quality students to the
program, quality coaching,
hard work, Harris said.
Harris said this years
topic is "Resolved: The
United States should significantly reduce its military presence in one or
more of the following: the
Arab states of the Persian
Gulf, the Greater Horn of
Africa, Northeast Asia."
Teams are required to
prepare two arguments,
one affirmative and one
negative. The tournament
begins with eight preliminary rounds. Each team

debates the affirmative


side for half of the rounds
and negative for the other
half. Only 32 teams of the
original 78 advance to the
single-elimination rounds,
which narrow the roster
down to 16, then the final
four, Harris said.
Chris Birzer, a junior
from Overland Park, and
Mac Cook, a sophomore
from Shawnee, make up
one the Universitys three
teams competing in the
NDT. While this will be
Cooks first NDT experience, it is Birzers second
year in the tournament after he broke into the top 32
teams as a freshman.
Even though hes been
there before, Birzer recognizes qualifying for the
NDT is a big deal for a collegiate debater.
To be able to qualify is
prestigious, both because
its hard to be one of the top
three teams from KU and
also because its difficult to
be one of the top 72 [teams]
in the country, Birzer said.
SEE DEBATE PAGE 2

Illustration by Jake Kaufmann/KANSAN

news
Kansan
staff

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SECTION EDITORS

TOWN HALL FROM


PAGE 1
Last semester, following
the University-wide Nov. 11
Town Hall Meeting on race,
respect and responsibility,
many schools and departments across campus held
forums on diversity and inclusion to address unique
needs within their own classrooms.
Brill said after the meeting in
November, many journalism
students felt content having
conversations in their classrooms or with professors or
advisors. Now that students
are ready to join the wider
conversation, Brill said she
thinks the main focus will
be on recruitment of diverse

students.
I think the biggest issue
right now is recruiting more
students of color, Brill said.
What I hear students say
in the journalism school is
they feel very welcome, they
feel very safe, they feel very
appreciated, but they really
wish they did not feel quite
so alone.
Brill said the committee
has already held several focus groups and will continue looking at mechanisms
to improve inclusion at the
school. The next chance for
students to meet and talk
with the dean about diversity will be during Donuts
With the Dean April 6 in the
Clarkson Gallery.
Edited by Madi Schulz

KANSAN.COM/NEWS |THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016

DEBATE FROM
PAGE 1
It is not uncommon for
student debaters to spend
20 to 40 hours per week
preparing arguments, researching, strategizing and
scouting competitors arguments. Its also common
for students to miss class
due to out-of-state tournaments. Birzer said he often
misses three full days of
class when the debate team
goes on a trip. Harris said
its worth it.
Policy debate itself is an
incredible rich, rewarding
experience, Birzer said. It
teaches not only communication skills but is very
heavily invested in research

Associate news editor


Cassidy Ritter
Sports editor
Scott Chasen
Associate sports editor
Shane Jackson
Arts & culture editor
Ryan Wright

Opinion editor
Maddy Mikinski
Visuals editor & design
chief
Roxy Townsend
Chief photographer
Caroline Fiss
Investigations editor
Miranda Davis
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much research and preparation as possible.


Its hard to place a
quantitative result on what
were hoping to do, Birzer
said. I think theres a good
chance that well be able to
be successful and have a
good run, and I think [] all
three of our teams have the
chance to be really successful if we put in some work
over the next few weeks.

Edited by Madi
Schulz

Prairie Acre restoration led by professor,


environmental studies capstone course

News editor
Kelly Cordingley

Associate
arts & culture editor
Christian Hardy

skills and learning about


how it is that political arguments work, about how it
is that the political system
works.
The University has won
the tournament five times,
most recently in 2009. Harris and his team dont have
specific expectations for
the upcoming tournament.
After losing in the first of
the elimination rounds last
year, Harris said he hopes
theyll at least make it that
far again.
Then its do your best
and let the chips fall where
they may, Harris said.
In the weeks leading up
to its departure for New
York, Birzer said the team is
buckling down to get in as

Caroline Fiss/KANSAN
This years environmental studies capstone class will implement what a 2014 class planned in order to restore
Prairie Acre, located north of Sunnyside Avenue and directly south of Blake Hall.

NASHIA BAKER
@Nashia_Baker

hen
Prairie
Acre, north of
Sunnyside Avenue and directly south of
Blake Hall, was created on
the University campus in
the early 1930s, about 100
indigenous plants thrived
there, Kelly Kindscher, environmental studies professor, said.
Throughout the years,
a lack of maintenance
has depleted the only native land on the Lawrence
campus to about 30 indigenous plants.
Now, an Environmental
Studies capstone course is
trying to revitalize Prairie
Acre.
Attempts to restore
Prairie Acre dates back
15 to 20 years ago, primarily through Kindscher
and management techniques, such as removing
trees that shaded the area.
Kindschers Environmental Studies capstone class
will implement what his
2014 class planned to restore Prairie Acre.
I teach the environmental studies capstone
class, and Im always looking for projects for that
class, Kindscher said.
Over the years theyve
done a variety of projects
and plans. So for that class
in 2014, we had a group
focus on the Prairie Acre,
and I worked with them
and the students generated this plan, which is what
we are planning to implement this year.
The plan includes informing the community
of the history, assessing
the land, explaining the
steps for healthy longterm maintenance of the
area, determining species
to include in the restoration and explaining the
valuable uses of the area,
according to the Environmental Studies Course
Restoration Plan. Even
with the unpredictable
seasonal weather, the
prairie can be maintained
because of the dormancy
of plants in the winter, and
the increase in management techniques allows
for the acre to flourish,

said Laurel Sears, Prairie


Acre Restoration Project
coordinator and GTA in
the environmental studies
capstone course.
If you look at other native prairies around here,
there are things that limit the floristic qualities,
Sears said. One of those
is mowing it and another is grazing. Sometimes
grazing is helpful to prairies, but we dont intend to
bring bison and cows out
there. So that is not one
that we are going to use,
but having too many fires
or not enough fires limits
the floristic qualities. So
having burns every other
year, every few years will
allow it to remain clear.
Sears also said fires
clear the underbrush, allowing for many species
to thrive. The capstone
class, which includes 32
students, and the addition of volunteers helps to
speed the process in order

Its one of the


quiet places on
campus that
there arent
many of, that
arent improved
or paved or
designed.
Laurel Sears
Prairie Acre Restoration
Project coordinator

to restore the acre, Kindscher said.


So far weve had a lot
of interest from students,
faculty, staff and really a
lot of community members, said Jeffrey Severin,
director of the Center for
Sustainability.
Theres
been a lot of work done
with preparing and sorting seeds. We had a really
successful volunteer day
to get those seeds started
down at the greenhouse.
Theres definitely a lot of
energy around the actual
planting that it going to
take place this spring.
Financial aid for the
project comes largely from
donations and fundraising
through the University
and outside sources, totaling $15,900. Donors

include Historic Mount


Oread Friends and anonymous donations, Sears
and Severin said. With the
help of funding, the continuation of the project
can serve several purposes, aside from sustainability of the land.
Whats really important is that this is morphing into an outdoor learning classroom, Sears said.
This is a site for learning
for KU students, and its a
site for teaching for professors. It works well, it
serves a lot of missions,
and its a really nice place
to be. Its one of the quiet places on campus that
there arent many of, that
arent improved or paved
or designed.
In addition to the opportunity to have a piece
of native land on campus,
there is a chance to connect with history as well.
I think it is really important because it connects a wide group of
people through the KU
community, Sears said.
It connects them to Kansas heritage. It really reflects the place where we
live and landscape where
we live and allows people
from different corners of
the world to come and understand where they live
right now.
The current plan for

the restoration of Prairie


Acre includes an approximate three-year timespan
for the land to begin to
restore to its full health,
Kindscher said.
Its a piece of present
moment; its one of very
few virgin prairies in the
whole county, Sears said.
This is a diminishing
landscape because of development, and I think the
fact that we have captured
this and are preserving it
allows people to see the
beauty, the delicacy, the
intricate balance that happens in native landscapes
and to also understand
that it is a sustainable
landscape.
Edited by Samantha
Harms

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to manage the plot of land


properly.
One of my main roles
is to communicate with
volunteers so they can be
engaged and involved and
to make a space for them
because theres volunteers of all capabilities and
backgrounds, Sears said.
Its about providing jobs
for them [providing]
ways to help other people
and the whole broad vision
of prairie acre manifest.
The volunteers, which
vary from 10 to 40 event
participants, help plant
and find the native species

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NEWS

KANSAN.COM

Worlds of Fun opens April 16 with 5 new rides


Each of the rides are up
and running for testing.
Snoopys Junction is a trainlike ride that features live
cacti along the ride to add to
the illusion of a desert.
This is a good ride for
children who are possibly
in arm casts or leg casts
who still want to partake in
riding rides, said David Bywater, director of park operations.
Woodstock
Gliders,
which Bywater admitted
was his personal favorite of
the new rides, features blue
and yellow Snoopy airplanes
that are link swings.
Once riders get inside,
they have the ability to use
the wings and flaps to utilize how fast they want to
go. The riders guide the ride,
not us, Bywater said.
Meadows said smoothing
out and replacing the wooden board on just a quarter of
the track of the Timber Wolf,
one of the parks most popular wooden roller coasters,
cost $600,000, while the
five new rides being added
cost about $400,000 combined.
Bywater said precautions
were being taken to ensure
the rides are safe to open
when the season starts.
Typically, a full time
staff member needs to ride

Alex Robinson/KANSAN
David Bywater, director of operations, observes the Snoopys Junction train ride, one of five new rides in Snoopy Planet at World of Fun.

