Salute

to Industry
Sunday, May 2, 2010
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 2 SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
BY JASON BROWNE
jbrowne@cdispatch.com
I
f students are East
Mississippi Community
College’s product, one
could say the Mayhew cam-
pus held its Customer
Appreciation Day Wednesday.
Actually, the people behind
EMCC’s workforce training
program hosted an auditorium
full of industry professionals
for its annual Industry
Appreciation Day. But the
product/consumer metaphor,
drawn by EMCC’s Vice
President of Instruction Dr.
Steve Vacik, holds true.
The goal of workforce train-
ing is to teach local citizens
the necessary skills to fill jobs
at local industries. Those indi-
viduals may be fresh out of
high school or leaving a job
they’ve held for 30 years, but
after completing the workforce
program at EMCC, they’re
ready to be snapped up by
local businesses.
Wednesday’s luncheon was
EMCC’s way to thank partici-
pating industries and reaffirm
its commitment to remain on
the cutting edge of training.
“We can provide the skills
and training if you just tell us
what you need,” said Dr. Raj
Shaunak, EMCC’s vice presi-
dent of workforce and com-
munity services.
JoNell Foster represents
one of the recipients of
EMCC’s workforce efforts.
The human resources manag-
er for Weyerhaeuser says her
company has hired a number
of workforce training com-
pleters and likely will take on
more in the near future.
“(Students) come in with
more knowledge about work-
ing in a manufacturing envi-
ronment than the average per-
son would,” said Foster.
“(EMCC is) working on a pulp
program that will train people
to come to work for
Weyerhaeuser. They will be
learning about the chemical
process so they come in with
base knowledge and a good
foundation of what they’ll
actually be doing to make the
Local industry dedicated to education
INDUSTRY APPRECIATION
Kelly Tippett/Dispatch Staff
East Mississippi Community College hosted its Industry Appreciation Day Wednesday at EMCC’s Mayhew campus. The luncheon was EMCC’s way to thank participating
industries and reaffirm its commitment to remain on the cutting edge of training. Left: Pictured, from left, are John Holliman, Lowndes County District 3 supervisor; Frank
Ferguson, Lowndes County District 2 supervisor; and Milton Sundbeck of Southern Ionics in West Point. Right: Noxubee County District 3 Supervisor Sherman Patterson
poses for a photo with EMCC nursing instructor Rosie Wilbon at Wednesday’s luncheon.
See EMCC, Page 5
“We can provide
the skills and training
if you just tell us
what you need.”
Dr. Raj Shaunak, EMCC’s vice
president of workforce and
community services

THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 3 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
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About the Cover
Severstal was chosen as Industry of the Year earlier this week. For more
information on this, see page 2 of this section. Shown on the cover is
Severstal employee Jennifer Porter.
4-County Electric Power Association ................................ 6
American Eurocopter ..................................................... 11
Atmos Energy ................................................................. 4
Baptist Memorial Hospital-Golden Triangle ...................... 9
Brunini Law Firm ............................................................ 3
C&P Printing ................................................................... 5
Cash & Carry Building Supply .......................................... 5
CFC Transportation ......................................................... 8
CPI Group ....................................................................... 6
Columbus Brick Company .............................................. 10
Columbus-Lowndes Development LINK ........................... 7
Columbus-Lowndes Recreation Authority ....................... 11
EKA Chemicals .............................................................. 12
Galloway-Chandler-McKinney Insurance .......................... 3
Golden Triangle Regional Airport .................................... 9
Lowndes County Board of Supervisors ............................. 7
Microtek Medical/Ecolab ................................................ 11
Mississipppi Industrial Waste Disposal .......................... 12
Neel-Schaffer................................................................. 10
Newell Paper Company ................................................... 7
OMNOVA Solutions ......................................................... 4
Phillips Contracting Company, Inc. .................................. 6
Priscilla King/Shelter Insurance ...................................... 11
Puckett-McGee Electric Supply ......................................... 5
Swoope Insurance Agency .............................................. 6
Tennessee Williams Tribute & Tour of Homes ................... 2
Tom Soya Grain Company ............................................. 12
United Deli ..................................................................... 7
INDUSTRY APPRECIATION AWARDS
Courtesy Photo
Severstal Columbus LLC, received the Director’s Award, the highest level of recogni-
tion through workforce training, demonstrating management excellence with superi-
or outcomes, continuing to improve and build upon outstanding results and excel-
lent systems and deploying “world-class” processes Wednesday at Industry
Appreciation Day on East Mississippi Community College’s Mayhew campus.
