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MUHL519-001

Studies in 20th-century Music


L. Doukhan

FALL 2015

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

FALL 2015 / DR. L. DOUKHAN

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MUHL519-001
STUDIES IN 20TH-CENTURY
MUSIC

MUHL519-001
STUDIES IN 20 T H -CENTURY MUSIC
FALL 2015

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

1 SCHEDULE INFORMATION

Class Location:
Class time/day:
Credits offered:

HH 214
R 2:003:40 pm
2.0 (50 class meeting per credit; 3 hours assignments per credit)
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2 I N S T R U C T OR C O N T A C T

Instructor:
Telephone:
Email:
Office location:
Office hours:

Lilianne Doukhan, PhD


269-471-3121
ldoukhan@andrews.edu
Hamel Hall 212
MTW 2:00 to 5:00 p.m.

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3 DISCLAIMER

This syllabus is subject to change. Subsequent versions will be uploaded and available in iVUE.
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4 COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is a survey of 20th-century repertoire from its late 19th-century origins to the present.
Emphasis is placed on compositional and stylistic trends and surrounding artistic climates. Trends
and styles are looked at in the perspective of various spiritualities which dominated the 20th century.
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C OU R S E M A T E R I A L S

Required:
Robert P. Morgan. Twentieth-Century Music: A History of Musical Style in Modern Europe and America. New
York: W. W. Norton, 1991.
Robert P. Morgan, ed. Anthology of Twentieth-Century Music. New York: W. W. Norton, 1992.
Robert P. Morgan, ed. The Twentieth Century. Vol. 7 of Strunks Source Readings in Music
History. Rev. ed., Leo Treitler, gl. ed. New York: W. W. Norton, 1998.

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For ISBN and price information,


www.andrews.edu/bookstore.

please

see

the

listing

at

the

Bookstore

P R OG R A M OU T C OM E S

Program Outcomes (PO)


1.Students will demonstrate understanding of music historyincluding the development of musical
styles and the contextual forces that shaped their development, in the context of Western music.
2.Students will hone critical thinking skills by
(a) consciously making informed interpretation choices;
(b) connecting theoretical and historical understanding to musical performance; and
(c) developing a personal and discerning philosophy of music.

7 S T U D E N T L E A R N I N G OU T C OM E S

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) By the end of the course, the student will:
1. be familiar with, and able to articulate an educated opinion regarding the significant
composers, genres, styles, and trends of 20th-century music
2. be able to aurally identify and place in historical context familiar and unfamiliar 20thcentury repertoire based on recognition of salient stylistic traits.
3. gain familiarity with and understanding of repertoire of his/her own performance area.
4. be able to see musical works of the 20th century as a reflection of a variety of spiritualities
current during the 20th century.
8 TEACHING STRATEGIES

Several teaching strategies will be used for this course:

Reading of textbook, scholarly articles, source materials


Watching recorded source materials (DVD)
Class lectures
Score study
Listening to repertoire (accompanied by score)
Music journaling
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Online and classroom discussion


Reflection papers on pertinent issues in 20th-century music
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9 CRITICAL THINKING

Students will be exposed to critical thinking by determining style characteristics by means of:

Conducting critical analysis of scores individually or in small teams;


Critical listening to musical excerpts, individually and in class setting;
Critically evaluating writings by composers and scholarly writings
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10 ASSIGNMENTS

