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HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT!

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MARKETING

MAGAZINE IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE:

The return of our annual working Knowledge tours!

I

n an industry where markets are constantly evolving and changing it’s important to stay ahead of the game. Marketing magazine, with the help of our sponsors has put together an informative Roadshow seminar series addressing a variety of topics, aimed at educating the communications industry. Each seminar will include evidence based research, relevant case studies, and feature guest speakers that are sure to inspire. This year’s seminars include: How Powerful is Print: No other medium can claim to be as tried and tested as print. Despite the abundance of publications that now appear online, it is evident that good, old-fashioned, tactile print remains the popular choice for readers. Interactive to the Max 2.0: If you’re not yet using this medium to its fullest potential, be sure to attend Interactive to the Max 2.0, a two-part working Knowledge program that is scheduled to make its way across Canada this October. Focusing specifically on insights relevant to the Canadian marketing and advertising environment, these seminars will leave you eager to incorporate interactive elements into your next marketing plan. Canadian Culture and Diversity: Gone are the days when advertising and marketing focused simply on product or service. Today, the Canadian marketplace is composed of diverse segmented audiences, each with their own, unique culture. Acknowledge, understand and take advantage of these

your key to working smarter, faster, and better
differences by attending the Canadian Culture and Diversity seminar. Youth Access: Continually evolving from one youth group to the next, Youth Access represents an elusive market - with high spending power. How can marketers keep up with this desirable crowd? In November 2005, working Knowledge presents Youth Access, a program designed to help educate marketers on the finer details of selling goods and services to this hard-to-reach demographic. These workshops are designed to help marketing industry professionals, work more efficiently, target and understand markets more effectively, and get a better overall grasp on markets that have been most frequently asked about over the past year. Tickets available now! Don’t miss out! For information call Cathy Fernandes 416-764-1571
cathy.fernandes@marketingmag.rogers.com

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MANAGEMENT
EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER Richard Elliott 416.764.1570 MANAGER, CUSTOM PUBLISHING Kate Finlay 416.764.1573 PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR Jennifer Micallef 416.764.1580

TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION: WHY PRINT? WHAT THE RESEARCH SHOWS
The Canadian Publishing Landscape Print - The Uninterupted Media Efficiency of Newspaper Advertising Regional Differences Where do Canadians turn for advertising? Where do Canadians turn for detailed information?

4 5
5 6 8 10 10 13 14 18 21 22 24 25

SALES
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER-SALES Cathy Fernandes 416.764.1571 ACCOUNT MANAGERS Carol Eby 416.764.1569

DESIGN
CREATIVE & DESIGN DIRECTOR Dave Curcio 416.764.1634

Exposure to Advertising What are acceptable types of advertising? auto information

dave.curcio@rci.rogers.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jay Dart Purchase Behaviour and Advertisement The Next Generation of Print Readers Canadian Newspaper Readership

PRODUCTION
DIRECTOR, PRODUCTION SERVICES Lida Kudla 416.764.1589 lida.kudla@rci.rogers.com E-mail addresses, unless otherwise noted, are:
firstname.lastname@marketingmag.rogers.com

SUN MEDIA ADVERTISING SOLUTIONS
Canadian Toy Association Microplay/Jumbo Video CreditXpert Canada Inc. 7 11 23

WWW.MARKETINGMAG.CA
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THE CREATIVE POWER OF PRINT!

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HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT! 3

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WHY PRINT?

P

rint is different from other media, as this handbook shows. It offers advertisers the opportunity to establish and maintain a loyal relationship with consumers that other media cannot match. Consider that 85% of Canadians read a daily newspaper regularly, with 72% of them reporting that they regularly read community newspapers. On the magazine side, the numbers are equally impressive, with 85% of Canadians saying that they regularly read magazines, the most popular being publications that cover news, hobbies and fashion. Significantly, research also shows Canadians read newspapers and magazines more regularly than they watch television. Given such a strong connection between Canadians and their preferred print vehicles, it is hardly surprising that they offer the advertiser an unmatched opportunity to reach core reader audiences. But loyalty should not bring complacency. Creative needs to capture the voice and tone of a publication and to
4 How Powerful is Print!

speak directly to its readers, to provide a chance to educate the consumer. Print audiences’ relationships with their preferred newspapers and magazines mean that advertisers can take a tactical stand with their creative, marrying a call to action with the speed to market of newspapers and magazines. Print advertising works. A recent study found that Canadians were more likely to consult newspapers than television and radio combined if they were looking for advertising about such items as appliances, travel and mortgages. Print is flexible and receptive to the demands of advertisers. In the last decade, print owners have worked diligently to improve the quality of their products with greater flexibility in all aspects of

49% OF CANADIANS HAVE BOUGHT A PRODUCT THAT THEY READ ABOUT IN A NEWSPAPER

their business, to provide more innovation, greater levels of customer service and outstanding full colour reproduction. That means print, whether newspaper or magazine, can assume any role asked of it. Almost half of all Canadians, 49%, have bought a product that they read about in a newspaper, with 55% those aged between 35 and 44 the most likely to have bought something they read about in a newspaper. However, the power of print is not restricted to those in a single age demographic. Canada’s children and young people also display the loyalty to print that their parents and grandparents have. A study by the Kaiser Family Foundation in the U.S. found that in a typical day almost half of all eight to 18 year olds read magazines and another third of them typically read a newspaper. Print isn’t passive, but an opt-in medium, as this handbook shows, and there is nothing more powerful than personal choice.
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WHAT THE RESEARCH SHOWS
The Canadian Publishing Landscape
Canadians are very media friendly. The vast majority read daily newspapers, community newspapers, and magazines, as well as watching a variety of television programs, listening to the radio and surfing the Internet. With the changing media landscape over the last fifty years and the explosion of online news channels and blogs it would not be a surprise if we spent most of our day with nothing but a screen in front of our faces. But surprisingly, the print media has survived television and the Internet and is still consumed on a regular basis. In 2002, the Department of Canadian Heritage commissioned the Activities and Motivations Survey (TAMS). While this survey’s focus was on Canadians classified as arts, heritage, or eco tourists, vital readerships statistics were also gathered. In this survey, it was found that 85% of Canadians read a daily newspaper regularly. More specifically, 75% say they read a weekday edition of newspapers on a regular basis, while another 73% say they read the weekend editions. Another 72% say they regularly read community newspapers. Magazine readership is quite high as well, as 85% say they read any magazine on a regular basis. Of these, the most popular magazines cover news, hobbies and fashion. Regular television viewing habits are somewhat lower, albeit still high. Three-quarters of
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PRINT MEDIA READ REGULARLY
Daily newspapers 85%

Magazines

85%

Weekday edition newspapers Weekend edition newspapers Community newspapers

75%

73%

72%

* SOURCE: Activities and Motivations Survey (TAMS). Department of Canadian Heritage. 2002

MAGAZINE TYPE

PERCENTAGE WHO READ REGULARLY 85% 41% 35% 35% 27% 27% 22% 18%

ANY MAGAZINE News Magazines Hobby Magazines Fashion/ Homemaking Magazines Travel Magazines Canadian/ National Geographic Sports magazines General Interest/ City Life Magazines

*SOURCE: Activities and Motivations Survey (TAMS). Department of Canadian Heritage. 2002

TELEVISION SHOW/TYPE Movies Early Evening News Nature Shows Evening Sitcoms Evening Drama Instructional/ Hobby Shows Professional Sports Late Evening News Morning News Daytime Programs on Weekdays

PERCENTAGE WHO WATCH REGULARLY 75% 67% 65% 62% 58% 55% 52% 49% 34% 26%

*SOURCE: Activities and Motivations Survey (TAMS). Department of Canadian Heritage. 2002

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Canadians say they watch movies on a regular basis, followed by twothirds who say they regularly watch the early evening news, nature shows and evening sitcoms. As most Canadians work or go to school, it is not surprising that morning news and daytime, weekday programs are watched the least regularly.

