Updated daily at www.ResearchProfessional.

com
Founded by William Cullerne Bown
28 October 2015

Jonathan Portes on why he
walked from NIESR – p6

Legal tender Universities Scotland hired
lobbyists to prepare for MSP grilling – p4
Harper’s pain Canada’s gain? – p25

RCUK to gain powers in
bid to avoid merger
Chairman says detail of plan depends on spending review

Research Councils UK will set interdisciplinary strategies and gain more back-office powers if plans to avoid
a wholesale merger of the UK research councils make it
beyond next month’s spending review, RCUK chairman
Philip Nelson has told Research Fortnight.
In an email sent to the research councils’ London
and Swindon head offices on 19 October, Nelson said
that the seven councils had committed to become a
“single, collective organisation” with a core of shared
functions. The email, signed by all seven chief executives and RCUK executive director Hilary Reynolds,
and seen by Research Fortnight, sets out a range of
back-office functions that will be managed centrally.
It also says that the chief executives will devise a collective research strategy for interdisciplinary work,
while individual councils will retain competences over
discipline-specific areas.
Nelson has confirmed that RCUK would manage the
core functions, as well as set and deliver interdisciplinary research strategies and calls. Back-office functions
coming under RCUK’s new remit include human resources, office estates and finance, which Nelson defines as
everything from managing and monitoring budgets
to dealing with invoices and reporting of accounts.
However, he says that the councils will continue to have
separate strategic financial advice that will inform their
planning and research funding decisions.
The governance of RCUK would remain the same, says
Nelson, and the organisation would maintain its nonlegal status as a non-governmental body. He adds that
more collective decision-making is expected between
the seven chief executives and Reynolds. The official
target for implementation is April 2016, but Nelson
acknowledges that it could take more than six months.
The move is the strongest indication of the chief
executives’ commitment to increase their collaborations—one of the major recommendations of last
year’s triennial review. It has been seen as a preemptive strike to dissuade business secretary Sajid
Javid from a wholesale merger of the councils. “It is a
shrewd proposal from the chief executives,” says former Medical Research Council chief executive Colin

by Cristina Gallardo

cgnews@ResearchResearch.com

Blakemore. “The greater risk would be doing nothing
and waiting for a plan that could be more draconian to
be imposed on them.”
However some are unsure about whether it will be
enough. “These changes are a good idea,” says Graeme
Reid, chair of science and policy research at University
College London, “but I’m left wondering whether they
are a step towards further restructuring.”
Another source close to the process agrees that it
should not be assumed that a merger is off the table.
“This is an attempt to provide many of the benefits of
a merger, without the need for a legislative action,”
the source says. “But it could be part of a larger programme of changes.”
Meanwhile, details of the new-look RCUK remain
scant, and there is no indication yet of how much the
plan is intended to save or how many redundancies can
be expected. It seems that the councils will undertake
an evidence-based assessment of which functions can
be most easily transferred to RCUK, before engaging formally with the trade unions involved.
Nelson adds that much will be dictated by the outcome of the Nurse review and next month’s spending
review. “We will have to very carefully consider our
situation depending on the settlement we may get
from government,” he says. It will, for instance, determine how the interdisciplinary funding calls work and
whether RCUK has to divert resources from research to
do the work to bring the councils closer together.
One thing the chief executives are keen to stress
is that the plan will not alter how researchers interact with the councils. “This is about streamlining the
back-office activities and improving
Every new opportunity
things for the researchers by, for
for research funding
instance, making the application
from every sponsor in
process for a grant more straightthe UK, EU, US & beyond
forward and more uniform among
the councils,” says John Womersley,
Every discipline
chief executive of the Science and
Every fortnight
Technology Facilities Council.
IssueIssue
No. 466
No.

2  editorial

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015
Edited by Ehsan Masood
news@ResearchResearch.com
Tel: 020 7216 6500
Fax: 020 7216 6501
Unit 111, 134-146 Curtain Road, London EC2A 3AR

A long time coming
Research council chiefs must show more steel, as
Whitehall is too used to getting its own way
The research council chief executives have been busy. Last week we
were leaked an outline of Research Councils Together, the plan to get
the councils working more closely than before, and widely seen as a preemptive strike in the face of the 25 November spending review.
The chief executives are pledging more shared services and more interdisciplinarity. At the same time they want to change their roles. They wish
to become less management focused and spend more time on ideas and
strategies for advancing knowledge. They acknowledge that change can
be unsettling, if not disruptive. That is why, for now, they say they want
less change to the ways in which researchers access council services.
Altogether this is quite a departure from how things are usually done.
Usually, structural changes to the research councils of such magnitude
would be announced by both the Department for Business, Innovation
and Skills and the councils. The fact that the council chiefs have chosen
to strike out on their own suggests that BIS is not consulting them on its
BIS 2020 restructuring plan.
In effect, the chief executives are trying hard to take back control of the
institutions they lead, which is to be commended. For too long, research
council chief executives have appeared to us, and to many researchers,
as being close—perhaps too close—to Whitehall. In private they will have
been fighting their corner, but that isn’t how it looked from the outside.
Few will have forgotten the reports of council meetings where officials
challenged the government’s chief scientific adviser Mark Walport over
his attempts to have more of a say in how council budgets were allocated.
But in public, the chief executives have been dutiful in their support for
whatever the government of the day has decided. Now that they have
broken their silence, they need to steel themselves further.
As we reported last week, Research Councils Together has not been
endorsed by BIS as an institution. In a message to staff, the chief executives said that senior BIS colleagues were “supportive”—but that is not
the same as saying Sajid Javid’s department has signed off on the changes, which it must.
Indeed, it is possible that Javid may not be best pleased. BIS 2020 is
about drastic change, including significant cuts to jobs. It needs to deliver headline-making savings. If Research Councils Together can’t do that,
it might not be welcome.
Many will be sceptical of the councils’ intentions; no doubt many will
have heard similar sentiments expressed before.
But now is not the time for scepticism. Now is the time to support the
chief executives in their attempts to protect the councils’ work from Javid
and his department. The chief executives will know that their implementation of the plan will be under heavy scrutiny. And they should expect to
be held to account for what they are promising.
If, as we expect, BIS turns around and demands significant job cuts,
it is imperative that the chief executives stand their ground. Jobs are on
line, and it is rarely those at the top who face the axe.

elsewhere
“Don’t ask me any scientific questions,
because I’m not a scientist.”
Former MI5 chief Eliza Manningham-Buller,
who was recently appointed chairwoman of
the Wellcome Trust, doesn’t want to go into
the specifics of it’s new £5-billion strategy.
BBC Radio 4 Today Programme, 22/10/15.
“I fear that these bullies will leave and
become unethical pariahs like insider
traders...and corrupt VW engineers.”
In a letter to students at the University of
Cambridge, chemist Alan Fersht urges second
years not to pressure younger students to
take part in drinking games and fresher’s
initiations. The Telegraph, 17/10/15.
“I am consuming adrenalin at a far
greater rate of knots than I can remember
for quite a while.”
Andrew Blake, former laboratory director
at Microsoft, says that despite his hectic
first weeks as director of the Alan Turing
Institute, he is relishing the opportunity.
Financial Times, 19/10/15.
“It will take much more than a couple of
high-profile centres to make up for the
fact that the UK’s investment in R&D is
among the lowest of the G8 economies.”
Athene Donald of the University of Cambridge
says that large, one-off investments in the
north won’t counter the UK’s productivity
problems. The Guardian, 18/10/15.
“Hinkley is on course to become the most
expensive power station ever built anywhere in the world. Bill payers could be
paying over the odds for decades.”
Shadow energy secretary Lisa Nandy voices
displeasure over plans for the nuclear power
plant at Hinkley Point. New Statesman,
21/10/15.
“Women, for whatever reason, have not
been persuaded by the facts. More facts
are not going to make any difference.”
Averil Macdonald, chairwoman of UK Onshore
Oil and Gas, says that women are less supportive of fracking because they rely more on
gut reaction. The Times, 23/10/15.

decade
“The UK has a huge job in
retaining the investment of
these companies. One can’t
be complacent.”
As R&D expenditure by small companies
drops, Mindy Wilson, head of the CBI’s
business performance group, says that a
reliance on such investment puts the UK
in a vulnerable position.
Research Fortnight, 26 October 2005.

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

what’s going on  3

what’s going on
Wellcome Trust ups spending in five-year strategy
The Wellcome Trust will invest £5 billion in research over the next five years, as part of its
latest strategic framework, up from £6bn in the previous decade. The strategy, published on
21 October, suggests an increased focus on global and grand-challenge research, such as
vaccination and infectious diseases.
£40 million for next phase of Sêr Cymru II scheme
The Welsh government is planning to offer just under £40 million for the next phase of its
scheme to attract outstanding researchers to the country. The funds will support between 20
and 25 rising stars, according to the chief scientific adviser for Wales Julie Williams, who told
Research Fortnight that she plans to announce the expansion of the scheme in mid-November.
Royal Institution breaks up collection to pay debts
The Royal Institution hopes to sell rare scientific and medical books from its collection in a
Christie’s auction to improve its financial situation. At present the institution’s debts stand at
£2 million. The sale, which will take place on 1 December, will include first editions of works by
Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin.
AHRC cuts Research Grant review panels
The Arts and Humanities Research Council is to reduce the number of panels it uses to assess
proposals submitted to its Research Grant scheme from four to one. The council said that this
would allow more regular panel meetings and quicker announcements of panel decisions. The
scheme awards grants of between £50,000 and £1 million for collaborative research.
Home Office gives more detail on animal experiments
The Home Office has changed the way in which information on the use of animals in scientific
experiments is collected, following an EU directive. It now includes data on the number of
experiments completed, the severity of procedures and how many procedures were carried out
on each animal. The first dataset using this method was published on 22 October.
Government seeks views on Patent Box reform
The Treasury and HM Revenue and Customs are consulting on changes to the UK Patent Box, a
system that gives companies a reduced tax rate on profits from patents and other intellectual
property. The consultation will run until 4 December, before the draft legislation is published
later that month.
Springer and Jisc sign ‘one bill’ open-access deal
Universities subscribing to Springer journals will now be able to pay for open access and
subscription access through a single annual fee. The deal was brokered by the UK’s higher
education ICT agency Jisc and will run from October 2015 to December 2018.
Public intellectual Lisa Jardine dies aged 71
Jardine was a historian, biographer and broadcaster. She was professor of renaissance studies
at University College London and held a number of honorary doctorates from universities
elsewhere in the UK. She was chairwoman of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority
from 2008-14 and for decades played a big part in UK civil society.

4  news

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

news

Universities Scotland sought
lobbyists to help handle MSPs
Universities Scotland hired the services of London-based
Charlotte Street Partners, a parliamentary lobbying firm,
while the higher education governance bill was being
discussed in the Scottish parliament.
The group, which represents the principals of Scottish
universities, sought the firm’s services in September.
The aim, according to a spokeswoman, was to help
Universities Scotland prepare to be quizzed by Holyrood’s
education committee on 6 October. The roundtable Q&A
format was unfamiliar to the principals, the spokeswoman
told Research Fortnight.
“We have been pleased to have some external and
objective advice in what was an important session for
us as an organisation, and we have no hesitation in this
being known publicly,” she says.
Charlotte Street Partners has connections to the
Scottish National Party; last June it hired SNP communications director Kevin Pringle to its staff as a partner.
The decision to hire the lobbyists—for an undisclosed
sum for three days’ work—has raised eyebrows for at
least one of the group’s critics.

news
in brief

Research spending targets
achieve nothing, Johnson says
MPs should stop worrying about the
European Union’s target for member states to spend 3 per cent of their GDP on research
and innovation, science minister Jo Johnson said at a
Westminster Hall debate on 21 October. He said that it
is bettter to use policies to drive behavioural changes in
companies and charities than focus on “abstract” targets.

by Cristina Gallardo

cgnews@ResearchResearch.com

Robin McAlpine, director of the left-wing think tank
Common Weal, who clashed with university principals at
the 6 October committee hearing, questioned the use of
university funding for this purpose.
“There is nothing technically improper in higher education institutions hiring lobbyists, except that paying
for it with public money may not look brilliant,” he says.
“Universities Scotland has already a quite big in-house
team and if it goes outside that, it is always going to
look a bit less than completely clean.”
The Russell Group of research-intensive universities and
the vice-chancellors’ group Universities UK told Research
Fortnight that they do not have any such arrangements
with lobbying firms on parliamentary issues.
A spokesman from Universities UK says that it prefer
to rely on its in-house political affairs team, which he
says individual universities often prefer to do as well.
“Occasionally a university might use a consultancy for a
particular campaign, although I think this is quite rare.”
UK running out of time to hit emissions targets
The UK government must act fast to meet emissions
targets set by the 2008 Climate Change Act, a Royal
Academy of Engineering report for the prime minister’s
Council for Science and Technology has said. The report
recommended that the government increases capacity
in nuclear energy, carbon capture and storage, and offshore wind technologies.

Benefits of Welsh universities reach regions
An analysis of Welsh universities’ economic impact has
found that all areas of Wales benefit from the knock-on
effects of universities, even where there is no local university. The report, published by the vice-chancellors’
group Universities Wales on 20 October, found that nearly a quarter of the total £2.4 billion gross value added was
generated in local authority areas without a university.

Tech City UK updates visa scheme
The government agency Tech City UK has added four
qualifying criteria to its Tech Nation Visa Scheme,
including a fast track for applicants working in digital
businesses in the north of England. The agency says it
intends the updated scheme to attract the best IT and
technology talent to the UK. The agency was granted
the power to review applications for Tier 1 Exceptional
Talent visas in 2014.

Precision Medicine Catapult centres named
Innovate UK has announced that six regional centres
of excellence will be established across the UK as part
of the Precision Medicine Catapult. The centres will be
based in Belfast, Cardiff, Glasgow, Leeds, Manchester
and Oxford, and will be coordinated from headquarters
in Cambridge. The centres will build teams for data analytics, clinical trials and health economics.

Innovation policies lack evaluation, report finds
A review into the impact of innovation strategies on local
economies has found that increasing government R&D
spending leads to mixed results. Innovation policies
tend to increase R&D spending, but little is known about
whether this feeds into more innovation. The report,
published by the What Works Centre for Local Growth,
calls for more effective ways to evaluate future policies.

news  5

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

Royal Society of Biology sets sights on the
big leagues after status boost
The Royal Society of Biology intends to use its recently
awarded royal charter status to boost its influence in
policy circles, its chief executive Mark Downs says.
Speaking to Research Fortnight after the launch of
the RSB’s latest three-year plan, which aims to increase
its reach and international standing, Downs said that
the society wanted to play a bigger role in policymaking. “Five years ago no one in the palace of Westminster
had heard of the Society of Biology,” he says. “Now we
are regularly meeting ministers, discussing policy and
meeting select committees.”
The society’s strategy focuses on three main areas:
creating “a unified voice” for the biosciences, developing the society’s professional membership and extending
its public engagement. Downs says that the change in
the society’s title had allowed it to be bolder and so create its most ambitious strategy to date.
It includes plans to launch a register for professionals
working in plant health in 2016, to expand its regional
grant schemes during 2016-17, and to double the number of community engagement projects that it funds.
Another major part of the strategy is to increase the

by Anna McKie

amnews@ResearchResearch.com

society’s international reach. Downs says that the society’s royal charter has helped enormously in increasing
its credibility overseas.
While it hasn’t changed the day-to-day work of the society, Downs says the name change has created “an equal
partnership” between biology and chemistry and physics.
The latter two are supported by the larger societies the
Royal Society of Chemistry and the Institute of Physics.
The change could also benefit the society’s organisational members, says Adam Hughes, head of group
projects and governance at one such organisation, the
Biochemical Society. “The addition of the royal charter
gives it that extra gravitas, which is great for its members,” he says. “The RSB is a collaborative and focused
voice for the biosciences and now it is more in line with
organisations like the RSC and IOP. We feel it’s going to
really benefit them in their policy matters.”
One policy area that Downs wants the society to focus
on is funding for biological research in government
departments, which he says is often overlooked.

Academics must do more in threat assessment
The government should do more to identify academics
who can advise on security threats, and ensure that it
heeds that advice, experts and MPs have said.
The House of Commons Defence Committee is carrying out an inquiry into the current threats facing the UK
and the government’s ability to assess them. As part of
this, the committee is investigating how easy it is for
academics to contribute to the government’s strategic
defence and security review, which is an analysis of
security threats that heavily influences defence policy
and spending. An update is due by the end of December.
Giving evidence to the committee on 20 October,
Andrew Dorman, professor of international security of
King’s College London, said that government should
break out of its traditional networks. “A lot of academics are never consulted,” he said. “There is generally a
London bubble. I would encourage government to think
about how they can bring these people in.”
For Patrick Porter, chair of strategic studies at the
University of Exeter, the real issue is not who is consulted; Porter says that academics are often sought out by
government. Instead, he says, the issue is “the extent to
which government is prepared to listen and test academics’ ideas and assumptions about security threats”.
Academics have a lot to offer defence policy, Porter

by Lindsay McKenzie

lmnews@ResearchResearch.com

adds, such as broad historical and cultural perspectives,
as well as the independence to offer dissenting or critical
opinion without fearing for their jobs.
Madeleine Moon, Labour MP for Bridgend and a
member of the committee, says that academics could
be daunted by getting involved with such politicised
debates. “Academics may feel they could be drawn into
party politics which could damage their independence,”
says Moon. “This is not how it would work but the fear
may be there.”
But Porter says that “the questions before us are too
important for academics to ignore.”
Moon says that she thinks the UK “fails to access and
utilise the talent, knowledge and skills that are available in academia”. But she also acknowledges that the
committee itself has work to do to expand its knowledge
base. “There can be a tendency to mainly have responses
from London-based academics from [the think tanks]
the Royal United Services Institute and Chatham House,
and King’s College London,” she says.
The committee plans to publish a report on its inquiry
before the update to the strategic defence and security
review by the end of 2015.

