BALI & BEYOND

VOLUME 12 NO. 120

THE SUN... THE SAND... THE SURF... THE CULTURE OF PARADISE AND OVER 18,000 SURROUNDING ISLANDS

MAY 2010

FAIR N’ SQUARE
SUNDA KELAPA THE PORT OF 1,000 LIVES

MAMASA TO TANA TORAJA on foot through Sulawesi’s traditional heartland

DAINTY DELIGHTS N’
A HEARTY “KAMPAI!”

COMPLIMENTARY

www.baliandbeyond.co.id

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NEW & NEWS • INFO INDEX • MAP OF BALI • CLASSIFIED COLUMNS
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teamtalk 05.10
MONTH OF MAY
‘Om Swastiastu...’ Welcome to the archipelago, welcome to Bali and to our May 2010 edition! We have been to a whole lotta Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) events within the preceding month, and still are as this edition goes to press. Really enjoyed the time going around with the representatives of the star hotels in the Nusa Dua and other areas to various places where they have implemented various forms of charities such as impoverished local family housing restorations, tree plantings and such. Well, it’s a good thing to know that the management is giving back to the local community - it all comes back to that sense of bearing, moral question and responsibility. Some of the highlights can be seen in our See & Seen page. We’ve packed in articles for you to enjoy this edition, starting off with an issue of fair trade in commemorating World Free Trade Day this month on May 8. The local fair trade organization, Mitra Bali, was established in 1993 in Ubud. Their motive was simple; for people to be able to buy a product that is free from exploitation - environmental and/or labor. Read about it in this edition’s Craft & Culture. In Pondering Point, the starting question is: “What lies ahead for Indonesia’s workforce, especially in the tourism industry after the signing of the ASEAN Tourism Agreement (ATA) in 2002 and the ASEAN Framework Agreement for the Integration of Priority Sectors (AFAS) back in 2004? Not many are aware of the agreement between the Southeast Asian countries, moreover the competency aspects of the island’s tourism industry workforce. We’ll try to highlight it here, along with a simple question and answer with the Head of the Cultural & Tourism Human Resources Development Office of the
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contributors

Indonesian Department of Culture & Tourism (Depbudpar), who also happens to be the Chairman of the AFAS Rundown Task Force. It’s a bit of Japanese in this month’s Invite & Indulge, as we invite you to the InterContinental Bali Resort’s KO Japanese restaurant that recently unveiled its newly refurbished Sushi Lounge & Bar with a brilliant cocktail selection and fabulous new design. For attractions to see should you opt to journey to the western part of the island, a visit to the regency of Tabanan will lead you along spans of rice paddies in Jatiluwih, have you adoring the colors of nature through the wings of exotic butterflies’ species, and soaking in the warmth of natural hot springs. It’s vast, vivid and verdant in this month’s Action & Attractions. Through Profile & Portrait, German artist Adi Bachmann shares his giving spirit as an artist. He shows that he is an inexhaustible artist and frequently exhibits his works. He feels that there are three things that he needs to support besides his own self, namely: society, art and his gallery. And in Beyond Bali we successfully grabbed hold of one of our most prolific writers, amidst his mountain climbing and multiple day treks on foot, to share with you his latest adventure. In Sulawesi, he happened to choose an off-beat route, one that would entail three days of walking through the mountains of the remote region of Mamasa, slipping into Tana Toraja through the back door. He made it. And after reading, you might want to ‘follow his footsteps’ perhaps? Capital Corner is bit of a historical take. In the midst of its race to advance, Jakarta still harbors a few historical places from the Dutch Colonial era. One of them is the old Sunda Kelapa Port, located at the mouth of the Ciliwung River in North Jakarta. Enjoy your adventures! And keep safe! ‘Om Shanti Shanti Shanti Om…’ The Team
Josua Alessandro loves to photograph human subjects, cultures and landscapes. His portfolio can be viewed at www.escapadepictures.com

Hary Subastian is MRA Media’s senior photographer and his portfolio spans Indonesia’s high-end fashion and lifestyle magazines.

Patricia Ivana loves writing, which also finances her travels. She loves the beach and wishes to go to all the beautiful beaches in the world. Don’t we all?

Tim Hannigan first came to Indonesia to surf the world class waves of Bali, but it was the potential for adventure on dry land that really got him hooked.

BALI & BEYOND
Deputy General Manager Managing Editor Editorial Assistant Editorial Advisors Graphic Advisor Graphic Designer GOESTAMAR ARDIBRATA goestamar@baliandbeyond.co.id NYOMAN ARI GUNADI eric@baliandbeyond.co.id NI LUH DIAN PURNIAWATI dian@baliandbeyond.co.id A.A. GEDE RAI, JOHN M. DANIELS WENIAR PRAMESTI PUTU PARTAJAYA putu@baliandbeyond.co.id MADE SUWARDANA suwardana@baliandbeyond.co.id Advertising & MarComm. Manager F&A Supervisor GA & Personnel Adm Distribution FANDY GUNAWAN A. fandy@baliandbeyond.co.id A.A. KETUT SUKERTI agung@baliandbeyond.co.id I GEDE ADARA adara@baliandbeyond.co.id NYOMAN TRI HARIAN SAPUTRA

Contributors JOSUA ALESSANDRO, HENNY DESTYARINI, TIM HANNIGAN, PATRICIA IVANA, HARY SUBASTIAN

Jakarta Marketing Services/Subscription Tel: (021) 315 2683/84, 391 0969 Publisher PT. BUMI DIAN KUSUMA Commissioner SOETIKNO SOEDARJO Director MAULANA INDRAGUNA SUTOWO Division Head MRA Printed Media INDRIATI WIRJANTO Printing PT. SUBUR JARINGAN CETAK TERPADU, JAKARTA OFFICE Bali White House - Jl. Dewi Sri No. 23 Block IV, Kuta 80361- Bali Tel: +62 361 8868601-2, Fax: +62 361 750075 E-mail:mag@baliandbeyond.co.id http://www.baliandbeyond.co.id Bali & Beyond Magazine is published monthly by PT. Bumi Dian Kusuma under the direction of MRA Media, Jakarta. Although every care is taken, neither the publishers nor any of their designees assume responsibility for the opinions and information expressed by editorial contributors. All material in this publication is copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without written permission of the publisher or author. All trademark and rights to Bali & Beyond are reserved by PT Bumi Dian Kusuma. Editorial materials may be submitted for consideration to the editorial office. Bali & Beyond is not responsible for the return of unsolicited material. © 2006 Bali & Beyond ISSN 0216-4590

Endorsed by

A member of

BALI GOVERNMENT TOURISM OFFICE Jl. S. Parman, Niti Mandala Renon, Denpasar Tel: (0361) 222 387, 226 313 Fax: (0361) 226 313

www. skal.org skalbali@dps.centrin.net.id

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THE SUN... THE SAND... THE SURF... THE CULTURE OF PARADISE AND OVER 18,000 SURROUNDING ISLANDS

May 2010 Volume 12 No. 120

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CRAFT&CULTURE FAIR N’ SQUARE The Fair Trade motive was simple; for people to be able to buy a product that is free from exploitation, environmental and/or labor.

BEYONDBALI MAMASA TO TANA TORAJA

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INVITE&INDULGE DAINTY DELIGHTS N’ A HEARTY “KAMPAI!” KO Japanese restaurant unveiled its newly refurbished Sushi Lounge & Bar.

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PHOTO BY NYOMAN ARI GUNADI

Our writer chooses an offbeat route; three days of walking through Sulawesi highlands and slipping into Tana Toraja through the back door.

PHOTO BY TIM HANNIGAN

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THE SUN... THE SAND... THE SURF... THE CULTURE OF PARADISE AND OVER 18,000 SURROUNDING ISLANDS

May 2010 Volume 12 No. 120

PROFILE&PORTRAIT

COVER
Plates Photo by Cristian Popescu/stock.xchng

SPIRIT OF SHARING

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36PONDERINGPOINT

STRIVING FOR SKILLS
What lies ahead for Indonesia’s workforce, especially in the tourism industry after the signing of the ASEAN Tourism Agreement (ATA) in 2002 and the ASEAN Framework Agreement for the Integration of Priority Sectors (AFAS) in 2004?

Adi Bachmann shows that he is an inexhaustible artist and frequently exhibits his works. He finds three things he needs to support, namely: society, art and his gallery.

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12 NEW&NEWS This month’s select news updates from the island’s tourism industry and what’s new around the island. 58 BEYONDUPDATES News updates from the tourism industry and what’s new beyond Bali. 62 COMMUNITYCALENDAR Schedules, calendar highlights and various happenings of interest, from art exhibitions to special events. 65 SEE&SEEN Snapshots of events and happenings within the preceding month. 70 BALIMAPS Map of Bali showing specific tourism areas and places of interest, as well as a distance scale between the island’s main destinations. 73 CLASSIFIEDCOLUMNS Listings and product descriptions from various clientele. 74 INFOINDEX Useful directory of companies and island-based businesses.

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CAPITALCORNER SUNDA KELAPA: PORT OF 1,000 LIVES
PHOTO BY HARY SUBASTIAN

In the midst of its race to advance, Jakarta still harbors a few historical places from the Dutch Colonial era. One of them: the old Sunda Kelapa Port.

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PHOTO BY JOSUA ALESSANDRO

40 ACTION&ATTRACTIONS VAST, VIVID AND VERDANT A visit to the regency of Tabanan will lead you along spans of rice paddies, have you adoring the colors of nature through the wings of exotic butterflies’ species, and soaking in the warmth of natural hot springs.

COURTESY PHOTO

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NEW&NEWS

YEARS OF SURF!
A 3-year sponsorship agreement was signed last month between Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia (CCAI) and the Indonesian Surfing Championships (ISC). After being the first non-surfing industry sponsor of a surfing tour in Indonesia starting in 2008 with a partial year sponsorship that continued through all of 2009, CCAI was very impressed with the performance of the ISC and the results they achieved, leading to a multi-year sponsorship beginning in 2010 and continuing through 2012. The symbolic signing took place with ISC CEO Tipi Jabrik and Bruce Waterfield of CCAI. Bruce Waterfield presented Coca-Cola surfboards to various surf event sponsors such as Tim Hawkins from Billabong shown here. www.isctour.com

HELPING SPIRIT
The Putera Sampoerna Foundation (PSF) “Save A Teen” project to build a school for Balinese students will be carried out in cooperation with The Patra Bali Resort & Villas, as an MOU was signed on April 22. The fundraising program’s goal is to provide financial support for junior high school students with high grades who don’t have the financial capacity to continue to senior high school. The Patra Bali will ask their guests to donate Rp. 10,000 to the program. www.sampoernafoundation.org

REEF N’ BARREL
Rusty presents its 7th Annual Rumble In Da Jungle surfing competition that will be held at Sanur’s Bangsal Beach over a waiting period through May 16. As the second stop on the Coca-Cola ISC tour, this six-star rated event has a prize pool of Rp 45 million up for grabs – but equally important is the opportunity for the surfers to build on their championship points. Fresh off a win at the ISC season opener at Canggu, Rusty team rider Made Awan is confident that he can carry his good form into this competition. The surfer who rides the ‘Best Barrel’ will also win a Rp 2 million prize. www.rustyindo.blogspot.com

SPA WELCOMES
Oberoi Hotels & Resorts Indonesia announces the appointment of Monica A. Witmer as its Assistant Spa Manager. Monica holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Hospitality Management from Ecole hôtelière de Lausanne in Switzerland. As part of her studies she completed a management internship at the Chiva-Som Health Resort in Thailand and at the Resense Spa in Switzerland. Monica is a devoted yoga student and a regular spa-goer – for her, Health & Wellness is not only a profession but a way of life! www.oberoihotels.com

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WALK AGAIN... FOR AWARENESS
Bali International Women’s Association (BIWA) together with Bali Tourism Development Centre (BTDC) and Bali’s Hotel Marketing & Public Relations Association (HHPB) present the 2nd Bali Pink Ribbon Walk for Breast Cancer Awareness in Bali. The 5km walk will start and finish at Nusa Peninsula Island and they expect over 1,000 participants from Bali, Jakarta and other cities in Indonesia as well as from overseas. The event will be held on Saturday, May 15 with registration opening at 2 p.m. The walk starts at 4 p.m. Besides the walk, the committee of the charity event are organizing a mini bazaar, silent auction, lucky draw, music and entertainment. Participation fee is Rp. 250,000 (US$ 25) for adults and Rp. 100,000 (US$ 10) for children aged 5-12 years – which includes ticket, snacks and a Bali Pink Ribbon Walk t-shirt. All proceeds will be used by the foundation to support breast cancer awareness activities and breast cancer treatment in Bali. For further information, call (0361) 286-564. www.balipinkribbon2010.com

LOUNGY TERRACE
Gabah Terrace Lounge is planned to launch on May 29. Gabah Restaurant & Bar introduces a fresh new lounge space created for those who enjoy watching the time go by while observing the city view from up high. The design of the lounge is in Balinese ethnic style and it is a real intimate venue for relaxing. It is open daily from 3 p.m. and offers a wide range of wine, cocktail and cigars from around the world. If you love jazz, Jazz Live will entertain you every Thursday and Sunday and the clear voices of Yadi and Ayu Handayani every Tuesday and Friday. Jazz time will be from 9 p.m. onwards. Gabah at Ramayana Resort & Spa, Jl. Bakung Sari, Kuta (0361) 751-864; www.ramayanahotel.com

FOR LOYALTY
Hotel Sanur Beach Bali introduces their new Restaurant Loyalty Program offering excellent value, dining experience and entertainment. Enjoy special privileges and discounts on food and beverages by becoming a member of the restaurant loyalty program. Members will enjoy a free meal at the food and beverage outlets after their 10th visit in any of the restaurants. Discover a perfect culinary experience at the Hotel Sanur Beach Bali, where all restaurants offer great views of the sea, beach and the resort’s marvelous gardens. Hotel Sanur Beach Bali, (0361) 288-011 www.sanurbeach.aerowisata.com