PRINT CONTINUES TO LEAD
Since 1991, the amount of money spent on advertising in Canada has risen consistently and almost every year. Daily newspapers generated the most in 2000, with $124 million more than television. Overall, the net advertising volume for the print media (daily newspapers, community newspapers, general magazines and trades) was $4,129 million in 2000, while that of radio and television was $3,470 million.
MEDIUM 1991 1995 2000

AMOUNT IN MILLIONS OF CAD DOLLARS

Print – The Uninterrupted Media
The print media continues to be a very powerful advertising tool. Not only do consumers still enjoy this traditional type of media reading it more regularly than they watch television, they are also more focussed when reading it. Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S.’s Jack Kilger agrees with this. According to the New York Times, “Mr. Kilger said research showed that when people are reading magazines, they are unlikely to be using any other form of media. But when they watch television, listen to the radio or wait to download something from the Internet, they are more likely to be listening, watching or reading something else at the same time. They are also likely to be fast-forwarding through commercials or deleting pop-up ads that they see as intrusions. But, he said, magazine readers often see ads as part of the magazine. (1) ” Unfortunately, many young media buyers forget that “focus” is a large part of media spend. Earl C. Cox, chief executive of Martin Agency, says some media buyers now find newspapers to be “static, inflexible and hard to buy… It doesn’t help any that media buyers are under 30 and their focus is elsewhere,’ mostly on the Internet. ” However, many fans of print
6 How Powerful is Print!

Television

Total National Local Network Specialty Infomercial Total National Local Classified Total National Local Total National Local Total Total

1,616 859 357 330 70 2,002 420 1,021 561 490 49 441 741 168 573 256 174

1,850 986 363 369 122 10 1,900 399 969 532 579 58 521 748 170 578 316 229

2,456 1,231 384 444 381 17 2,580 592e 1,139 849e 820e 110e 710e 1,014 233 781 434 295e

Daily Newspapers

Community Newspapers

Radio

General Magazines Trade Magazines

* SOURCE: Snapshot 2002 – The Developing Picture of the Canadian Community Newspaper Industry. Canadian Community Newspaper Association. 2002. “Sources compiled by TVB, with information from: Television: Statistics Canada, CRTC; Daily Newspapers: CNA for Total, estimates for breakdown; Community Newspapers: CCNA/Les Hebdos du Quebec; Radio: Statistics Canada; General Magazine: Magazines Canada; Trade Magazines: Statistics Canada/Industry estimates. “e” represents Industry estimates.

WHEN PEOPLE ARE READING MAGAZINES, THEY ARE UNLIKELY TO BE USING ANY OTHER FORM OF MEDIA..

remain, such as the president of Conde Nast Media Group Richard Beckman. In an interview with B2B Magazine, he explained the reasons behind a recent advertising campaign for the Magazine Publishers of America. The magazine wrote: “Beckman said one message of the campaign is the attractiveness of magazines to advertisers in an age when digital
continued on page 8

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SUN MEDIA ADVERTISING SOLUTIONS
CANADIAN TOY ASSOCIATION

Seasonal supplement increases profile, membership and sales
The Challenge
The Canadian Toy Association (CTA), a non-profit, member-based organization founded in 1932, was seeking a means to communicate directly with parents and children and to reinforce its position as Canada’s national authority on toys. As well, the association wanted to help promote its members’ products in the important pre-holiday season, to increase its profile in the media and among Canadians generally, and to provide CTA members and others with an economical means of advertising in the mass media. Lastly, in addition to providing added value to its existing members, the CTA sought to increase association membership.

The Solution
Working with its Sun Media advertising solutions partners, the CTA drafted plans to produce a full-colour newspaper supplement that would appear in early November in Sun Media weekend papers across the country. The 24-page, tabloid-size supplement, entitled “Hot Toys for 2004, ” featured short descriptions and accompanying photographs of members’ products, along with consumer articles about the power of play, the evolution of toys, and choosing toys for safety and play value. The supplement, designed and edited by Sun Media, was distributed in the company’s newspapers in
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1.2 million copies distributed across Canada

major cities across Canada. The combined circulation of those papers is more than 1.2 million.

The Details
Within the “Hot Toys for 2004” supplement, the pages featuring members’ products were divided into categories — arts and crafts, dolls, action figures, etc. — and each page
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was set up as a “Wish List, so that ” children and parents could use the supplement as a shopping guide. Member listings were free, provided participating members donated 12 toys to the CTA’s “So Kids Can Play” charity toy drive. The supplement was funded by display advertising purchased by CTA members, toy retailers and other
HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT! 7

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advertisers interested in reaching a family readership (Dodge Caravan, for instance). In addition to widespread distribution through the Sun Media papers, the supplement was mailed to all CTA members, whether they participated or not, and distributed at the Toy Fair and other CTA events. The supplement was also designed to drive readers and potential members to the CTA website.

MORE THAN 1,500 HOT TOYS WERE DONATED TO THE CTA’S TOY DRIVE

The Results
The Hot Toys promotion was a success all around. Sun Media helped in coordinating it from concept through execution and the CTA praised that turnkey aspect of the project. The writing, editing and design of the supplement was of a quality that met or surpassed the expectations of CTA
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members and management. Members were also pleased with the CTA’s heightened media profile. By incorporating the Sun supplement in its annual Hot Toys promotion, participation by CTA member rose to 68 companies and 120 products in 2004, up from 41 members and 80 products in the previous year. As a result of the promotion, more than 1,500 Hot Toys were donated to the CTA’s toy drive. The CTA was so pleased with its inaugural supplement, it is planning to use Sun Media supplements as a major component in its ongoing “Hot Toys for the Holidays” campaign. And this year, the supplement program will include a French-language version for the Quebec market. Once again, all of the details will be handled from start to finish by Sun Media. According to WAN, the newspaper works because the newspaper is: • The ultimate portable media • Convenient • Accessible • Disposable, or cutting out articles/ ads/ sections to keep for future reference • Cheap to buy and give away • Content rich • Review-able. When comparing general effectiveness of advertisements in the different media in the United Kingdom, WAN concluded that broadcast is an “in your face medium” “The Radio Advertising Bureau . of the UK, in their Wireless Wisdom study point to consumers being very annoyed by some ads (they use the slang expression “Gets right up their nose, which means very ” annoying). ” Again, quoting the WAN study: • Viewers find advertising on television more annoying than in any other medium.
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video recorders and the do-not-call list show that people spend most of their time seeking refuge from a media onslaught, but not when they’re reading a magazine. ‘You can’t passively read a magazine. It’s an opt-in medium,’ he said. (2) ” In other words, when consumers read newspapers or magazines, these media types will most likely have their undivided attention and therefore will absorb more of the messages within those media.
*SOURCES: (1) Print Media Work to Convince Advertisers They Still Matter. Katharine Q. Seelye. New York Times. May 2nd, 2005. (2) Ad Campaigns Tout Power of Magazines. Sean Callahan. B2B. April 4, 2005.