ANISSA FRITZ
@anissafritz

The smell of paint, trucks


carrying large metal pieces
of equipment, torn up gravel
and workers planting shrubbery is the current scene at
Worlds of Fun theme park

in Kansas City, Mo.


The park staff is preparing for opening day April 16
and will introduce five new
rides this summer to their
guests.
To make way for the new
rides, the park has demolished Thunderhawk, Crazy

Cars and Snoopy Bounce.


The five new rides and
demolition of the three
old ones took roughly two
months and cost the park
around $2 million in construction, labor and parts
over the last two months,
said Wayne Meadows, di-

rector of maintenance and


construction.
All five new rides,
Snoopys junction, Linus
Launcher, Snoopys Space
Buggies, Beagle Brigade
Airfield and Woodstock
Gliders, are catered to children and their parents.

the ride and sign off that the


ride looks and sounds right.
But before that, we test the
ride with what would feel
like a full load of people. We
do this by filling up mannequins with water and use
them to test the ride first,
Bywater said.
Season pass holders can
come a day early, April 15,
to experience the new additions.

Edited by Shane
Jackson

NEW RIDES
Snoopys Junction
Linus Launcher
Snoopys Space
Buggies
Beagle Brigade
Airfield
Woodstock
Gliders

READ FULL
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8246

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WE HEAR
FROM YOU

KANSAN.COM | THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016

Text your #FFA


submissions to
785-289-8351

Are you campus wifi?


Because I'd really
like to hit you with
some construction
equipment.
Setting an alarm for 6
am, then 7, then 8. It's
9:23 am and I'm still in
bed
7:30 AM enrollment
is for freshmen.
I'm a senior. I have
important sleeping to
do.
Is there another word
for the word "word"
Editor's Note: term,
name, expression,
designation, locution,
vocable, appellation

Illustration by Jake Kaufmann/KANSAN

Mikinski: Breaking news coverage lacks


clarity and misses the mark on accuracy

When u think u got a


text but u actually just
accidentally turned
on Siri
The founding
fathers didn't wear
underwear. Pass it on.

MADDY MIKINSKI

@Miss_Maddy

Twas the night


without wifi and all
through the house,
not a connection
was stirring, nobody
moved a mouse.
When I turned my
car on, the music
was so loud I almost
whimpered.
Just drove away from
the gas station with
the gas pump still in
my car... All time low.
Wishing I had millions
of dollars so I could
buy the Han Solo
leather jacket that
Harrison Ford is
auctioning off

n October 30, 1938,


mass panic swept
the nation. Americans fled their homes in
search of safety and gas
masks. They packed the
freeways, trying to escape
chaos in New York. In Indianapolis, a woman interrupted an evening church
service, telling them, New
York has been destroyed!
Its the end of the world! Go
home and prepare to die!
This was the day Orson
Welles (who would go on to
direct "Citizen Kane") presented his reinterpretation

YOU CAN DO THE


THING!

READ MORE AT
KANSAN.COM
@KANSANNEWS
/THEKANSAN
KANSAN.NEWS
@UNIVERSITY
DAILYKANSAN

attacks, the first major international news event we


remember, were covered
by breaking news. A quick
Google search can bring up
live coverage of the World
Trade Center from CNN,
FOX and NBC. Though
some of the videos are almost two hours long, they
only show a small portion
of the total coverage that
day.
Breaking news in the
modern era tends to last
for hours. News anchors
and phone-in eyewitnesses heap speculation on top
of itself until the facts are
almost
indistinguishable
from the fallacy.
During coverage of the
2012 Aurora, Colo. movie theater shooting, ABC
News was forced to apologize after mistaking shooter
James Holmes for an Aurora resident and incorrectly linking him to the Tea
Party. In April of that same
year, CNN and many other
news outlets drew criticism

for incorrectly reporting


that an arrest had been
made in the Boston Bombing case.
Viewers who have time
to sit down and watch
hours of breaking news
coverage may be able to see
corrections and retractions.
Viewers who only catch 20
minutes of breaking news
coverage will most likely
walk away with incorrect
facts. Like in the War of
the Worlds, if viewers miss
the context, theyll walk
away knowing less than
when they tuned in.
Craig Silverman, who
runs the Poynter blog Regret the Error, has what he
calls the Law of Incorrect
Tweets. Silvermans law
states that initial, inaccurate information will be
retweeted more than any
subsequent correction.
In other words, inaccurate information will
always be more widely received than any attempts to
correct it. This is something

were taught in journalism classes, and maybe its


something network news
services would do well to
remember.
Instead of pushing out
unsubstantiated information to an audience who
wont stick around to see
it rectified, network news
outlets should be more discerning with the speculations they throw out as fact.
Untrue, sensational information, as seen in Orson
Welles broadcast, has the
power to create monumental ripples in its audience.
When covering breaking
news, networks should
keep in mind just how
much their statements can
be misconstrued and blown
out of proportion.
Maddy Mikinski is
a senior from Linwood
studying
English
and
journalism.
Edited by Shane
Jackson

Issawi: We attempt to make our lives seem


more interesting on social media than they are

It figures that the


Internet would go
down when I actually
have work to do.
Panda bears eat
roughly 14 hours a day.
Why was I not born a
panda? I'd fit right in

of H.G. Wells novel War


of the Worlds. The life-like
breaking news broadcast
tracked an alien invasion
targeting New York. Listeners tuning in after the
programs
introduction
were tricked into believing
that the world was over and
aliens were attacking.
Though Welles program was fictional, the
panic caused by War of
the Worlds teaches us a
valuable lesson on breaking
news and its repercussions.
The 1930s were considered the golden age of radio. Today, radio has been
overtaken, according to a
2015 American Press Institute study, by local and
network news. When global
breaking news happens, research suggests Americans
turn to broadcast news organizations such as CNN,
Fox and MSNBC to get the
scoop.
Todays college students
have grown up surrounded
by breaking news. The 9/11

DANYA ISSAWI

@danyasawi

In 1997, entrepreneur
Philippe Kahn created the
first-ever camera phone.
Kahns revolutionary invention stemmed from a
simple desire to easily capture photos of his newborn
baby; and what a long way
weve come in the nearly
20 years that followed. The
camera phone has become
amorphousconstantly
changing in the form of
increased megapixels and

front-facing cameras in an
attempt to keep up with the
recent uptick in popularity
of photo sharing on social
media platforms.
Social media may very
well be the greatest invention and inconvenience we
have ever conceived. Dont
get me wrong- I am a huge
proponent of social media use. Not only has this
newly conceptualized virtual world created a smaller, global community and
made communication easier, but it has also created an
entirely new sector of jobs
for millennials.
But, the double-edged
sword that comes with such
constant, external exposure
cannot be ignored.
Weve slowly but surely
stripped away our humanity in an attempt to advertise the best version of ourselves on social media. We
Photoshop, lighten, tighten

and erase every flaw and


imperfection until each image is pristine. No longer do
we use pictures to capture
moments, but rather, we
create moments to capture
pictures staging candid, laughing pictures with
friends or a serene moment, staring at the sunset,
on the beach.
Weve become brands,
competing against one another to create the farthest
outreach (aka the greatest amount of likes), until
eventually we begin competing against ourselves,
and our true, organic
state of being is no longer
enough. Images that barely resemble us plaster our
walls, news feeds and manifest an image of the version
of ourselves we want people
to see, and maybe who we
truly wish we could be.
Famed Instagram model Essena ONeill recently

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR


LETTER GUIDELINES: Send
letters to editor@kansan.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the
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Length: 300 words

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authors name, year, major and
hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at
kansan.com/letters.

deleted her account, which


garnered hundreds of thousands of followers, on the
popular photo-sharing platform for this reason, claiming her account had no
longer become about her,
but had rather become a
source of contrived perfection made to get attention.
This compulsion to make
our lives seem more interesting has become an overwhelming and unnecessary
source of competition. But
at the end of the day, perpetuating a manipulated
image of oneself becomes
exhausting, and the gap
between who we are in the
real world and our persona
in the virtual world widens,
and we lose ourselves in
space in-between.
Yes, social media portrays a portion of who we
are, but only the sliver we
allow people to see. In a
sense, weve become slaves

CONTACT US
Vicky Diaz-Camacho
Editor-in-chief
vickydc@kansan.com

Gage Brock
Business Manager
gbrock@kansan.com

to the system in a constant state of photo-taking,


photo-editing and photo-sharing. Its become
natural to watch an awe-inspiring sunset or gawk at
a plate of savory food and
wonder what it would look
like through the lens of an
Instagram filter, but once
we control that urge to
reach into our pockets, pull
out our phones and snap a
picture, then maybe we can
break free from the system.
Maybe life can stop being
so mechanic and mundane,
and we can begin to accept
ourselves in our natural
state of being and truly enjoy fleeting moments rather
than stress about capturing
them within the confines of
a couple million pixels.
Danya Issawi is a
sophomore from Kansas
City studying journalism.

