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APRIL 13–19, 2016

Barclay Farmstead’s
savior, first director
to be honored

Volley for Support

Friends of Barclay Farmstead will
present Bonnie Cocchiaraley with
plaque for role in saving farmstead,
turning it into a historic site, museum
By MIKE MONOSTRA
The Sun
Every first Sunday from March
through November, local community members file through the
historic house at Barclay Farmstead. The farmhouse has served
as a historical museum for more
than 40 years, giving local residents a glimpse at what life was
like in the early 1800s. This year,
the farmstead is celebrating its
200th anniversary with special
events at the museum and other
locations in Cherry Hill.
For a time in the 1970s, however, the farmstead’s future was in
doubt. The farmhouse was in disrepair and developers were interested in purchasing the property
and tearing down the historic
structure.
A former Barclay Farms resident, Bonnie Cocchiaraley, was
instrumental in saving it, helping
to facilitate the purchase of Bar-

clay Farmstead in 1974. She
served as the farmstead museum’s original director for 17 years
and helped launch an array of
programs, many of which still
exist today.
In the same year the farmstead
celebrates its 200th anniversary,
Friends of Barclay Farmstead
plans to honor Cocchiaraley. At
Friends’ spring luncheon and
meeting on April 14, Cocchiaraley
will be presented with a plaque in
honor of her service.
It has been 25 years since Cocchiaraley, 92, left her position as
director of the Barclay Farmstead Museum. However, she still
vividly remembers her time
working there.

Saving a historic site
Cocchiaraley moved to Cherry
Hill with her family in 1962. The
family lived on Wayland Road,
please see BARCLAY, page 17

MIKE MONOSTRA/The Sun

Emma Woods, Nora Boiler and Karl Boiler hold up their posters as they cheer for Horace Mann Elementary School at the 2016 Volley for Support event.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Going down in history
Students tell little-known tale,
win award. PAGE 7

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . 23–27
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

2 THE CHERRY HILL SUN — APRIL 13–19, 2016

softball scores
The following Cherry Hill High
School West softball score was
submitted by varsity head coach
Melissa Franzosi.
Cherry Hill West defeated
Northern Burlington, 5-2, on April
1.
Elena Vaughan had a big game
for the Lions, going 3-for-3 with
two home runs. Rachel Kubrak
also went 3-for-3 with a double.
Meghan Davis added two RBIs
and Arcie Hernandez got an RBI.
Kerriann Dignan was the winning pitcher.
The following Cherry Hill High
School East softball scores were
submitted by varsity head coach
Stephanie Digneo.
Cherry Hill East defeated

Winslow, 18-1, on April 1.
The Cougars got two doubles
from Valerie Velasco, a double
each from Kendall Geis and
Megan Miller and a triple from
Julianna Martinez as they erupted for 18 runs. Velasco was the
winning pitcher for Cherry Hill
East.
Cherry Hill East defeated Cherokee, 17-16, on April 4 in six innings.
The Cougars scored 11 runs in
the fifth inning to take the lead
and then won the game in the
sixth inning after allowing six
runs to the Chiefs in the top of the
inning. Cherry Hill East had nine
extra base hits and were led by Belasco,
who
had
a
double and a home run in the
game.

Send us your Cherry Hill news
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an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@cherryhillsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (856) 427-0933.

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APRIL 13–19, 2016 5

tennis
score
The following Cherry Hill High
School East boys’ tennis score was
submitted by varsity head coach
Greg DeWolf.
Cherry Hill East defeated Eastern, 4-1, on April 6
Singles:
First singles: Rahul Goculdas,
Cherry Hill East, defeated Ashwin Ramesh 6-1 6-4
Second singles: Adam Yu, Cherry Hill East, defeated Parth
Hardikar 6-0 6-3
Third singles: Elan Boyarsky,
Cherry Hill East, defeated Kautic
Agrawal 6-4 6-5
Doubles:
First doubles: Alec Feldstein
and Rabell Ahmad, Eastern, defeated Drew Meklinsky and
Aaron Silverberg 6-3 4-6 6-4.
Second doubles: Jesse Dubrow
and Kevin Hu, Cherry Hill East,
defeated Pranav Chugh and Anthony Stella 6-3 6-2

lacrosse
score
The following Cherry Hill High
School East girls’ lacrosse score
was submitted by varsity head
coach Katie Boyle.
Haddonfield defeated Cherry Hill
East, 19-9, on April 1.
Kelsey Gorman scored four
goals for the Cougars in the loss.
Haley Pawliczek scored twice.
Emily Millspaugh made 11 saves.

volleyball
score
The following Cherry Hill High
School East boys’ volleyball score
was submitted by Eastern Regional High School.
Cherry Hill East competed in
the Eastern Invitational tournament on April 2. The Cougars
were eliminated in the quarterfinals, losing to the host Vikings.

6

THE CHERRY HILL SUN — APRIL 13–19, 2016

in our opinion

Animals need statewide support
The solution to homeless animal problem is education, from the top down
his is the final week in The
Sun’s “Help for Homeless Pets”
series. For four weeks, we have
looked at the state of homeless pets in
our region. We interviewed heads of
animal shelters, volunteers with rescues and foster families. We talked intake numbers, live release rates and –
this week – how to potentially solve
such a staggering problem.
There’s no easy solution.
All of these non-profits are playing
a huge role in a very public problem.
They’re doing the best they can – and
the best they can is nothing to sneeze
at – but unfortunately, it’s not enough.
What these non-profits need is more
public support.
All of our interviewees agreed that
a big part of moving forward is education – about the vital importance of
spaying and neutering, about ensuring all pets are microchipped, about
the lifetime commitment of owning a
pet.
This is what we believe the next step

T

is – an organization that spearheads
the homeless animal education campaign. There is no public education
about homeless animals at the state
level, and that’s where this should
start. Think “Click It or Ticket.”
Think “Drive Sober or Get Pulled
Over.” These programs have state
funding to target a statewide problem
that needs fixing, and homeless animals are most definitely a statewide
problem that needs to be fixed.
It’s true there are excellent education campaigns already in place at a
local level. Our shelters and rescues
work hard to inform the public,
whether it is with advertising low-cost
spay and neuter clinics or offering free
training seminars for problem pets.
But everything comes down to money,
and between feeding and housing animals, paying employees and purchasing much-needed items for facilities,
these shelters and rescues – even
banded together within towns and
counties – can only do so much in the

realm of educating the public.
There is strength in numbers. What
if there were more groups such as the
Camden County Animal Alliance, and
each had a representative who reported to one state-level organization?
What if these alliances helped create a
state-run alliance solely focused on educating the public on finding a solution to the homeless animal problem?
The overarching goal of every animal shelter and rescue is to not exist.
Are the employees and volunteers of
these organizations passionate? Of
course they are. But that doesn’t mean
they would rather not be needed, because if they’re not needed, that
means every homeless animal – every
last dog, cat, rabbit and hamster – has
a home.
And to make this happen, there
needs to be more public support.
There needs to be more public education. And if the state government got
behind it, we would be one step closer
to a home for every homeless pet.

Jacobs, Short to run in council special election
Jacobs is Democratic nominee for the seat, while Short will run for Republican Party
By MIKE MONOSTRA
The Sun
A contested Cherry Hill Township Council election will take shape this fall as one
Republican candidate and one Democratic
candidate have filed to run for their party’s
nomination for township council in New
Jersey’s June 7 primary election.
According to the Cherry Hill Township
clerk’s office, Carolyn Jacobs will run uncontested for the Democrat Party’s nomination. Jacobs was appointed to council

last January after the resignation of former Councilwoman Susan Shin Angulo.
Rick Short is running uncontested in
the primary for the Republican nomination.
The winners of the primary election
will move on to November’s general election. The winner in November will be
elected to township council for one year to
fill the unexpired term of the seat formerly
held by Angulo, who resigned at the end of
2015 after being elected to the Camden
County Board of Chosen Freeholders. The

seat will be up for election again for a full,
four-year term in 2017.
Primary elections in New Jersey will
take place on Tuesday, June 7. Voters must
be a registered party member to vote in a
party’s primary election. Voters who are
voting in a primary election for the first
time are permitted to declare their party
affiliation at the polls.
For information on how to register to
vote and to find your polling location in
Cherry Hill Township, visit www.cherryhill-nj.com/378/Voting-Information.