6  news

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

a n a l y s i s    j o n a t h a n p o r t e s r e s i g n a t i o n

A bridge too far
Departing research leaders don’t always give reasons for quitting. But Jonathan
Portes, outspoken former head of the National Institute of Economic and Social
Research, told Eloise Johnston about his struggles to balance the books.
Jonathan Portes may be an economist of the mainstream
and have long experience of working in Whitehall. But
unlike some of his professional colleagues he isn’t shy of
venting opinions that challenge mainstream thinking.
Portes for example is sceptical of some aspects of how
chancellor George Osborne is steering the UK economy.
He is also critical of the immigration policies of home secretary Theresa May. And, as those of us in the media know
well: Portes is a direct and relentless critic of what he sees
as lazy reporting or inaccurate representation of statistics.
So, when he announced last month that he was stepping down as director of the hugely respected National
Institute of Economic and Social Research, with immediate effect, there was much speculation about his reasons.
NIESR is governed by a galaxy of the great and the good
of UK economics. Could it be that the chancellor had a
quiet word with one of them about their troublesome
director? Or could it be that Portes’s outspokenness
meant fewer government research contracts?
In reality, as Portes confirmed to Research Fortnight,
his departure through “mutual consent” was ultimately
down to balancing the books. As the institute’s annual
reports make clear, while annual income was stable at
about £3 million, expenditure increased steadily and
reached nearly £3.48m in 2013-14.
There have been on-going discussions at NIESR for
some time about the challenges facing the institute. “The
institute does have a business model which I think is
creaking,” says Portes, “I don’t think there is any secret
about that.” Despite trying to make some largely incremental adjustments, he says he could have gone further
and faster. “I have a certain regret that I didn’t do better in terms of the finances but also I feel a sense of relief
CV Jonathan Portes now I’m not responsible for it anymore,”
says Portes who will stay at NIESR in a
2011-2015 Director,
research role until the end of April 2016.
NIESR.
Camilla Toulmin, who recently stepped
2008-2011 Chief econodown
after a decade as director of green
mist, Cabinet Office.
think
tank
the International Institute of
2002-2008 Chief econoEnvironment
and Development is sympamist (work), Department
for Work and Pensions.
thetic. Providing research leadership and
2000-2002 Partner,
raising funds, she says, isn’t easy. “I have
Development Strategies.
complete sympathy with Jonathan,” she
1999–2000 Deputy
says. “I think we spend too much time...
director, Performance
trying to get money.”
and Innovation Unit,
Praise for Portes also comes from
Cabinet Office.

*
*
*
*
*

Hetan Shah, executive director of the Royal Statistical
Society: “Jonathan has played an important role in being
a voice for good quality evidence on key issues, especially migration, in recent years.”
However, David Goodhart, former director at centre-left think tank Demos, is more critical of Portes’s
leadership. “It may be that NIESR is feeling the impact
of the rise of the Institute of Fiscal Studies,” he says. “Or
perhaps the IFS has rather elbowed NIESR out.”
NIESR has no core funding, which means that a large
part of the director’s job is to spend time on the road
rattling the tin. For Goodhart, obtaining core funding
should have been high on Portes’s to-do list when he
took the job in 2011. “As a think tank you can get by on
project funding without very much core funding but perhaps the national institute can’t.”
What about the charge that Portes’s views might have
contributed to his departure? Goodhart, who recently
stepped down as director of Demos, thinks it might have
been a factor. “He is very good at what he does, and of
course one can sometimes take strong views on things,”
he says. “But whether he should have been the head of
this rather establishment economic think tank that is
committed to neutrality and a scientific approach to
understanding economic trends, I’m not sure they really
went well together.”
Portes naturally disagrees with this. Asked if his successor should take less of a public stand on issues they care
about, Portes is emphatic. “That’s certainly not advice I
would give or follow,” he says. “Of course there are these
balances and issues around how outspoken you can be,
and on some things I have indeed been outspoken. I think
part of the job here is to say what you think.”
There is no evidence that institutions that are led by
more public personalities get any less in research funding, he adds. “Do you think the Economic and Social
Research Council decides whether or not to give money
because of the views of the director? It’s just not the way
things happen.” he says.
Former ESRC chairwoman and former senior editor at
The Economist Frances Cairncross has stepped in as interim
director at NIESR. When the post is eventually advertised,
Toulmin has a message for the search committee. “If you
are thinking about value for money it might be better to
have greater assurance of funding so people can spend
less time on that and more time doing a great job.”

funding opportunities

Research Fortnight
28 October 2015

every new opportunity  every discipline

deadlines

focus points

Opportunities from previous issues of
Research Fortnight, listed by closing
date. European Commission and
associated funders marked EU.

Issue no. 466

Horizon 2020
The European Commission
has launched its latest
research funding calls under
Horizon 2020, with up to
€16 billion available over
the next two years [1-151].

 5

Bioscience informatics
The Biotechnology and
Biological Sciences
Research Council, under
its tools and resources
development fund, invites
applications for call 2 –
support for the development
of bioinformatics tools and
computational approaches.
Each grant is worth up to
£150,000 [167].

Multidisciplinary grants
Cancer Research UK invites
expressions of interest for
its grand challenge awards.
Awards are worth up to
£20 million each [181].
n o t t o be
photocopieD
For subscriptions call +44 20 7216 6500

Each entry is followed by a Web id

Ecosystem services
The Natural Environment
Research Council invites
applications for its
regional opportunities
fund – small grants
scheme. Each grant is
worth up to £50,000 [156].

Adolescent health
The Medical Research Council
and the Department for
International Development
invite applications for their
implementation research for
improved adolescent health
in low and middle income
countries. The total budget
is £3 million [180].

November

Agriculture and Horticulture
Development Board research and
knowledge transfer contracts
1175148
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Timoshenko medal 199119
EU Eureka innovation award
1186865
EU European Foundation for the
Improvement of Living and Working
Conditions establishment of European reshoring monitor 1187020
Innovate UK game-changing technologies for aerospace – feasibility
studies 1184437
Institute of Refrigeration J and E
Hall gold medal 250881
National Academy of Education/Spencer postdoctoral fellowship 207076
US Department of Defense peer
reviewed orthopaedic research
programme – orthopaedic care and
rehabilitation consortium award
1185390
Crohn's in Childhood Research
Association postdoctoral fellowship
programme 1186340
Fulbright all-discipline scholar
awards 212634
Fulbright American studies earlycareer award 1169063
Fulbright Commission all-discipline
postgraduate student awards
212622
Fulbright cybersecurity awards
1183488
Fulbright Fight for Sight research
award 1163919
Fyssen Foundation international
prize 192181
Iran Heritage Foundation grants
189705
JRF psychological, social and
cultural factors in decision-making
by people in poverty in the UK
1187005
Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research
clinical research training fellowships 191885
Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research
project grants 255249
Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research
specialist programmes 191882

 6







Mind Association conference grants
1173210
NWO security and rule of law applied
research fund: call for evidenceinformed ideas 1184184
NWO security and rule of law applied research fund: open call for
evidence-based policy advice and
tools 1184186
Wellcome investigator awards in
biomedical science 1159096
Louis Bonduelle Foundation Louis
Bonduelle research award 1176217
EU Cedefop apprenticeships – a
cross-national overview 1187000
EU Cedefop skills utilisation and
formation: learning cultures in
enterprises 1186998
European Calcified Tissue Society/
Amgen bone biology fellowship
253475
EU European Defence Agency interoperability in forward aeromedical evacuation with rotary wings
1186992
NIHR public health research
programme – researcher-led call for
proposals 259153
Royal Historical Society conference
travel grants 1185849
CRUK biotherapeutic drug discovery
programme awards 1182477
CRUK biotherapeutic drug discovery
project awards 1182473
CRUK cancer immunology project
awards 1181313
European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases TAE
awards for training achievements
1160687
International Visegrad Fund university studies grants 1169917
MOD Centre for Historical Analysis
and Conflict Research 1186918
NIHR efficacy and mechanism evaluation programme – researcher-led
workstream 260392
Rank Prize Funds postgraduate
studentship in nutrition 1160328
Arthritis Research UK senior
research fellowship 257132
BBSRC standard follow-on funding
259759
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
addressing newborn and infant
gut health through bacteriophagemediated microbiome engineering
1184012
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
exploring new solutions in global
health priority areas 1186852
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
exploring new ways to measure

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Online Funding Search
For full details of every funding opportunity, visit
www.ResearchProfessional.com
Online subscribers can view full details of any funding opportunity by
simply searching for the Web id number as free text in a funding search.

Funding search
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Search

delivery and use of digital financial
services data 1184005
EPSRC digital technology for Living
with Environmental Change (LWEC)
senior fellows 1186752
Innovate UK enhancing the end-toend journey 1186415
Innovate UK software verification
and validation for complex systems
1186926
Innovate UK/Office of Security and
Counter Terrorism/Government
Decontamination Service chemical contamination competition
1186875
MOD Centre for Defence Enterprise/
Defence Science and Technology
Laboratory enduring challenge
competition 1175661
MOD/UK Defence Solutions Centre/
SBRI autonomy and big data for
defence 1187076
EU Partnership for Advanced
Computing in Europe project access
(tier-0) 1162792
STFC public engagement large
awards scheme 206468
BBSRC Brazil partnering awards
1164670
BBSRC China partnering awards
257852
BBSRC Europe partnering awards
1176544
BBSRC India partnering awards
257850
BBSRC international workshops
scheme 258600
Leverhulme international academic
fellowships 258621
Leverhulme research fellowships
258623
NERC advanced training short
courses initiative 1178233
Royal Society for Asian Affairs
Sir Peter Holmes memorial award
1170356
Royal Society of Medicine ophthalmology travelling fellowship
bursary 187528
Royal Society Wolfson research
merit awards 255189
AXA Research Fund postdoctoral
fellowships 202799
Eni new frontiers of hydrocarbons
prize 1175152
Eni protection of the environment
prize 1175155
Eni renewable energy prize 1175151
Juvenile Diabetes Research
Foundation International strategic
research agreements 1159205
NIHR/NICE scholarships 1164832
Royal College of Radiologists Karol
Sicher cancer research fellowship
187379
Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh/Cutner joint research fellowship in orthopaedics 1185416
ScotGov Chief Scientist Office NHS
Research Scotland career clinical
researcher fellowships 1181984
Royal College of Surgeons of
Edinburgh Maurice Wohl research
fellowship in surgery and dental
surgery 254124
British Retinitis Pigmentosa Society
research grants 213198

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15

8  funding opportunities
h2020
The latest Horizon 2020 calls launched on
14 October, offering €16 billion over the
next two years

Euratom

H2020 NFRP-2016 Euratom fission
Budget: €57.74 million
Web id: 1186832
Deadline: 5 October 2016 [1]
H2020 NFRP-2017 Euratom fission
Budget: €47.3 million
Web id: 1186833
Deadline: TBA [2]

Excellent Science
H2020-MSCA-ITN-2016 Marie Sklodowska-Curie innovative training networks
Budget: €370 million
Web id: 1184953
Deadline: 12 January 2016 [3]
H2020-MSCA-NIGHT-2016 European
researchers’ night
Budget: €8 million
Web id: 1184998
Deadline: 13 January 2016 [4]
H2020 ERC-2016-COG consolidator grants
Budget: €605 million
Web id: 1186276
Deadline: 2 February 2016 [4.1]
H2020-FETFLAG-2016 tackling grand
interdisciplinary science and technology
challenges
Budget: €9 million
Web id: 1186439
Deadline: 1 March 2016 [5]
H2020-EINFRA-2016 e-infrastructures
– topic 11, 22
Budget: €36 million
Web id: 1187221
Deadline: 30 March 2016 [6]
H2020-INFRADEV-2016-2017 development and long term sustainability of new
pan-European research infrastructures
– topic 3
Budget: €70 million
Web id: 1184985
Deadline: 30 March 2016 [7]
H2020-INFRAIA-2016-2017 integrating
and opening research infrastructures of
European interest – topic 1
Budget: €160 million
Web id: 1184994
Deadline: 30 March 2016 [8]
H2020-INFRAIA-2017 integrating and
opening research infrastructures of European interest – topic 2, two stage
Budget: €40 million
Web id: 1184999
Deadline: 30 March 2016 [9]
H2020-INFRAINNOV-2016 fostering the
innovation potential of research infrastructures – topic 2
Budget: €10 million
Web id: 1185003
Deadline: 30 March 2016 [10]
H2020-INFRASUPP-2016 support to
policy and international cooperation –
topics 1, 3
Budget: €15.5 million
Web id: 1185010
Deadline: 30 March 2016 [11]
H2020-FETPROACT-2016 proactive –
boosting emerging technologies
Budget: €90 million
Web id: 1186428
Deadline: 12 April 2016 [12]
H2020-MSCA-RISE-2016 Marie Sklodowska-Curie research and innovation staff
exchange
Budget: €80 million

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015
Web id: 1184991
Deadline: 28 April 2016 [13]
H2020-FETOPEN-2016 novel ideas for
radically new technologies – topic 2
Budget: €3 million
Web id: 1186433
Deadline: 11 May 2016 [14]
H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017 novel ideas
for radically new technologies – topic 1
Budget: €194.5 million
Web id: 1186434
Deadline: 11 May 2016 [15]
H2020-INFRADEV-2016 development
and long term sustainability of new
pan-European research infrastructure
– topics 2, 4
Budget: €40,000
Web id: 1184984
Deadline: 22 June 2016 [16]
H2020-MSCA-IF-2016 Marie SklodowskaCurie individual fellowships
Budget: €218.5 million
Web id: 1184981
Deadline: 14 September 2016 [18]
H2020-EINFRA-2017 e-infrastructures
– topic 21
Budget: €26 million
Web id: 1187226
Deadline: 20 September 2016 [19]
H2020-FETHPC-2016 proactive – high
performance computing
Budget: €41 million
Web id: 1186424
Deadline: 27 September 2016 [20]
H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017 innovation
launchpad – topic 4
Budget: €3 million
Web id: 1186436
Deadline: 29 September 2016 [21]
H2020-MSCA-COFUND-2016 Marie Sklodowska-Curie co-funding of regional,
national and international programmes
Budget: €80 million
Web id: 1184996
Deadline: 29 September 2016 [22]
H2020-MSCA-ITN-2017 Marie Sklodowska-Curie innovative training networks
Budget: €430 million
Web id: 1184979
Deadline: 10 January 2017 [23]
H2020-FETOPEN-2017 novel ideas for
radically new technologies – topic 3
Budget: €1.5 million
Web id: 1186435
Deadline: 17 January 2017 [24]
H2020-FETPROACT-2017 proactive –
boosting emerging technologies
Budget: €5 million
Web id: 1186430
Deadline: 24 January 2017 [25]
H2020-EINFRA-2017 e-infrastructures –
topics 12, 21
Budget: €60 million
Web id: 1187224
Deadline: 29 March 2017 [26]
H2020-INFRADEV-2017 development
and long term sustainability of new
pan-European research infrastructures
– topic 1
Budget: €20 million
Web id: 1184957
Deadline: 29 March 2017 [27]
H2020-INFRAINNOV-2017 fostering the
innovation potential of research infrastructures – topic 1
Budget: €20 million
Web id: 1185000
Deadline: 29 March 2017 [28]
H2020-INFRASUPP-2017 support to
policy and international cooperation
– topic 2
Budget: €6.5 million

Web id: 1185011
Deadline: 29 March 2017 [29]
H2020-MSCA-RISE-2017 Marie Sklodowska-Curie research and innovation staff
exchange
Budget: €80 million
Web id: 1184992
Deadline: 5 April 2017 [30]
H2020-MSCA-NCP-2017 transnational
cooperation among Marie SklodowskaCurie national contact points call
Budget: €1.5 million
Web id: 1185001
Deadline: 4 May 2017 [31]
H2020-MSCA-IF-2017 Marie SklodowskaCurie individual fellowships
Budget: €248 million
Web id: 1184982
Deadline: 14 September 2017 [32]
H2020-FETHPC-2017 proactive – high
performance computing
Budget: €44 million
Web id: 1186426
Deadline: 26 September 2017 [33]
H2020-MSCA-COFUND-2017 Marie
Sklodowska-Curie co-funding of
regional, national and international
programmes
Budget: €80 million
Web id: 1184997
Deadline: 28 September 2017 [34]

Industrial Leadership
H2020-NMBP/BIOTEC-2016 nanotechnologies, advanced materials, biotechnology
and production, two stage – topics NMBP
1-3, 9-10, 17-18, 23, 26, BIOTEC 2, 3
Budget: €174.08 million
Web id: 1184871
Deadline: 8 December 2015 [35]
H2020-EUJ-2016 EU-Japan call
Budget: €7 million
Web id: 1185018
Deadline: 19 January 2016 [36]
H2020-EUK-2016 EU-South Korea call
Budget: €6 million
Web id: 1185019
Deadline: 19 January 2016 [37]
H2020-ICT-2016 information and communication technologies – topics 37-39
Budget: €2.8 million
Web id: 1186822
Deadline: 19 January 2016 [38]
H2020-INNOSUP-2016 for a better innovation support to SMEs – topic 6
Budget: €2 million
Web id: 1186203
Deadline: 19 January 2016 [39]
H2020-EEB-2016 energy efficient buildings – topics 1-4
Budget: €49 million
Web id: 1184869
Deadline: 21 January 2016 [40]
H2020-NMBP/BIOTEC-2016 nanotechnologies, advanced materials, biotechnology
and production – topics NMBP 8, 11, 21,
24, 27, 30-33, 36, BIOTEC 1, 4
Budget: €56.7 million
Web id: 1186151
Deadline: 21 January 2016 [41]
H2020-SMEInst-2016-2017 dedicated
SME instrument – phase two
Web id: 1186216
Deadline: 3 February 2016 [42]
H2020 CBBA-2016 awareness-raising and
capacity building for business angels and
other early-stage investors – topic 1
Budget: €2.5 million
Web id: 1187171
Deadline: 16 February 2016 [43]
H2020-SMEInst-2016-2017 dedicated
SME instrument – phase one

