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Asylum rules

Safeguarding the possibility for fleeing people to seek a safe refuge in Sweden is an important and integral
part of the work for human rights. People who need and seek protection must know that they are welcome
here, in accordance with Swedish laws and the conventions to which Sweden is a signatory.

Asylum seekers
Asylum seekers are those who come to Sweden and apply for protection (asylum) here, but who have not yet had their
application assessed.

Grounds for Asylum


Sweden has signed the UN Refugee Convention. That means that Sweden will examine every asylum application that is
received. Sweden must provide asylum a residence permit to you if you are a refugee according to the Convention
or otherwise need protection. Sweden is also under the common rules of the EU.
It is important that all asylum seekers are heard, and that their asylum applications are examined individually. The
individual examination includes consideration to gender, i.e. having a gender perspective and taking into account LGBT
issues.
Refugee status
According to the Refugee Convention, Swedish law and the EU rules, you are a refugee if you have good reasons to be
afraid of attacks or persecution because of:

race;
nationality;
religious or political beliefs;
sex;
sexual orientation; or
belonging to a certain social group.
Persecution could come from the authorities in your home country, or it could also be that the authorities cannot or will
not protect you from persecution from individual people or groups of people.
The Refugee Convention is included in Swedish law together with rules for the declaration of refugee status. Refugee
status declaration is an international concept based on the UN Refugee Convention and EU rules.
Even if you are not a refugee, you might still have the right to be given a residence permit because you need protection.
As a person needing protection, you can get a residence permit as aperson eligible for subsidiary protection or a person
otherwise in need of protection.

Subsidiary protection status declaration


If you are in danger of:

being punished by death;


being punished physically, tortured or exposed to other inhuman or
humiliating treatment or punishment; or
as a civilian, being hurt because of armed conflict;
then the law states that you are eligible for subsidiary protection.
Subsidiary protection status is internationally recognised and is based on EU rules.

Other reasons
Status declaration as a person otherwise in need of protection
If you need protection because:

of external or internal armed conflict or because of other severe tension in your home country;
of well-grounded fear of being subjected to serious abuse; or

you cannot return to your home country because of natural disaster;


then the law states that you are a person otherwise in need of protection.
Status declaration as a person otherwise in need of protection is a Swedish concept that applies only in Sweden.

Residence permit
A person who is given a status declaration as a refugee or a person eligible for subsidiary protection or a person
otherwise in need of protection will be granted a permanent residence permit or a temporary residence permit that is
valid for at least three years. In exceptional cases the validity is limited, but the permit is never granted for a period less
than one year.

The Dublin Regulation


The Dublin Regulation applies in the EU's Member States and in Norway and Iceland. The Dublin regulation helps
countries regulate which country will be responsible for the asylum case. This means that an asylum seeker does not
have the right to choose the country to examine and analyse his/her reasons for asylum.

Asylum seeking children


The Aliens Act states that the Migration Board must pay particular attention to the interests of children. All children, that
are able and willing, have the right to be heard. Children's grounds for asylum should be tried separately - a child may
have different grounds for asylum than his or her parents have. When a child's grounds for asylum are tried the case
officer will, to the greatest extent possible, adapt the investigation to fit the child's age, health and other circumstances.
The child has the right to have an adult present during the interviews. This adult can be a parent, a legal guardian,
custodian and/or a public council.

Page updated: 2011-07-29

From asylum application to decision


Every year people come to Sweden in order to seek asylum. The Swedish Migration Board investigates each application
individually and on an equal footing regardless of country of origin, religion, economic or social background. The Aliens
Act governs who may remain and who is to be refused entry.
How do we determine whether an asylum seeker should stay or not? What does an asylum seeker do when dissatisfied
with the decision?

At the border
The police are responsible for border inspection in Sweden and make sure that travellers have the right to enter the
country, for example, that they have valid passports.
In many cases, travellers may cross the border into Sweden without inspection. This is because Sweden, as well as most
other countries within the EU, have subscribed to the Schengen agreement. All people that have the right to reside in a
country that is part of the Schengen region can travel freely across borders to other Schengen countries.
At borders with countries outside the Schengen region, however, traveller documents are checked carefully.
If a person seeks asylum at the border, the police hand the matter over to the Swedish Migration Board.

Seeking asylum
Most people seek asylum after they have entered the country. They contact one of the Swedish Migration Board's
application units directly in Stockholm (Solna and Mrsta), Gteborg and Malm.
The asylum seeker must say who he* is and explain his travel arrangements to Sweden. He must also give fingerprints.

Initially the Board considers whether it is Sweden or another country that is responsible for the asylum investigation.
If the person is to have an application for asylum examined in Sweden, the person must explain why he needs asylum in
Sweden. The asylum seeker is given help with an interpreter and legal assistance from a public counsel if necessary.
During the waiting period, the Swedish Migration Board offers the applicant somewhere to stay. The asylum seeker can
also choose to organise his own accommodation, such as at friends or relatives.
* Most asylum-seekers in Sweden are men and this is the case in this example.

Decision
Refusal of entry with immediate enforcement
If it is clear that the asylum seeker does not need protection, nor has other reasons to remain in the country, he is
expelled from Sweden immediately. This is called "refusal of entry with immediate enforcement" and is relevant if the
asylum seeker clearly has no grounds for seeking asylum. Such a decision must be made within three months of the
application date.
The asylum seeker may appeal against the Swedish Migration Board decision, but he is not entitled to remain in Sweden
and await the outcome of the appeal.
An asylum seeker can also be refused entry immediately if he was in another country where he was protected against
persecution before coming to Sweden. The asylum seeker is then returned to this country, and any further investigation
is not normally necessary. Otherwise, the examination of the asylum case will continue.

Examination
The legal assistance is free of charge for the asylum seeker. The counsel works exclusively for the asylum seeker and
looks out for his interests.
When the Swedish Migration Board has received a complete application from the applicant, we summon a meeting with
the applicant and counsel. Following the meeting where any uncertainties can be sorted out the Board decides on
the asylum case. It is the Swedish Aliens Act that governs who may be granted a residence permit.