Pictured, from left, are Dr. Raj Shaunak, EMCC vice president of Workforce and
Community Services, Atiba Prater, Ray Hamer and Danyell Gingell, all of Severstal
Columbus, and EMCC President Dr. Rick Young.
Courtesy Photo
Dexter Holloway and the State Board for Community and Junior Colleges was recog-
nized for outstanding leadership in workforce training and demonstrated financial
management excellence with superior results. From left, are Dr. Raj Shaunak, Dr.
Eric Clark, executive director of the Mississippi State Board for Community and
Junior Colleges, accepting for Dexter Holloway, the SBCJC’s director of workforce
education, and Dr. Rick Young.
Courtesy Photo
Weyerhaeuser received recognition for best practices for providing outstanding
examples of workforce training, quality management and business practices that
serve as models for others. From left, are Dr. Raj Shaunak, Bernadette Mestas, Jo
Nell Foster and Cary Butler, all of Weyerhaeuser Columbus, and Dr. Rick Young.

THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 4 SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
BY DAVE CARPENTER
AP Business Writer
CHICAGO —
C
orporate America is
back. Companies
that do everything
from making appliances
to selling cruises are
reporting strong first-
quarter profits — not
because of the layoffs
many of them used to
dress up last year’s earn-
ings reports but because
people are spending
more.
The turnaround has yet
to produce a dramatic
increase in hiring, which
isn’t expected until 2011 or
later. But it provides
emphatic new evidence
that the economy has
moved past the crisis and
should continue to
strengthen.
“We’re out of the woods
for good,” says Joseph
LaVorgna, chief U.S. econ-
omist at Deutsche Bank.
“This is not just an arith-
metic story. It’s a story of
legitimate growth.”
Companies in the
Standard & Poor’s 500
index have reported 76
percent higher operating
earnings than a year ago
— on pace to be the
biggest year-over-year
increase ever, according
to S&P analyst Howard
Silverblatt. Nearly half the
companies in the index
have reported earnings so
far.
One reason for the
gains is simply that the
economy in early 2009 was
at the depth of the worst
recession in generations,
but consumer spending is
clearly making a come-
back.
After a year and a half
of hunkering down, peo-
ple are buying expensive
items such as electronics
and furniture and dining
out more, even though an
unemployment rate of 9.7
percent clouds the recov-
ery and the housing mar-
ket is still hurting.
“They’ve saved some
money, they’ve paid down
debt, and at a certain point
you just get bored of eat-
ing frozen pizza and
watching cable TV on a
Saturday night,” says
Barry Ritholtz, head of the
financial research firm
FusionIQ.
Consumer spending
has risen for five straight
months, retail sales for
four, and restaurant sales
surged this spring after
being stagnant since 2008.
Profits from those sales
reflect a healthier econo-
my, as opposed to the
drastic cost-cutting that
helped companies
improve their bottom lines
in recent quarters.
Among the latest win-
ners, Ford Motor Co. did
an about-face from a year
ago in reporting a $2.1 bil-
lion profit on 15 percent
higher revenue; it plans to
boost production.
Caterpillar Inc. also
reversed a loss from a
year ago and said demand
for its construction and
mining equipment is surg-
ing.
Royal Caribbean
Cruises Ltd. returned to a
first-quarter profit as more
travelers vacationed on its
ships and spent additional
money on board. UPS Inc.
posted a 33 percent profit
increase; it said tech firms
are shipping more prod-
ucts and other industries
are restocking invento-
ries.
A parade of other
Fortune 500 corporations
also have boosted their
full-year profit forecasts
this month. This week
alone, the list includes
DuPont Co., Estee Lauder
Cos. and Whirlpool Corp.
Exports have played a
key role. Caterpillar
enjoyed especially strong
orders for its heavy equip-
ment in developing coun-
tries, and Deere Inc. also
is selling more interna-
tionally. But domestic
demand also has been
strong.
Rosy earnings show that
corporate America is back
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 5 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
James Gibson, Owner
715 6th Street South, Columbus, MS 39701
662-328-5151 • Fax 662-329-1842
D
SQUARE D
PREMIER
DISTRIBUTOR
Puckett-McGee
Electric Supply
A LOCALLY-OWNED ELECTRICAL SUPPLY COMPANY
for over 70 years
We salute local industries
for their hard work
and dedication.
