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Universit y of G eorgia

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In the Spring of 2010, the Capstone class in the New Media Institute investigated the possibilities of using various forms of personal media to encourage users to engage behaviors and activities that will improve their overall health. In an effort to fight problems like heart disease, childhood obesity, type II diabetes, and high blood pressure, the class researched the various platforms and created the projects detailed in this report.

P R E S E N T E D B Y:

New Media I nstitute • University of Georgia • w w w.mynmi.net

Table of Contents
Letter from the director Twitter - TweetFit Facebook - MyFitness Live Mobile - CityStep Gaming - Tugg

Letter from the director
Our relationship with media is changing. Old media that encouraged us to consume mass messages are being pushed out by new media that respond in unique ways to our individual tastes, desires, and behaviors. We call these new forms "personal media" because our experience with them is customized and individualized. With Facebook, we craft our own personal content and consume the content of our friends. Via Twitter we build networks that allow us to "follow" those individuals we personally nd interesting, entertaining, or informing -- and ignore the rest. Mobile media delivers content to the most personal devices that we live with 24/7 -- cell phones. And games allow us to create our own personal spaces and experiences. e phenomenal growth in personal media attests to the changes in media preference. ere is a fundamental shift from media by them to media by and for us. e New Media Institute has challenged itself this semester. We wanted to determine if the power of these personal media can be converted from individual grati cation to a larger public good. Can personal media make the world a better place? is semester we explored the role that personal media might play in addressing one of our most pressing issues. We looked at whether Facebook, Twitter, mobile media, and gaming can build healthier communities by encouraging individuals to make good health behavior decisions. NMI students scrutinized each of the personal media platforms. ey analyzed existing projects. ey researched the technological components. en they put what they learned to work. ey actually built "promotypes" to demonstrate the health opportunities for each platform. is report contains their ndings and a description of these systems they created. We learned many things. But the main lesson is that personal media has great potential for public good.

Dr. Scott Shamp

Kristen Danch-Powell, Amanda Gordon, Ellen Greenwell, Cindy Reynolds, Lauren Robinson, Kristy Sumner

TWITTER

UGA | May 1, 2010 New Media Institute

Twitter
The Personal Media Public Good group devoted to Twitter have made it our goal to determine the best way to use Twitter to help people change one behavior that can improve their overall health. To establish this approach, we have conducted research on the Twitter platform, literature related to Twitter, social media, and health, as well as examined a successful health-related Twitter account, ActiveNetwork.

Platform overview
Jack Dorsey, the founder of Twitter, wanted to know where his friends were and what they were doing at any given time during the day. Intrigued by the idea, Dorsey and several colleagues partnered with a creative environment based in San Francisco, called Obvious, to build a prototype, which became Twitter (What is Twitter, 2009). Twitter is a short messaging service that allows users to post messages of 140 characters or less in real-time. It works with many networks and devices, from mobile to web, making it a popular social networking tool. Through Twitter, subscribers are able to follow people or interesting sources. To use Twitter, you must have an account. When a user tweets, their message is posted to their account and appears on the home page of other users that follow them. This action allows users to interactively connect with other people on Twitter. Using Apple computers, engineers at Twitter worked with a web application framework called Ruby on Rails. The Twitter platform uses a message routing system to send tweets to user devices and offers features like TwitPics and direct messaging in a sleek and simple social networking format (What is Twitter and how does it work, 2009). The first Twitter prototype launched in March 2006 and went public in August 2006. With an overwhelming response, Twitter became its own entity, and Twitter, Inc. was born in May 2007 (What is Twitter, 2009). People enjoy how simple it is to use Twitter. Users can post what they are doing, type what is on their mind, or post links to other websites they find interesting or amusing. Recently, companies and organizations have gotten involved in Twitter, using this free tool to promote their business and keep people updated on their programs or initiatives. Many have found Twitter to be an effective marketing tool. Unlike text messaging, which is a two-way conversation between two specific mobile phones, everyone that follows an account can see those conversations on Twitter. This open aspect is a unique way for content to circulate and reach many different types of users instantly. The future of Twitter lies in its ability to quickly spread information to anyone at any time. An example of Twitter’s communication abilities occurred in 2009 when protestors in Iran and Moldova used Twitter to report riot information from the streets, because access to traditional media was cut off by the government. In both cases, protestors created special hash tags to more easily identify their tweets, which gave direct attention to the protests all over the world. Outsiders could readily spot the tags and then retweet them to build awareness. This example illustrates how Twitter has crossed boundaries from a simple social media network to a tool that can be used to incite public change (Siegel, 2009).
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Twitter is also becoming increasingly useful as a networking vehicle. Twitter allows professionals to connect with each other and post information about their industry. Twitter grew to be especially relevant for networking after the economic downturn in 2008 and 2009 led to layoffs and job loss. Twitter provides easy avenues for letting your network of followers know that you are looking for work, and through Twitter you can brand yourself with a profile, tweet about projects, and find instant updates on companies and conventions. Twitter’s relevance will only continue to expand as an information channel in an ever-growing globalized world (“Twitter,” 2009). The most frequent ways that people use Twitter are for personal reasons, to post information on a specific topic, and for a company or an organization. The best way to use Twitter as a personal tool is to open an account, and start to actively following other accounts that interest you. Once you are comfortable with the format, you should start tweeting and interacting with your own followers. It is also important to note for new users who find the amount of content on Twitter overwhelming that you can follow different categories of Twitter users in groups called lists. You can create a list to group Twitter accounts together for any reason and receive it as a tweet stream; furthermore, you can include accounts into your lists that you are not directly following. The Twitter list feature allows individuals to follow certain themes without having to follow several single accounts (Catone, 2009). Twitter is a great vehicle for self-promotion, marketing, and branding. For businesses the marketing and branding aspects are important because Twitter facilitates a two-way conversation between a company and an individual. Never before could an organization have other people see the conversation between the company and an individual in an interactive setting. An example of this type of exchange occurred on Saturday, February 13, 2010, when Hollywood director Kevin Smith was asked to deplane a Southwest Airlines flight due to his obesity. Outraged, Smith immediately began a tweeting tirade in which he publicly attacked Southwest Airlines. Southwest was able to respond on Twitter with an apology to the director, but they also could reiterate their seating policy and justify their actions as a safety precaution. Southwest correctly dealt with the negative press by publicly addressing Kevin Smith; therefore, the negative public exposure focused back to Kevin Smith and his large size rather than the airline. Public relations departments should capitalize on Twitter’s communication aspect, because it allows companies to defend or explain their actions on the Web. Finally, Twitter is a great tool for acquiring news; not only can you instantly access blogs and articles, but you can also subscribe to feeds for specific websites and news channels (Lee, 2010).

Resources
www.twitter.com www.listorious.com www.retweet.com www.pingwire.com www.twitip.com http://twitpic.com

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Terms
@replies - Twitter update that begins with @username to tweet to a specific user. Direct message (DM) - private Twitter messages to users. Following - getting updates in your personal timeline from Twitter users you choose to follow.  Hashtags – tweets in a certain category that contain a pound symbol and subject, ex. #UGANMI. Lists – a group of Twitter accounts built by users that any Twitter account can follow. Mention - any Twitter update that contains @username in the body of the tweet.  Retweet (RT) – reposting a tweet you found interesting from a different user. Tweet – an update posted by a Twitter user using, containing 140 characters or less.

Literature Review
The following analyzes relevant literature surrounding the topics of obesity, the initiation of behavior changes, and social media tools. It is important to consider previous findings and studies when creating our Twitter account to use the most effective strategies. Obesity in America According to a recent study by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), more than one-third of U.S. adults and 16 percent of U.S. children are obese. Since 1980, obesity rates for adults have doubled and rates for children have tripled. Obesity rates among all groups in society – regardless of age, sex, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education level, or geographic region – have increased remarkably in the last 20 years (The Center for Disease Control and Health Prevention: The National Center for Chronic Diseases Prevention and Health Promotion, 2009). Obesity has physical, psychological, and social consequences in adults and children. Children and teens are developing obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, that were once seen only in adults. Obese children are more likely to have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, and abnormal glucose tolerance. The CDC found that 70 percent of obese children had at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease and 39 percent of obese children had at least two risk factors (CDC, 2009). The prevalence of adults in the U.S. who are obese may be high, yet new data suggests that the rate of increase for obesity in the U.S. in recent decades may be slowing (American Medical Association, 2010). Although the rate of the obesity epidemic may be slowing, drastic measures still need to be taken to reduce the high obesity rates in America. The Benefits of Exercise According to the 1996 U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health, people of all ages who are generally “inactive” can improve their health and well-being by becoming moderately active on a consistent basis (The Center for Disease Control and Health Prevention: The National Center for Chronic Diseases
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Prevention and Health Promotion, 2008). Regular physical activity that is performed on most days of the week reduces the risk for developing or dying from some of the leading causes of illness in the United States, such as heart disease (CDC, 2008). Regular physical activity can also improve health in the following ways: • Reduces the risk for dying from heart disease • Reduces the risk for developing diabetes • Reduces the risk for developing high blood pressure • Helps reduce blood pressure in people who already have high blood pressure • Helps control weight • Helps build and maintain healthy bones, muscles, and joints • Helps older adults become stronger and better able to move about without falling • Promotes psychological well-being (CDC, 2008). The CDC has identified everyday ways in which individuals can become more physically active. Evidence indicates that aspects of the home, workplace, and community environments influence a person's level of physical activity. For example, the availability and accessibility of attractive stairwells, bicycle paths, walking paths, exercise facilities, and swimming pools, as well as the overall aesthetics and perceived safety of an environment, may play a part in determining the type and amount of physical activity in which people engage. Being physically active, no matter how moderate, helps combat problems that can result from a sedentary lifestyle, such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease (CDC, 2008). Social Learning/Social Cognitive Theory Effective communication techniques to promote healthy lifestyles are based on a strong theoretical framework. The social learning theory, also known as social cognitive theory, proposes that behavior change is affected by environmental influences, personal factors, and attributes of the behavior itself. A central principle of social cognitive theory is the idea of self-efficacy. A person must believe in his or her capability to perform the behavior and must perceive an incentive to do so. Or according to the social cognitive theory, the person must possess self-efficacy and the person's positive expectations from performing the behavior must outweigh the negative expectations. Additionally, a person must value the outcomes or consequences that he or she believes will occur as a result of performing a specific behavior or action. Outcomes of the behavioral change may be classified as having immediate benefits (i.e., feeling energized following physical activity) or long-term benefits (i.e., experiencing improvements in cardiovascular health as a result of physical activity). because these expected outcomes are filtered through a person's expectations or perceptions of being able to perform the behavior in the first place, self-efficacy is believed to be the single most important characteristic that determines a person's behavior change. Self-efficacy can be increased in several ways, among them by providing clear instructions, providing the opportunity for skill development or training, and modeling the desired behavior (Hortz & Petosa, 2008). A proper model for delivering messages related to behavioral changes must be carefully selected to gain the most success in initiating behavioral changes.  To be effective, models must evoke trust, admiration, and respect from the observer. Models must not, however, appear to represent a level of behavior that the observer
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is unable to visualize attaining. Social media represents a possible model to help effectively encourage and deliver a behavioral change message to potential candidates (Hortz & Petosa, 2008). Social Media as a Behavioral Change Tool Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are social media tools most often associated with words like social, youths, and networking. Yet a growing body of evidence is suggesting that traditional social networks play a surprisingly powerful and underrated role in influencing how people behave. This recent finding is supported by Nicholas A. Christakis, a medical sociologist at the Harvard Medical School, and James H. Fowler, a political scientist at the University of California at San Diego. The two reported in 2009 that obesity appeared to spread from one person to another through social networks, almost like a virus or a fad (Stein, 2008). Christakis and Fowler have also produced similar findings about another major health issue: smoking. In a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the team found that a person's decision to quit smoking is strongly affected by whether other people in their social network quit, even people they do not know. Surprisingly, entire networks of smokers appear to quit virtually simultaneously. This study suggests that behaviors are swayed by social networks in ways that have not been fully understood. The researchers claim it may be possible to harness the power of these networks for many purposes, such as encouraging safe sex or getting more people to exercise (Stein, 2008). For this study, Christakis and Fowler analyzed records kept between 1971 and 2003 of 5,124 people who participated in the landmark Framingham Heart Study. When researchers analyzed the patterns of those who managed to quit smoking over the 32-year period, they found that the decision appeared to be highly influenced by whether someone close to them stopped. A person whose spouse quit was 67 percent more likely to kick the habit. If a friend gave it up, a person was 36 percent more likely to do so. If a sibling quit, the chances increased by 25 percent (Stein, 2008). The findings from this research could also have implications for the obesity epidemic. Groups of friends, coworkers or neighbors can use social media tools such as Twitter to aid in a coordinated effort to become a more health and physically active public. Though not much has been tested, as social media is still young, evidence from this research demonstrates the potential in social media to influence a behavioral change (Stein, 2008).

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Case Study
ActiveNetwork, www.active.com; http://twitter.com/activenetwork
In order to help us develop a successful Twitter approach, the Twitter group chose to study the ActiveNetwork account in depth.  Using this example, we can develop a foundation for our own account based on some of the most successful techniques that ActiveNetwork has employed to promote an active lifestyle.

Linked to the workout website Active.com, the ActiveNetwork Twitter account takes being physically fit to a whole new level.   With over 27,000 followers and impressive utilization of the Twitter medium beyond mere website promotion, it is certainly not your average account. Not only do those who run Active Network tweet about countless races and contests people can get involved in for various sports from running to bicycle riding and beyond, but they also cater to those that are not already active.  They have started several Twitter trends using hash tags, among them #activemonday and #bestrace, to create a sense of community and encourage people to be physically active and share their tips with others.  They also provide links to articles for everyone from the seasoned athlete to the mother who just wants to get her kids outdoors (Active.com, 2010). Active.com is owned by the Active Network, Inc., a company based in San Diego, California, which started in 1998 as a registration website for endurance races.  Since then, the company has grown to become a technology-rich site for event registration of all kinds with online communities supporting physical activity in several regions of the world and in many different ways.  Along with their growth as a company, they have established their presence on several social media sites like Facebook and, of course, Twitter, and they use these effectively to continue to expand the community aspects of their many branches (The Active Network, Inc., 2010). The developers of Active.com and its respective social media profiles wanted to create a social network that would enable people to “discover, learn about, share, register for and ultimately participate in activities.”  In essence, their purpose was just as simple as their name.  They wanted people to get out there and be active.  As one of the most popular sports and activity sites on the Internet today, they serve as an encouraging example of a successful social media community (The Active Network, Inc., 2010).