Decision
Residence permit
If the asylum seeker needs protection or should be allowed to stay as a result of particularly distressing circumstances,
he is granted a residence permit in Sweden. As a rule, this is permanent and means that he has a right to stay in Sweden
as long as he wants. In some cases, the Swedish Migration Board may also grant a temporary permit.
When a person has been granted permission to remain in Sweden, he is given a residence permit card. The card is proof
of his residence permit.
Refusal
If the asylum seeker is not in need of protection or has no other reasons to remain in Sweden, the Swedish Migration
Board takes a decision on refusal of entry. He can then accept the decision and return home or to another country that is
willing to accept him.
However, the vast majority of people who are refused by the Swedish Migration Board appeal against the decision. This
means a continued wait.

Appeal
An appeal is sent first to the Swedish Migration Board who re-examines the decision. If the Board stands by its rejection
decision, the appeal will be passed on to the Migration Court at one of the administrative courts in Stockholm, Gteborg
or Malm.
The Court may invite the applicant together with his public counsel and the Swedish Migration Board to an oral hearing.
The Migration Court makes a decision on the appeal either by confirming or changing the decision of the Swedish
Migration Board.
There is the option of appealing the decision of the Migration Court at the Migration Court of Appeal at the Administrative

Court in Stockholm. However, the Migration Court of Appeal only examines in principle important cases and only after
having granted leave to appeal.

Decision
Residence permit
If the Migration Court or Migration Court of Appeal changes the Board's decision, the Swedish Migration Board will issue a
residence permit.
Refusal
If the Migration Court and, in certain cases the Migration Court of Appeal , considers that the asylum seeker has no need
of protection, nor has any other reasons to remain in the country, the Court will reject the appeal.
The person who has been refused entry must now leave Sweden. The Swedish Migration Board staff can assist with the
preparations for departure.
If the person who has been refused entry or been deported refuses to leave voluntarily, it becomes the responsibility of
the police to ensure that he leaves.
Impediments to enforcement
Where new circumstances emerge following a final decision on refusal of entry or deportation, the Swedish Migration
Board will re-examine whether there are any impediments to enforcement. The Board can do so on its own initiative or
after the person concerned has presented evidence.
If the impediments are medical or practical, it is the assessment of the Swedish Migration Board that applies and the
decision of the Board cannot be challenged. If the impediments, on the other hand, include new reasons for protection,
the rejection decision from the Board can go to appeal at a Migration Court.

Page updated: 2009-12-02

Examining your asylum application


In Sweden, it is the Swedish Migration Board that examines your application for asylum. The rules for who is
entitled to asylum are written in the UN Refugee Convention and in Swedish law (the Aliens
Act,utlnningslagen).

Submit an application
You should apply for asylum at Sweden's border. If you have already entered Sweden, you may apply at one of the
Swedish Migration Board's application units located in Gvle, Gteborg, Malm, Mrsta, Norrkping and Stockholm.
Initially, the Board determines whether it is Sweden that should examine your asylum application or whether you came
from another country which has a primary obligation to do this. If it is clear that you lack grounds for asylum, the
Migration Board can make a quick decision in the case; for example, you may be the citizen of another EU Member
State.
You will be asked to come to several meetings at the Migration Board when you first come to Sweden. It is important
that you come to all appointments which have been booked for you.

The asylum investigation


Nobody knows more than you do about why you left your country. So it is important that you right away tell us
everything that happened to you in your country. The Swedish Migration Board can then make a proper assessment of
whether or not you have grounds for asylum.
The Swedish Migration Board will ask you questions about your identity. You should bring your passport or other
identification documents with you. The documents must show your name, where you were born and your nationality. You
need to tell us why you are seeking asylum and what has happened to you. Some things are hard to talk about, but they
could be especially important. If you need to, you can ask for a break during the investigation. You can bring with you to
the investigation things that support your story or information about your country.

Fingerprints
Countries in the EU, as well as Iceland, Norway and Switzerland, have a fingerprint database called Eurodac. It is the
Swedish Migration Board that looks after this database in Sweden. If you are over the age of 14 you will be fingerprinted
and your fingerprints checked against the database to see if you have applied for asylum in any of the other countries
that use the database.
The Swedish Migration Board will also check your fingerprints against another database called the Schengen Information
System, or SIS. SIS holds information about people who are wanted criminals etc.
Legal assistance
Most asylum seekers are allowed to have legal assistance. This is called your right to public counsel. Usually, a trained
lawyer will look out for your interests and help you to explain your grounds. The Swedish Migration Board will choose a
counsel for you, but you can also suggest someone whom you trust. The Migration Board will pay for the public counsel.
The counsel works independently of the Swedish Migration Board and other public authorities.
If you do not have the right to public counsel, you can choose to pay for and hire your own counsel.
Translation
An interpreter translates for you when you are in contact with the Migration Board. The interpreter is neutral and will
translate only what is said. The interpreter is not allowed to let his or her own private, political or religious beliefs
become involved. Neither is the translator permitted to speak of what he or she has heard during your investigation. If
you do not understand the interpreter, it is important that you say so.

How long does it take to reach a decision?


The Migration Board's goal is to reach a decision within three months. If you cant show proof of your identity, or your
grounds for asylum, it may take longer to investigate your case. It may also, on occasion, take longer if there has been
an unusual inflow of asylum applications recently.

The Migration Board examines each application individually


Each application is examined individually and if you have grounds which, according to the Aliens Act, entitle you to
asylum or protection, the Migration Board will grant you a residence permit. If you have no grounds for asylum or
protection, we look at whether there are any other grounds for you being able to stay in Sweden, e.g. family ties or
particularly distressing circumstances.

Show who you are and prove your identity


If you are seeking asylum, you must tell the Migration Board who you are. It is your responsibility to show
proof of your identity. How well you do this may have long-term repercussions for you, in such varied
contexts as when you wish to obtain a Swedish ID card, open a bank account, apply for citizenship and a
Swedish passport or become entitled to a pension.
The best way to make clear your identity is to produce documents which prove your name, where you were born and
what citizenship you hold. The documents must also contain a photograph and be issued by an authorized authority.
If you are unable to supply such documents directly, do what you can to produce these documents or explain why you
cannot do this.
During the waiting period, you must endeavour to clarify your identity until it is confirmed. You will do this in conjunction
with your case officer. If you do not participate in establishing your identity, the Migration Board may reduce your daily
allowance. The Migration Board also has the right to retain your identity document while waiting for your decision.