THE KANSAN
EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan
Editorial Board are Vicky
Diaz-Camacho, Kate Miller,
Gage Brock and Maddy
Mikinski

arts & culture


HOROSCOPES
WHATS YOUR

KANSAN.COM | THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016

SIGN?

Aries ( March 21-April


19)
Career opportunities seem
within reach. Stay focused.
Consider whats best for
family. If it goes against your
grain, turn it down. You gain
profound insight into a problem. Teach someone what
youre learning.

ART IN
FOCUS:

Taurus ( April 20-May


20)
Travel and academics hold
your focus. A formidable barrier blocks the path, so step
carefully. You can see what
wasnt working. Keep practicing. Work with someone who
sees your blind spot. Have a
backup plan.

CARRIE BEALL

Gemini ( May 21-June


20)
Manage shared finances
with your partner. Difficulties
become apparent. Listen
carefully, and avoid blame or
argument. Focus on what can
be done. Make an important
call. Keep your sense of
humor.
Cancer ( June 21-July
22)
Collaborative efforts get
through where a solo push
fails. Keep your patience with
partners and roommates.
Deep breathing is good now.
Negotiate to refine the plan.
Let go of old baggage.
Leo ( July 23-Aug. 22)
A change of direction at
work does you a lot of good,
but may take you by surprise.
Cut clutter to make space
for whats ahead. Reconnect
with your base.
Virgo ( Aug. 23-Sept.
22)
Relax, and take it easier.
Pay bills before spending
on treats. Simple luxuries
satisfy, like open sky and hot
water. You dont need gifts
to express your love. Remind
people what you appreciate
about them.
Libra ( Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Family matters hold your
focus. You and a housemate
may have differing opinions.
Slow down and proceed with
caution, or youll break something. Avoid harsh words by
listening more. Go for clarity.
Decrease clutter.
Scorpio ( Oct. 23-Nov.
21)
Breaking news reveals a
startling turn of events. Study
background details before
weighing in. Discover the
undercurrents and hidden
resources. Take abrupt action
to grab a passing opportunity. Youre gaining influence in
a growing conversation.
Sagittarius ( Nov. 22Dec. 21)
Prioritize positive cash flow.
Pay bills, and send invoices.
Sell or give away stuff you
no longer need. Establish
efficient routines to save
money. Keep things frugal,
even when a windfall lands
in your yard.
Capricorn ( Dec. 22-Jan.
19)
Take charge, and motivate
others to participate. An opportunity requires action, and
you see something possible.
Slow down to navigate sharp
turns. Get out and explore
whats going on. Invite someone interesting.

Annie Grabowsky/KANSAN
Carrie Bealls goal of the display was to create a living room in the middle of an art gallery for people to look at her books while having a comfortable place to relax.

Graduate students MFA thesis tells story


of childhood through illustrated memoir
OMAR SANCHEZ
@OhMySanchez

"H

ard to Say" is a
feature exhibition by University graduate student Carrie
Beall, an MFA thesis that
will cap off her three years
of education at the University. This feature will run,
with one other thesis, from
March 27 to April 1 at the
Art & Design Gallery, which
is located on the third floor
of Chalmers Hall.
As a sentimental installation that focuses on
themes of memory and
interpersonal communication, "Hard to Say" envelops
many of Beall's passions,
as her degree in Expanded
Media allows her to build
a piece of art through illustrations, drawings, technology and paintings.
The exhibit features a
"pop-up" living room with
chairs and lamps that create a comfortable setting
for visitors to sit down and
take a look at her illustrations at their leisure.
"I wanted to give viewers
the most authentic reading
experience that I could inside of a traditional gallery
space," said Beall. "I wanted it to feel like the furniture was pieced together in
the same way that the stories from the book were."
The book, a memoir that
serves as an arrangement of
short stories, family photos
and illustrations, tells of

Beall's childhood in Chesapeake Bay, Md., as she tries


to understand how to cope
with the inability to fully
express her emotions.
The stories are disjoint,
yet colorful and simple
in a way that emanates a
commonality between the
pages, one that reveals a
powerful message about
memory and how it shapes
how we know the world
around us.
In this way, the furniture you will find becomes
an exemplar of our collection of memories and how
we use it to create new ones
as well.
"I wanted them to feel
like memories that fit together but weren't all exactly the same," Beall said. "I
wanted the furniture to feel
like it came from different
points in the past but that
it could maybe all belong to
the same person or family."
A theme, for example,
throughout her illustration
book is that of her mother.
The first pages introduce us
to a young Beall as she meticulously attempts to fill
a plastic cup with soda for
her mother. In dead center
of the handwritten pages
of the story are the various
plastic cups that Carrie associated with her mother.
Her filling up the cups
is a gesture that Beall said
connotes her struggle to
show her love and compassion for her. Also, she said
"on another level, it's about

tiny details that surround


the memories of my mother."
These succinct yet hazy
memories of her interactions with her mother are
an important part of Beall's
life. She said there were not
many kids in her neighborhood where she grew up, so
she spent much of her time
at home and had a difficult
time communicating and
making new friends.
Her mother became a
symbol for Beall of trying
to break out of her shell.
Throughout the rest of the
illustration book, Carrie
explains situations such
as when she used a paper
plane to tell her mother
she had her first period.
She also delved into her
realization that she loved
the way her house always
changed in the short story
"A House Reset," an idea
that came into her mind after her mother began to be
hospitalized for reasons she
is still attempting to understand.
"To me, ["A House Reset"] is the most important
story in the book. I have
been struggling with the
memory of my mother's
hospitalization for several
years now, and it's something that no one in my
family talks about," Beall
said. "This story really
functioned as a way for me
to bring up the topic to my
mother when she read the
book to try to open up

communication to her in
the present."
After attending Towson
University in Maryland and
studying Studio Art, KU
became the next step for
her to continue making art
and attempt to make something that could help her
have some sort of closure
with her past.
Tanya Hartman, director of graduate studies in
the Department of Visual
Arts and chair of the thesis committee, immediately saw a special quality in
Beall and knew Beall could
accomplish her goals using
her artistic abilities.

I wanted to give
viewers the most
authentic reading
experience that I
could inside of a
traditional gallery
space.
Carrie Beall
Expanded Media
Student

"Carrie is a tremendously talented human being,"


Hartman said. "She is a
writer and an artist with a
wealth of intelligence and
sensitivity to bring to her
creations. She is absolutely
original and needs to be encouraged to see the potential in her unique vision."

"Hard to Say" became


that unique vision.
"This book was an important process for me,"
Beall said. "I have always
loved writing and drawing,
and it was a struggle to get
to the point where I found
a support system that allowed these ideas to flourish."
Overall, Beall said it was
a therapeutic and gratifying
experience creating "Hard
to Say," something she described as an emotionally-healing process that she
hopes others will be able to
begin as they see her art.
In fact, this curative
quality to her art is something she wants to continue
to explore after graduation.
"I plan to move back to
the east coast and continue
to write, start a new collection of stories and revisit
some of the ideas that I began but didn't get to flesh
out in my three years in the
program. I also hope to go
back to school and become
a certified Art Therapist,"
Beall said.
"Hard to Say" is available to the public and is free
for all who are interested.
Edited by Samantha
Harms

Aquarius ( Jan. 20-Feb.


18)
Peace and quiet suit your
mood. Private productivity
generates satisfying results.
Read instructions and
histories. Plan upcoming
engagements in detail. Think
carefully before making an
important decision. Home
draws you in magnetically.
Pisces ( Feb. 19-March
20)
Find ways to increase shared
assets. Insurance? Investments? Manage accounts,
and get feedback from a
partner. Set up meetings, and
resist temptation to spend on
non-essential frills. Get expert
opinions. Share ideas for
profit and savings.

Annie Grabowsky/KANSAN
Carrie Beall recreates the stack of plates in front of her.

Annie Grabowsky/KANSAN
Comfortable chairs and a calm atmosphere surround the books, which include stories of
Bealls mother.

ARTS & CULTURE

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Non-Students
Welcome
Confidential

ART & CULTURE

KANSAN.COM

Langston Hughes documentary


created by University professors
JACKSON DODD
snooopdodd

Contributed Photo/KANSAN
Langston Hughes. Photo courtesy of University Archives.

