University of Maryland

College Park, MD 20742
Website: www.umd.edu
emailum@umd.edu
Phone: 301-405-1000
NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NOV. 12, 2015
CONTACT: Claire Ramirez, 1claireramirez@gmail.com. 240-535-2016
University of Maryland Minority Enrollment increases 8.7 percent
COLLEGE PARK, Md – University of Maryland released figures today showing
minority enrollment has increased by 8.7 percent this fall from last year alone.
The minority enrollment increase came in a year when overall campus enrollment
grew less than one percent.
“This university has taken a significant step forward,” President Loh said.
“Our many efforts of recent years are beginning to produce the desired results.”
Statistics of enrollment from prior years also showed a total 20 percent
increase in minority enrollment over the past 5 years.
Minorities
The following chart lists the minorities in order of largest to smallest
increase in student enrollment:
Black students
Hispanic students
Asian students
American Indian
students

Fall 2014
34
23
44
46

Fall 2015
678
452
565
204

Out of the
the University’s total enrollment of 24,500 students, Black students are the largest
minority population followed by Asian, Hispanic and American Indian students.
About the University of Maryland
The University of Maryland is the state's flagship university and one of the
nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research,
entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 37,000
students, 9,000 faculty and staff, and 250 academic programs. For more
information about the University of Maryland, visit www.umd.edu.

A#5 News release 2
-30Subject: President Loh’s take on minority enrollment improvement
Mr. Serpico
I enjoyed reading your story on the Black leadership panel last year. I
thought maybe you or one of your staff writers would want to cover a story on
University of Maryland’s 2015 minority enrollment.
University of Maryland released figures today that showed dramatic
improvement in student diversity. Minority enrollment increased by almost 10
percent this year from last year alone. This added up to a 20 percent total increase
over the past five years. Black students are currently the highest minority
population.
I have a few suggestions of people you might be interested in contacting
for possible interviews and photo opportunities.


Tia Dolet, Graduate Coordinator for Black Student Involvement &
Community Advocacy. tdolet@umd.edu. 301-314-8341
Yvette Lerma, Coordinator for Latin Student Involvement and
Advocacy. ylerma@umd.edu 301-314-5822
Naliya Kaya, Coordinator for Multiracial and Multicultural Student
Involvement and Community Advocacy. Nkaya@umd.edu.
301-405-8757

For your convenience I have included a copy of the news release. With
contact and website information for the University of Maryland.
For more information or if you have any questions, feel free to contact me
at any time.
Sincerely,
Claire Ramirez
1claireramirez@gmail.com
240-535-2016

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A#5 News release 3
U niversity of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742
Website: www.umd.edu
emailum@umd.edu
Phone: 301-405-1000
NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NOV. 12, 2015
CONTACT: Claire Ramirez, 1claireramirez@gmail.com. 240-535-2016
University of Maryland Professor Uncovers Dark Side of Testing
Professor Hanson writes a book examining American society’s testing addiction
Students rush in and out of the library holding cups of coffee and
mumbling incoherencies as they weigh the outcome of their GPA for the past
semester. Before University of Maryland students are able to enjoy their welldeserved Winter Break, they must first endure their dreaded final exams.
Much to the despair of students, testing does not end with education.
Professor of anthropology, Allan Hanson, examined the hidden consequences of
American society’s addiction to testing in his new book, “Testing Testing: Social
Consequences of the Examined Life.”
The book explores topics ranging from drug testing, polygraph tests and
aptitude tests most often used in business and education.
“People are examined and evaluated less for qualifications or knowledge
they already possess than for what the test results can predict about future actions
or potential behavior,” Hanson said.
(more)

A#5 News release 4
Hanson says tests that predict behavior or aptitude early on may carry a
heavy impact on children later on in life. Scores from IQ tests can become life
sentences for children with very high or very low scores, often predicting how a
child sees themselves and therefore how they behave.

Future of Testing
Hanson also addressed the possible future of where he believes testing is
going as more and more universities no longer offer aptitude tests such as the
ACT, SAT or GMAT as an application requirement.
The future is likely to produce even more detailed knowledge of each
individual as new genetic tests and DNA fingerprinting are developed, said
Hanson.
However, Hanson recommends eliminating most drug tests, intelligence
and aptitude tests and lie detector or integrity tests as these often cause more harm
than good.
Hanson’s book Testing Testing: Social Consequences of the Examined Life
is published by University of California Press and is available at local bookstores
or by contacting Denise Cicourel at UC Pressm 2120 Berkely Way, Berkely, CA
94720

(more)

A#5 News release 5
Subject: The Dark Side of Testing:
Mr. Serpico
I enjoyed reading your story on the Black leadership panel last year. I
thought maybe you or one of your staff writers would want to cover a story on a
University of Maryland professor’s new book on testing.
In his new book, anthropology professor, Allen Hansen of
University of Maryland examines negative impact of testing. News flash: testing
doesn’t end after college. Testing Testing: Social Consequences of the Examined
Life takes a hard look at drug testing, polygraphs and aptitude tests: Their impact
and their future.
I have suggestions for people to contact for possible interviews and photo
opportunities.
 Paul A. Shackel, Department Chair of the Anthropology
Department. anthinquiry@umd.edu or 301-405-1423
 Stephen Brighton, Director of Undergraduate Studies for the
Anthropology Department. sbrighto@umd.edu. 301-405-3700
 Judith Freidenberg, Professor of Anthropology. jfreiden@umd.edu.
301-405-1420.
For your convenience I have included a copy of the news release. With
contact and website information for the University of Maryland
For more information or if you have any questions, feel free to contact me
at any time.
Sincerely,
Claire Ramirez
1claireramirez@gmail.com
240-535-2016
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