Clear identity important for many reasons


It is important for you that you do all you can to establish your identity because:

If you cannot show who you are and from which country you come, it may be difficult for the Swedish Migration
Board to assess whether or not you are entitled to asylum
You will receive a more rapid decision regarding your asylum application if your identity has been established
You have the possibility to work in Sweden while you are waiting for your decision. You may have an exemption
from the obligation to hold a work permit (AT-UND)

If you should become severely ill or meet with an accident in Sweden, the Swedish Migration Board must be
aware of your true identity in order to be able to contact your close relatives
You will be able to return home if you receive a negative decision
It will make it easier to obtain Swedish identification documents if you are granted a residence permit;
You need it to open a bank account
You avoid having a note in any aliens passport or travel document stating that your identity is not established
which may make it difficult to travel to other countries
You avoid the risk that any residence permit you receive may be canceled if it becomes known that you
submitted incorrect information regarding your identity
A possible reunion with your family will be made more difficult if you present yourself under a false identity
Your chance of become a Swedish citizen in the future may be hindered or delayed if you do not have proof of
your identity.

You cannot choose which country examines your application (the


Dublin Regulation)
You do not have the right to choose which country will investigate and examine your application for asylum.
The Member States of the EU, along with Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland, are governed by
the Dublin Regulation.
The Dublin Regulation determines which country will be responsible for your asylum case. You may only have your
asylum application examined by one of these countries.

Which country will examine your application for asylum?


Even if you have applied for asylum in Sweden and wish to have your application examined here, it is still not certain that
you are entitled to do so. Another country covered by the Dublin Regulation may be responsible for examining your
application. You may therefore have to travel to that country.
This may be the case, for example, if:

you have received a visa or residence permit from another country governed by the Dublin Regulation
you have illegally entered a country governed by the Dublin Regulation
you have already applied for asylum in another country governed by the Dublin Regulation.

If your family already has residence permits in another EU Member State, it may mean that your application for asylum
will be examined in the same country.

Database comparison of fingerprints


If you are over the age of 14 you will be fingerprinted and your fingerprints checked against the database Eurodac to see
if you have applied for asylum in any of the other countries that use the database. You can find out what is written in
the database and you may ask the Migration Board to correct any mistakes. A Swedish authority called the Swedish Data
Inspection Board (Datainspektionen) supervises the storage of personal information in computer registers.

If another country is to examine your application for asylum


If it appears that another EU Member State is responsible for examining your application for asylum, the Migration Board
generally decides to send you there. If you do not agree to leave Sweden voluntarily, we have the right to compel you to
do so.

Appealing a decision
If you do not accept that another country should examine your grounds for asylum, you have the right to appeal the
decision to the Migration Court. The appeal must be received by the Migration Board within 21 days, calculated from the
date on which you were notified of the decision. Note that it is the country in which your application is to be examined
that is reviewed during the appeal process and not your grounds for asylum. You must still leave Sweden during the
appeals process.

Theses countries are covered by...


...the Dublin Regulation

The EU countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany,
Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia,
Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom. Norway, Iceland and Switzerland are covered by the Dublin Regulation
through special agreements.
...Eurodac
All EU countries are linked to the electronic data-base Eurodac. Iceland, Norway and Switzerland are covered by Eurodac
through special agreements.

If you are allowed to stay


These pages provide information for those people who have sought asylum and been granted a residence
permit in Sweden.

Permanent residence permits


If you receive a permanent residence permit, it means that you are allowed to live and work under the same
conditions as every other Swedish resident. You can travel in and out of the country, but when you leave
Sweden, you must have a valid passport document and residence permit card to be able to come back again.
Your permanent residence permit is valid as long as you live in Sweden. You will receive a residence permit card. The
card is proof of your permanent residence permit. It is not an ID card or a travel document. When you enter Sweden,
you must therefore show your card along with a valid passport. The card is valid for five years. When you apply for a new
card, you will need to visit one of the Swedish Migration Boards Permit Units in order to be fingerprinted and
photographed again.

Registering with the authorities


When you have been given permanent residence, you must immediately register with the tax office. It is important that
you register before you are discharged from the Swedish Migration Board.
The tax authorities record where you live, your marital status, your nationality and place of birth. When you have been
registered with the tax authorities, you can also register with the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (Frskringskassan),
so that you can benefit from the Swedish social security system. National registration is also needed so that you can get
a Swedish identification document, which you will need to access money paid into a bank.

Living in Sweden
You may move to wherever you like in the country. However, it is very difficult to get accommodation, especially in the
big cities. You often need to have work or a regular income.
If you cannot find work or a place to live, the Swedish Public Employment Service (Arbetsfrmedlingen) can help you. A
plan ("etableringsplan", or introduction plan) will be made for you so that you can support yourself as soon as possible.
Right after receiving your residence permit, you will meet Arbetsfrmedlingen to talk about your skills, previous work
experience, goals, interests and talents. If you have any certificates and references from work you have had before, you
should bring them to your meeting with Arbetsfrmedlingen. If you are entitled to an introduction plan, you can be given
an allowance if you follow it.
The rules for settlement change depending on if you have stayed in accommodation offered by the Swedish Migration
Board or if you have arranged your own place to stay during the waiting period.

If you are staying in an accommodation centre


If the place you are staying in is provided by the Swedish Migration Board, you have to move out as soon as possible
after being given your residence permit.
If you cannot find a place to live, Arbetsfrmedlingen can help you. Together you will discuss what conditions apply for
you to settle in a municipality. You cannot choose which municipality to move to, but if you do want to live in a certain
town, you have a better chance of moving there if you can show that you can find work there.
On the day that you can move into your new home, you will be discharged from the Swedish Migration Board. If you are
not happy with your new home, you will have to find something else yourself.

If you have your own accommodation


If you have been living with family or friends in their home during the waiting period, you will remain there. You will be
discharged from the Swedish Migration Board one month after you receive your residence permit. Shortly after you
receive your permit, Arbetsfrmedlingen will invite you to a meeting, which may lead to an introduction plan being made
for you.
If you are not able to stay at the same address as before, you can either look for a new place to live on your own, or
Arbetsfrmedlingen can help you. They can help you find a home up to six months after you received your residence
permit. If you are in urgent need of a place to live and are still registered with the Swedish Migration Board, we can
provide you with a temporary place to stay in an accommodation centre. If you are no longer registered with the
Migration Board, you should talk to your local municipal authorities.
Not everyone can have an introduction plan
Not everyone who receives a residence permit has the right to have an introduction plan made for them. You will not get
a plan if you:

have full-time work;


are studying at high school (gymnasiet);
are older than 65; or
are disabled or so ill that your are not able to work at all.