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Interview with ActiveNetwork

To gain a complete understanding of how Active.com and its parent company the Active Network, Inc. use their websites and their many social media outlets to encourage physical activity, we contacted the company to ask them a few questions. Based on communications with Geoff Scow on February 16, 2010 According to Geoff Scow, a representative for the Active Network, Inc., Active.com draws its success from a variety of sources. Because it not only provides users with a way to sign up for and engage in physical activity but also gives them an opportunity to “access instructional articles, get peer support in forums, track progress through training logs, [and] receive discounts on gear,” this site stands apart from other sport-related registration sites. The sheer quantity of activities represented on the site is also noteworthy with “over 80 sports […] in [their] events and activities directory” (G. Skow, personal communication, February 16, 2010). From a social media standpoint, Active.com maintains a powerful and highly interactive online community. The company uses their Twitter and Facebook pages to interact with users and to encourage them to take advantage of the wealth of information provided on the site. Beyond that, though, Scow remarks, concerning their Twitter account, that Active.com has “a fantastic team of content producers and editors […], and that’s reflected in the depth, breadth and popularity of articles [linked] to in a lot of [ActiveNetwork’s] tweets.” He feels that this is the “biggest differentiator” between their company’s social media pages and those of other activity-based companies (G. Skow, personal communication, February 16, 2010). Significance of ActiveNetwork ActiveNetwork has been influential in getting people to adopt healthier habits, especially in the realm of physical activity. Active.com encourages participation in many forms of sporting events. While it originally served as an online forum for race registration and team building, ActiveNetwork has grown to provide other services such as nutritional information for dieting and immune system building, as well as recreational activity information. Acitve.com is one of the most visited sports-related websites on the Internet (The Active Network, Inc, 2010). Utilizing their Twitter account, ActiveNetwork holds a large discussion each day on sports and nutrition. ActiveNetwork posts tips, responds to followers' suggestions, and responds followers' questions related to hashtag responses. ActiveNetwork's tweets also inform followers about activities going around in their own areas, give updates on upcoming races, and provide healthy eating tips. Followers may not be seeking to race or diet, but for many the tweets simply serve as a reminder to get moving. Followers may be encouraged to seek out activities stemming from the events discussed on this Twitter feed. The Facebook fan page/group Active.com has over 58,000 fans (Facebook Active.com, 2010). The “status” updates mirror those of the ActiveNetwork Twitter feed, and the fans participate with comments and wall posts. Facebook fans also post pictures from their endeavors. These pictures serve to both give and receive encouragement from other ActiveNetwork community members. The Active Network, Inc. links people all over the globe. Facebook fans and Twitter followers interact with each other trading ideas, tips, and encouragement. The community feel allows people to recognize their not
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alone in their pursuit of an active lifestyle. Participating in ActiveNetworks' social media serves as a motivation tool for those who need a little extra push. Reading others' stories, seeing the advice given, and in some cases looking at their photos helps out those who do not know if they are up for some of the physcial challenges. Future of ActiveNetwork The Active Network, Inc.'s use of social media lends hope that the Network will continue to be influential in the future.  The company has also been global since 2000, spreading its mission to many other countries. With now more than 20 offices worldwide Active has proved itself in the business world, becoming a major competitor in the marketing industry (The Acitve Network, Inc, 2010). On Active.com’s website, there is an online community where people can discuss races, other sports, exercise tips, etc. This open forum has 30,325 participants, many of which contribute a great deal to the forum (Active Community, 2010). There is even a singles section on Active.com that serves to engage singles in a separate online community with live audio chats and instant messaging. These forums are more important to site members who are less likely to be involved in social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter. Having embraced social media mediums like Facebook and Twitter, Active.com allows their online community to continue to grow.  With over 3,000 tweets, the ActiveNetwork's Twitter presence is a huge success (activeDOTcom, 2010).    The Active Network, Inc. is also on YouTube, Active.com. The videos include such subjects as "Efficient Swimming" and different stretching methods. The channel has 2,650 followers and 142 friends. The Active.com videos have received more than 2 million hits in less than three years (activeDOTcom, 2010). YouTube is an ever-growing force reaching all audiences. YouTube interacts very well with Facebook and Twitter, however Acitve.com has not fully integrated these vehicles. With more advertisement of their channel, they could reach even more subscribers. With the Twitter account and the online community, The Active Network, Inc. is positioned for a successful future. The company is continuing to grow and reach new audiences.

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Twitter project: TweetFit
Representing one of the most popular platforms of social media today, Twitter has become an influential communication tool used by corporations, non-profits, individuals and even celebrities. According to Twitter there are over 105 million users, sending over 55 million Tweets a day. By all measures, Twitter is growing rapidly. But Twitter is more than a social media platform, it has also transformed into a trusted source of information. “Twitter lets people know what’s going on about things they care about instantly, as it happens,” Evan Williams, Twitter’s CEO, told The New York Times. “In the best cases, Twitter makes people smarter and faster and more efficient.” A survey of Twitter users from MarketingProfs supports Williams’ views. On a scale from 1 to 5 (with 1 for strongly disagree and 5 and for strongly agree), the phrase “I find it exciting to learn new things from people” averaged a score of 4.65 and “I value getting information in a timely manner” averaged 4.58. It is clear that Twitter is here to stay and perhaps more powerful than ever. Based on these findings, students in the New Media Institute selected Twitter as a valuable and trusted new media platform to use in promoting behavioral changes.

Target Audience
Unlike the majority of social media platforms, Twitter attracts a slightly older audience. The Pew Internet and American Life Project says that the average Twitter user is "overwhelmingly young," though the average age of a Twitter user is slightly higher than most other social networking services. Twitter's median age is 31, while Facebook's is 26 and MySpace's is 27. Based on these findings, New Media students identified busy adults age 25 to 40 as the target audience for this project. Many adults who work full-time or have children find it hard to be physically active during the week. Finding time to go to a gym is not always an option for everyone. Yet following a sedentary lifestyle can be more dangerous for your health than smoking, says a new study carried out by the University of Hong Kong and the Department of Health. In the study, researchers looked at the level of physical activity in people who died and were able to correlate their level of physical activity with their risk of dying. The results revealed that 20 percent of all deaths of people 35 and older were attributed to a lack of physical activity. With this information, New Media students dedicated the Twitter platform to helping adults add physical activity to their day. The target audience specifically includes young professionals, working parents, and stay-at-home moms.

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TweetFit
Wouldn’t it be cool if you could use Twitter to add physical activity to your daily routine?   After all, regular exercise is a very important part of a healthy lifestyle. The American Heart Association recommends that adults get about 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day. The benefits of daily activity can include helping to maintain a healthy body weight and increasing energy levels.  Cardio workouts are specifically designed to raise the heart rate which provides numerous health benefits as well.  These workouts tend to focus on movement-intensive activities and sports like running, climbing, or walking. Stretching, on the other hand, can relieve tension in the muscles and tendons while also raising the heart rate.  Stretching and yoga-related exercises are generally more relaxed and more focused on flexibility than movement.  No matter the type of exercise, regular physical activity provides a large array of benefits. As students at the New Media Institute, we have created a way to use Twitter to send customizable timereleased messages that encourage adults to exercise and raise their heart rates during lunch. TweetFit will send direct messages with workouts, including either cardio workouts or yoga, created especially for busy adults who have little time during their day. By using Twitter in this innovative way, TweetFit allows followers to customize the time and content of their messages. Followers have a choice of receiving messages at 11 am, 12 noon or 1 pm each week day. Additionally, TweetFit users have the option of selecting whether they would like to receive tweets including information about cardio workouts, yoga stretches, or both. Users can read their tweets as text messages on the go or on their Twitter page online. TweetFit can help adults fit a quick 15 minute or less workout into any hectic day and create a more physically active routine for followers. 

How TweetFit Works
To create TweetFit, we utilized a several programs that, when combined, help us operate this account as a unique and personalized exercise suggestion system.  First, we established our Twitter account using the account name TweetFitAth. Next, we created a website using Google’s blogger tool www.tweetfitath.blogger.com - and embedded a Google form on the sign up page, so followers can tell us when and what kind of messages they’d like to receive.

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Our next task was to find a way to send time-released direct messages to specific groups of our Twitter followers. For this, we chose to use a combination of the third-party programs, including TweetParty.com and SocialOomph.com. TweetParty allows Twitter accounts to group their followers using hashtags.  They can then send direct messages to these groups separately instead of contacting all of their followers at once. SocialOomph.com gave us the ability to send direct messages to users at pre-assigned times. Now we have a working system for sending our messages to the correct groups of users at the times that they choose.

How to Use TweetFit
To use TweetFit, first a person must follow TweetFitAth on Twitter.  TweetFitAth will then follow the user as well, so that direct messages can be sent between them.  Next, the user needs to inform TweetFit when and white kinds of exercises they would like to receive, but filling out the Google form on our website powered by Blogger.com. Users can access our website by clicking on the link on our Twitter page, or by going to www.tweetfitath.blogger.com. On the site, under Sign Up for TweetFitAth, the user will find an embedded Google Form.  On the form, they will provide their contact information as well as the time they would like to receive their daily message and the type(s) of exercise (cardio, yoga, or both) that they would like these messages to include. 

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Once the user clicks submit, they will receive the following confirmation email: Thanks for signing up for TweetFitAth. Starting immediately you will receive messages based on your time and workout speci cations. Your feedback is important to us. If you like our messages, feel free to retweet our workout suggestions to your friends and followers or send us a message to let us know. We hope TweetFitAth will help you reach your tness goals. Best of luck! TweetFitAth Team  Now the user is signed up for TweetFitAth!  They will receive one direct message to their Twitter account each week day with a suggestion regarding their choice of exercise. The user can set up their Twitter account to send direct messages to their phone as SMS (text) messages or to their email account through their Twitter settings.  Tweets they may receive include: Cardio • Ditch the elevator and take the stairs. You can burn up to 9 calories a minute and tone your body from head-to-toe! • Do 2 sets of 75 jumping jacks. This will boost your heart rate and keep you energized for the rest of the day! • Sit on your chair with knees bent, feet flat on the floor. Extend your feet so they face out with your knees locked. Do 2-3 sets of 20. • Today's move: Push Ups! Make sure your back is strait and elbows are square. Do 2-3 sets of 15. • Burn Fat! Walk briskly for five minutes, stop and jump in place for one minute; make sure to bend low and extend arms up during jump. Repeat. Yoga • Stretch your arms! Extend one arm strait then pull it towards your chest with your other arm. Hold for ten count then switch. Do 3-4 sets. • Keep your neck long with your head facing forward, roll your shoulders back and down. This stretch lengthens your torso and improves posture. • Sit on the floor with legs extended flat against a wall. Bend towards toes. Hold stretch until you feel the tension in your muscle release!

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• Stretch Hamstrings! Stand with your feet shoulder width apart and pointed straight ahead. Slowly bend forward, keep knees slightly bent. • Raise your shoulders towards your ears until you feel slight tension in your neck and shoulders. Hold for 3-5 seconds then relax. Repeat.

Evaluation
It is important to consider how the developers can evaluate the success of TweetFit in the future. To determine which exercises are most popular amongst users, developers can track the number of times followers retweeted TweetFit messages. Based on these findings, developers can continue to send workout tips that followers find most helpful. TweetFit should also continually send followers reminders to provide feedback, as this will be the best way to evaluate success. Additionally, future developers should encourage and utilize TweetFit success stories. By creating an interactive two-way conversation with TweetFit followers, developers can monitor how users are benefiting from TweetFit. Success stories can also attract prospective users by demonstrating follower’s success with TweetFit.  

Future Direction
During the initial development, TweetFit can start by setting up local Twitter accounts such as TweetFitAth for Athens, Ga. By creating a community aspect, users will feel connected to each other and TweetFit can gain credibility within communities. As TweetFit grows and learns from its users by monitoring feedback, it can develop a national account. Once a national account has been established, TweetFit can pursue a number of different options to continue its development and increase followers. Future possibilities for TweetFit include acquiring corporate sponsors, partnering with personal trainers and working with organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). By developing this innovative way to use Twitter, organizations will be able to reach audiences on a more personal level to help adults get more physically active.

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The Twitter Team
Cindy Reynolds cindy@costa-creative.com M.A. Mass Communication, concentrating in Advertising, graduating in December 2010. Cindy acted as the team leader, and was responsible for finding the technology solutions that made the Twitter project work. Cindy completed a B.A. in Advertising and Journalism from Lee University in 2003, and went on to work in graphic design. She spent the last four years managing the corporate brand for Zaxby's, which included working on everything from race cars to training material. Cindy went back to school in the fall of 2009, and she currently is building her own business - Costa Creative - specializing in advertising, branding and creative communication. She also works with Dr. Shamp in the New Media Institute. In the future, Cindy plans to continue to build her business and follow her husband's band, Leaving Araby, as they tour. Kristen Danch-Powell k19dora@gmail.com B. A. Mathematics/ Statistics, graduating in December 2010 Kristen designed the website, contacted and wrote the case study on Active Network, helped write the final paper about TweetFitAth, and conducted searches for information like applicable Twitter apps, stats, etc. as needed. While at the University of Georgia, Kristen has worked towards Bachelor's degrees in Mathematics and Statistics, a minor in Theatre, and certificates in Computer Science and New Media. Outside of school, she write for EchoreynofAthens.com, a biweekly blog Kristen created about the local music scene of Athens, GA. She also writes and directs her own creative short films for the amateur film studio she established called Echoreyn Midnight Studios. In the future, Kristen dreams of becoming a published author, establishing her own company, and working in search engine optimization, data mining, website design, and animation among other things.

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Ellen Greenwell ellengreenwell@gmail.com B. A. in Public Relations, graduating in May 2010 Ellen conducted research on Twitter as a new media platform, how Twitter is being used to influence healthy decisions and the health risks affecting adults today. She helped in the development of the TweetFitAth website and the TweetFitAth Twitter account. Ellen was also a part of the marketing team representing the Twitter group. Ellen is a senior Public Relations major with two minors in Spanish and History. She has completed a number of internships including a corporate communications internship with Solvay Pharmaceuticals and a social media internship with Athens Banner-Herald. Currently, Ellen is looking for interesting opportunities after graduation. In the future, Ellen would like to use her communications and new media skills to do corporate communications for a Fortune 500 company. Amanda Gordon mandag22@gmail.com B. A. in Sociology, graduating in May 2011 Amanda organized and managed the Twitter account, as well as other third party accounts. She was responsible for setting up the account and scheduling/posting tweets. Amanda is majoring in Sociology, emphasizing Criminal Justice. She is also working on a New Media Certificate, as an asset in her future career. She hopes to enter into the Criminal Justice field through the Navy. Amanda wishes to become an NCIS Special Agent, or maybe work in the intelligence field. She hopes that her New Media Certificate will make her more valuable in this field. Lauren Robinson lrob77.robinson@gmail.com B. A. in Advertising, graduating in May 2010 Lauren researched the different ways people use Twitter from a personal and business standpoint, and wrote the user case study for Emily to give a voice to the TweetFit target audience. She wrote and researched all of our health/ cardio/yoga Tweets as well. Lauren is in her fourth year as an Advertising Major with a minor in Consumer Economics and a certificate in New Media. She am a lifelong golf enthusiast and has interned for Fore Georgia golf magazine in Atlanta doing media and web work. Lauren spent last summer traveling with gypsies through Hungary and living in a village in Transylvania. In the future, Lauren hopes to do work that she am passionate about. She wants to help companies connect with real consumers through advertising and media. She would also love to have the opportunity to travel more and learn another language.
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Kristy Sumner sumner.kristyh@gmail.com B. A. in Agricultural Communication, graduating May 2010 Kristy helped gather information on the Twitter platform, laid out the poster that was later edited to its final version, made an outline for the presentation, as well as brainstormed and made suggestions throughout the process of developing TweetFit. Kristy is a creative person who loves design. She is highly motived in all the projects she am involved in. Kristy is a great team player and can take on several projects at once, giving each a lot of attention to detail. She loves advertising and graphic design, and she hopes to one day work in a field that works with them and/or social media. Kristy would one day hopes to start her own freelance design company focusing on invitations, announcements and stationary. More importantly, Kristy hopes to get a job with a company that has a great atmosphere, values and work ethic where she will fit in and enjoy every day that she comes to work.