Last summer, Randal


Jelks, a professor of African-American Studies, sat
down with a group of scholars on the life of Langston
Hughes. Hughes was a key
voice of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and
1930s. They planned out
a new documentary idea
about the life and writings
on Hughes. The discussion
included the decision to
search for an endowment
grant that would fund their
movie, "I, Too, Sing America: Langston Hughes Unfurled, A Doc Film."
The film eventually got

its funding March 23 by the


National Endowment for
the Humanities. The group
was awarded $50,000 to
develop the film, according
to a press release.
The title of the documentary comes from a famous poem titled "I, Too,
Sing America" written by
Hughes in 1945 about race
relations. The group, called
"Hughes Dream Documentary Collective," is teaming
with the Lawrence Arts
Center to make the film.
While the documentary
is only in the pre-production phase, it started with a
quest to gain awareness on
Hughes. Jelks said he noticed the sparse collection

of Hughes' life in Lawrence


so he looked through the
body of film of Hughes life.
The extensive collection of
anything about Hughes is at
Yale University, and Jelks
worked with the people
there to see if any footage or
images could help the story
in the documentary.
If you see Hughes
quotes on Twitter, people
might not know who said
it, Jelks said. No one
knows the interesting complexity of the man and the
wonderful richness of his
life. We thought we should
bring that back to the
American public.
Jelks also said he was
surprised about the lack of

representation of Hughes
in Lawrence. There are
very little signs or statues
or anything big in Hughes
honor aside from the Lawrence Arts Center, which
Jelks said shocked him.
The filmmakers are focused on how capturing
how Hughes roots in Lawrence helped shape his
identity and career, Jelks
said. They know Hughes
story has to be told in a way
that emphasizes his ties to
Kansas.
As global as the reach of
his writing would eventually
become, what we're arguing
is that you can't fully grasp
SEE HUGHES PAGE 8

KU Common Book selection Between the World


and Me aims to stimulate conversation about race
SAMANTHA SEXTON
@Sambiscuit

"Between the World and


Me" by Ta-Nehisi Coates
will be the University common book for the 2016-17
academic year, according to
an announcement from the
Office of First Year Experience.
The Common Book Program was introduced by the
Office of First Year Experience, said Howard Graham,
associate director of academic programs, to create
a common ground and an
atmosphere of community
for incoming freshmen and
current students, faculty
and staff.
Each year a three-part
committee made up of faculty, staff and students sift
through nominated books
suggested by students to
find one that best fits the
atmosphere of the campus.
With the 100-year anniversary of World War I, for example, this academic year's
common book, "A Farewell
to Arms" by Ernest Hemingway, was selected to
open a dialogue about war
and allowed the office to
host events highlighting the
Universitys connections to
the war.
We want to start conversations, and we want

to open students minds to


stories and situations that
they may not be familiar
with but may experience
during their time here at
KU, Graham said. Every student comes to the
University with different
backgrounds and different
perspectives, and we hope
that will add to the conversations started here.
"Between the World
and Me," a true story about
author Ta-Nehisi Coates
experiences as a young,
black man growing up in
Baltimore, was chosen to
not only spark a conversation, but, Graham said, to
continue the conversation
weve been having on campus for the past year.
A student involved with
the selection committee,
Jarred Morris, a senior
from Saint Paul, Minn., said
the book is overdue in its
importance, but coming at
the right time given the environment on campus.
Weve already started this conversation about
inequality, racism and inequity on campus, so its
going to help continue the
dialogue and work as a platform for initiative, Morris said. We need to keep
talking, keep listening and
take actions.
Morris, like Graham,

said he strongly believes


the Common Book Program can create change on
campus. He said he became
involved with the program
in order to make a real impact at the University.
Coates book really
struck me in the first chapter, Morris said. Its very
blunt and honest about
what he experienced in his
life and how that shaped
him, and thats the kind of
thing we need.
Morris said hes proud
to have a common book
that speaks to the racial injustices still felt on campus
and throughout the country
without beating around the
bush or trying to cover anything up.
It may be a hard pill to
swallow for some students,
but its a pill that needs to
be swallowed regardless,
Morris said.
Another student on the
selection committee, Elizabeth Wenger, a freshman
from Tulsa, Okla., said it
would be irresponsible to
not read the book no matter
how you feel about it.
Books have a lot of
power, and I wanted to help
pick a good book because
I had some mixed feelings
about the common book
this year, Wenger said.
[Hemingway]s
another

KANSAN
CLASSIFIEDS
785-864-4358

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P/T, seasonal position. Applicants must be at least 18yrs of
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white, male author, and I


think that we deserve more
diversity and to hear varying voices.
Wenger said racial issues on campus was one
of the driving factors given
the recent prevalence of
Rock Chalk Invisible Hawk
and the Black Lives Matter
movement that has been
felt.
There was another book
that we were considering
that kind of did the same
thing as 'Between the World
and Me; it talked about racial issues but it took place
in the '70s, and we really wanted something that
people couldnt just react to
by saying, 'Oh, its different
now, because it isnt different, Wenger said.
'Between the World and
Me' talks about what has
happened recently; he talks
about shootings that happened not too long ago, and
he brings in a modern, real
look that is hard to ignore.
Graham said despite
the fact that the upcoming
common book doesnt directly relate to the University, hes confident in the programs strength and ability
to connect the world to the
students and vice versa.
We have a history of
looking at situations in
ways that arent necessar-

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ily straightforward or traditional but that connect


with the students and open
them up to a new way of
thinking by using what is
around them, Graham
said. I cant give anything
away just yet, but I know,

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given our history, that the


common book will lead to
engaging and intellectually stimulating discussions
that the campus desperately needs.
Edited by Deanna
Ambrose

textbooks

announcements

hawkchalk.com

JOBS

Contributed Photo/KANSAN
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates.

classifieds@kansan.com

JOBS
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ART & CULTURE

8
HUGHES FROM PAGE 7
the themes and impulses in
his work until you look at
how his Kansas childhood
propelled the explorations
of his writing career, said
Darren Canady, an English
professor and playwright at
the University.
The documentary is
composed of two parts, one
focusing on his life and the
other on his writings. As of
now, Jelks said, it will be
composed of interviews,
clips and images of Hughes

life and narration while also


trying to speak to a young,
modern audience.
We need to get creative
and create how we are going
to speak to young audience
through Hughes' voice,
Jelks said.
The filmmakers will look
for young actors and young
voices in Hollywood to help
with the film. Jelks said he
is looking for hip-hop types,
whose modern voice could
help bring out Langstons
poetry.
One could argue that
Langstons poetry and verse

were predecessors to hiphop in the '70s and other


things, Jelks said. We
will reach out to kids that
will come of age when the
film comes out and reach
out to the film industry as a
whole.
Canady is one the writers of the film and said his
involvement in the film
started with Jelks, who he
referred to as the mad genius of the film.
We're working hard
to revise and refine what
exactly is the story we're
telling about Langston

Hughes' life, Canady said.


Certainly, when your subject has such a rich, varied and historic output as
Hughes', you could take any
number of approaches, but
we want to make sure we
choose one that highlights
what makes him still one
of the most vital writers in
American history.
While the filmmakers
continue to think of conceptual ideas, they will try setting up fundraising efforts
to fund this documentary.
Weve got this far, and
were lucky, Jelks said.

KANSAN.COM
The competition is fierce,
and were lucky to have gotten this far because most
documentaries and films
dont get this far.
A group of scholars who
helped work on the documentary will hold a panel
at the Free State Festival at
the Lawrence Arts Center,
located at 940 New Hampshire St., from June 20-25
talking about the documentary and his life and writings.
As of now, its just a process of finding footage and
finding the right people for

the film. Davis, Jelks and


Canady will look through
other peoples collections
of Hughes work and see if
anything can help with the
film. The remaining preliminary work for the documentary will take place over
the course of the remaining
year.
Edited by Samantha
Harms

Micelis Italian Market brings unique Italian flavor


RYAN MILLER

@Ryanmiller_UDK

A Lawrence couple has


recently opened up an Italian deli with the intent of
making something unlike
anything in the Lawrence
food scene right now.
Jess and Renee Maceli opened Micelis Italian
Market and Deli, located at
3300 W. Sixth St., on Dec.
1, and offer a wide variety
of meats, cheeses and even
cookies, many of which are
imported from Italy and
cant be found elsewhere in
Lawrence. They also make
their own meatballs, sauces
and soups.
Jess became inspired
to open his own deli after
growing up with a rich Italian heritage in Frontenac,
Kan. near a place called
Palluccas Meat Market and
Deli.
"Lawrence didnt really

have anything like this and


its a little unique, Jess
said. Its just something
weve been wanting to do
for quite a while.
The Macelis bought
the location around a year
ago which also includes a
convenience store located
across the building. The
convenience store opened
up last July, with the actual
deli following in December.