Residence permits can be withdrawn


Your permanent residence permit can be withdrawn if you move away from Sweden. It can also be withdrawn if you
have:

provided a false identity;


committed a crime; or
deliberately left information out or given false information. For this to apply, the information must be relevant to your
residence permit.
Your residence permit can be withdrawn even if you have had it for years.

Practical advice
When looking for a place to live
Some municipalities have municipal housing offices. They can help you find somewhere to live in both municipal and
privately-owned properties. There are also private housing offices. Many local authorities have a list of all property
owners in the municipality. You can find their telephone number in the green pages of the telephone catalogue or on the
internet.
Housing, social support and school for children

The local authorities where you live provide child care and schooling for children. If you have been assigned to a
municipality, they will also provide housing and other social support. The local authorities will arrange for you to learn the
Swedish language and will also give you information about how society works. You can find more information on the
municipality's web site.
Home equipment loan

If you are 18 years old or older, you can apply for a loan to buy things you need for your home. Ask Arbetsfrmedlingen
to help you with your application when you meet them.

Protection status
Sweden has ratified the UN Declaration on Refugees and incorporated it into the Swedish Aliens Act. This
convention gives refugees the right to a legal declaration which proves their status. Furthermore, since 1
January 2010 Sweden has amended the Aliens Act to fulfill the requirements of the EU's Qualifications
Directive. Everyone who is granted a residence permit based on grounds of protection is now given the right
to a status declaration.

Refugee status declaration


A person who, according to Swedish law, is considered a refugee is granted refugee status declaration. This is an
international status declaration based on both the Geneva Convention and the EUs Qualifications Directive.

Subsidiary protection status declaration


A person who, according to Swedish law, is considered eligible for subsidiary protection will be granted a subsidiary
protection status declaration. This is an international status declaration based on the provisions in the EUs Qualifications
Directive.

Status declaration as a person otherwise in need of protection


A person who, according to Swedish law, is considered otherwise in need of protection will be granted a status
declaration as a person otherwise in need of protection. This is a Swedish status declaration which is only valid in Sweden

Retroactive application
A person who has been granted a residence permit in Sweden, but who has not been granted status declaration, can at
any time apply for a status declaration. This also applies to persons who have been granted a status declaration, but who
want to have a subsidiary protection status declaration or a refugee status declaration.
You can apply for a status declaration by filling out the form "Application for status declaration", form no 158011 (this
form is only available in Swedish.

Withdrawal of status declaration


A persons status declaration can be withdrawn, for example if this person is no longer in need of protection. It is,
however, required that the circumstances which led to the person receiving a certain protection status declaration are no
longer valid, or have changed in a substantial and permanent way.
A withdrawal of a status declaration does not necessarily affect a persons residence permit.

Appeal
A status declaration can be appealed separately from the decision regarding a residence permit. This means that a
person who is granted a residence permit but who has not been given a status declaration, can appeal the status
declaration decision.

Travel grant for family members trip to Sweden


If you have been granted a residence permit as a refugee in accordance with the Geneva Convention of 1951
you may apply for a travel grant to cover the expenses of your family members trip to Sweden. Please note
that you are not eligible for the grant if you are a Swedish citizen or if you or your family members can pay
for the trip yourselves.
The grant can be approved for family members whom you have lived with outside of Sweden, an who are;

your wife, husband, registered partner or common-law spouse


your children (if they are unmarried and under the age of 20)
your parents and siblings (if you are under the age of 18)
Your family members must have been granted Swedish residence permits and hold valid passports before you can apply
for the grant.
The travel grant normally consists of one airplane ticket per person, from the country where your family members are
situated, to Sweden.

Application

You can apply for the travel grant on the form number 4452, see link to the right on this web page (the form is only
available in Swedish). Submit you application by mail to Migrationsverket, 601 70 Norrkping.
Practical assistance
The refugee reception, civic offices or immigrant services bureau in your minicipality can help you to fill out the form.
The Swedish Migration Board will consider your application. If your application for a travel grant the Migration Board will
provide for your family member's travel arrangements and let you know when they will arrive in Sweden.
Can not be appealed
You can not appeal against the Migration Board's decision to refuse your application for a travel grant.

Page updated: 2011-07-19

Alien's passport
If you need a passport and you are unable to acquire one, the Swedish Migration Board can issue you with
an alien's passport in exceptional cases. With an alien's passport you can travel to all countries. The only
exception is that you can not travel to your home country if you got a residence permit on grounds of
protection. In that case you can travel to all countries except your home country. However, the country you
plan to travel to may require an entry visa for citizens from certain countries.
An alien's passport satisfies EU passport requirements. This means that it has a computer chip to store the holder's
personal details, fingerprints and a passport photograph.

Requirements for obtaining an alien's passport


In order to obtain an alien's passport, it must be the case that you are unable to obtain a passport from your country of
origin. In most cases it is not reason enough that it is difficult, expensive or takes too long time to obtain a passport
from your country of origin.
You can in principle always get an alien's passport if you got a residence permit on grounds of protection.
A person under 18 must, in most cases, have parental or guardian consent to obtain an alien's passport.

Application for an alien's passport


You apply for an alien's passport by completing the formApplication for alien's passport and temporary alien's passport,
no. 157011. Submit your application in person to one of the Swedish Migration Board permit units. You do not need to
book in advance. Note that the Permit Unit in Solna has other routines.

Make sure your application is complete


Our chances of quickly processing your case increase if your application is complete and you have enclosed all the
necessary documentation.
Enclose the following documents with your application:

any passport issued previously.


other documents confirming your identity.
possible proof of a permanent residence permit.
consent of the parents/guardians when the application is for a child under the age of 18 years.

The Swedish Migration Board will take your photograph and fingerprints when you submit your application.

Application fee

Most people have to pay an application fee; see page on fees.

Waiting time
From the date on which the Swedish Migration Board has granted your application it normally takes one to two weeks to
produce an alien's passport.
When you collect your passport
Please note that you must collect your alien's passport in person. If you are under 18, your parents/guardians can collect
your passport, without you being present. If you have turned 15, you can collect the passport yourself if the custodian
admits it and it is noted when you submit the application. When you collect the passport you need to show an approved
identification.