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MADE MANEUVER
In the final day of the Oakley Pro 2010 in early April, Made Awan scored the highest points for a single wave in the competition, 9 points out of 10 and defeated the ISC 2008 champ and WQS surfer from West Java; Dede Suryana, taking out the first event of the Coca Cola Indonesia Surfing Championship 2010. Made Awan received a prize of Rp. 10 million and gained 3,000 points toward the championship. He also received the Coca Cola Best Maneuver Award and an extra bonus of a million rupiah. www.isctour.com

DIP N’ DINE!
Bali Dynasty Resort, fresh from a recent multi-million dollar makeover with a complete renovation of three wings, an impressive new lobby, and two new restaurants. The resort now presents its new ‘come for lunch then stay for sunset’ program. Dip & Dine at the Golden Lotus Restaurant is featured every Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. and you can enjoy the largest variety Family Dim Sum Lunch in town as well as obtain free use of the swimming pool after lunch. The Sunday Buffet Lunch is Rp. 85,000 to indulge in the all you can eat promo. Bali Dynasty Resort, Jl Kartika, Tuban, South Kuta (0361) 752-403; www.balidynasty.com www.primeplazahotels.com

GOLDEN EATS GOLF N’ GRILL
The Patra Bali introduces its Golf & Grill program that invites golfers to taste its famous grilled lamb or sirloin steak and get free usage of the driving range with 50 balls and a golf club for only Rp 150,000. The program is offered at the resort’s Floating Lounge. Patra Bali Resort & Villas Jl. Ir. H. Juanda, South Kuta Beach (0361) 751-161, www.patrabali.com
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Grand Hyatt Bali’s Nampu Japanese Restaurant presents its Golden Week Special through May 8. Golden Week is an extremely popular time to travel for the Japanese, as it is the longest vacation period of the year in Japan, normally starting at the end of April to early May. The long vacation is caused by the vast amount of traditional celebrations held consecutively in Japan. The first is the birthday of the former emperor Showa (Showa-No-Hi or Showa Day) on April 29; the second is Kenpou-Kinen-Bi (Constitution Memorial Day)on May 3. Then, May 4 is called Midori-No-Hi (Greenery Day), a celebration for nature. The last holiday during Golden Week is Kodomono-Hi (Children’s Day) on May 5. In respect to the celebration, the Grand Hyatt Bali and Chef Shozo Yoshioka have prepared special dishes served exclusively during the Golden Week period. Nampu opens for dinner daily from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Experience the Golden Week festivities from April 28 - May 8. Grand Hyatt Bali, Nusa Dua, (0361) 771-234; www.bali.grand.hyatt.com

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NEW&NEWS

SEMINYAK PREMIUM COOKING INDIAN
Ayana Resort and Spa Bali introduces its new Indian chef Faizan Ali at the resort’s Padi restaurant. Appointed Chef-inCharge of Indian specialty cuisine at the Padi restaurant, Faizan brings a wealth of experience and passion to his new role at Ayana. After completing his apprenticeship in New Delhi in 2003, Faizan worked at luxury five-star hotels including the Leela Kempinski Bangalore, where he was Sous Chef at the Jamavar restaurant, which was featured in Forbes.com’s list of the World’s Top 10 Power Dining restaurants. Here, he underwent specialized training in Indian Cuisine by masters in the field such as the renowned Chef Farman Ali. Ayana Resort and Spa Bali, Jalan Karang Mas Sejahtera, Jimbaran (0361) 702-222; www.ayanaresort.com Resor Seminyak Bali announces its new luxury resort brand: The Seminyak – A Premium Beach Resort. As an impressive complement to the stunning lifestyle of the trendy and most dynamic area of Seminyak, with Bali’s best dining and boutique shopping centers, The Seminyak is scheduled to open its doors in December of this year. Following the total demolition of the previous property, this new resort will have 38 beach wing rooms measuring 47 square meters, 26 incredible suites of 75 square meters complete with a private Jacuzzi overlooking the ocean, two spacious Penthouses of 155 square meters, 10 appointed ocean-view villas of 190 square meters and one two-bedroom Villa of 318 square meters. Meanwhile, 30 garden wing rooms are dedicated for those seeking more privacy in one separate compound within an elegant garden setting with a swimming pool and sunken bar. The Seminyak – A Premium Beach Resort Jl. Kayu Aya, Seminyak, (0361) 730-814 www.theseminyak.com

HEAVENLY TRANSFORMATION
The Westin Resort Nusa Dua announces its guest room revitalization plan that will start this month for the duration of one year. The 8 million dollar renovation project will include a comprehensive transformation that will result in sleek and sophisticated looking guest rooms with a tropical edge. Ergonomically designed furnishings and personal touches will take every conceivable guest need into careful consideration. Guest rooms will feature the new generation of the Heavenly® Bed, a spacious 1.37 meter bed in the double-double rooms, I-pod dock with alarm clock, bedside master switchboard, Audio Visual Entertainment port, extended bathroom with a separate bathtub, double vanity, 37” flat screen television, and personalized in-room shop with lifestyle products set along with the resort’s new ergonomic refreshment centre. www.westinbalitransformation.com

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CRAFT&CULTURE

FAIR N’ SQUARE

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rade not only affects economic progress and development but it also extends to the society and culture. Bali is a small island

contact with Chinese merchants. The kettledrum of Pejeng also testifies to the bronze culture of Dongson; the ancient Vietnamese culture had reached Bali long before Anno Domini. Interactions between the local populace and outside cultures increased through time, alongside the modernization of transportation and the human consciousness of a global community. Trade is possibly the world’s oldest form of civilization. People bartered for items until currency emerged. One could own something to fulfill their needs and wants by forfeiting possession of another through a process known as ‘trade’. Lately trade has gone through rapid

and since early times has depended heavily upon agriculture. Fertile lands and the perseverance of the people have forged the agrarian Balinese life. The island also has several seaports that enable interconnection with communities outside Bali, neighboring islands as well as neighboring countries. Archeological finds in the area of Sembiran in North Bali describe that since 2,000 years ago the Balinese have had
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World Free Trade Day falls this May 8. The World Fair Trade Organization, based in the Netherlands, has now reached Indonesia with an office based in Bali. One among its long participating members is Mitra Bali.

progress and freeform practices. In the beginning each country would protect its own domestic production, but now it has shifted to trade with virtually no limits. This purge of protection together with export and import taxes, which in the end yield the highest profits, seems rather fantastic. This fantastic goal in fact has a range of bad results. A very large gap widens between workers and capital owners. On one side the capital owners become richer, and on the other the workers more suppressed.

This ‘unfairness’ can occur in many ways, such as hiring young workers with minimum pay, gender-based compensation discrepancies, disregarding quality of output, below average pay, or not taking heed of the effects of industrialization on the environment. These practices are usually implemented to suppress production costs and attain maximum profits. Ignorance on the capital owner’s part and the large companies will eventually devastate workers and spawn hardships.

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Local craftsmanship is hailed the world over. Generally, buyers are also aware of fair trade and would not hesitate to inspect whether the practice has been implemented.

This is the apprehension that needs to be overcome. Isn’t the purpose of trade aimed at economic progress? A good economy leads to social welfare, not injustice. This causes the longing for fair trades practice; focusing not only on partial profit but also for the benefit of all. This practice is referred to as “fair trade.” Fair Trade was set in motion in the 1940s in the US and Europe. As its name implies, fair trade is the creation of trade that is fair and benefits all parties including the workers. This movement became popular the world over, including in Bali. The movement started off with missionary institutions and nongovernmental organizations. They observed that there were a lot of injustices in the practice of trade in all parts of the world, but most prominent in developing countries. This platform made fair trade a major movement that spread all over the globe. In Western countries many become aware that when they purchased an item, they not only own the product but there is a
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social motivation as well. That is why it is no wonder when no one purchases an item upon knowing that the product was produced by underpaid children who worked long hours – a crime. Why would we buy from an act of crime or from a criminal? The World Fair Trade Organization, based in the Netherlands, has now reached Indonesia and its office is based in Bali. One among its long participating members is Mitra Bali. Mitra Bali was established in 1993 in Ubud. Their motive was simple; for people to be able to buy a product that is free from exploitation, be it environmental and/ or labor. Mitra Bali receives art item orders from a buyer. Generally the buyer is also aware of fair trade and would not hesitate to audit and inspect whether the fair trade practice has really been implemented or not. Mitra Bali then forwards the order to one or several partnering craftsmen depending upon the scale of the order and ability of the workers. The craftsmen have the

right to recruit additional laborers to fill the orders as long as they play by the rules. The Balinese believe that the main teacher figures are the parents. Each child has the right and duty to help out both their parents. Many times duties that are carried out by the parents are also done by children. The children are of the notion that it is in their upbringing to help support their parents. A frequent practice in Bali’s crafting centers is that the children participate in the finishing processes. In a family there is a division of tasks, for example the father would sculpt the statues, the mother would sand down the figures, and the children would do the finishing and paint. At first they would participate in the process simply help out, but eventually it becomes part of their daily chores. And they feel or show no objection even though they’ve lost time for study and play. Things like this might seem trifling and not taken into account by parents. They forget that when orders come suddenly and

Mitra Bali was established in 1993 in Ubud. Their motive was simple; for people to be able to buy a product that is free from exploitation, be it environmental and/or labor.
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Mitra Bali partners at work adding finishing touches to their orders. Various art and craft products comprise their orders.

them. They forget that the profits that they gain indirectly rob their children’s rights. Yet these aspects are taken deeply into account within the Fair Trade rules, namely against child labor. Agung Alit, head of Mitra Bali said that even if children participated in the labor process, it must be only 2 hours a day with the purpose of learning and honing skills. They must pay their labor force on time plus a number of other rules. To ensure that the rules are abided by, Mitra Bali deploys supervisory staff to control their craftsmen. To improve their craftsmen’s knowledge they hold workshops frequently. Workshop themes are mostly around simple topics that are often overlooked by craftsmen, such as matters surrounding cost calculation, the importance of accountability to determine cash flow, and various other basic financial topics. Indeed, the most basic things are frequently overlooked by traditional craftsmen. In reality, these workshops significantly help the craftsmen in understanding the development of their businesses. Wayan Sudi, a silversmith from the village of Singapadu admits this is true. He became a Mitra Bali partner in 2008. Prior, he received orders from a local silver businessman. He notices the empowerment and the differences between then and now.
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laborers, whether up to standard or not, or whether he puts in efforts to start with the orders including how Sudi pays his workers. Basically, businessmen receive orders on time and in good quality. Of course this is in contrast with the principles of fair trade. Justice and care of others will always benefit all. In reality, with good payment Wayan Sudi’s workshop is better and never has a fair trade business player led to economic failure. More craftsmen have been attracted to cooperate with players who have ‘adopted’ fair trade. Other programs that they have are gatherings, soft loans, non trade support, and green camps. They established a green camp in the village of Abuan, in the Bangli regency. This village serves as a prototype for people who want to know more about fair trade. One of its activities is planting albasia wood (Albazia falcataria). The concept is very simple, as until now craftsmen have used wood as their main medium, so why not replant to replace the chopped down trees. In Bali, the concept of fair trade has been adopted by Mitra Bali and Arum Dalu Mekar, a handicraft company in Seminyak. According to data from the Forum Fair Trade Indonesia (FFTI) in Indonesia there are eight business players who have now joined as members.

CO UR TESY MIT

to study and play will be taken away from

pay attention to the work conditions of its

RA BA LI

in a spike, then more of the children’s time

PHOTOS BY NI LUH DIAN PURNIAWATI

As businessmen in general seldom

FFTI is an organization that oversees fair trade in Indonesia. It also is a network from the Asia and International WFTO. All members of the WFTO are companies that adopt the ten basic principles of fair trade. An FFTI office is based in Sanur where it has also opened a fair trade outlet. Many companies have implemented the rules. Yet only a small number of them could really implement the ten principles. Agung Alit, who is also the secretary general of FFTI, explained that the world’s society has now become aware of fair trade. They purchase fair trade products from companies who have adopted its principles.■ Text by Ni Luh Dian Purniawati Photos by Nyoman Ari Gunadi ■ Mitra Bali, Jalan Gunung Abang, Lod Sema, Lod Tunduh, Ubud (0361) 295-010; www.mitrabali.com ■ Secretariat Forum Fair Trade Indonesia & Fair Trade Outlet, Griya Sanur Complex Jl. Bypass Ngurah Rai, Sanur (0361) 283-555; www.en.ffti.info

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INVITE&INDULGE

DAINTY DELIGHTS N’ A HEARTY “KAMPAI!”

elevated its concept. KO recently unveiled its newly refurbished Sushi Lounge & Bar, with a dazzling cocktail selection and a new design marking the dining venue a favorite in the ever growing “bar n’ cocktail” scene. Diners who arrive via KO’s eastern entrance are treated to subtlylit covered walkways with the typical primary themes of black and red accentuated by striking motifs, all providing a unique backdrop in lead to special dining areas and the manicured outdoor Japanese gardens provide an evoking treat along the way, transporting you into a Japanese dining wonderland. At the reception door there are two petite Kimono-clad staff to greet the customers, and I first thought that with a smile and that typical Japanese bow of respectful greeting the girls would make my acquaintance with a hearty Irasshaimase (“Welcome” in Japanese). But
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PHOTO BY NYOMAN ARI GUNADI

S

ince its eventful reopening back in 2004 when it unveiled a stunning new look combining a subtle blend of Balinese architecture and Japanese aesthetics, creating a contemporary yet minimalist dining environment, KO Japanese restaurant at the InterContinental Bali Resort has once again further

anticipation of the fine Japanese dining within its walls. The walkways

The manicured outdoor Japanese gardens provide an evoking treat along the way, transporting you into a Japanese dining wonderland.

to my surprise it was a cheerful “Selamat Datang”! And that reminded me that I was still in Bali. As both doors slide aside, the impressive interior engulfs you. KO caters to a range of different tastes through a variety of unique and interactive dining concepts. We were shown to the newly renewed Lounge & Bar that provides a relaxing environment in which to enjoy a pre-dinner drink and light snacks. The interior space has been opened up by the clever and innovative use of interior design to generate warmth and peace. Up to 50 guests can enjoy the relaxed and informal gathering in the generously cushioned gold armchairs, or in the more traditional dining experience of a table setting.