Web id: 1186202
Deadline: 24 February 2016 [45]
H2020-COMPET-2016 competitiveness of
the European space sector: technology
and science
Budget: €65.85 million
Web id: 1184849
Deadline: 3 March 2016 [46]
H2020-EO-2016 Earth observation
Budget: €21.85 million
Web id: 1184847
Deadline: 3 March 2016 [47]
H2020-INNOSUP-2016-2017 for a better
innovation support to SMEs – topic 5
Budget: €1 million
Web id: 1186208
Deadline: 17 March 2016 [48]
H2020-INNOSUP-2016 for a better innovation support to SMEs – topic 1, two
stage
Budget: €15 million
Web id: 1187174
Deadline: 6 April 2016 [49]
H2020-ICT-2016 information and communication technologies
Budget: €460.5 million
Web id: 1184963
Deadline: 12 April 2016 [50]
H2020-INNOSUP-2016 for a better innovation support to SMEs – topic 4
Budget: €3.5 million
Web id: 1187175
Deadline: 28 April 2016 [51]
H2020-INNOSUP-2016 for a better innovation support to SMEs – topic 2
Budget: €7,200,000
Web id: 1187176
Deadline: 30 June 2016 [52]
H2020-NMBP/BIOTEC-2017 nanotechnologies, advanced materials biotechnology
and production, two stage – topics NMBP
4-7, 12, 14, 15, 19,20, 22, 25, 28,29, 35;
BIOTEC 5-7
Budget: €234.19 million
Web id: 1184872
Deadline: 27 October 2016 [53]
H2020-ICT-2017 information and communication technologies – topics 4,
7-9,19
Budget: €230.5 million
Web id: 1184964
Deadline: 8 November 2016 [54]
H2020-EEB-2017 energy efficient buildings – topics 5-8
Budget: €54 million
Web id: 1184870
Deadline: 19 January 2017 [55]
H2020-NMBP-2017 nanotechnologies,
advanced materials, biotechnology and
production – topics NMBP 13, 16, 31,
34, BIOTEC 8
Budget: €20.2 million
Web id: 1186171
Deadline: 19 January 2017 [56]
H2020-COMPET-2017 competitiveness of
the European space sector: technology
and science
Budget: €41.5 million
Web id: 1184851
Deadline: 1 March 2017 [57]
H2020-EO-2017 Earth observation
Budget: €19.5 million
Web id: 1184848
Deadline: 1 March 2017 [58]
H2020-GALILEO-2017 applications in
satellite navigation
Budget: €33 million
Web id: 1184850
Deadline: 1 March 2017 [59]
H2020-EUB-2017 EU-Brazil call
Budget: €7 million
Web id: 1184978
Deadline: 14 March 2017 [60]

funding opportunities  9

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015
H2020-INNOSUP-2017 for a better
innovation support to SMEs – topics
3, 7, 8
Budget: €6.9 million
Web id: 1187177
Deadline: 28 March 2017 [61]
H2020-INNOSUP-2017 for a better innovation support to SMEs – topic 1, two
stage
Budget: €18.5 million
Web id: 1187178
Deadline: 4 April 2017 [62]
H2020-ICT-2017 information and communication technologies – topics 5, 11,
14-17, 20, 23, 25, 27, 28, 30-33, 39
Budget: €374 million
Web id: 1186441
Deadline: 25 April 2017 [63]

Science With and For Society
H2020-2016-SwafS call science with and
for society – topic 25
Budget: €500,000
Web id: 1186856
Deadline: 26 January 2016 [65]
H2020-2016-SwafS call science with and
for society – topics 1-24
Budget: €43.52 million
Web id: 1186859
Deadline: 30 August 2016 [66]
H2020-2017-SwafS call science with and
for society
Budget: €54.55 million
Web id: 1186862
Deadline: 30 August 2017 [67]

Societal Challenges
H2020-PILOTS-2016
Budget: €32 million
Web id: 1186045
Deadline: 8 December 2015 [68]
H2020-ART-2016 automated road transport – two stage
Budget: €61 million
Web id: 1185291
Deadline: 20 January 2016 [69]
H2020-MG-2016 mobility for growth –
two stage
Budget: €174 million
Web id: 1185312
Deadline: 20 January 2016 [70]
H2020-EE-2016 energy efficiency – topics
3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 17
Budget: €50 million
Web id: 1184829
Deadline: 21 January 2016 [71]
H2020-FoF-2016 factories of the future
– topics 1-5
Budget: €77 million
Web id: 1184858
Deadline: 21 January 2016 [72]
H2020-FoF-2016 factories of the future
– topics 11,13
Budget: €83 million
Web id: 1185026
Deadline: 21 January 2016 [73]
H2020-SPIRE-2016 sustainable process
industries
Budget: €74 million
Web id: 1184865
Deadline: 21 January 2016 [74]
H2020-ART-2016 automated road transport – single stage
Budget: €3 million
Web id: 1184916
Deadline: 26 January 2016 [75]
H2020-GV-2016 European green vehicles
initiative
Budget: €78.5 million
Web id: 1184919
Deadline: 26 January 2016 [76]

H2020-MG-2016 mobility for growth –
single stage
Budget: €36.1 million
Web id: 1184908
Deadline: 26 January 2016 [77]
H2020-SC5-2016 greening the economy
– topics 12, 24, single stage
Budget: €2.3 million
Web id: 1186007
Deadline: 26 January 2016 [78]
H2020-CO-CREATION-2016 co-creation
for growth and inclusion – topics 2,3,
8, 9
Budget: €14.5 million
Web id: 1184873
Deadline: 4 February 2016 [79]
H2020-CULT-COOP-2016 understanding
Europe – promoting the European public
and cultural space
Budget: €19.5 million
Web id: 1184885
Deadline: 4 February 2016 [80]
H2020-REV-INEQUAL-2016 reversing
inequalities and promoting fairness –
topics 1-8, 10
Budget: €43.5 million
Web id: 1184878
Deadline: 4 February 2016 [81]
H2020-DS-2016 digital security focus
area – topic 1
Budget: €23.5 million
Web id: 1186180
Deadline: 16 February 2016 [81.1]
H2020-DS-2016 digital security focus
area – topic 3
Budget: €11 million
Web id: 1184845
Deadline: 16 February 2016 [82]
H2020-LCE-2016 competitive low-carbon
energy – topics 7, 8, 23- 25, 31, 36
Budget: €120.7 million
Web id: 1184875
Deadline: 16 February 2016 [83]
H2020-SC1-PM-HCO-2016 personalised
medicine and health coordination – topics
HCO10-HCO16, PM12, PM13, PM18
Budget: €48 million
Web id: 1184833
Deadline: 16 February 2016 [84]
H2020-BB-2016 bio-based innovation
for sustainable goods and services – supporting the development of a European
bioeconomy, single stage
Budget: €7 million
Web id: 1185209
Deadline: 17 February 2016 [85]
H2020-BB-2016 bio-based innovation
for sustainable goods and services – supporting the development of a European
bioeconomy, two stage
Budget: €5 million
Web id: 1186537
Deadline: 17 February 2016 [86]
H2020-BG-2016 call for blue growth –
demonstrating an ocean of opportunities,
single stage
Budget: €74 million
Web id: 1185201
Deadline: 17 February 2016 [87]
H2020-BG-2016 call for blue growth –
demonstrating an ocean of opportunities,
two stage
Budget: €8 million
Web id: 1186516
Deadline: 17 February 2016 [88]
H2020-SFS-2016 call on sustainable food
security – resilient and resource-efficient
value chains, topics 9, 12, 19, 24, 25, 41,
single stage
Budget: €39 million
Web id: 1184894

Deadline: 17 February 2016 [89]
H2020-SFS-2016 call on sustainable food
security – resilient and resource-efficient
value chains, topics 1-3, 6, 7, 11, 14,
15, 21, 23, 26, 31, 33, 37, 38, 42, 44,
45, two stage
Budget: €141.5 million
Web id: 1186506
Deadline: 17 February 2016 [90]
H2020-CIRC-2016 industry 2020 in the
circular economy – single stage
Budget: €7.5 million
Web id: 1184915
Deadline: 8 March 2016 [91]
H2020-CIRC-2016 industry 2020 in the
circular economy – two stage
Budget: €80 million
Web id: 1186034
Deadline: 8 March 2016 [92]
H2020-SC5-2016 greening the economy
– single stage, topics 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11,
13, 15- 17, 20, 23, 25 27, 28
Budget: €82.55 million
Web id: 1184952
Deadline: 8 March 2016 [93]
H2020-SC5-2016 greening the economy
– topics 1, 14, 21, two stage
Budget: €58 million
Web id: 1186006
Deadline: 8 March 2016 [94]
H2020-SC5-2017 greening the economy
– topics 8, 14, 21, two stage
Budget: €91 million
Web id: 1186839
Deadline: 8 March 2016 [95]
H2020-SCC-2016 smart and sustainable
cities – topic 2
Budget: €40 million
Web id: 1186037
Deadline: 8 March 2016 [96]
H2020-SCC-2016 smart and sustainable
cities – topics 3, 4
Budget: €20 million
Web id: 1186038
Deadline: 8 March 2016 [97]
H2020-FTIPilot-2016 fast track to innovation pilot
Budget: €100 million
Web id: 1187169
Deadline: 15 March 2016 [98]
H2020-LCE-2016 competitive low-carbon
energy – topics 1- 3, 26, 32-34
Budget: €149.96 million
Web id: 1184880
Deadline: 5 April 2016 [99]
H2020-SCC-2016 smart and sustainable
cities – topic 1
Budget: €60 million
Web id: 1186981
Deadline: 5 April 2016 [100]
H2020-IoT-2016 internet of things
Budget: €104 million
Web id: 1185766
Deadline: 12 April 2016 [101]
H2020-SC1-PM-2016 personalised medicine – topic 14
Budget: €5 million
Web id: 1184830
Deadline: 12 April 2016 [102]
H2020-SC1-PM-HCO-2016 personalised
medicine and health coordination – topics
HCO1, HCO2, HCO4-HCO6, PM1, PM4-PM6,
PM9, PM11, PM21
Budget: €290 million
Web id: 1184834
Deadline: 13 April 2016 [103]
H2020-ENG-GLOBALLY-2016-2017
engaging together globally – topics 8,9
Budget: €11.5 million
Web id: 1184882
Deadline: 14 April 2016 [104]
H2020-CO-CREATION-2016 co-creation

for growth and inclusion – topic 5
Budget: €9 million
Web id: 1186423
Deadline: 24 May 2016 [105]
H2020-CIP-2016 critical infrastructure
protection – topic 1
Budget: €20 million
Web id: 1184917
Deadline: 25 August 2016 [106]
H2020-DS-2016 digital security focus
area – topics 2, 4, 5, single stage
Budget: €29 million
Web id: 1186181
Deadline: 25 August 2016 [107]
H2020-SEC-2016 security
Budget: €113.25 million
Web id: 1184920
Deadline: 25 August 2016 [108]
H2020-LCE-2016 competitive low-carbon
energy – topic 35
Web id: 1185639
Deadline: 8 September 2016 [109]
H2020-LCE-2016 competitive low-carbon
energy – topics 9, 13, 15, 19, 20, 22
Budget: €85 million
Web id: 1184862
Deadline: 8 September 2016 [110]
H2020-SC5-2016 greening the economy
– topic 29
Web id: 1186837
Deadline: 8 September 2016 [111]
H2020-SFS-2016 call on sustainable
food security – resilient and resourceefficient value chains, topic 18, single
stage
Web id: 1186508
Deadline: 13 September 2016 [112]
H2020-EE-2016 energy efficiency –
topics 6, 9, 11, 13, 14, 16, 21, 22,
24, 25
Budget: €43 million
Web id: 1184836
Deadline: 15 September 2016 [113]
H2020-SC1-PM-2017 personalised medicine – topics 2, 7, 8, 10, two stage
Budget: €16 million
Web id: 1184840
Deadline: 4 October 2016 [114]
H2020-PILOTS-2017
Budget: €48 million
Web id: 1186050
Deadline: 27 October 2016 [115]
H2020-LCE-2017 competitive low-carbon
energy call – topics 6-8, 21, 27-31
Budget: €151.5 million
Web id: 1184881
Deadline: 5 January 2017 [116]
H2020-EE-2017 energy efficiency – topics
1, 4, 7, 12, 17, 20
Budget: €46 million
Web id: 1184828
Deadline: 19 January 2017 [117]
H2020-FoF-2017 factories of the future
– topics 6-10
Budget: €85 million
Web id: 1184864
Deadline: 19 January 2017 [118]
H2020-FoF-2017 factories of the future
– topic 12
Budget: €33 million
Web id: 1185027
Deadline: 19 January 2017 [119]
H2020-SPIRE-2017 sustainable process
industries
Budget: €80 million
Web id: 1184868
Deadline: 19 January 2017 [120]
H2020-ART-2017 automated road transport – two stage
Budget: €50 million
Web id: 1184918
Deadline: 26 January 2017 [121]

10  funding opportunities
H2020-MG-2017 mobility for growth –
two stage
Budget: €205 million
Web id: 1184914
Deadline: 26 January 2017 [122]
H2020-SC1-PM-2017 personalised medicine – topic 15
Budget: €25 million
Web id: 1184842
Deadline: 31 January 2017 [123]
H2020-GV-2017 European green vehicles
initiative
Budget: €128 million
Web id: 1184941
Deadline: 1 February 2017 [124]
H2020-MG-2017 mobility for growth –
single stage
Budget: €20.5 million
Web id: 1185313
Deadline: 1 February 2017 [125]
H2020-CO-CREATION-2017 co-creation
for growth and inclusion – topics 1,
4, 6-8
Budget: €33.15 million
Web id: 1184877
Deadline: 2 February 2017 [126]
H2020-ENG-GLOBALLY-2017 engaging
together globally
Budget: €30.5 million
Web id: 1184884
Deadline: 2 February 2017 [127]
H2020-SC6-REV-INEQUAL-2017 reversing inequalities and promoting fairness
– topic 9
Budget: €3 million
Web id: 1184879
Deadline: 2 February 2017 [128]
H2020-BB-2017 bio-based innovation
for sustainable goods and services – supporting the development of a European
bioeconomy, single stage
Budget: €3 million
Web id: 1185210
Deadline: 14 February 2017 [129]
H2020-BB-2017 bio-based innovation
for sustainable goods and services – supporting the development of a European
bioeconomy, two stage
Budget: €12 million
Web id: 1186538
Deadline: 14 February 2017 [130]
H2020-BG-2017 call for blue growth –
demonstrating an ocean of opportunities,
single stage
Budget: €47 million
Web id: 1185202
Deadline: 14 February 2017 [131]
H2020-LCE-2017 competitive low-carbon
energy call – topics 1, 4, 5
Budget: €111.12 million
Web id: 1184857
Deadline: 14 February 2017 [132]
H2020-SCC-2017 smart and sustainable
cities – topic 1
Budget: €71.5 million
Web id: 1186982
Deadline: 14 February 2017 [133]
H2020-SFS-2017 call for sustainable food
security – resilient and resource-efficient
value chains, topics 4, 5, 13, 22, 35, 36,
43, 48, single stage
Budget: €85 million
Web id: 1184893
Deadline: 14 February 2017 [134]
H2020-SFS-2017 call on sustainable food
security – resilient and resource-efficient
value chains, topics 7, 8, 10, 15-17,
20, 21, 27-30, 32, 34, 39, 40, 46, 47,
two stage
Budget: €166 million
Web id: 1184895
Deadline: 14 February 2017 [135]
H2020-CIRC-2017 industry 2020 in the

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015
circular economy – two stage
Budget: €70 million
Web id: 1184949
Deadline: 7 March 2017 [136]
H2020-SC5-2017 greening the economy
– topics 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 13, 15, 16, 18, 19,
22, 23, 26, single stage
Budget: €92.1 million
Web id: 1184956
Deadline: 7 March 2017 [137]
H2020-SCC-2017 smart and sustainable
cities – topic 2
Budget: €40 million
Web id: 1186039
Deadline: 7 March 2017 [138]
H2020-SC1-PM-2017 personalised medicine – topics 16, 17, 19
Budget: €46.26 million
Web id: 1184826
Deadline: 14 March 2017 [139]
H2020-SC1-PM-HCO-2017 personalised
medicine and health coordination – topics
HCO3, HCO7, HCO8, PM3, PM20
Budget: €54,000,000
Web id: 1184831
Deadline: 11 April 2017 [140]
H2020-DS-2017 digital security focus
area – topic 6
Budget: €18.5 million
Web id: 1186182
Deadline: 25 April 2017 [140.1]
H2020-IoT-2017 internet of things
Budget: €35 million
Web id: 1186035
Deadline: 25 April 2017 [141]
H2020-EE-2017 energy efficiency – topics
2, 6, 9, 11, 14-16, 18, 19, 22-24
Budget: €55 million
Web id: 1184825
Deadline: 7 June 2017 [142]
H2020-CIP-1-2017 critical infrastructure
protection
Budget: €20 million
Web id: 1184844
Deadline: 24 August 2017 [143]
H2020-DS-2017 digital security focus
area – topics 7, 8
Budget: €36 million
Web id: 1184846
Deadline: 24 August 2017 [144]
H2020-SEC-2017 security
Budget: €121.75 million
Web id: 1184921
Deadline: 24 August 2017 [145]
H2020-LCE-2017 competitive low-carbon
energy call – topics 10-12, 14, 16-20
Budget: €367.62 million
Web id: 1184863
Deadline: 7 September 2017 [146]

Spreading Excellence and
Widening Participation
H2020-WIDESPREAD-02-2016 support to
joint programming initiatives in urban
Europe
Budget: €1.25 million
Web id: 1187222
Deadline: 4 February 2016 [147]
H2020-WIDESPREAD-01-2016-2017
teaming phase 2
Budget: €135 million
Web id: 1187220
Deadline: 30 August 2016 [148]
H2020-WIDESPREAD-04-2017 teaming
phase 1
Budget: €12 million
Web id: 1187225
Deadline: 15 November 2016 [149]
H2020-WIDESPREAD-05-2017 twinning
Budget: €20 million
Web id: 1187227
Deadline: 15 November 2017 [151]

uk
highlights
New opportunities from UK-based funders.