Passport period of validity


An alien's passport is valid for five years and cannot be extended. If you want to extend your residence permit and have
not obtained another passport, you should apply for a new alien's passport at the same time.
Information from criminal records
It should be noted that the Swedish Migration Board will obtain information from the police criminal records when your
application for an alien's passport is being considered.

Temporary alien's passport


You can obtain a provisional (temporary) alien's passport in cases where it is not possible to issue a normal
alien's passport or you cannot use the one you have.
You must check that the temporary alien's passport is accepted in the countries you plan to travel through and/or to. The
passport must be returned to the Swedish Migration Board after your journey. The Swedish Migration Board then
destroys the returned temporary alien's passport.

Requirements for obtaining a temporary alien's passport


A temporary alien's passport can for example be approved:

For a foreign citizen who lives in Sweden and has no possibility of applying for a country of origin passport or
other acceptable travel document in Sweden should be able to apply for a passport abroad. A temporary alien's
passport is only issued if there is a travel plan that shows "when, where and how" a country of origin passport is
to be obtained outside Sweden.
For a foreign citizen without a passport who lives in Sweden so he or she immediately will be able to travel
abroad for a humanitarian urgent purpose.
For a foreign citizen currently outside his/her country of origin who may be granted a residence permit for
reasons of family ties but has no passport documents that are acceptable in Sweden to be able to travel here.
The same applies when a foreign citizen in the same situation is refused a passport by the authorities in his/her
country of origin for reasons that are, in our opinion, unacceptable.
For a foreign citizen with a residence permit in Sweden who is currently abroad, although not in his/her country
of origin, that has lost an alien's passport or travel document and who needs a travel document for the return
journey to Sweden.
For a foreign citizen without a residence permit who voluntarily wants to return to his/her country of origin.
For a foreign citizen who does not get an alien's passport or travel document due to the misuse of a previously
issued document for traveling or a serious crime but who needs to make an urgent journey.

Application for a temporary alien's passport


Application in Sweden
You can apply for a temporary alien's passport by completing the form Application for alien's passport and temporary
alien's passport, no 157011. You can submit your application in person to one of the Swedish Migration Board's permit
units. You do not need to book in advance. Note that the Permit Unit in Solna has other routines.

Application abroad
You can apply at a mission abroad by completing the form Application for alien's passport and temporary alien's
passport, no 157011. The mission abroad will send the application to the Swedish Migration Board for a decision. The
Swedish Migration Board's decision is notified to the mission abroad.
Make sure your application is complete
Our chances of quickly processing your case increase if your application is complete and you have enclosed all the
necessary documentation.
Enclose the following documents with your application:

any passport issued previously.


other documents confirming your identity.
possible proof of a permanent residence permit.
consent of the parents/guardians when the application is for a child under the age of 18 years.

Application fee
Most people have to pay an application fee; see page on fees.

Passport period of validity


A temporary alien's passport is in most cases valid for a maximum of seven months. It can be for a single journey to or
from Sweden or for a journey in both directions.
Information from criminal records
It should be noted that the Swedish Migration Board will obtain information from the police criminal records when your
application for an alien's passport is being considered.

Travel documents
If you have been recognised as a refugee under the 1951 Geneva Convention, or if you are applying for
refugee status, you can apply to the Swedish Migration Board for a travel document. Persons who are
stateless and meet the requirements of the 1954 New York Convention can apply for another type of travel
document.
Under the 1951 Geneva Convention, a travel document will allow you to travel to all countries except your country of
origin or the country from where you have fled. This limitation will be entered in to the travel document.
The travel document satisfies EU passport requirements. This means that it has a computer chip to store the holder's
personal details, fingerprints and a passport photograph.

Requirements for obtaining a travel document


In order to obtain a travel document you must be:

recognised as a refugee in accordance with the 1951 Geneva Convention, or are applying to be one

stateless and meet the requirements of the 1954 New York Convention. A declaration of refugee status is not
required here.

or

Your husband or wife and your children under the age of 18 can under certain circumstances also receive a travel
document if they have a permanent residence permit in Sweden. A person under the age of 18 must normally have the
consent of his/her parents or guardians to acquire a travel document.

Application for a travel document


You apply for a travel document by completing the formApplication for travel document, no. 109021.
You can hand in an application in person at any of the Swedish Migration Board permit units. You do not need to book in
advance. Note that the Permit Unit in Solna has other routines.
The Swedish Migration Board will obtain information from the police criminal records when your application for a travel
document is being considered.
Make sure your application is complete
Our chances of quickly processing your case increase if your application is complete and you have enclosed all the
necessary documentation:

any passport issued previously


other documents confirming your identity
possible proof of a permanent residence permit
consent of the parents/guardians when the application is for a child under the age of 18.

The Swedish Migration Board will take your photograph and fingerprints when you submit your application.
Application fee
If the Swedish Migration Board grants your application for a travel document you must pay SEK 400 when you collect
it.

Waiting time
From the date on which the Swedish Migration Board has granted your application it normally takes one to two weeks to
produce a travel document.

When you collect your passport


Please note that you must collect your travel document in person. If you are under 18, your parents/guardians can
collect your passport, without you being present. If you have turned 15, you can collect the passport yourself if the
custodian admits it and it is noted when you submit the application. When you collect the passport you need to show an
approved identification.
Travel document period of validity
A travel document is valid for a maximum of five years and cannot be extended.

Page updated: 2009-12-01

If you are refused by the Swedish Migration Board


A decision to reject your application for asylum means that you are not entitled to a residence permit in
Sweden. You have the right to declare acceptance or appeal against the decision, but you should plan for
your return even if you appeal.
If your decision states that you are to be deported withimmediate enforcement special rules apply. You will find the
rules for immediate enforcement on a separate page, see link to the left.

Declaration of acceptance
You can notify the Swedish Migration Board that you accept the rejection decision (you declare acceptance). You cannot
then appeal the decision. If you have already lodged an appeal, the declaration of acceptance means that your appeal
case is withdrawn. You cannot withdraw a declaration of acceptance.