Efficiency of Newspaper Advertising
In 2001, The World Association of Newspapers (WAN) published a large-scale study examining the effectiveness of print advertisement
8 How Powerful is Print!

versus television or radio advertisements. This study, using survey data and case studies from around the globe, undoubtedly found that, plain and simply, newspaper advertising works. A study from Japan in particular stood out from these findings. It asked consumers to evaluate different types of media based on accuracy of information, credibility of content, usefulness for daily life, broad coverage of events in society, being an intellectual source, and providing memorable content. In all categories, Japanese consumers rated newspapers as the number one medium, well above any other media. WAN also found out that often times consumers around the world will buy more newspapers to: • Find job advertisements • Find business advertisements • Find automobile advertisements • And even private-arty advertisements.
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• More than half (51 per cent) of respondents who watch TV claimed that they often find the advertising annoying. • Commercial radio and the Internet fared slightly better with 23 and 18 per cent respectively. • Far fewer respondents felt that advertising in print media was annoying, with only 10 per cent of magazine readers believing that advertising has a negative effect on the medium. • This is important, whilst advertisers struggle to develop brand values annoying consumers with poor or unwelcome messages can often damage the brand. In fact, the Radio Advertising Bureau state this potential in their Wireless Wisdom study. Poor broadcast advertising damages the brand because it is difficult to avoid, whilst poor press advertising is merely avoided! Some of the case studies used in the report by WAN are also worth mentioning. For example, Specsavers Opticians in the United Kingdom wanted to measure the impact press advertisement had compared to that of radio. Over a three-week period, the company found that advertising recall of its brand name increased by 31% after the first week solely among its print advertisement, and another 10% after the second week. Another case study chronicles the advertisement efforts of the Dutch firm CEBUCO. Its ketchup products MUTTI had virtually no awareness among the Dutch public, so CEBUCO set out with an advertising plan. Over a three-week period, the company marketed its brand by including a total of 10 inserts each in 13 different newspapers. The first insertion was a full two
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WHY NEWSPAPERS WORK
50% 39%

Usefulness

17% 21% 23% 50% 16%

Accurate info
4%

12% 10% 50% 8% 7% 7% 10% 49% 31%

Intellectual

Broad coverage

11% 10% 10% 49% 28%

Memorable

12% 23% 10% 43% 13% 10% 3% 5%

Credibility

NEWSPAPERS

TV

RADIO

MAGAZINES

INTERNET

*SOURCE: Why Newspaper Advertising? World Association of Newspapers (WAN). 2001.

COMPARING RADIO AND PRINT
When Specsavers Opticians in the UK compared the ad recall values fro print and radio over a three week period they found dramatic increases on the print values.
34%

37%

+1

0%

26%

+3

1%
20%

22%

15%

Week 1

Week 2
NEWSPAPERS RADIO

Week 3

* SOURCE: Why Newspaper Advertising? World Association of Newspapers (WAN). 2001. HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT! 9

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REGIONAL DIFFERENCES
While print advertising unquestionably works, the World Association of Newspapers did find that media consumption also differs around the world. What works in one country, does not necessarily work in another. The graph below shows this difference. The pink lines represent newspaper consumption, while green represents television consumption. Radio is blue, cinema is brown and light pink is outdoor media. As WAN concluded: “It seems to suggest a possible link with developed countries and increased press consumption. It certainly raises doubt about the use of TV as a first choice media across the globe!”

effect this campaign had on the retailers, who are, of course, also newspaper readers. According to WAN, ”all of the leading retailers contacted the importer in the first week and the shelf space was more than doubled. After the print adver” tising campaign, sales of MUTTI Ketchup increased by 442%!

Where do Canadians turn to for advertising?
Purchasing a product will often times be preceded by seeking out information about, and the pros and cons of, this product. Most likely, competing products will also be researched in some fashion to help decide just what the end purchase will be. The research almost always involves some kind of advertising, but where does the consumer find these ads? Leger Marketing asked 1,500 Canadians which type of media they would most likely turn to if they were looking for advertising on a variety of products, such as appliances, electronics or gadgets, travel and mortgages. We found that when it comes to seeking out advertising for any product category, Canadians will always turn to newspapers over television and radio combined. This is especially true when they are looking for advertisements on new or used cars, groceries and other household products, and electronics. While men and women always choose newspapers over television, men are even more likely to do, especially when it comes to electronics, appliances and mortgages. Women are somewhat more likely than men to turn to television when it comes to cars, groceries and electronics, although men turn to television more often than
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Finland Denmark Sweden Malaysia Switzerland

Poland Portugal Romania Russsia Cambodia

NEWSPAPERS

TV

RADIO

CINEMA

OUTDOOR

*SOURCE: Why Newspaper Advertising? World Association of Newspapers (WAN). 2001.

pages and all inserts targeted consumers between the ages of 25 and 55, who did the grocery shopping. At the end of this campaign, the results were as follows: • 87% believe they have seen the ad in a newspaper - 10% on TV (even though the ad never appeared on TV) • 35% believe the ad tells it is quality ketchup. • 58% would stop and look at the ads, if they see them again • 53% would like to try the product. But even more amazing was the
10 How Powerful is Print!

87% BELIEVE THEY HAVE SEEN THE AD IN A NEWSPAPER – 10% ON TV (EVEN THOUGH THE AD NEVER APPEARED ON TV)

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SUN MEDIA ADVERTISING SOLUTIONS
MICROPLAY/JUMBO VIDEO

Strategic ad placement targets select audiences
The Challenge
Jumbo Video and Microplay are related companies (both are owned by Jumbo Entertainment Inc.) with very different target audiences. Jumbo Video, founded in 1987 is , Canada’s largest franchise home video chain, with 55 locations across the country in English markets. It specializes in family-oriented home entertainment needs, with an emphasis on video and DVD offerings suitable for kids, adults — and both. Recent offerings include Million Dollar Baby, The Pacifier and Bride & Prejudice. Microplay is in the video game business and enjoys popularity primarily among young male gamers. Recent top rentals include Juiced, Medal of Honor: European Assault and Destroy All Humans! Jumbo Video and Microplay share some store locations, but otherwise have very little in common. The challenge the newer Microplay faced was to increase awareness about its products and store locations among gamers. Jumbo Video, on the other hand, didn’t want to be forgotten in a promotional push for Microplay. How could the two companies reach their individual target audiences?

Regular Video Game feature in the Toronto Sun’s Showcase section

The Solution
The answer for both Jumbo Video and Microplay lay within the pages of Sun Media newspapers. Their
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Sun Media advertising consultants showed store executives that the company’s newspapers had demographics that were a perfect fit for both Jumbo Video and Microplay products.
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Sun Media had the young male readership that Microplay was looking for and also enjoyed a large family component among its audience — ideal for Jumbo Video. Not only that, but Sun Media had a
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strategy for going directly after those two audience segments.

The Details
What are young male gamers interested in? You got it: more games. Sun Media suggested to Microplay that it had an ideal environment for Microplay advertising in the “Gaming” feature that appears in the Toronto Sun’s Showcase section on Sundays. In Ottawa, London and Winnipeg, Microplay’s ads alternated between the news and sports sections. Sun Media advised Jumbo Video to place its advertising in the up-front news area and entertainment section of the newspapers.
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WHAT ARE YOUNG MALE GAMERS INTERESTED IN? YOU GOT IT: MORE GAMES.

The Results
After its first ad appeared in Sun Media newspapers, sales at Jumbo Video increased by an astounding 15 per cent. The company’s creative, which emphasized

special “3rd movie free” discounts and the fact that its stores carried multiple copies of every new, major release, also drove up store traffic in most locations. Microplay also saw an increase in store traffic and overall brand awareness. Where Microplay and Jumbo Video shared store locations, both companies benefitted. There is no doubt that the twopronged advertising strategy within Sun Media newspapers had an immediate and positive effect on sales and profiles for both stores. Executives at Jumbo Video and Microplay are so pleased, they are planning new, multiple-insertions ad campaigns for both companies.