Lawrence is a
unique town. Weve
got the University
here so all these
different people
from different states
and countries
coming here...
Renee Maceli
Owner, Micelis Italian
Market and Deli

The two have plans in


the works for the deli which
include tweaking the menu
and various expansions
like a potential drive-thru,
a larger market, and the
ability to make their own
sausages.
The couple said they
hope visitors get a unique
taste
and
experience
with their butcher paper
wrapped sandwiches and
freshly cut high quality imported meats.
Just making [visitors]
them feel like oh this reminds me of my childhood
back home. Thats what I
hope they take away from it.
I mean we do it kind of old
school. We wrap our sandwiches in butcher paper,
a lot of people think thats
pretty neat, Renee said.
Jess said they try to stay
unique by offering a wide
variety of products that are
imported. Some of their

meat is from Volpi, a company based in St. Louis.


We wanted to try to carry something that nobody
else is carrying, and I think
theres several things were
carrying that other people
[in Lawrence] are, but as a
whole, the majority of the
things are unique to us,"
Jess said.
One of the biggest challenges the two faced opening the deli was being able
to focus on opening both
the deli and the convenience store.
We needed two people
to do that. Its a full-time
job really just to get it going, Jess said.
Renee said that she enjoyed being able to do her
own thing for the market.
For me the reward-

ing part was when I finally


came on board and helped
him get this part up and going, Renee said. I was able
to create all these different
sandwiches and things like
that and I really like that.
That was rewarding for me
to be able to finally get to do
what I wanted to do.
Jess said doing research
on meats and cheeses in advance, and being prepared
was crucial for opening
their deli.
Do some research and
be prepared to put a lot
of time and effort. Its not
something that you think
youre going to do one day
and work three-to-four
hours a day because you
own it. Youre going to work
more than that. Be willing
to make the sacrifice to do

it, said Jess.


The Macelis said they
felt Lawrence was a good
location because of the
unique community here.
Lawrence is a unique
town. Weve got the University here so all these different people from different
states and countries coming
here, so I think its a good fit
for it, Renee said.
Jess said the variety of
people and support for local
businesses sets Lawrence
apart from other cities.
[Theres] all different
walks of life coming through
here. I think thats what sets
it apart, and the Lawrence
community,
hometown
people, really put forth the
effort to support their own
local [businesses], and
weve been here 20 years
now, so I think we can call it
our home, Jess said.
Micelis Italian Market
and Deli, open from 7 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Monday through
Friday and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
on Saturdays. The store will
be having its official grand
opening on April 15 and 16,
with biscuits and gravy and
tastings of their deli items.
Edited by Michael
Portman

Ryan Miller/KANSAN
Renee (left) and Jess (right) Maceli, the owners of Micelis.

Ryan Miller/KANSAN
Micelis Italian Market and Deli.

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SPORTS

10

KANSAN.COM

Self named
NABC National
Coach of the Year
for first time
SHANE JACKSON
@jacksonshane3

Paige Stingley/KANSAN
Sophomore pitcher Andie Formby pitches the ball against the St. Louis Billikens during the Jayhawks 9-0 victory at Rock Chalk Park on Sunday.

Pitchers will be key in softballs


next game against Oklahoma
NICK COUZIN
@ncouz

Tuesday against Wichita State, it was the top of


the fifth inning, and sophomore pitcher Andie Formby needed two outs to keep
her scoreless innings streak
alive at 23, but ultimately
the streak came to an end.
During the streak, she
threw 22.1 innings of no hit
ball: 620 pitches, 0.00 ERA
and a no-hitter against SLU
on March 20.
Formby had more scoreless innings than junior
Sophia Templin has on the

mound this season (10), and


she was two innings shy of
freshman Alexis Reid, who
has pitched 24.2 innings.
Shes our best pitcher,"
Kansas coach Megan Smith
said. "Were going with our
best in tough situations. I
rely on her to give us those
innings."
Formby will look to start
a new streak once Big 12
play starts this weekend
against Oklahoma, whose
best pitcher is sophomore
Paige Parker. Formby will
most likely face her this
weekend.
Parker has a 2.00 ERA to

Formbys 1.82 ERA. Parker has Formby beat in two


categories: strikeouts and
hits allowed. Parker has 91
strikeouts to Formbys 86,
and Paige has given up 50
hits while Formby has allowed 63 hits.
Formby has thrown
more innings (96) than
Parkers 70. Formby also
has one more win (11) than
Parker (10). Formby also
has seven less earned runs
than Parker, who has 22.
Smith is not worried
about her ace heading into
conference play.
She needs to focus on

her first seven innings,


Smith said. This team
[Wichita State] we faced
tonight, offensively they are
a Big 12-caliber team, and
I was encouraged with the
way she played them tonight through those seven
innings.
Formby and Parker are
set to square off in Norman
this weekend in a battle
of elite arms. Formby and
Parker are two of the top six
best pitchers on the mound
this season in the Big 12.

On Tuesday, the National Association of Basketball


Coaches named Kansas
coach Bill Self the National Coach of the Year. The
award is voted on by members of the NABC, who are
also coaches. This is also the
first time in Self's career he
is the NABC National Coach
of the Year.
"All that means is you had
a group of kids that cared
an awful lot and played to
a ridiculously high level all
year," Self said in a KU Athletics release. "Awards appear to be nice, but for me, a

hundred times over, I would


give any of that up to have
those kids play in Houston
(at the Final Four)."
Kansas finished the season 33-5 after an Elite Eight
loss to Villanova last Saturday. This is the fifth time
the Jayhawks have won 33
games or more under Bill
Self in his 13 years directing
the program.
Two other organizations
have also named Self the
national coach of the year
USA Today and Bleacher
Report.
Self will receive his award
at the AT&T NABC Guardians of the Game Awards
Show in Houston on Sunday, April 3.

Edited by Madi Schulz

Missy Minear/KANSAN
Kansas coach Bill Self smiles from the sidelines. On Tuesday, he was
named National Coach of the Year by the NABC.

Column: Its time to appreciate Selfs greatness

Caroline Fiss/KANSAN
Kansas basketball coach Bill Self smirks after the Jayhawks won their 12th Big 12 regular season title in a row.

EVAN RIGGS

@EvanRiggsUDK

At the end of each college basketball season,


only one team survives the
chaotic single-elimination
NCAA tournament that has
become legendary for its
shocking upsets and Cinderella stories.
Once a team is eliminated, all of the regular season
accomplishments seem to
be thrown out the window.
For Kansas, its certainly
understandable to be disappointed with this years
tournament loss to Villanova. The Jayhawks were the
No. 1 overall seed, riding
a 17-game winning streak
with aspirations of a national title.
I dont know if this particular group could have a
special year without getting
to Houston, Kansas coach
Bill Self said. But nobody
can say these kids didnt
have a great year.

In January, after Kansas lost to Iowa State, if you


would have said this team
would reel off 17 consecutive wins and win the Big
12 the toughest league
in the country by two
games, nobody would have
believed you.
But they did it. Without lottery picks, without a
dominant low post presence
and without a go-to-guy,
they ran away with the best
conference in America.
Kansas went 61 days
without a loss, so excuse me
if Im not willing to think
any less of Self because his
team played one bad game
and came up short.
If any KU fan even briefly debates starting throwing shade at Self for losing
here, log off right now. Do
not pass Go, do not collect
$200.
@MattNorlander
The Jayhawks went just

6-of-22 from beyond the


arc and committed 16 turnovers, and senior forward
Perry Ellis had his worst
game of the season, shooting just 1-of-5.
I dont think he demanded the ball like he
probably wished he would
have, Self said.
At some point, the blame
has to fall on the players not
executing and playing poorly, not Self and the coaching
staff, which is exactly what
Kansas legend Sherron Collins pointed out on Instagram.
The tournament has
proven time and time again
that its great entertainment, but it doesnt necessarily do a good job of
determining the best team.
For example, last year, Kentucky was 38-0 and clearly the best team in college
basketball before its season-ending loss in the tournament.
Tom Izzo, who is known

as Mr. March, just lost in


the first round of the tournament to a No. 15 seed
with arguably the best player in college basketball in
Denzel Valentine on his
roster.
In the last 10 years, Mike
Krzyzewski has lost in the
first round three times, Izzo
has lost in the first round
twice, and Roy Williams
and John Calipari both
coached teams that missed
the tournament altogether.
The tournament is such
a small and random sample
size, but theres no doubt
it should matter when discussing coaching legacies.
But the regular season
which is a much larger sample sizeshould matter too.
And nobody has had
more sustained success and
accomplished more in the
regular season than Self
over the last 13 seasons.
Selfs .823 winning percentage at Kansas is the
highest in school histo-

ry, and his 12 consecutive


conference titles is nothing
short of remarkable. Hes
never received lower than
a No. 4 seed in the tournament at Kansas, and hes
been a No. 1 or No. 2 seed
nine times.