Appealing the decision


If you believe that the rejection decision is incorrect, you may appeal. If you have a public counsel, you may receive
assistance. The appeal must be received by the Swedish Migration Board within 21 days from the date on which you were
notified of the decision.
If you appeal, the Swedish Migration Board will review your case once again. If the Board upholds its decision, the appeal
will be forwarded to the Migration Court at one of the three administrative courts, in either Stockholm, Gteborg or
Malm. Which one will depend on the asylum unit that rejected your application. The Migration Court can either change
or confirm the Board's decision.
From the date the Migration Court received your appeal, you must contact the Court if you any question relating to your
application for asylum and the judicial proceedings. As a rule you have a public counsel for assistance.

What does the rejection decision mean?


When the decision comes into force, you must leave Sweden. This means that you cannot appeal against the decision. A
decision comes into force if you:

have declared acceptance, that is to say accepted the decision


have not appealed within the stipulated time
have withdrawn your appeal or when the Migration Court or the Migration Court of Appeal has confirmed the
Swedish Migration Board decision.

If you received a decision on refusal of entry you must leave the country within two weeks. If you received a decision on
deportation, you must leave the country within four weeks. A decision on refusal of entry or deportation normally applies
for four years unless otherwise stated in the decision. If you come back to Sweden within this period, the decision to
refuse entry or deport may be re-enforced. You will not be enrolled at the Swedish Migration Board and you will not be
subject to the Act on Reception of Asylum Seekers.
You must return to your country of origin or the country you have arrived from. If you have been living in another
country that provided you with protection or where you could have applied for protection before you came to Sweden,
you may be returned to that country. This country is then responsible for your application for asylum.
You are responsible for leaving the country within two and four weeks respectively. If necessary, you must also produce
travel documents and plan for your journey. The Swedish Migration Board provides practical support to facilitate your
journey as long as you are taking part in the preparations for your return.
If you return by air, airlines have special rules for luggage. The Swedish Migration Board staff can provide information on
how much luggage you may take with you before you depart. You must pay for any excess weight.

You are entitled to work


If you have been working while you have been an asylum-seeker and had an AT-und. (exemption from the obligation to
have a work permit) you can continue to work until you leave Sweden. However, your AT-und will be withdrawn if you do
not cooperate with the Migration Board regarding your return journey.
If your decision on refusal of entry or deportation has come into force you may apply for a work permit. For more
information, please read under the headin Working in Sweden - For people wanting to work in Sweden - Applying in
Sweden - Asylum seekers, or contact your handeling officer.

You must return your LMA card


If you hold an LMA card, you are entitled to emergency healthcare and financial compensation until the day you leave
Sweden. This also applies to children, who moreover, have the right to both education and healthcare.
Before you leave the country, you must return your LMA card. You must also return your debit card if you previously
received financial compensation from the Swedish Migration Board.

If you do not cooperate

It is your own conduct that determines the procedure for leaving Sweden. If the Swedish Migration Board considers that
you are not cooperating with your return following your rejection decision, the Swedish Migration Board is entitled to:

reduce any daily allowances


if we assess there is a risk that you will make yourself unavailable, we have the right to place you under
supervision or put you into detention (see fact box below)
if you do not cooperate in leaving Sweden, or make yourself unavailable so that it is impossible to execute (to
practically implement) the decision to leave, the Swedish Migration Board hands the case over to the police. The
police have the right to issue a description and search for you. The police also have the right to use force in
order to make you leave the country. If your case is forwarded to the police, your return journey is always made
with the police's help.

Supervision and detention


Supervision means you are obliged to regularly report at the times and at the place you have received information of,
and that you must relinquish your passport or other identity papers. You may also need to satisfy other special
conditions.
If you are placed in detention this means your freedom of movement is restricted to a detention unit (secured unit). The
Swedish Migration Board is responsible for the detention facilities. Children may be placed in detention if the Board does
not believe that it is sufficient that the child is placed under supervision. The requirements for placing children in
detention are significantly more stringent than for adults. A child without a guardian in Sweden may only be placed in
detention if there are serious reasons involved.

Page updated: 2011-07-25

If you are refused by the Migration Court and the Migration Court of
Appeal
The rejection decision by the Migration Court or the Migration Court of Appeal means that you do not have
the right to a residence permit in Sweden.

What does the Court's rejection decision mean?


When the decision of the Swedish Migration Board to refuse entry or deport is adopted after a judicial review, this means
that the decision comes into force and you have to leave Sweden.
If you have received a decision from the Swedish Migration Board on refusal of entry, you must leave Sweden within two
weeks, and if you have been given a decision on deportation, you must leave Sweden within four weeks. You must travel
to your country of origin, if you cannot show that a third country will accept you, or the country you have arrived from.
The rejection decision normally applies for four years after the decision has come into force. If you come back to Sweden
within this period, the decision to refuse entry or deport may be re-enforced.
You are responsible for leaving the country yourself and where necessary, produce travel documents and plan for your
journey. The Swedish Migration Board provides practical support as long as you are cooperative.
If you return by air, airlines have special rules for luggage. The Swedish Migration Board staff can provide information on
how much luggage you may take with you. You must pay for any excess weight.

You are entitled to work


If you have been working while you have been an asylum-seeker and had an AT-und. (exemption from the obligation to
have a work permit) you can continue to work until you leave Sweden. However, your AT-und will be withdrawn if you do
not cooperate with the Migration Board regarding your return journey.
If your decision on refusal of entry or deportation has come into force you may apply for a work permit. For more
information, please read under the headin Working in Sweden - For people wanting to work in Sweden - Applying in
Sweden - Asylum seekers, or contact your handeling officer.

You must return your LMA card


If you hold an LMA card, you are entitled to emergency healthcare and financial compensation until the day you leave
Sweden. This also applies to children, who moreover, have the right to both education and healthcare.
Before you leave the country, you must return your LMA card. You must also return your debit card if you previously
received financial compensation from the Swedish Migration Board.

If you do not cooperate


It is your own conduct that determines the procedure for leaving Sweden. If the Swedish Migration Board considers that
you are not cooperating with your return following your rejection decision, the Swedish Migration Board is entitled to:

reduce any daily allowances.


if we assess there is a risk that you will make yourself unavailable, we have the right to place you under supervision or
put you into detention (see fact box)
if you do not cooperate in leaving Sweden, or make yourself unavailable so that it is impossible to execute (to
practically implement) the decision to leave, the Swedish Migration Board hands the case over to the police. The police
have the right to issue a description and search for you. The police also have the right to use force in order to make
you leave the country. If your case is forwarded to the police, your return journey is always made with the police's
help.