NERC ecosystem services
The Natural Environment Research Council, under the Ecosystem Services for
Poverty Alleviation programme, invites
applications for its regional opportunities
fund – small grants scheme. This assists
ESPA projects, groups of projects, and
their local stakeholders, to significantly
enhance the overall impact of individual
projects and the ESPA programme as a
whole. Each grant is normally worth up
to £50,000, although in exceptional cases
up to £75,000 is available.
Web id: 1187252
Email: manager@espa.ac.uk
No deadline [156]

Justice observatory
The Nuffield Foundation invites expressions
of interest for its scoping study to develop
proposals for a family justice observatory.
Funding aims to promote a system-wide
approach to the generation and practical
application of research evidence and administrative data relevant to family justice
issues, as these can have a profound influence on families and children. The budget
is worth between £100,000 and £150,000.
Web id: 1187267
Contact: Alison Rees
Email: arees@nuffieldfoundation.org
Deadline: 9 November 2015 [157]

Defra biodiversity monitoring
Department for Environment, Food and
Rural Affairs invites tenders for a study
to develop the scope for monitoring
landscape-scale biodiversity impacts. The
tenderer will conduct a scoping study to
inform survey design and stratification
of a landscape scale agri-environment
scheme monitoring programme. The
project should last approximately four
months, starting on 1 December 2015.
Web id: 1187189
Email: vicki.cookson@defra.gsi.gov.uk
Deadline: 11 November 2015 [158]

Cereal pathogen survey
The Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board's cereals and oilseeds
division and the Animal and Plant Health
Agency invite tenders for their UK cereal
pathogen virulence survey. This call
supports a research project that aims
to monitor changes in the virulence of
certain major cereal foliar pathogens
and determine their significance for the
resistances that are being used in current
varieties and breeding programmes. The
budget is worth up to £200,000 per year
for a maximum period of three years.
Web id: 1187197
Email: jenna.watts@ahdb.org.uk
Deadline: 13 November 2015 [159]

Sub-Saharan PhD capacity
The British Council and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) invite
proposals for their call on PhD capacity
in sub-Saharan Africa. This supports a
research project that focuses on how
research-oriented and sustainable PhD
capacity and capability is being developed
in sub-Saharan Africa within a national
and regional context. The total budget is
estimated to be worth £70,000.

Web id: 1187210
Email: education.market.intelligence@
britishcouncil.org
Deadline: 13 November 2015 [160]

Defra fishing gears
The Department for Environment, Food
& Rural Affairs invites tenders for the
provision of an analysis of existing data
to study the effect of towed fishing gears.
The tenderer will review and recommend
metrics and data analysis methods to
test for the effect of natural disturbance
in mobile sedimentary habitats, such as
sandbanks, in the UK at small, local scales.
Web id: 1187256
Contact: Matthew Bird
Email: network.procurement@defra.
gsi.gov.uk
Deadline: 13 November 2015 [161]

Flexible grants
The Independent Social Research Foundation invites applications for its flexible
grants for small groups competition.
These enable independent-minded
researchers to explore and present
original research ideas which take new
approaches, and to suggest new solutions
to real world social problems. Grants are
worth up to £5,000 per project for a period
of up to one year.
Web id: 1187166
Email: applications2015@isrf.org
Deadline: 13 November 2015 [162]

JRF flood resilience
The Joseph Rowntree Foundation invites
applications for its flood resilience for
disadvantaged areas grant. This aims to
understand more about how to develop
flood resilience in communities which
may be most disadvantaged by climate
change impacts in the UK in light of
the future risks of flooding, taking into
account climate change as well as other
socio-demographic, economic and environmental change. The total budget is
worth up to £75,000 for one project only.
Web id: 1187165
Email: christine.appleton@jrf.org.uk
Deadline: 18 November 2015 [163]

African agriculture
The University of Greenwich's Natural
Resources Institute, in collaboration
with WYG International and funded by
the Department for International Development, invites concept notes for grants
under its campaign for sustainable agricultural intensification research and
learning in Africa. These aim to finance
a series of research projects to generate
new evidence and decision support tools
for decision makers at international,
national and local levels, and create an
enabling environment for poorer African
smallholder farmers, especially youth
and women, to benefit from sustainable
intensification. Proposals may request
between £400,000 and £750,000 each
for up to 45 months.
Web id: 1187235
Email: sairla@wyg.com
Deadline: 19 November 2015 [164]

RCUK research policy
The Research Councils UK's Shared Business Services invites tenders for the provision of analytical support for science and
innovation audits. The tenderer will undertake analysis at a local level in the form
of science and innovation audits, to map

funding opportunities  11

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

ISSN 1358-1198
Published every two weeks with
breaks at Christmas, Easter and in
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N OT TO B E P H OTOCOPI E D

local research and innovation strengths
and infrastructure, in order to provide
new innovative ways to identify and build
on areas of greatest potential across the
UK. The contract is worth up to £350,000.
Web id: 1187259
Contact: Tessa Gawthorn
Email: research@uksbs.co.uk
Deadline: 20 November 2015 [165]

JRF cities inclusive growth
The Joseph Rowntree Foundation invites
applications for its call on international
policy and practice review on how cities
lead an inclusive growth agenda. This
aims to identify cities that champion an
inclusive growth agenda to generate evidence and ideas which can influence UK
city leaders. The total budget is worth up
to £65,000 for one project only.
Web id: 1187168
Email: christine.appleton@jrf.org.uk
Deadline: 23 November 2015 [166]

BBSRC bioscience informatics
The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, under its tools
and resources development fund, invites
applications for its call on support for
the development of bioinformatics tools
and computational approaches. This supports research relevant to animal and plant
health, specifically on farmed animal and
crop health problems caused by endemic or
emerging pathogens or pests. Each grant is
worth up to £150,000 over six to 18 months.
The indicative total budget is £2 million.
Web id: 1186920
Email: development.fund@bbsrc.ac.uk
Deadline: 24 November 2015 [167]

AHRC/British Library CDP
The British Library, funded through the
Arts and Humanities Research Council's collaborative doctoral partnerships
scheme, invites proposals for its research
consortium studentships. These enable
HEIs to invite candidates to seek funding for PhD studies conducted with the
members of the consortium and a UK
university on the following themes: the
working life of scientists – exploring
the culture of scientific research; digital
publishing and the reader; Hans Sloane's
books – evaluating an enlightenment
library. Studentships are awarded for
three years, however an additional six
months of funding per studentship may
be made available.
Web id: 1187305
Email: arts-humanities@bl.uk
Deadline: 27 November 2015 [168]

AHRC/Football Museum CDP
The National Football Museum, funded
through the Arts and Humanities Research
Council's collaborative doctoral partnership scheme, invites proposals for its
research consortium studentships. These
enable HEIs to invite candidates to seek
funding for PhD studies conducted with
the members of the consortium and a UK
university. A maximum of three studentships per year are available.
Web id: 1187299
Email: sarah.trinder@nationalfootballmuseum.com
Deadline: 27 November 2015 [169]

AHRC/Science Museums CDP
The Science Museums and Archives
consortium, funded through the Arts
and Humanities Research Council’s col-

laborative doctoral partnerships, invite
proposals for their research consortium
studentships. These enable HEIs to invite
candidates to seek studentship funding for PhD studies conducted with the
members of the consortium and a UK
university. A maximum of six studentships are available to be taken up in
autumn 2016.
Web id: 1187307
Email: research@sciencemuseum.ac.uk
Deadline: 27 November 2015 [169.1]

AHRC/National Gallery CDP
The National Gallery and the Bowes Museum consortium, funded through the Arts
and Humanities Research Council’s collaborative doctoral partnerships, invite
proposals for their research consortium
studentships. These enable HEIs to invite
candidates to seek studentship funding for PhD studies conducted with the
members of the consortium and a UK
university. A maximum of three studentships are available.
Web id: 1187313
Email: headofresearch@ng-london.org.
uk
Deadline: 27 November 2015 [169.2]

AHRC/Historic England CDP
Historic England and English Heritage,
funded through the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s collaborative
doctoral partnerships, invite proposals
for their research consortia studentships.
These enable HEIs to invite candidates to
seek studentship funding for PhD studies
conducted with the research consortia
and a UK university. A maximum of three
studentships are available.
Web id: 1187318
Email: philip.pollard@historicengland.
org.uk
Deadline: 27 November 2015 [169.3]

AHRC/V&A CDP
The Victoria and Albert Museum, funded
through the Arts and Humanities Research
Council’s collaborative doctoral partnerships scheme, invites proposals for its CDP
studentships. These enable HEIs to invite
candidates to seek funding for PhD studies
conducted with the Victoria and Albert
Museum and a UK university. A maximum
of three studentships are available.
Web id: 1187319
Email: ahrcresearch@vam.ac.uk
Deadline: 27 November 2015 [169.4]

AHRC/Oxford CDP
The Oxford University Museums, funded through the Arts and Humanities
Research Council’s collaborative doctoral partnerships, invite proposals for
their research consortium studentships.
These enable HEIs to invite candidates
to seek studentship funding for PhD
studies conducted with the university museums and a UK university. A
maximum of three studentships are
available.
Web id: 1187316
Email: dan.hicks@prm.ox.ac.uk
Deadline: 27 November 2015 [169.5]

Resilient structures
The British Council, via the Newton Fund,
invites applications for grants to attend
its workshop on resilient structures
and infrastructures. Funding enables
researchers from the UK and Kazakhstan to participate in an international

workshop on resilient structures and
infrastructures, to be held from 14 to
17 March 2016 at Nazarbayev University
in Astana, Kazakhstan. Grants cover all
travel and accommodation expenses.
Web id: 1187141
Email: katherine.cashell@brunel.ac.uk
Deadline: 30 November 2015 [170]

ESRC networking
The Economic and Social Research Council
invites applications for the International
Journal of Social Research Methodology
seminar competition. Funding supports
the development of critical and innovative approaches to on-going and emerging methodological debates across a
range of approaches, both qualitative
and quantitative, including mixed and
comparative methods, as these relate
to philosophical, theoretical, ethical,
political and practice issues. Grants are
worth £1,500 per seminar, and may cover
the costs of room and equipment hire,
hospitality, consumables and travel for
speakers.
Web id: 1187157
Contact: Alice Edwards
Email: tsrm-editor@tandf.co.uk
Deadline: 30 November 2015 [171]

UK-Iran health workshop
The British Council, University College
London and the Tehran University of
Medical Sciences invite expressions of
interest for their UK-Iran researcher
links workshop on public health. Funding enables UK and Iranian early-career
scholars and experienced researchers to
attend a workshop on public health with
subthemes of healthy public policies for
sustainable development and universal
health coverage, to be held from 20 to
23 February 2016 at Tehran University
in Kish Island, Iran. Grants cover travel,
subsistence and accommodation costs.
Web id: 1187303
Email: education.iran@britishcouncil.
org
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [172]

Sustainable nutrition policy
The Global Food Security programme
invites expressions of interest to participate in its policy lab on sustainable nutrition. Funding supports research taking an
interdisciplinary and systems approach to
the area of sustainable nutrition, or sustainable and healthy eating patterns. The
successful team will be awarded £5,000 to
cover the costs associated with producing
a report for GFS.
Web id: 1187293
Email: policylab@foodsecurity.ac.uk
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [173]

Water management
The British Council, via the Newton Fund,
invites applications for grants to attend
its workshop on water management and
environmental assessment in gas and oil.
Funding enables researchers from the UK
and Kazakhstan to attend a workshop on
management and environmental impact
assessment in the oil and gas industry, to
be held from 14 to 17 March 2016 at Nazarbayev University in Astana, Kazakhstan.
Grants cover all travel and accommodation expenses.
Web id: 1187144
Email: evina.katsou@brunel.ac.uk
Deadline: 15 December 2015 [174]

12  funding opportunities

Research Fortnight, 14 October 2015

Innovate UK diabetes care

MRC/DFID adolescent health

Innovate UK, the Scottish Government,
the Scottish Diabetes Group and Scottish
Enterprise invite registrations for their
competition on personalised diabetes
education and care. This call supports
research and development projects that
aim to find innovative solutions focused
on improving education for people with
Type 1 diabetes, including mobile health.
The total budget for phase one projects is
worth up to £150,000. Each project may
receive up to £30,000.
Web id: 1187191
Email: sbri_diabetes@gov.scot
Deadline: 30 December 2015 [175]

The Medical Research Council and the
Department for International Development invite applications for their call on
implementation research for improved
adolescent health in low and middle
income countries. This aims to generate
the research evidence needed to effect
real and practical changes to improve
adolescent health. The total budget is
£3 million.
Web id: 1187261
Email: meriel.flint@headoffice.mrc.
ac.uk
Deadline: 21 January 2016 [180]

EU experimental development

CRUK multidisciplinary grants

EUREKA, in collaboration with the Newton-Picarte Fund, Innovate UK and the
CORFO Chilean funding agency, invites
proposals for experimental development
projects. These aim to bring together
businesses from Chile and the UK for
the joint development of innovative
products, processes or services that meet
the particular challenges that Chile is
facing in its growth and development
trajectory.
Web id: 1187272
Email: graham.mobbs@innovateuk.
gov.uk
Deadline: 8 January 2016 [176]

Innovate UK/BIS aerospace
The Aerospace Technology Institute,
Innovate UK and the Department for
Business, Innovation and Skills, invite
applications for their research and technology programme. Funding supports
collaborative research and technology
projects related to aerospace technology. Innovate UK aims to fund up to 50
per cent of the total eligible project
costs, with consortium members funding the remaining 50 per cent. Academic
and research organisations may receive
up to 30 per cent of the total eligible
costs.
Web id: 1187117
Email: support@innovateuk.gov.uk
Deadline: 13 January 2016 [177]

Innovate UK 5G apps
Innovate UK invites registrations for
its 5G applications and services competition. Funding supports collaborative R&D projects that aim to explore
innovative applications or services that
leverage the anticipated benefits of 5G.
The total budget is worth up to £1 million. Each project is expected to receive
between £150,000 and £220,000,
although larger proposals may be considered.
Web id: 1187306
Email: support@innovateuk.gov.uk
Deadline: 20 January 2016 [178]

NIHR technology assessment
The Department of Health's National
Institute for Health Research invites
proposals under the commissioned
funding stream of its health technology
programme. This aims to ensure that
high quality research information on the
effectiveness, costs and broader impact
of health technology is produced in the
most efficient way for those who use,
manage, provide care in, or develop
policy in the NHS
Web id: 1185197
Deadline: 21 January 2016 [179]

Cancer Research UK invites expressions of
interest for its grand challenge awards.
These support a multinational, interdisciplinary effort to tackle significant
problems in cancer research. Awards
are worth up to £20 million each over a
maximum period of five years.
Web id: 1186936
Email: grandchallenge@cancer.org.uk
Deadline: 12 February 2016 [181]

Aesthetic surgery fellowships
The National Institute of Aesthetic
Research, on behalf of the Healing
Foundation, and in collaboration with
the British Association of Aesthetic
Plastic Surgeons and the British Association of Plastic Reconstruction and
Aesthetic Surgeons, invites applications for its aesthetic fellowships. These
support post-certificate of completion
of training trainee plastic surgeons
wishing to learn skills in aesthetic
surgery and medicine, by allowing them
to assist senior aesthetic practitioners
and their teams. Three fellowships of
£8,000 each are available.
Web id: 1187219
Contact: Charlotte Coates
Email: charlotte@thehealingfoundation.org
Deadline: 26 February 2016 [182]

Aesthetics small grants
The British Society of Aesthetics invites
applications for its small grants. These
support conferences, workshops, seminars and lecture series in the field of
aesthetics. Grants are worth up to £5,000
each.
Web id: 1187209
Email: admin@british-aesthetics.org
Deadline: 1 April 2016 [183]

British Academy grants
The British Academy invites applications
for the following grants:
•Honor Frost Foundation small
research grants, worth up to £10,000
each. Web id: 1187284
•Moral Education Trust small research
grants, worth up to £10,000 each.
Web id: 1187285
•Philosophy of Education Society of
Great Britain small research grants, worth
up to £10,000 each. Web id: 1187287
•Society for the Advancement of Management Studies small research grants,
worth up to £10,000 each.
Web id: 1187288
Contact: Claire McDonagh
Email: grants@britac.ac.uk
Deadline: 11 May 2016 [184]

uk
other
Renewed opportunities from funders based
in the UK.