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PHOTO BY NYOMAN ARI GUNADI

For an exciting dining experience with a touch of theatrics by chefs who give off chopsocky action, take to the Teppanyaki.
The Japanese design is typified by oversized hanging lanterns and carved wall lighting panels shedding a gentle light from floor to ceiling columns and recesses in layered stone. A stunning collection of glassworks complements the collection of local and international artwork. Here, live entertainment in the lounge strums and hums nightly. And once cocktails and starters have been enjoyed, guests can opt to indulge in a memorable meal in the dining room. The centerpiece sushi bar is a convivial treat for the eyes, where skilled sushi chefs prepare the wraps and toppings behind the arrayed exhibit of dainty delights. Swirling abstracts of the sushi bar backsplash provide a dynamic backdrop to the fresh array of fine seafood on display. Colorful and often artfully arranged sushi truly
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reflect traditional Japanese aesthetics, at least in the culinary facet. The trained chef prepares fresh sushi, sashimi and maki rolls upon request. The extensive and well balanced menu also features yakitori, tempura, noodle and rice dishes. Indeed, from the moment we set foot inside the realm of a Japanese restaurant like KO, we had the opportunity to have a go at our Japanese, exchanging simple Japanese greetings and browsing through the menu names (as though it was a tough Sudoku) along with the interesting customs that usually go with any foreign cuisine. The Japanese diet consists largely of rice, vegetables, seafood, fruit, and small portions of meat. Rice and tea are part of almost every meal as well. Popular Japanese foods include miso (bean paste) soup, noodles (ramen, udon,

and soba), curry and rice, sashimi (slices of raw fish served with soy sauce and wasabi, a pungent form of horseradish), tofu, and pork. While the sushi is cold rice, flavored with vinegar, and served with fish (usually raw). Japanese cuisine is infused with art, culture and nature, making an aesthetic treat for both the eyes and the taste buds. And from a small slab and slice of sushi, you’ll enjoy reading out the menu names as well as the action over hashi chopsticks and ice-chilled Sake or Shoju vials. At the KO dining room, enjoy more intimate dining settings as traditional Japanese cuisine from the set and a la carte menus fulfills the appetite for a feast or an aesthetic treat. Look out for the sushi promos that will please any appetite for Japanese. Again, dig in and explore the Japanese culinary insights on the menu. You

may choose from among these highlights; Nigiri Sushi comes in various names according to the thin slices on top of the rice, namely Sake (salmon), Maguro (tuna), Unagi (eel), Ebi (prawn), Tamago (omelet), Shiromisakana (barramundi), and Tako (octopus). Maki, rolled in rice with seaweed, comes in Kapamaki (cucumber), Maguro, and Sake, while the hand rolled Temaki Sushi comes as California Temaki (with crabmeat) and Unagi. Gunkan Sushi is boat shaped and comes in choices of Wakame (seasoned seaweed), and the dazzling presentations of Tobiko (flying fish roe) and Ikura (salmon roe). Find interestingly contemporary renderings of sushi through the Modern Dragon Roll consisting of eel, avocado, cucumber, sambal mayo and daikon, or the Dynamite Tuna Roll with fresh tuna, chopped chilies, cucumber and avocado mayo. There’s also the familiar Boston Roll and California Roll. An option of assorted sushi platters with 10 to 15 pieces per
PHOTO BY NYOMAN ARI GUNADI

Sushi Roll selections, which include a Fire

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order a la carte is also available. Besides those vibrant dainty Japanese delights (don’t underestimate the small sizes, because they will surely fill you up), you can always opt for the common Japanese selections of Sashimi, an Appetizer & Salad selection of Tebasaki chicken wings, Agedashi Tofu, Lobster Gyoza, the succulent Chawan Mushi of egg custard, shrimp, chicken and vegetables steamed in a cup, and Shabu Shabu Salad with thinly sliced Angus rib eye beef with Japanese dressing. Tempura, noodles and rice meals, as well as a selection of main courses, all that come served with Miso soup, steamed rice and pickles are also available – a completely Japanese selection. For an exciting dining experience with a touch of theatrics by chefs who give
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off chopsocky action, KO offers four Teppanyaki tables that can seat up to 40 diners per seating. Here the chefs display not only their culinary skills but also provide artful entertainment that precedes the preparation of the food. It encourages a true theatre enjoyment of interactive dining. Diners can choose a dynamic food preparation performance at the grill with karate-chopped dishes of traditional Japanese cuisine. A KO Gourmet Experience has the chef prepare for you fresh oyster sashimi, wasabi California Rolls, Teppanyaki salmon with tsume sauce, Teppanyaki foie gras with apple and portabella, Teppanyaki beef wagyu sirloin, salad, rice, miso soup, pickles, and a Teppanyaki banana. For the Teppan, all you have to do is enter the room and you will be greeted

by the smiling girls in kimonos who will show you to your seat, and then enjoy the evening as the chef explains the menu prior to each of his flamboyant displays of swift chopping, spicing, throwing, mixing, the occasional flambé… swoosh… and voila! The dishes are ready right before your eyes. A feast before your eyes before the feast for your taste buds. And after every bite, exclaim as the Japanese do, “Oishii desu!” and raise your Sake vials or Shoju shots with cheers of “Kampai!” to your heart’s content.■ Text by Nyoman Ari Gunadi Courtesy photos

■ KO Japanese Restaurant InterContinental Resort Bali, Jalan Uluwatu 45, Jimbaran, 701-888

PHOTO BY NYOMAN ARI GUNADI

The new Sushi Lounge & Bar provides a relaxing environment in which to enjoy a pre-dinner drink and light snacks. Colorful and often artfully arranged sushi truly reflects traditional Japanese aesthetics.

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PROFILE&PORTRAIT

Not only was the artist captivated by the many nuances of Bali, but also by the charm of a Balinese girl. Adi Bachmann with wife Komang Sarining.

SPIRIT OF SHARING
Insights from an inexhaustible artist; his early life lessons and views on art, love and the personal belief that there are things that need to be supported besides one’s own self, and the need to share.

L
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ife experiences, a row of ‘have read’ book titles, and other sources of enlightenment have provided him with inspiration for his work.

COURTESY PHOTO

Apparently there’s a unique answer to those questions. Such an episode would spark everyone’s curiosity. Moreover if among those in the attendance list were the Buddha, Germanic deities, and even a Pharaoh. It would make an extraordinary event. This kind of conference was a spark of imagination for Adi Bachmann. Inspired not only by global issues such as those above, Adi also exhibits simple works inspired by the social interaction patterns of the Balinese, who are fond of lively conversations. In a roadside ‘warung kopi’

After having lived in Bali for four years, Adi Bachmann exhibits his sculptures within the garden grounds of the Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA), his first outdoor sculpture exhibition held in Bali. What would happen if a conference on global warming was held in Ubud? And who would be on its attendance list?

“They can put their works on display at my gallery. I will take care of all the expenses and won’t quote any percentage whatsoever if one of their art pieces gets sold.” - Adi Bachmann

(traditional coffee shop), multitudes of topics make up the discussions. This is in contrast to the general German character that in Adi’s opinion only enjoy talking about three topics: work, money and sex. Through his works he tries to present something that engages people to contemplate. Satire can make people laugh, but within the laugh people frequently concur to the satire and think ‘why?’. At the beginning Adi was attracted to reliefs yet was slightly reluctant in taking up sculpture. He felt that in order to be able to create something big he needed courage. The first time he sculpted, he created a very large form out of plywood but flat resembling a relief. And now he continues to sculpt ‘big’. Nearly all of the sculptures he works on are made with high quality Indonesian cement, worked over frames of metal wiring. The final touches are mixtures of calcium chloride and white glue. Then the sculptures are coated over with five layers of quality acrylic paint and highly transparent varnish to treat the form to withstand degradation from ultraviolet rays and mold. In the process he collaborates with his team of talented and skillful aides led by Gede Eka from the village of Manuaba. A German, born in 1943, Adi Bachmann grew up in a poor family and couldn’t continue schooling past the age of 16. With an undying spirit to keep on learning, he took up evening university, a free educational option for underprivileged kids, while working in graphic design. He realized

he had artistic skills and at the age of 21 made up his mind on entrepreneurship and started his own studio. During the times that followed he was lucky to travel to various places in the world and learn many things. He felt that his many brief stopovers throughout the course just simply could not provide him with a lasting impression. He lived for four years in Greece, 9 months in Egypt, and several times in Italy. Major archeological museums were his most frequently visited places in Egypt. There he read, sketched, and contemplated a lot. Adi was very attracted to the myths, rites, and history. This can be seen in his works in how he depicts the pharaoh, bringing forth the Minoan mythologies of Crete, and depicting the Buddha shortly before attaining Nirvana. He arrived in Bali four years ago. One of his friends who stayed in Lovina, North Bali invited him to visit. The four days on the island left a deep and everlasting remembrance in his heart. Not only was he captivated by the many nuances but also by the charm of a Balinese girl. Heading home from the journey, he had sworn that he would someday return. And true to his heart, within several months he returned to marry Komang Sarining and had stayed in Bali ever since. He observed many things here. Not only the beauty of nature and the people’s artistry but also their everyday life. He saw how Balinese women played such important roles in the family and society. In his opinion, they do not have priority at advancement. Their

education is often times put aside. He decided to pay for three of his neighbors’ daughters education, who continued through to tourism school. Challenges since childhood, a reality that one has to quit school, moved his heart to lend a helping hand. In an observation of the island’s artistic progress, he noted that art in Bali could be divided into two areas, fine art and craft. Craft is undeniably based on materialistic virtues and profit. Meanwhile fine art until now remains in the domain of those with established names and those who had tasted academic education. They are able to display their works through large scale exhibitions in major galleries, yet all that requires funds. Unfortunately not all gifted artists with high skills are also blessed with high wealth. Often times their meaning-filled works of art attract dust at home, far from any exhibition. Realizing this, Adi decided to build a gallery that could be utilized by artists free of charge. “They can put their works on display at my gallery. I will take care of all the expenses and won’t quote any percentage whatsoever if one of their art pieces gets sold,” said Adi Bachmann. Adi Gallery is located on Jalan Bisma and was opened on October 2007. Several local artists have now made use of this gallery. He developed a relationship pattern between the gallery and artists based on partnership principles, mutual trust, fairness and transparency. In the month of April for example, he took four brothers and exhibited their
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works. They are Nyoman Budiarta, Ketut Budiarsa, Wayan Piadnya, and Kadek His sculptures exhibited within the garden grounds of the Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA), his first outdoor sculpture exhibition held in Bali. Budiana. They are unique personalities. Three of them suffer from ‘glass bone disease’ – leading to abnormalities in their leg and arm structures. It can be imagined how difficult it is for them to carry out daily activities, moreover get involved in art. But actually they create impressive art. Their paintings may not be as striking as those lined up at the art shops and galleries, yet are unique, expressive, original, and provoke deep impressions. It is quite astonishing how he is able to support his gallery. He believes that his savings up until now is sufficient to cover the costs of operating the gallery. He admits to have been well paid during his 35 year tenure as a graphic designer.
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Besides, his wife Komang Sarining also runs the Gallery Cafe. Adi shows that he is an inexhaustible artist and frequently exhibits his works. Right now he feels that there are three things that he needs to support besides his own self, namely social, art and the gallery. “In life we must share,” expressed Adi. On your next trip to Ubud, drop by Adi’s Gallery, quite a small art space, where you can admire unique works of art as well as enjoy wholeheartedly Ibu Komang’s homemade cakes under the shady trees.■ Text and photos by Ni Luh Dian Purniawati ■ Adi’s Gallery, Jl. Bisma No. 102, Ubud (0361) 977-104; www.adi-s-gallery.com

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PONDERINGPOINT

COMPETITION AND COMPETENCE
The ASEAN Framework Agreement for the Integration of Priority Sectors covers 12 priority sectors that would become integrated amongst ASEAN countries.