For your patronage,
we say thank you.
Thank You
for your business!
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104 Gardner Blvd. • Columbus • 327-9742
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EMCC
Continued from Page 2
product from start to finish.”
Rob Smith, director of the West
Point Career and Technology
Center, deals with students on the
other side of workforce training,
before they enter the program. He
says providing students an alterna-
tive to traditional academic college
programs will usher more stu-
dents to post-secondary schooling.
“It’s good to start seeing a
more seamless transition of stu-
dents from K-12 into community
colleges and workforce develop-
ment programs. In K-12, through
the redesign effort we’ve really
started pushing down in the
eighth and ninth grade to select-
ing career pathways. Giving stu-
dents more wise pathways earlier
in life so they can transition into
one of these programs,” said
Smith.
Other collaborations between
high schools and community col-
leges, such as dual enrollment,
further the likelihood of students
attending post-secondary school-
ing by giving them a taste of
what’s in store at the next level
before they graduate.
The keynote speaker at
Wednesday’s Industry
Appreciation Day, State College
Board Commissioner Dr. Hank
Bounds, also spoke of adjusting to
meet new needs, for both students
and their eventual employers.
“Most of the jobs that will be
available 10 years from now, we
haven’t even thought of. We’re
educating students to be nimble
enough to slide into those jobs,”
he said. “There are states that are
not doing this and they’ll pay for it
for decades.”
Bounds pointed to an anticipat-
ed 25 percent cut in funds for
state funded universities in the
next three years as both a necessi-
ty and an opportunity for reinvent-
ing the college system. He says
universities will have to learn to
do more with less, and that forced
ingenuity will cause them to
emerge from the economic down-
turn leaner and more focused.
Part of that focus, he says,
includes greater synergy between
universities and community col-
leges and more attention to meet-
ing the needs of industry, just as
EMCC has.
“You are envied across the state
for attracting so many businesses
and industries,” Bounds said of
the Golden Triangle. “And you’re
preparing your citizens to go to
work.”
EMCC President Dr. Rick
Young wasn’t shy about touting
EMCC’s workforce development
program, even in front of repre-
sentatives from Itawamba
Community College and
Northeast Community College.
“Our workforce training is the
best in the state. That’s measura-
ble by the number of hours spent,
the number of people trained and
the number of millions of dollars
spent,” said Young. “When indus-
tries come to the area, they tell us
we’re doing a good job.”
Young says EMCC plans to
build an allied health center just
off the Highway 82 exit leading to
the Lowndes County Global
Industrial Aerospace Park and the
road leading to the Mayhew
Campus which will include an
employee wellness center, child-
care, a post office and a cyber
library available to employees of
all the Aerospace Park industries.
As extra thanks to industry
partners, EMCC handed out some
hardware. Best Practices awards
went to Weyerhaeuser, Stark
Aerospace and Baptist Memorial
Hospital–Golden Triangle. The
Director’s Award for “the highest
level of recognition through work-
force training, demonstrating man-
agement excellence with superior
outcomes, continuing to improve
and build upon outstanding results
and excellent systems and deploy-
ing world class processes” went to
Severstal Columbus LLC.
Kelly Tippett/Dispatch Staff
Left: Debby Gard, vice president of finance at East Mississippi Community College, left, and Dr. Steve Vacik, vice president of instruction at EMCC pose for a picture dur-
ing Industry Appreciation Day Wednesday at EMCC’s Mayhew campus. RIght: From left, Bobby Harper of Cadence Bank, Ward 6 Columbus City Councilman Bill Gavin and
Larr y Branch are shown at Industry Appreciation Day Wednesday.
Kelly Tippett/Dispatch Staff
Dr. Paul Miller, vice president of the Golden Triangle
EMCC campus and Dr. Sandra Harpole, director of cor-
porate and foundation giving at Mississippi State
University are seen Wednesday at EMCC’s Industry
Appreciation Day.
INDUSTRY APPRECIATION AWARDS
Courtesy Photo
Stark Aerospace
received the Best
Practices Award.
From left, are Dr.
Rick Young, Chuck
Bigelow of Stark
Aerospace and Dr.
Raj Shaunak.
Baptist Memorial
Hospital–Golden Triangle
also received the Best
Practices Award. Pictured,
from left, are Dr. Raj
Shaunak, Laurie Sansing,
director of education for
BMH–GT and
Dr. Rick Young.