EPSRC fellowships
The Engineering and Physical Sciences
Research Council invites applications for
its fellowships. These aim to develop the
next generation of researchers with the
greatest potential across different career
stages. Fellowships are available at the
postdoctoral, early career and established
career level. Support is available for up
to five years.
Web id: 1163517
Email: epsrcfellowships@epsrc.ac.uk
No deadline [189]

Companion animal studies
The Society for Companion Animal Studies invites applications for its research
projects grants. These support research
on the human-animal bond, in particular
projects which focus on children and pets;
older people and pets; people with diverse
needs and pets; pet loss; bond-centred
veterinary practices and animal-assisted
interventions. Grants are worth between
£500 and £10,000 each.
Web id: 1160683
Email: info@scas.org.uk
No deadline [190]

Oxford Ebola research
Oxford University's International
Growth Centre invites proposals for its
economic impacts of Ebola grants. These
support research on the economic costs
of the Ebola epidemic and economic
aspects of the crisis including panic,
loss of confidence, reduction in market
interactions, breakdown in formal systems and institutions, reduced supply of
essential goods, and potential increased
prices. The total budget is worth up to
£250,000.
Web id: 1187121
Email: special.call@theigc.org
No deadline [191]

Research merit awards
The Royal Society, in partnership with
the Wolfson Foundation and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills,
invites nominations for the Wolfson
research merit awards. These enable
universities to attract, or keep in the
UK, respected researchers in all areas of
the life and physical sciences, including
engineering. Awards take the form of salary enhancements and are usually worth
from £10,000 to £30,000 per year over a
maximum period of five years.
Web id: 255189
Email: seniorfellowships@royalsociety.
org
Deadline: 12 November 2015 [192]

Scotland-China collaboration
The Royal Society of Edinburgh and the
National Natural Science Foundation
of China invite proposals for their joint
projects scheme. This facilitates international collaboration between researchers
based in Scotland and China who are
working on projects related to sensor and
imaging systems. Grants are worth up to
£6,000 per year for a maximum period
of two years. Within the £6,000, up to
£1,000 may be requested for research

expenses.
Web id: 196255
Email: ctait@royalsoced.org.uk
Deadline: 16 November 2015 [193]

Latin American studies
The Society for Latin American Studies
invites applications for its postgraduate
and postdoctoral bursaries. These provide
accommodation and registration costs
for postgraduate students presenting
papers at the annual society conference.
Bursaries are worth £200 each.
Web id: 200458
Contact: Sarah Bowskill
Email: s.bowskill@qub.ac.uk
Deadline: 19 November 2015 [194]

RAEng visiting fellows
The Royal Academy of Engineering invites
applications for its distinguished visiting
fellowships. These enable UK university engineering departments to host
international academic experts for up to
one month. Fellowships are worth up to
£6,000 each, and include return air fare,
accommodation and a daily allowance to
cover incidental expenses.
Web id: 260314
Email: international@raeng.org.uk
Deadline: 30 November 2015 [195]

Wellcome fellowships 1
The Wellcome Trust invites applications
for the following fellowships:
•the Science Foundation Ireland and
Health Research Board research career
development fellowships in basic biomedical sciences. Web id: 253970
•the Royal Society Sir Henry Dale fellowships. Web id: 1164964
Email: sciencegrants@wellcome.ac.uk
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [196]

Wellcome research training
The Wellcome Trust invites applications
for its research training fellowships.
These support medical, dental, veterinary
or clinical psychology graduates who wish
to develop a long-term career in academic
medicine. Fellowships normally provide
a salary and research expenses for a
period of two to three years, however in
exceptional cases the funding period may
be extended to four years.
Web id: 260191
Email: sciencegrants@wellcome.ac.uk
Deadline: 4 December 2015 [198]

RCUK digital economy
Research Councils UK and the Digital Catapult Centre invite applications for their
researcher in residence programme. This
enables researchers to spend time at the
Digital Catapult Centre within junior or
senior residency schemes. Grants, worth
up to £25,000 each, are available to cover
expenses such as salary costs, equipment,
travel and accommodation.
Web id: 1184628
Contact: Andrea Kells
Email: ark20@hermes.cam.ac.uk
Deadline: 6 December 2015 [199]

Newton-India placements
The British Council in India and the
Department of Biotechnology in India
invite applications for the Newton-Bhabha PhD placements programme. This
enables UK and Indian PhD students to
spend between three and six months
in Indian and UK higher education or

jobs  13

Jobs
Policy, Management & Support – plus Expert Committees

Highlights
Experienced Researchers
– Programme ARD 2020
Cosmetosciences (2 posts) NS
LE STUDIUM® Loire Valley
Institute for Advanced Studies
Closing date: 31/10/2015
Contact: Dr Aurélien Montagu
Email: aurelien.montagu@
lestudium-ias.fr
Training Manager
NS
International and Scientific
Affairs Department, Centre for
Genomic Regulation
Closing date: 02/11/2015
Details: Please visit
http://recruitment.crg.eu
Research Support Manager NS
Research and Faculty Office,
London Business School
Closing date: 09/11/2015
Details: Please visit
www.london.edu/theschool/
workingforus/jobopportunities/
jobopportunities.do
Email: jobs@london.edu
Business Interaction Manager
£28,384 plus benefits
Biotechnology and Biological
Sciences Research Council
Closing date: 15/11/2015
Details: Please visit our job board
at http://rsrch.co/bbsrcjob
Senior Innovation Manager
(Benefits Realisation)
£36,033 plus benefits
Biotechnology and Biological
Sciences Research Council
Closing date: 16/11/2015
Details: Please visit our job board
at http://rsrch.co/bbsrcjob2
Senior Evaluation Manager –
Economic Impact
£36,033 plus benefits
Biotechnology and Biological
Sciences Research Council
Closing date: 16/11/2015
Details: Please visit our job board
at http://rsrch.co/bbsrcjob1
Appointment of New Members
and Chair
NS
Scottish Science Advisory Council
Closing date: 22/11/2015
Contact: Please visit
www.scottishscience.org.uk
Email: scottishscience@
scotland.gsi.gov.uk
For more details and the complete
list of jobs, please visit:
www.researchresearch.com/jobs

28 October 2015

Getting ahead as a young PI: Don’t let
poor management swamp your science
It was just five years after she had finished
her PhD when Sinéad Collins, an evolutionary
biologist based at the University of Edinburgh,
became a principal investigator.
Determined to start her own research group as
soon as possible, she had spent much of her time
as a postdoctoral researcher grilling PIs about how
they managed their teams.
“I was completely shameless in asking
questions,” Collins says of her time as a postdoc,
first at the Max Planck Institute of Plant Breeding
in Germany and then as a Natural Environment
Research Council fellow in Edinburgh. “I looked
specifically at PIs who were between three and
five years ahead of me, and tried to find out what
made a team happy and productive.” She says
that learning from others’ experience taught her
more than any of the team management courses
she went on.
There are courses designed to help most earlycareer researchers master the paperwork side of
a managerial position, including forms regarding
the progress of their PhD students, as well as how
to build the confidence to start running a lab
early in their career. They will particularly help
academics at very competitive universities, says
Bill Dunn, a professional development adviser at
the Oxford Learning Institute, who runs courses on
how to become a good PI. Dunn and his colleagues
provide advice on issues such as managing a
diverse team, dealing with bullying in the lab,
knowledge transfer, and how to secure funding.
The competitive environment that many of
those PIs work in makes it harder for them to
recognise that they need to seek help, says Dunn.
“Courses can be helpful because PIs can see that
they are not the only ones struggling with the
management of their teams,” he says.
Dunn says that one of the hardest parts of the
process of setting up your own team is what he
describes as a loss of identity, especially for those
researchers who have been very successful in their
early years. “The researcher becomes a manager
and has little or no time to do science,” he says.
“Smart PIs are those who can manage their time
in a way that allows them to set aside some time
for their own research.”
Collins’ way of dealing with this has been to
limit her team to six people: three PhD students,
one postdoctoral researcher, one research
assistant and herself. A one-in, one-out policy has
allowed her to devote enough time to the students
while keeping her own projects and fieldwork.
“With more than six people you become just a
manager,” she says. “Six is the most that I can
handle and still do enough science to stay happy.”
Another challenge PIs face in recruitment is how
to persuade established scientists to join a team
that might be newer and smaller than their own.

by Cristina Gallardo cgnews@ResearchResearch.com

Some PIs tend to focus too much on explaining
the team’s budget and the equipment, Dunn says,
forgetting to seduce them with their vision.
Collins suggests introducing the candidate to
the rest of the team during the interview, as well
as giving yourself enough time with them to be
sure that they’re the right fit.
Chris Bakal, leader of the dynamical cell
systems team at the Institute of Cancer Research in
London, takes a similar approach. “I always think
of the person before the CV,” he says. “In some
teams there can be a lack of actual teamwork,
even though individually everyone can be quite
productive. I wanted my lab to be a cohesive unit.”
When he started out as a PI, Bakal says he
chose a very hands-off management style, but
soon found out that not everybody would thrive
with a lot of independence. Without becoming a
micromanager, he says he has recently decided
to hold more one-on-one meetings with team
members. “Some researchers might feel that their
day-to-day work is not part of the greater effort,”
he says. “It is up to me to make sure that they
understand how their work fits into the overall
scheme of things.”
For Collins, communication is crucial in
managing her group. Learning to juggle her
managerial tasks while keeping track of around
14 different sub-projects was tough, she says. She
needed a way to ensure that information would
keep coming her way without having to chase
people for updates. Her group now has weekly
meetings where everyone, including Collins,
discusses the work they have been doing. She
says the meetings help to make sure that everyone
feels like part of the team.
“Reporting to my team helps prevent people
becoming resentful when there is a lot of work, and
for them to understand that you are sometimes
grumpy because you also had a week of rejection,”
she says. “A lot of my work consists of getting the
grants and since I spend a lot of time outside the
lab it is hard for the rest of my team to know what
I’m doing.”
And although grants and papers are important,
Collins says that the main motivation of each
member of the team should be their curiosity,
what she describes as “gleeful nerdiness”.
As the size of your group grows, delegation
becomes essential, Dunn says. But not everyone
heeds this advice. Dunn recalls leaders of
40-strong research groups who refused to delegate
any responsibilities. Both he and Collins stress the
importance of hiring a good research assistant.
Collins says that her assistant keeps her updated
on any problems in the team. “And she can always
tell me when I’m being an idiot,” she says.

14  jobs
POLICY MANAGEMENT &
SUPPORT VACANCIES

Senior Research Policy Officer
£38,511-£45,954
Research Services,
University of Oxford
Closing date: 02/11/2015
Contact: Recruitment
Email: recruitment@admin.
ox.ac.uk

Contracts Manager
£34,233-£45,954
Research Office, School of
Clinical Medicine,
University of Cambridge
Closing date: 08/11/2015
Contact: Human Resources
Email: hrenquiries@cam.ac.uk

Impact Manager (Government
Social and Corporate)
£40,645-£48,088 (inc LW)
Research and Enterprise, Royal
Holloway University of London
Closing date: 11/11/2015
Contact: Recruitment
Email: recruitment@rhul.ac.uk

Director of the Institute of
Health and Community
NS
Institute for Health & Community,
University of Plymouth
Closing date: 04/11/2015
Contact: Recruitment
Email: jobs@plymouth.ac.uk
Tel: 01752 588255

Centre Manager
£33,242-£35,526
EPSRC Centre for Predictive
Modelling in Healthcare,
University of Exeter
Closing date: 09/11/2015
Contact: Recruitment
Email: jobs@exeter.ac.uk

Impact Manager (Creative and
Cultural Sectors)
£40,645-£48,088 (inc LW)
Research and Enterprise, Royal
Holloway University of London
Closing date: 11/11/2015
Contact: Recruitment
Email: recruitment@rhul.ac.uk

Grants Officer
£24,000
Cancer Research UK
Closing date: 01/11/2015
Contact: Applications should be
submitted via Cancer Research
UK's careers website

Contracts Officer
£31,342-£35,256
Research & Enterprise
Development,
University of Bristol
Closing date: 04/11/2015
Contact: HR Resourcing Team
Email: recruitment@bristol.ac.uk
Tel: 0117 331 7421

Collaboration Development
Manager
£35,222-£38,254
National Oceanography Centre,
Natural Environment Research
Council (NERC)
Closing date: 09/11/2015
Contact: Visit www.topcareer.jobs

IP Commercialisation Manager
£38,511-£45,954
Enterprise Office,
Loughborough University
Closing date: 11/11/2015
Contact: Human Resources
Email: webrecruitment@lboro.
ac.uk

Senior Partnerships Manager
(Health)
£51,785 (inc LW)
Research Services, Queen Mary
University of London
Closing date: 02/11/2015
Contact: Human Resources
Email: humanresources@qmul.
ac.uk

Researcher/Research Manager
in Operations £24,779-£37,480
Research and Product Operations,
National Foundation for
Educational Research
Closing date: 06/11/2015
Contact: Recruitment
Email: hr@nfer.ac.uk

Business Development Officer
£32,122-£36,669 (inc LW)
Research, Innovation and
Enterprise, University of
East London
Closing date: 09/11/2015
Contact: Recruitment
Email: jobs@uel.ac.uk
Tel: 020 8223 3000

Business Development Manager
£32,277-£37,394
Department of Molecular and
Clinical Cancer Medicine,
Institute of Translational
Medicine, University of Liverpool
Closing date: 11/11/2015
Contact: Human Resources
Email: jobs@liv.ac.uk

Business Development Manager
£53,119-£57,760 (inc LW)
Translational Imaging Group,
Medical Physics and Biomedical
Engineering Department,
University College London
Closing date: 01/11/2015
Contact: Neha Shah
Email: neha.shah@ucl.ac.uk
Research Development Manager
£48,743-£54,841
Research & Enterprise Services,
Lancaster University
Closing date: 01/11/2015
Contact: Human Resources
Email: hr@lancaster.ac.uk

Scottish Science Advisory Council

Appointment of New Members and Chair
The Scottish Science Advisory Council (SSAC) is Scotland’s highest level science advisory body. It provides independent advice
and recommendations on science to the Scottish Government.
We are looking to appoint a Chair and members to the Council.
SSAC members will play a key role in supporting the Scottish Government to make effective use of science advice, knowledge
and techniques when formulating and implementing policies that will benefit Scotland’s economy, environment and people,
further enhancing Scotland’s status as a science and innovation nation.
The SSAC’s work will be expected to support Scotland’s Economic Strategy, and its two mutually supportive goals of increasing
competitiveness and tackling inequality.
Applications for both Members and a new Chair of SSAC are sought from suitably qualified individuals who are able to
demonstrate a broad understanding of strategic science, engineering or technology issues, expertise and leadership in their
own area of science, and connectivity to science networks in Scotland and further afield. Members and the Chair are also
expected to be operating at a senior level, most likely in academia or business and industry. Experience in a similar advisory
or committee environment is desirable.
Appointments will be for two years initially, with the possibility of extension. Members are not remunerated but reasonable
expenses involved in attending meetings will be paid. The Chair will be paid a daily rate of £250 per day for time spent on
Council business.
We will also be recruiting for a Chief Scientific Adviser (CSA) shortly. Applicants for the SSAC may also apply for the CSA role.
How to apply:
Further details are available on the SSAC website – www.scottishscience.org.uk and from: SSAC Secretariat, Area 1C South,
Victoria Quay, Edinburgh EH6 6QQ. Tel: 0131 244 2192 email: scottishscience@scotland.gsi.gov.uk
Closing date for applications is midnight on Sunday 22 November 2015 and interviews are expected to be held in
December 2015.
SSAC welcomes applications from eligible candidates from diverse backgrounds and actively encourages applications
from disabled people. Appointed on merit; committed to diversity and equality.

jobs  15

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The EARMA Annual Conference 2016 is in Luleå, Sweden
from 20th to 23rd June in cooperation with the Luleå University of Technology.

CONFERENCE THEME:

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02/10/2015 14:13

16  jobs

Policy and market intelligence for university decision-makers
Looming public spending cuts threaten the very existence of the Higher Education Funding Council for England, the Quality Assurance Agency and all of the research councils.
Meanwhile the government is developing the Teaching Excellence Framework that aims
to link the ability to raise tuition fees in England to the ability to demonstrate high-quality
teaching. Coping with such constant change can be exhausting.
*HE is designed to help. As a subscriber you gain:

8am Playbook

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the morning papers.

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plus a round-up of reactions and analysis from our team of experienced academics and
observers.

News

Succinct and timely analysis of political developments and market shifts in higher
education to keep you on top of current and emerging trends.

Parliamentary Monitor

Daily updates of all relevant parliamentary activity in the national and devolved
administrations.