WHERE DO THEY TURN FOR ADVERTISING
43%

Cars

19% 2% 42% 42%

Groceries

13% 1% 44% 40% 17% 2% 43% 35%

Electronics

Appliances

12% 1% 54% 34%

Travel

19% 2% 42% 28%

Mortgages

12% 2% 42% 22%

Jewellery

2%

14% 47%

NEWSPAPERS

TV

RADIO

OTHER

* SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005. N=1,500

women in terms of travel advertisements. However, print still leads in all categories across both genders. Although there are significant differences among age groups,
12 How Powerful is Print!

print is still the media type most often turned to in all categories except one. Younger Canadians are much more likely to turn to television for advertisements on any product category. In fact, when 18
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to 24-year olds seek out advertisements for travel-related products as well as jewellery, they are more likely to turn to television than to print. While this is significant for this age group, no other age group chooses television over print more often for any product category. The biggest fans of the print media are those between 45 and 54, who are more likely than any other age group to use newspapers over television for most products. As with many behaviours and attitudes, Canadians in any province do things slightly differently than others across the country. This is also true when it comes to types of media used for finding advertising. Most notably, three in five of those in the Prairies say they read newspapers for advertisements on cars (60%) and groceries (62%). Using the newspaper for grocery ads is very likely in the Maritimes (57%), while newspapers are the best choice for ads on mortgages in Ontario (33%). Television is least used in
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British Columbia as a medium for advertising on cars (14%), electronics (11%), and appliances (7%), but most likely to be used for ads on mortgages (17%). Instead, B.C. residents are much more likely to turn to newspapers for appliance ads (41%), as are those in the Prairies (47%).

IF YOU WERE THINKING OF BUYING A PRODUCT, WHICH TYPE OF MEDIA WOULD YOU MOST LIKELY USE TO FIND ADVERTISING ON…? MEN WOMEN Print TV Print TV Cars Groceries Electronics Appliances Travel Mortgages Jewellery 45% 42% 43% 38% 34% 31% 21% 17% 10% 15% 11% 21% 13% 14% 41% 41% 37% 32% 35% 24% 23% 21% 16% 19% 13% 17% 11% 15%

Where do Canadians turn to for detailed information?
Newspapers and magazines require more thought and concentration than listening to radio, watching television, or surfing the Internet. This means that Canadians are more accepting of print as a source for detailed information on products. Not only are they more accepting of it, it also means that they seek out print media when they wish to learn.

❑ Denotes significant differences within print. ❑ Denotes significant differences within television. *SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005. N=1,500

THE BIGGEST FANS OF THE PRINT MEDIA ARE THOSE BETWEEN 44 AND 54.

When Canadians want to find out more detailed information about any given product, they are more likely to turn to newspapers than the broadcast media. Radio is considered to be the least likely source, and not at all for jewellery items, while television is the choice of less then 10% of the

IF YOU WERE THINKING OF BUYING A PRODUCT, WHICH TYPE OF MEDIA WOULD YOU MOST LIKELY USE TO FIND ADVERTISING ON…? 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Print TV Print TV Print TV Print TV Print TV Print TV Cars Groceries Electronics Appliances Travel Mortgages Jewellery 48% 33% 36% 33% 24% 26% 13% 30% 21% 29% 19% 39% 18% 23% 43% 36% 34% 30% 39% 29% 19% 31% 19% 20% 17% 23% 13% 17% 42% 44% 44% 38% 36% 33% 27% 18% 12% 19% 12% 17% 13% 13% 49% 46% 49% 42% 42% 31% 29% 15% 10% 14% 9% 15% 12% 16% 40% 39% 44% 38% 37% 22% 19% 15% 14% 17% 10% 16% 13% 12% 35% 47% 29% 28% 27% 20% 18% 9% 7% 10% 8% 13% 5% 8%

❑ Denotes significant differences within print. ❑ Denotes significant differences within television. * SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005. N=1,500

IF YOU WERE THINKING OF BUYING A PRODUCT, WHICH TYPE OF MEDIA WOULD YOU MOST LIKELY USE TO FIND ADVERTISING ON…? ATLANTIC QUEBEC ONTARIO PRAIRIES AB BC

Print
Cars Groceries Electronics Appliances Travel Mortgages Jewellery 40% 57% 31% 35% 37% 21% 25%

TV
20% 8% 15% 9% 24% 15% 14%

Print
40% 32% 36% 28% 29% 26% 18%

TV
19% 16% 18% 16% 17% 12% 13%

Print
38% 43% 41% 35% 36% 33% 23%

TV
19% 13% 18% 12% 17% 10% 14%

Print
60% 62% 49% 47% 37% 27% 27%

TV
20% 15% 21% 15% 23% 16% 22%

Print
51% 39% 42% 35% 38% 22% 26%

TV
22% 14% 21% 10% 20% 9% 12%

Print
48% 38% 38% 41% 33% 25% 19%

TV
14% 12% 11% 7% 22% 17% 14%

❑ Denotes significant differences within print. ❑ Denotes significant differences within television. *SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005. N=1,500 workingKnowledge
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population. As with advertising, groceries, cars and electronics top the list for newspaper listings, although groceries overtake cars to be ranked first. Men and women do not differ too much in this regard, except when it comes to items that men may be more likely to have interest in to start, such as cars and electronics. In these two categories, they are more likely than women to say they would turn to newspapers for detailed information. Mortgages are also an area where men choose newspapers more often than women, while women choose newspapers for jewellery information more often. Neither would turn to television more often than newspapers for any product category. The younger generation is a TV generation and it shows. Those between 18 and 24 will turn to television more often than any other age group for detailed information on all product categories, albeit still less than newspapers. Jewellery is the only exception, where both media fare similarly. Perhaps because they are more likely to read newspapers on a regular basis, middle-aged Canadians are most likely to turn to newspapers for product information. Once again, television does not overtake newspapers for any category in any of Canada’s regions. In the Prairies, however, using television for information is somewhat more usual than anywhere else in the country. Especially for travelrelated products, groceries/ household items and jewellery, those in the Prairies are more likely to say they will turn to TV. Half of Maritimers say they will use newspapers to find out more about gro14 How Powerful is Print!

WHERE DO THEY TURN TO FOR DETAILED INFO
39%

Groceries

6% 1% 53% 35%

Cars

8% 1% 55% 34% 7% 1% 56% 31%

Electronics

Appliances

6% 1% 61% 29%

Travel

8% 2% 56% 22%

Mortgages

5% 1% 55% 19%

Jewellery

0%

7% 57%

NEWSPAPERS

TV

RADIO

OTHER

* SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005. N=1,500

IF YOU WERE LOOKING FOR DETAILED INFORMATION ON A PRODUCT’S FEATURES OR PRICING, WHICH TYPE OF MEDIA WOULD YOU MOST LIKELY TURN TO FOR…? MEN WOMEN Print TV Print TV Cars Groceries Electronics Appliances Travel Mortgages Jewellery 37% 40% 36% 32% 29% 26% 17% 8% 5% 7% 7% 11% 6% 7% 34% 39% 32% 30% 28% 19% 20% 7% 6% 6% 5% 5% 4% 6%

❑ Denotes significant differences within print. ❑ Denotes significant differences within television. *SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005. N=1,500

THOSE BETWEEN 18 AND 24 WILL TURN TO TELEVISION MORE OFTEN THAN ANY OTHER AGE GROUP FOR DETAILED INFORMATION ON ALL PRODUCT CATEGORIES, ALBEIT STILL LESS THAN NEWSPAPERS.

ceries. But these are still significantly lower than those who turn to print.