108 Kings Highway East
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856-427-0933
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executive editor

publisher

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Mike Monostra
cherry hill editor Mike Monostra
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senior associate editor

elauwit media Group
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editor emeritus

Steve Miller
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The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 108 Kings Highway East, 3rd
Floor, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. It is mailed
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SPEAK UP
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Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
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them off at our office, too.
The Cherry Hill Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – including electronically.

APRIL 13–19, 2016 – THE CHERRY HILL SUN 7

Making history
National History Day group from Rosa
International Middle School uses performance
to tell story of Jewish exodus from Iraq
By MIKE MONOSTRA
The Sun
Rosa International Middle
School has always done well in
National History Day competition.
Under the direction of Christy
Marrella, the school has had
groups qualify at the national
level of the competition eight consecutive years. This year, Rosa
will have six groups competing at
the state level on May 7.
While there have been many
accomplishments coming out of
Rosa’s participation in NHD over
the years, one of the 2016 groups
has performed a project Marrella
describes as unlike anything
she’s seen before.
The team of eighth graders

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Naomi Abrams, Isabel Andino,
Aditi Doiphode, Pallavi Goculdas
and Jessica Lam completed an
NHD project entitled “Hidden
From History: The Forgotten Exodus of Iraqi Jews.” The project is
the story of how thousands of
Jews were forced to leave Iraq in
the 1940s and 1950s.
During that time, many Jews
were being hanged and tortured
in Iraq after being accused of
being Zionist. Many of these
Jews were innocent, but ended up
persecuted for a number of reasons, with anti-Semitic views
stemming partially from Nazi-influenced beliefs. Eventually in
1950, Iraq and Israel came to an
agreement where Jews were perplease see STUDENTS, page 19

PAGE 8

THURSDAY APRIL 14
Friends book sale: 9:30 a.m. at
Cherry Hill Public Library. The
book sale offers the opportunity
to browse thousands of books,
CDs and DVDs for sale. All proceeds benefit the library.
Rhyme time: Ages 2 and under. 10
and 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. at Cherry Hill Public Library. Develop
baby’s motor, sensory and social
skills. Enjoy short books, songs,
movement and more.
Thursday Morning: 10:30 a.m. at
Cherry Hill Public Library. Representatives from the Social Security Administration will visit the
library to present benefits and
how seniors can get the most out
of them.
Temple Beth Sholom Hazak meeting: 1 p.m. at Temple Beth
Sholom. This month, community
members can join in a sing-along
with Fran Schwartz that features
songs from the great Broadway
shows. The meeting is free to
members and costs $5 to attend
for non-members. Refreshments

CALENDAR
will be served. For more information, contact Zelda Greenberg at
(856) 751-4201.
Fandom meetup: Grades six to 12. 6
p.m. at Cherry Hill Public Library.
Harry Potter, Hunger Games,
Doctor Who, Percy Jackson, all
are invited to share their fandom
love in a fun and welcoming environment.
Scleroderma Support Group meeting: Every other month. 1:30 p.m.
at Cherry Professional Building,
first floor conference room, 385
Kings Highway North. For additional information or to confirm
meeting, contact John Keegan at
767-4783 or johnkeegan@comcast.net.
Alzheimer’s Support Group:
Spouses Sharing Challenges:
Noon in the Witherspoon Building
behind the Trinity Presbyterian
Church, 499 Route 70 E. Support
group for spouses and/or partners of persons with Alzheimer’s
or related dementias. Sponsored
by the Delaware Valley Chapter
of The Alzheimer’s Association.
For more information, call Ruth
Bishoff at (856) 829-5345.

FRIDAY APRIL 15
Friends book sale: 9:30 a.m. at
Cherry Hill Public Library. The
book sale offers the opportunity
to browse thousands of books,
CDs and DVDs for sale. All proceeds benefit the library.
Tax help for seniors: 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. at Cherry Hill Town Hall.
Representatives from AARP will
help Cherry Hill senior citizens
prepare federal income tax
returns, state income tax returns,
homestead rebate forms and
property tax reimbursement
forms. Seniors should bring a
copy of their 2014 returns, all relevant tax statements, receipts
and forms and a Social Security
card. The event is free and no
appointment is needed.
Luncheon with the Arts for Seniors: 10:30 a.m. at Katz JCC. The
RB Express will perform songs
from the days of doo-wop. Lunch
will be served after the entertainment. The cost is $5 in advance
and $8 at the door. For more
information or to reserve ticket,

call the Cherry Hill Township
Recreation Department at (856)
488-7868
or
email
Arts@CHTownship.com.
Tot Shabbat at Temple Emanuel: 6
p.m. in the chapel. Family dinner
at 6:30 p.m. 1101 Springdale Road,
Cherry Hill.
Garden State Rotary Club of Cherry Hill meeting: 12:15 p.m. at Seasons 52, Cherry Hill Mall. For
more information, visit www.gardenstaterotarycherryhill.com.
Cherry Hill Retirees Club: Noon to
4 p.m. at Cherry Hill Community
Center, 820 Mercer St. Enjoy
bridge, pinochle, shuffle board.
Call (856) 795-3720.

SATURDAY APRIL 16
Sweet treats sale: 9:30 a.m. at
Cherry Hill Public Library. The
Junior Friends of the Cherry Hill
Public Library will host a this sale
to benefit the library.
Friends book sale: 9:30 a.m. at
Cherry Hill Public Library. The
book sale offers the opportunity
to browse thousands of books,

APRIL 13–19, 2016
CDs and DVDs for sale. On Saturday, shoppers can buy a bag of
books for $5. All proceeds benefit
the library.
Parents Night Out program: 6 p.m.
at Philly Art Center’s Cherry Hill
studio, 1721 Springdale Road in
Cherry Hill. Kids will enjoy a Saturday night art making extravaganza with pizza and will then
dive into sculpture and book arts
projects. The cost is $25 per Katz
JCC member and $30 for guests.
To
register,
please
visit
katzjcc.org or contact Kenny Einhorn, director of JCC Children &
Family
Programs
at
keinhorn@jfedsnj.org.

SUNDAY APRIL 17
Another Song Will Rise: A Tribute
to Debbie Friedman: 4 p.m. at
Congregation M’kor Shalom. This
concert will honor the life and
legacy of singer and songwriter
Debbie Friedman. It will include
highlights from Friedman’s vast
please see CALENDAR, page 16

APRIL 13–19, 2016 – THE CHERRY HILL SUN 9

‘Fiddle and Tradition in America’ April 13
Haddonfield Chapter, NSDAR
will present Fiddle and Tradition
in America: A History and
Demonstration by Matthew Backes, Ph.D. on April 13 at 7 p.m. at
Springdale Farms, 1638 South
Springdale Road, in Cherry Hill.
This program is free and open to
the public. Reservations are encouraged. The program is funded
by the Horizons Speakers Bureau
of the New Jersey Council for the
Humanities, a state partner of
the National Endowment for the
Humanities.
Until the early 20th century, the
fiddle was the centerpiece of
American folk music and folk culture. Since then, it has been the

focus of a musical preservation
impulse and a search for authentic folk expression, often referred
to as “traditional” music. This
presentation explores the dynamic role of fiddle music in American life from the 18th century to
the present.
Historian and working musician Backes discusses the origins,
styles and interrelated histories
of a range of fiddle traditions
while providing demonstration of
technique and repertoire. The

presentation begins as an interactive introduction to the fiddle and
ends by raising big questions
about the meaning of tradition itself and the place of music in the
making, recording and understanding of cultural change.
For more information about
this event, contact Pamela Campbell
at
(856)
783-7965
or
pscampb456@iwon.com.
For
more information about the Horizons Speakers Bureau please visit
njch.org/programs/hsb/.