Supervision and detention

Supervision means you are obliged to regularly report at the times and at the place you have received information of,
and that you must relinquish your passport or other identity papers. You may also need to satisfy other special
conditions.
If you are placed in detention this means your freedom of movement is restricted to a detention unit (secured unit). The
Swedish Migration Board is responsible for the detention facilities. Children may be placed in detention if the Board does
not believe that it is sufficient that the child is placed under supervision. The requirements for placing children in
detention are significantly more stringent than for adults. A child without a guardian in Sweden may only be placed in
detention if there are serious reasons involved.

Page updated: 2011-07-25

New events after decision


You shall leave Sweden within four weeks after being informed of a final decision that you cannot stay here.
A final decision means you cannot appeal the decision further. In exceptional cases, something may happen
that means you do not have to return home even though the final decision states you must. In this case, we
receive new information after you have received your decision. This is what the Migration Board calls
considering if there are impediments to enforcement.
Examples of factors/situations which may lead to the previous decision being amended or changed are:

the political conditions in your country of origin have changed and this means you cannot return
you have a life-threatening illness and are unable to receive care in your country of origin
you will be forced to live apart from your close relatives/family for an extended period of time
your country of origin does not permit you to return there.

The Migration Board cannot change your decision merely because you are anxious about the return journey, or have
social or financial problems at home.

The Migration Board observes impediments


The Migration Board shall observe the presence of impediments to your return home. The Board may decide to cancel or
suspend your return home. The police also have a duty to report any impediments to the Migration Board.

You may write to the Migration Board


You may write to the Migration Board if you wish the Board to consider new reasons/factors that might prevent your
return home.
In the letter you must write:

your case number


new reasons/factors and why you cannot return home
your address.

You must sign the letter with your name. Please also send any documents that may support or provide evidence for what
you write about in your letter, preferably original copies. Write preferably in English or Swedish so that you may receive
a quicker response.

Decision
You will receive your decision by letter.
Page updated: 2011-02-18

The Migration Board will offer you accommodation


The Migration Board will offer you temporary accommodation while you wait for the outcome of your asylum
case. This means that you must move to the location where the Board has a place available. You may also
choose to arrange your own accommodation, for example with friends or relatives.
The majority of the temporary accommodation provided by the Migration Board is in normal blocks of flats on average
housing estates in medium and small towns across Sweden. If you are single, you must be prepared to share the flat
with other single asylum seekers.

Written housing rules


You are personally responsible for cooking, cleaning, care and maintenance of the flat and the same housing rules apply
to you as to other tenants in the building. Should you deliberately damage the flat, you may be liable to pay for the
repairs when you move.
To ensure that you do not become liable to pay for old damage which may have been caused by the previous guest, it is
important that you report any damage or defects as soon as you discover them.
You will receive information on how the flat should be looked after when you move in and when you have read it, you will
have to confirm in writing that you have received the information.

Do not forget to change address


You are always registered with a Reception Unit. Irrespective of whether you choose accommodation provided in one of
the Migration Boards rented flats (ABO) or your own accommodation (EBO) with someone you know, you will be
registered with a Reception Unit. The Reception Unit must always know your address so that the Migration Board can
contact you.
Should you move during the waiting period, do not forget to inform your Reception Unit of your new address.

Working while you are an asylum seeker


It is preferable that you support yourself during the period in which you are waiting for your application to
be processed. You can do this either by living off your own savings or by working. Below you will find
information on the conditions which apply to working while an asylum seeker.
To have the right to work while you are an asylum seeker, you must have a certificate exempting you from the obligation
to have a work permit (AT-UND).

Conditions which must be fulfilled in order to work while an asylum seeker


You will be entitled to an AT-UND exemption from the obligation to hold a work permit if:

You have established your identity by means of identification documents. This means that you need to present
documents showing what your name is, when you were born and of which country you are a citizen. The
document should also contain a photograph and be issued by a competent authority. Even if you do not have any
identification documents, you can obtain an AT-UND if you help the Migration Board to establish your identity as
far as possible.
Your case is to be considered in Sweden. Read more about the Dublin Regulation and consideration in the first
country. More information on the Dublin Regulation
Your application is well-founded. This means you must have valid reasons to have your application considered
and grounds for seeking asylum.

Should you fulfil these conditions, you will receive an LMA card on which it states that you have an AT-UND this means
that you are exempt from the requirement to have a work permit. An AT-UND is normally valid until you are granted a
residence permit or leave Sweden.
If you receive an AT-UND, you may use the Swedish Public Employment Service (Arbetsfrmedlingen) in your
municipality to find job vacancies.
You can find job vacancies and other information atwww.arbetsformedlingen.se .

Working while you seek asylum


If you work during the time you are seeking asylum,

you must demonstrate to your employer that you are exempt from the obligation to have a work permit (ATUND). The proof can be found on your LMA card under point 7.
using a standard form which can be found by following the link on the right, your employer must notify the
Reception Unit where you are registered that you have found employment and when this employment ends.

If you receive a daily allowance, you must always notify the Migration Board of your income.
You must contact the Swedish Tax Agency to obtain a coordination number. You will need this to show that you have
been working and paying tax during your asylum period if you subsequently wish to apply for a work permit. You will also
require a coordination number in order to be able to receive sickness benefit if you become sick and are unable to work.

LMA card
Asylum Seeker Card
When you apply for asylum in Sweden, you are given a receipt. A few days later, you will receive a card called LMAkort or the Asylum Seeker Card. The card shows that you are an asylum seeker and that you have the right to stay in the
country whilst you are waiting for the reply. If you show your card when visiting a health-care centre, the fee you have
to pay will be smaller.
Even though the LMA card has the same format and, to some extent, the same contents as an identity card (ID), it is not
an ID card. It simply confirms that you have been registered in the Migration Board's reception system under the name
stated on the card.
You must give your card back if you receive a residence permit or if you have to leave Sweden.
Page updated: 2011-07-18

Housing and financial assistance


The Swedish Migration Board offers temporary accommodation during the waiting period. You can also
arrange your own accommodation with relatives or friends for example (own accommodation). Regardless
of the type of accommodation you choose you must be available if the Migration Board needs to contact you.