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Concise coverage of major events, briefing documents and other policy outputs with
analysis of their implications for universities.
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funding opportunities  17

Research Fortnight, 14 October 2015
research institutions. UK host universities
may apply for up to £5,000 to cover fees.
Indian scholars will receive a monthly
stipend of £1,300 to cover meals, accommodation and domestic travel, whereas
UK scholars may receive a monthly stipend
of INR25,000 (£248).
Web id: 1182986
Email: purti.kohli@britishcouncil.org
Deadline: 7 December 2015 [200]

Japan fellowships
The British Academy, in its capacity as
overseas nominating authority to the
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, invites applications for the JSPS
postdoctoral fellowship for overseas
researchers. This enables early career
postdoctoral researchers to conduct cooperative research in Japan with leading
research groups in Japanese universities
and other institutions, under the guidance
of a host. Fellowships are tenable for one
to two years and provide a round-trip air
ticket, a monthly maintenance stipend of
¥362,000 (£2,000), a settling-in allowance of ¥200,000, and a research grant
of up to ¥1.5 million per year.
Web id: 251748
Email: c.pascolini-campbell@britac.
ac.uk
Deadline: 9 December 2015 [201]

Community space projects
The UK Space Agency invites applications
for its space for all – community funding
scheme. This aims to help members of
the UK space community harness the
inspirational value of space in education and outreach. The total budget is
£40,000, and bids of up to £10,000 will be
considered. Funding may be used to cover
all types of expenses including contributions to salaries, costs of materials, travel
and subsistence.
Web id: 1169793
Email: tony.forsythe@ukspaceagency.
bis.gsi.gov.uk
Deadline: 11 December 2015 [202]

Cancer research award
The European Association for Cancer
Research, via the Pezcoller Foundation, invites nominations for its cancer
researcher award. This recognises academic excellence and achievements in
the field of cancer research. The award
is worth €10,000 (£7,300) and includes
expenses for travel, accommodation and
congress registration.
Web id: 254658
Contact: Laura Strachan
Email: l.strachan@nottingham.ac.uk
Deadline: 31 December 2015 [203]

Research dissemination
The Medical Research Foundation invites
applications for grants from the Alexander Fleming dissemination scheme. This
supports the dissemination of Medical
Research Council and Medical Research
Foundation-funded research results
beyond the scientific peer reviewed press,
to patients, participants, practitioners
and policymakers. Awards are worth up
to £30,000 each.
Web id: 1165099
Deadline: 11 January 2016 [204]

fessionals, worth up to £250,000.
Web id: 1165132
•research fellowships in society and
ethics. Web id: 254308
Email: hssgrants@wellcome.ac.uk
Deadline: 22 January 2016 [205]

RAEng innovation award
The Royal Academy of Engineering invites
applications for the MacRobert award.
This recognises the successful development of innovative ideas in UK engineering, and seeks to demonstrate the
importance of engineering and the role of
engineers and scientists in contributing
to national prosperity and international
prestige. The award is worth £50,000.
Web id: 189854
Deadline: 31 January 2016 [207]

Relativity and gravitation
The International Society on General
Relativity and Gravitation , as an affiliated commission of the International
Union of Pure and Applied Physics,
invites nominations for its general
relativity and gravitation young scientist prize. This recognises scientists at
early stages of their career for work in
any area of relativity and gravitation,
theoretical or experimental. The prize
consists of €1,000 (£730), a medal and
a certificate. An Ashtekar travel award
of US$1,000 (£645) is also presented
to the winner.
Web id: 1177007
Email: beverlyberger@me.com
Deadline: 1 February 2016 [208]

BBSRC awards
The Biotechnology and Biological
Research Council invites applications for
the following opportunities:
•flexible interchange programme, with
funding worth up to £150,000 per project
over two years. Web id: 1168139
•modular training partnerships, with
funding worth £20,000 per module.
Web id: 212336
•strategic training awards for research
skills. The budget is worth up to £250,000
per year to fund up to 30 awards.
Web id: 1186703
Deadline: 3 February 2016 [210]

Latin American studies
The Society for Latin American Studies
invites applications for the following
grants:
•conference grants, worth up to £500
each. Web id: 212961
•postgraduate travel grants, worth up
to £600 each. Web id: 200450
Contact: Sarah Bowskill
Email: s.bowskill@qub.ac.uk
Deadline: 12 February 2016 [213]

Surgical research
The Royal College of Surgeons of England
invites applications for its one-year surgical
research fellowship. This enables a student
of any aspect of surgery or surgical care to
undertake research training in the UK. The
fellowship covers salary, on-costs and some
running expenses for a one-year period.
Web id: 259189
Deadline: 29 February 2016 [215]

Wellcome fellowships 2

Textile history projects

The Wellcome Trust invites applications
for the following fellowships:
•research fellowships for health pro-

The Pasold Research Fund invites applications for its research project grants.
These fund high-quality research relating

to all branches of textile history and the
history of dress and fashion. Grants are
worth between £751 and £2,500 to cover
expenses such as travel, subsistence,
photocopying, microfilming and similar.
Web id: 204402
Contact: Amy Evans
Email: pasold.research@warwick.ac.uk
Deadline: 1 March 2016 [216]

Gastroenterology research
Core invites applications for the following awards:
•Dr Falk Pharma UK/Core awards,
worth between £1,000 and £2,500 each.
Web id: 1170893
•research essay prize, worth £1,000.
Web id: 255569
Contact: Julie Solomon
Email: research@corecharity.org.uk
Deadline: 4 March 2016 [217]

Surgery travel grants
The Royal College of Surgeons of England
and the Ethicon Foundation Fund invite
applications for the following grants:
•grants for short-term clinical visits,
worth up to £400 each. Web id: 1166550
•travel grants, worth up to £1,000
each. Web id: 254604
Email: lslater@rcseng.ac.uk
Deadline: 15 March 2016 [219]

and £250,000. Fellowships cover up to 80
per cent FEC and are awarded for six to 18
months for full-time research.
Web id: 1161652
Email: grantspreaward@ssc.rcuk.ac.uk
Deadline: 30 September 2016 [227]

Iraq studies grants
The British Institute for the Study of
Iraq invites applications for its outreach
grants. These support outreach and public
engagement events and projects, such
as lectures, study days and popular publications, that relate to Iraq and to the
institute's areas of interest. Grants are
worth up to £500 each.
Web id: 254627
Email: bisi@britac.ac.uk
Deadline: 1 October 2016 [228]

Metabolic disease
Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases invites outline summaries
for its research grants. These support
research projects related to metabolic
diseases, specifically those on GM1
gangliosidosis and Alexander's disease.
Grants are usually worth up to £15,000
each.
Web id: 255643
Email: grants@climb.org.uk
Deadline: 1 October 2016 [229]

British Academy awards
The British Academy invites applications
for the following opportunities:
•44th International Congress of Americanists fund travel grants, worth up to
£1,000 each. Web id: 159961
•ancient Persia fund, with awards
worth up to £500 each.Web id: 181987
•the Elie Kedourie memorial fund, with
awards worth up to £1,000 each.
Web id: 182061
•the Elisabeth Barker fund, with
awards worth up to £1,000 each.
Web id: 201843
•the Sir Ernest Cassel Educational Trust
fund, with grants worth up to £1,000
each. Web id: 182099
Contact: Claire McDonagh
Email: grants@britac.ac.uk
Deadline: 11 May 2016 [221]

Leverhulme visits
The Leverhulme Trust invites applications for its visiting professorships. These
enable UK institutions to host eminent
researchers from overseas, primarily to
enhance the skills of academic staff or
students at the host institution. Funding
covers maintenance, travel expenses and
research costs and supports visits that
last between three and 12 months. Travel
within the UK, laboratory consumables
and essential technical assistance may
also be covered.
Web id: 255771
Contact: Andreas Heiner
Email: aheiner@leverhulme.ac.uk
Deadline: 12 May 2016 [226]

AHRC leadership fellows
The Arts and Humanities Research Council invites applications for the standard
route of its leadership fellows scheme.
This enables researchers to develop their
capabilities as leaders, to carry out work
with a potential to generate a transformative impact on their discipline, and to
develop and undertake leadership activities that are connected to their research.
Projects may receive between £50,000

europe
highlights
New opportunities from European funders,
excluding funders based in the UK.

EU pig castration
The Directorate-General for Health and
Food Safety invites tenders for a study
on pig castration – methods of anaesthesia and analgesia for all pigs and
alternatives for pigs used in traditional
products. The tenderer will identify available methods for the use of anaesthesia or prolonged analgesia to reduce
pain at the time of castration or in the
period of restitution, and explore alternatives to surgical castration for pigs
used in traditional products, analyse
and compare the identified alternatives
with particular emphasis on costs and
benefits. The contract is worth between
€80,000 (£58,400) and €100,000 over
nine months.
Web id: 1187255
Contact: Marc Vallons
Email: sante-procurement@ec.europa.
eu
Deadline: 23 November 2015 [230]

EU global climate projections
The European Centre for Medium-Range
Weather Forecasts invites tenders for
the provision of global climate projections: data access, product generation
and impact of front line developments.
The tenderer will provide and assess
historical climate simulations and global
climate projections for different emission
scenarios produced with atmospheric
and coupled general circulation models.
The contract is worth between €500,000
(£365,200) and €1.33 million over 27 to
39 months.
Web id: 1187188
Deadline: 25 November 2015 [231]

18  funding opportunities

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

EU food risk crowdsourcing

EU transnational volunteering

The European Food Safety Authority
invites tenders for its crowdsourcing –
engaging communities effectively in food
and feed risk assessment. The tenderer
will explore the possibilities of citizen
science and crowdsourcing through innovative use of information technology tools
and assess their applicability to the work
of EFSA. The contract is worth €250,000
(£182,600) over 24 months.
Web id: 1187314
Email: efsaprocurement@efsa.europa.eu
Deadline: 25 November 2015 [232]

The Education, Audiovisual and Culture
Executive Agency invites tenders for a study
on the impact of transnational volunteering through the European voluntary service. The tenderer will evaluate the impact,
effects and opportunities that the experience of transnational volunteering through
the European voluntary service has created for young people, the organisations
involved and the communities affected, in
order to support future policy. The contract
is worth up to €250,000 (£179,600).
Web id: 1187302
Email: eacea-tenders@ec.europa.eu
Deadline: 7 December 2015 [239]

Border security
Frontex invites tenders for a study on
the set-up and management of border
security-related research in and outside
of Europe. The tenderer will conduct
a study aiming at obtaining consolidated knowledge on how research and
innovation related to border security
is addressed in and outside Europe by
authorities, agencies and public bodies
with responsibilities in this field.
Web id: 1187296
Email: procurement@frontex.europa.eu
Deadline: 25 November 2015 [233]

EU social services
The Directorate-General for Employment,
Social Affairs and Inclusion invites tenders for a study on integrated delivery of
social services aiming at the activation of
minimum income recipients in the labour
market – success factors and reform
pathways. The tenderer will provide a
comprehensive and concise analysis and
assessment of reform processes focused
on integration of social services aiming
at the activation of minimum income
recipients in the labour market. The contract is worth up to €800,000 (£584,200)
over 18 months.
Web id: 1187237
Email: empl-vt-2015-048@ec.europa.eu
Deadline: 30 November 2015 [234]

EU defence tenders
The European Defence Agency invites
tenders for the following contracts:
•a business case for a multi-crypto
environment, worth up to €70,000
(£51,100) over 10 months.
Web id: 1187312
•course correction fuse integration
with artillery systems in the EU, worth
€150,000 over 12 months.
Web id: 1187281
•radar imagery applications supporting
actionable intelligence, worth €200,000
over 10 months. Web id: 1187279
Email: procurement@eda.europa.eu
Deadline: 30 November 2015 [235]

Law research grants
The Ragnar Söderberg Foundation invites
applications for its postdoctoral grants
for law research. These enable postdoctoral graduates to undertake a research
visit related to law at an international
university or research institute. Grants
cover 100 per cent employment at a
Swedish university in two years' 80 per
cent to full-time research. In addition,
they cover equipment and consumables,
travel to conferences, publishing and
accommodation costs.
Web id: 1187164
Email: help@ragnarsoderbergsstiftelse.
se
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [238]

EU defence research agendas
The European Defence Agency invites tenders for an overarching strategic research
agenda and capability technology groups
strategic research agendas harmonisation.
The tenderer will conduct a study to develop
a solid architectural framework to be used
by EDA capability technology groups for
the development of harmonised strategic
research agendas and overarching strategic
research agenda and implement the architecture produced. The contract is worth
€500,000 (£359,200) over 15 months.
Web id: 1187311
Email: procurement@eda.europa.eu
Deadline: 7 December 2015 [240]

EU environment objectives
The Special EU Programmes Body invites
proposals under the European Regional
Development Fund, via the following
INTERREG VA environment objective calls :
•improve freshwater basin quality in
cross-border river basins. The budget is
€20 million (£14.6m). Web id: 1187254
•manage marine protected areas and
species. The budget is €11m.
Web id: 1187253
•recovery of protected habitats and
priority species. The budget is €11m.
Web id: 1187251
Email: paul.boylan@seupb.eu
Deadline: 8 January 2016 [241]

europe
other
Renewed opportunities from European
funders, excluding funders based in the UK

Astronomy female visitors
The Netherlands Institute for Radio
Astronomy (ASTRON) invites applications for the Helena Kluyver female visitor
programme. This enables women with
a proven track record in the fields of
astronomy and engineering research and
development to visit ASTRON or JIVE in
Dwingeloo, the Netherlands. The duration
of visits may range from three weeks to
three months. Funding covers accommodation, travel expenses and limited
subsistence expenses.
Web id: 1163219
Email: helenakluyver@astron.nl
No deadline [244]

EU Erasmus+ civil society
The Education, Audiovisual and Culture
Executive Agency invites applications
for its civil society cooperation grants, as
part of the Erasmus+ programme. These

provide structural support to European
NGOs and EU-wide networks active in the
field of education and training or in the
field of youth. The total budget for annual
operating grants is €600,000 (£438,600).
Individual grants are worth up to €35,000
per year.
Web id: 1177471
Email: eacea-youth@ec.europa.eu
Deadline: 26 November 2015 [245]

Cardiovascular research
The European Society of Cardiology
invites applications for its basic research
fellowship in cardiovascular science. This
enables a researcher to spend one year
in a European research laboratory of
their choice, working on a topic of their
choice. One fellowship is available, worth
€25,000 (£18,300) for one year.
Web id: 1174474
Email: councils@escardio.org
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [246]

Fellowships in Romania
The New Europe College Institute for
Advanced Study invites applications
for its international fellowships. These
enable young international researchers
and academics, working in the fields of
humanities, social studies and economics, to spend a full academic year or one
term at NEC. The fellowship includes a
monthly stipend of €700 (£512), accommodation and international transport
costs to and from the home country at
the beginning and end of the fellowship
and for season holidays. Fellows staying
for the whole academic year are offered
€2,600 towards a one-month research
trip to an institution of their choice, or
field research.
Web id: 1160083
Contact: Irina Vainovski-Mihai
Email: applications@nec.ro
Deadline: 7 December 2015 [247]

Spinal muscular atrophy
The French Muscular Dystrophy Association, on behalf of Spinal Muscular
Atrophy Europe, invites proposals for
spinal muscular atrophy research projects. These support projects aimed at
finding a therapy for spinal muscular
atrophy or at elucidating the basic
pathophysiological processes of the
disease. Standard operating grants
do not normally exceed €150,000
(£109,700).
Web id: 213938
Contact: Vanessa Christie-Brown
Email: vanessa@sma-europe.eu
Deadline: 9 December 2015 [248]

Cardiology fellowships
The European Society of Cardiology's
European Heart Rhythm Association
invites applications for its arrhythmias and cardiac pacing training fellowships. These promote the development
of academic medicine in the field of
arrhythmias and cardiac pacing with
emphasis on implantable cardioverter
defibrillators and cardiac resynchronisation therapy, and aim to help young
candidates to attain clinical competence
and acquire high quality experience in
electrophysiology practice. Fellowships
are worth €25,000 (£18,300) each over
one year.
Web id: 1175642
Email: ehra@escardio.org
Deadline: 11 December 2015 [249]

Cardiovascular exchanges
The European Society of Cardiology
invites applications for its first contact
initiative grants. These provide resources
for the establishment of research links
from young scientists from European
institutions to hosting institutions in a
foreign country within or outside Europe.
A maximum of 10 grants are available,
each worth up to €2,500 (£1,800) for a
minimum stay of 10 days.
Web id: 1161384
Email: councils@escardio.org
Deadline: 4 January 2016 [250]

Neuroscience PhD programme
The Paris School of Neuroscience invites
applications for its neuroscience graduate
programme. This four-year programme,
open to international students primarily
trained outside France, leads to a PhD in
neuroscience.
Web id: 206035
Email: graduateprogram@paris-neuroscience.com
Deadline: 10 January 2016 [251]

Cardiology grants
The European Society of Cardiology,
through the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions,
invites applications for its interventional
cardiology training and research grants.
These offer specialised research or clinical training in the interventional cardiology field. Grants are worth €25,000
(£18,300).
Web id: 259095
Email: eapci@escardio.org
Deadline: 15 January 2016 [252]

Scientific workshops
The Lorentz Center, with funding from the
Netherlands Organisation for Scientific
Research (NWO), invites applications for
support to host the Lorentz Center international workshops. These encourage
ground-breaking innovative research
and focus on stimulating new collaborations and interactions between scientists
from different countries and fields. Two
Lorentz workshop facilities offer space for
groups of up to 55 participants. The total
annual budget is €700,000 (£506,300).
Web id: 1158115
Email: n.kos@nwo.nl
Deadline: 15 January 2016 [253]

EU Erasmus+ sport 1
The Education, Audiovisual and Culture
Executive Agency, under its Erasmus+
programme, invites applications for its
collaborative partnerships in the sport
field. These offer the opportunity to
develop, transfer or implement innovative practices in different areas relating
to sport and physical activity between
various organisations and actors in and
outside sport. The total budget for all
sport actions is €27.4 million (£20m),
and the maximum grant awarded for
European week of sport-related projects
is €150,000 and €400,000 for other
projects.
Web id: 1176977
Deadline: 21 January 2016 [254]

Oncology innovation
Merck Serono invites applications for
its oncology innovation grant. This
aims to support innovative research
projects that have the potential to

funding opportunities  19

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015
advance the implementation of personalised treatment for solid tumours.
The total budget is worth up to €1 million (£731,100) to fund one or more
selected projects.
Web id: 1182480
Email: goi@merckgroup.com
Deadline: 22 January 2016 [255]

Growth research grant
Merck Serono invites applications for its
grant for growth innovation. This aims
to support the advancement of science
and medical research in the field of
growth, and to facilitate new external
research to identify potential clinical
markers in patients with growth disorders. The total budget is worth €400,000
(£292,400) to fund up to three selected
projects. Research may be conducted
over a maximum of three years.
Web id: 1182670
Email: ggi@merckgroup.com
Deadline: 31 January 2016 [256]

EU Erasmus+
The Education, Audiovisual and Culture
Executive Agency's Erasmus+ programme
invites applications for its key action one
call for mobility projects in the field of
education, training and youth. This supports mobility projects that comprise one
or more of the following activities: a study
period abroad at a partner higher education institution; a traineeship or work
placement abroad in an enterprise or any
other relevant workplace; teaching periods at partner HEIs abroad; staff training
periods abroad. Funding amounts vary
according to applicant country and the
duration of the project.
Web id: 1176968
Deadline: 2 February 2016 [256.1]

EU Erasmus+ partnerships 1
The Education, Audiovisual and Culture
Executive Agency's Erasmus+ programme
invites applications for its strategic partnerships in the field of youth. These
support the development, transfer and
implementation of innovative practices
as well as the implementation of joint
intiatives promoting cooperation, peer
learning and exchanges of experience
at European level. Each grant is worth
€12,500 (£9,100) per month up to a
maximum of €450,000.
Web id: 1176972
Deadline: 2 February 2016 [257]

Multiple sclerosis grant
Merck Serono invites appliations for
its multiple sclerosis innovation grant.
This supports promising translational
research projects to improve understanding of multiple sclerosis for the
ultimate benefit of patients. The budget
is worth €1 million (£731,100).
Web id: 1182663
Email: gmsi@merckgroup.com
Deadline: 8 February 2016 [258]

Science and technology
The European Cooperation in Science
and Technology (COST) invites applications for its open call. Funding supports
networking activities, such as meetings,
short-term scientific missions, training
schools and dissemination activities in
the areas of science and technology.
Selected proposals receive financial support in the range of €130,000 (£95,000)
per year, normally for four years.