Exposure to Advertising
Canadians feel that throughout a normal day, they are always or occasionally exposed to advertising from all media. In fact, three-quarters (72%) say they are always exposed to advertising in any given day. Those between the ages of 45 and
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IF YOU WERE THINKING OF BUYING A PRODUCT, WHICH TYPE OF MEDIA WOULD YOU MOST LIKELY USE TO FIND ADVERTISING ON…? 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Print TV Print TV Print TV Print TV Print TV Print TV Cars Groceries Electronics Appliances Travel Mortgages Jewellery 33% 30% 28% 23% 25% 20% 12% 18% 12% 17% 11% 14% 8% 13% 36% 35% 27% 28% 26% 24% 19% 14% 9% 7% 5% 14% 5% 7% 40% 45% 40% 38% 33% 31% 24% 5% 3% 6% 5% 8% 4% 7% 35% 44% 39% 36% 32% 25% 19% 5% 4% 5% 6% 6% 3% 6% 39% 39% 37% 30% 34% 17% 17% 8% 5% 6% 6% 7% 6% 5% 30% 37% 28% 26% 22% 13% 19% 3% 3% 5% 4% 3% 4% 3%

❑ Denotes significant differences within print. ❑ Denotes significant differences within television. * SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005. N=1,500

IF YOU WERE THINKING OF BUYING A PRODUCT, WHICH TYPE OF MEDIA WOULD YOU MOST LIKELY USE TO FIND ADVERTISING ON…? ATLANTIC QUEBEC ONTARIO PRAIRIES AB BC Print TV Print TV Print TV Print TV Print TV Print TV Cars Groceries Electronics Appliances Travel Mortgages Jewellery 38% 50% 39% 27% 34% 20% 18% 8% 5% 5% 6% 7% 5% 5% 33% 31% 29% 29% 25% 20% 13% 9% 7% 7% 8% 7% 6% 8% 32% 40% 34% 34% 28% 24% 23% 8% 4% 7% 6% 7% 4% 6% 46% 46% 35% 31% 31% 18% 21% 9% 12% 6% 5% 13% 4% 9% 34% 41% 33% 28% 30% 21% 19% 6% 4% 10% 6% 9% 5% 6% 42% 42% 39% 30% 33% 24% 18% 5% 4% 3% 4% 7% 5% 5%

❑ Denotes significant differences within print. ❑ Denotes significant differences within television. * SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005. N=1,500

54 are most likely to feel their exposure, as 76% say they are always exposed. Regionally, Maritimers feel they are less exposed in general than the rest of Canada (83%), while Quebeckers and Prairie residents are least likely to find they are always exposed (69% and 68%, respectively). When comparing this advertising exposure to 10 years ago, it is agreed that Canadians feel more exposed to advertising now than then. Almost no one finds there is less advertisement today. Those between the ages of 35 and 44 are most likely to find the amount of advertisement has remained the same (17%). Regionally, Prairie and B.C. residents feel there is even more advertisement now than other
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EXPOSURE TO ADS
90% 87% 90% 90% 93% 87% 88%

10%

11%

10%

9% 6%

11%

11%

All Canadians

18-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

65+

EXPOSED

NOT EXPOSED

* SOURCE: Leger Marketing Advertising Saturation Report. 2004.

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HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT! 15

Which target would you rather reach?
Young active consumers or old...

Target: Adults 18-49
% Composition

68%

56%
Competitive Dailies

Sun Network

Footnote: NADbank 2004 Study: Edmonton CMA, Calgary CMA, Winnipeg CMA, London CMA, Toronto Sun readership markets, Ottawa-Gatineau CMA, Montreal CMA, Quebec City CMA; Sun Network = Edmonton Sun, Calgary Sun, Winnipeg Sun, London Free Press, Toronto Sun, 24 hours Toronto, Ottawa Sun, Journal de Montréal, 24 heures, Journal de Québec Competitive Dailies = Edmonton Journal, Calgary Herald, Winnipeg Free Press, Toronto Star, Metro Toronto, Ottawa Citizen, La Presse, Métro Montreal, Le Soleil.

EDMONTON SUN • CALGARY SUN • WINNIPEG SUN • LONDON FREE PRESS • TORONTO SUN • OTTAWA SUN • JOURNAL DE MONTRÉAL • JOURNAL DE QUÉBEC • 24 HOURS • 24 HEURES

For more information, please call 1-877-786-8227 or visit: www.sunmediasales.ca

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EXPOSURE TO ADS
1% 2% 8% 17% 2% 1% 1% 0% 11% 13% 8%

0% 6%

Canadians (90% each). Quebeckers, however, are more likely to say the amount has remained the same (16%).

11%

What are acceptable types of advertising?
We all know advertising is what funds newspapers, magazines, radio and television shows, Internet sites and even people’s personal endeavours. Remember the man who sold his forehead to advertising on Ebay? But just how acceptable is all of this advertising? Are Canadians oversaturated with it and can’t take anymore or do they understand the importance of this revenue? A survey with 1,500 Canadians in 2004 found that about half of Canadians (51%) do find it acceptable to be exposed to advertisements on a daily basis. This is highest for young people (60% of those under the age of 24), perhaps because they have always lived in a world of ads. As Canadians get older, however, we do see a steady decline in this acceptance, with just over one-third (37%) of those over the age of 65 finding it acceptable. So if daily exposure to advertising is acceptable to half of the population, are there any types of advertising that are more acceptable than others? Two years in a row, Leger Marketing asked Canadians if they found the following types of ads acceptable. Both years, print advertising in newspapers came out on top, with four in five Canadians finding this type of advertising more acceptable than any other. Less traditional forms of advertising such as ads on personal property or cell phones are not found to be acceptable. Sneaky and intrusive advertising is the least acceptable. Only 20%
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86%

90%

88%

81%

87%

85%

87%

All Canadians

18-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

65+

MORE

SAME AMOUNT

LESS

* SOURCE: Leger Marketing Advertising Saturation Report. 2004.

OVERALL ACCEPTANCE OF DAILY EXPOSURE TO ADS

51%

60%

59%

55%

47%

46%

37%

All Canadians

18-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

65+

* SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2003 and 2004.

18 How Powerful is Print!

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MEDIA SATURATION – WHAT IS ACCEPTABLE TO CANADIANS ADVERTISING TECHNIQUE Print advertising in newspapers Radio advertising Posters on buses or subways Television advertising Billboards along the roads Product placement in television shows Ads in washrooms Banner advertising on the Internet Ads place on personal property, like baby carriages Ads on cell phone displays Famous people appearing on talk shows and praising prescription drugs without mentioning they are paid Pop up windows with advertising on the Internet
*SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2003 and 2004.

2003 81% 77% 75% 72% 63% 56% 46% 34% 32% 25% 20% 17%

2004 78% 72% 70% 68% 56% 53% 47% 31% 29% 20% 20% 12%

MEDIA SATURATION – WHAT IS ACCEPTABLE TO CANADIANS ADVERTISING TECHNIQUE Print advertising in newspapers Radio advertising Posters on buses or subways Television advertising Ads in subway tunnels Billboards along the roads Product placement in television shows Video monitors in subway cars Ads in washrooms Banner advertising on the Internet Ads place on personal property, like baby carriages Ads on cell phone displays Famous people appearing on talk shows and praising prescription drugs without mentioning they are paid Pop up windows with advertising on the Internet
*SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2003 and 2004.