W
Sectors (AFAS) in 2004? Putu Laksaguna. agreed upon.

hat lies ahead for Indonesia’s workforce, especially in the tourism industry after the

good would it be for Indonesia? Of course, local products would face fierce competition from other ASEAN countries. Meanwhile, the ASEAN Framework Agreement for the Integration of Priority Sectors covers 12 priority sectors that would become integrated amongst the ASEAN countries. The 12 sectors are: Agro Based Products, Air Travel, Automotive, E-ASEAN, Electronics, Fisheries, Healthcare, Rubber-based products, Textiles and apparel, Tourism, Wood-based products and Logistic Services. With the ‘AFAS 2010’ coming into effect, there would be no more barriers in integrating all the service sectors between each ASEAN nation. So what does AFAS have in store for Indonesia? If we have high quality products and competent human resources, we will easily compete with the neighboring countries in each of the aforementioned sectors. Yet if the contrary, we would simply be opening ourselves to “preeminence” by the other countries. So, will Indonesians be seeing doctors from Singapore or Thailand opening up practitioners near their rural residences? It seems possible. And likewise, competent Indonesian doctors would also be able to work at a neighboring country in the textile business for instance. The AFTA and AFAS

were signed around fifteen years ago. And we are yet to see a Singaporean doctor in our neighborhood. Also, the issue of the Single Visa initiative is fresh in mind, regarding the plans to implement a single visa for tourists within the ASEAN region, which according to the Head of the Culture & Tourism Human Resources Development Office of the Indonesian Department of Culture & Tourism (Depbudpar), I Gusti Putu Laksaguna, also the Chairman of the AFAS Rundown Task Force, is still behind us with the preparedness of all the nation members. Laksaguna recently mentioned the “no-barriers” between the service sectors, including tourism and air travel, at a recent ministry human resources forum together with participants from the government tourism departments, tourism education institutions, tourism associations and the national profession certification body, BNSP. Laksaguna commented during the preparations that the Cultural and Tourism Department (Depbudpar) together with the various tourism associations, found it necessary to form task groups in order to prepare the various steps in anticipation of AFAS. In a presentation by Laksaguna, it was laid out that the ASEAN Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) in the

signing of the ASEAN Tourism Agreement (ATA) in 2002 and the ASEAN Framework Agreement for the Integration of Priority Here we share our collection of information and a question and answer session with the Head of the Culture & Tourism Human Resources Development Office of the Indonesian Department of Culture & Tourism (Depbudpar), I Gusti Government representative members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) signed the ASEAN Framework Agreement for the Integration of Priority Sectors (AFAS) in Vientiane, Laos on November 29, 2004. And now the year is 2010, the year when the AFTA and AFAS have supposedly come into effect, as With the ASEAN Free Trade Agreement (AFTA), where free trade would commence among ASEAN member nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei Darussalam, Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Myanmar), what
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workforce, aimed to act as controller of recognition over quality and competence of the workforce, namely to facilitate the mobility and protection of the workers in the global employment market, and the MRA agreement was metaphorically akin to “opening a floodgate from a number of interconnected dams”. Through the presentation he explained the effects of the ASEAN MRA. Some of the positive sides include the ease of obtaining rare competent labor in the domestic job market, stimulation towards the improvement of quality domestic human resources, an increase in mobility and protection among competent workers abroad, lowering unemployment levels, and increasing foreign exchange. The negative would be the influx of workers that would threaten the opportunities of the domestic workforce, ever-tighter competition, social resentment in the job market, and the outgoing of foreign exchange to pay for foreign workers. The ASEAN Tourism Agreement (ATA) was signed by ASEAN nation leaders at the 8th ASEAN Summit in Phnom Penh, Cambodia on November 4, 2002. It was to open cooperation and ease travel within ASEAN countries; increasing cooperation in the tourism industry among its members for efficiency and competence; basically suppressing obstacles in the trade of tourism and travel services; building an integrated network of tourism and travel services; increasing development and promotion of ASEAN as a sole tourist destination that has standardized facilities and world appeal; increasing mutual efforts in human resources and strengthening cooperation in developing, improving and expanding tourism services and facilities in ASEAN; and to create a condition that supports public and private sectors in getting involved in the development of tourism, inter-ASEAN travel and investment. ATA was made official by the Indonesia government via the Presidential
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PHOTO BY HARY SUBASTIAN

Formal competence certification can be obtained through competency tests at BNSP licensed tourism LSPs. There are currently 7 LSPs.

Regulation No. 2 Year 2007, dated January 25, 2007. Is Indonesia’s infrastructure prepared for AFAS, bearing in mind that the Presidential Regulation signing the AFAS was just done in 2009? Liberalization of the services sector, which involves the mobility of competent tourism human resources, has basically taken place far before AFAS. Infrastructural anticipation in facing competition in the workforce included governmental regulations No. 13 Year 2003 on competence, and No.10 Year 2009 on tourism and competency of human resources; Indonesia has its National Profession Certification Body (BNSP) that in the year 2004 licensed Profession Certification Institutions (LSP) and now total 7 institutions each with branches in various provinces; in 2004 Indonesia had its own national profession competence standards (SKKNI) with 378 units in the travel bureau, hotel and restaurant services. By the end of 2009, Indonesia already had 11 competency areas with 563 competency units.
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WHICH NATION MEMBERS ARE ALREADY TO IMPLEMENT?
Recognition of competency certification is based on ASEAN Common Competency Standards for Tourism Professionals (ACCSTP), which currently is still in “framework” form; completion of the ACCSTP is planned for 2014. In fact, historically the basis of ACCSTP was SKKNI, and from there we can say that it is Indonesia that has prepared itself long before with the infrastructure, which takes us back to the first question. In 2010, the Minister of Culture and Tourism declared the Competency Based Human Resources Development in the Tourism Sector. In support of this human resources movement, the ministry will remain forming LSPs, and facilitating competence assessors within the tourism industry. 5,112 workers were certified last year and targets 50,000 by 2014.

Formal competence recognition and certification can be obtained through competency tests at BNSP licensed tourism LSPs. Until now there are 7 Tourism LSPs ready.

ON THE OTHER HAND, WHAT ABOUT ASEAN MEMBERS WHO WISH TO WORK IN INDONESIA?
Same case, as they will seek certification through a Tourism Professional Certification Board (TPCB) in each ASEAN country.

WHO DETERMINES THE STANDARDIZATIONS?
In Indonesia it is under the SKKNI, with convention members comprised of those from professional associations, the industry, experts, educational and vocational institutions, and other relevant players in the field. In ASEAN, the ASEAN Common Competency Standard for Tourism Professional (ACCSTP) is formulated through task forces with ASEAN nation members.■ Text and photo by Nyoman Ari Gunadi

HOW CAN WORKERS IN THE TOURISM INDUSTRY OBTAIN CERTIFICATION?

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ACTION&ATTRACTION

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The Vast, The Vivid and The Verdant
Before arriving at Jatiluwih there are several places that must be seen by visitors to the region who want to make their day’s journey worthwhile.

exotic butterflies species, and soaking in the warmth of natural hot springs. Tabanan is one of the most fertile regions on the island. This regency is aptly nicknamed in Indonesian the ‘rice-barn’ region due to its presence as the largest rice producer on the island. Walking

A

visit to the regency of Tabanan will lead you along spans of rice paddies in Jatiluwih, have you adoring the colors of nature through wings of

through its varied terrain you will easily find green flowing terraces of paddies. Nearing the harvest season, usually between the periods of March to May and August to October, the green seedlings become a full, ripe yellow color, containing the best produce on the island. At the mention of rice fields in Tabanan, Jatiluwih easily comes to mind. It is a village at the foot of Mount Batukaru. Its scenic attributes are easily noticeable as it also finds its way among the many snapshots frequently showing up on

Bali postcards, in addition to the major temples, beaches and beautiful traditional dancers. Small wonder that people fall in love at first sight and yearn to visit and take in the magnificent vistas with their own eyes – especially when green, fresh and beautiful scenes like these are a breakaway from modern life with its crowds and pollution. Jatiluwih is located approximately 50 kilometers from the densely populated southwest center of tourism, Kuta in particular. It can be reached by private transportation due to the scarcity of public transport service options that serve the route, which is also good as prior to reaching Jatiluwih you can stop by the various highlights that dot the map along the way. Before arriving at Jatiluwih there are several places that must be seen by visitors to the region who want to make their day’s journey worthwhile. These include the first and largest butterfly park in Indonesia. The park is located in the village of Wanasari, along the way north towards Jatiluwih, where at the left of the densely foliaged roadside reads a signboard bearing the name “Bali Butterfly Park.” Tickets can be purchased at the first building. At this building there are also numerous displays of petrified butterfly specimens. Moreover there are also several on sale, from framed butterflies as
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Yeh Panes, the local name for ‘hot water’ is located in the village of Penatahan, right on the riverbanks of the river Yeh Ho. In the beginning, the water only spouted from a small spring within a temple’s grounds.

well as resin clad specimens that make up unique key chains. Entering the park’s area, you are treated to a spacious welcome amongst the dense foliage that is vibrant with flora analogous to the fluttering Lepidopterae. Best time to visit the park is in the morning. The feeding time usually spans from between 8 to 9 a.m. This park covers an area of approximately 4,000 square meters and has an expansive anthology of butterflies in its collection, including the Bali Lace Wing (Cethosia hypsea) and the Great Mormon (Papilio memnon). It also has several collections of beetles and mantis such as the Orchid mantis (Hymenopus coronatu) that resembles a deep purple orchid and the Stick insect (Eurycnema stick). Other collections include the Atticus Atlas. Atticus is actually a species of moth, yet its large wings lead to its resemblance of a butterfly. Its impressive wingspan

that parallels butterflies has it frequently identified it as the largest butterfly in the world with a span of up to 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) from tip to tip. It can survive in tropic and subtropical regions such as India, China, and Southeast Asia. Indonesia’s rich cache of rainforests also boasts diverse species of insects including butterflies. The country has over 2,000 species of them, a number only contended by several South American countries. Since the year 1980, Indonesia has gained protection status over its bird-winged butterfly (the Troides, Trogonoptera, and Ornithopetra species) to prevent trade and excessive collection in the wild. Several efforts towards its conservation were made, and one of them was started in Bali. The butterfly park’s establishment was also inspired by the International Butterfly Conference held in Makassar in 1993. The park itself was opened at the end of 1996

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ESPA Yeh Panes channeled hot spring water and created a large pool. Within the area there are five ‘Jacuzzis,’ cold and hot water pools. The cool air of the altitude makes for a pleasant and elongated stop.

Mount Batukaru provides a sort of blessing among the people who live around its sphere. It feeds hot rich sulfur water, not only to the ESPA hot springs but also to other hot water spring locations such as those in the villages of Angseri and Mangesta. At least ESPA is on the main route and has more facilities with a restaurant and a hotel. Back on the route towards Jatiluwih, you are offered a harmonious rural nuance. Groups of children walking home from school on quiet roads that you never get to see in the city; and on a bright day clear from mist and overcast, the majestic Batukaru stands in the backdrop of blue and green. with the roles of conservation, education, research and recreation. The next stop to visit on the journey is ESPA Yeh Panes, Natural Hot Spring and Spa. Yeh Panes, the local name for ‘hot water’ is located in the village of Penatahan, right on the riverbanks of the river Yeh Ho. In the beginning hot water only spouted from a small spring within a temple’s grounds. As it is a scared area, people could not enter and bathe at will. The operators of ESPA then channeled the water and created a large pool to contain more water and accommodate more visitors. Within the area there are five ‘Jacuzzis’ cold and hot water pool. This pool is usually packed in the afternoons and can get overwhelming on public holidays. The cool air of the altitude makes for a pleasant and elongated stop. Additionally, the sulfuric content of the water is known to effectively cure many skin problems. Batukaru, at 2,276 meters above sea level, is Bali’s second highest after Mount Agung. Besides feeding hot therapeutic water, this mountain also brings to the Tabanan people fertile lands. At its foot is Pura Luhur Batukaru, which built in the 11th century. This temple is frequented by pilgrims and visiting tourists, situated deep in the forest as it is located at least a kilometer from the nearest village neighborhood.
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Jatiluwih has become nominated as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Its official announcement is anticipated this year.
From the Batukaru temple environs, the route leading to Jatiluwih starts to narrow, with a persistent up and down contour. To the sides are the lush greenery of the paddies. Many lands are then incorporated into eco tourism and agro tourism. The scenic multitude starts to gradually unveil. Many visitors make for the roadside stops to capture the scene and save the photographic memories. After passing several more kilometers, you arrive at a highland where terraced rice fields provide further panoramic moments, with open vistas of Mounts Batukaru and Agung and the refreshing sound of running and sprinkling irrigational spouts and streams. This is Jatiluwih. The name Jatiluwih can be broken down into Jati, meaning ‘true and essential’, and luwih meaning ‘splendid’. So very appropriate. Jatiluwih is located at 700 meters above sea level.
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PHOTO BY HARY SUBASTIAN

Most of its population still holds true to its agrarian way of life with their traditional irrigational system, Subak. Subak is a system that matches the people’s sociocultural aspects. It aims to reach and maintain harmony with a communal spirit and environmental sustainability. This unique aspect, if not held on to, might face degradation by modern farming that tend to brush aside traditions. This is what has led Jatiluwih to become nominated as a World Heritage
PHOTO BY NYOMAN ARI GUNADI

end as you cross the Tabanan border. Indeed it is not the only place where terraced rice paddies reign, but it is where you can easily learn to appreciate Mother Nature, valuable traditional values, and realize an endowment of blessings on ‘the island of the gods’.■ Text and photos by Ni Luh Dian Purniawati ■ Bali Butterfly Park Jalan Batukaru, Wanasari village (0361) 894-0595 www.balibutterflypark.blogspot.com ■ ESPA Natural Hot Springs Resort Jalan Batukaru, Desa Penatahan Tabanan, (0361) 252-356 www.espabali.blogspot.com

Site by UNESCO. Its official announcement is anticipated sometime this year. You can never get bored of nature and admiring the magnificent scenery it offers. On the way back from a day out in Jatiluwih, you can still see the green rows of paddies. But all seems to come to an

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BEYONDBALI

One of our most prolific writers shares his latest adventure in in Sulawesi, where he happened to choose an off-beat route; three days of walking through the mountains of the remote region of Mamasa and slipping into Tana Toraja through the back door. Dare to ‘follow his footsteps’?