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References

Active.com. (2010). Retrieved February 11, 2010, from http://twitter.com/activenetwork. activeDOTcom (2010). YouTube ActiveDOTcom's Channel. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/user/ACTIVEdotCOM. Active community (2010). Active.com Retrieved February 16, 2010 from http://community.active.com. Adult obesity still high, but recent data suggest rates may have stabilized US. (2010). American Medical Association. Catone, J. (2009, November 2). How to: Use Twitter lists. Mashable. Retrieved from http://mashable.com. Facebook Active.com (2010). Retrieved February 11, 2010, from www.facebook.com/pages/Active.com. Hortz, B. & Petosa, R. (2008). Social cognitive theory variables mediation of moderate exercise. American Journal of Health Behavior. 32, 305-314. Lee, C. (2010, February 16). Kevin Smith’s Southwest airlines incident sets web all a-Twitter. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved from http://articles.latimes.com. Siegel, R. (Show Host). (2009, June 19). Twitter’s impact on Iran protests examined [Broadcast transcript]. National Public Radio. Retrieved from www.npr.org. Stein, R. (2008). Social networks’ sway may be underestimated. Washington Post. Retrieved from www.washingtonpost.com. The Active Network, Inc. (2010). History - The active network. Retrieved February 10, 2010, from www.activenetwork.com. The Active Network, Inc. (2010). Timeline - The active network. Retrieved February 10, 2010, from www.activenetwork.com. The Center for Disease Control and Health Prevention: The National Center for Chronic Diseases Prevention and Health Promotion. (2009). Obesity at a Glance. The Center for Disease Control and Health Prevention: The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (2008). 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Twitter. (2009). Retrieved February 10, 2010, from http://topics.nytimes.com. What is Twitter and How Does It Work? (2009). Retrieved February 16, 2010, from www.johncow.com. What is Twitter? How to Twitter? (2009). Retrieved February 16, 2010, from http://learntotwitter.com.

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Genevie di Leonardo, Nicole Bennett, Sierra Fenton, Meghan Irwin, Magan Jenkins, Andrew Kann, Caitlin Peterson

FACEBOOK

UGA | May 1, 2010 New Media Institute

Facebook
Platform overview
• Developed in 2004 by Mark Zuckerberg • Although originally designed only for college students, now anyone with an email address is able to become a member • More than 400 million active users (visited the site within 30 days) worldwide (“Statistics,” 2010) • More than 65 million active Facebook Mobile users (“Statistics,” 2010) • Facebook Mobile users are 50% more active than non-mobile users • 94,748,820 users in the United States (largest user nation in the world followed by the UK) (Gonzalez, 2009) • 56.7% Female; 43.3% male • 18-24 year olds are largest user group (25.2%) followed by 25-34 year olds (24.9%) • About 70% of users are outside of the United States (“Statistics,” 2010) • Over 70 translations available on the website • Average users spend more than 55 minutes a day on Facebook (“Statistics,” 2010) • More than 500,000 active applications on the website (“Statistics,” 2010) In March 2010, Facebook eclipsed Google as the most visited site on the Internet in the United States, receiving 7.07 percent of weekly website traffic. Despite the site’s astronomical popularity, the potential of this relatively new platform remains largely untapped. Although developers have experimented with Facebook as a personal, entertainment, and business oriented social media outlet, the potential to use Facebook as a means to encourage public health has been scarcely explored. Wouldn’t it be cool if you could use Facebook to help you lose weight? Our project transforms facebook into a virtual personal trainer that connects users through live video feed to help them achieve their personal fitness goals. The MyFitness Live application capitalizes on the popularity of Facebook to encourage users to become more active. By providing Facebook users with exercise-related content customized to their personal interests and goals, as well as the opportunity to interact and learn from others who share these interests, the MyFitness Live application will motivate Facebook users to spend some of the time that they already dedicate to Facebook to being more active and, consequently, getting healthier. The MyFitness Live application encourages and motivates Facebook users to persevere and master the exercise videos in order to achieve the Expert status, wherein they will be able to help other users of the application. Therefore, the social and community
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aspects of the application encourage users to stick with it and continue to interact with the application as they reach their personal fitness goals. This paper will show how we made this project possible. First, the different ways in which Facebook is used will be discussed, including: Personal/Social, Business/Philanthropic, and Entertainment. Next is a case study of a Facebook application that works well to help users keep track and reach their personal fitness goals. This is followed by a description of our project, the MyFitness Live application. To better present our project, a user case study follows the project description, depicting how a typical Facebook user would interact with the MyFitness Live application.

Social/Personal
The most popular way in which Facebook is used is as a mechanism for social interaction and personal expression. The connection that users feel with others in the Facebook community has led the platform to explode in popularity. Facebook is a powerful way for users to stay connected with people that they may not typically call on the phone or see on a regular basis. Profile A key component of Facebook is the Profile. All Facebook users have a Profile, which allows them to control how they are depicted to the rest of the Facebook community. Users can choose to include information about their relationship status, religious and political views, interests, hobbies, favorite books, movies, and quotes. Wall One of the most frequently used components of every Facebook users’ Profile is the Wall. Users are able to leave messages on each other’s Walls that can be viewed by their Friends. The Wall also displays photos that the user was recently Tagged in, Groups and Events that the user has recently joined or plans to attend, and other interactions that the user had with his or her Friends. Friends Users can connect with each other by sending Friend Requests. Users have the option to either accept or ignore requests. Facebook is a useful avenue for users to stay connected with people that they know and to learn more about new acquaintances. The average Facebook user has about 130 Friends and sends roughly eight Friend Requests per month (“Statistics,” 2010). Facebook is an easy way to stay connected with people that one may not communicate with in person. It also provides the opportunity for users to find and communicate with others who share their interests.

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Friend Requests Friend Requests are requests to connect with another Facebook user; by accepting a Friend Request, a Facebook user grants access to his or her profile, including Photos, Videos, Applications and other information. However, users have the option to limit the access their Friends have to this information. Status The Facebook Status feature enables users to tell the Facebook community what they are doing, what they are thinking about, or to post a link to other online content. Facebook Statuses can be customized in a practically infinite number of ways, and are one of the most commonly used features of the social networking site. Each time users update their Statuses, a notification appears on the News Feed of their friends, allowing them to comment. News Feed News Feeds are a useful tool for observing what others are doing, as well as current trends that are developing on the site. The News Feed is a type of Wall that is located on users’ home pages, and includes information about their Friends’ recent Facebook activities, such as uploaded Photos, comments, and Groups or Events that they had joined or attended. Photos The Photo application enables Facebook users to upload pictures to share with their Friends. After an event or get together, a new album is often made by users to display their documentation of the festivities. Tag The Tag feature is within the Photo application. This feature enables users to link images of other users to their Profiles. Users’ linked photos are displayed on their Profiles and in the photo albums of the user who uploaded them. Users have the ability to “Untag” a picture if they do not want others to see it on their Profile. More than 2.5 million photos are uploaded on Facebook each month (“Statistics,” 2010). Events Facebook Events have become a logical and simple way to send out invitations, as the majority of people’s friends are Facebook users. It also provides an easy way to draw more people to an event, as Facebook users constantly receive notifications about events that their Friends are attending on their News Feeds. There are more than 3.5 million Facebook Events created each month, and the average user is invited to three Events per month (“Statistics,” 2010). Chat Rather than having to text or pick up the phone and call someone, users are given the ability to have real-time communication with Friends via back-and-forth instant messaging. If users have a quick question about something or want to tell someone something short and they see that the person that they want to talk to is on Facebook, the Chat function can be an extremely useful and appropriate communication tool.
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Business/Philanthropic
Facebook was once written off as another means to help college students waste away precious study time by browsing photos from last night’s party or posting witty status updates. However, fast forward to today, and you can see the tremendous influence this social networking platform has had on the success of businesses and philanthropies. Both large and small organizations are taking advantage of access to a staggering audience of over 400 million active users. Facebook has quickly become a staple marketing tool for corporations and non-profit organizations around the globe since its creation in 2004. Though businesses and philanthropies have different objectives—one to generate money and awareness for a product or service for profit, the other for charities and public good—many of the same Facebook features can be used to achieve each result by simply altering their content and promoting continuous interaction with their audiences. There are several ways in which an organization may develop an identity through Facebook. Advertisements Advertisements on Facebook serve the same purpose as banner advertisements on websites. These ads appear on the right side of the Facebook users’ screen and are customized to his or her stated interests and location, as is displayed on their Profile. Groups Facebook Groups are a group of people that share a common interest. Some groups require an invitation, while others are open for all users to join. Group pages are very similar to regular Profile pages, featuring a Wall, Info, Discussions, Photos, Video, and Events. Fan Page The Fan Page is basically a glorified version of a Group. More than 700,000 local businesses have active Fan Pages on Facebook (“Statistics,” 2010). Similar to an individual Facebook user’s Profile, a Fan Page serves virtually the same purpose for a professional business, charity foundation or any number of other causes or endeavors that rely on user interaction and feedback (“Social Media Guide,” 2010). Anyone can become a Fan of a Page by clicking the “Become a Fan” button in the Page header. Fans are equivalent to Friends on a personal profile. Fan Pages have created more than 5.3 billion Fans (“Social Media Guide,” 2010). Fans are granted access to view all content on the Fan Page, receive all messages, etc. A Fan Page serves as an umbrella for additional features that allow the business to interact with the user on a more personal level, such as applications, user-generated content, videos, images, group discussions, two-way conversation, and much more. Info Within both the Group and the Fan Page is an info tab, which is set aside for general information, such as the companies’ contact information, location, mission statements, and links that enable users to purchase products, make donations or view the business or philanthropy’s external website. Events
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Businesses and philanthropies use the Events tool to invite fans or group members to sponsored events and provide information about how many people will be, will not be, or maybe attending the Event. Wall The Wall is used to post the recent Facebook activity or news related to the business or philanthropy for a Group or on a Fan Page, while also enabling fans to respond and interact with the content. Discussions Other user-generated content can be posted in the Discussions section of the Group and Fan Page. Here, users can respond with feedback, testimonials, and opinions regarding a particular cause, product, etc. Applications Another notable feature of the Fan Page is the ability to incorporate Applications to further engage fans. There are thousands of applications used for many different purposes, such as: • • • • Keeping records Voting Streaming outsourced content Simple entertainment

The following list is a few Applications that may prove quite useful once added to a Fan Page: • The Twitter app automatically pulls tweets into Facebook statuses, saving time updating and remaining consistent The Video app provides the ability to upload user-generated video feeds The RSS Reader pulls in content from users’ blogs to their Facebook Profiles The HTML/FBML (Facebook markup language) enables developers to add images, video, interactive comments, etc. The Flash Player enables users to embed Flash content, i.e. video, widgets, and games. It also enables users to create their own Applications.

• • •

Facebook Connect Facebook Connect is another very important tool that enables users to seamlessly transport their Facebook identities to an external website or application (“Build and Grow,” 2010). This tool is extremely beneficial in increasing traffic to a website, encouraging Facebook user engagement, and potentially boosting revenue for the business or philanthropy. More than 80,000 websites have implemented Facebook Connect since its development in December, 2008 (“Build and Grow,” 2010). Facebook users may visit a website using Facebook Connect, allowing them to stream this content to their Facebook profiles and share it with their friends who,
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in turn, are likely to click back to the external website. More than 60 million Facebook users use Facebook Connect each month (“Statistics,” 2010). Two thirds of comScore’s U.S. top 100 websites and half of comScore’s global top 100 websites use Facebook Connect (“Build and Grow,” 2010).

Entertainment
Facebook provides its users with an outlet for something everyone can relate to: entertainment. While Facebook’s primary application is as a social media tool that allows users to connect with their friends and stay up to date with what is going on in their social circles, it is also the perfect medium for people of all backgrounds to entertain themselves. Facebook enables its users to engage in activities through different mediums including applications, gaming, music, videos, and celebrities. Applications Applications are software programs that can be both externally and user-generated and range from games to non-profit donation buttons. Applications personalize users’ profiles, creating a more unique and personal space within Facebook. Games Facebook Games are developed for the active user and are generated with a different purpose than traditional video games. These Games are intended to be played for short periods of time while users are on the Facebook website. Therefore, users do not have to open separate browsers and are able to continue interacting with the website while they are playing. Facebook Games also allow users to share their progress with the game and play with all of their Facebook Friends. Competition and community are the driving forces behind a successful game on Facebook. Music and Videos Music and Videos allow users to listen to, share, and interact with their favorite artists and bands. Groups market themselves through Facebook Fan Pages, while Applications, such as iLike and Music Challenge, provide a way for users to share their Music with friends and connect to their favorite songs, artists, and Videos. Users can watch, listen, rate, and comment on Music and Videos and Post them to their profiles, allowing for further personalization of their page. Celebrities Celebrities use Facebook to reach out to fans and to promote their endeavors. While Facebook has become a less popular means of following celebrities because of sites like Twitter, it still provides a place for fans to interact and support their favorite celebrities. The Fan Pages also draw attention to causes that the celebrities find important and enable users to interact and post commentary. Facebook provides a personal look into celebrity life with Photos, Videos, and frequent, real-time postings and Status Updates.