1. Assigned Textbook and Scholarly Article Readings:


Regular reading from the 2 textbooks in preparation of the class sessions is required.
PO 1; SLO 1
2. Listening Journal
Students will keep a weekly online listening journal. The listening is set up as a chat room on
Moodle. Listening selections are indicated on the course calendar form (bolded entries;
posted on Moodle). Comments must be posted before the beginning of the class period.
Consult the instruction sheet for more specific guidelines.
PO 2 b,c; SLO 2, 4
3. Projects/Activities
There will be 4 projects/activities assigned (see separate instruction sheets posted on
Moodle). These projects must imperatively be turned in on the assigned days. For every late
day the grade will be lowered by one grade increment.
PO 1, 2abcd; SLO 1, 3, 4
4. Video Viewing
The student will choose 3 video tapes from the suggested list (including 1 by Leonard
Bernstein) and write a 1-page report on the combined viewing. This report will be due on
December 3, 2015.
PO 1; SLO 1, 4
5. On-line discussion and exchange; reflection papers
Selected readings and recordings will be proposed for personal reflection and on-line class
discussion exchange. Topics and musical selections will be posted on the Moodle
website on specific dates.
PO 1, 2abc; SLO 1, 2, 4
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6. Class Participation and Attendance


This area covers contribution to the course through in-class and online discussion,
attendance, and general participation. AU policy for attendance will be applied. No
credit will be given for the class if the student misses more than 10% of total class
meetings.
1 1 T E S T S & E X A M I N A T I ON S

Midterm and Final Examinations:


These examinations consist of objective and essay questions. An exam guide will be
provided ahead of time.
Midterm: Thursday, October 8, 2015.
Final exam: Thursday, December 10, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
No make-up exams will be offered without doctors excuse or real emergency.
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12 GRADING CRITERIA

Criteria for Grades


Student performance will be evaluated based on the results obtained on written projects,
reflection papers, music journaling, class participation including online discussion forums,
midterm and final examinations.
Grading Scale
Written Projects & Reflection papers 25%
Discussion Forums and Class Participation 25%
Listening Journal 25%
Midterm & Final Examinations 25%
A 94-99; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 83-86; B- 80-82; C+ 77-79; C 73-76
Assignment Submission
All assignments must be submitted on Moodle.
Late Submission
Late assignments are unacceptable unless prearranged with the instructor. Late assignments
incur a 10% per day penalty. Late participation in discussion forums will result in no grade
for the missed section.

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1 3 C L A S S P OL I C I E S

1. Student Responsibility
Email is the official form of communication at Andrews University. Students are responsible
for checking their Andrews University email, Moodle, and iVue regularly.