volleyball
scores
The following Cherry Hill High
School West boys’ volleyball
scores were submitted by
Moorestown High School.
Cherry Hill West competed in
Moorestown’s 22-team tip-off
tournament on April 2.
Collingswood defeated Cherry
Hill West, 33-12
Cinnaminson defeated Cherry
Hill West, 25-17
St. Augustine defeated Cherry
Hill West, 25-22
Cherry Hill West defeated
Northern Burlington, 32-23
Pennsauken defeated Cherry
Hill West, 28-19
Moorestown defeated Cherry
Hill West, 31-21
Rancocas Valley defeated Cherry Hill West, 25-17

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609-506-4644

Cherry Hill Montessori’s
Summer Day Camp features
our unique “swim confidently” swim program and
offers an exciting and funfilled early camp experience
for children ages 3 to 7
years. For more than 30
years, we have been teaching children to swim in our
heated in-ground swimming
pool designed specifically
for preschool and early-elementary age children, and
campers love their daily
swim activities! Staffed by
experienced lifeguards and
our full time school year
and returning staff members, our Summer Camp offers a stimulating range of
activities with different experiences every day. To complement our weekly themes,

we have special visitors, biweekly sports camps,
magic and science shows,
arts and crafts, a special
off-site field trip and many
other indoor and outdoor
fun activities.
Our camp offers flexible
scheduling so you can sign
up your child for a minimum of four weeks or our
full camp schedule of nine
weeks, and can choose
daily schedules from three,
four or five full days, or
even a half day schedule.
Check out our website at
www.cher ryhillmontessori.com for more information about our Summer
Camp or call the school for
a
tour
(856-751-0525).
Spaces fill up quickly so
contact us now!

Abandonment doesn’t
dampen dog’s spirit
As senior dog Shiver improves
her own health, she has special impact
on rehabilitation patients as a therapy dog
By KRISTEN DOWD

surgeries to remove her tumors, the majority of which
have been malignant. Her
It has been almost three chronic dry eye condition is
months since Shiver found her being managed daily, and she’s
way to the Animal Welfare As- back to a healthy weight.
sociation in Voorhees after
“She
looks
fantastic,”
being abandoned in a box be- Keklak said. “Any time she
hind a local hardware store. comes in with her foster mom,
Riddled with mammary tu- she’s all snuggled in with her
mors, underweight and dehy- blankie. Her foster mom says,
drated, the 13-year-old minia- ‘She can walk on a leash, but
ture pinscher mix was far from she prefers to be carried.’”
the picture of health.
It’s safe to say life has turned
Thanks to the AWA, things around for Shiver and, accordlook a little different for Shiver ing to foster mom Alicia Redtoday.
fern, the little dog is paying it
“It’s amazing what can hap- forward.
pen in a few short months,”
Redfern, a Voorhees resiAWA shelter manager Nanci dent, works in the rehabilitaKeklak said.
tion department of a local longShiver recovered from her term care facility, where Shiver
first in a sehas become a favorite among
ries of
staff and residents.
“Shiver comes to work with
me every day. She’s been able to
get through to residents in
ways that we can’t,” Redfern
said. “She is really affectionate but not in a demanding
kind of way. She’s just
very, very gentle. I’ve had
residents do things
with Shiver that I
couldn’t get them to
do in therapy.”
Redfern said the
connection Shiver has with her
residents
brings tears to
her eyes. Residents
become more
focused
and motiSpecial to The Sun
vated
Shiver cuddles into
please see
her blanket in the
WHAT,
arms of foster mom
page 12
Alicia Redfern.

The Sun

BRIGIT BAUMA/The Sun

Apache, approximately a year old, lost his way in Edgewater Park. He is one of a number of homeless
dogs at the Burlington County Animal Shelter.

Where do we go from here?
As animal shelters across the region continue to strive
to increase their live release rate, they place a specific focus
on collaborating to reach this common goal
By SEAN LAJOIE
The Sun
Thousands of animals find
themselves in local shelters each
year, with no permanent home
through adoption guaranteed.
Solving a problem of this magnitude will undoubtedly take
years, but it is clear animal shelters across South Jersey have a
plan.
“We think the demand for our
service will continue to grow,”
Animal Welfare Association Executive Director Maya Richmond
said. “One thing we can always be
sure about moving forward is
people always having love for animals.”
It will just be a matter of if
these organizations can properly

capitalize and collaboratively
tackle this common goal in an efficient manner.

Increasing family involvement
The behind-the-scenes planning to reduce homeless animals
requires extensive research, and
shelters across the region are
doing their homework. The
groups strategically plan for the
future by studying trends.
They are constantly evaluating
needs in the community to dis-

cover consistent ways to provide
resources to specific populations
as efficiently as possible. They’re
also actively looking for ways to
get more families involved
through education outreach, engagement and service projects
that bring families and corporations to their location.
“We host educational outings
like our Yappy Hours to be accommodating to these families and
please see RICHMOND, page 11

GET INVOLVED WITH OUR SERIES
This is the last in a four-week series The Sun published looking into the
state of homeless pets in South Jersey and what is being done to find
homes – and futures – for thousands of animals. We want our readers
involved! Go to our Facebook page to share your favorite photos of
your furry friends. They may appear in a future issue of The Sun!

‘Pet ownership is a lifetime commitment’
Consider all responsibilities of pet ownership before bringing home a new furry friend
By KRISTEN DOWD
and BRIGIT BAUMA
The Sun
“Pet
ownership
is
a
lifetime commitment,” Vicki
Rowland said. “Pets are our children.”
Rowland, the executive director of the Camden County Animal Shelter, can’t stress enough
the importance of understanding the responsibility that
comes
along
with
pet

ownership.
“Clearly (the CCAS) is offering a service to those who, at the
end of the day, there’s absolutely
no hope for that person keeping
their pet. That’s what we’re here
for,” Rowland said. “But then
there’s always the other side of
that coin. They may adopt a cute
puppy, but then it grows up and
it’s too much. They don’t think it
through.”
Thinking through an adoption is just one way local shel-

ters and homeless pet advocates
say the problem of homeless
pets can be helped. Find out
more suggestions below.

Ways to reduce the number
of homeless animals
• Consider all responsibilities
of pet ownership before adopting your pet. Remember, as Rowland said, that pet ownership is a
lifetime commitment for that animal.

• Have a problem pet? Don’t
give up. Talk to your vet and invest in a trainer if pet behavior
is becoming an issue.
• Microchip your pet and keep
the information up-to-date. Have
your pet wear an ID tag. “I think
that is good for people to know,”
Barbara Agnew, adoptive parent
to four dogs, said. “Get your dog
microchipped and make sure it
has a tag on it.”
• If you see a homeless pet, report it. Don’t assume someone

else already did.
• Spay and neuter your pet.
“Neutering or spaying pets is a
real way to prevent more homeless pets being out in the world,”
Eric Arpert, Burlington County
public
information
officer,
said.
• If you absolutely cannot
keep your pet, never abandon it.
Surrender your pet to a reputable shelter or rescue that is
equipped to find the animal the
best placement.