...nobody can
say these kids
didnt have a
great year.
Bill Self
Kansas Coach

What makes it even


more remarkable is hes
doing this in a sport that
has more turnover than
any sport at any level. Self
has entered a season with a
completely new starting five
three times and has won at
least 25 games and a share
of the Big 12 each time.
No matter who is on the
roster, Self seems to get

them to buy into his style of


play and get the most out of
him.
Thats good coaching.
In his 13 seasons at
Kansas, hes won as many
league titles as Krzyzewski
at Duke and just four fewer
than Williams in considerably fewer years. Oh, and he
also has a higher winning
percentage than both.
Its undeniable that
Selfs postseason results
dont stack up with what
hes done in the regular season. Certainly both of those
coaches have an edge on
Self in postseason accomplishments.
Appreciate what hes
able to do every year, Jayhawk fans. Because youll
miss him when hes gone.

Edited by Mackenzie
Walker

Kansas Army National Guard

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sports
KANSAN.COM/SPORTS | THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016

KANSAS 2016 NBA DRAFT GUIDE


SCOTT CHASEN
@SChasenKU

Players can announce


their intentions to play professionally by declaring for
the NBA Draft. However, a

declaration doesnt necessarily mean a player cant


come back to play at the
University.
Players have until 10
days after the NBA Draft
Combine which runs

CHEICK DIALLO

May 11-15 this year to


withdraw their name from
draft consideration, according to the new NCAA rules.
In addition to the combine,
players can participate in
one tryout per NBA team

per year, according to an


NCAA release.
This change, which was
announced in January, allows players to test the NBA
Draft waters and receive
specific feedback from the

WAYNE SELDEN JR.

BRANNEN GREENE
JUNIOR GUARD

On Monday, Diallo became the first


Jayhawk to declare
for the NBA Draft,
doing so without
representation. After
missing the first five
games of the year due
to an NCAA investigation into his eli-

gibility, Diallo made


his debut against
Loyola (Md.), scoring 13 points. Diallo
showed flashes of
what he could be,
but struggled to find
minutes behind a
few talented Kansas
big men.

On Tuesday, Selden
announced his intentions to declare for the
NBA Draft with representation, thus ending his time at Kansas.
Selden finished second
on the team in points
per game last season,
and scored in double

figures in all four of


Kansas NCAA tournament games. He closed
out the year with sixstraight performances
of at least 11 points and
five combined assists
and rebounds.

On
Wednesday,
Greene declared for
the NBA Draft, as was
confirmed by Kansas
coach Bill Self in a KU
Athletics release. In the
release, Greene thanked
his teammates, coaches and the fans. Self
said he thinks Greenes

competiveness and talent should allow him


to play professionally
for many years, adding that he wishes him
nothing but the best.

Diallo has the potential to be the best


Kansas prospect in
the draft. He has a
ridiculous 74 wingspan and runs the
floor exceptionally
well. The high-motor big man is pro-

jected as an early
second-round pick
by
DraftExpress.
ESPN NBA Insider
Chad Ford has him
slotted as the 36th
best prospect in the
class.

DraftExpress projects Selden as a second-round pick. Right


now, the site has him
listed as the 44th best
prospect in the draft.
Ford has him ranked

55th on his big board,


noting that Selden
looked the part of an
NBA player against the
UConn Huskies in the
Round of 32.

Neither DraftExpress
nor Ford has Greene
slotted as a top-100
prospect. However, that
doesnt mean hes without a shot at playing pro
basketball. Greene is
heralded as one of the

best three-point shooters in college basketball,


not to mention that CBS
Sports Sam Vecenie
pointed out on Twitter
that anyone who can
shoot like that at his size
will get looks.

an agent, meaning he can return


if he chooses to
do so before the
May 25 deadline.

In the release announcing his departure,


Selden said he plans to
hire representation in

the upcoming weeks,


which all but guarantees
he wont be returning.

In the release announcing his departure,


Self said Greene has the
intent of hiring an agent,

which would mark the


end of his Kansas basketball career.

GONE FOR
GOOD?

OVERVIEW

JUNIOR GUARD

once his or her eligibility


ends his or her status as
an amateur athlete is essentially terminated; officially,
its referred to by the NCAA
as jeopardized.

DRAFT STOCK

FRESHMAN FORWARD

league, with the safety net


of knowing they can return
to college.
However, if a player has
hired an agent or representation or has agreed to
be represented by an agent

CBS Sports
Jon
Rothstein
said in a tweet
that Diallo is declaring without

Bowen and Kansas defense go back to fundamentals in offseason


CHRISTIAN HARDY
@ByHardy

File Photo/KANSAN
Kansas football defensive coordinator Clint Bowen talks to his defense in a huddle.

After two losses to begin what would be a winless season in 2015, David
Beaty used his first off week
as Kansas coach to go back
to the fundamentals: Footwork, technique, alignments and hand placement,
and, most importantly, doing it all correctly.
It made sense. Kansas
had just dropped a game to
an FCS opponent at home,
then another one by 32
points to a non-conference
opponent. And through the
next ten games, fundamentals kept popping up, especially on the defensive end;
tackling was subpar, basic
cornerback skills seemed to
be lacking at times, and the
defensive line was regularly
silenced.
Over the offseason, in
the few hours he spent with
his players every week, defensive coordinator Clint
Bowen overhauled those
fundamentals once again.
This time, though, he went
to the bare essentials of
football.
To the degree we did
it, Ive never gone this far
back. We went back like we
were coaching second graders and started from there,
Bowen said. And I think it
was necessary.
For Bowen, during this
offseason, emphasis has
been on one thing at a time.

During spring practice, the


focus has been tackling and
the details of it. But in winter, fundamentals were all
Bowen focused on. As he
put it: All of the things that
are going to happen every
single game, no matter who
youre playing.
Under the NCAAs rules,
coaches get eight hours a
week with players in the
offseason, and most of that
time is spent with strength
coach JeNey Jackson. With
what was left usually two
or three hours per week
Bowen, along with the position coaches, cemented the
basics of football into the
defenses mind.
There are a lot of little steps [] that we were
able to, during the course
of the winter time, to just
focus on one little element
every day, Bowen said.
Lets just get great at an
inside-out alley. Lets get
great at planting our power
foot and throwing our two
uppercuts.
That process of getting
the very small things down
pat, though, was tedious
at times. It was repetition
after repetition on small,
mind-numbing
details.
Sophomore defensive back
Tyrone Miller called it annoying. Sophomore defensive end Dorance Armstrong Jr. was hesitant to
say he learned anything at
all.
I knew it all already,

Armstrong said with a


smile. It felt weird []
But it just let us focus on
it more, get it down completely so we dont have to
start over again.
Now, seven practices
into spring, the fundamentals are paying off. Compared to last years raw personnel that were sometimes
utterly lost in practice while
learning a new 4-3 scheme,
this team is far ahead. Bowen has been able to move
forward, with the team
learning the schematics he
and Beaty expect, and just
play football.
When they come in
there this year, theyre able
to not think about so much
what they have to do, Bowen said. They can think
about more how to do it and
do it better and keep focusing on their fundamentals.
And the players have
seen it benefit them too, in
hindsight. While it was repetitive, it served a purpose
for a team that oftentimes
fumbled its fundamentals
on gameday last season.
We needed it, Miller
said. We needed to work
on our footwork more
we just needed to work on
our raw game. [] Weve
made it into a habit now.
Instead of just doing it
through drills, Ive got to do
it through games.
Edited by Brendan
Dzwierzynski

DAY
IN
THE
LIFE

DAY IN THE LIFE

KANSAN.COM

A DAY
IN THE
LIFE OF:
ROZE
BROOKS
Colleen OToole // Kansan
Roze Brooks serves as the first openly gender non-conforming individual in their field of higher
education and as a graduate assistant in the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity.

IVE BEEN
KNOCKED
ON MY ASS
PLENTY OF
TIMES AT THIS
POINT, AND
THATS WHY I
DO WHAT I DO.
-ROZE BROOKS

Roze Brooks calls their


office a revolving door
of students.
As the first of several
doorways in the hall of
the Student Involvement and Leadership
Center, Brooks is at
an easily-accessible location for people who
want to discuss a new
article they saw, receive
some life advice or get
their opinion on a new
hair color.
As the first openly
gender non-conforming
individual in their field
of higher education and
graduate assistant in
the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, Brooks provides an
active and empathetic
lense to problems faced
by LGBTQ+ students on
campus.
I have to double-double-double up as a life
coach and a relationship advisor and family counselor and as an
academic advisor and
all these other things,
because it became clear

to me very quickly that


a lot of my students I
work with either dont
feel comfortable or they
dont know where to go
or theyve had bad experiences, Brooks said.
So they come to me.
For the past year,
Brooks has worked in
the Sexuality and Gender Diversity Center,
often just called The
Center, to provide resources to LGBTQ+
students and educational programming for allies. One of their recent
programs is a series of
conversations
called
TRANSlation where
students were invited to
discuss and learn about
issues faced by transgender individuals.
As an undergraduate at the University of Missouri Kansas
City, Brooks said they
had a positive experience helping create an
LGBTQ+ group and organizing one of the biggest regional LGBTQ+
conferences: The Mid-

LIFE COACH & MENTOR


FOR LGBTQ+ STUDENTS
by Lara Korte
@lara_korte

west Bisexual Lesbian


Gay Transgender Ally
College Conference, or
MBLGTACC for short.
As co-chair of the conference, Brooks said
they developed strong
relationships with administrators at UMKC
and said they were able
to basically turn around
the relationship between queer students
and administration on
campus. Brooks said
coming to the University meant coming to an
institute that functions
radically differently.
To realize that not everyone is in student affairs to change student
affairs was not something I anticipated,
Brooks said.
Murphy Maiden, a
junior from Overland
Park, said Brooks has
tackled issues at the
University not just by
being an empathetic
voice to confide in, but
also by spreading ideas
of acceptance and understanding
across

campus.
Not only are they creating these safe spaces
for trans students to
exist and discuss their
identities, and be allowed to discuss them,
and create safety for
them, but theyre also
educating people who
arent necessarily part
of those spaces on campus to create a more
inclusive environment
on campus and hopefully some self-reflectivity
in students and staff
and faculty who are not
among the LGBTQ+
population on campus,
Maiden said.
Furthermore, Maiden
said Brooks has encouraged them to speak up
in their own lives.
Roze has been one of
my mentors on campus whos really helped
me to reveal myself on
campus in terms of my
own identity and being
more open and more
active and advocating
for them, Maiden said.
Not only for myself but

for others whose identities I dont share.