Courtesy Photo
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 6 SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
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THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 7 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
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THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 8 SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
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SPECIAL TO THE DISPATCH
Y
ou recruit top talent to join
your team. But, how do you
keep them there?
A high turnover rate within
your company or organization
causes lost profits, lowered pro-
ductivity and the inability to grow
your business. Headquartered in
Columbus, The CPI Group pro-
vides staffing solutions, human
resources consulting and staff
development training across
northeast Mississippi. In addition
to providing HR solutions, CPI
shares useful staff development
advice for today’s workplace.
According to a recent survey
conducted by the Society for
Human Resource Management,
employees rate several staff
development needs as important
or very important. As a top priori-
ty, employees ranked the impor-
tance of job-specific training at 85
percent. Following close behind,
83 percent of employees consid-
ered the organization’s commit-
ment to professional development
significant to their job satisfaction.
Almost 79 percent of employees
rated the importance of career
development opportunities as
important or very important. The
need for career advancement
opportunities rated 76 percent
among employees.
“It is evident, based on data as
well as feedback that we receive,
that an organization’s team wants
and appreciates their employer’s
investment in their further devel-
opment; this is a crucial element
of a fully functioning internal HR
function,” explained CPI CEO
Mark Smith.
Job-specific training
As an employer, it is important
to provide new employees job-
specific training as part of the
overall retention and staff devel-
opment program. Job-specific
training includes workplace
health and safety programs; train-
ing employees to understand
their job responsibilities and how
to perform their tasks; and, addi-
tional training that is required to
perform the expected job duties.
Commitment to professional
development
Employees want to engage in
professional development oppor-
tunities to learn about new
advances in their field, to acquire
new skills, maintain and improve
their professional competence,
learn new technology and prac-
tice their skills, enhance their
career track, to comply with pro-
fessional organizations’ standards,
and to curb their learning
appetite. Considering how impor-
tant an employer’s commitment
to professional development
ranks among employees’ job sat-
isfaction levels, employers should
include professional development
opportunities into the overall
retention and staff development
program.
Career development
Career development should
be taken just as seriously by the
employer as it is by the employ-
ee. Career development is how
the organization structures the
potential career paths for their
employees. Career development
should involve the employer
working with the employee in
planning career goals and devel-
op career plans.
Advancement opportunities
Employees want to know that
career advancement opportuni-
ties are available within their
organization or else they may
look for outside job opportunities
in order to advance in their
career. Building upon the career
development opportunities, be
sure to have a plan for employee
advancement. After time, employ-
ees will seek new challenges and
recognition within their organiza-
tion, but will seek outside employ-
ment if those needs remain
unmet.
According to Sandra Spengler,
training and staff development
consultant for The CPI Group,
training and development is the
part of human resources that
ensures valuable employees are
challenged not only with their job,
but with their skills and abilities.
“Training and development
also play an important part in
human resources whenever an
employee needs further training
on skills that make them a more
productive employee,” Spengler
said.
“It is much wiser to improve
the skills of an employee that a
company has already invested
time and money in, than to find
someone else to replace them,”
she added.
The CPI Group provides sen-
ior level, certified HR consultants
and professionally certified train-
ers to private sector organiza-
tions, federal and state agencies
and has extensive experience in
the aerospace, steel and manufac-
turing industries.
ON THE WEB
I THE CPI GROUP:
www.cpi-group.com
Courtesy Photo
CPI employees Kristi Stubbs, left, and Meagan Coughlin review
resumes on the computer.
A rewarding workplace benefits businesses and employees
Courtesy Photo
Tony Lenoir, of West Point, worked at Friction Holding LLC building brakes and clutches for Chrysler until they closed their doors
because of the slow economy. He is now seeking employment utilizing The CPI Group’s services. Lenoir is handing his resume to Kristi
Stubbs, assistant to the CPI Group President Mark Smith.
SPECIAL TO THE DISPATCH
C
olumbus Brick Co.
first opened its
doors in North
Mississippi more than 100
years ago. It was a time
when bricks were made of
clay, formed in wooden
molds, and hardened by
the blazing of red-hot
coals. Mule, rail car and
steamboat were the meth-
ods of transport and thou-
sands of brick were
unloaded by hand every-
day.
It was hard work and
Columbus Brick Co. was
dedicated to doing their
best, offering commercial
and residential customers
distinctive products,
whose impressive quality
was only topped by the
company’s outstanding
level of customer service.