18-24 76% 71% 78% 70% 73% 72% 58% 62% 59% 43% 35% 32% 20% 14%

25-34 81% 84% 77% 73% 73% 67% 61% 62% 60% 45% 34% 23% 23% 14%

35-44 91% 81% 78% 76% 75% 62% 59% 57% 53% 35% 31% 21% 22% 11%

45-54 77% 71% 73% 69% 66% 54% 52% 51% 48% 29% 30% 20% 21% 15%

55-64 80% 69% 65% 66% 51% 46% 49% 39% 33% 20% 26% 16% 15% 11%

65+ 60% 52% 47% 51% 32% 34% 39% 19% 23% 12% 20% 10% 13% 8%

of Canadians say that celebrities praising prescription drugs on talk shows without mentioning they are being paid for their brand mention is acceptable, while even fewer find pop up windows on the internet to be acceptable (12%). Most types of advertisements are also found to be less acceptable in 2004 than the year prior. But the biggest drop in acceptability comes in the form of billboard advertising along roads and highways. Just over half of Canadians (56%) find this acceptable, a
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QUEBECKERS ARE GENERALLY MORE ADVERTISING FRIENDLY, FINDING MOST OF THESE ADVERTISING METHODS MORE ACCEPTABLE THAN OTHER CANADIANS.

seven-per cent drop since 2003. As mentioned earlier, the most acceptable form of advertising is print advertising in newspapers. This is especially true for those between the ages of 35 and 44 (91%). However, as seen in the overall acceptance of daily exposure to advertising, the older the respondent, the less likely she or he is to find any of these types of advertisements acceptable. Only four per cent of Canadians say that none of these advertising methods are acceptable, most of
HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT! 19

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MEDIA SATURATION – WHAT IS ACCEPTABLE TO CANADIANS ADVERTISING TECHNIQUE Print advertising in newspapers Radio advertising Posters on buses or subways %Television advertising Ads in subway tunnels Billboards along the roads Product placement in television shows Video monitors in subway cars Ads in washrooms Banner advertising on the Internet Ads place on personal property, like baby carriages Ads on cell phone displays Famous people appearing on talk shows and praising prescription drugs without mentioning they are paid Pop up windows with advertising on the Internet

Atlantic Quebec Ontario Prairies Alberta BC 72% 65% 68% 65% 54% 45% 51% 40% 35% 32% 26% 26% 25% 15% 79% 75% 72% 69% 67% 58% 53% 53% 46% 27% 40% 22% 27% 15% 79% 75% 71% 69% 66% 59% 54% 52% 48% 34% 29% 20% 17% 12% 78% 66% 65% 71% 51% 61% 50% 42% 49% 31% 18% 23% 18% 12% 75% 70% 64% 66% 57% 54% 57% 39% 44% 30% 23% 19% 20% 9% 81% 68% 74% 63% 60% 49% 53% 49% 53% 29% 25% 12% 12% 7%

GRAPH

79 79 78 72

81 75 65 75 75 70 66 68 65 69 69 71 66 63 58 59 61 54 49 45 40 29 26 18 23 25 26 22 20 23 19 12 25

27 17 18 20 1515 12 1212 9

7

Newspaper

Radio

TV

Billboards

Personal property

Cellphone

Famous people

Internet pop ups

ATLANTIC

QUEBEC

ONTARIO

PRAIRIES

ALBERTA

BC

*SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2003 and 2004.

who are over the age of 65 (12%) and live in Alberta (6%) or BC (7%). Quebeckers are generally more advertising friendly, finding most of these advertising methods more acceptable than other Canadians. This is especially true for ads placed on personal property like
20 How Powerful is Print!

THOSE IN THE PRAIRIES DISAPPROVE MOST OF ADS ON PERSONAL PROPERTY.

baby carriages (40%) and even celebrities endorsing products on talk shows (27%). Maritimers disapprove most of advertisements in washroom, while those in the Prairies disapprove most of ads on personal property.

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AUTO INFORMATION
Purchasing a vehicle, may it be new or used, is a tough decision for most people. With so many different manufacturers to choose from, Canadians tend to choose between five or more vehicles and three-quarters say they begin planning a new vehicle acquisition 6 months to a year in advance. In a study conducted for Sun Media, Leger Marketing surveyed 2,400 Sun Media readers in eight markets across Canada to find out just what they drive, when they upgrade and where they go to find information on replacement vehicles. The survey found that half of Sun Media readers turn to daily newspapers before even friends or family when they want to find information on vehicles. Two in five search the Internet and one-quarter read magazines. Only one-fifth say they find television to be the best source for automotive information. In fact, more then one-third of readers said that the most important part of a section they were reading included advertising and/or deals. This desire for advertising is almost as prevalent as a desire to learn more through reviews/ratings and slightly more than articles on new technology. This is a clear indication that newspapers are valuable to drive prospective car buyers to the section whether they are looking for deals for an immediate purchase or just seeing what is new and upcoming for that future purchase.
BEST SOURCE FOR AUTO INFORMATION
Daily newspapers Friends/family Internet Magazines TV Community newspapers Radio Billboards Don t know/refuse ’ 50% 48% 39% 25% 21% 7% 5% 4% 4% * SOURCE: Auto Information. Commissioned by Sun Media and conducted by Leger Marketing. 2004.

WHAT MAKES NEWSPAPERS A GOOD SOURCE
Reviews/ratings Ads/price deals New technology Used car articles Car features Styles/models What’s available Maintenance Everything Reliability Other Don’t know workingKnowledge 40% 37% 33% 16% 11% 4% 2% 2% 2% 2% 10% 4% * SOURCE: Auto Information. Commissioned by Sun Media and conducted by Leger Marketing. 2004.

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HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT! 21

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HAVE YOU EVER PURCHASED A PRODUCT BECAUSE YOU... ?
57% 54% 51% 47% 45% 40% 36% 30% 31% 28% 26% 23% 21% 18% 14% 26% 24% 18% 24% 25% 25% 36% 29% 47% 47% 45% 45% 54%

28%

29%

Read about it in newspapers

Saw it in TV ad

Heard on the radio

Saw a billboard

None of these

ATLANTIC

QUEBEC

ONTARIO

PRAIRIES

ALBERTA

WEST

*SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005.

Purchase Behaviour and Advertisement
Advertising and general awareness in the media are both very important factors when it comes to consumer purchasing behaviour. This can be most accurately demonstrated through a study done by Leger Marketing with 1,500 Canadians, of whom half say they have at one time or another purchased a product because they read about it in a newspaper (49%) or saw it on television (46%). Canadians between 35 and 44 are most likely to have purchased something they read about in the newspaper (55%), whereas younger ones tend to have bought something because they saw it on TV (58% of those between 18 and 24 and 57% of those between 25 and 34). Higher income Canadians (61%) and those with a university education (57%) are most influenced by what they read in the newspaper,
22 How Powerful is Print!

HAVE YOU EVER PURCHASED A PRODUCT BECAUSE YOU... ?

49%

46%

28%

21%

27%

Read about it in newspapers

Saw it in TV ad

Heard on the radio

Saw a billboard

None of these

* SOURCE: Leger Marketing Omnican. 2005.

saying they have purchased products because of it. Regionally, there are also some differences in purchasing behaviour.
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Maritimers are the least influenced by advertising, as over one-third (36%) say they have never purchased an item because they saw
continued on page 24

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SUN MEDIA ADVERTISING SOLUTIONS
CREDITXPERT CANADA INC.

24 hours campaign delivers major increase in sales leads
The Challenge
CreditXpert Canada Inc., a company that offers professional advice and representation to help consumers achieve financial well-being, was looking for the right print medium in which to create top-of-mind public awareness of its services. Its objectives included increasing the volume of queries from potential clients, broadening its client base, educating consumers on the credit consolidation options available to them, and positioning CreditXpert Canada as the go-to service provider for those wishing to achieve financial freedom.

The Solution
Working with Sun Media advertising consultants, CreditXpert Canada determined that 24 hours Toronto was an ideal environment for an ongoing print campaign. The glossy commuter paper reaches young urbanites on the go, with a readership that is mobile, active and attentive. CreditXpert was looking to reach young adults and a remarkable 79 per cent of 24 hours readers are adults between 18 and 49 years of age. Each day, 24 hours provides insightful coverage of society, news (local, provincial, international), business, show business, television and sports. It also invites reader interaction and features weekly columns covering such topics as cars,
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24 Hours/24 heures: Number 1 free dailies circulated in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal

employment, health, fashion, travel, movies and technology.