Richmond: Non-profit rescues have grown, but donations have not
RICHMOND
Continued from page 10
make them feel comfortable,”
Richmond said.
The executive director of the
Camden County Animal Shelter,
Vicki Rowland, believes the economy has an impact on family involvement.
“More people would get involved if they had more time,”
Rowland said.
Families are often deterred
from experimenting with the idea
of fostering or adopting animals
because they believe it would be
too much of a financial burden.
However, with organizations
such as the CCAS, it is completely
free. The rescue provides everything it takes to care for a foster
pet. According to Rowland, the
major challenge it faces is getting
the word out to families that fostering is free, fun and rewarding.
The organization recently got
involved in targeting feral cats –
an animal Richmond agreed is
being brought into shelters more
frequently.
Owner reclaims of animals
that come into CCAS are not especially high, specifically for cats.
Historically, Rowland said re-

claims of cats are less than 2 percent of intake compared to 12 percent of dogs.
Getting phone calls from residents concerned about feral cats
living in their town is not uncommon for local shelters and rescues.
“We’re still trying to brainstorm action steps,” Rowland
said. “How do we answer the
questions and provide the solutions for those people who call?”
The CCAS looks to continue to
educate and provide appropriate
resources for families moving forward to help them deal with these
problems and get involved with
shelters.

Building regional relationships
Over the last 15 to 20 years,
non-profit rescues have continued
to grow. However, donations have
not.
According to Richmond, this
has set up a dynamic the shelter
community needs to be aware of.
“We need to work more collaboratively, maybe even combine
some shelters in order to reduce
cost so animals can get more,”
Richmond said.
One Love Animal Rescue
Chairwoman
Sherri
Smith
agreed with Richmond in the
sense that she would rather see

BRIGIT BAUMA/The Sun

Vera spends some time in the Burlington County Animal
Shelter’s cat room which was added to the shelter in 2014.
The room allows cats to get the chance to be out of cages
as well as socialize with other cats and potential adopters.

existing shelters get funded more
appropriately instead of creating
more.
“I would like to see those existing organizations be able to expand discounted or free veterinary services to the community,
be able to create educational and
outreach programs for the community, and be able to create and
support more programs to get
shelter pets trained to assist individuals who need companionship
or special help,” Smith said.

Rowland has noticed a trending decline in intake over the last
five years.
“Five years ago, I was taking
over 6,000 animals a year, and
now I’m taking nearly 4,000 animals a year,” Rowland explained.
“I don’t believe the number of
shelters and rescues in New Jersey will increase in the future.”
In 2011, the Camden County
Animal Alliance began bringing
organizations together when it
joined the CCAS, Animal Welfare

Association, Animal Adoption
Center, Voorhees Animal Orphanage and Independent Animal Control to help improve the
services it provides to animals
and communities. The alliance
now meets once a month with a
focus on continuing to look for
partnerships with struggling
communities.
For example, the AWA recently
started bringing in animals from
please see SHELTERS, page 12

Shelters agree spaying/neutering pets is of top importance
SHELTERS
Continued from page 11

Cape May County to help an area
that doesn’t have great exposure.

Spay/neuter targeting
The promoting of targeted
spaying and neutering has become a top priority of shelters
statewide.
“Specifically-targeted
spay/neuter is one of our goals in
trying to prevent pet overpopulation,” Rowland said.
The AWA focuses on continuing to commit efforts toward underserved communities or what it
refers to as “deserts of services.”
“We try to be proactive and
mindful of their situations so we
are not degrading anybody, but
being there to support their community and building trust and
providing resources to them,”
Richmond said.
The AWA is making a particular effort to have cats spayed or
neutered due to the rising number of feral cats in the area. The
CCAS recently hosted its first cat
clinic targeted toward Camden
residents. The clinic, subsidized
by
a
grant,
offers
free
spay/neuter surgeries and vaccinations. About 10 cats were
spayed or neutered at this first
clinic.
“It went well,” Rowland said.
“We’re really trying to supply outreach to Camden as far as offering the services to an area that
doesn’t have them already offered.”

The clinics will continue until
the grant obligation is fulfilled,
meaning 130 cats will be spayed
or neutered. Another clinic is
planned this month.
“We will keep spreading the
word – spay /neuter your pets! It
won’t change until this is widely
accepted by everyone as the only
way to responsibly care for your
pet,” Smith said.

Objectives
The No. 1 goal of all these organizations is to eventually reach
a 100 percent live release rate.
But with each new animal
brought, a new challenge is presented.
“I don’t have a choice of what
comes in. I have to take all owner
surrenders and extreme cases,”
Rowland said.
To increase adoption rates at a
record pace, One Love works extremely hard to portray rescue
and adoption in a positive light.
“We have good cameras and
make sure our photos of adoptable dogs are more like a dreamy,
happy portrait than a sad, dark
photo of an animal behind kennel
bars,” Smith said.
The rescue wants people to associate adopting a rescue pet with
the amazing and positive experience they truly believe it to be.
“It is our goal to show how glorious and rewarding it is to foster
and/or adopt an animal in need,”
Smith said.
To do this and in turn raise
adoption rates, the group has set
a number of objectives.
It continues to grow its communication plan with surrounding shelters and its online follow-

ing by enhancing its website and
social media experience. It posts
things such as happy family adoption photos and photos that show
the progress of rescue pets to
shine the positive light on what
can come of the services with the
help of families in the area.
It is also constantly looking to
expand communication when it
comes to the local available pets
in shelter to understand as much
as possible about each pet’s behavior and medical services.

Continued from page 10
when Shiver is around. One
woman with no short-term
memory even remembered giving Shiver a bath the next day.

“She has so many medical issues, and she’s older. I don’t
know if there’s a kindred spirit
there,” Redfern said. “I don’t
know what it is, but I’ve been
around a lot of animals and I’ve
never seen an animal have so
much impact on so many people
before.”

save lives, with hopefully having
more adoptions and less pet overload and costs, having less to pay
for pets.”

What’s the answer?

“There’s no one set answer,”
Rowland said. “Spay/neutering is
clearly the top thing – education,
awareness, the whole nine
yards.”
Smith agreed with this notion.
One Love plans to place a special
focus on getting the spay/neuter
message to the public, providing
Expanding and upgrading
more discounted or free sterilizaLimited space has also become
tion services to everyone, and
a problem local shelters are lookpromoting awareness and educaing to tackle.
tion specifically in low-income
“We have to have
areas.
more space,” RichEncouraging
mond said. “We opadoptions is key,
“We
will
keep
spreading
the
word

erate in 40 percent of
too, according to
the space that organspay/neuter your pets! It won’t change until Rowland, along
izations similar to us
with making sure
this is widely accepted by everyone as the
around the country
the public knows
have.”
there are all sorts
only way to responsibly care for your pet.”
At the Burlington
of
animals
County Animal Shelavailable
at
shelSHERRI SMITH
ter, a new cat room
ters.
Chairwoman, One Love Animal Rescue
was added in 2014
“It’s that awareand opened in 2015.
ness that we have
“The cat room was
so many great
made as an alternative to cages through these programs.
dogs, great cats, all different
that the cats would normally stay
The Voorhees Animal Orphan- shapes, sizes, breeds, and I think
in. This allows them to get the so- age’s $1.6 million “Take Me there’s that misconception. We
cialization they need as well as Home” capital campaign was have everything. We get everyfor families to see and interact launched in January. At a Jan. 28 thing in,” she said.
with cats they could potentially press conference, VAO officials
Shelters across South Jersey
adopt,” Eric Arpert, Burlington said the organization hopes to are trying to set the standard for
County public information offi- raise the funds necessary to con- care extremely high, in hopes
cer, said.
solidate several outdated and sep- other rescues will follow their
The BCAS also has a new dog arate outbuildings on its grounds lead.
play area and dog play groups, into one new, modernized struc“We are striving to create best
which help with socialization. ture.
practices that might someday
Being cooped in a shelter can
BCAS is also looking to expand guide other rescuers and help
have a potentially negative im- its current facility. Some of the adopters find reputable rescue ormain features of the project ganizations,” Smith said.
They strive to supply their
would include an expansion to
the front, including a new wel- communities with skills people
come area, entrance and parking need to make an impact and elelot; the addition of new acquain- vate the well-being of homeless
tance rooms and cat rooms; more animals.
And, according to Shiver’s
“It’s incredibly touching for us
offices; and dog runs and play
foster mom, there’s no doubt the
when we see it work out,” Richareas outside.
little dog was loved at some
The expansion was approved mond said. “We believe if we help
point in her life.
for $1.9 million and is incorporat- the humans, they will help the an“She just loves everybody,”
ed in the county budget, accord- imals.”
Redfern said. “For an old girl
ing to Arpert.
that was abandoned, the things
Kristen Dowd, Zane Clark and
“We believe that the new exshe’s doing for so many people
pansion will help more pets be Brigit Bauma contributed to this
now … it’s so empowering.”
adopted,” Arpert said. “This will article.