MAMASA TO TANA TORAJA
on foot through Sulawesi’s traditional heartland
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trees on the higher slopes. But there was no traffic noise, as the nearest surfaced road was a full day’s walk back across the mountains. I was sitting in the shade outside Ibu Maria’s house in the hamlet of Timbaan, enjoying the cool of the evening and

T

he mountain village was full of sound; running water, the voices of children, buffalo lowing in the rice terraces, and goats bleating in the pine

watching the first stars appear in the pale sky above the pine-studded ridges. I had begun my solo trek that morning. There were two days of walking ahead of me, but if the landscapes I had seen already were anything to go by, the aches and blisters would all be worth it. Sulawesi, the great, spidery, fourlegged island that lies northeast of Bali, is one of Indonesia’s most intriguing destinations. It has a hinterland of green mountains, and clear coral seas offshore. Sulawesi’s most famous attraction is Tana

Toraja, an upland fastness in the center of the island’s southwest “leg”. Home to mountains, tumbling rice terraces, and traditional culture, it stands out even amongst Indonesia’s myriad wonders. Most visitors to Toraja make their way directly from Sulawesi’s capital of Makassar by bus or air, but I had chosen an off-beat route, one that would entail three days of walking through the mountains of the remote region of Mamasa. I was slipping into Tana Toraja through the back door.
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Like Toraja, Mamasa is mountainous. But while Toraja is now well connected to the outside world, Mamasa remains spectacularly remote and virtually untouched by tourism. There are no air links, so the 100-kilometer journey up from the main coastal highway took five hours along a narrow, potholed road. The town of Mamasa is a small place with a bustling market beside a shining river. I spent a night there before shouldering my backpack and setting out along the track to Toraja. Mamasa shares many cultural links with its more famous counterpart across the mountains. Most people adopted Christianity during the last century but pre-Christian traditions are still strong,
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especially in the rites that accompany funerals. As I plodded along the track I passed open pastures where horses and slate-blue buffalo grazed, and saw village houses of elaborately carved wood, painted in interlocking patterns of black, red and gold. These houses are known in Mamasa as banua sura. The trail led into the rising forest, and I sweated going uphill to reach a high pass, topped with a cluster of banua sura. Behind me I could see the long, mist-cut sweep of the Mamasa Valley and ahead, hidden behind ranks of interlocking ridges, lay my destination – the Toraja heartlands. It was all downhill to Ibu Maria’s house in Timbaan. This kindly, middle-aged lady keeps a few rooms in her home free for

any trekkers who pass. For a modest fee I slept on a lumpy mattress and dined on rice, stewed vegetables and fried river fish. Ibu Maria even managed to dig out a dusty bottle of Bintang beer from a cupboard. There was no electricity and no fridge, but the cool mountain air had chilled the beer perfectly. The following days led me through many beautiful landscapes. Villages of wooden houses standing beside bubbling streams and mist drifting over pine-covered hillsides. Gangs of village children chased after me, begging to have their photos taken. The route was easy to find, running along an unsurfaced track above a swift-flowing river, so there was no need for a map. On the second night I

Tana Toraja is indeed beautiful. Rugged limestone peaks rise above forested valleys with spectacular terraced rice fields on the lower slopes.
slept in a family home in another peaceful mountain village. I had now reached the fringes of Tana Toraja. The houses here had enormous and soaring roofs, and were decorated with buffalo horns. The third day’s walk took me over another high pass and down to Bittuang where I shambled, a little footsore, onto a surfaced road and caught a bus along green valleys to the heart of Tana Toraja. Tana Toraja is indeed beautiful. Rugged limestone peaks rise above forested valleys with spectacular terraced rice fields on the lower slopes. Given the landscape it’s easy to see how the area stayed free from outside interference for centuries, and it is this that has made Toraja so special. Traditional ways are remarkably strong here. Toraja’s villages are famous as they display some of the most spectacular traditional architecture in the world. The houses, known as tongkonan, have huge arched roofs, rising to high peaks. They are said to represent the boats that carried the ancestors of the Toraja people to Sulawesi. A typical Toraja village has a rank of these tongkonan, faced by another row of smaller buildings, designed for storing rice – the staple food. A few villages, such as Ke’te Kesu near Rantepao, have been developed for

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49

MT. KAMBUNO

BONEBONE MAMASA (West Sulawesi) LIMBUNG WOTU

MATANA LAKE

SOROAKO LARONA
TOWUTI LAKE

RANTEPAO PALOPO MAKALE
MT. RANTEKOMBALA

SOUTH SULAWESI
TANA TORAJA

ENREKANG

S T R A I T S

PINRANG PAREPARE

SINDERENG
SINDERENG LAKE TEMPE LAKE

SENGKANG

BARRU WATAN SOPENG WATAMPONE

M A K A S S A R

INDONESIA
PANGKAJENE MAROS

MAKASSAR
MT.LOMPOBATANG

SINJAI

of the most striking ones can be seen at Lemo, south of Rantepao. Death is taken seriously in Toraja, and a huge investment is made to ensure that the deceased receives a good –and bloody – send off. During a funeral dozens of buffalo are sacrificed to ensure a successful journey to the afterlife. Tourists
BENTENG BARANGBARANG

TAKALAR

BANTAENG BULUKUMBA JENEPONTO SELAYAR ISLAND

are welcome to attend, and wandering around Rantepao you’re sure to hear of forthcoming ceremonies. After resting my blistered feet in the little town of Rantepao I hired a 100cc motorbike and headed for the hills. From the mountain eyrie of Batu Tumonga I

F L O R E S

S E A
JAMPEA

TANAH JAMPEA ISLAND

looked out over the spectacular vista of rice terraces and forests and spent a night up there sleeping in a traditional house. In the morning a sea of white mist had filled the valley and the sun rose pink over the distant mountain ranges. Tana Toraja and it’s remote neighbor Mamasa are some of the most beautiful and fascinating parts of Indonesia I have visited so far, and the route I had taken to get there was a perfect way to reach these deeply traditional communities. But my feet were still sore, so when it was time to leave I took the easy option – I caught an air-conditioned bus out of the mountains and back down to Makassar.■ Text and photos by Tim Hannigan

BONERATE BONERATE ISLAND KALOATOA ISLAND

tourists with car parks and gift shops. But from the high hillsides of Toraja you can pick out the arched roofs of countless villages, poking out from stands of trees; few of them ever visited by sightseers. The people of Toraja kept invaders at bay for centuries, and they kept foreign religion at arm’s length too. Long after other parts of Sulawesi had converted to Islam and Christianity, Toraja was still a bastion of ancestor worship, known here as Aluk Todolo. Despite the efforts
50 BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010

of Dutch missionaries in the early 20th century, when Indonesia gained its independence in 1949, there were still only a handful of Torajan Christians. These days most Torajans are nominal Catholics, but the old ways are still maintained especially when it comes to funerals. In Toraja people are buried in caves and cliff faces. Lifelike effigies of the dead are placed in niches close to the tomb, looking out with blank eyes across the ricefields. These are known as tau tau, and some

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CAPITALCORNER

SUNDA KELAPA THE PORT OF 1,000 LIVES

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Sunda Kelapa harbor is no ordinary port. With a land area of 760 hectares and a water docking area of 16,470 hectares, it is a place of great historic importance.

Skyscrapers, state-of-the-art buildings, single story residential houses and modern apartment complexes stand proudly almost at every bend of the city. Jakarta is fast, unforgiving and on its’ way to competing with other metropolis’s. However, in the midst of its race to advance, Jakarta still harbors a few historical places from the Dutch Colonial era. One of them is the old Sunda Kelapa Port, which is located in the mouth of the Ciliwung River in North Jakarta. The Dutch domination of Jakarta and the rest of Indonesia began from this area, where the remnants of Kasteel Batavia, an old fort and trading post of the Dutch East Indies Company, can still

L

ike a lot of major cities in the world, Jakarta is growing at an incredible speed. As the financial hub of the country, almost every pore of Jakarta oozes modernism.

be seen today. At present, Sunda Kelapa is a fisherman’s wharf and an inter island port, with hundreds of schooners sailing in and out, day after day. Sunda Kelapa harbor is no ordinary port. With a land area of 760 hectares and a water docking area of 16,470 hectares, it is a place of great historic importance. In fact, Sunda Kelapa is where the history of Jakarta began centuries ago. According to the Indonesian Travel Guide, in the 12th century Sunda Kelapa was the most important harbor of the Pajajaran Kingdom, used by trading ships from China, Southern India, Japan and the Middle East. The port was attacked and conquered by its neighbor Demak Kingdom under the leadership of Fatahillah, then on June 22nd, 1527 the port was taken away and the name was changed to Jayakarta, which meant the city of victory. The date marked the birth of Jakarta.
BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010 53

Enjoy the gentle warm rain from seven showers spraying your body in the Jet Affusion Shower or the Hot Stone Massage at Bimasena Spa.

The old port was vastly overshadowed in the 1880s by the construction of a modern port a few miles east named Tanjung Priok. Sunda Kelapa however, holds its own importance. It is the port for Phinisi schooners, the traditional vessels of the Bugis people of Sulawesi. These Phinisi schooners are made by hand out of ironwood. It’s the kind of wood that is soft when wet and thus pliable, but dries into a very hard, durable wood. These Phinisi schooners are around 40 meters long and 15 meters wide, with two main masts carrying seven sails each. The boats have
54 BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010

diesel engines they can use alternately with the sails and can carry up to 950 tons of cargo, which varies from cement, timber and rice to electronic devices and appliances. The schooners transport goods across the archipelago, but mainly to Batam Island or Pontianak in Kalimantan. The journey takes from three to four full days. They usually return empty to Sunda Kelapa to reload. Navigated primarily by Bugis and Makassarese traders, the Phinisi schooners are a magnificent sight, as they belong to one of the last fleet of sailboats in the

world, still carrying merchandise as they did centuries ago. Over 1,000 workers are roaming around the old port every day, loading and unloading goods manually, without the help of any equipment. Because no cranes are used and the goods are carried in and out of boats by hand, it can take up to three weeks to unload a ship and load the new cargo. Visitors usually marvel at the strength of these sinew-stretched coolies carrying cement sacks on their shoulders with remarkable agility. Those who are not loading and uploading

Over 1,000 workers are roaming around the old port every day, loading and unloading goods manually, without the help of any equipment. Because no cranes are used and the goods are carried in and out of boats by hand, it can take up to three weeks to unload a ship and load the new cargo.

cargo can be found in the water wearing simple snorkeling masks, sometimes of their own creation, cleaning the hulls of the schooners. These men work hard and their skin is shriveled and dark from all the direct exposure to the sun, toughened from their hardships, day in day out. These ship workers and porters came from various parts of Indonesia, some from as far as East Timor. But most are from the neighboring Central and East Java areas. They came to the capital city with a dream to build a better life. They speak different languages but they use Bahasa Indonesia to
BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010 55

The old port is where Jakarta was born. It has been around longer than the city, and one can hope that it will still be around for many, many years to come.

there from generation to generation. Boys are recruited from the age of 15 to work on the ships. They usually are given the job of cooking food for the boat crew. The village is often flooded but the workers make do with the living arrangements because from their meager income they cannot afford to move to a better place. Those who do not work on the boats support themselves by selling fish. The normal day starts extra early at the old fish market, where the catch of the day is auctioned off. On the street leading to the fish market there are rows of shops selling shells, dehydrated turtles, lobsters and everything else a seafarer might need. Besides fish, villagers also sell food supplies to the ship workers and porters in the port. Because of its historical value, Sunda Kelapa is a popular destination for tourists and photographers. They usually take a boat and cross the Ciliwung River to get to the fish market or to take pictures of the schooners. This gives birth to the many boatmen around the Sunda Kelapa port, who charge their passengers Rp 5,000 for one trip. Life in the port is hard, but the 1,000 or more people who populate the port persevere. Their spirits are as strong as their physiques. The porters carry their heavy communicate with each other. They are like the condensed version of Indonesia itself. Sadly, most of them are nowhere near realizing their dreams of living a better live. Most workers are living in poverty, making as little as Rp 300,000 a month. To earn this amount, they have to load and unload about 40 sacks of cement, rice and other cargo daily. A sack usually weighs around 50 kg. They have to carry those enormous loads on their shoulders as they clamber up and down steep gangplanks. The condition has turned for the worse during the past year. As the global recession has deepened, many of the porters and
56 BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010

ship workers have lost their jobs. Shipping activities at the port have virtually ground to a complete halt, prompting export-oriented companies to lay off their staff. Before the recession, 10-13 people usually unloaded a ship. Now, as there are fewer ships in operation, 30 people will swarm around a single ship and the wages have to be divided amongst them so they are earning less and less. This condition urges them to start to look for other opportunities. Some of them moonlight as ojek (motorcycle taxi) drivers to earn extra income. These boat workers live in a workers village nearby. They have lived and worked

burdens on their resilient backs as fearlessly as the sailors conquer the unforgiving waves of the ocean. The air is thick with the spirit of survival. And they will survive, just as the old port has survived the 21st century, and just as the traditional Phinisi schooners have survived the modern vessels. The old port is where Jakarta was born. It has been around longer than the city, and one can hope that it will still be around for many, many years to come.■ Text by Patricia Ivana Photos by Josua Alessandro www.escapadepictures.com

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BALI & BEYOND

BEYONDUPDATES

EVEN MORE...
During the recent Aston Fair in Medan, Aston International announced 5 recently opened brand new hotels increasing the group’s total operating hotel portfolio to 25 properties. In addition to the newly opened hotels, the Aston Group also announced that 12 more Aston Hotels are currently under construction and scheduled to open between mid 2010 and 2011. These new Astons will range from 5 star Grand Astons such as the Grand Aston Yogyakarta Hotel & Convention Center that is scheduled to open in late 2010, to the 4-star Aston Hotels in Serpong (Jakarta), Glodok (Jakarta), Menteng (Jakarta), Nusa Dua (Bali), Bogor, Purwokerto, Palembang and Jayapura, and the 3-star Aston City Hotels in Bintan and Bangka Island. www.aston-international.com