The Details
The CreditXpert strategy called for a daily campaign consisting of a page 3 banner ad on Mondays and Fridays and an additional insertion in the
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Business Directory Tuesdays to Thursdays. The premium positions would assure heightened awareness among the 24 hours audience. In addition to the ad component, CreditXpert and Sun Media determined that a weekly column addressing issues about credit,
HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT! 23

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debt and financial planning would be of benefit to readers and help to educate them on the choices available to them. The column, with a question-and-answer component to answer readers’ questions, is written by the client. CreditXpert’s e-mail address and the 24 hours website are noted at the bottom of the column to help drive traffic. Questions can be emailed or readers have the option of calling a dedicated telephone number.

COMPANY EXECUTIVES SAY 82% OF THEIR SALES LEADS ARE NOW GENERATED FROM 24 HOURS.

The Results
The 24 hours campaign, which fell well within CreditXpert’s budget parameters, met or surpassed all of
continued from page 22

the client’s goals. CreditXpert experienced a surge in calls from potential clients — in fact, company executives say that 82 per cent of their sales leads are now generated from 24 hours. The campaign has increased the profile of CreditXpert Canada among young adults, and the column feature has helped to educate readers about their financial options. The message that is brought home to readers is that they can indeed achieve financial freedom, and CreditXpert Canada can help to get them there. And the message CreditXpert came to appreciate is that Sun Media delivers effective, immediate advertising solutions.

an advertisement for it in a newspaper, on TV, radio or on a billboard. On the other side of the country, however, Canadians are most likely to have purchased a product because they read about it in the newspaper, with 57% of Albertans and 54% of BC residents saying they have done so.

KFF DATA: SPENDING TIME WITH MEDIA
Watch TV Listen to radio Use a computer Go Online Read a magazine
81% 74% 54% 47% 47% 46% 41% 39% 34% 13%

The Next Generation of Print Readers
A new generation of Canadians is growing up and growing up fast. Already, this generation is exposed to more media than any other, from video games, to computers, to television, “Generation M” is the newest target for advertisers. But these kids are much more scatterbrained than older people and this poses a challenge for effective and targeted advertising. A study by the U.S.-based Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8-18 Year Olds looks at exactly what types of media these kids are consuming and how often. The previous graph
24 How Powerful is Print!

Read a book Play video games Watch videos/DVDs Read a newspaper Go to a movie

* SOURCE: Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8 to 18 Year Olds. Kaiser Family Foundation. March 2005.

shows what types of media 8 to 18year old are using in a typical day. While television and radio are the most used media, half of them do read magazines (47%) and another third say they typically read a newspaper (34%). Not surprisingly, kids spend most
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of their time watching television, videos/ DVD’s and listening to music. But they do spend a significant time reading as well. In fact, 19% say they spend more than one hour on reading each day. Looking at exactly what kids read when they do, KFF found that most
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KFF DATA – SPENDING TIME WITH MEDIA

3:51 Watching TV (TV, Videos, DVD’s, etc.)

1:44

1:02

0:49

0:43

0:25 Going to a movie

Listening to Using a Playing video Reading music (radio, computer games (magazines, CD’s/MP3’s (online/offline) newspapers, etc.) books)

were even multitasking at all. It found that generally, Generation M does not multitask nearly as much when they are reading. As KFF’s report states: “Regardless of level of print exposure, fewer than one-fifth of 7th- to 12th-grade kids report heavy media multitasking.” This compares to one-quarter who are considered to be heavy multitaskers when watching television and one-third who are heavy multitaskers when using the computer. This information again goes to level of concentration and shows that even the next generation, albeit all over the media map, is already focusing when looking at print.

* SOURCE: Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8 to 18 Year Olds. Kaiser Family Foundation. March 2005.

Canadian Newspaper Readership
All of this that we have reported is only important if people actually look at newspapers and magazines. The children and teens that we just discussed must grow up to become regular print readers if the ads are really going to be able to influence them. What we find is that, yes, Canadians are frequent newspaper readers. According to the 2004 Nadbank study, four in five Canadians (79%) say they read a newspaper in the past week and half (53%) say they read a paper every day. Weekend readership is at 58%. When looking at the top 10 markets, weekly readership is highest in Winnipeg (85%), Quebec City (84%), Montreal (81%) and Edmonton (81%). Daily readership is also highest in Winnipeg (59%), Edmonton (56%) and Montreal (54%), but includes Hamilton as well (56%). What is really beneficial to advertisers is that not only are people more likely to regularly read a paper in these 10 markets, these are also the most important markets
HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT! 25

MEDIA MULTI-TASKING BY LEVEL OF MEDIA EXPOSURE AVERAGE EXPOSURE Light Moderate Television Computer Video Games Print 11% (a) 8% (a) 12% (a) 15% 16% (ab) 14% (b) 21% (ab) 15%

Heavy 25% (b) 33% (b) 28% (b) 18%

“Note: Only those items in each row that do not share a common subscript differ from one another with statistical reliability. Those items without a subscript, or those that share a common subscript, do not differ by a large enough margin to ensure statistical reliability. ” * SOURCE: Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8 to 18 Year Olds. Kaiser Family Foundation. March 2005.

time is spent on books (23 minutes on average), but a significant time is also spent on magazines (14 minutes on average). Newspapers are read on average for six minutes a day, which, although low, is still significant for this age group. Not only that, but one-third of kids at least flip through newspapers regularly (34% saying they read a newspaper for at least 5 minutes the previous day). More importantly, however, this study looked at attention spans and what kids are doing when reading any print media, or if they
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“REGARDLESS OF LEVEL OF PRINT EXPOSURE, FEWER THAN ONE-FIFTH OF 7TH- TO 12TH-GRADE KIDS REPORT HEAVY MEDIA MULTITASKING. ”

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AVERAGE TIME CONSUMING PRINT MEDIA PRINT MEDIUM 8-18 8-10 Year-Olds Year-Olds A. Average daily time with each print medium Books 0:23 0:27 Magazines 0:14 0:12 Newspapers 0:06 0:04 (a) ALL PRINT 0:43 0:44

11-14 Year-Olds

15-18 Year-Olds

0:21 0:15 0:05 (a) 0:41

0:24 0:13 0:07 (b) 0:45

B. Proportion who read at least 5 minutes the previous day Books 46% 63% (a) 44% (b) Magazines 47% 35% (a) 54% (b) Newspapers 34% 21% (a) 35% (b) ALL PRINT 73% 73% 75% C. Proportion who read 30 minutes or more the previous day Books 30% 40% (a) 27% (b) Magazines 22% 16% (a) 25% (b) Newspapers 7% 7% 7% ALL PRINT 47% 51% 48%

34% (c) 47% (b) 43% (b) 71%

26% (b) 21% (b) 8% 43%

“Note: Only those items in each row that do not share a common subscript differ from one another with statistical reliability. Those items without a subscript, or those that share a common subscript, do not differ by a large enough margin to ensure statistical reliability. ” * SOURCE: Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8 to 18 Year Olds. Kaiser Family Foundation. March 2005.

Children aged 8 to 18 are all consuming print media but the mix of what they consume changes as they age.