What Shiver does is empowering, foster mom says

WHAT

pact on dogs, causing anxiety and
stress, according to Arpert. Areas
for dogs to play outside and with
other dogs help with that.
“The outside play area makes
these dogs more adoptable,”
Arpert said.
Many local shelters have expansion projects in place and underway.
The AWA is looking into a
three-year facility upgrade that
includes remodeling its adoption
center to make things more welcoming for visitors. The association plans to expand its technical
and training expertise programs
as well by looking into animals’
needs and trying to cater to them

APRIL 13–19, 2016 – THE CHERRY HILL SUN 13

Philly Art Center
to host Parents Night Out
On Saturday, April 16 from 6 to
10 p.m., parents can take advantage of a night out while kids
ages 5 to 12 get to sample serious
studio fun at the Cherry Hill outpost of Philly Art Center.
Kids will enjoy a Saturday
night art making extravaganza
with pizza and will then dive into
sculpture and book arts projects.
Children will invent their own
worlds through diorama construction while learning paper
construction techniques and create 3D people to inhabit these creations! Next, kids will design
books that tap the imagination

and tell the story of the worlds
created, and draw, collage, color
cut and build with an exciting
array of materials.
This Parents Night Out program will take place at the Philly
Art Center’s Cherry Hill studio,
located at 1721 Springdale Road in
Cherry Hill. Pre-registration required and space is limited! Cost
is $25 per Katz JCC member and
$30 for guests.
To register, visit katzjcc.org or
contact Kenny Einhorn, director
of JCC Children & Family
Programs at keinhorn@jfedsnj.
org.

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BALLETNj PRESENTS “CINDERELLA” AT THE VOORHEES
SCHOOLS THEATRE WITH DANCERS FROM CHERRY HILL
BalletNj, Theatre Company of
New Jersey, will present an allnew, full-length production of
“Cinderella” at the Voorhees
Schools Theatre, 1000 Holly Oak
Drive, Voorhees, NJ 08043 on April
23, 24, 30 and May 1, 2016. Starring
Evelyn Kocak, soloist dancer with
Pennsylvania Ballet, and Alexandra Hughes, corps de ballet member of the Pennsylvania Ballet, as
“Cinderella”, this production will
also star Ian Hussey, Principal
Dancer of the Pennsylvania Ballet, as the “Prince”. Max Baud,
star of the National Touring Company of “Billy Elliot” will appear
as the “Dancing Master” along
with Independent Guest Artist,
Andre Vytoptov. Additional guest
artists will be Jack Sprance and
Aaron Anker of the Pennsylvania
Ballet. Dancers from Cherry Hill
appearing in this production are:
Sydnie Stern Arias, Anna, Amelia

and Alexandra Calzaretto, Alexandra Braem, Julia and Tricia Coen,
Emma Hinkle, Sophia Leone, Katrina Lorenzo, Audrey and Hannah
Nash, Abigail Murphy, Kathryn
Murphy, Anjali Soni, and Sofia Tufano. Based upon the classic children’s tale, this production will
also feature sets by 8 Stars Scenic
Studio and costumes by Rosemary
Gorman and Jurga Kwiatkowski.
There will be two Girl Scout Days
at the Ballet on April 23 and April
30. The event is open to all Girl
Scouts and their family members.
The cost of this package is $20.00
and includes a backstage tour, an
opportunity to watch the dancers
prepare for the performance, a
patch, and a private autograph
session and photo opportunity
with “Cinderella” following the
performance. Tickets can be ordered by calling 856-768-9503. In
addition there will be a “Cin-

derella Ball” at the Tavistock
Country Club on April 8 from 6:008:30pm. This event is open to the
public and will feature dancing,
prizes and an appearance by featured characters from the production. The cost of this event is
$50.00 and tickets can be ordered
by
going
online
@
www.balletnj.org or by calling 856768-9503.
Tickets will go fast for what will be
the highlight of the Spring Dance
Season in South Jersey. You may
order tickets by going online @
www.balletnj.org or by calling 856768-9503. Ticket prices range from
$22.00 to $18.00 with a senior citizen discount. BalletNj accepts
MasterCard and Visa. All shows
are at 2:30 PM. Parking is free and
the Voorhees Schools Theatre is
wheel chair accessible, so call or
order on-line now!

14 THE CHERRY HILL SUN — APRIL 13–19, 2016

‘Explore the Music
of Broadway’ on April 14
Temple Beth Sholom Hazak invites the community to attend
our meeting on Thursday, April
14 at 1 p.m. in Cherry Hill to “Explore the Music of Broadway.”
Join in a sing-along with Fran
Schwartz that features songs
from the great shows of the Great
White Way.
Schwartz is a pianist, lecturer
and teacher who has been performing concerts with commentary in Pennsylvania, New Jersey
and Florida. Starting lessons at
age five, she has a bachelor’s and
master’s degree in English literature from the University of Pennsylvania and a master’s of music
in piano performance from Arcadia University.
Schwartz’ passion for performing and teaching has produced informative piano concerts and lectures. Their appeal is the combination of entertainment and education, with an informal ap-

proach, that captivates music
connoisseurs and music lovers.
As president of the Philadelphia Music Teachers Association,
Schwartz planned workshops,
recitals, competitions and master
classes with renowned performers. She has given presentations
for her local and state chapters of
the Music Teachers National Association.
Schwartz is first vice-president
and program chair of the Rittenhouse Square Committee for the
Philadelphia Orchestra and has
been a member for 25 years. The
committee presents six Lecture
Luncheons a year, and Schwartz
has been a celebrity guest and
plays background music for these
events.
Members are free, guest admittance is $5. Refreshments will be
served. For more information,
contact Zelda Greenberg at (856)
751-4201.

BIRTH YEAR 2002 THROUGH 2008

BIRTH YEAR 2009

APRIL 13–19, 2016 – THE CHERRY HILL SUN 15

Friedman Tribute April 17
“Another Song Will Rise: A
Tribute to Debbie Friedman,”
honoring the life & legacy of the
prolific singer-songwriter Debbie
Friedman,
who died in
2011 but whose
music
lives,
will take place on April 17 at 4
p.m. at Congregation M’kor
Shalom in Cherry Hill. It will include highlights from Friedman’s
vast repertoire, performed by
cantors from South Jersey area
synagogues, cantorial students,
the M'kor Shalom Adult & Youth
Choirs, the M'kor Shalom Bayit
Band and the Debbie Friedman
Community Choir.
Admission is $18 for adults.
Children 13 and under are admitted for free. For more information, call 856-424-4220 or visit
www.mkorshalom.org.

briefs

Library spring book sale
set for April 13-15
The Friends of the Cherry Hill

Public Library will hold its
spring book sale from Thursday,
April 13 through Saturday, April
15 at 1100 Kings Highway North.
The book sale will begin with a
special pre-sale for Friends members on Wednesday, April 12 from
6 to 9 p.m. New Friends members
are welcome to join the library
that evening and be among the
first to get great bargains.
The sale, which is open to the
public, will continue on Thursday, April 13 from 9:30 a.m. to 9
p.m. and on Friday, April 14 from
9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, April
15, between 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m., is
a special $5 for a Bag of Books
day. Thousands of books, CDs and
DVDs will be offered and sorted
into categories. Prices are $2 for
hardback books, CDs and DVDs,
and $1 for paperback books. Children’s books cost even less. All
proceeds benefit the library.
For more information, call
(856) 667-0300, e-mail cherryhillfriends@gmail.com or go to
www.chplnj.org.