2. Professionalism
To prepare students for the professional world, certain behaviors/activities are not allowed in
the classroom.
Cell Phones, Personal Laptops, and Recording devices: Cell phones should be turned off
before entering the classroom. Picture-taking during class is not allowed. Recording devices
are allowed only if pre-approved by instructor, and if approved, under no circumstance are
recordingsvisual or verbalto be posted on a public website.
Laptops should not be used for surfing the web, doing email, or watching movies during class.
It is disrespectful and unprofessional to use these devices inappropriately during class. In case
of infringement, student will be asked to discontinue use of his/her laptop/electronic device.
Eating in class: Please do not bring food or beverages to class. Water is permitted.
Presentation is important. Your attention to detail, demeanor, and attire factor into how you
are perceived as a professional. Active participation in class discussions and critiques is an
essential part of learning. Without participating and expressing opinions and thoughts, it is
impossible to clarify your goals and develop a personal style.
3. Disability Accommodations
If you qualify for accommodation under the American Disabilities Act, please contact Student
Success in Nethery Hall 100 (disabilities@andrews.edu or 269-471-6096) as soon as possible
so that accommodations can be arranged.
4. Examinations
Credit is not granted in courses unless the required examinations are completed by the
student. Students are expected to follow the published examination schedule. In cases where
the schedule requires a student to complete four exams in one day, arrangements may be made
with the dean to complete one of the examinations at another
time.
AU Bulletin 2014-2015 Student Responsibilities, page
30
5. Class Attendance
Regular attendance at all classes, laboratories and other academic appointments is required
for each student. Faculty members are expected to keep regular attendance records. The
syllabus notifies students of the attendance requirements.
AU Bulletin 2014-2015 Student Responsibilities, page 30
6. Class Absences
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Whenever the number of absences exceeds 10% of the total course appointments, the
teacher may give a failing grade. Merely being absent from campus does not exempt the
student from this policy. Absences recorded because of late registration, suspension, and
early/late vacation leaves are not excused. The class work missed may be made up only if the
teacher allows. Three tardies are equal to one absence.
7. Excused Absences
Excuses for absences due to illness are granted by the teacher. Proof of illness is required.
Residence hall students are required to see a nurse on the first day of any illness which
interferes with class attendance. Non-residence hall students should show written verification
of illness obtained from their own physician. Excuses for absences not due to illness are issued
directly to the deans office. Excused absences do not remove the students responsibility to
complete all requirements of a course. Class work is made up by permission of the teacher.
8. Teacher Tardiness
Teachers have the responsibility of getting to class on time. If a teacher is detained and will
be late, the teacher must send a message to the class with directions. If after 10 minutes no
message has been received, students may leave without penalty. If teacher tardiness persists,
students have the right to notify the department chair, or if the teacher is the department chair,
to notify the dean. AU Bulletin 2014-2015 Student Responsibilities, page 30
9. Academic Integrity
Honesty in all academic matters is a vital component of personal integrity. Breaches in
academic integrity principles are taken seriously. Acts of academic dishonesty as described
below are subject to incremental disciplinary penalties with redemptive intent. Such acts are
tracked in the office of the Provost. Repeated and/or serious offenses will be referred to the
Committee on Academic Integrity for further recommendations on penalties.
University learning thrives on the rigor of individual investigation, the authentic exchange of
ideas, and a corporate commitment to integrity and mutual respect. University learning
requires all members of the academic community to behave honestly. Andrews University
anchors its practices in the teachings of the Bible as well as in widely established and honorable
academic traditions. As the apostle Paul calls us to authenticity in our Christian walk, so the
educational institution demands of its participants true and accurate self-representation. In
Ephesians, Paul invites believers to be renewed in the spirit of your minds, and to clothe
yourselves with the new self, created according to the likeness of God in true righteousness
and holiness (Eph. 4:23-24, NRSV). As scholars and as Christ servants, we build His living
body through our honesty in all things, both small and great. To that end, Andrews
Universitys faculty and students pledge to learn and grow together, committing to the
following Standards and affirming honesty as a core component of an Andrews University
education.

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The Andrews University faculty pledge to promote classroom experiences that foster academic
integrity. In the same way, students commit to do their part to build a community of honesty.
Students promise to:
1. Present assignments, lab reports, and research findings that are not falsified in any way.
2. Respect copyrighted and/or licensed material (whether it be directly quoted or
paraphrased) by citing print or electronic sources as appropriate.
3. Follow the source citation guidelines outlined by the course professor.
4. Submit work that is solely created by the person to whom it is assigned.
5. Contribute equitably when participating group-work.
6. Prepare for quizzes and examinations by study and review without stealing, accepting,
or using unauthorized quizzes or examination materials.
7. Follow the professors instructions regarding allowable aids during a quiz or
examination.
8. Complete quizzes and tests without seeking answers from or sharing answers with
other students or unauthorized sources.
9. Encourage others to high standards of integrity by refusing to assist in acts of academic
dishonesty.
In this course, my policy will be: no credit will be given on an assignment, quiz, test,
or examination where there was cheating involved. No credit will be given for the
entire course when plagiarism was involved.
10. Language and Grammar
There is an expectation that a student enrolled in a graduate program possesses advanced
written language skills, particularly in the language in which the degree is acquired. Thus, no
special consideration will be given to English as a second language learners or native-English
speakers who have yet to obtain mastery in written English. Such students are advised to seek
the assistance of the campus writing lab or procure the services of an editor prior to the
submission of their assignments. Tips for success include reading your assignments aloud and
having someone else do likewise prior to submission. This practice will provide you with
immediate feedback on your written assignments.
11. Emergency Protocol
Andrews University takes the safety of its student seriously. Signs identifying emergency
protocol are posted throughout buildings. Instructors will provide guidance and direction to
students in the classroom in the event of an emergency affecting that specific location. It is
important that you follow these instructions and stay with your instructor during any
evacuation or sheltering emergency.
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