Web id: 200543
Email: opencall@cost.eu
Deadline: 9 February 2016 [259]

Diabetes research fellowships
The European Foundation for the Study
of Diabetes invites applications for the
following fellowships:
•Novo Nordisk rising star fellowships,
worth €30,000 (£21,900) each.
Web id: 1165235
•the Lilly research fellowships, worth
€50,000 each. Web id: 260001
Email: foundation@easd.org
Deadline: 15 February 2016 [260]

EU Erasmus+ Jean Monnet calls
The Education, Audiovisual and Culture
Executive Agency, under its Erasmus+
programme, invites applications for the
following opportunities:
•the Jean Monnet centres of excellence
call, with grants worth up to €100,000
(£73,100) each. Web id: 1177001
•the Jean Monnet chairs call, with
grants worth up to €50,000 each.
Web id: 1176976
•the Jean Monnet modules call, with
gants worth up to €30,000 each.
Web id: 1163895
•the Jean Monnet network call, with
grants worth up to €300,000 each.
Web id: 1177003
•the Jean Monnet projects call, with
grants worth up to €60,000 each.
Web id: 1177004
•the Jean Monnet support to associations, with grants worth up to €50,000
each. Web id: 1177002
Deadline: 25 February 2016 [262]

EU Erasmus+ alliances
The Education, Audiovisual and Culture
Executive Agency's Erasmus+ programme
invites applications for the following
opportunities:
•knowledge alliances action, worth up
to €1 million (£731,100) for three-year
alliances. Web id: 1176973
•sector skills alliances action, worth up
to €1.4m for lot two alliances.
Web id: 1177048
Deadline: 26 February 2016 [268]

EU metrology grants
ERA-Net European Association of National Metrology Institutes (EURAMET)
invites applications for its early stage
researcher mobility grants. These allow
researchers in the first four years of their
research career to undertake research
activities relevant to the joint research
projects objectives, in order to prepare
the next generation of experienced
metrology researchers by building
experience of metrology collaborations.
Grants include a fixed monthly stipend
and travel allowance.
Web id: 1158304
Email: emrpa169@npl.co.uk
Deadline: 4 May 2016 [272]

EU Erasmus+ sport 2
The Education, Audiovisual and Culture
Executive Agency, under its Erasmus+
programme, invites applications for its
small collaborative partnerships in the
sport field. These offer the opportunity to
conceive, transfer or implement innovative practices in different areas relating
to sport and physical activity between
various organisations and actors in and
outside sport. Each grant is worth up to
€60,000 (£43,900).
Web id: 1187320
Deadline: 12 May 2016 [273]

rest of world
Opportunities from funders outside of the
UK, Europe and the US.

Japanese studies exchange
The Japan Foundation Sydney invites
applications for the following opportunities:
•intellectual exchange conference
programme. Web id: 1182627
•Japanese studies fellowship.
Web id: 1175574
Email: jstudies@jpf.org.au
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [274]

Theoretical physics visits

CERN invites applications for its scientific
associates programme. This offers the
use of its research facilities to a certain
number of associates to participate in
its programmes covering experimental
and theoretical particle physics, as well
as various related activities in applied
physics, electronics, computing and
engineering.
Web id: 251966
Deadline: 11 March 2016 [270]

The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical
Physics invites applications for the Emmy
Noether visiting fellowships. These
enable female theoretical physicists to
pursue research, collaborate and take
part in workshops and conferences at
the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo,
Ontario. Fellowships provide financial
and organisational support for up to
one year.
Web id: 1175887
Contact: Christina Bouda
Email: cbouda@pitp.ca
Deadline: 10 January 2016 [276]

EU Erasmus+ partnerships 2

Quaternary research

Physics programme

The Education, Audiovisual and Culture
Executive Agency's Erasmus+ programme
invites applications for its strategic partnerships in the field of education and
training. These support the development, transfer and implementation of
innovative practices as well as the implementation of joint intitatives promoting
cooperation, peer learning and exchanges of experience at European level. Each
grant is worth €12,500 (£9,100) per
month up to a maximum of €450,000.
Web id: 1176971
Deadline: 31 March 2016 [271]

The International Union for Quaternary
Research invites applications for the
following grants:
•international focus groups grants,
typically worth between €5,000 (£3,700)
and €8,000. Web id: 1169707
•project grants, typically worth
between €4,000 and €5,000.
Web id: 260069
• skills enhancement grants, typically
worth between €4,000 and €5,000.
Web id: 1169710
Email: brian.chase@um2.fr
Deadline: 31 January 2016 [277]

usa
nih
Opportunities from the National Institutes
of Health. Recurring NIH calls include the
next closing date only.

Capturing complexity in the molecular
and cellular mechanisms involved in the
aetiology of Alzheimer's disease (R01)
NIH ref: PAR-15-358
Web id: 1187146
Deadline: 10 December 2015 [280]
Health disparities and Alzheimer's
disease (R01)
NIH ref: PAR-15-349
Web id: 1187132
Deadline: 11 December 2015 [281]
Major opportunities for research in
epidemiology of Alzheimer's disease
and cognitive resilience (R01)
NIH ref: PAR-15-356
Web id: 1187134
Deadline: 11 December 2015 [282]
Novel approaches to diagnosing
Alzheimer's disease and predicting
progression (R01)
NIH ref: PAR-15-359
Web id: 1187149
Deadline: 11 December 2015 [283]
Research on informal and formal
caregiving for Alzheimer's disease (R01)
NIH ref: PAR-15-348
Web id: 1187135
Deadline: 11 December 2015 [284]
Understanding Alzheimer's disease in
the context of the ageing brain (R01)
NIH ref: PAR-15-357
Web id: 1187136
Deadline: 16 December 2015 [285]
Emerging directions for addressing health
disparities in Alzheimer's disease (R03)
NIH ref: PAR-15-350
Web id: 1187133
Deadline: 17 December 2015 [286]
Research on informal and formal
caregiving for Alzheimer's disease (R21)
NIH ref: PAR-15-351
Web id: 1187137
Deadline: 17 December 2015 [287]
Personalised strategies to manage
symptoms of chronic illness (R01) Aidsrelated
NIH ref: PA-16-007
Web id: 1187265
Deadline: 7 January 2016 [288]
Personalised strategies to manage
symptoms of chronic illness (R01)
NIH ref: PA-16-007
Web id: 1187264
Deadline: 5 February 2016 [289]
Cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment
technologies for global health (UG3/UH3)
NIH ref: RFA-CA-15-024
Web id: 1187139
Deadline: 9 February 2016 [290]
Collaborative activities to promote
metabolomics research
NIH ref: PA-16-005
Web id: 1187159
Deadline: 15 February 2016 [291]
Personalised strategies to manage
symptoms of chronic illness (R21)
NIH ref: PA-16-008
Web id: 1187260
Deadline: 16 February 2016 [292]

20  funding news
usa
other
US funding opportunities available to UK
researchers.

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
International conference grants
Web id: 167817
No deadline [295]
Smithsonian Institution Lemelson Center travel to collections awards
Web id: 1167508
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [297]
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History Lemelson Centre
fellows programme
Web id: 173819
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [298]
Smithsonian Institution Mpala postdoctoral fellowship
Web id: 1182797
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [299]
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Patricia and Phillip Frost fellowship
Web id: 1169221
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [300]
Smithsonian Institution Peter Buck fellowship
Web id: 1170758
Deadline: 1 December 2015 [301]
Department of Defense vision research
programme – clinical trial award
Web id: 1187228
Deadline: 2 December 2015 [308]
Department of Defense vision research
programme – technology and therapeutic development award
Web id: 1187230
Deadline: 2 December 2015 [309]
Newberry Library Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel short-term fellowship
Web id: 196040
Deadline: 15 December 2015 [310]
Newberry Library Lester J Cappon fellowship in documentary editing
Web id: 184633
Deadline: 15 December 2015 [311]
Newberry Library Midwest modern language association fellowship
Web id: 184631
Deadline: 15 December 2015 [312]
Newberry Library American Musicological Society fellowship
Web id: 1176833
Deadline: 15 December 2015 [313]
Newberry Library American Society for
Environmental History fellowship
Web id: 1176834
Deadline: 15 December 2015 [314]
Smithsonian Institution Anne van Biema
fellowship
Web id: 1170756
Deadline: 15 December 2015 [317]
Department of Defense joint programme
committee 8 and clinical and rehabilitative medicine research programme –
extremity regeneration technology and
therapeutic development award
Web id: 1187232
Deadline: 15 December 2015 [318]
Department of Defense joint programme
committee eight and clinical rehabilitative medicine research programme –
extremity regeneration intervention
Web id: 1187300
Deadline: 15 December 2015 [319]

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

policy diary
November
  4 Praxis Unico: Essentials of
Businesss Development,
Loughborough. To 6.
http://rsrch.co/1KhPQ1q
  • Inside Government: Enchancing the Quality of the Student
Experience 2015, London.
http://rsrch.co/1Y2YF9w
  • AHRC: Doctoral Training Meeting, London.
http://rsrch.co/1i8yjBP
  5 AHRC: Doctoral Training Meeting, Leeds.
http://rsrch.co/1KA0PmC
10 BBSRC: Public Engagement
Training Course, London.
http://rsrch.co/1f839tN
December
  2 National Co-ordinating Centre
for Public Engagement: Engage
2015, Bristol. To 3.
http://rsrch.co/1OpQqjJ
  3 AHRC: Collaborative Doctoral
Award Scheme 10th Anniversary
Event, Birmingham.
http://rsrch.co/1RwF64k
  4 AHRC: Inspire and Engage
Workshop, London.
http://rsrch.co/1LQNqIT
20 AHRC: Best Practice Day for
Research Officers and Research
Managers, London.
http://rsrch.co/206QwSH
January
20 Universities UK: Strategic Fundraising for HE Leaders, London.
http://rsrch.co/1UQLuUY
26 AMRC: Essential Research
Management, London.
http://rsrch.co/1gcWHls
  • Universities UK: Innovation in
Teaching and Learning, London.
http://rsrch.co/1J7lQEC
February
23 AMRC: Developing New Funding
Schemes, London.
http://rsrch.co/1UQIjMW
25 WBF: The Future for Biometric
Data and Technology in the UK,
London.
http://rsrch.co/1LeFGzQ
  • WHEF: Extending the Global
Reach of UK Universities –
Policy Priorities, London
http://rsrch.co/1MOMiX9
March
  1 WHEF: The Future for the
Catapult Network, London
http://rsrch.co/1LhAUG8
  • EPSRC: Council Meeting,
London. To 2.
http://rsrch.co/1G7t0IJ
10 WHEF: The Changing Shape of
Higher Education Admissions
and Next Steps for Policy on
Widening Participation, London. http://rsrch.co/1BlQVaO

UK to increase research
collaboration with China
The UK government has announced a plethora of deals
to boost collaboration with China in areas such as
research, higher education and intellectual property. The
announcements, made during Chinese president Xi Jinping's
state visit to Britain between 20 and 24 October, encompass
more than £2 billion of commitments in healthcare and
life sciences, including a joint £9-million fund to support
research on antimicrobial resistance and the creation of a
£32m UK-China technology fund.
Charity launches £100m cancer challenges fund
Cancer Research UK has launched a £100-million
Grand Challenges Award fund that offers international,
multidisciplinary teams the chance to win up to £20m
in funding for up to five years. CRUK says the fund is the
“biggest and most ambitious” cancer grant scheme in the
world. Teams must include a patient advocate and have a
strong link to the UK, where 25 per cent of the grant must
be spent.
ERC maps uneven distribution
An analysis of European Research Council awards under
Framework 7 has shown that 80 per cent of grants went to the
50 wealthiest regions—mapped using the NUTS classification
system—over the seven-year period. The three highest
performing regions were Île-de-France (encompassing the
Parisian metropolitan area), inner London and East Anglia.
Innovate UK to simplify funding schemes
Innovate UK is planning to simplify its funding schemes,
according to chief executive Ruth McKernan. Speaking at
an event on 16 October, she said that there were plans to
streamline and improve access to its schemes and that a
formal announcement would be made at the Innovate UK
conference in November.
EPSRC announces £32m for grand challenge winners
The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council has
awarded a total of £21 million to seven research programmes
that it says will help solve some of the UK’s major science
and engineering challenges. The award winners, announced
on 16 October, will also share an extra £11m from industry.
Ideas for global food security sought
The cross-council Global Food Security programme is seeking
applications from postdoctoral researchers to take part in its
Policy Lab workshop on sustainable nutrition. The workshop,
is to be held on 20-22 January 2016 and participants will
produce an evidence-based report on novel interdisciplinary
ideas in the field.
Digital Catapult seeks researchers in residence
Research Councils UK is inviting applications for its
researchers in residence programme at the Digital Catapult
Centre in London. The appointments form part of RCUK’s
Digital Economy Theme, and include junior residencies
for early-career researchers and senior residencies for
exceptional researchers.

  europe  21

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

europe

Universities caught up in data ruling
National ICT organisations are warning European universities of a need to review their data-processing
arrangements, following a ruling by the Court of Justice
of the European Union.
On 6 October, the court ruled that the so-called safeharbour agreement between the EU and the United
States was invalid, following a legal challenge by
Austrian student Max Schrems against the use of his data
by Facebook. The safe-harbour provision was previously
used to allow companies to transfer data to the US, but
the court ruled that the agreement didn’t sufficiently
protect against US authorities accessing personal data.
According to Surf, the Dutch ICT organisation for higher education and research, the ruling is “highly relevant”
to its members because most universities make “intensive
use” of US computing services. These include services to
store or process student, staff and research data.
Andrew Cormack, chief regulatory adviser for the UK’s
higher education ICT agency Jisc, is concerned but cautions universities not to panic. “Where institutions have
made outsourcing or cloud-computing arrangements
involving the storage or processing of personal data outside Europe, they will need to review their agreements
to ensure individuals’ rights still have adequate protection,” he says (see also View, page 23).

europe
in brief

Plan to link research and
structural funding
The European Commission has
launched the Seal of Excellence
label to help funders identify high-quality Horizon 2020
proposals that fail to receive funding. This should help
regional funders identify innovative projects and decide
whether to support them themselves using, for example,
European Structural and Investment Funds, it said.
Social sciences goals unmet
More than a quarter of Horizon 2020 projects flagged as
having a significant social sciences or humanities component have so far failed to integrate those disciplines
into the work, a report by the European Commission
has found. However, the report also said that social sciences or humanities researchers received “satisfactory”
funding in the first year of Horizon 2020: under the societal challenges and industrial leadership programmes,
€236 million (£170m) of the €1.1 billion awarded so far.
Consultation site opens
The European Commission has launched an online platform to gather views on science policy. Digital4Science
allows anyone interested in research and innovation to
share their opinion on how the EU supports science with
researchers and policymakers, the Commission said.

by Craig Nicholson

cnnews@ResearchResearch.com

Stephan Appt, an IT specialist at law firm Pinsent
Masons, says the ruling has implications for any organisation that uses cloud computing provided by US
companies. The effect of the ruling is that European
organisations are now legally required to stop transferring data under safe-harbour principles, and to ensure
that no further processing of data transferred under the
agreement takes place in the US, Appt says.
On 16 October, an EU advisory body on the processing of personal data called the Article 29 Data Protection
Working Party met to discuss the implications of the
ruling. The advisory body said that EU member states
and institutions should come up with a legislative solution with US authorities within three months. This could
include the negotiations for a new safe-harbour agreement that were underway before the court’s ruling, the
advisory body said.
It also said that it would analyse the impact of the
ruling on other agreements under which data can be
transferred to the US—so-called model clauses. These
cannot prevent US authorities accessing the data, and
several German regional data protection authorities
have cast doubt on their adequacy.
EU and US to share observation data
The European Commission has agreed to share data from
the Copernicus Earth observation programme with US
government agencies including NASA. The agreement
will also help to improve validation and quality control,
and increase satellite system compatibility. The data are
relevant to climate-change research, ocean and atmospheric monitoring and land-use management.
Japan joins antimicrobial initiative
The Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development
has signed up to the Joint Programming Initiative on
Antimicrobial Resistance, which seeks to pool national
funding and R&D strategies against antimicrobial resistance. Six other non-EU countries including Argentina,
Canada, Israel and Turkey have already signed up,
together with 15 EU member states.
OECD bemoans low public spending
The OECD has called on national governments to increase
support for R&D, after its annual assessment found
below-par average investment around the world. In a
statement to accompany its Science, Technology and
Industry Scoreboard 2015, the OECD said average public
spending stood at less than 0.7 per cent of GDP, and that
further investment was needed to help develop technology and solve societal challenges.