Housing offered by the Migration Board


Housing offered by the Migration Board (centre accommodation) is either in an apartment in a normal housing area or at
a centre. If you choose to live at a centre you will need to move to a town where we can offer you a place.
If you have money of your own you pay for the accommodation yourself. If you do not have any money the centre
accommodation is free. Single persons will need to share a room. A family can have its own room but must expect to
share an apartment with other people. It could be that you need to move around within the centre or to another centre
during the processing period.
If you are granted a residence permit, and are entitled to an introduction plan, the Public Employment Service can in
connection with your introduction interview, help you to get housing in a municipality.
If you are granted a residence permit on the basis of employment, you must arrange your own housing.

Own accommodation
If you choose to arrange somewhere to live yourself you will as a rule be personally responsible for the cost of the
accommodation. If for any reason you cannot remain living in accommodation you have arranged yourself, you can move
to one of the Migration Boards centres where there is a place. Contact the reception unit where you are registered for
further information.
If you have arranged accommodation yourself and you are granted a residence permit you are regarded as being a
resident there one month from the date on which you receive the permit decision. If you would like help to find
somewhere to live other than the place you had during the investigation period, you must first move within the same
period of time to centre accommodation.

Economy
Allowance
If you can not find work or if you for some reason do not have money, you can apply for daily allowance. At reception
centres where food is provided free of charge, the daily allowance is:

SEK 24 per day for single adults


SEK 19 per person per day for adults sharing accommodation
SEK 12 per day for a child up to and including the age of 17 years. (From the third child onwards the allowance
is halved.)

The daily allowance, which should be enough to buy food, is as follows:

SEK
SEK
SEK
SEK
SEK

71
61
37
43
50

per
per
per
per
per

day for single adults


person per day for adults sharing accommodation
day for children up to the age of three years
day for children aged 4-10 years
day for children aged 11-17 years. (From the third child onwards the allowance is halved.)

Apart from food, the daily allowance should be sufficient to pay for: clothes and shoes, medical care and medicine, dental
care, toiletries, other consumables and leisure activities.
If you are granted a daily allowance by the Migration Board you will receive a bank card where the money is deposited.
For further information contact a case officer at the Migration Board.
Housing allowance
If you have been offered or have received a job you can apply for a housing allowance. This applies if the period of
employment is longer than three months and you need to move to a town where the Migration Board does not have any
accommodation.
The housing allowance is:

SEK 850 per month for families


SEK 350 per month for single persons.

Conditions for payment


You must report how much money you have with you and your other assets. If you find a job, both you and your
employer are required to notify the Migration Board. You shall also notify the Migration Board if your financial situation
should change during the processing period if you find a job for example.
It is important that you report your financial situation and changes in your financial situation
otherwise you could be found guilty of fraud.
The daily allowance may be reduced if, for example:

you do not co-operate to prove your identity


you make the asylum application investigation more difficult, for example by not informing the Migration Board
of your current address
you do not come to an investigation meeting when you are summoned
you do not assist in returning if you have been refused entry or if you are to be expelled.

Right of appeal
If you feel that the Migration Board has made an incorrect decision about your daily allowance you are entitled to appeal.
Your appeal must be submitted to the Migration Board within 21 days of the date on which you were informed of the
decision.
If the Migration Board does not change its decision the case will be handed over to the county administrative court, which
will examine the Migration Board's decision.
If you lose your bank card
If you lose your bank card or if it is stolen you must block the card immediately.
Notify ICA Banken by phone on 033-435 98 29, in Swedish or English only. You must give your card number, serial number or dossier
number.

Report it to the police.


Take the police report to the Migration Board unit where you are registered in order to get a new card.
Remember that you must block your card and make a police report in order for the Migration Board to give you a new card.
Page updated: 2011-09-01

Your right to health and medical care


County councils are authorities that are responsible for district health centres (vrdcentralen), hospitals and
the National Dental Service (Folktandvrden). The numbers for the various county councils are listed in the
blue pages of the phone book and at: www.skl.se.
If you are sick or injured, go to your district health centre first. If the centre is closed, go to the nearest hospital. If its a
serious emergency and you need an ambulance, dial 112.

Adults rights to health and medical care


You have the right to a free medical examination. The nursing staff will take laboratory tests and answer any questions
you may have. You are entitled to emergency or urgent medical and dental care. Your local county council decides on
what kind of care that includes.
You are also entitled to gynaecological and prenatal care, as well as care in accordance with the Swedish Communicable
Diseases Act. Remember to show your asylum receipt or LMA card whenever you see a doctor or dentist, and whenever
you pick up a prescription drug.

Childrens right to health and medical care


Child and teenage asylum seekers under 18 are en-titled to the same health care as all others who live in Sweden. For
further information, get in touch with your district health center.

Fees for health and dental care


If you show your LMA card, you pay 50 kronor to see a doctor at the district health centre or to receive medical care after
obtaining a referral. Other medical care, such as with a nurse or physical therapist, costs 25 kronor per visit. You pay 40
kronor for a medical transportation. The fee for emergency care at a hospital varies from county to county.
You can receive compensation for any amount over 50 kronor. Take your receipt to the Migration Board and submit an
application for a special allowance as soon as possible after receiving emergency care. To obtain emergency dental care,
go to the National Dental Service or another dentist to which the county council has referred you. The fee for adults is 50
kronor. If you see a private physician or dentist to whom you have not been referred by the county council, you must
pay the entire fee yourself. The fee for children who seek medical care varies among county counties.

Medication
You can buy any medication you need at the nearest pharmacy. If you show your LMA card, you pay no more than 50
kronor for prescription drugs. That applies to children as well. Make sure to save both the cash register receipt and the
prescription receipt with your name on it.

The 400 kronor rule


If you have paid more than 400 kronor for doctors appointments, medical transportation and prescription drugs within
six months, you can apply for a special allowance. The Migration Board can compensate you for costs over 400 kronor. In
order to get money back, you should show receipts that can attest your costs from doctors appointments, medical
transportation and prescription drugs. Once you have paid over 400 kronor within six months, you should give your
receipts to the Migration Board reception unit. Then a new six-month period starts. The 400 kronor rule applies
individually for adults and common for siblings under 18. Remember that this rule covers only care at the district health
centre, medical transportation, prescription drugs and hospital care with a referral. Dental and emerg-ency hospital care
are not covered.
Page updated: 2011-03-03