After graduation this
spring,
Brooks
said
they will not remain involved in the University
but has no intention of
distancing themselves
from advocating for
queer college students.
As for others at the
University, such as some
of their cohorts, Brooks
said they hope they can
come to realize there is
work to be done in higher education.
Hopefully, some of
them, in the most lovingly way possible, get
knocked on their ass
and realize that theyve
got work to do, because
Ive been knocked on
my ass plenty of times
at this point, and thats
why I do what I do, but
there are other folks
who still need that,
Brooks said.
Edited by Michael
Portman

DAY IN THE LIFE

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF:


ANTHONY GARDNER
ACTIVE DUTY STUDENT-SOLDIER
by Tanner Hassell
@thassell17

In the wee hours of a


weekday before the sun
is up, most students at
the University are still
snuggled up in their
beds.
For
Anthony
Gardner, a junior from
Garden City and Army
Reserve
Specialist
(SPC), the day begins
around 5 a.m. when he
walks into the gym.
He might be there
again later that day, but
after a couple hours of
cardio and lifting while
the sun rises, its time
to get ready for class.
By 9 a.m. hes in the
classroom. This is just
another day in the life
of this student-soldier.
Being a college student is stressful in and
of itself, Gardner said.
Ive always had a lot
on my plate, but Ive
learned that its much
harder to be involved
with so much and still
balance the college and
military lifestyles.
As a political science
major, Gardner said he
normally enrolls in 15
to 17 credit hours per
semester. In addition to
school and training, he
also meets with the Reserve once a month for
a three-day weekend of
training. He said being
in the Army Reserve
and being a student
can sometimes create
scheduling issues.
The most stressful
part of the military side
is not knowing anything ahead of time,
Gardner said. Being a
lower-enlisted soldier, I

have to be patient with


my higher command
because I dont know
whats going on until
they send me the information. When youre
trying to plan stuff for
school or for work, you
really have to pay heed
to what they want. If
they decide to plan drill
for a specific weekend
or week and you have
plans, those go right out
the window. Orders arent recommendations
or suggestions. Theyre
mandatory.
Gardner, who enlisted
in the Army Reserve
immediately
after
graduating high school
in 2013, came to the
University for the 2014
spring semester upon
completing basic training.
Gardners mother, Melissa
Gardner-Bland,
said she never doubted
he could handle being a
student and soldier, but
she had some concerns
initially.
Being a soldier was
something that he talked about doing since he
was a little kid, so it
came as no surprise,
Gardner-Bland
said.
At the time I was
concerned because I
didnt want him getting
shipped off overseas
without getting an education first. I knew he
could do it though.
An average day for
Gardner involves hitting the gym once or
twice a day to train
to compete for a third

time in the Army Reserve Best Warrior


Competition.
I won my first and
second
competitions,
and qualified for the
competition right below
the USARC (United
States Army Reserve
Command)
competition, Gardner said.
According
to
the
Army and Army Reserve websites, soldiers
and reservists compete
in events like firing
weapons, land navigation, the Army fitness test and surprise
events meant to test
each soldiers adaptability.
If you win, you get
Soldier of the Year,
which basically means
youre the best soldier in your division or
component, Gardner said. This in
conjunction
with
school and work
has been pretty
stressful.
Despite
the
added
stress and responsibilities that come along
with being a student
and soldier, Gardner
said his military training has helped him
through it all.
Being in any branch
of the armed forces,
you learn time management skills, Gardner
said. You learn to get
things done in a very
short amount of time,
which has really helped
me.
Edited by Madi Schulz

Alex Robinson // Kansan


Specialist Anthony Gardner, now in the army reserves, is a junior Political Science major at KU.

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KANSAN.COM

A DAY
IN THE
LIFE OF:
TASHITSO
ANAMZA

DAY IN THE LIFE

WHEN I FIRST CAME


HERE, IT WAS VERY
DIFFERENT.
-TASHITSO
ANAMZA

BIOLOGY GRADUATE
STUDENT FROM TIBET
by Courtney Bierman
@courtbierman

As the eldest child of a


nomadic family in Tibet,
Tashitso Anamza spent
much of her youth helping her family herd yaks
and other livestock for
meat and dairy products.
Now, 25 years later, she
can usually be found in
the Universitys Natural
History Museum or riding her bike on the Lawrence River Trails. This
summer she will receive
her Masters degree from
the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.
Since coming to the
United States eight years
ago, Anamza has immersed herself in her
studies. When shes not
assisting an introductory biology class or examining specimens in a
lab, shes working on her
masters thesis about the
biodiversity of Philippine
frogs.
After getting over the
initial culture shock of
being half a world away
from home, Anamza says
she quickly came to appreciate life as a college
student in the United
States.
When I first came here,
it was very different, she
said. I really like the libraries here its open,
you have access to computers [...] its not like this
[where] I went to school.
We never had computers.
But now Im kind of used
to it.
Anamza grew up in

the region of Amdo, the


northernmost of Tibets
three regions and the
birthplace of the current Dalai Lama. She left
home to attend boarding
school at a young age, but
her family didnt have a
car. Since the school was
five hours away by horseback, she was only able to
return home twice a year.
In 2006, Anamza was
hosting a group of Americans in her village who
had traveled to Tibet to
work on various NGO
(Non-governmental-related) projects. One of
those Americans was a
donor who brought up
the idea of studying in the
United States.
Anamza had excelled
in school and had already received an associate degree in language
from Qinghai Normal
University in China. She
had also worked on and
headed projects intended
to improve the quality of
life for people in her home
region.
With an American education, she thought her
efforts
could
become
more effective.
I think the decision [to
study in America] was
kind of not only for me,
she said. Its a result of
communal interaction.
After a lengthy application process, Anamza
arrived in Lawrence in
2008 as an undergraduate
thanks to the sponsorship
from the American donor

and his family.


University lecturer Deborah Peterson of the Department of East Asian
Languages and Cultures
is involved with an NGO
that does environmental and educational work
in Tibet. When Peterson
was assisting a project,
which Anamza had proposed, to fund a library of
a monastery in a nearby
village, the two met.
Their friendship is one
of the reasons Anamza
chose the University over
other American schools.
Tashitsos a remarkable person extremely
independent, brilliant
but also shes a testimony
to the value of educating
women, Peterson said.
She
single-handedly
changes life for the better
in this place where shes
from as an example of the
power of educating women.
Due to a lack of resources, very few Tibetans
study biology abroad,
and women in particular
are
underrepresented.
Although she was able
to take math, chemistry,
Chinese and other basic
courses in Tibet, Anamza
said a biology class wasnt
offered.
Money is also a contributing factor. In Tibet,
where average per capita income is only about
$5,000 per year, many
families are simply unable
to send their children to
school.