22  view

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

v i e w f r o m t h e t o p    s t e p h e n w o r d s w o r t h

Syrian academics need help to
return, not only to flee
Almost every day, TV news bulletins show the hundreds
of thousands of Syrians trekking across Europe, seeking a safe place to settle. Faced with such distress, the
natural reaction is to look for ways to help. But do we
also risk encouraging the most able to leave permanently, depriving their country of talent that will be needed
when reconstruction becomes possible?
This question was brought into focus by the
recent announcement of the European Commission’s
Science4Refugees initiative for asylum-seeking and
refugee scientists and researchers. Scientific institutions would declare themselves as “refugee-welcoming
organisations”, and offer positions, internships or training. Carlos Moedas, the research, science and innovation
commissioner, said the programme would help the EU
gain a “huge diversity of new insight for our research, science and innovation”, by providing “opportunities for a
vastly talented but greatly underprivileged community”.
At first sight it is hard to fault such an approach, particularly when many governments are being hesitant or
worse with their welcome. But on closer examination,
things are not so clear.
The League of European Research Universities’ press
release on Science4Refugees makes clear that applicants will have to “compete for employment on the same
basis as non-refugee applicants”, and “follow national
employment law, including rules on residence, visas and
work permits, when applying for a job”. All of which raises questions about how many people will benefit from
this scheme, however good its original intentions, and
the effect on the countries that they leave.
There is another way. For more than 80 years the UK
charity the Council for At-Risk Academics has worked
to support university teachers and researchers forced
out of their posts by discrimination, persecution, violence and conflict. Most of
those whom Cara supports today—about
140 researchers, with a total of 200
dependants—are Syrians, most of whom
contacted Cara from Syria or from the
surrounding countries.
Their urgent need to escape cries out
from their messages: “Our books and
research were burned and laptops taken.
Our colleges became our prisons and torture chambers…we lost some of our best
lecturers, killed by ISIS”; “I have never
felt so helpless and hopeless as when I
imagine my educational future being

‘The aim is
to support
those who do
not want to
abandon their
home country
but rather to
rebuild it.’

destroyed before my very eyes”; “Three colleagues were
kidnapped, one of them the dean of the business faculty; my last memory of him was watching helplessly as he
was kidnapped in the middle of the university car park”.
Despite witnessing such horrors, however, the defining characteristic of Cara’s most recent beneficiaries is
that they are not refugees, and do not want to be seen
as such. Indeed, their views led Cara to change its name
last year, from Refugee Academics to At-Risk Academics.
These academics feel an obligation to return home as
soon as they can. For now, they are looking for university places here so they can improve their qualifications,
develop their skills and continue their work until that
day comes.
Cara, the only organisation of its kind in Europe, acts
as the intermediary. The universities that it works with—
110 in the UK, and a growing number in Europe, Canada
and Australia—contribute generously through fee waivers and other support.
The results speak for themselves. More than 90 per
cent of the Iraqi academics who Cara supported in recent
years did not stay abroad, but instead went home to take
up positions.
Cara also runs regional programmes, targeted at academics trying to stay on despite the risks. Its recent Iraq
programme, run through an office in Amman, Jordan,
linked Iraqi academics still in the country with those in
the surrounding region, as well as with academics in the
UK to carry out research projects. The outputs of the projects were passed to Iraq’s policymakers and planners.
Cara is drawing on this experience to plan how best to
help Syrian academics still in Syria and the region. Again,
the aim will be to support those who do not want to abandon their home country but to prepare to rebuild it.
The flow of applications continues. Cara receives new
enquiries almost every day and has a backlog of more
than 100 researchers who urgently need help. Many
universities and research institutes are coming forward
with further offers of support, and Cara is stepping up its
fundraising efforts. In the end, so much comes down to
money: for travel, for visas, for medical care, and all the
other daily costs of living. More is always needed. But it
is a vital investment—not just in the people, but in the
long-term future of their region.
More to say? Email comment@ResearchResearch.com
Stephen Wordsworth is executive director of the Council
for At-Risk Academics (www.cara1933.org).

  view  23

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

a n d r e w c o r m a c k    v i e w f r o m t h e t o p

End of safe-harbour data rule
needn’t lead to panic
The Court of Justice of the European Union invalidated
the safe-harbour data-protection agreement between
the EU and the United States on 6 October.
Safe harbour meant that US companies could selfcertify that they would comply with EU regulations on
data protection. Now, as with most other countries outside Europe, the transfer of personal data to the US is
forbidden unless there are protections in the form of
contracts or technical arrangements.
The decision has been described as a threat to transatlantic business. It has also caused alarm at some UK
universities, which are likely to export personal data
to the US for collaborative research or teaching, and to
overseas data service providers.
The court’s decision, however, is far from a disaster.
The change is most likely to affect American commercial
services that process personal data through, for example, outsourcing or cloud-computing arrangements.
Transfers to US universities, government-funded and
not-for-profit organisations should be unaffected, as the
rule on safe harbour never applied to them.
Even so, scrapping the 15-year-old agreement is
a reminder for data controllers and service providers
to use multiple complementary mechanisms to protect data. Exporters can pass muster before the EU by
including suitable clauses in their contracts with those
receiving the data. Technical measures such as encryption or reducing the amount of data transferred also
contribute to protection.
UK organisations should spend the next few months
identifying, reviewing and if necessary updating activities involving the export of personal data. Universities,
colleges and research institutions that store or process
personal data outside Europe will need to review their
agreements to ensure individuals’ rights are protected.
This process need not be rushed. The UK regulator
has indicated that data exporters will be allowed a reasonable period to consider their arrangements. With an
updated European Data Protection Regulation expected
in the next three years, the resulting inventories and
procedures should also be useful when planning future
activities involving transfers of personal data.
The UK’s higher education ICT agency Jisc recommends, and is itself using, a three-step response to
the judgment on safe harbour. First, identify activities
that involve transferring personal data out of Europe.
Second, consider whether they depend on safe harbour
Andrew Cormack is chief regulatory adviser at Jisc.

or whether individuals’ rights are protected by other
means. Third, agree improved protection for activities
where it is needed.
For several years, Jisc has been helping major providers of cloud-computing services offer service agreements
to users in education and research. Many of the resulting
contracts already include legal and technical provisions
in addition to safe harbour.
Contracts often include clauses from the EU’s model
contract, which is a good standard for protection.
Technical measures include using European data centres, which are protected by EU law and enforcement,
with temporary exports only occurring as and when
needed, for example to handle support calls. Such provisions should allow organisations using these contracts
to provide protection for the data they export, in accordance with the UK information commissioner’s guidance.
Jisc is also encouraging service providers to review
their arrangements to make sure that the end of safe
harbour does not hinder their ability to work with UK
research and education organisations. Holding bulk
data in European centres will give reassurance, as will
the use of EU model clauses. It is encouraging that many
major service providers are already planning to offer
these and other measures.
The court’s decision provides one more example of
how cloud services continue to be influenced by legislation, regulations, technical development and evolving
best practice around the globe. It demonstrates why
organisations need to remain knowledgeable in these
areas to make safe use of the opportunities inherent in
using cloud services.
The cloud-services team at Jisc takes the leading role in
drawing together expertise and knowledge and brokering
cloud services in research and education. If institutions are concerned
about what this latest development
means for them, we encourage them
to contact us at cloud@jisc.ac.uk.
Given an appropriate response, the
judgment on safe harbour may turn
out to be an opportunity to make sure
that the information we handle is
protected by a suite of measures that
reinforce one another. The loss or
failure of any one precaution should
not create a data-protection disaster.
Something to add? Email comment@
ResearchResearch.com

‘Institutions must
consider whether
they depend on
safe harbour or
if individuals’
rights are
protected by
other means.’

24  view

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

v i e w f r o m t h e t o p    j a c k s t i l g o e

From Agent Orange to GM crops:
scientific responsibility in flux
In November 1974, Lord Lucan disappeared, Killer Queen
failed to topple David Essex from the top of the British
charts and the UN’s science and education agency Unesco
adopted a statement on the status of scientific researchers.
Since then the document has ossified, but now countries are submitting recommendations for its revision.
As they do so they are prompted to ask questions about
scientific freedom and responsibility that have, like
much else from the 1970s, fallen out of fashion.
The original document was a product of its time, coloured by the surrounding geopolitics. Recognition of the
responsibilities of scientists was growing. Experiments
could no longer be contained behind laboratory doors.
In Alamogordo, Nuremberg, Tuskegee, the jungles of
Vietnam and beyond, the power of technology and the
urgent need for ethical restraint had been announced to
the world. Postwar technological optimism was losing its
sheen and Unesco was forced to recognise what it called
the “cases where the results of scientific research are
used against mankind’s vital interests in order to prepare wars involving destruction on a massive scale”.
The 1974 Unesco recommendation reflects an overriding concern with the dual use of science—the potential
to produce technologies with the power to both help and
harm. In the early 1970s, for example, the use of Agent
Orange in Vietnam and the proliferation of nuclear warheads had stolen the innocence of scientists searching
for benign weedkillers and cheap energy.
Scientists recognised that science could be pressed into
military service, as it had been since Archimedes. They
sought to assert their freedoms from state interference and
their responsibilities towards society. During the Cold War,
national and international movements for social responsibility in science sprang up in the wake of the Pugwash
Conferences on Science and World Affairs, an organisation
that was awarded the Nobel peace prize in 1995.
Taking responsibility for science is
not straightforward, however. Its implications are profoundly uncertain and
scientists need to collaborate with outsiders to anticipate consequences.
Priorities change over time, influenced
by scientific possibilities and political
events. In 1974, the world had not yet
woken up to climate change, and it was
the big, expensive projects in physics
rather than those in biology that were the
source of potent technologies.
Four months after the Unesco docu-

‘It is not clear
what role
science plays
in asymmetric
battles with
terrorists and
hackers.’

ment was published, scientists famously attempted to
take responsibility for a field whose ramifications would
turn out to be world-changing. When the first genetic
engineers met at Asilomar, California, in early 1975, their
concerns centred on the possible dual uses of recombinant DNA.While trying to contain their excitement at
the scientific possibilities, researchers concentrated on
the possibility of accidental release of pathogens as the
major issue of public interest. They were less good at predicting the politics of biotechnology, even though the
first companies were just around the corner.
As well as the growth of the biotech industry and the
intensification of relationships between public and private science, much has changed in and around science
since the mid-1970s. More people are doing science, in
more places, in more ways. As Soviet science has waned,
Chinese and Indian scientists are starting to challenge
US and European leadership.
The threats to global security are harder to predict
and it is not clear what role science plays in asymmetric
battles with terrorists, hackers and so on. Technologies
become ever more potent, but the division between
supposedly good and bad uses is not so clear. Science
remains tangled up in a web of politics, but 21st-century
geopolitics are more ambiguous than those of the 1970s
and technologies are not so easily connected to the
strategies of ministers.
The science policy scholar Caroline Wagner has argued
that the age of techno-nationalism is dead and that scientists worldwide now form a “new invisible college”.
This global network of researchers is largely unregulated
and may be largely ungovernable from the top down. And
yet science is not a well-defined profession like law or
medicine, with professional oaths and codes of conduct.
Given this, the need for scientists to govern themselves responsibly, to foresee problems before they
become irreversible, to speak up against political manipulation and to reshape science in the public interest is
perhaps stronger than ever. Individual scientists may
feel powerless to make a difference. This makes collective activities such as those organised by Unesco all the
more important.
More to say? Email comment@ResearchResearch.com
Jack Stilgoe is a senior lecturer in science and technology
studies at University College London. He was part of an
expert group advising the UK National Commission for
Unesco on the revision of the Recommendation on the
Status of Scientific Researchers.

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

  analysis   25

analysis

All change in Ottawa
The end of Stephen Harper’s government has brought both relief and wariness to
Canada’s labs. Brian Owens looks at his successor’s plans for science.
Canada’s scientists have got their wish. Stephen Harper’s
Conservative government was roundly defeated in the
federal election last week, ending nearly 10 years in
power. In that decade, Harper managed to alienate and
infuriate the country’s research community, to the point
that in 2012 they took to the streets to protest against
what they called the “death of evidence”.
The list of grievances is long. Harper’s administration
cut funding for dozens of environmental research programmes, including the world-renowned Experimental
Lakes Area; fired thousands of government scientists and
placed harsh restrictions on how the rest could talk about
their work; closed government research libraries, with
some of their contents ending up in the trash; cancelled
the mandatory long-form national census, losing the valuable extra data it offered researchers; and transformed
the National Research Council from a world-leading basic
research organisation into—in the government’s own
words—a “concierge service” for business, leaving dozens of research teams idle and demoralised.
Academic research in Canada’s universities fared
a little better, with programmes such as the 10-year,
$1.5-billion Canada First Research Excellence Fund. But
most of the new money was earmarked for applied work,
and required an industrial collaborator or co-funder.
University researchers said that government pressure
led them to self-censor when discussing results that
might go against government policy.
After nearly 10 years of that, researchers, and much of
the rest of the country, were ready to get behind anybody
who promised to make things better. Both the centreleft Liberal Party and the left-wing New Democratic
Party promised just that. Late in the campaign, voters
coalesced around the Liberals, led by Justin Trudeau,
propelling them from third place to a majority in the
House of Commons and knocking the NDP down to third.
Science advocates rejoiced in the end of the Harper
era and in the Liberal leader’s promise to treat science
and evidence with more respect in policy-making. But
many researchers were probably hoping for an NDP or
Liberal minority government, forcing the two parties to
cooperate and perhaps come up with still more progressive science policies. The NDP had the more ambitious
agenda on science and the environment, but as the
anti-Harper vote stampeded to the Liberals, several
Brian Owens is editor of Research Professional in Canada.

prominent New Democrats lost their seats, including
Megan Leslie, the party’s deputy leader and most
respected environment spokeswoman.
That’s not to say the Liberal platform is poor on science. It promises to reinstate the long-form census;
reverse many of the cuts to ocean science and environmental monitoring programmes; re-appoint a chief
science officer; and do more to fight climate change. The
long-form census could be back as soon as next year.
The Liberals also plan to encourage scientists to speak
freely about their work, with Marc Garneau, a former
astronaut and Liberal MP, saying that the muzzling of
federal scientists would end immediately.
The other Liberal promises are more vague. The job
description of the chief science officer is to make sure
“that government science is fully available to the public, that scientists are able to speak freely about their
work, and that scientific analyses are considered when
the government makes decisions”. It’s not entirely clear,
though, what powers will come with the position.
Ideally, the post might be something like the chief
scientist of Quebec, held at the moment by Rémi
Quirion. Quirion advises the government on evidencebased policies and also chairs a committee of the heads
of three research-funding agencies in the province, and
can influence their strategic direction.
On the balance of research funding, there is little
to suggest that the Liberals will dramatically tip the
scales towards blue-sky research. They have promised
to restore funding to long-term data-gathering programmes, such as the Experimental Lakes Programme.
But they too are preoccupied with improving Canada’s
anaemic record in innovation as a route to economic
growth. They plan to tackle this through German-style
innovation centres, probably modelled on
the Fraunhofer Institutes, and possibly a
version of the popular US Small Business
Innovative Research programme.
The culture change between the two
governments alone was enough to trigger a huge sigh of relief in labs across the
country last week, but researchers are only
cautiously optimistic about the new government. They will be keeping a close eye
on whether it lives up to their expectations.
Something to add? Email comment@
ResearchResearch.com

‘The
Liberal leader
promised to
treat science
and evidence
with more
respect.’

26  interesting if true

Research Fortnight, 28 October 2015

interesting if true
H ard to swallow At a House of Commons Business,
Innovation and Skills Committee hearing on the productivity plan, Ruth McKernan, chief executive of
Innovate UK, told MPs the plan was “very rich”. Perhaps
less impressed with the plan, Iain Wright, Labour MP
and chairman of the committee, replied: “Is it too rich?
Does it give you indigestion?” To which a straight-faced
McKernan responded: “No, not at all actually.”
Premature party? The Economic and Social Research
Council is the latest of the seven to launch a 50th
anniversary celebration, but your ever-pedantic correspondent notes that this is something of an early party.
Back in 1965, the moniker ESRC was merely an apple
in the government’s eye: instead it founded the Social
Science Research Council. The ESRC technically didn’t
exist until 1983, when efforts to save the SSRC saw it add
more empirical research to its remit. But who can blame
the powers that be for wanting to launch the 50th party
now? The way things look at the moment, there might
not be an ESRC to celebrate if they wait until 2033.
Royal problems Rumour has it that some learned societies are struggling to arrange meetings with the
Northern Irish education minister and Sinn Féin MLA
John O’Dowd. We wonder if their royal charters aren’t

having an effect on the staunch republican—hopefully the Royal Society of Biology managed to sneak in a
meeting before it gained its charter.
R esearch search Great news for lazy journalists this
week, as it emerged that researchers at Columbia and
Stanford universities are working to develop a tool that
compares recent research papers with old ones. The team
says that the so-called Science Surveyor will help journalists identify whether a supposedly “new” discovery
is as novel as it claims, without missing their deadlines. But the project won’t be finished anytime soon:
according to Columbia journalism professor Marguerite
Holloway, “It’s a many-year project.” Looks like reporters will have to keep picking up the phone to check the
relevance of their stories, then.
Something fishy The BBSRC’s quest for its research to
generate impact plumbed new depths this week when it
released a statement saying that prawns had “revealed
the secrets of innovation”. Apparently a University of
Exeter study showed that “small and hungry prawns are
more likely to be resourceful in the face of adversity”,
successfully locating hidden food faster than their
bigger and less hungry counterparts. The secret to innovation? Desperation, apparently.

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