A lot has changed
since then and Columbus
Brick Co. has successful-
ly moved into the modern
age. Today, the small
brick company, which
only served the surround-
ing areas of Columbus,
now ships more than 140
million bricks a year
throughout the Southeast
and Mid-west. In addition,
Columbus Brick is a dis-
tributor for many other
brick companies based in
Mississippi, Alabama,
Georgia, North Carolina,
South Carolina and
Virginia.
Columbus Brick Co.
offers customers a variety
of brick in a broad range
of colors, textures and
styles. The company
devotes a majority of its
product line to “Papercut
Brick,” which differenti-
ates itself from other
brick by its soft textured
edges. In addition to the
modular and queen size
brick offered, Columbus
Brick also can create cus-
tom brick shapes that can
help capture the individu-
alism of many contrac-
tors, homeowners and
architects.
Environmental
concerns
In a time when envi-
ronmental responsibility
is becoming a greater pri-
ority for all of us,
Columbus Brick is proud
to go above and beyond
the regulatory require-
ments for its manufactur-
ing facility along with its
mining operations. The
company has recently
been recognized by the
Mississippi Department
of Environmental Quality
as a Steward Level mem-
ber of its newly intro-
duced EnHance program.
This program awards
companies for environ-
mental practices that
exceed those required by
law and for an ongoing
commitment to the envi-
ronment.
While manufacturing
practices such as recy-
cling virtually all of its
manufacturing waste
along with the use of
highly efficient electric
motors certainly help
decrease their impact on
the environment, proba-
bly the best thing the
company does is produce
a highly sustainable prod-
uct. Brick is made from
an abundant natural
resource and has a life
expectancy that yet to be
determined.
The company has been
family-owned and operat-
ed since its beginning in
1890. With 120 years of
service to the Golden
Triangle and the sur-
rounding states, they are
a great company to work
for and a positive force in
the community with long-
standing employees that
have served this area
making bricks for
decades. Eugene
Chapman, with 55 years
of service, and Sam
Lawrence, with 56 years
of service, say they
“wouldn’t trade their job
for the world.”
Tillman Baker is cele-
brating 46 years of
employment; Al Puckett
III has been with the com-
pany full time for 40
years; Emmitt Lucas has
41 years of service;
Thomas Lowe and
Charles Chapman each
have 26 years.
Albert Bush has 32
years of service; Vernon
Morgan has been with
the brickyard 29 years,
and Tommy Harrison has
worked there 32 years.
Lucy Anne Puckett
Walker has worked with
the company for 26 years.
George Mallard was
recognized as Employee
of the Year for exception-
al service throughout
2009 at an annual recogni-
tion picnic April 28.
Humanitarian
involvement
Community involve-
ment locally and abroad
are crucial to the
Columbus Brick Co.
employees. They are
active donors to Global
Connections, initially
formed by several family
members of the Brick Co.
and it’s employees, a
world wide ministry that
connects people, organiza-
tions, and resources inter-
nationally and domestical-
ly. They promote aware-
ness of the fact that of the
2.2 billion children in the
world, more than 1 billion
of them live in poverty.
Their motto of “rethinking
involvement, rethinking
travel and rethinking
humanitarian aid” will not
be completed until every
child is out of poverty.
A.B. Puckett, son of Al
Puckett, current CEO of
the Brick Co., is a full-time
employee of Global
Connections, dedicating
his life to serving the less
fortunate. While working
at the brickyard may
occur in A.B.’s future, he
is giving all of his time and
energy to working with
the needy. He is passion-
ate about making known
the fact that nearly 1 bil-
lion adults can not read a
book or sign their name.
This is tragic and unac-
ceptable and every dime
and every minute makes a
difference. With that phi-
losophy, they have been
extremely successful part-
nering with the Limuru
Children’s Centre in
Kenya, Africa, to clothe,
feed and educate aban-
doned orphans. With
more than 50 boarders liv-
ing on site, and more than
200 children there each
day, it’s a full-time job.
But their work is close
to home as well. In addi-
tion to all they do overseas
with Global Connections,
several employees of the
brickyard work with the
underprivileged children
in sports. Billy White and
David Edmonds coach
baseball while White
teams with Anthony Davis
to coach football. This is
just one small way they
can give back, but it
makes a big impact on the
young men’s lives that
they touch.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 9 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
Courtesy Photo
Butch Reed, left, and Pat Hopper are recognized for 20 years of service by Lucy
Anne Puckett Walker, center, at the annual Columbus Brick Co. Recognition
Luncheon.