READERSHIP IN TOP 10 MARKETS

Toronto Montreal Vancouver Ottawa/Gatineau Calgary Edmonton Quebec City Hamilton Winnipeg London YESTERDAY

51% 54% 48% 53% 52% 56% 53% 56% 59% 52%

71% 74% 72% 73% 75% 76% 74% 75% 77% 73%

78% 81% 74% 78% 79% 81% 84% 80% 85% 79%

5 DAY CUMULATIVE

6/7 DAY CUMULATIVE

* SOURCE: Nadbank Study 2004.

when it comes to population size, density and incomes. Three-fifths of Canadians over the age of 50 reported they read a newspaper the day before (60% of those 50-64 and 62% of those over 65), compared to 44% of those between 25 and 34 and 45% of those under the age of 25. The higher the household income, the more likely Canadians are to have read a newspaper the day before or on the weekend. The same is true for education, as those with a university degree are more likely to have read a newspaper the day before (58%) than those with some high school (46%). The key sections of the newspaper include news, be it local (74%), international (63%), or provincial/ national (61%). Arts and Entertainment news is at least sometimes read by three-quarters (76%), while Health and Editorial are read by three-quarters of Canadians at least sometimes (70% and 67%), respectively. When you combine this information with what we have discovered in other research it also helps to demonstrate the benefit of targeted media. For example, the graph on content readership shows that about half of Canadians do not look at the automotive section on a regular basis. Now go back to the earlier section of this report that shows that when someone is looking for a vehicle they will use the newspaper for deals, reviews and information. Another point we have made throughout this report is concentration is highest when looking at print media compared with other forms. As you will recall, we have proven that print is the “opt-in media” for which multi-tasking is lowest, even among young readers. Print readers feel less annoyed by advertisements in their newspapers and magazines than by Television ads or Internet
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26 How Powerful is Print!

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Pop-Ups, making for a more product-friendly consumer. And finally, the print media is still the most acceptable form of advertising. All of these pieces of information can lead us to an understanding that print ads are noticed by people who are actually in the market for a new product, in this case a new vehicle. Regular readership, acceptance of print advertising in our lives, higher awareness of print ads over time, greater likelihood that the ad breaks through the clutter and a desire to seek out print for information, ads, and knowledge leads us to conclude that the print medium has not been replaced by the television or computer screen. As we go forward the print medium will continue to adapt and change to reflect the interests of all generations but it looks like it has been doing it long enough to maintain its leadership as a viable advertising tool.

CONTENT READERSHIP
Local News World News Prov./Natl. News Arts & Ent. News Editorial Health** Sports Comics Food Finance/Business Travel Fashion/Lifestyle Homes/Real Est. Automotive USUALLY
74% 63% 61% 44% 38% 37% 36% 30% 30% 28% 27% 27% 23% 21% 32% 29% 33% 18% 19% 29% 25% 32% 28% 29% 24% 46% 51% 41% 47% 41% 45% 48% 55% 33% 30% 22% 22% 18% 8% 15% 17% 24%

SOMETIMES

RARELY/NEVER

** “Full Sample Markets Only” * SOURCE: Nadbank Study 2004

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THE CREATIVE POWER OF PRINT!

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I

n the beginning, there was the print ad. Today, despite the wide selection of advertising vehicles, including the formidable presence of online formats, newspaper and magazine print advertising remains a popular choice with corporate marketers. Offering the marketing community a considerable advantage, the print medium helps advertisers forge meaningful and intimate relationships with a loyal readership. That’s why print advertising is a critical part of the greater media mix explains Jacqueline Loch, Director of Strategic Creative with Rogers Publishing Ltd. “There is a special relationship between the reader and their publication. It is very personal and it is a choice. Advertising becomes part of that relationship. ”

Create a Relationship
How a marketer chooses to form and nurture the relationship with the target audience is a matter of choice. There is a unique opportunity to leverage the reader relationship that each print brand has with its core audience. Creative should capture the voice and tone of the publication, speaking directly to the consumer. Attracting audience attention is crucial, and because you may only get a few seconds to make an impression, Loch offers these tips for getting your creative noticed: • Use a product demo or incorporate the brand experience: Offer a specific product demo that engages their interest and invites them to interact with the product. • Educate the consumer about the product: Use this opportunity to let readers discover and learn more about a specific product or advertiser. • Take a tactical stand: Generate a call-to-action—whether your goal is to get your reader to visit
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Custom 1/3 page advertorials were created to run adjacent to the Scotiabank print campaign. Each advertorial was was customized to the magazine that it ran in.

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Microsoft created this custom 6-page, 6-part series on Social Responsibility that ran in Canadian Business magazine. Content was created through a never-been-done partnership between two Canadian MBA schools and a series of panel discussions with Canadian business leaders.

a store or book an airline ticket— the speed-to-market of newspaper advertising and weekly-published magazines is a powerful tool. • Customize brand creative: Connect with your reader by speaking to them in their own language. Utilize the tone and language of the specific publication. • Co-brand content: Leverage the value of the print vehicle to pres30 How Powerful is Print!

ent and deliver your message through a customized and cobranded publishing effort. Supplements, bonus issues and special reports align your brand with the print vehicle. • Raise brand awareness: Supplement your core brand campaign with “extra” initiatives to increase your brand’s awareness. For example, use overwraps, post-it notes, small space
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teaser ads in targeted, high-value print publications.

Research Delivers Results
Implementing a successful print campaign requires flexibility and often working with print suppliers outside of the stringent parameters set by a traditional rate card and media kit. Success is also largely determined by establishing the advertising objective(s) before diving
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into creative development. Deciding what the primary goal is for the campaign—whether it’s to raise brand awareness or create a call-toaction—and following this goal through creative development and execution helps ensure campaign success. Research is also a key factor. Leveraging consumer knowledge that publications, especially in the editorial department, have about their readership is an invaluable source of information for corporate marketers. Editors invest a considerable amount of time soliciting reader opinions on what kinds of information they want to read about in the publication. For example, Chatelaine’s editorial team discovered their readership values any significant “bonus” information on key themes and topics featured in the magazine. Corporate marketers can use the knowledge gleaned from newspapers and magazines to create unique, targeted advertising opportunities that connect with their core audience. Another important consideration
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THE MORE TIMES THE AUDIENCE READS ABOUT THE PRODUCT, THE MORE FAMILIAR THEY WILL BECOME WITH IT.

is ad placement. Like everything else, ad positions move in and out of fashion. If the competition is running full-page right-hand ads, address the challenge by switching your creative placement to tackle the competition head-on. Want to make an impact and differentiate the print campaign in the marketplace? Get innovative and use a gatefold or dominate the issue by running strategically placed small space ads throughout multiple sections of the paper.

Foundation for Success
Don’t overlook key “tried and true” print principles, they are the foundation for marketplace success. Develop a frequency media plan based on the fundamental that the more times you run your ad, the
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more people you will reach. Relevancy is another key factor. Work with your print media supplier to place your message within relevant content and print sections, with the goal of attaining prime real estate and identifying the most likely timeframe your target market will read about your product in the publication. Here’s the reality: the more times the audience reads about the product, the more familiar they will become with it. Despite the abundance of innovative advertising solutions in the market place, print remains a popular and successful choice for corporate marketers. Loch credits the longevity of the medium with its inherent creative flexibility and ability to form a connection with its audience. “Print can take on whatever role it needs to. It can be tactical, providing the reader with more information, launch a product or represent a cause. That’s why it’s a critical contributor to the greater media mix. ”

HOW POWERFUL IS PRINT! 31

Presenting sponsor of the 2005 Working Knowledge Program How Powerful is Print?
Sun Media Corporation, a division of Quebecor Media Inc., is the largest publisher of tabloid newspapers in Canada. The urban daily papers owned by Sun Media attract a group of young, active Canadians. Every Sun Media urban daily is read by a larger proportion of adults under the age of 50 than its competitor. Sun Media is Canada’s second largest newspaper publishing company, with daily newspapers in nine of the top 10 markets in Canada. Sun Media publishes a total of 20 dailies as well as more than 160 community weeklies and specialty publications across Canada. Every week, more than ten million Sun Media newspapers are distributed from Vancouver to Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula. The Corporate Sales Office of Sun Media is committed to working with you to deliver innovative advertising programs and to develop new initiatives designed to expand your business and customer base.

Sun Media

For more information, please call 1-877-786-8227 or visit: www.sunmediasales.ca