SCRUMPTIOUS SLURPS
Akmani Hotel’s Bel Piatto Restaurant at the lobby level introduces its “Soto Nusantara” promo for the month of May. Various versions of the traditional clear soup will appease the appetite for Nusantara archipelago cuisine. These variations include their place of origin, from Soto Betawi, Soto Madura, and Soto Kudus to Soto Banjar will be featured on the menu at Bel Piatto through the month of August. This soup delight has garnered the favor of Indonesian and international diners. At Rp 49,900 nett, enjoy Soto for lunch and dinner 24 hours a day. Akmani’s Scarlatti Lounge also presents its “Florence Mocktail” as Mocktail of the Month for May and June. This Mocktail comes in attractive colors. Three colors are combined, with green from melon syrup, orange from fresh oranges, and red from fresh strawberry juice. The Akmani Hotel, Jl. Wahid Hasyim 91, Jakarta, (021) 3190-5335; www.akmanihotel.com

NEWSPAPER DIRECT
Newspaper Direct introduces its unique services to Jakarta, Bali and Lombok. Now you can get your favorite newspaper in Jakarta, Bali and Lombok on the same day of publication! Through the innovative technology of the NewspaperDirect global digital network, same-day editions of internationally-recognized newspapers are available in print in their original layout. Already available in over 85 countries through a global network of distributors, the newspaper Print-onDemand service is suitable for individual subscribers, retail outlets, hotels, cruise ships, airlines, corporate offices, libraries, educational institutions, events and private yachts. For further information, call John Eisermann at +62-811-399-079.
58 BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010

WAISAK: BOROBUDUR
Waisak is observed traditionally in South and Southeast Asian countries such as Nepal, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Indonesia, Pakistan and India. Sometimes it is referred to informally as “Buddha’s birthday”, and in fact covers prince Siddhartha Gautama’s birth, attainment and crossing to Nirvana. Every year on a full moon in the month of May (or June in a leap year), Buddhists in Indonesia celebrate Waisak in grandeur at the Borobudur temple. Waisak here observes the prince’s highest attainment of wisdom and turning into Buddha Sakyamuni. The three episodes are referred to as Tri Suci Waisak. The procession highlights culminate on May 28, which normally includes walks by monks and followers from the temples Mendut and Candi Pawon with arrival at Borobudur. The initial processions will start off with the ‘water processions’ on May 26 and then with the ‘fire processions’ on May 27.

HIGH VIEWS
Rumah Teras Guest House Bandung introduces its extension of Pavilion Rumah Teras with an opening promotion of a 20% discount through May. Pavilion Rumah Teras is 10 minutes away from Rumah Teras Guest House Bandung, located at the prime location of the Awilligar hillside, 15 minutes from the Dago area. Here guests can experience the highland atmosphere and wake to the exotic view of Bandung from their beds. Facilities include 14 air-conditioned rooms with television, refrigerator, hot and cold showers and a swimming pool. Room rates range from Rp. 400,000 to Rp. 1.2 million nett and include breakfast for single or double occupancies. Pavillion Rumah Teras Bandung Jl. Listrik No.1, Bandung (022) 700-66-567; www.rumahteras.com
BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010 59

BEYONDUPDATES

BRAZILIAN DELIGHTS
Gran Meliá Jakarta, proudly presents its Brazilian food festival from May 21 to 28 at the Café Gran Via. In collaboration with the Embassy of Brazil and fully supported by Ambassador H. E. Mr. Manuel Innocencio de L’acerda, this event has been eagerly anticipated by discerning Latin food lovers in Jakarta. Guests will be pampered with authentic Brazilian cuisine exclusively prepared by Chef Toya Yamashita, specially flown in from São Paulo to present authenticity to the event. During his 18 years of experience in the gastronomy field, he has had the opportunity to work in different Sol Melia hotels such as the Tryp Higienópolis and others in Latin America. In charge of the international kitchen at Meliá Jardim Europa, Itaim Bibi, São Paulo since 2002, he has continually used his expertise to surprise the most discerning palates, matching sophistication to a unique and healthy cuisine. Gran Meliá Jakarta, (021) 526-8080 www.granmeliajakarta.com

RINGING IN THE WEST
National mobile telecommunications provider Telkomsel recently supported the proceedings of the West Lombok regency’s 52nd anniversary by launching the regency’s anthem as a personal dial tone. Also agreed upon at that moment was the use of the provider’s telecommunications services throughout the governmental office staff in support of the government’s implementations of the Universal Service Obligation (USO), in the form of telecommunications infrastructure in 27 villages in West Lombok. www.telkomsel.com

LEGONG LEGACY
Bentara Budaya Bali and the House of Sampoerna in Surabaya will play host to an exhibition of Legong dance themed studio photography and computer software enhanced imagery by I Ketut Widiatmika. Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta played host to the first series in March and the series will continue in Bali this month through May 9. The House of Sampoerna in Surabaya will play host from August 19 to September 19. I Ketut Widiatmika, 48 years old, presents his work on prime quality digital prints and uses salon photography techniques, which he has long dealt with. His shots also feature montages of dancer’s poses as if taken through multiple exposures. The final results are black and white imagery that is easy on the eyes. 30 frames were exhibited at the Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta in March. Garda Printing, Jl. Pulau Kawe 43, Denpasar, (0361) 238-413 www.gardaprinting.com

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Bali Tropic Resort & Spa

HOTELHIGHLIGHTS
Bali Tropic Resort & Spa is an all-inclusive hotel that epitomizes the authentic Balinese architecture and style fringed by whitesand and crystalline sea--s. It combines nature, rejuvenating spa treatments, and a host of recreational activities to give you the ultimate tropical retreat... Perched gracefully between the ocean and the sky, embraced by the lush tropical landscape, resort serenity designed for indulgence, the ambience is definitely natural, a place of beauty beyond imagining. The resort offers 130 deluxe rooms, 14 royal bungalows and 3 2-bedroom suites, each featuring individually controlled air– conditioning, private bath/showers, satellite TV, IDD, minibars, and tea/coffee making facilities, safe deposit box. Vast choices for dining include three restaurants and four bars, serving international barbecue buffet dinner. Bali Tropical Spa has 10 treatment rooms with private shower and bathtub offering traditional massages, body scrubs, facial and other therapies to choose from. Experience the authentic Balinese hospitality.

All Inclusive
Jl. Pratama 34A, Tanjung Benoa, Nusa Dua Tel: (62) 361 772130, Fax: (62) 361 772131 E-mail: hotel@balitropic-resort.com Website: www.balitropic-resort.com

Pool Villa Club Sanur Beach Bali
The Pool Villa Club at Sanur Beach Bali offers luxurious one-bedroom ocean view villas with direct beach access. Each villa with private terrace and its own 11m private pool also comes with a majestic bed, living and dining areas and expansive gardens with gazebo. The villas have fully equipped kitchens with breakfast bar, a spacious bathroom with Jacuzzi and walk-in wardrobes. Guests may take the option of dining at the gazebo while enjoying the beach and the ocean. Personal butlers provide personalized services. A perfect place for couples, families or to entertain friends. Sanur Beach Bali also features 426 rooms and suites, 2 large pools, a choice of restaurants and bars.
Jl. Danau Tamblingan, Sanur 80228 Bali, Indonesia Ph: +62 361 288011 Fax: +62 361 287566 reservation@sanurbeach.aerowisata.com www.sanurbeach.aerowisata.com

The Patra Bali

Resort & Villas
The Patra Bali Resort & Villas is an 11 hectare five star resort in Tuban, offering one of the largest guestrooms in Kuta. All decorated in traditional Balinese style with exquisite wooden furnishings overlooking exotic tropical landscapes. The hotel has a warm and peaceful atmosphere and is ideal for total relaxation! The Resort has 206 rooms and suites, all beautifully appointed, with marble bathrooms and five-star amenities. There is a huge swimming pool right by the sea. The 22 Villas are a semi-boutique concept, giving extra privacy and luxury for families or couples. Many have private plunge pools, and they’ve all 24-hour butler service. Villa guests have their own huge seaside swimming pool and exclusive use of the Floating Heritage Lounge. The hotel offers more facilities like 4 restaurants, convention centers, a Kids club, Spa & Health club, a Beach Bar and free shuttle service to Kuta.

Jl. Ir. H. Juanda, South Kuta Beach, Kuta Tel : (0361) 751-161 Fax: (0361) 752-030 reservation.bali@patra-jasa.com www.patrabali.com

The location is ideal, a huge landscaped property on South Kuta Beach, directly on the Indian Ocean and next to the international airport. A 5-minute drive north brings you to the heart of Kuta’s shopping district.

The Dreamland Luxury Villas & Spa
The Dreamland Luxury Villas & Spa is a new destination for those who want to experience the atmosphere of first class service with state of the art facilities. 42 Private Pool Villas are available with different categories; 1 bedroom suite villa, 2 and 3 bedroom family villas to meet every guest’s dream. The Dream Spa is a fantastic hide away spa destination for the mind, body and soul. Featuring 3 Romantic Spa Rooms with double spa bed, shower, Jacuzzi, Sauna and spa locker. From the moment you enter into the resort’s lobby you can see the amazing Ocean Views, nice breeze, breathe in the fresh air, you can feel the sensation of the tranquil up hill environment. The Dream Spa is where a heavenly atmosphere invites you to relax, with an assortment of treatments invite you to indulge. Let the sensation of the Dream Spa’s atmosphere pamper and comport you soon. In the Ungasan village, high on the southernmost peninsula of the island of Bali. Ten minutes to Dreamland beach, from your villa by our free shuttle service. BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010 61

Jl. Raya Uluwatu, Br. Bakung Sari, Ungasan, South Kuta, Bali Tel. (0361) 708 199; Fax. (3361) 708 168 E-mail: reservation@dreamland-villa.com sales@dreamland-villa.com www.dreamland-villa.com

COMMUNITYCALENDAR

WHAT’S OUTSIDE YOUR DOOR
100 Sunset Boutique Hotel hosts a photo exhibition by Dedi Kristian through May 30. Dedi Kristian is most famous in Bali’s radio and music scene. Born in Bali, Dedi is also a DJ, rapper, guitarist, music director, announcer, and scriptwriter, so you know this multitalented young man has had what it takes to enjoy life with its many different colors. The colors of the things inside and outside his reach have shifted slowly and surely into images caught by his gadget, the camera. His latest projects are the latest events, pre-wedding and architectural designs. His jubilant works are now open for interpretation in the latest photography exhibition at 100 Sunset Boutique Hotel. 100 Sunset Boutique Hotel, Jl. Sunset Road No. 100 (0361) 847-7360; www.100sunset.com

ASIAN SPIRIT
Harris Resort Kuta hosts another photo exhibition held through June 30, displaying the works of French photographer Didier Leblond. His career shifted from graphic design to become a journalist. His passion for traveling took him to Europe, North Africa, and South America. In 1989, his first visit to Thailand impressed him enough to further explore Southeast Asia, especially Indonesia, where he was overwhelmed by the hospitality, the beautiful landscapes, the architecture, and the culture. He is now working freelance and is enthusiastic to discover more of Indonesia and other countries. His photographs have been displayed in many countries such as Indonesia, Australia, Germany, France, England, and the United States. Harris Resort Kuta Bali, Jl. Pantai Kuta, (0361) 753-868 www.harris-kuta-bali.com

PLAYING WITH THE ANCESTORS
Ganesha Gallery presents an exhibition of works by Kamto Widjaya Lindu Prasekti through May 31. Lindu is a Javanese sculptor, inventor, architect and all-round eccentric. Graduating from university, he went on to an alternative livelihood, a job with a local cottage bamboo and metalworking industry. Holding tools in his hands and making real things made him feel good. In 1996 he was even able to travel to Osaka, Japan to work as a draughtsman. Back to Yogyakarta in 1999, he had saved enough to open Jagad Gallery. As the supply of antiques thinned, his attentions turned to the large amount of leftovers - bits and pieces, odds and ends from old doors, furniture, chairs, and architectural elements that had accumulated in his warehouse. Ganesha Gallery, Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay, (0361) 701-010 Artist contact: 081-227-146-07 jagad_galeri@yahoo.co.id
62 BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010

Bali Masari

HOTELHIGHLIGHTS
Villas & Spa
Bali Masari Villas is a hotel with a difference and features four onebedroom and eight two-bedroom luxury villas each with their own private plunge pool beautifully situated overlooking a ravine in the valley of the Petanu River. A place to be at one with nature, to soothe the senses - mind, body and soul. Self-contained villas are perfect for honeymooners, for discerning travelers and executives. Restaurant providing a range of Asian and European food; bars, a spa, a large swimming pool and a smaller childrens pool. The villas have recently been refurbished to four star standards, each featuring its own dip pool and equipped with television, air conditioning, hot and cold water, telephone, electronic safety deposit box and kitchen. Spacious rooms boast high Balinese roofs, marble floors, a large central living area and a pull out sofa double bed. The 1.6 hectare resort is situated near the Sukawati village in the Gianyar Regency. 45 minutes drive from the Ngurah Rai International Airport, 30 minutes from Ubud, 20 minutes from Sanur. Shopping and art markets are nearby in Sukawati.

Jl. Pantai Purnama, Banjar Gelumpang, Sukawati, Gianyar Tel: (0361) 290-029 Fax: (0361) 290-050 E-mail: reservations@balimasarivillas.com Website: www.balimasarivillas.com

Mentari Sanur Hotel
The Mentari Sanur Hotel is tucked away down a small side street just off Jalan Hangtuah at the northern end off Sanur, Bali’s most enchanted village. Shaded by frangipani trees, this two-storey 28 rooms hotel offers the ideal combination of modern facilities and a charming Balinese atmosphere with family style hospitality and service. A large luxury private swimming pool is the right place for you to pamper your self and relax in a privacy atmosphere under a warm tropical sun. Tunjung Restaurant offers a combination of continental and traditional Balinese dining, cozy lounge is the area where you can sit down, relax, and bar will serves you varieties of drinks. Free exclusive broadband internet access. Located in a tranquil coastal village of Sanur make the Mentari Sanur Hotel is situated in an ideal location with immediate access to the main highway and just minutes from many great tourist activities and attraction, 25 minutes drive to the Ngurah Rai International Airport, 20 minutes drive to Kuta Beach, 5 minutes drive to the Sanur shopping area, 10 minutes drive to Denpasar and 30 minutes to Ubud.