Kelcie Matousek // Kansan


Tashitso Anamza, now a graduate student at KU, received an associates degree from Qinghai Normal
University in China and a bachelors degree at KU in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

You dont really get


much chance if youre
born in this [nomadic]
family, Anamza said.
They dont have a lot
of money to send you
abroad.
After finishing graduate
school at the University,
Anamza will start work
on her Ph.D; she knows

she wants to teach eventually, possibly even back


in Tibet. But Anamza
stresses that she would
not be where she is without outside financial support.
For me, I really met
very generous people.
Without their support, I
couldnt make it this far

because its too expensive, she said. I want to


continue to do this kind of
work and then get my Ph.
D and then do research
or teach to other people
what I learned basically, contribute back.
Edited by Michael
Portman

DAY IN THE LIFE

A DAY
IN THE
LIFE OF:
CAITHE
ALEXANDER

ADVOCATE & PANGENDER


DRAG SHOW PERFORMER
by Vicky Diaz-Camacho
@vickyd_c
Over the chorus of Oh
girls and Ohs Caithe
Alexander, and their
friend Ray Lawrence,
lay out dresses, makeup,
heels, wigs and jewelry
in preparation for one
of the many drag shows
the two participate in
together. In an otherwise quiet Tuesday night
in one of the Universitys
scholarship halls, the
two set up on opposite
sides of the room, their
makeup and clothes laid
across the table.
Welcome
to
our
world, they said.
Alexander, a sophomore from Shawnee, has
purple dye-dusted hair,
almond-shaped
eyes
with colored contact
lenses, a playful grin and
a 90s-inspired look
tattoo necklace and all.
Alexander identifies as
pangender and uses the
pronouns they, them and
their. They added that
they are very spiritual
and a romantic. They
have been in dance, tap,
the Renaissance festival as a fairy, does art
and, most recently, drag
shows.
While they said Danielle, their mom, has
been supportive, they
consider their family to
also be made of friends.
[They are] my family
in the definition of the
word. I found them at
the perfect time, they
said. Weve shared our

deep pasts.
Lawrence, a sophomore
from Kansas City, Kan.,
and Alexander started performing in drag
shows in Lawrence last
semester.
Caithe and I are so different; Id like to say we
balance each other out,
Lawrence said.
However, Alexander is
still searching for other
pieces to their identity, they said. Alexander
briefly mentioned the
sperm donor their mother used. Their mother is
white, yet they consider
themselves biracial because the sperm donor is
Native American.
They said they want to
find and explore their
cultural roots.
When I first saw
Caithe, you know, [in
2009] I could tell they
were struggling with
their identity from the
very beginning, said
Barry Casey, Alexanders
big brother from the
Big Brothers Big Sisters
program in Kansas City,
Kan.
Casey is a special education teacher at Hazel
Grove Elementary. He
said he always had the
means to help others,
and thats why he signed
up for Big Brothers Big
Sisters. He first met Alexander when they were
7 years old. Per their
mothers request, Casey
was paired with Alexan-

Vicky Diaz-Camacho // Kansan


Caithe Alexander, a sophomore from Shawnee, said recently they found that they associate best with pangender.

der because Danielle had


requested that the big
brother be a gay man.
No other family wanted him because he was
gay but we clicked, Alexander said.
Were just like family,
Casey said.
He said he saw Alexander grow up and mentioned that he witnessed
the process Alexander
went through in finding
themselves, from child
to young adult.
When you go through
your stages as a teenager, you tend to find out
where you are in the
world and where your
place is in the world,
Casey said. So [Caithe
was] kind of like trying
to figure out through all
that stuff.
When Alexander was
a toddler they asked for
their first Barbie. They
would also paint their
nails, wear dresses and
preferred the color pink.
They were diagnosed
with
childhood
gen-

der nonconformity and


gender dysphoria when
Alexander was in the
fourth grade.
Doctors became interested in Alexanders
gender dysphoria and
how they compared to
Jared, their fraternal
twin brother, in development. This put the twins
on the radar for a 60
Minutes spot about nature versus nurture on
being gay or straight.
During the interview,
both
children
were
asked: If you were going to tell a stranger
what you were like, what
would you say?
Nine-year-old Alexander, with painted nails,
answered: I would say,
like a girl.
Doctors
determined
that Alexander was the
product of nature and
Alexander agrees, according to the 60 Minutes report, which Alexander confirmed.
Middle school was the
worst for bullying, Al-

exander said. I would


try
to
self-mutilate
myself because people
would point out, You
have a penis. And Id be
like, That doesnt make
sense.
In eighth grade they
came out as bisexual. At
the end of their freshman year of high school
they came out as gay.
Casey said he also witnessed a turning point
in Alexanders life: I remember when we went
to Chicago and we went
to Pride and that was
when Caithe was like,
oh, 16 or 17 or something
like that. And just seeing
[] people: gay, trans, bi,
whatever just like being happy, Casey said.
[People] being together, proud of themselves,
showing their pride, seeing the parade, seeing
everybody else proud of
themselves that really
helped Caithe.
In the past couple semesters, they have become known for their

push for more LGBTQ+


support on campus and
in dorms and, most recently, an open panel
discussion of what it
means to be transgender on campus.
Alexander is the current vice president of
Spectrum KU and is
starting a new group
called the Gender Euphoria League. GEL
will be effective next semester, they said.
I think that since
Caithe has been through
a
lot
[and
gained]
knowledge they can [use
to] support others with
those kinds of needs,
Casey said. Im just
more and more proud of
them every year. Its exciting.
Edited by Samantha
Harms

KANSAN.COM

Colleen OToole // Kansan


Caithe Alexander, a pangender student, getting ready for their drag show.

IVE ALWAYS
BEEN LIKE SUPER
CONFIDENT IN MYSELF,
AND THATS WHY IM
HERE STILL TODAY.
-CAITHE ALEXANDER

10

DAY IN THE LIFE

A DAY
IN THE
LIFE OF:
BRIAN
RUSSELL
A LECTURER WHO
DOES IT ALL
by Ryan Wright
@ryanwaynewright
In the early 2000s, Brian
Russell
was
visiting
Lima, Peru, at the time
the country was in
political turmoil. Russell
said the country was on
the brink of a civil war
due to its controversial
president at the time,
Alberto Fujimori, which
led to bombings in the
urban area. To get away
from the violence, Russell
traveled to a remote
village in the Andes
Mountains, a few hours
away from Lima.
When Russell arrived,
he saw people living in
small huts made out of
wood and corrugated
metal with dirt floors.

However, the thing that


surprised him was the
people were genuinely
happy, despite not having
much.
Russell, a lecturer in
the School of Business,
has traveled to over 35
countries, many of them
developing nations, and
said people in those other countries tend to be
more grateful for what
they have.
Theyve got nothing
compared to what most
Americans have and yet
they are appreciative of
the fact that theyre not
hungry, theyre not sick
[and] theyve got family there, Russell said.

Baxter Schanze // Kansan


Brian Russells dog, Ruger, has visited his class at KU several times.

KANSAN.COM

I THINK YOU
SHOULD TRY
TO FIGURE OUT
WHAT IS THE
CONTRIBUTION
THAT YOU
CAN MAKE TO
SOMETHING
LARGER.
-BRIAN RUSSELL

Baxter Schanze // Kansan


Brian Russell teaches a lecture class at the University, in addition to being an author, app developer, director, lawyer and more..

Theyre not embroiled


in the chaos in the political society just a couple
hours down the mountain from them.
However, back home
in the United States,
Russell said hes noticed
a trend of entitlement
throughout the country.
That sentiment led to
him writing a book titled
Stop Moaning, Start
Owning: How Entitlement is Ruining America
and How Personal Responsibility Can Fix It,
which was published in
October of 2015.
I think our society
has become, certainly
with many exceptions,
too narcissistic. People
are thinking not enough
about things larger than
themselves and too much
about themselves, Russell said. And when
people think that way, it
makes it easy for them
to develop an attitude of
entitlement where they
feel that they are owed
things by others.
For Russell, entitle-

ment is something that


has permeated throughout all of society, including the government.
[Entitlement is] messing up kids, marriages,
businesses, communities,
and by extension the
country, Russell said.
Our [the United States]
debts out of control because people feel entitled
as individuals and also as
the nation to be living beyond our means.
Beyond lecturing and
authoring his book, Russell, a University graduate, has his hands in several different fields. Hes
an attorney, a psychologist and has appeared
as an analyst on television shows such as The
OReilly
Factor
and
Nancy Grace. He also
co-hosts Fatal Vows
with fellow psychologist
Stacy Kaiser which airs
on Investigation Discovery.
His work in television
also helps in the classroom, said James Guthrie, associate dean of

academic affairs in the


School of Business.
[Russell] teaches big
lectures and it certainly
helps to have stage presence [...] with classes like
those, Guthrie said.
Russell said he decided
to venture into so many
different fields because
he wanted to have an impact on a larger amount
of people.
I think you should try
to figure out what is the
contribution that you can
make to something larger, Russell said. Something that you can do
uniquely well that is good
for the world.
His desire to help the
world led to the development of his app, Check
On Me, which launched
two weeks ago. The app
allows people to quickly check on the safety of
loved ones.
The initial inspiration
for Check On Me came
from Russells work covering crime cases as an
analyst on the news and
on his show Fatal Vows.

He said he saw many


cases about people that
would go missing but
could have been saved
if someone would have
checked on them earlier
than they did. When he
couldnt find an app that
did that simple task, he
made his own.
Whether it be developing an app or appearing
on television, whatever
Russell does, his ultimate
goal is to simply help people.
Im not Ben Carson,
but as a health care professional Ive gotten to
see how I can help people
in that way, Russell said.
And Im not Ted Cruz,
but as an attorney Ive
gotten to see how I can
help people in that way.
Im not Bill OReilly, but
Ive gotten see what its
like to have a successful
television show and try to
help people in that way.

Edited by Samantha
Harms