CONCORD PET FOODS & SUPPLIES
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16 THE CHERRY HILL SUN — APRIL 13–19, 2016

CALENDAR
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
repertoire, performed by cantors
from South Jersey area synagogues, cantorial students, the
M'kor Shalom Adult & Youth
Choirs, the M'kor Shalom Bayit
Band and the Debbie Friedman
Community Choir. Admission is
$18. Children 13 and under are
admitted for free. For more information, call 856-424-4220 or vis-

it www.mkorshalom.org.

MONDAY APRIL 18
Page turners: Grades one to four. 7
p.m. at Cherry Hill Public Library.
This program is for elementary
age kids who still enjoy being
read to. Listen to longer stories
and let your imagination run wild.
Cherry Hill Township Planning
Board meeting: 7:30 p.m. first
and third Monday of the month in
room 208, Municipal Building.
Agendas available prior to meeting and online at www.cherryhillnj.com.
Cherry Hill Township Environmental Advisory Committee meeting: 7 p.m. third Monday of the
month at Cherry Hill Public
Library, 1100 Kings Highway
North, Cherry Hill. For more information, visit www.cherryhillnj.com.
Balance Your Life with Tai Chi: 7 to
8 p.m. at St. Andrew’s United
Methodist Church, 327 Marlton
Pike West. Call (856) 795-3427 or
email
cherryhilltaichigroup@
gmail.com
or
visit
http://www.meetup.com/cherryhill-taichi-group/.
Cherry Hill Rotary meeting: 6:15
p.m. at Ponzio’s Diner and
Restaurant, Route 70. Visitors

welcome. For more information,
visit www.cherryhillrotary.com,
email chrc2015@yahoo.com or
call (856) 424-3456.

TUESDAY APRIL 19
Little listeners: Age 2. 10 and 11 a.m.
at Cherry Hill Public Library.
Develop language and pre-literacy skills with short stories, songs,
rhymes, movement and a simple
craft.
Lit with Librarians Book Club: 3
p.m. at Cherry Hill Public Library.
Join the book club for a discussion of “All the Light We Cannot
See” by Anthony Doerr.
Maker Challenge: Grades one to
five. 6:30 p.m. at Cherry Hill Public Library. In this month’s challenge, construct noise makers
from recycled material.
Cherry Hill Township Senior Citizens Advisory Board meeting:
10 a.m. third Tuesday of the
month at Cherry Hill Community
Center, 820 Mercer St. For more
information, visit www.cherryhillnj.com or call (856) 661-4800.
Cherry Hill Retirees Club: Noon to
4 p.m. at Cherry Hill Community
Center, 820 Mercer St. Enjoy
bridge, pinochle, shuffle board.
Call (856) 795-3720.

APRIL 13–19, 2016 – THE CHERRY HILL SUN 17

Barclay Farmstead was saved in the 1970s
BARCLAY
Continued from page 1
about a mile from Barclay Farmstead.
“They have the swim club just
on the other side (of the farmstead),” Cocchiaraley said. “I
used to take my kids and we
walked through there to go to the
swim club. That’s how I became
familiar with it.”
Cocchiaraley loved history. She
was a member of the Camden
County Historical Society and
helped get an old, Revolutionary
War-era bridge on her property
listed in the National Register of
Historic Sites. The bridge was
named Bonnie’s Bridge in honor

of Cocchiaraley.
It wasn’t until 1974, however,
when Cocchiaraley became heavily involved with Barclay Farmstead.
“I was on the community development board for the township,”
she said. “John Holden, who was
mayor at that time in 1974, said to
me, ‘Come up with something for
the Bicentennial.’”
Cocchiaraley thought the farmstead would be a great local museum for the United States Bicentennial because of its history.
Joseph Thorn, a Quaker farmer,
built the farmhouse in 1816. Four
different families owned the property through its history. In 1974,
Helen Barclay owned the farmstead. She had previously sold
dozens of acres for development

151 New Road, Marlton, NJ 08053

856-985-0412

in what is now the Barclay Farms
neighborhood in Cherry Hill, but
still owned 32 acres of what consists of the farmstead today.
“She lived in Haddonfield,”
Cocchiaraley said. “I called her
up and told her I had something
in mind. I had written notes of
what might be good out there.”
According to Cocchiaraley,
Barclay was excited when she
heard about the plan to preserve
the house.
“There was no family left,”
Cocchiaraley said of Barclay.
“She had been offered for it, but
they wanted to tear down the
house and build other houses or
something. That wasn’t to her satisfaction.”
After Cocchiaraley and Barclay discussed the plan, Barclay

please see COCCHIARALEY, page 20

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visited town hall to meet with
Holden to negotiate a sale of the
farmstead.
“Within 15 or 20 minutes, they
made a deal,” Cocchiaraley said.

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18 THE CHERRY HILL SUN — APRIL 13–19, 2016

Anonymous tips lead to the arrest of
man accused of attempted child luring

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The following information was
provided by the Cherry Hill Police Department.

Saturday, June 11, 2016
9AM – 2PM
Eastern Regional High School, Voorhees

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Cherry Hill Police have arrested a 56-year-old man from Roebling after police investigated a
suspicious incident that occurred
in Cherry Hill Township on
Wednesday, April 6.
At approximately 5:20 p.m., two
juvenile females were at the
Wawa located at 843 Cooper Land-

ing Road, when they noticed the
man watching them.
They were uncomfortable with
his presence and waited for him
to leave before making their purchase. The females were walking
in the area of South Lincoln and
Garfield avenues, which is approximately one mile from the
Wawa, when the man pulled
alongside the curb and offered
them a ride home. Both girls ran
and told an adult, and the man

drove away.
Anonymous tips led to the
identification of the suspect, and
through continued investigation,
probable cause was developed to
charge him with second-degree
attempted child luring and thirddegree child endangerment. He
was arrested without incident
and was remanded to the Camden
County Jail on $80,000 bail. He
has since posted bail and was released.

Send us your Cherry Hill news
Drop us an email at news@cherryhillsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (856) 427-0933.

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APRIL 13–19, 2016 – THE CHERRY HILL SUN 19

Students to compete at states in May

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STUDENTS
Continued from page 7
mitted to leave Iraq for Israel as
long as they gave up citizenship.
Many of them also had to give up
possessions.
The group of Rosa students
found the topic challenging.
When they began reading research others did, they found it to
be incomplete.
“A lot of the documents from
the time were either burned or
stolen during riots,” Doiphode
said. “Not a lot of people have
talked about it and not a lot of
people have written about it.”
“It was kind of shocking not
many people knew about it because it didn’t even happen 100
years ago,” Abrams said. “But
World War II was going on at the
same time and people didn’t realize what else was happening in
the world.”
Rather than telling the story
primarily through what they read
in books, the group decided to tell
the story itself through someone
very close to Abrams who had
lived through the exodus.
“It’s my family history,”
Abrams said. “My grandmother
grew up in Iraq.”
“We interviewed Naomi’s
grandmother and she referred us
to people who knew a lot about
this topic,” Lam said. “We
branched off of that because they
had a lot of experiences and stories.”
During the interview process,
the group was captivated. The stories they heard were heart
wrenching and very emotional.
The group was able to build a
more detailed story than other accounts they had read.
“It was so violent, and many
Jews were arrested and tortured,” Doiphode said.
With the stories being so emotional, Marrella encouraged the
girls to create a play for the NHD
competition rather than doing a
documentary. The group would
write an original play depicting
the story of the Jews’ exodus
from Iraq as it was told from their
interviews.
“Here’s this chance to tell a