Courtesy Photo
Al Puckett III, left, congratulates George Mallard for being awarded 2009 Employee
of the Year at the recognition picnic for Columbus Brick Co.
Columbus Brick dedicated to service and making a difference
(Columbus Brick Co.) has been family-
owned and operated since it’s beginning
in 1890. With 120 years of service to
the Golden Triangle and the surrounding
states, they are a great environment to
work for and a positive force in the com-
munity
METRO CREATIVE GRAPHICS
O
nce upon a time an advanced
degree guaranteed job seekers
an edge over other prospective
applicants. Today, however, the benefits
are not so black and white. In fact, on-
the-job experience might be more
attractive to potential employers than an
advanced degree. Most people are
aware that the country is in the throes
of one of the most challenging job mar-
kets seen in history. Unemployment
rates crept over the 10 percent mark to
reach all-time highs. Those currently
looking for a job may think it’s better to
How an advanced degree may
not help in today’s job market
See DEGREE, 10
SPECIAL TO THE DISPATCH
B
ulldog Sand and
Gravel Inc. offers
much to the Golden
Triangle and the sur-
rounding area. The compa-
ny has various operations.
The first division is the
barge company, which is
responsible for transporta-
tion, hauling products
north and south in addi-
tion to hauling gravel.
Secondly, the
Bulldog/Twiner Jackson
Yard, which handles loads
of limestone that have
been emptied into rail cars
at the Lowndes County
Port is shipped to Jackson
where the partnership
takes place.
Bulldog/Twiner Jackson
Yard provides the same
service to Central
Mississippi that Bulldog
Sand and Gravel offers to
North Mississippi.
Thirdly,
Bulldog/Cumberland
Resources sells gray rock
from the port to various
companies.
Bulldog Sand and
Gravel carries all products
of all sizes from screening
material all the way up to
rip rap (the large gray
rock one sees on the side
of the road to eliminate
hillside erosion.)
The company, estab-
lished in 2001, works in
conjunction with
Cumberland Resources
(out of Paducah, Ky.) to
supply limestone to
Mississippi and Alabama.
They ship by barge. The
barges are maintained by
Bulldog Sand and Gravel’s
own workers; Lavaris
“Punchie” Williams and
James Tice actually clean
and weld the barges.
They also export
washed river gravel to the
Gulf Coast and New Iberia,
La. After mining areas
along the Tennessee-
Tombigbee River, they use
screeners to wash and
clean the river gravel (it is
illegal to ship contaminat-
ed product) and then haul
the Lowndes County prod-
uct to lower Mississippi
and Louisiana. Tony Baze
is the manager of the grav-
el operation on the river.
Because the barges are
clean and not contaminat-
ed, they also are used to
haul product, such as
scrap metals, cranes and
more for companies after
dropping off their delivery.
Any thing capable of being
shipped in an open barge
can utilize Bulldog Sand
and Gravel for their ship-
ping needs. On return
trips up the river, they
back haul various products
to utilize the boat and fuel
as effectively as possible.
Bubba Comer, owner of
Bulldog Sand and Gravel,
says Lowndes County is a
“heaven of gravel.” This
county has more river
gravel than any other
county in the state. Comer
is usually two or three
days ahead of the boat,
making sure they have a
load north bound after a
delivery to the south. He
oversees the offloading,
calls on new customers
and finds freight to go
north.
Instead of going a long
way to purchase product,
limestone is brought in by
barge for companies and
individuals who need it.
More than 100,000 tons of
limestone has been
shipped into this area that
has been sold or re-
shipped on to Jackson.
While Bulldog Inc. prima-
rily supplies other busi-
nesses such as local dirt
contractors and other
retail yards, they also sup-
ply five local counties lime-
stone for their road main-
tenance product. Choctaw
and Oktibbeha get gray
rock for building roads
and road maintenance.
Because limestone is
less expensive and more
economical than asphalt or
cement, it’s becoming a
popular alternative to the
other paving options.
Bulldog/Cumberland
Resources manager, Steve
Yarborough, oversees the
location on Port Access
Road at Lowndes County
Port. He receives ship-
ments, loads the trucks,
weighs them to make sure
they are within federal lim-
its and transfers from
barges to the railroad lines
on Kansas City Southern
Railway.