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Feature Case Study: Fit-ify Exercise Tracker
Since Facebook first leapt onto the social media scene around six years ago, the social networking site has exploded in popularity, today serving over 400 million users online. Unfortunately, many of its users have also exploded in size, especially in America. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention data compiled in 2008, around one-third of all American adults are obese or overweight (Flegal et al., 2010). Among children and teenagers, the numbers are similarly staggering: according to government data cited in a February USA Today article, around 32% of children and teens are currently obese (“Premature,” 2010). Another recent government study shows that obese children and teenagers may live two to five years less than their parents because of future health complications caused by childhood obesity (“Premature,” 2010). Should this trend continue, future generations will be forced to pay for the astronomical healthcare bills and insurance premiums that will be incurred down the road by many obese children, who are likely to become obese adults. Facebook’s emergence as one of our generation’s most popular modes of communication is likely not helping the problem. Internet use amongst our generation has reached an all-time high: a recent British study estimated that youth under the age of 20 spend over 30 hours per week on the Internet, the majority of which is spent on Facebook (Greenhow et al., 2009). The average Facebook user spends an average of 55 minutes per day perusing the site, clicking through photos from last weekend or checking up on old friends (“Statistics,” 2010). On a daily basis, Facebook’s nearly 400 million users are spending almost an entire hour sitting in front of a computer screen, browsing through the site. This is precious time that could be otherwise spent walking, running, or participating in some other form of physical activity. Though the exorbitant amount of time that Americans are spending in front of their computer screens may be a problem, one study has shown that the Internet, if used effectively, does have the power to get people back on the move. A 2001 study commissioned by the Weight Risk Investigators Study Council, which examined 91 healthy but overweight adults, found that the Internet can be an effective vehicle for public health intervention, especially for such public health problems as obesity (Tate et al., 2010). Researchers found that the study participants who were enrolled in an immersive online weight loss program, complete with a sequence of 24 weekly weight loss lessons delivered via e-mail and required weekly submissions of an online self monitoring diary, lost significantly more weight than those assigned to the study group that participated in a simple weight loss education program online (Tate et al., 2010). It was found that the repeated contact with participants, offered by the immersive behavior therapy program, was one of the most important reasons why participants receiving that particular treatment fared better in their weight loss endeavors (Tate et al., 2010). Clearly, a key component of any web-based weight loss program must be constant interaction with the individual. Given the amount of time users spend on its website, Facebook presents a logical platform for application developers looking to venture into the realm of public health. Several Facebook applications and pages have attempted to address the issue of mass inactivity that is plaguing America, from the personalizable “Tickers” that users can add to their Facebook profiles to keep tabs on their weight or exercise habits to the countless fan pages dedicated to gyms or fitness programs around the country. However, these attempts to mobilize the Facebook community lack the capacity to allow users to set specific and personalized fitness or
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weight loss goals, and to provide users with a means to track their progress towards their own personal objectives. Fortunately, one developer has created a Facebook application aimed at spearheading this problem in a convenient and effective way. Developed by independent application developer Don Holloway, the Fit-ify Exercise and Health Tracker is a useful application for Facebook users looking to set and achieve specific health and fitness goals. The application aims to take advantage of the enormous amount of time that Facebook users spend in front of a computer screen as a way to keep them focused on and moving towards their stated fitness or weight loss goals. Considered a “lifestyle” type application, Fit-ify has been available to Facebook users for nearly two years. The application was launched in March 2008 but, despite its somewhat lengthy availability on the Facebook landscape, the application has just over 5,500 monthly active users. Despite its relatively small base of users, Fit-ify is a very unique and innovative application, especially considering its use of the Facebook platform. Capitalizing on the compulsive use of Facebook by many Americans today, Fit-ify aims to keep its users focused on their health and fitness goals. After installing the application to your profile, the application requires users to enter information about their current height and weight. Based on the information provided, the application calculates the user’s Body Mass Index (BMI), a statistical measure that compares his or her weight and height. Though a person’s BMI doesn’t provide an exact measure of a person’s percentage of body fat, it is a useful tool for estimating an individual’s healthy body weight based on his or her height. If one’s BMI is currently over 25, a number above which is considered to be unhealthy, Fit-ify will calculate how many pounds he or she needs to lose to achieve a healthy BMI. Though the application’s BMI calculator is a useful tool for Facebook users to gauge their physical fitness, perhaps the most innovative feature of the Fit-ify application is its ability to visually display your progress towards a healthy weight and physical fitness level. On each subsequent visit to the application’s Facebook page, users are asked to “weigh in”, or enter their current body weight. Using the weight information that is entered over periods of weeks and months, the application generates a graphical representation of the individual’s “90 Day Weight History.” This line graph gives users the unique ability to see their progress towards a healthy BMI, while also allowing them to see trends and fluctuations in their weight. It also allows users to pinpoint time periods where they made real progress towards their weight loss goals, and also to take notice of periods of weight gain or stagnation. This visualization of progress is an important tool for anyone trying to shed a few pounds. By charting users’ weight loss over time, Fit-ify allows them to consider their eating and exercise habits during times of significant weight reduction so that they can adjust their current diet and exercise regimen accordingly. Any effective exercise tracker must do just that: allow users to craft a workout and fitness regimen that suits their abilities, schedule, and weight loss goals, and track their progress towards achieving those goals. Fit-ify, perhaps more than any other fitness-focused Facebook application currently available, does just that. The application features an “Exercise History” tab, which allows users to enter their recent workouts. Users can log distance workouts in one of four areas of exercise activity: running, walking, swimming or cycling. For those interested in getting in shape via alternative types of physical activity, Fit-ify also allows its users to record a number of types of timed workouts: aerobics, yoga, pilates, spinning, mixed workouts or even boxing.
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Fit-ify stores users’ workouts in a personal “Workout History,” allowing them to look at their activity levels over the past week or month. Often, a major struggle for individuals trying to get in shape or lose weight is developing a feasible workout regimen. However, outlining the workout is only half the battle. If individuals really want to get in shape or lose weight, they must stay dedicated to their fitness program and focused on their weight loss goals. Acknowledging this issue, Fit-ify provides its users with workout suggestions, as well as links in the “Exercise History” section of the application to popular running or aerobics programs. This feature makes it easy for Fit-ify users to choose a regular workout program and stick to it. As another tactic to keep users dedicated to their weight loss objectives, Fit-ify offers various awards and other forms of recognition as users record more workouts and accumulate mileage and aerobics time. In any athletic or goal-oriented endeavor, competition is a key motivating factor for people in a variety of disciplines. The developers of Fit-ify, recognizing this innate human desire to compete with others, have incorporated a competitive element into their exercise tracker. The application features a “Top Ten” section, which ranks the ten best Fit-ify runners, walkers, cyclists and swimmers based on distance logged. This ranking of users, and the competitive spirit that it fosters amongst the Fit-ify community, is one of the most significant features of the exercise tracker. Overall, user reviews that have been posted on the Fit-ify application’s wall are very positive. Many users explain that because they are already on Facebook so much, Fit-ify is a perfect way for them to stay focused on their fitness goals and also to record their weight loss progress. Some users have suggested a section for recording non-distance based activities besides aerobics, such as weightlifting or sports activities. Also, a few users have suggested a calorie burn calculator to give them an idea of how many calories they are burning during their 2-mile run or 30-minute aerobic workout. Social media technologies are constantly evolving, as evidenced by the seemingly never-ending platform adjustments that hit Facebook every couple of weeks. Despite the ever-changing nature of the social media landscape, there are a number of ways that Fit-ify and other applications of its kind can be improved and advanced to better serve the public good in the future. Allowing users to enter their food intake and diet information would further enhance the Fit-ify experience. By calculating daily caloric intake, the application could then calculate exactly how many calories users need to burn to meet their stated weight loss or BMI goals. Also, the issue of accountability is one that needs to be addressed by Fit-ify and similar applications in the future. Currently, there is no way for Fit-ify to determine whether its users are actually running and swimming the distances that they claim to be in their exercise history logs. Right now, technologies exist in several products sold by Nike and other sportswear companies that utilize a computer chip embedded in an individual’s shoe that can be synced with the individual’s iPhone or iPod to record a user’s workouts. Perhaps something using this or a similar technology could be developed to track workouts and record them automatically on the user’s Fit-ify Exercise History. Though there is still much room for improvement for the Fit-ify Exercise Tracker and future public healthrelated Facebook applications of its kind, Fit-ify represents a noteworthy use of the Facebook platform as a means to get people in shape. Though it may seem somewhat odd to even use the words “Facebook” and
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“weight loss” in the same sentence, Fit-ify strives to do just that: to get Facebook users focused on achieving personal fitness and weight loss goals.

Wouldn't it be cool if...
…you could use Facebook to help you lose weight?  Our project transforms Facebook into a virtual personal trainer that connects users through a live video feed to help them achieve their personal fitness goals. Our group wanted to find a way to use Facebook to get people to be more active.  Ultimately, we were trying to contribute to the nationwide battle against obesity, which has become a major public health epidemic across the entire country.  According to the Get America Fit Foundation, obesity is currently the #2 cause of preventable deaths. One of the major contributors to obesity is inactivity, a problem that goes hand-in-hand with the rising popularity of Internet use, specifically social media sites like Facebook.  According to Nielsen (2008), Facebook was the ninth most popular brand on the Internet and had the longest time spent on its website per person in comparison to the 75 most popular internet brands.  Between December 2007 and December 2008, the amount of time that Facebook users spent on the site increased by 566%. The most common and successful solution for battling the obesity problem is exercise. Unfortunately, many exercise programs require people to take time out of their days to leave home and attend a gym. This proves difficult not only due to busy schedules, but also the costs associated with a gym membership. We were looking for an opportunity to take advantage of Facebook's popularity, while providing a free peer-oriented opportunity for people to exercise while in the comfort of their own home. 

Proposed Solution
Users of the MyFitness Live application will be able to exercise during the time that they already spend on Facebook.  Facebook users will have the opportunity to download the application and begin working out instantly.  The application will provide users with a community setting that will encourage and motivate them to achieve their fitness goals.  It also gives them the one-on-one attention that is characteristic of a personal trainer at a gym...but for free! The application will not only give users workout videos that are personalized to their own exercise interests and goals, but also the opportunity to receive help from others that have mastered that particular exercise.   Rather than simply becoming a "Fan" of a gym or exercise-related organization, our application allows Facebook users to actually participate and interact with the exercise content and other users!  The opportunity to become an Expert of a specific exercise provides users with the motivation to continue working out and ultimately reach their fitness goals.

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Facebook project: MyFitness Live
When Facebook users download the MyFitness Live application, they will be prompted to choose three out of the five provided exercises—yoga, pilates, Tae Bo, step, and dance—in which they are interested. Once the users choose their three exercises, they will be provided with three videos related to their selected exercises will be provided. Users are able to choose between beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels of each exercise.  Upon selecting a video, an enlarged screen will appear, where the users are able to click play and begin watching the selected video.  Following the completion of the video, users will be provided with the option of watching the next video in the series or a video related to one of the other exercises that they selected.  Users also have access to still photos of exercises and poses, as well as additional exercise videos from which they can choose in a gallery section of the application. At the bottom left hand side of each video screen is a help button that users can click while viewing the video if they have a question regarding the workout.  Upon clicking the help button, a list of all of the available Experts of that particular exercise will drop down for their selection.

Once the user selects an Expert from the list, an interactive screen featuring a live video feed with the Expert will pop-up in a new window. The Expert will be available to all users that are currently viewing a video in his or her area of expertise. He or she will be equipped with a screen layout of one large video screen, on which he or she will appear to the users, as well as multiple smaller video screens displaying the live feeds of the users that are currently in need of assistance. When the Expert is helping a particular user, he or she is able to enlarge that user's video feed by simply clicking on that user's small screen to better see the problem. If the Expert appears busy helping another user, users have the option of exiting the live feed and returning to the previous page where they will be able to choose another available Expert from the drop-down menu. After users complete ten videos of a particular exercise, at least one of which is an intermediate and advanced video, they have the option of becoming an Expert of that exercise. Once users become an expert,
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they can be called upon by other users for help regarding that particular exercise. Upon agreeing to be an expert, users' names will be added to the Expert drop-down list that is provided to all other users who are in need of assistance.

Technology
We thought that an application would be the most effective way to use Facebook to get users to be more active. Applications provide the opportunity for Facebook users to customize their profile pages with free content--think of it as adding flair to your Facebook…only this flair can interact with you!  We had two options for the creation of the application: applications can be developed either through the Facebook website or externally with Flash or Dreamweaver and then imported onto the Facebook page. If the application is developed through Facebook, all of the fonts, colors, links, etc. would be exactly like the Facebook page. If the application is developed externally, the developer is able to choose his or her own colors, fonts, and layout. We decided to develop the application externally in order to have this creative freedom. Originally, we decided to use Dreamweaver to create the application; however, it limited our options for development. Flash was our next choice.  It allowed our project to go above and beyond: it was cleaner, easier to work with, and required no coding or decoding.  To create our application, we decided to go with a Fitness Sport & Health Flash template. We customized the template by changing the pictures, content, etc. First, our task was to find where the content was located in Flash. Each piece of our template was located on different layers that needed to be either changed or deleted to fit with our project. However, certain animation and predetermined layouts were a challenge to work with. We also had to find workout videos on YouTube for each of our workout categories: yoga, Tae Bo, dance, pilates, and step. We then linked each video to our application through a video streaming database called Stickam.  Stickam is a social networking site featuring professional and user-generated images, audio, and video.  It is the first website of its kind to accommodate the live-streaming video chat for which it is most prominently known.  Users are able to host live group chats and debates and participate in public chat rooms.  The website has expanded to include live-streaming shows, as well as live performances by many musicians and celebrities.  We chose this program for our application because it has the convenient ability to embed its streaming webcam feeds into other websites using a Flash player.  By merging this social networking resource with the most popular social networking platform to date—Facebook—we have been able to expand Sitckam’s functional capabilities to create more interactive social communities.

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There is currently a Stickam application on Facebook that enables users to broadcast themselves through Stickam on their profiles.  However, we believe that this application has more potential than just enabling Facebook users to broadcast themselves online.  The MyFitness Live application uses the Stickam interface to unite Facebook users that share a common interest: fitness.  The MyFitness Live application is centered around the opportunity for developers to embed their streaming webcam feeds from their Stickam accounts into the Facebook application using a Flash player.  By inserting the embed code for a given Stickam host account into the application, viewers are able to sign into Stickam and join the live conversation.  We linked the list of fitness Experts on our application to their Stickam live accounts.  By clicking their names on the list, users will be instantly connected to the Experts’ live feeds and prompted to sign in to Stickam.com so they may be assisted in their workout.  It is necessary to have an active Stickam.com account in order to use the service. If the Expert of the embedded account is not signed in to Stickam, however, he or she will not be visible or available to the MyFitness Live users.  The Expert is able to maximize the size of each guest’s screen for better viewing of each individual user.  Multiple guest windows allow the Expert to assist several users at once.

Challenges
We faced many challenges in the development of this project. The first challenge that we faced was when we attempted to create a project that none of us had the skills to actually develop.  In our attempt to be innovative in a medium that has done little in the realm of public good, we lost touch with our true technological abilities.   While we had a great deal of good ideas about what the project should do, we were not sure how exactly it could be done.  Originally we came up with a project that created a new version of Facebook and would, thus, require the permission and partnership of the Facebook developers.   As this would be very difficult to acquire and develop, we decided to break the project down into feasible components, while maintaining its original innovativeness.  We decided that we wanted to include live video conferencing within our project, but we had several different ideas of how it should be incorporated.  First, we thought that it should be a live workout, wherein users would be connected with an instructor who would be able to watch and help them throughout the workout.  As we were discussing the logistics of this program, we realized that it would be impossible for an instructor to keep up with a large group of users and actually be any help.  We tossed around the idea of setting a maximum number of users that could participate in the live chat, but realized that there was probably an easier way to incorporate the live video feed.  That was when we decided that the video feed would only be used when a user clicks a help button while watching a provided workout video, thus leading to a live conversation with the Expert. After we decided the basic premise of the MyFitness Live application, we had to find a live video program that we could embed into a Facebook application.  After researching and playing around with a variety of programs, including SkypeMe, an application that was currently used on Facebook, we found the Stickam program. We were then faced with the challenge of learning how to use the application and incorporating it into our project.
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Future
Fitness is ever-changing and will continue to be a hot topic as long as people desire healthy lifestyles. The media world changes each and every day and will inevitably open more doors for advertising, community involvement, and other social media outlets within the fitness world. In the future, the MyFitness Live application will provide the option for users to not only interact with an individual Expert through the live video feed, but to also participate in a live video workout with an instructor and other participants in the class of their choice.  Additionally, because it is an external application—developed outside of Facebook—the MyFitness Live application can be adapted to other social media websites, as well as mobile media players, in the future.

Conclusion
Despite the almost infinite number of applications available to Facebook users, the market for effective, easyto-use applications aimed at getting people off of the couch and on the move remains largely unexplored. The MyFitness Live application represents a unique transformation of the Facebook platform. By capitalizing on Facebook’s tremendous capacity to connect its users, as well as its widespread use among the general population, MyFitness Live allows users to exercise from the comfort of their homes with the ability to receive real-time fitness assistance.

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MyFitness Live Team
Genevieve di Leonardo          genevievedileonardo@gmail.com Expected Graduation Date: December 2010 Genevieve served as the leader for the Facebook group.  She was in charge of bringing together and facilitating communications between members of the group—keeping everyone on the same page and working toward the same goal.  She also participated in the brainstorming and idea generation that eventually led to the development of the MyFitness Live application.  Finally, she contributed to the research and writing of the final paper and was in charge of all of the editing. Genevieve is a first year graduate student at the University of Georgia, where she is completing her master's degree in advertising.  She attended the College of Charleston for her undergraduate education, where she majored in corporate communication and minored in business administration.  While at CofC, she served as the vice president of PRSSA and a reporter for the student newspaper The George Street Observer.  She is currently working as a graduate publications assistant in the College of Education's Office of Communications and Publications.  Upon graduating, Genevieve plans to pursue a career as an account executive, either in an advertising agency or a political consulting firm.  Even though she was born and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Genevieve plans to spend the rest of her life in the south. Nicole Bennett njlbennett@gmail.com Expected Graduation Date: May 2010 Nicole contributed to the writing and editing of the final report, as well as research and assisting in the development of the application. Nicole is a senior at the University of Georgia, completing her education in Sociology and New Media. She has always had an interest in the newest gadgets and technologies to hit the market, so the New Media Certificate program was a perfect fit. During her free time, she enjoys spending time with her parents and her closest friends, taking trips, eating out, being in the sun, and trying anything new and adventurous. After graduation this upcoming May, Nicole is moving to Greenville to start her career with one of the nation's leading commercial printing companies, Consolidated Graphics, where she will start as an Associate in the Leadership Development Program.