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Rosa International Middle School student Aaiti Dolphode, teacher
Christy Marrella, students Pallavi Goculdas, Isabel Andino, Naomi
Abrams and Jessica Lam pose with their blue ribbons after competing in a regional New Jersey History Day contest at Princeton University in March. The students will compete at the state level in May.
story and set forth a legacy,” Marrella said. “If you’re going to tell a
story and you want it to live forward, the most appropriate way
and perhaps the most emotional
would be to do a performance.”
“People don’t know how emotional it was and how the Jews
felt,” Goculdas said.
Abrams in particular enjoyed
hearing stories from family and
others close to her.
“They finally let me in and let
me know all this information,”
she said. “It was really amazing.”
Performing a short play was
difficult for the group. Only
Abrams had ever acted on stage
before.
“We were really uncomfortable
doing a performance because a
lot of us had a big fear of being on
stage,” Lam said. “We didn’t
know how we could execute it
well.”
Abrams admitted writing an
original play and acting the
scenes was much tougher to do
than just reading a pre-written
script.
“It was a lot harder to do some
of the scenes,” she said. “It’s such
a serious topic. You want to show
the emotion, but you don’t want it
to be over the top.”
On March 5, the group competed in a regional competition at
Princeton University and gave its
performance before a panel of
judges. The reaction was overwhelmingly positive.
During one scene of the play,
Abrams depicts a riot in 1941 in
Fahud, Iraq, where more than 100

Jews were killed. Andino described it as an impactful moment for the audience.
“The fear that Naomi shows
within that scene, that’s the fear
you can see in the interviewers
when they talk about this,” Andino said. “You can see the emotion
within them.”
Even though the team was successful, the impact it had with the
judges and those in attendance
made the project worth it.
“Letting people know my family story is an opportunity that I
never thought I’d have,” Abrams
said.
Now, the group is focused on
the NHD state competition that
will take place on May 7 at
William Paterson University. If
the group scores high enough, it
can advance to the national competition in June.
The group hopes it can perform well enough to advance to
nationals. However, what’s most
important for the girls is to tell
the story of the Jewish exodus
from Iraq to a wider audience.
“They’ve created a story that
will last the test of time,” Marrella said. “I don’t need May 7 to
know that they’re winners.”

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20 THE CHERRY HILL SUN — APRIL 13–19, 2016

Cocchiaraley to be honored at Friends’ luncheon
COCCHIARALEY
Continued from page 17
“The deal was that they could not
tear down the house. They paid
her $325,000.”
After the purchase, the township needed someone to get the
museum off the ground.
“I said, ‘You’ve got to hire
somebody,’” Cocchiaraley recalls.
“I had ideas but I had never developed or worked in a museum.
(Mayor Holden) looked at me and
said, “Bonnie, how can we hire
somebody to interpret what you
have in mind. No one’s better to
do it than you.’”
Cocchiaraley was hired as the
museum’s director, a role she immediately embraced. She embraced it so much, she worked out
of the farmhouse on a daily basis.
Cocchiaraley’s office is located in
what is now the first floor
kitchen.

The farmhouse was in disrepair when the township purchased it. After the purchase, the
township paid for a couple major
restoration projects, including
putting on a new roof and replacing the plastering.
However, more money was
needed. Cocchiaraley quickly realized she needed help to get the
house fixed and the museum running.

Building a museum
Cocchiaraley had a hand in
starting nearly all of the programs present at Barclay Farmstead today. Shortly after the
township’s purchase of the property, Cocchiaraley knew she had
to get other members of the community involved. She met with
the Junior League, a group of
women who volunteer to improve
local communities.
“I had been to their meeting in
September in one of the girls’
house,” Cocchiaraley said. “They

were getting ready for the season.
I brought my information and
gave them a talk with what I envisioned to do. They got really excited, so they took on me as a project.”
That group of women helped
form Friends of Barclay Farmstead, a nonprofit group that
helped raise funds and run programming at the farmstead. The
group is instrumental in keeping
the museum running today.
Cocchiaraley also got additional volunteers thanks to a large
amount of media coverage. Newspapers and television stations
from around the area wanted to
hear about the transformation of
the farmstead.
As the house was being restored, Cocchiaraley realized programming was needed to attract
community members to the museum. One of the first events was
Holiday House, a tradition still
held every November the weekend prior to Thanksgiving.
“A bunch of people got together
and they made handmade
wreaths,” Cocchiaraley said. “My
husband and a friend got plastic
and put it over the windows because a lot of windows were broken. There was no heat in the
place.”
“That Holiday House was my
favorite memory, the very first
one,” she added.
Another program still existing
today is the partnership with
Cherry Hill schools. Cocchiaraley
teamed with a local teacher to create a program where Cherry Hill
students would visit the farmstead and learn how people lived
in the early 1800s.
“It took us two weeks to write
up what we think the interpreta-

tion would be,” Cocchiaraley
said. “We did churning butter. I
had a group of quilters. Everything was pertaining to life in the
early 1800s.”
Making the program even
more authentic were the tour
guides who dressed as people
would in the 1800s. Cocchiaraley
had previously worked in the
fashion industry and designed
the costumes for the guides.
The museum also used to have
an event for Halloween where volunteers would tell stories to kids
who visited.
“We did the basement and
brought the kids down,” Cocchiaraley said. “We have the men
go down. They liked scaring the
kids.”
To help with upkeep of the
property, Cocchiaraley remembers having people who were sentenced to community service for
minor crimes perform their service at the farmstead. Minor
restoration projects were done
through the program.
To help fund the museum,
Friends held numerous fundraisers. Cocchiaraley remembers
having barbecues where community members could pay to enjoy
home cooked food, with proceeds
from the event going toward
Friends. Friends continues to
raise money today to pay for programming at the farmstead.
Cocchiaraley continued as director until 1991. After she left the
position, she admitted one person
could not take on everything she
did.
“They had to hire two people to
do my job,” Cocchiaraley said.

Honoring Cocchiaraley
Cocchiaraley moved to Florida

PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
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in the late 1990s, where she lives
today. She comes back to New Jersey regularly to visit her family.
She also visits the farmstead,
with her last trip to the historic
site taking place in the summer of
2015.
Cocchiaraley’s role in forming
the museum is unknown to many.
Cocchiaraley said she avoided becoming the face of the museum.
“I never put myself out in
front,” she said. “I stayed in the
background. I pushed those people who were doing it out front. I
made sure they were in the limelight. I would never get in the pictures.”
Cocchiaraley will be in the
spotlight on Thursday at Tavistock Country Club as she’ll be
presented with a plaque that recognizes her role in the purchase
and restoration of Barclay Farmstead. It will hang in the downstairs hallway of the farmhouse.
“I never dreamed of it,” Cocchiaraley said of being honored.
“When I quit, I would come back
and everything was fine.”
Cocchiaraley was informed
she would be honored last winter
after receiving a call from a
Friends member, Sally Callaghan,
who said there was nothing in the
farmhouse saying how Cocchiaraley helped save the property and
served as its director. Friends
wanted Cocchiaraley’s name to
hang in the farmhouse for years
to come.
Cocchiaraley said many of the
long-time Friends members still
want her to return to New Jersey
and get involved with the farmstead again.
“They keep telling me to come
back. The old timers keep telling
me ‘Come back Bonnie, come
back,’” Cocchiaraley laughed.
Cocchiaraley doesn’t plan on
coming back. However, she does
want the farmstead to remain a
vital part of Cherry Hill for many
years. For this to happen, Cocchiaraley believes new community members should look into joining Friends and seeing how they
can help. She feels building a
stronger volunteer base will only
help the farmstead flourish.