Bulldog Sand and
Gravel, Inc. serves the
Golden Triangle by provid-
ing not only jobs but also a
valuable service to the
community that very few
people are available to
offer. For more informa-
tion on the limestone
inquiries, contact manager
Steve Yarborough at 662-
574-8752.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 10 SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
MANUFACTURERS OF QUALITY BRICK SINCE 1890
Columbus Brick is committed to
our employees and community.
Thank you for letting us serve you!
N Q NC 89 MANUFACTURERS OF QUALITY BRICK SINCE 189000
Columbus Brick Company
• GENUINE
PAPERCUT BRICK
• FACE BRICK
• WOOD MOULDS
• BRICKTILE
• FIREBRICK
• ACCESSORIES
• MORTAR
• PAVERS
114 Brickyard Road • Columbus, MS 39705
662-328-4931 • www.columbusbrick.com
©
C
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m
m
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c
ia
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D
is
p
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t
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h
CiviI Engineering · Transportation · Structures / Water Resources · Bridges
Surveying Services · PIanning · Emergency Management · Landscape Architecture
SoIid Waste Engineering · GeotechnicaI Engineering · Forensic Engineering
EnvironmentaI Engineering · EnvironmentaI Science · TeIecommunication Services
www.neel-schaffer.com www.neel-schaffer.com
0LVVLVVLSSL 2IÀFHV
%D\ 6W /RXLV ‡ %LOR[L ‡ &ROXPEXV ‡ *XOISRUW ‡ +DWWLHVEXUJ ‡ -DFNVRQ ‡ /DXUHO
0DGLVRQ ‡ 0F&RPE ‡ 0HULGLDQ ‡ 3DVFDJRXOD ‡ 5LGJHODQG ‡ 6RXWKDYHQ
125 South Congress Street, Suite 1100 · Jackson, Mississippi 39201 · 601-948-3071
ACEC
Honor
AWARD
MS
More than
just sand
and gravel
Courtesy Photo
Steve Yarborough operates a bulldozer to move No. 67 limestone preparing to be loaded. No. 67 limestone is a
combination of a No. 6 rock (1 inch) and a No. 7 rock (3/4 inch).
Courtesy Photo
Kansas City
South Railway
cars are
loaded with
No. 89 lime-
stone, com-
prised of a mix-
ture of No. 8
rock (1/2
inch) and No.
9 rock (1/4
inch).
Bubba Comer,
owner of Bulldog
Sand and Gravel,
says Lowndes
County is a
“heaven of gravel.”
Degree
Continued from Page 9
set those goals aside and go back to
school until the employment prospects
are better. But is this a wise idea?
Perhaps not.
It all comes down to spending money.
Individuals with an advanced degree are
generally paid anywhere from 20 to 50
percent more than peers who have less-
er degrees. As companies look for any
way to cut costs, job applicants who are
not so educated may seem the better
buy. In fact, those with bachelor’s or
master’s degrees may find they’re
repeatedly passed over for individuals
with associate’s degrees or simple life
experience. Companies actually may be
turned off by a higher degree.
What about individuals contemplating
more schooling to get a more lucrative
position in a company? Again, the plan
may backfire. Many companies are turn-
ing from an education-based advance-
ment program to a performance-based
one. That means workers could have all
of the degrees in the world and not
make more money.
The cost of continued schooling is
also something to consider. Many gradu-
ates are already facing mounting debt
from educational expenses. Adding
more debt onto that number can leave
many individuals in a deep financial
hole, one that is not easily scaled.
Employers are cutting back on tuition
reimbursement, and higher degrees do
not guarantee a job once school is out.
Before advanced schooling is consid-
ered, weigh all of the options.
Tell your child a bedtime story.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 11 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
www.clra.net
327-4935
C
L
R
A
Building leaders
for tomorrow’s
industrial teams!
Their Future...Your Responsibility...
Our Business...
Priscilla King
940 Tuscaloosa Road
Columbus, MS
662-328-9988
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Wouldn’t it be
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THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 12 SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010 SALUTE TO INDUSTRY
Producer of Hydrogen Peroxide
and
of Sodium Chlorate
eka
Celebrating 12 years and
more than 3 million hours
without a lost time incident.
Highway 50 West Point, MS 494-3754
With five locations along the waterway,
Tom Soya Grain Company, a pioneer on the
Tenn-Tom, has utilized the Tennessee-Tombigbee
Waterway for its operations since 1979 in serving
its farmer customers and local industries.
©The Dispatch