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Sierra Fenton sierrapf@gmail.com   Expected Graduation Date: May 2011 Sierra proposed the original concept of using a live video interface to create a specialized community within the platform for the project development.  She was also part of collaboration in concept execution, and was responsible for finding an applicable live stream video client.  It was necessary for her to become fluent with this program and aid in the creation of the featured Facebook application: embedding live stream interface and enhancing program appearance and capabilities using raw HTML code and text editing software. Sierra is the artist, the designer, and the nerd… all rolled into one.  She spends much of her extra time enhancing her graphic design and web development skills.  Painting, drawing and Discovery Channel specials are some of her favorite past times.  Her most recent challenge has been teaching herself raw HTML code to better understand some of the software she uses.  Sierra is an Advertising major pursuing a New Media Certificate and has been involved with campus organizations such as Fashion Design Student Association, Little Red Book fashion magazine, and AD Club.  Following graduation, Sierra plans to either enroll in portfolio school or begin her career in an advertising agency.  Meghan Irwin Mei6589@uga.edu, meghan6589@yahoo.com Expected Graduation Date: May 2011 Meghan was the marketing representative for Facebook Group.  She was in charge of contacting people about the New Media Public Good conference, including Facebook developers and experts in fitness and physical health. She also helped design the MyFitness Live application on Flash and assisted in the writing of the technology section within the project description. Meghan is currently a junior majoring in Advertising and getting a certificate in New Mix Media. She is a member of the Phi Mu fraternity on campus. In her free time, she enjoys being social, working out and watching television series. Her plans for the future are to attend graduate school and earn a degree in Marketing. She would love to live in a large, populated city and work for an advertising firm or magazine company. If you would like to know more about her, contact her via email.

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Magan Jenkins magannj@gmail.com, magannj@uga.edu Expected Graduation Date: December 2010 Magan helped design the application logo. She was also a main designer and developer of the application and its layout. Magan is majoring in Public Relations and is expected to obtain the New Media Certificate. She is a fanatic for film and loves watching movies in her free time. In the future, Magan hopes to be a part of an entertainment PR firm and living the life! Andrew Kann dkann88@gmail.com  Expected Graduation Date: May 2010 Andrew wrote the feature case study portion of the final report.  He also contributed to background research and designed and created the project poster. Andrew is a senior magazines major in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communications and is in the process of working towards completing his New Media Certificate. Since May 2009, Andrew has worked as a sports reporter for the Red and Black, the University's independent student newspaper, covering men's basketball, baseball and women's soccer. Drew enjoys sports and being outdoors, as well as writing about topics that interest him. Caitlin Peterson cbarrettp@gmail.com Expected Graduation Rate: December 2010 Caitlin was a main designer and developer of the poster and the logo.  She also contributed to the writing and editing of the final paper.  Caitlin is currently a senior majoring in Public Relations and receiving a certificate in New Media. Outside of class she is involved with many different organizations on campus including Delta Delta Delta Sorority; the Guide Dog Foundation, wherein she raises and trains Isaiah, a future guide dog for the blind; as well as serving as the Campus Relations Chair for UGA Relay For Life. She is looking forward to getting out into the "real world" and utilizing the skills she has acquired while at The Grady College and The New Media Institute. Social Media and its assimilation into the business world is something that really interests her, especially social media's ability to become more than just a forum for discussion and really be one for action, brand identity and communication.

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Works Cited
Build and Grow with Facebook Connect (2010). Facebook Developers. Retrieved February 4, 2010 from http://developers.facebook/connect.php. Facebook Marketing Statistics, Demographics, Reports, and News. CheckFacebook.com. Retrieved February 2, 2010 from http://www.checkfacebook.com/. 1Flegal, K. M., Carroll, M.D., Ogden, C.L., & Curtin, L.R. (2010). Prevalence and Trends in Obesity Among U.S. Adults, 1999-2008. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 303 (3), 235-241. Greenhow, C. & Reifman, J. (2009). Engaging youth in social media: Is Facebook the new media frontier? Nieman Reports. Retrieved February 3, 2010 from http://www.nieman.harvard.edu/reportsitem.aspx?id=101906. Hellmich, N. (2010). Premature death is more likely in obese children. USA Today. Retrieved February 3, 2010 from http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/weightloss/2010-02-11-obesekidsdieearlier11_ST_N.htm. Statistics (2010). Facebook Press Room. Retrieved February 2, 2010, from http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics. Tate, D.F., Wing, R.R., & Winett, R.A. (2001). Using Internet Technology to Deliver a Behavioral Weight Loss Program. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 285(9), 1172-1177.Gonzalez, Nick (2009). The Social Media Guide (2010). Mashable. Retrieved February 4, 2010 from http://mashable.com/guidebook/facebook/.

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Ben Benson, Becky Atkinson, Allison Cass, Chelsea Gattung, Kiki Milteer, Madison Staab

MOBILE

UGA | May 1, 2010 New Media Institute

Mobile
Platform overview
Purpose of paper This paper will outline how mobile media can be used to promote healthy behavior changes. For our purposes, mobile media is limited in definition to Smartphones, or cellular telephones with advanced capabilities beyond dialing and receiving calls. Whereas phones were once used for the single purpose of talking to someone, Smartphones have revolutionized personal technology. They have brought about a convergence of media and technology. A phone is no longer just a phone. It’s also a camera, a Google map, a texting workhorse and a complete social platform. Smartphones give many people have access to the Internet immediately in their pocket. This paper will explain how mobile media can be used for the public good changes by outlining Smartphone technology, explaining a feature case study and presenting our own original mobile media idea. If nothing else, we hope that this paper will spark ideas and demonstrate how new media can lead to a healthy behavior. Issue to address Our initial focus for creating this mobile application was as a tool to alleviate symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes. This disorder is characterized by high blood glucose in the presence of insulin resistance and deficiency. It can be avoided or even help suppressed with exercise and diet change. Recognizing that physical activity was a key component to changing the prevalence of this disease, we elected to target in activity among children and adults. These adverse health conditions at a societal level inspired us to create a Smartphone application that creates incentives to encourage healthy behavior by simply adding walking to one’s list of daily activities. Throughout our project’s development, however, we expanded our focus in addition to increasing people’s activity, incorporating stories and other creative aspects. Our final project specifically is designed to give travelers or even curious residents a fitness-focused tour of their city with immediate feedback regarding your physical achievement. Specific Behavior Change The behavior change we chose to promote is encouraging people to walk 30 minutes a day. According to the American Heart Association, walking has the lowest dropout rate of all physical activities. Research has even shown that the benefits of moderate physical activity can reduce the risk of heart disease, osteoporosis and Type 2 Diabetes as well as improving blood pressure levels and maintaining mental well-being among other health benefits. A simple part of your day, walking 30 minutes can be a positive change to your lunch break, a way to stay active on-the-go and a habit you’re not afraid to let seep in to your daily routine. Simply put, we tried to make exercise easy.

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Platform description
Mobile Phone Intro By this point, Smartphones are nearly old technology. In fact, IBM and Nokia released devices that allowed people to manage their contacts, calendar, and e-mail all on a mobile phone during the 1990s. However, looking back, the first Smartphones appear cumbersome and technologically inept. Nonetheless, these phones paved the way for the recent Smartphone revolution. Today, it’s becoming more customary to use and have a Smartphone, especially among certain demographics. Standard Smartphone users are between the ages of 25 and 34 and have an income of more than $75,000. Thus most people who use Smartphones are people who have high-paying jobs and on the younger side of the general population. Even though the demographics of Smartphones skew young, their convenience is making them more common among everyone all the time. In 2009, according to The Nielsen Report, Smartphones had a market penetration of 16.9 percent, up 6 percent from the previous year. Smartphones have made it easy for people to haul a wide array of technological gadgets – from personal email to health trainers to games – with them wherever they go. They serve as a convenient method for us to transport our lives without hauling around excess luggage. Smartphones are becoming our lives’ mobile companions, riding alongside in a pocket. Most Popular Smartphones: iPhone and Droid Today’s cell phone market is dominated by two major Smartphones: the iPhone by Apple and the Droid by Google/Motorola. Not surprisingly, the two largest new media companies, Apple and Google, have produced these competing cell phones and operating systems. The iPhone came out in 2007, shaking up the cell phone industry with its large, multi-touch screen, a fancy applications store, and multi-function capability that was exclusively available on the AT&T network. Unlike any other phone of its time, Apple combined the basic functions of previous cell phones (e.g., text messaging, camera, video) with the iPod, a web-browser, e-mail, GPS, and virtual keyboard into one device. In late 2009, Google’s Droid came onto the market with its Android operating system, an open-source platform, available only on the Verizon network. The Droid includes a multi-touch screen, a similar applications store, GPS, web-browser, e-mail, and other basic Smartphone features. However, a couple of versions of the Droid, unlike the iPhone, include a slide-out keyboard to accompany the touch screen for those who prefer the feel of the keys to the uncertainty of the virtual screen.   The key difference between these two phones is their operating system. Android OS is an open-source system that allows people to upload apps and other media to the Android system without restrictions, whereas Apple’s iPhone OS requires authorization and approval for each app before it becomes available in their application store.  
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Competition is driving Smartphone growth. Apple and Google have tried to one up each other by creating distinct, albeit similar, Smartphones. In addition to selling the device and its operating system, each company has attached its brand name to the service of the phones, Google siding with Verizon and Apple with AT&T. Even though the companies’ Smartphones deliver many of the same features, Google and Apple hope to further differentiate their mobile phones to capture more of the burgeoning Smartphone market. Smartphone Components SMS and MMS Text Messaging Text messages come in two forms: SMS and MMS messages. The following explains each and how they related to Smartphones. SMS is an acronym for Short Message Service, or to the typical mobile user, a “text message.” With text messaging, people can send words and characters to others with their mobile devices. Text messages also have options to customize text with bolded, italicized, and underlined words. Many cell phones also use technology called “Predicted Text.” This is when as a person types, the phone’s dictionary (or word memory) will suggest words it “thinks” you are trying to spell for a more efficient way of typing.  Cell phones can also switch to multi-tap mode, which allows you to press each letter until you spell out the desired word. Symbols are also a feature for many phones to use. Most symbols on a keyboard – such as slash or exclamation point – are stored in the phone’s memory for message clarity and emoticon creation. iPhones display the most recent 50 messages. Messages can be loaded by tapping “Load Earlier Messages.” iPhones have many SMS-related apps. For example textPlus allows iPhone users to send Group text up to 50 people at the same time, and Nuance Dragon Dictation automatically turns voiced words into text on your phone. MMS is an acronym for Multimedia Messaging Service, otherwise known as a “picture message.” MMS messages are used to send photos, audio, or video and can be sent to a 10-digit number or an e-mail address. However, MMS messaging is narrower in scope than SMS messages. Some carriers charge extra for MMS messages or do not support the feature. iPhone 3G and 3Gs or later are able to support MMS messaging and Apple allows people with cellular carriers that do not support MMS to still receive the message. Instead of viewing the message on their phone, they are sent a link that asks for message ID and password. Users go through a special webpage to view the message. The limit of the size of the message depends on your carrier. However, iPhones and other Smartphones can compress photos and videos. Photography, Video, and Audio Capabilities

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Smartphones have a built-in camera with the lens positioned on the backside of the phone. In this manner, the Smartphone’s screen acts as a viewfinder. However, many Smartphones do not have an optical zoon or a powerful flash. The camera’s resolution varies depending on the Smartphone. Droids have a 5.0 megapixel camera and iPhones have either a 2.0 or 3.2 megapixel camera. The Droid has a decent mobile camera, with image stabilization, a dual LED flash and a 4x optical zoom. Once images are a taken, photographs are stored in albums, also called a “camera roll.” From there, the photos can be sent to people with a MMS message or uploaded to social networking sites like Facebook. With the built-in camera, Smartphones can record video as well. Some Smartphones even allow for videos to be edited on the mobile phone itself by “trimming frames.” This allows Smartphone users to edit video on their phone by editing the beginning or end of videos. Smartphones typically have microphones built-in to go along with the video recorder, allowing people to capture meetings, mental notes, or lectures. As an example, Apple’s iPhone allows you to record, manage, edit and share recorded memos right from the phone. As well, the captured audio can be sent to your contacts via MMS messaging. Bluetooth Bluetooth wireless technology is available on both the iPhone and Droid cell phones, and most cell phones today have Bluetooth technology as well. Bluetooth wireless technology is a short-range form of communication, replacing the cables of connecting portable or fixed devices. Some key features of Bluetooth technology are high levels of security, sturdiness, low power and low cost. Bluetooth allows the user to simultaneously handle data and voice transmissions without using their hands. Bluetooth also allows a hands-free experience for voice calls, printing, faxing and synchronization for PCs and mobile phones. The classes of Bluetooth devices determine the signal range: Class 3 radios handle a range up to three feet, while Class 1 radios handle a range up to 300 feet. There are multiple brands, designs, and levels of Bluetooth headsets that are compatible with different types of phones, drivers and ears. Bluetooth headsets are easy-to-use, flexible, and reduce outside sounds to allow for a clear phone connection. On-Star, a comprehensive in-vehicle security and diagnostics system, also provides hands-free calling. OnStar’s hands-free calling is voice-activated, allowing the driver to keep his or her hands on the wheel and eyes on the road while driving. Bluetooth has become a popular safety feature, as a headset and an in-vehicle accessory for all drivers. The technology’s popularity will continue to grow as more states ban handheld cell phone use while driving. Applications What is an App?
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  Apps, short for applications, are designed to expand the functionality of a mobile device. They can serve a variety of purposes, from gaming to social networking and travel to health and fitness. Apps are only available on Smartphones and have a variety of different platforms.   What is an App store and how do App stores differ? An app store is an online store that can be accessed from the mobile device or from your personal computer. The original app store was created by Apple for iPhone users and was quickly emulated by other companies. In order to be included in the Apple app store, applications must be coded so that they conform to a specific standard. They then face approval by the manufacturer before being released to the public. This results in theoretically “safer” environment, at the frustration of many app creators. However, with more than 100,000 apps, consumers still have a wide selection of content.   Another important app store is the Android Market, which can be used by Verizon’s Droid phone as well as other Android-capable devices. Compared to many existing platforms, Android is open to continued innovation and new experiences. This is because independent developers have almost unlimited access to the platform, so they can develop applications without the approval of a third party. While their store is considerably smaller compared to Apple’s creation, Droid offers a unique feature allowing its users to multitask all of the available apps. Popular Applications: Gaming: Top-grossing games include adaptations of popular computer and video games such as The Sims, Rock Band and Grand Theft Auto. Games have also been developed for the iPhone that utilize the accelerometer feature. Social Networking: Mobile platforms exist for such sites as Facebook and MySpace with adaptations of TweetDeck and even Skype made available on either store. Navigation: Free apps like Google Earth ensure people are always able to navigate their location wherever they travel. Travel: Travel apps range from general fields like translators and currency converters to specific adaptations of Internet platforms like Kayak, Lonely Planet, AAA and Zagat.  Health & Fitness: Applications in the fitness category offer a combination of services that range from calorie counting to pedometers and heart rate trackers to exercise tips. Even gyms, hospitals and health magazines have taken advantage of apps to create a mobile form of communication.   Future of Apps There are several questions in regard to the future of apps. Following the release of the iPhone, practically every major handset manufacturer has jumped on the app store bandwagon, with online retail outlets open for Blackberry, Nokia, Palm, Windows Mobile and Google's Android handsets. With so many different operNew Media Institute
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ating systems, operators are considering joining forces to bypass the multiple sign-up processes for various app stores. However, they still face the challenge of agreeing on how to release content on an equal playing field. Another consideration for the nature of applications is how they will be used. Are browser-based apps a sign of the future, as Google develops their wireless cloud further? Or will downloaded content, like many iPhone apps, become the standard platform? These questions hint at the budding future of the mobile application.