APRIL 13–19, 2016 – THE CHERRY HILL SUN 21

St. Andrew’s Nursery School and Kindergarten
to host 50th birthday party on April 20
St. Andrew's Nursery School
and Kindergarten in Cherry Hill
is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2016 and wants to extend a
special, reunion birthday party
invitation to anyone who has ever
been associated with the school –
a universe that stretches back in
time to include nearly 12,000
beloved students, plus all their
parents, grandparents, nannies,
staff, church members and assorted other friends and associates.
The birthday party will take
place at St. Andrew's United
Methodist Church on Wednesday,
April 20, from 6 to 8 p.m., downstairs in the all-purpose room.
Cake and punch will be provided
for all.
Also on that festive evening, St.
Andrew's will be showcasing the
school's famous and spectacular,
43rd annual children's art show,
which will be on display throughout the entire building.
"Come one; come all," said director Jill Mayo. "It will be a fabulous 50th anniversary evening.
We are anxious to see everyone –
past and present."
Mayo has just announced she
will retire at the end of this special anniversary year. She had
been thinking about retirement,
she says, but the timing didn't feel
quite right until recently.
"Jill has done a terrific job, and
we are sad to see her step down,"
said office administrator Connie
DiRocco, "but we do expect a perfectly smooth transition, and I assure you that all our great programs will continue."
The school governing committee has selected a familiar and
highly qualified St. Andrew's
teacher, Megan Falcone, to succeed Mayo. The transition will
take place on May 28, at the beginning of the school's summer proPSA

Alcoholics Anonymous
of South Jersey
(856) 486-4444

gram. Falcone has a master's degree in education/early childhood education, and taught first
grade in public school before
coming to St. Andrew's. "I'm a
parent myself, and I started at St.
Andrew’s as a parent," Falcone
said, "so I have that important
parent's perspective. I've been
teaching different classes here for
quite a few years, and this spring,
I'm shadowing Jill closely. I'm just
thrilled to be taking on this new
role."
Following the big birthday
party in April, the school plans to
host a special gala evening for all
past and present teachers and
staff and church members on Saturday, May 7, at the Marian House
on South Kings Highway in Cherry Hill.
The landmark nursery school
is busy, as usual, accepting registrations for its summer camp program, as well as for the 2016-2017
school year.
Regular classes

range from Mother’s Morning
Out and toddler programs
through kindergarten enrichment and transitional kindergarten classes. Additional enrichment options include a literacy
lab for 3 year olds and a science
and math academy for 4 year olds.
For more information on the
50th anniversary events, contact
the school office at StAndrewsNSK@verizon.net or (856)
429-4470. You may find more information on the school’s programs
at www.staNurserySchool.com.
PSA

Narcotics Anonymous
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Stump Removal
24 Hr. Emergency Service

FREE ESTIMATES
Fully Insured

856 222-0676
Firewood for sale!
10% OFF WITH THIS AD

• Pruning, Topping and Removal
• Guaranteed To Beat Any Written Estimate
• 24 Hr. Emergency/Insurance Work

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Trees, Shrubs, Pruning, Clean-ups, Mulch,
Topsoil, Sod, Grading, Paver, Patios,
Walks, Walls, Stone, Ties,
Sprinklers installed-repaired,
Underground Drainage

GREAT WINTER PRICES

CALL MIKE 856-535-4946

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(856) 235-8080

TREE SERVICE

D.E.C. Contracting
609-953-9794
609-405-3873
Lic #13VH03950800
ISA Cert. Arborist NJ-0993A

CLASSIFIED

APRIL 13-19, 2016 — THE CHERRY HILL SUN
!-*

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WILLIAM SHUSTER
OWNER
LIC#13085

NEW SHINGLE
NEW
SHINGLE ROOF
ROOF SPECIALISTS
SPECIALISTS • SLATE
SLATE ROOF
ROOF REPAIRS
REPAIRS • RUBBER
RUBBER ROOFS
ROOFS
SEAMLESS
SEAMLESS GUTTERS
GUTTERS • SIDING
SIDING • WINDOWS
WINDOWS & DOORS
DOORS • CAPPING
CAPPING • SOFFITS
SOFFITS
EMERGENCY
EMERGENCY TARP
TARP SERVICE
SERVICE AVAILABLE
AVAILABLE • RESIDENTIAL
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
COMMERCIAL

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Tactics
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SERVICE! Professional
Professional Installation
Installation • Serving
Ser ving tthe
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Tri-State area
area
FREE
ESTIIM
MATES

Like us on FACEBOOK
and get 10% OFF
your next job!

oday!
Call T
• BACK-FLOW TESTING • SEWER JETTING • SEWER EXCAVATION
• PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE • TRADITIONAL PLUMBING • WATER HEATERS

Any
Any new
new complete
complete roofing
roofing or
or siding
siding job
job

VIDEO SEWER INSPECTIONS

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BARBARA
BOLAND
TUTORING

27

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OIL TANK
REMOVAL /
INSTALLATION
Residential
Specialist
Underground
Crawlspace
Above Ground
Tanks
Clean Ups
Structural Support
DEP Certified
Insurance Approved

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NJ Grant Money
Available
Ask our expert!

Paperhanging,
Removal & Painting

(856) 629-8886
(609) 698-4434

By Randy Craig

NJ LIC. # 13VH00102300

(856) 981-1359
www.rcpaperhangings.com
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National/American Waterproofing
609-206-5364

856-767-4443

www.americanwatermanagement.com.
Lic # 13VH06045200

!-3%$ 3.
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ST D!
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COSTUME JEWELRY

CHINA DINNERWARE
SETS OR PARTS
!

Matt Bader
FURNITURE
LAMPS - MIRRORS
STATUES
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
!
“CALL GINA"
856-795-9175
609-471-8391

3409 ASBURY AVE

Ocean City New Jersey’s #1 Real Estate Team!

Cell 609-992-4380

The Team You Can Trust!

Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539

Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue • Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com

Great 1st floor condo located
across the street from the
playground, close to shopping
and the beach! 3409 Asbury is in
the "Heart" of Ocean City and
features 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
central air, gas heat, enclosed
garage, outside shower, large
enclosed deck and much much
more! The property is being
offered furnished (less personal
items) and has a great rental
history! Call for your showing
today!

$469,900

WE
DELIVER
TO THE
SHORE!

NGS!!**
NG SAVIIN
SPRIIN

0%
0%
F
FINANCING
INANCING

$50 OFF
$100 OFF
$200 OFF
$300 OFF

Until
U
ntil 2017
2017 with
with 1/3
1/3 down.
down.
See sstore
tore for
for details.
details.
See

SAVE
S
AVE
U
PT
O $300
$300
UP
TO
O
N ALL
ALL
ON
SECTIONALS!
SECTIONALS!

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Your
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Fabric
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$995
995

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Recliners
On
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Display!
P
rices Starting
Starting
Prices
aatt $299
$299

Flat
at Screen Entertainment Cabinets
Fireplace
Fireplace
Over 50 Models On Display!
Entertainment
Entertainment

SSPRING
PRING
R
ecliner Sale
Sale
Recliner

R
Rocker/
ocker/
Recliner
Recliner

$349
$349

Centers
Centers

PPowered
owered
LLay
ay Flat
Flat Chair
Chair

$$599
599

PPower
ower
Lift Chair
Chair
Lift

$$749
749

Heat
H
eat
&M
Massage
assage

By,
B
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PPower
ower
Lift Chair
Chair
Lift

$539
$$5
539
with
coupon.

**Also
Also oon
n ssale:
ale: m
matching
atching rreclining
eclining chair
chair $499
$499
aand
nd rreclining
eclining love
love seat
seat $749
$749

Three HUGE Floors of Furniture
813 White Horse Pike • Oaklyn, NJ (Rte. 295, Exit 29 - Rte. 30)

(856) 854-3198 • www.NastasisFurniture.com
Mon-Fri 10am-8pm • Sat 10am-5pm • Sun 12pm-5pm

All types of furniture in many styles and colors. If you don’t see
it in our 30,000 sq. ft. showroom, just ask. We will get it!
*Cannot be combined with any advertised prices