Jl. Hangtuah III No.3, Sanur, Tel: (0361) 283-286, Fax: (0361) 283-017 E-mail: sales@mentarisanur.com Website: www.mentarisanur.com

Maxi Hotel & Spa
The Maxi Hotel & Spa is situated in the heart of Bali’s shopping and nightlife district. Centrally located, the property offers an ideal base for visitors wishing to explore Bali while keeping all the island’s best shops, bars, restaurants and beaches within easy walking distance. Hotel facilities and services include restaurant, bar, meeting room, massage and spa, room service, swimming pool with Jacuzzi, children’s pool, laundry and dry cleaning service, airport pickup and transfer, snack bar, tour desk, doctor on call, free car park, baby sitter upon request, broadband internet connection, major credit cards accepted, individually controlled air-conditioning, local and IDD telephone, satellite TV, daily mineral water, private bathroom with bathtub and shower, mini bar, personal electronic safe deposit, tea & coffee maker. The balcony overlooking the swimming pool and landscaped tropical garden offers a private area for relaxing.
Jl. Legian 83A, Legian Tel: (0361) 754-082Fax: (0361) 750-792 E-mail: info@maxi-hotel.com Website: www.maxi-hotel.com

The hotel is less than 15 minutes from Ngurah Rai International Airport; 20 minutes drive to Denpasar, 30 minutes from Sanur, Nusa Dua and within 45 minutes drive to the artistic centre of Ubud and about 350 meters from Bali’s famous Kuta Beach.

The Haven Hotel
Pioneering three in one concept, hotel, suites and villas located in the heart of hippest Seminyak Area. Famous area for clubs, boutiques and restaurants. Walking distance to beaches. With perfect concept “Naturally Elegant” post Perfect palace for honeymooners, party goers and fashionista. 96 hotel rooms, 60 spacious suites, 7 villas with private pool in each, function and meeting rooms, Three Main swimming pools, Atma Spa, SABEEN Healthy Restaurant, Gym, Library, Tirta Pool bar, butler services, Limousine service, LCD TV’s, Broadband Internet connection.
Jl. Raya Seminyak 500 – Bali Tel: (0361) 738-001 The Haven Suites & Villas Gg. Raja, Jalan Double Six – Seminyak - Bali Tel: (0361) 738-001, Fax: (0361) 738-002 Sales: (0361) 738-008 E-mail: info@thehavenbali.com Website: www.thehavenbali.com

Honeymoon package, Meeting package, Bed and breakfast package and Photo-shoot wedding Package. 15 Minutes from Ngurah Rai International Airport, walking distance to beaches, Shopping area, and Boutiques.

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COMMUNITYCALENDAR

WEDDING BAZAAR
Magnificent 9 Production and Rain Photography will hold a Photography & Wedding Bazaar titled “My Portfolio” from May 7-9 at Harris Riverview Kuta. Raymond Jr Setyadi was born in Balikpapan, East Kalimantan in 1974. His first career was as a video editor and cinematographer in Bali in 2002. Since then he has been interested in photography, with naturalist, artistic, candid, and landscape styles. Besides the photos displayed in the exhibition there will also be a wedding bazaar from wedding organizers, bridal houses and salons to introduce and promote their products and services. The goal of this event is to provide information for brides and couples to be prepared for their special day of tying the knot. This will also act as a pre-event for the Bali Wedding Exhibition that will take place in 2011. Magnificent 9 Production 0811-380-1258, www.mag9pro.com

FRENCH FILMS!
Alliance Française Denpasar will hold a French Film Festival from May 8-10. There will be 14 screenings and 5 films in French with English subtitles. The film screenings will be at the Galeria 21 at the Mal Bali Galeria in Kuta. Free ticket bookings at Alliance Française Denpasar commence on May 3. The 5 films are Les Enfants de Timpelbach (Trouble in Timpeltil), a family comedy; L’heure d’été (Summer Hours), a drama with Juliette Binoche; Je crois que je l’aime (Could this be love), a comedy; Délice Paloma (Paloma Delight), drama; and Les Bureaux de Dieu (God’s Office), a comedy. Alliance Française Denpasar, (0361) 234-143 www.afdenpasar.org

KARNIVAL THIS YEAR?
The Kuta Karnival is planned to take place again this year from September 29 to October 3. This 8th annual international event is targeted to attract thousands of people to the sands of Kuta once more. As with the previous years, the fun series of events is to include an opening ceremony with turtle releases and a Paddle for Peace commemoration, a Kite Festival, a Mepantigan Balinese Martial Art exhibition, Bali Hotels Association’s Bartender Competition, Graffiti Cartoon Expose, T-Shirt Cartoon Competition, Sunset Dances, Mini Cartoon Exhibition, Youth Race, movie screenings, a Barong Reptile Show, Street Art & Sand Sculpture Competition, Youth Info Centre, Raremotion Artist Series, Environment Day, Cardinal Music Awards, Bali Food Festival and a Street Parade. www.kutakarnival.com

PHOTO BY HENNY DESTYARINI

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SEE&SEEN

SPLASHES OF BEAUTY...
A group of Miss Universe finalists from Western Australia stopped at the Ayana Resort and Spa Bali for a session in the Aquatonic Seawater Therapy Pool - before having sunset cocktails at the Rock Bar. That lucky smiling guy in the middle is Troy Barbagallo, an Australian businessman who arranged their visit to Bali as part of their prize package before they head to Sydney for the national finals. Ayana Resort and Spa Bali, Jalan Karang Mas Sejahtera, Jimbaran, (0361) 702-222 www.ayanaresort.com

COLLECTION LAUNCH
Stella.R introduced its spring/summer 2010 collection to the fashion connoisseur in Bali during their launch at SKS (Simple Konsep Store) on April 10. Stella.R Spring/Summer 2010 collection is filled with dazzling colors that are flattering, elegant, sophisticated and delicate – in other words, feminine. Stella. R is available for exclusive retail in Stella Rissa Studio, Gaya the Designers’ Corner in Plaza Indonesia (Jakarta), IVY Boutique Plaza Senayan (Jakarta), Black Market in Singapore and SKS (Simple Konsep Store) in Bali. www.stellarissa.com

FULL SMILES
Harris Resort Kuta went on its regular visit to Yayasan Senyum to support its Corporate Social Responsibility program on April 10. Since 2005, Yayasan Senyum, a nonprofit organization has been responsible for attending to patients with craniofacial abnormalities and cleft-lip palates. The Harris Resort Kuta team handed over four boxes of second-hand clothes to support the “Smile Shops”. Two boxes were donated by the members of the Rotary Club Seminyak Bali. The other two boxes were items donated by the Harris Resort Kuta. Harris Resort Kuta Bali, Jl. Pantai Kuta, Kuta (0361) 753-868 www.harris-kuta-bali.com

KNOT TIED EXOTICALLY
The Dreamland Luxury Villa and Spa recently conducted a wedding ceremony followed by a Balinese blessing ceremony for a French couple, Mr. Thomas and Mrs. Libys Mortoveille, held at Padang Padang Beach on April 27. The Dreamland Luxury Villa and Spa in partnership with the local people of Padang Padang beach will cater the venue as a wedding destination in the near future to all of its clients. Now, the hotel also provides daily shuttle services to the beach, arranged through a concierge. The wedding was held successfully and the couple was asking for Villa team photographs so as to immortalize the celebration for when they are back home in France. www.dreamland-villa.com

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DREAM HOMES CONTINUE
As part of Melia Bali’s poverty alleviation project, this year in celebrating its’ 25th Anniversary the resort helps make four Dream Home projects for four families a reality, and those are the housing projects of I Wayan Lena in Banjar Bualu, I Made Peleng in Banjar Bualu, I Wayan Patra in Banjar Pande, and Made Puja Miasa in Banjar Kaja Jati. Meliá Bali has sponsored six housing projects since 2007, and the completely refurbished homes were turned over to six families. Each project was made possible through the involvement of the resort’s employee, guests, and management as well as the Badung Regent. Melia Bali, (0361) 771-510; www.meliãbali.com

RARE TREES
The Patra Bali Resort & Villas recently planted a thousand trees as part of its Patra Green Globe Care. The five-star resort has its own uniqueness. Over 11 hectares in size, one part of its grounds blooms with a rare coconut tree that has multiple branches and has become a key feature for the resort. The management decided to carry out conservation efforts of 100 rare plants in the resort’s area and plans to plant 1.000 trees in the area of the Badung regency. Maja trees were the most planted, donated by the Abdi Bumi foundation. Other trees included the Majegau, Badung, Mundeh, Gatep, and Sentul. The Patra Bali Resort & Villas, (0361 ) 751-161

PARTIED GOOD
Sector Bar-Restaurant-Lounge & Event House and BaliMoon Liqueurs invited the media, travel agents, bankers and Bali Beach Golf Course members to an appreciation night and thank you party in April. The event adopted a ‘party ala Grammy award and Red Carpet’ style, with people dressed up ala Marilyn Monroe, Barack Obama, and others. It was also Sector’s awarding night for its supporters. Entertainment included Moulin Rouge dancers, bands, Salsa performances, stilt walkers, and bartending flair. www.sectorbarrestaurant.com

OIL AND WATERCOLOR
Museum Pasifika in Nusa Dua hosted an exhibition in April featuring the works of French artist Guy Roussille in an exhibition of oil and watercolor titled Wantok. The exhibition was held at the entrance of the Pasifika and was an opportunity for the public to view 30 of Guy Roussile’s artworks comprised of 16 oil-on-canvas paintings and 14 watercolor paintings. The artworks featured dragonflies, Balinese objects and landscapes. The artist draws his inspiration from the ubiquitous essence of nature, and travels the world in search of its sensations. He likes the Americas, and he has lived in Mexico from 1979 in Valle de Bravo. His search for inspiration leads him throughout the world. 66 BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010 Museum Pasifika, (0361) 774-935

SEE&SEEN

IN APPRECIATION
Sanur Paradise Plaza Hotel & Suites threw a party to express their appreciation to their supporting partners during the year 2009. The evening was filled with various entertainment including an opening act by a Capoeira troupe, who set down the beat to invitees who indulged in the canapes and full buffet. The party took place at the hotel’s Negara ballroom. In the opening speech, General Manager Keith Bell expressed his appreciation for the support and briefly introduced the hotel’s newly renovated facilities including the Sanur Harum Restaurant and the new pillar-less ballroom. www.sanurparadise.com

LIVE EARTH
The Bali 6K Run/Walk For Water that was part of the Dow Live Earth Run For Water took place on April 18. The event aimed to raise public awareness of the water crises at the Pecatu Indah Resort, Bali. National celebrities such as Kaka Slank, Nadine Chandrawinata, Nugie, Dwiki Dharmawan and Marshanda were featured as guest stars alongside tree planting ceremonies and a 2km run. 17 local bands played in a concert. Dow Live Earth Run For Water was also held in Buenos Aires, Cape Town, Chicago, Hong Kong, China, and Los Angeles. www.liveearth.org

BOSSA NOVA DIVA
Hotel Tugu Bali and Word of Mouth presented for the first time in Bali the internationally renowned Bossa Nova diva Bebel Gilberto, live and in concert on April 16. Bebel Gilberto is an American-born Grammy Award-nominated Brazilian singer. She may be more familiar as the daughter of Joao Gilberto, one of the pioneers of the Bossa Nova movement in Brazil. Hotel Tugu Bali, Jalan Pantai Batu Bolong, Canggu Beach 0361-731701

OPENED IN APRIL
dekuta saw its grand opening in April as a budget boutique hotel offering comfort, ambiance and flair at affordable prices. The event featured fire dance entertainment as well as its own Managing Director on the guitar in a live music performance. The owners and family as well as business partners and media were invited to the opening event with food and drinks. www.dekuta.com

HIGH SCORES
Starwood Hotels & Resorts in Bali handed over scholarships to 30 high scoring students at the Dwijendra Junior High School in Nusa Dua on April 23. The junior high students were from grade 7 and 8. SMP Dwijendra in Nusa Dua is one of the schools under the supervision of Yayasan Dwijendra, one of the best foundations in Bali that focuses its energy towards the improvement of education. The event took place at the district administrative office of Benoa in Nusa Dua. www.starwoodhotels.com BALI&BEYOND MAY 2010 67

SKAL INTERNATIONAL BALI
An International Association of Travel and Tourism Professionals Doing Business Among Friends

LUNCH ST. REGIS STYLE
Another Triumph for St. Regis Bali, this April’s lunch brought back fond memories of last year’s January lunch to many of the 93 present. Frank Beck’s team continue to out do themselves. The KING COLE BAR pre-lunch reception with berry cocktails and the music of the bar’s pianist and singer was a great success. The BONEKA lunch was a true reflection of the resort’s signature style and quality with a menu featuring Walnut crust deep sea scallops, Wagu Tokusen beef strip loin MB7+, Orange cream palet and St. Regis Chocolate Truffle. We’re looking forward to coming back next year.