Feature Case Study: DailyBurn
The next section will explain how DailyBurn, a Smartphone application, encourages people to partake in healthy behaviors through both exercise and healthy eating. Overview DailyBurn is an interactive website and mobile platform that addresses living a healthy, proactive lifestyle. Through monitoring adequate nutritional intake, offering daily encouragement and listing physical workouts and challenges, among other uses, DailyBurn creates incentives for making healthy behavior change. The website and mobile app act as a social networking program, allowing each user to create a personal profile in which they can set nutritional guidelines and choose applicable workout challenges to reach their personalized health and fitness goals. Workouts: In this section, users can find a workout program, set up a custom workout or quickly track an exercise. Established workout programs are organized by fitness goals, whether that is fat loss, strength building or anything in between. Users can also define their own personal routine measurements and establish a fitness calendar. Current challenges are also available for people who seek a competitive atmosphere. Training: DailyBurn also serves as a handy training aide. Video instruction can be found daily via featured exercises streamed to DailyBurn from YouTube. Nutrition: In this section, DailyBurn breaks down your specific health goals into a comprehensive log, a water glass counter and complete dietary history. The program allows users to monitor and track their dietary progress. Motivation: This element of DailyBurn is where the aspect of social interaction comes into play. Users can find motivators who can help keep them accountable. They can even allow their motivators to see their exercise and nutrition progress, write in their journal, and send and receive motivational messages. An interactive forum creates an atmosphere for conversation regarding daily challenges, general health topics, and opportunities to share success stories. What do the iPhone apps offer for those who wish to use DailyBurn on the go? DailyBurn App: The DailyBurn iPhone app offers a fully integrated mobile platform for everyone the site includes. As a feature-full app, users can access their profile on the homepage; keep a Body Tracker with current weight goals; log detailed workouts that include calories burned, weight lifted and distance traveled; add to their nuNew Media Institute
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tritional log; and synchronize all elements with the online component on their personal computer. This app works offline and as such can be used regardless of the user’s present situation or circumstances. FoodScanner App: FoodScanner takes the DailyBurn platform one step further by allowing users to take pictures on their iPhone camera of UPC barcodes. From the picture, the app then recognizes the food and is able to retrieve basic nutritional information, including calories, fat, carbohydrates and protein. Many food items, such as fresh produce, may not have a UPC code, but the FoodScanner app allows users to type in food names and select the correct choice to retrieve the necessary information. Finally, for foods that are not yet included, the app allows users to enter information into the growing data base of more than 240,000 foods. Whether users find themselves grocery shopping or enjoying lunch, they can quickly reach for their phone to log the nutritional information of their meals.

Literature Review
Past research supports several manners in which DailyBurn can have a positive effect on people’s lives and their health. Obesity epidemic in the United States According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, two-thirds of adults and one-fifth of children in the U.S. are obese or overweight. America’s obese or overweight population has increased the risk for certain diseases, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and certain cancers. According to the Office of the Surgeon General, approximately 300,000 deaths a year may be due to obesity, and obesity cost the United States $117 billion in 2000. Counting calories works Knowing calorie information helps people eat healthier – Yale University conducted a study to see if knowing the amount of calories affected food choices and intake. Three groups participated in the study. The first group received a menu with no calories labeled. The second group received a menu with calorie labels. The third group received a menu with calorie labels and a label that listed the recommended amount of daily calories for an average adult. The study found that the group with calorie labels and the recommended daily caloric intake consumed an average of 250 fewer calories. The study showed that when people made healthier dietary choices when they knew both the caloric content of their food and how much they should eat. Support systems motivate people to lose weight and keep it off Community-wide initiatives support positive weight-loss behavioral changes - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide) strongly recommend communitywide initiatives incorporating informational components.
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  This recommendation was used as a basis for Walk Missouri, a community-wide media campaign to encourage walking in a Missouri town. Results of the study show that the media campaign caused residents of the town to walk almost one more day per week than residents unexposed to the media campaign. The campaign also may have boosted attendance at community-sponsored walks. And according to a study by the Center for Community-Based Research in Boston, Mass., small changes in levels of physical activity at an individual level can contribute to major benefits in public health. Finding a weight-loss buddy online helps you lose weight – A study from the University of Vermont compared a structured behavioral weight loss website (the study used VTrim) against a commercial weight loss website (eDiets.com). The VTrim group lost significantly more weight and kept the weight off by having a more structured, individualized program. The participants in this group followed the program with 15 to 20 other people with similar health goals and participated in hour-long online chats once a week that were led by a trained therapist. Research demonstrates the benefits of walking even 30 minutes a day Participating in moderate physical activity, such as walking for 30 minutes, five or more times a week reduces the risk of many diseases. According to AARP, walking lower the risk of heart attacks, breast cancer, type 2 diabetes and strokes. Alternatively, walking helps manage weight, control blood pressure, and boost good cholesterol. Walking reduces risk of pre-diabetes by 50 percent – In a study funded by Diabetes UK, people aimed to walk 30 minutes every day, aided by the using a pedometer. The study wanted to determine if using a pedometer helps people sustain increased physical activity levels and specifically focused on people with pre-diabetes (i.e., people with raised blood glucose levels). This study discovered that using a pedometer and walking every day reduced the risk of diabetes by up to 58 percent over the long term. Using a pedometer also reduced blood glucose levels in that group by 15 percent. Something simple like a pedometer (such as an iPhone app) can make a real impact on the diabetes epidemic. Interview with Andy Smith, CEO of DailyBurn Was there anything in particular inspired you to work for DailyBurn? (Also, were you the founder?) I was the founder, along with Stephen Blankenship. We were both looking for a site to track our workouts and to be honest, the rest of the sites really sucked. We wanted to focus on social/usability/usefulness. I love technology and fitness, and the combination has been a dream job for me. Is there a typical DailyBurn user that you are trying to reach? Are most people who use it looking for a new way to lose weight, or are they athletes searching for a better way to keep track of their training progress? Also, do you modify DailyBurn with a specific demographic in mind or do you try to make it as universally applicable as possible?  The first users of DailyBurn were fitness enthusiasts – those who knew what they wanted to do and just needed good tools. Over time, we are seeing that our demographic is shifting to those who don't know what
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to do and need more hand-holding and guidance. We aren't targeting a specific sex/age/geo demographic, but we do see a larger percent of our users as male. The copyright on DailyBurn says it’s been around since 2007. How have you changed the application and platform over the past four years (or at least since you've been at DailyBurn)?  Since 2007 we have gone through a lot of changes. From adding nutrition, challenges, integrating devices, mobile apps, etc. One of the biggest changes was re-branding from Gyminee (primarily so people could spell our name when spread by word-of-mouth). I’m not asking you to specifically reveal any future plans, but are there any other health areas or behavior changes you see further incorporating into DailyBurn? For example, DailyBurn’s FoodScanner application encourages healthy eating behavior right at the grocery store. Since people always have their cell phones with them, what are other opportunities you see to encourage people to practice healthy lifestyle choices? I think increasingly we are in a position to integrate all sorts of fitness devices, from watches/phones/sleep sensors, etc. I also think you will see us moving toward more automated capture and hand-holding for beginner users. Finally, what are the most gratifying aspects of being the CEO of DailyBurn? It sounds cheesy, but it sure is fun to work on a technology that is changing people's life for the better.  That is probably the best part! Significance of DailyBurn For better or worse, people never leave home without their mobile phone. We bring our phones with us at all times, whether we’re working or driving, watching television or shopping for groceries. Mobiles phones are our constant companion. Due to this change in our culture, companies like DailyBurn have taken advantage and are using it as an opportunity to make us healthier people. The DailyBurn app allows its users to stay healthy on-the-go and throughout their busy day. Users are able to document their eating habits at their fingertips and no longer have an excuse not to. Keeping a food journal has never been easier because the DailyBurn app keeps it organized for you. Having a documented account of one's daily food intake helps people take responsibility for their actions in hopes to encourage a lifestyle change. In addition to documenting food and caloric intake, the DailyBurn app can map out workout plans unique to an individual's fitness level. Having your phone create a specific workout encourages users to exercise on-thego and more frequently. Not only does the app create workouts, but users can set challenges that will motivate and constantly remind them that they need to be completed. Having a third party – computer-generated or otherwise – increases the pressure to perform and, in return, the user will feel compelled to complete chosen challenges.
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The DailyBurn app creates a sense of accountability to its users and the constant reminders encourage the completion of each task. Even though it relies on self-reporting, if people cheat they will at least feel a pang of guilt. As well, the social networking aspect of Daily Burn creates a community aspect where users can show off their success, thereby fulfilling the satisfaction of reaching a goal.  Mobile phones are so frequently used in today's society that it makes sense to have applications on the phone that encourage a healthier lifestyle. We live on the go and the level of ease and convenience influences our daily decisions. Having an app that motivates you while you exercise and makes it convenient is a revolutionary concept when applied to mobile devices. Daily use of the Daily Burn app will also help users develop a habit to take part in everything that the app offers daily. Repeated and extended use of DailyBurn has the potential to create lifestyle behavior changes for each and every one of its users.  Future Potential The DailyBurn application has the potential to be generalized to other devices. In the interview, Andy Smith talked about integrating aspects of DailyBurn with watches. Cheaper devices would give customers an opportunity to use DailyBurn without having to purchase a Smartphone. For instance, a watch would reach a lower price point for people who could not afford a Smartphone. Even though Smartphone usage is becoming more common, most of these phones are still owned by wealthier individuals who can pay the phone’s upfront costs and the monthly dues. By lowering the costs to participate with DailyBurn, the product could become used by less-wealthy demographics that, incidentally, have higher rates of obesity and its related diseases.  Additionally, watches and other cheaper devices could be modified for children or adolescents whose parents may not trust a Smartphone. DailyBurn exercise challenges could encourage physical activity among children, and, subsequently, fight against childhood obesity. Also, as DailyBurn becomes easier to use and accommodates more electronic devices, people have a better opportunity to challenge and interact with their friends through the device. Studies have shown that we act healthier as a group, and mobile apps like DailyBurn can serve as an on-the-go communal motivator. However, despite its convenience among regular Smartphone users, DailyBurn’s applicability and effectiveness is probably still too advanced for non-Smartphone users. The more automated DailyBurn can become, the better it will be designed for the general population. For example, DailyBurn could have the potential to track all the distance a person walks in a day if initiated into a certain mode. There could be “walk,” “bike,” or “run” mode that track distance and calories burned in real time as opposed to a person choosing a predetermined route or entering their time and mileage data. This feature would make challenges like “Walk 100 miles in month” easily doable. Also, in its current incarnation, the FoodScanner application still has many gaps. Inputting fruit, vegetables, and other non-bar-coded foods is somewhat tiresome. Probably only the most diehard people watching over their diet will actually input every food item they eat. However, further software updates to FoodScanner
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should make the program easier to use. For example, once mobile food recognition apps can identify the shapes and colors of fruits or vegetables, they will overcome the problem of people manually identifying them. Finally, mobile fitness monitors like this can serve as a constant reminder for people to exercise, eat nutritious food, and stay healthy in general. The more people think about these topics, the more it becomes normal and part of their everyday routine.

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Mobile project: CityStep

Project Description
Original Idea What did we want to accomplish? The idea behind our project was to give people in an unfamiliar area a reason to go explore their surroundings by walking around. We wanted to make mobile media into a personalized walking travel guide. Our inspiration originally came from research that says that walking 30 minutes a day can improve physical fitness and help people keep fit. By staying in shape and warding off excess fat, people decrease their chance of many types of diseases, including diabetes and hypertension. We wanted to provide people, especially those who are on-the-go, with a simple-yet-motivating way to incorporate 30 minutes of walking into their day. We coupled this with the idea that people are often sedentary on business trips or vacations. When people are moving around via plane, train or car, packing excess luggage can be a hassle and exercising can seem invasive in a busy schedule. Putting these ideas together, we made CityStep. CityStep is just an idea of what this type of app could do. It’s meant to get people out and walking around.
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Also, we wanted to make it easy for people to learn interesting stories about the city, or, as with much of our example, a local campus. The audio and visuals that go into CityStep explain why and how the quirks, facts and urban legends exist within a city. We wanted to go beyond the traditional tourism-type material and make the tour intriguing. Ultimately, our goal was to uncover the heartbeat of a city through an original walking tour. By combining fascinating insight with history, comedy and even a little mystery we created interesting content that engage travelers to explore a city’s culture in a truly interactive way.

Challenges to Making CityStep
Problems constantly presented themselves as we created CityStep Story Creation At first, we thought it would be easy to create entertaining stories that would engage a variety of listeners. However, this was not the case. We began by writing stories about historical landmarks in Athens, but that proved to be uninteresting and unoriginal. We struggled with making our stories both interesting and educational while keeping our audiences intrigued.  After many brainstorm sessions, where we thought about highlighting the music scene of Athens, choosing a particular day in history and describing what campus was like, we finally decided to tell stories about why things are the way they are around campus. We decided to incorporate myths that many students hold, thus exploring the campus’ underlying lore. By choosing buildings, monuments, and other landmarks around campus to write about, we were able to make the stories both educational and interesting. Most people would never know the story of Joe Brown Hall or why there was a memorial just outside the Miller Learning Center. We identified these stories by collaborating with one another and asking our peers for stories of myths, legends or traditions on campus and composed a final list: Sanford Stadium, Journalism Building, MLC Memorial Garden, Joseph Brown Hall, Founders Garden, Old College, The Arch, and The Georgia Theatre.  Mobile Website Coding & Flash Initially we wanted to use Flash to have different buttons on the page that could be clicked to release audio and exercise details, such as calories burned and distance walked, to tell users about the different locations included on the city's tour. Since Droid is the only Smartphone that runs Flash, we scrapped using Flash in order to accommodate more Smartphones, including the iPhone.

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Our next step was deciding between building a web app or an app sold through the iPhone store. Since we know how to build websites, we created a web-based application. Additionally, a web app is accessible to Smartphones other than the iPhone. Our final step was finding a template to help us build the web app and be the correct size to fit on a smartphone screen.  Mapping the route on a Smartphone Making our app user friendly became a tedious process. We initially wanted to use GPS to guide users through our chosen route, but after speaking with experts we chose to sidestep GPS to reach a larger audience, including people without a GPS subscription on their phone. Also, we were afraid the GPS would be too unreliable and hard to coordinate with the rest of the app. We then turned to Google Maps where we realized we could map out our own route and create our own lettered pinpoints at each of our destinations.  For our app, instead of embedding our Google Map into the page, we decided to insert a screen shot of the map. We did this after trying to zoom in on the Google Map version from an iPod Touch, which caused problems with moving the page and zooming in using our fingertips. We also discussed placing screenshots of the route from point to point on each of the destination pages, so the user did not have to zoom in on the map. However, we instead added a screenshot of the entire map into a page of its own (and a link from a destination page to the map) so people can refer back to it at anytime and zoom in using their phone's preset zoom functions. As well, CityStep includes a picture slideshow between points to better direct our viewers through the visual landscape of the CityStep tour while the audio component simultaneously plays. The app instructs you to play the story as the user travels to the desired location, while approximating the distance traveled and calories burned.

Bringing CityStep to Life
Brining all aspects of the Smartphone app together Story writing Before crafting each tale, we researched. This included interviewing friends and alumni for personal adventures, requesting stories from our friends and followers using Facebook and Twitter, searching for articles about historical content and urban legends, and referring to history documents to supplement our personal experiences. This content provided the opportunities to weave together captivating legends and humorous anecdotes to entice our users and keep them interested throughout their walk. Each story reveals a location’s uniqueness and legend.
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We walked our route several times to determine the distance from each point and ensuring our stories did not overlap. The stories play the CityStep user arrives at the actual destination. We thought that listening to the story while leaving the destination would leave the user unsatisfied, because they would not have known what or why they were at the particular destination point. Web-based Coding for Smartphones We created our web app using iWeb Kit, a mobile for created websites on mobile phones. We used a template from a previous New Media class that automatically sizes CityStep and adjusts it for vertical and horizontal view for an iPhone screen. CityStep uses a mixture of HTML and CSS to work. We used Dreamweaver to edit the HTML and CSS exactly the way we wanted and added in links, pictures, information and slideshows. The beginning and ending of CityStep are graphic-based to add a visual appeal and catch the app user's attention right away. The slideshows were created in Final Cut Pro as a way to aid users in following the right path. Guiding People on the Walking Tour Choosing the sites and route for our users to walk was one of the largest obstacles we crossed. We wanted to ensure our users could easily follow the route on their Smartphone or iPod Touch. After researching and writing our stories, we mapped out a direct route from place to place while marking each destination with a lettered pin point using Google Maps. We then walked the route while tracking the number of steps, distance, and calories burned by using an iPhone pedometer. We incorporated the recorded information into each page to help users stay on the route. The app has an easy-to-read page explaining CityStep and how to use it. Each page includes step-by-step instructions guiding the user to the next action required from them. A picture slideshow matches the tour while the CityStep user is walking to the next destination. This makes navigating through Athens easier, since our primary target user for the app is someone who is a newcomer. After adding all instructions into the app's pages, we tested it on multiple people to see if they could navigate through the app without our help or explanation and we revised any spots seen as troublesome. We also included a full version of the map on the home screen for users to refer to at any time.  
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CityStep Interactivity We also included a section that makes CityStep more interactive. An intriguing question precedes the beginning of each story. The questions either shed light on the upcoming content or they provide new information all together. We aimed to make this aspect of CityStep more fun for users and add another element to learning about the city.

Conclusion
How can this be generalized to other places? CityStep Athens can be easily adapted to other locations. However, a large amount of effort has to be devoted to the content of the stories. Combining history with clever narration will develop insightful tales that complement the physical locale. However, people will only use an app similar to CityStep if the content makes it worthwhile. From there, the technical programming will be almost identical to our original prototype. By including Google maps and picture slideshows, CityStep can be implemented with ensured success. Routes could also be modified for places in further distances apart, for hikers or bike riders. Still, features from this mobile app can be applied beyond promoting healthy living. CityStep can enhance the local tourist industry by strategically designing pathways to target specific places, while the auditory component can also be used to explore desired locations. Finally, advertising may require compliance by both local government or tourism agencies to reach travelers effectively. Placing advertising media in local hotels and restaurant establishments will help to encourage visitors and citizens alike to explore the CityStep mobile application.

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CityStep Team Members
Becky Atkinson I am a junior magazine major at the University of Georgia earning my New Media Certificate and English minor. I've written, edited and designed for several on-campus publications including The Red & Black, Ugazine and InfUSion. Additionally, I have worked in the marketing department at The University of Georgia Press and at Peachtree Publishers, a children's book publishing company in Atlanta. I am an executive board member for the Grady Student Society, a group that connects current students in the journalism school with fellow students and alumni, and I now represent the journalism school as a Grady Ambassador. After graduation, I hope to live in New York or Boston working in the publishing industry and using my new media skills. Ben Benson I am a graduate student studying public relations at the University of Georgia. I graduated from the University of Oregon in 2009 with degrees in journalism and economics. Although I have focused on public relations in graduate school, I have tried not to tie myself down to one type of communication. I have worked at an advertising agency on a assortment of clients, including health care, aviation and footwear. I also helped re-brand a studentrun cultural magazine at the University of Oregon. I plan to write my thesis on communication strategies to adopt wind energy. Allison Cass I am a senior public relations major at the University of Georgia working to complete my New Media Certificate. I am heavily involved with several oncampus organizations including Gamma Sigma Sigma National Service Sorority and Designated Dawgs, serving on both executive boards in the past. I am currently the Relay for Life team captain of my sorority, and I also am interning for a local music booking agency, while still working part-time as a pharmacy technician. Pharmaceuticals and music are my passions in life, and
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I hope I will be given the opportunity to have a careers in both. I plan on moving to Atlanta post-graduation in May, where I will continue my job hunt.  Chelsea Gattung I am a senior at the University of Georgia studying advertising, sociology, and new media. I am currently the Vice President of Fundraising for Advertising Club, an Account Executive for Your Pie restaurant through our student-run advertising agency Hooper, Sanford, Baldwin, & Thomas and I am interning with NetStream Interactive as a web designer. After graduation in December, I would ultimately like to attend portfolio school at either Creative Circus or Miami Ad School to further study my passion for interactive or graphic design. Kiki Milteer I am a senior at The University of Georgia. I graduate in December 2010 with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. I am a Broadcast News major, Film Studies minor, and New Media Certified. Furthermore, I am a recipient of UGA's EXCEL Award and the HOPE Scholarship. As an avid Journalist, I have experience in broadcast news, print, media productions, telecommunications, film, radio, digital media, social media, and public relations. I was a part of UGA’s Georgia Gameday, WUOG, and am currently with UGA Newsource. In addition to my campus involvement, I've had internships with CNN, Star94, Q100, and this summer with NBC. After graduation, I intend to begin my career as a news producer and travel the world. Madison Staab I am a junior at the University of Georgia, studying Advertising with a minor in Art History and completing the New Media Certificate. My involvement includes Alpha Chi Omega Sorority, where I serve as Webmaster as well as the Graphics and Online Marketing Chair on the executive board for the American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life. I am a member of UGA’s Ad Club and have recently been selected to represent the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communications as a Grady Ambassador. Upon graduation, I hope to either move back home to Texas or venture to Chicago to work in the creative department of an ad agency.

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References
King, A. (2009, May 22). Walk: Want to save money and live longer?. The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved from http://www.latimes.com/sns-health-save-money-live-and-walk,0,671728.story Nielsen. (2009). The global online media landscape. Retrieved April 20, 2010, fromhttp://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/nielsen-online-global-lansc apefinal1.pdf Hellmich, N. (2009, December 21). Diners eat fewer calories when menu lists entrees' contents.USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/weightloss/2009-12-21-caloriesonmenu21_ST_N.htm Wray, R. J., Jupka, K., & Ludwig-Bell, C. (2005). A community-wide media campaign to promote walking in a Missouri town. Preventing Chronic Disease 2(4), (1-17). Gold, B. C., Burke, S., Pintauro, S., & Harvey-Berino, J. (2007). Weight loss on the web: A pilot study comparing a structured behavioral intervention to a commercial program. Obesity 15(1), (155-164). Devlin, K. (2010, January 4). Using a pedometer "can cut chance of developing diabetes by half." Telegraph. Retrieved from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/journalists/kate-devlin/6918062/Using-a-pedometer-can-cut-chance-of -developing-diabetes-by-half.html

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Kiley Dorton, Isha Ghodke, Jessica Henry, Katrina Kulik, Kelly Skyler Musgrove, Sara Osburn, Lauren Rohde, Hal Tift

GAMING

UGA | May 1, 2010 New Media Institute

Gaming
Platform overview
GAMING 101 What is a game? Historians have suggested that games have been played since before written history. According to an article published by the National Institute of Health (NIH), a game is a physical or mental contest with a goal or objective.  Games are played according to the framework or rules set out by the creator. Games come in many forms and are said to fulfill basic human psychological needs.  Today many games are considered video games and are played digitally on devices such as at arcades, on consoles, computers, handheld devices or the internet.  Video games have become a huge part of the entertainment industry in our society.  Recently, video games have taken a lot of criticism regarding the amount of violence involved and the fact that they are distracting from physical activity.  To combat this criticism, a new genre of gaming is emerging called “serious video games;” these games “use role-playing and story to teach train and change the knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of those playing.”  [NIH, 2007]  The move towards ‘serious video games’ is becoming more and more prevalent. A lot of research is being done to discover how to use video games to create a more fit and pleasant society.  In order to create effective ‘serious games,’ it is important to understand the elements of a game, why people play games, and how games can be used to influence a person’s behavior. Elements of a Game Games are typically played for fun and are able to reach a large and diverse audience because they do not require a special set of skills to succeed.  However, video games do more than just provide entertainment, and that is why people continue to play them.  Research has found many people enjoy video games because they find them intrinsically satisfying.  They feel rewarded and want to continue to play the game.  They strive to achieve mastery and Video games satisfy a need for autonomy, control, and connectedness.  They provide a sense of achievement, but beyond that virtual games tend to involve group play and satisfy a players social needs as well.   The most successful video games are those that involve story, interactivity, and intrinsic motivation.  When a game involves a realistic story, players want to continue to see what the future holds.  In the NIH study, they found that games that sought to only increase physical activity while playing without including a story, were
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considered boring after four weeks.  To create an even greater ‘pull’ or motivation, game creators add an element of interactivity.  Most often they create a game in which players feel like they are immersed in the game environment.  This helps to create a feeling of connectedness, especially when the gaming environment is retable, or realistic.  A large part of both intrinsic motivation and the ‘pull’ of video games is that the results of an action or decision are instant.  Outside of the gaming world a person might make a bad decision and not realize the consequences until weeks, months or years later, but in video games if you put off or decide not to do something you instantly see the results of your actions. Researchers at the University of Rochester found that players felt best when games produced positive and challenging experiences “that connected to what they know in the real world.”  [CBC News, 2006]  Therefore, when games are realistic they have a greater ability to change a person’s behavior. Game Theory Games are typically played for fun, but there are many different aspects of games that can be considered fun. A study by Hsu, Lee and Wu in 2005, identified six factors of fun in action video games: novelty and powerfulness, appealing presentation, interactivity, challenge, sense of control, and reward. According to an NIH study found that children also find elements of fantasy and interactivity to be enjoyable. Games can satisfy the player’s needs for autonomy, connectedness, and control. To win the game, video games challenge players to use the information they obtain as they navigate the game world, thereby providing an important education and training modality [2007]. These factors contribute to the rise to the emerging genre of “serious video games” that “employ the medium’s rich, role-playing, story-based environments to teach, train, and change knowledge, attitudes, and behavior” [NIH, 2007]. Theory gives the foundation to promote behavior change. Some social theories have been incorporated into gaming models to promote positive behavior changes. According to the National Institute of Health, these include the social cognitive theory (SCT) and the elaboration likelihood model. These include four steps: attention, retention, production, and motivation. The elaboration likelihood model proposes that gaining and maintaining a person’s attention is the first step in getting a person to process the information in a message to promote behavior change. SCT proposes that behavior change is a function of enhanced skills and confidence (self-efficacy) in doing the new behavior, while modeling and feedback are keystones for learning skills [NIH, 2007]. These four categories are necessary to create a game that will hold the attention of players and keep them interested in continuing play. The NIH also argues that self-control procedures such as goal setting mobilize a person’s personal resources and focus attention on making specific changes. Games add an element of fun, an aspect of intrinsic motivation, thereby enhancing behavior change through enhanced motivation. Incorporating theory-based change procedures provides reason to believe that they can be effective [2007]. Therefore, combining social theories of change with gaming components of fun and motivation, should lead to positive results.
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Behavior Change Using video games as vehicles to encourage behavior change can capitalize on the fact that children’s already enjoy them. There seem to be two main ways that video games influence behavior. According to an NIH study, “The first involves the insertion of behavior-change procedures (e.g., goal setting) into the process of playing the game. The second involves the use of story and inserting behaviorchange concepts in the story.” The study also suggests that adding the elements of a story that addresses behavior-change issues can enhance the actual behavior change, especially when the story itself promotes behavior change. Video games are able to reach a vast and diverse demographic that expects extended contact, so that suggests that games can not only attract but maintain attention, which is a key aspect of effective behavior change. The National Institute of Health suggests that “to capitalize on the possibilities of video games for promoting health behavior changes, behavioral scientists need to collaborate with professionals who can write an engaging story and have knowledge and skills in game design, formative research, story boarding, producing, directing, music composition (for games with music scores), computer art, animation, and programming” [2007]. It is possible to create an effective video game that uses social and gaming theories to promote behavior change, and game developers just need to use the available information to make a game that can really lead to behavioral differences. (Baranowski et. al. 2008) What makes a good game? Games can take advantage of many hardware and software components to build advanced concepts. Smart phone technology now includes an accelerometer, which can detect changes in velocity (most popularly portrayed in Nintendo’s Wii Handsets), global positioning systems (GPS), and even cameras. According to a leading developer, Ngmoco, they have three elements that define a “hit,” a game that is both commercially successful and critically acclaimed. The first component is audience appeal. The game must appeal to a universal market, not just a niche or segmented audience. The second component of a good game is quality of execution: is the game polished, free of bugs, and above the general market standard? The third element is innovation. Using touch and the accelerometer have been reduced to the cost of entry for most games have far exceeded those terms of innovation. In order for a game to be a “hit,” it must have some element of advancement or innovation otherwise it will get lost in the mix. The following diagram above shows Ngmoco’s formula for a “hit” game.
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CURRENT MOBILE GAME SCENE Leading Game Developers As of February 2010, the app store reportedly had over 150,000 apps available belonging to more than 31,000 different developers. These developers engineer the coding, graphics and marketing to their applications, and many of them “sell” one to five apps in the store. Some developers offer over 100 applications. Leading developers are distinguished by repetitive success —not just “one-hit wonders” in the app store. Across the board in iPhone and Android application stores, the gaming category is both the top grossing and the most popular. Of the 20 developers listed, only one does not produce games and most of them produce games for Android as well. By far, the top iPhone game developers are Gameloft S.A. and Electronic Arts. Most Popular According to Touch Arcade, an online iPhone gaming information center, games such as Broken Sword, Sword & Poker, and Grand Theft Auto all topped their list of most frequently recommended games with five stars each. None of the three games were originally created for the mobile platform. Broken Sword, for example, was released for use with Windows in 1996. However, they are all successful adaptations of old favorites. In fact, Mobile Marketing News reports that Tetris has exceeded 100 million downloads worldwide on mobile platforms. Tetris was initially introduced over 25 years ago and was adapted for mobile by Blue Planet Software Inc. and Electronic Arts Mobile. It became available as a paid download in 2005. Production Mobile gaming is unique, because it is changing the relationship between the computer and player. As opposed to video and computer games, mobile gamers
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are multitasking-waiting for a friend, walking down a street, watching television-as they play. However, this mobility poses problems such as light irradiation, network connectivity, positioning and unreliable communication to the game itself. Apple’s iTunes Store makes it easy for developers to profit from the code they write, because it brings marketing, selling and distributing together in one place. When Ethan Nicholas’ game, iShoot, gained the No. 1 position in the iTunes Stores, he made $37,000 in a day. By the end of the month, he had earned $600,000. He attributes his success to word of mouth, luck and a quality game. The future of mobile game production lies in virtual communities, tangible media, instrumented rooms, wearable devices and different kinds of interaction and sensorial design. F E AT U R E D C A S E S T U DY: CO R V E N T I X P I I X PiiX At-A-Glance Who: Corventis, Inc. What: Wireless heart monitor; “An unobtrusive, waterresistant, lead-less device that adheres to the skin and automatically detects, records and transmits physiological information” Where: San Jose, California When: Approved by the FDA in February 2009 Why: Easy wireless transmission to the iPhone allows Corventis to integrate heart rate information seamlessly into iPhone applications and, potentially, games. Who Created PiiX Corventis, Inc, based in San Jose, California, is a privately held company and self-proclaimed “pioneer in wireless cardiovascular solutions.” As their website states, Corventis is “focused on advancing digital healthcare through the confluence of medical device, telecommunication and information technologies.” The company has filed over 50 patents for health monitoring technologies and solutions, and recently received FDA clearance on a new out-patient monitoring solution called the NUVANTTM Mobile Cardiac Telemetry System. The NUVANT MCT System allows physicians to monitor at-risk patients’ heart patterns from anywhere in the world. Corventis is dedicated to wirelessly connecting clinicians and patients, providing unprecedented visibility into patient health status. What others are saying “A 15-centimeter wireless sensor, recently approved by the FDA, holds the promise of reducing hospitalizations by allowing automated early detection of heart failure. The noninvasive device, which costs a few hundred dollars and adheres to a patient's chest, monitors indicators of heart health--including heart and
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respiration rates, levels of patient activity, and even the accumulation of body fluid--as patients go about their daily lives. Part of a technology platform a startup in San Jose, CA, the a special cell-phone-like gadget in From there, the data is wirelessly servers. Algorithms detect physicians via the Web or a to patients who need immediate Review) “At the Body Computing [October 2009], wireless health demonstrated a concept iPhone the company created with the game that leverages Corventis’ transmit the players heart rate to broadcast the heart rate over message or email. By using demonstrates that players can get heart rates in real-time. The concept app aimed to health to become interactive and could create social incentives to now being marketed by Corventis, waterproof sensor beams data to the patient's pocket or home. transmitted to the company's anomalies and transmit data to mobile device, drawing attention care.” (MIT Technology
“...Corventis Beating Heart...draws data wirelessly from a patch placed on the chest.”