COMING EVENTS AT THE BEST VENUES IN BALI
The 145 members of Skal Bali meet monthly for a great meal, fellowship, fun, networking and an opportunity to bond and get to know industry colleagues. On the calendar 2010 are:

May 7 – Nikko Bali Resort and Spa – Nusa Dua June 4 – Ma Joly – Tuban July 2 – Tao - Tanjung Benoa

ABOUT SKAL AND SKAL BALI
Skal International, founded in Paris in 1934, is the World’s largest travel and tourism organization with over 20,000 members in 500 clubs in 90 countries. Members are industry management and professionals providing accommodation, tours, transportation, travel, cruising, maritime activities, attractions, restaurants, golf, spas, consultation and media. Skal Bali is the largest club in Southeast Asia and World Leader in Membership Growth Membership and Information Gede 2010 Juwena 68 BALI&BEYOND MAY Telephone: 7840212, email: gede@skalbali.com

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Fish Market

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The St. Regis

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CLASSIFIEDCOLUMNS

ACCOMMODATION
VILLA DIANA BALI – luxurious and exclusive place, good value for money. 3 villas with 3 bed rooms each, private swimming pool and garage, kitchenete, shower and bath tub, hot/cold running water. Jl. Kresna, Ulun Tanjung, Legian, Kuta. Tel: 754-038, 744-1282, 745-1600; Fax: 751-510 E-mail: info@dianagrouphotel.com; www.dianagrouphotel.com

during these tours are sometimes beyond description. BaliQuad (using ATV’s / quad bikes) and BaliBuggy (using off-road cars) are located in different locations which offer different tracks. A special “2-in-1 adventure” can be arranged, combining both off-road tours in one great adventurous day. BaliQuad, Jl. Wirasatya VI No.9X, Suwung Kangin, Denpasar, Tel: 720-766; Fax: 727-956 www.baliquad.com; www.balibuggy.com

ACTION & ATTRACTION
BALI ORCHID GARDEN – Enjoy the beauty of walking among hundreds of beautiful and rare orchids, Heliconia, Ginger and other interesting plants. A peaceful, natural and safe haven close to the city. Enjoy a drink and find unique souvenirs. Tel: 466-010, Fax: 466-011; www.baliorchidgardens.com; E-mail: info@baliorchidgarden.biz. BALI QUAD DISCOVERY TOURS - The Bali Quad and Bali Buggy tours both bring you to a part of Bali where you still can find old traditions alive. Drive yourself with a specially designed off-road vehicle that copes with all kinds of terrain, through an authentic part of the island, passing rice fields, crossing jungles and driving through a traditional Balinese village. The views

INTERNATIONAL NEWSPAPERS
NEWSPAPER DIRECT – Bali widest range of daily newspapers from anywhere of the world. Chose from 1012 titles of 79 countries, daily, weekly or as you like it. This service delivers you the complete edition of your preferred hometown newspaper on the same day of publication to your hotel or residence on Bali. Contact your hotel or villa reception or call or email them for the selection and pricelist 0361 769414 / info@newspaperdirect-bali.com

TOURS & TRAVEL
ADVENTURE INDONESIA – JUNGLE SURVIVAL TRAINING & FUN JUNGLE WAR, Student Field Trip, Orangutan & Dayak, Explore Irian Jaya Tribes, Komodo & Flores Adventure, Toraja Tour. BALI: Ruko Wana Segara 12A, Tel: (0361) 750 971, 750 964. JAKARTA: Wisma 31 kemang, 3rd floor tel: (021) 7182250/56, Email: info@adventureindonesia.com www.adventureindonesia.com

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INFOINDEX
AIRLINES
■ AIRPORT OPERATOR: Tel: (0361) 751-011 ■ CATHAY PACIFIC AIRWAYS: Wisthi Sabha Building, 2nd Floor Ngurah Rai International Aiprort Call Centre: 0804-1-888888 ■ CONTINENTAL MICRONESIA: Tel: (0361) 768-358, Fax: 768-369 ■ ROYAL BRUNEI: Tel: (0361) 757-292 ■ SINGAPORE AIRLINES: Jl. I Gusti Ngurah Rai, Airport Tel: (0361) 768-388, Fax: 768-383 ■ GARUDA: Jl. Jalan Sugianyar 5 Denpasar Tel. (0361) 227-824, Fax: 226-298 24-hour access: 08071-807-807 ■ MERPATI: Jl. Melati No. 51, Denpasar Tel: (0361) 235-358 Airport Tel: (0361) 751-011, ext. 5240/5242 Hotline: Tel: (0361) 722-740, 722-741 ■ MANDALA AIRLINES: Komp. Plaza Kertawijaya, Jl. Diponogoro No. 98, Denpasar Reservation Call center 08041234567 ■ NGURAH RAI AIRPORT: Tel/Fax: (0361) 759-761 ■ THAI INTERNATIONAL: Grand Bali Beach Sanur, Tel: (0361) 288-141 ■ QATAR AIRWAYS: Discovery Kartika Plaza Hotel, South Kuta Beach Tel: (0361) 752-222; Fax: 753-788. Wisti Sabha Building, 2nd Floor, Ngurah Rai International Aiprort, Tel: (0361) 760-274 Fax: 760-275 ■ DEPARTURE Arrive at the airport two hours prior to departure. A Rp. 150,000 international departure tax is required. Domestic departure fee is Rp 30,000. Residents pay an additional Rp. 2.5 million Fiscal tax for international departures, whereas holders of official tax registration (NPWP) numbers are Fiscal tax-exempt. Ngurah Rai Intíl Airport, Tel: (0361) 751-011 Tel: (0361) 285-485, Fax: 286-406 E-mail: consul @dps.centrin.net.id ■ GERMANY: Jl. Pantai Karang 17, Sanur Tel: (0361) 288-535; Fax: 288-826 Email: dtkonsbali@denpasar.wasantara.net.id ■ HUNGARY: Marintur, Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai 219, Sanur. Tel: (0361) 287-701 Fax: 287-456 Email: cristofoli@denpasar.wasantara.net.id ■ ITALY: Lotus Enterprises Building Jl. Bypass Ngurah Rai, Jimbaran Tel: (0361) 701-005 E-mail: italconsbali @italconsbali.org ■ JAPAN: Jl. Raya Puputan 170, Denpasar Tel: (0361) 227-628; Fax: 265-066 ■ MEXICO: PT Puri Astina Putra Building Jl. Prof. Moh. Yamin 1A, Renon Tel: (0361) 223-266 E-mail: yudhara@astinatravel.com ■ NETHERLANDS: KCB Travel, Jl. Raya Kuta 127, KutaTel: (0361) 751-517, Fax: 752-777 E-mail: purwa@denpasar.wasantara.net.id ■ NORWAY & DENMARK: Mimpi Resorts, Jimbaran, Tel: (0361) 701070 E-mail: mimpi@mimpi.com ■ SLOVAKIA: Jl.Gunung Agung 93, Denpasar 80118 Tel: (0361) 426171; Fax: 426-477 E-mail: konsulslowakbali@yahoo.com ■ SPAIN: Jl.Raya Sanggingan, Br. Lungsiakan Kedewatan, Ubud. Tel: (0361) 975-736 Fax: 975-726; E-mail: rabik@indo.net.id ■ SWEDEN & FINLAND: Jl. Segara Ayu (Segara Village Hotel) Tel: (0361) 288-407, Fax: 287-242 E-mail: segara1@denpasar.wasantara.net.id ■ SWITZERLAND & AUSTRIA: Istana Kuta Galeria Blok Valet 2 No 12, Kuta Tel: (0361) 751-735, Fax: 754-457 E-mail: swisscon@telkom.net ■ UNITED STATES: Jl. Hayam Wuruk 188, Denpasar. Tel: (0361) 233-605 E-mail: amcobali@indosat.net.id fever, but this is not a problem in tourist areas. Bali is non-malarial and prophylaxis is not required. Mosquito bites, cuts or abrasions easily become infected in the tropics. Treat them immediately. Drink only bottled or boiled water. Peel fruit before eating; avoid raw vegetables except at reputable restaurants. Ice in restaurants is safe. Protect yourself from the intense equatorial sun. Use high SPF sunblock and a hat. AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases are increasing in Indonesia. Local sex workers have multiple partners from around the world. They are not checked for sexually transmitted diseases. Act responsibly and use condoms, available over the counter at pharmacies. ■ MUSEUM LE MAYEUR: Tel: (0361) 286-164, Jl. Hang Tuah, Sanur. Open 8 am - 2 pm, Tuesday - Sunday. ■ MUSEUM MANUSA YADNYA: Mengwi, open daily, but often unattended. ■ MUSEUM NEKA: Tel: (0361) 975-074, 975-034, Jl. Raya Campuan, Ubud open daily 9 am - 5 pm. ■ MUSEUM PURI LUKISAN: Tel: (0361) 975-136, 971-159, Jl. Raya Ubud Ubud, www.mpl-ubud.com ■ MUSEUM RUDANA: Tel: (0361) 975-779, 976-479, Peliatan, Ubud. ■ MUSEUM SUBAK: Tel: (0361) 810-315, Jl. Raya Kediri, Desa Sanggulan, Tabanan.

HOSPITAL
■ MEDICAL EVACUATIONS: Contact your consulate. ■ BIMC HOSPITAL: Provides medical attention for emergencies and evacuations. Jl. Ngurah Rai 100X, at the KutaSanur-Nusa Dua roundabout. Tel: (0361) 761-263. ■ INTERNATIONAL SOS CLINIC: 24-hour emergency medical clinic services, medical evacuation, multilingual staff. Jl. Bypass Ngurah Rai 505X, Kuta 80361. Tel: (0361) 710-505, Fax: 710-515. ■ RUMAH SAKIT UMUM PUSAT SANGLAH (General Hospital): Jl. Diponegoro, Sanglah, Denpasar. Tel: (0361) 227-911/15. ■ KASIH IBU HOSPITAL: (Private Hospital) 24-hour emergency traumatology unit, maternity center, complete facilities and a full list of specialists, Jl. Teuku Umar 120, Denpasar. Tel: (0361) 223-036; Fax: 238-690 Email: marketing@kasihibu.co.id www.kasihibu.co.id

TELECOMMUNICATIONS
■ CELLULAR SERVICES Indonesia applies GSM (Global Services for Mobiles). You can purchase prepaid calling cards at lower cost than calling on your home card. Major Service Providers are Telkomsel, Satelindo, Pro XL and Indosat. Look for kiosks and outlet signs or banners with product variants and brand markings. ■ TELKOMSEL The major GSM provider, Telkomsel, is reputed to have the widest national coverage area, minimizing connection and signal relay inconvenience. Graha Telkomsel, Jl. Diponegoro 134 Denpasar. Tel: (0361) 228-811.

TOURIST INFORMATION
■ INTEGRATED TOURISM INFORMATION CENTER (ITIC) A one-stop tourist information complex of ten provinces in Indonesia comprising Bali, Lampung, Jakarta, Banten, West Java, Central Java, East Java, Jogjakarta. Jl. Raya Kuta 2, Kuta, 80361 Tel: (0361) 766-188 ■ NGURAH RAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT: Tel: (0361) 751-011 ■ BADUNG GOVERNMENT TOURISM OFFICE: Jl. Kuta Raya 2, Kuta Tel: (0361) 756-175/76 ■ BALI GOVERNMENT TOURISM OFFICE: Jl. Supratman, Niti Mandala, Renon, Denpasar Tel: (0361) 222-387 ■ SINGARAJA TOURIST INFORMATION OFFICE: Jl. Veteran 23, Singaraja Tel: (0362) 251-41 ■ UBUD TOURIST INFORMATION SERVICE: Jl. Raya Ubud, Gianyar Tel: (0361) 96-285, 973-285; 8 am - 9 pm.

MUSEUMS
■ ABIAN KAPAS: Tel: (0361) 227-176 East Denpasar. ■ AGUNG RAI MUSEUM OF ART (ARMA): Ubud, Tel: (0361) 976-659, Fax: 974-229. Jl. Pengosekan, Ubud, open daily 8 am-6pm. ■ ANTONIO BLANCO: Tel: (0361) 975-502, 975-551, Ubud, open daily 8 am-5 pm. ■ ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM: Tel: (0361) 942-352, Pejeng. Open 8 am - 3 pm weekdays. ■ GEDONG KIRTYA HISTORICAL LIBRARY: Tel: (0362) 25141, Jl. Veteran, Singaraja. Open 7am - 3pm Monday - Thursday, until Fridaynoon, closed on weekends. ■ GALLERY SENIWATI: Jl. Ubud Raya, Gianyar. Tel: (0361) 975-485 ■ MUSEUM BALI: Tel: (0361) 235-059, 222-680, Jl. Let. Kol Wisnu, Denpasar.

CONSULATES
■ AUSTRALIA, CANADA, NEW ZEALAND: Jl. Tantular No. 32, Renon - Denpasar 80234 Tel: (0361) 241-118, Fax: 221-195 E-mail: bali.congen@dfat.gov.au www.dfat.gov.au ■ BRITAIN: Jl. Mertasari 2, Sanur, Denpasar 80227. Tel: (0361) 270-601 Fax: 270-570 E-mail: tamarin@dps.centrin.net.id ■ CZECH REPUBLIC: Jl. Pengembak 17 Sanur. Tel: (0361) 286-465, Fax: 286-408 E-mail: bali@honorary.mzv.cz ■ FRANCE: Jl. Mertasari Gg. II No. 8, Sanur

HEALTH & MEDICAL
Call an ambulance by dialing 118, but it is a lot more practical and quicker to hire a taxi. Most hotels have on-call doctors on standby. For “Bali Belly”, Lomotil and Imodium eliminate symptoms, but not gastro-related infections. A fever along with symptoms requires doctor-prescribed antibiotics. Drink as much liquid as possible. Isotonic drinks under various brand names are widely available and are known to replenish body hydration and replace fluids. For discomfort, diarrhea and cramping, drink strong, hot tea; avoid fruits and spicy foods. Some day-biting mosquitoes carry dengue

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