Conference in Los Angeles company Corventis app called Beating Heart, which event’s organizers. The app is a wireless “band-aid” sensor to the iPhone, which then can Twitter and Facebook or via text Bluetooth, the concept app also a snapshot of nearby players’

demonstrate the ability for mobile fun through a social game, and becoming healthier.

‘We were told it wasn’t worth designing for teenagers if there wasn’t a strong self-play piece,’ Dr. Leslie Saxon, the Body Computing Conference cofounder and Chief of Cardiovascular Medicine at USC, told Fast Company at the event. ‘So, pretend we’re teenagers and we’re going to broadcast to each other incessantly as we do math homework.’ Here’s how the event organizers described the Beating Heart app: ‘The Corventis Beating Heart, which was co-developed at USC, draws data wirelessly from a patch placed on the chest. You can then take your heart rate and tag it to your status update on a social network. The concept originated with Dr. Leslie Saxon, conference organizer and chief of cardiology at USC’s Keck School of Medicine. She hopes that Beating Heart will educate the next generation of health care users and normalize the idea of monitoring your own body’s information.” (FastCompany.com) Critique - What Worked & What Didn’t Work Corventis is currently focusing on patients with severe or worrisome heart complications that need constant monitoring by professional clinicians. The product is aimed specifically at those interested in monitoring
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their heart for pre-existing conditions. So, in the effort to provide patients with a wireless device to monitor their physiological information, Corventis has succeeded quite well. However, should Corventis decide to extend its product from the market of problem monitoring to the business of prevention, the PiiX device has the potential to be the cornerstone technology of a targeted attack against a growing problem facing our nation’s children: obesity. The PiiX device currently has all the high tech monitoring sensors for every possible heart complication, and thus sells for over $100; but if Corventis stripped down the device to the bare essentials (e.g., simply a transmitter of heart rate to an iPhone), the price-point could drop significantly enough that developers could create innovative, engaging games based on users’ real life heart rate. Schools could follow the trend set forth by the DDR case study and implement raised heart rate games into the physical education curriculum, taking one more step against childhood obesity using the mobile, social gaming technology from Corventis.

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Gaming project: Tugg

W O U L D N ’ T I T B E CO O L I F. . . Wouldn't it be cool if we could create a mobile game to fight childhood obesity? Our game, Tugg, utilizes a blend of mobile heart monitoring technology and social gaming to pit teams of kids against each other in virtual games of tug-owar. The only way for kids to win is by literally raising their heart rate, thereby reducing the risk for and effects of childhood obesity in a fun, competitive social game. We have created a promotype of Tugg to show how this health-oriented game could potentially work, all the way from the back end of the technology to the student’s hearts. Our Tugg promotype utilizes a hand-held heart monitor from Vernier that’s as easy to use as holding on to the handles of a jumprope. After signing up on http://heartygames.mynmi.net, the student simply plugs in the kid-friendly heart monitor to her home computer and starts dancing, jumping, hoola-hooping, or exercising in any way she wants. After 30 minutes of a healthy elevated heart rate, the student’s session on Tugg is complete and she sees the progress of her team or class so far. If the student’s class is winning, she will see a visualization of a tug-of-war rope moving one step closer to victory. At the end of the week, the class with the most 30-minute sessions completed will win! At the end of the round-robin style tournament within her school, the class with the most overall wins is the champion and moves on to represent the school in a state-wide single elimination tournament. Little did they know, but while the students were competing with one another to win the tournament, every elevated heart beat moved them one step further from hypertension, diabetes, high blood pressure, and a number of other health risks that accompany childhood obesity.
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BEHIND THE SCENES: THE MAKING OF TUGG iPhone “App” Team: Hal Tift & Jessica Henry Our role in creating Tugg has centered on app development. Hal has focused on programming and functionality while Jessica split off on user experience design. We briefly planned on trying to build a native iPhone application, but there were too many unknown variables—especially the issue of having a live connection from an iPhone to a heart rate monitor—and we had limited experience in the necessary programming language(s). Instead we opted to build a simulation in Adobe Flash of what would be the Tugg iPhone app. We consider the ideas behind Tugg to be what make it valuable, so we are comfortable leaving behind the actual iPhone functionality. The flash app reads a user’s heart rate from an online database and reacts accordingly. When the heart rate meets or exceeds a predefined goal rate, a displayed timer will begin counting down and will continue as long as the goal rate is met or exceeded. Once the timer reaches zero the user has achieved the daily goal and that accomplishment will be recorded and inserted into the current team or personal Tugg match. For instance, if one’s match goal is fifteen minutes at a bpm (heartbeats per minute) of 120 or greater, s/he will receive a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ for each day, depending on whether or not s/he achieved that goal. Over the course of a match (one week for instance), the team or person with the most accumulated successes (a maximum of seven in the case of a week) wins the virtual tug-of-war. Other aspects of the flash application consist of simple animations to serve as an interface for the above functionality and to simulate the look and feel of a true iPhone app. Combining the use of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator with the existing flash program, Jessica was able to do just that.
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Heart Rate Monitor Device Research and Process Team: Sara Osburn & Kiley Dorton During our research on devices several factors remained constant. We knew that whatever we chose must be kid-friendly and record the heart rate and time of workout. Throughout the process, as we gained more insight into what our specific needs were we discovered other characteristics that were mandatory for our device which is what led us to our final decision. Originally we found numerous heart rate monitors, as recording heart rates during fitness seems to be a growing trend. A variety of vendors such as Best Buy, Target, Garmin, Polar, CardioSport, Timex etc supply heart rate monitors all with a variety of specifications, prices, hardware and software. After meeting with a gaming expert we
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discovered that the device we chose must easily transfer data to a computer via USB, Bluetooth or WiFi connection. We then found a device called the Oregon Scientific Heart Rate Data Logger which stored information sent from the recording device and transferred it to a computer with a USB plug. We then realized that not only would this option require a lot of hardware but we wanted the data to be transferred via real-time, which the Heart Rate Data Logger did not do. So, after more research and evaluating more options such as build your own heart rate monitors we found a similar option that met our specific needs. The Vernier, our final choice, extracts the heart rate data from a person standing next to the computer (while they hold the Vernier Hand-grip Heart Rate Monitor and Transmitter) and uploads the information to the database online through the Vernier Go!Link USB Interface in real-time. This would allow us to use the developed iPhone app and retrieve the data from the heart rate monitor back to the app in almost real-time. Web Site Team: Isha Ghodke & Lauren Rhode(http://heartygames.mynmi.net/) The process for designing the Hearty Games Web site began with a consideration of our target audience. We narrowed it down to two broad groups-students and interested adults-before searching for an appropriate design. First, it is a place where students register in the initial stage of the Tugg program. When students want to monitor their individual progress, they can log in on the Web site and access a personalized page that visualizes the changes in their heart rate over a given period of time. Tracking progress online adds to the interactivity of the game by giving kids the opportunity to compare their results with the results of other participating teams. The second audience, interested adults, could be parents, teachers, administrators or future investors. The pages regarding the issue of childhood obesity and the page about us, the developers, are targeted at these adults. Not only do we intend to convince them that childhood obesity is an issue requiring immediate and creative attention, but we also want them to trust our game and its potential for a positive impact on their children. We realize that in order for school systems to adopt our recommendations and game, we need the support of these adults, so it is vital that we have a strong, yet straightforward channel of communication to them. The future of the Web site lies in increasing interactivity for both groups of our target audience even further, while still maintaining core concepts of simplicity and functionality. ` I worked on the web site with Isha Ghodke, who created the template and put the pages together. I'm responsible for the content on the site, and I really wanted to emphasize the tournament aspect since that is what can really hook this game for children. Dr. Shamp pointed out that technology will
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continue to change, which will inevitably alter the way our idea works. The concepts behind the technology that make the game fun while encouraging children to get active will stay the same, so that should be the focus of the We site's product information. The pages, Home, Register, Track Progress, Issues, Tournament and About Us, were all strategically planned by our team, and we have tried to plan for all possible scenarios that may be encountered by a user. This way, our site is as user friendly as possible. Video Production Process Team: Kelly Skyler Musgrove, Sara Osburn, & Kiley Dorton In order to catch our audiences attention quickly and effectively we thought we should open with a video about our project. The first step we took was making a broad outline of how we wanted to video to go and then how to proceed into the rest of our presentation from there. Capturing the audiences attention and giving them accurate information about our complex project in less than 2-3 mins is difficult so the outline was a must. After, writing up a broad outline and discussing it with my group members we had our idea for the video solidified. From there it went into research mode. We had to find all the right facts and video clips for our presentation video that we wanted to included about our project or relating to our project. At this point we also began scripting for what our group members were to say in the video. After all the scripting and research was done the filming of our project took place. After the filming came the editing process. We put together the clips, added music, and effects. After finishing the last step process of editing we had created our awesomely entertaining project presentation video. Research & Materials Process Team: Katrina Kulik Creating this game, our team knew we would have to come up with a way to market and explain the game. We wanted to come up with a creative way to share with both the school personnel and parents. In order to participate in this program both the teachers and parents must understand why it is beneficial and what they will have to do to make it beneficial. So we explored some programs similar to this one, such as FuelUpto60 program. In order to do this we decided to make a packet that would be sent out to both the teachers and parents. The one sent to parents will explain the program- the technology involved, the tournament, the benefits, the parents role etc. We hope to encourage parents to allow their children to participate and will include instructions on how to sign them up and a permission slip. The one to the teachers explains how to get students excited and suggestions on how to inform the students about the program. The goal of the packets is to ensure that everyone is informed about the program so it will be as beneficial as possible and to do it in a somewhat creative and interesting way.

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Tugg Team Members
Kiley Dorton M.A. Mass Communication concentrating in Mass Media Studies A.B. Cognitive Science, New Media Interdisciplinary Certification Greenville, SC Graduate team leader, hardware manipulation, project management, graphic design Ever since my high school statistics teacher convinced me to buy a Mac, I've dreamed of moving to Silicon Valley, working 24/7 on a crazy start-up, and starting an a cappella group called the Silicon Valley Singers. Don't judge my dream! I don't care quite as much about where the bus is going as who I'm riding with. My career aspirations focus heavily on finding a highly skilled, incredibly driven, respectfully fun team with whom I can create projects and small companies that truly make a difference. 1. I sing in the all-male a cappella group the UGA Accidentals, and this semester we're going to NYC for finals in an international competition! 2. I can't speak a lick of Spanish, but I managed to acquire 13 XO Laptops (OneLaptopPerChild Campaign) and took them down to San Luis, Costa Rica to 45 beautiful elementary school children. Within ten minutes, the kids were doing things with the laptops that even I didn't know how to do! 3. I compose music for films, and I recently scored a commercial for the EcoFocus Film Festival that made it to NBC, ABC, and CBS! Isha Ghodke Public Relations, German, New Media Certificate Norcross, Ga. Web site, positive attitude After graduation, I want to spend time visiting Germany before beginning law school and eventually practicing media law. 1. I like politics. 2. I spend the majority of my time preparing to compete in mock trial competitions with the UGA Undergraduate Mock Trial Program. 3. I am fluent in four languages.
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Jessica Henry Public Relations Allentown, Pennsylvania Jessica is on the developer team contributing her design and coding skills. Upon starting life as a post-graduate, Jessica hopes be the product of her life experiences thus far: a wildly innovative strategist and communicator. One day she would also like to one day travel the world publish a book about food. Jessica hopes to enter the public relations industry specializing in new media solutions. One day Jessica would like to start such company and consult international organizations. Jessica has lived in seven states, she published marketing research as 16-year-old and she enjoys seeing her world through the lens of her 1960's medium format camera. Hal Tift Magazines Macon, GA I am responsible for much of the programming and database management behind the Tugg promotype. Finding work in a new media field. Working with computers in programming and/or design-related work and possibly taking the eventual step of participating in the founding of a new media company. I'm relatively new to computer science and web design, but I've hit the ground running. HTML and CSS are my strongest areas in computer tachnology to date. I also have a bachelor's degree in music from Wesleyan University in Connecticut. Sara Osburn Advertising Davidson, North Carolina Heart Rate Monitor research and logistics. Video Production Travel and expand my knowledge and skills within the advertising industry. Work for an advertising agency or corporate marketing department in brand strategy or creative but ultimately my dream job is to work for Pixar! 1. I've been bungy jumping in New Zealand, the world's 3rd highest bungy 2. I was the first and only person from my high school to come to UGA
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3. I know more about college football than most of my guy friends. Kelly Skyler Musgrove Telecommunication Arts, Anthropology, New Media Certificate, American Sign Language Douglasville, Georgia Heart Rate Monitor research and logistics. Video Production, and the occasional treat. Find a job that in some way would encompass everything that I studied in undergraduate school. In doing so, helping myself to continue to grow, study, learn and travel while helping and being highly involved with people. To be highly involved with people and the world in order make a difference or a change. By studying and being interested in so many things I could see myself going in so many different directions with my career path. But, I do have a dream job and that would be working for companies like Google, National Geographic, or Discovery Channel. 1. I love to learn and broaden my knowledge of many things. Originally I came to UGA just to study Telecommunications, then I feel in love with many other fields along the way. Now, I am up to 4 different things that I am currently studying. 2. I am a big activist for all Human Rights. I spend a lot of my spare time involving myself in Human Rights campaigns. 3. I love technology. I enjoy learning about it and educating myself to be a more "techknowledgeable" person. The cooler the device the better. Katrina Kulik Advertising Aiken, SC Program Packet for teachers and parents. Research, ideas. ALL ABOUT HOW WE WORKED AS A TEAM. Working as a manager at Goshen Plantation Golf Club in Augusta, GA To obtain a job in a field involving sports. 1. I love sports 2. I visited Fiji, New Zealand and Australia 3. Everyone I meet comments on or nicknames me "smiley".
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Lauren Rohde Public Relations, Speech Communications minor, New Media certificate Marietta, GA Compiled target audience to divide among our group members so we can invite many people to our event, Wrote a Use-case scenario from a parent's perspective, worked on the content of the Web site Starting mid-June, I'll be working in media relations and marketing for Lockheed Martin's Missiles and Fire Control Division in Orlando, then a year doing internal communications, then placed somewhere within the company. Something where I get to combine all my favorite skills in communications, design, and new media so work feels like play. 1. I live for the work/life balance and try not to take anything, including myself, too seriously. 2. I only had one wisdom tooth, and still got it removed. 3. 3. I know some of the CNN anchors personally from working with them this summer as a PR intern on the digital media team.

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Bibliography
Frembe, Linda Seid. “PE Classes Use AV, Media, and Video Games to Combat Obesity.” 17 July 2007. 10 February 2010. http://svconline.com/education/features/av_media_video_games_071807/ Schiesel, Seth. “P.E. Classes Turn to Video Game That Works Legs.” 30 April 2007. 10 February 2010. http:// www.motionfitness.com/pdf/DDR_NewYorkTimes.pdf Konami. “Konami Digital Entertainment Inc. and Games for Health to Launch the 2010 Dance Dance revolution West Virginia State Championship Tournament.” 9 February 2010. 11 February 2010. http://www.konami.com/ news/2010_february/ konami_and_games_for_health_launch_2010_ddr_west_virginia_state_championship.php Baranowski, T., Buday, R., Thompson, D., & Baranowski, J. (2008). Playing for Real: Video Games and Stories for Health-Related Behavior Change. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 34(1) 74-82.

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