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Grade 3: Module 2B:

Overview
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Researching to Build Knowledge and Teaching Others:
Connecting Literary and Informational Texts to Study Culture Then and Now

In this module, students will use literacy skills to build expertiseusing reading,
writing, listening, speaking, and collaborative skills to build and share deep
knowledge about a topic. This focus on research intentionally builds on Module 1,
in which students explored the superpowers of reading. Specifically, students will
seek evidence of culture, which can be thought of as the story of a group of people
constructed through the generations; it can be evidenced through ancient and
modern-day customs and traditions. The module will begin with a class study of the
culture of Japan: Students will read Magic Tree House: Dragon of the Red Dawn, a
book set in ancient Japan, paired with Exploring Countries: Japan, an
informational text about modern Japan.

Unit 2 follows a similar pattern, but students work with increasing independence.
They will form book clubs to build expertise on a different countryreading a new
Magic Tree House book set in their selected country, paired with a new Exploring
Countries informational text to learn about that countrys culture. Students expand
their definition of culture to include more than just customs and traditions In Unit
3, students will demonstrate their expertise about how customs and traditions help
us learn about culture by writing a research-based letter to Magic Tree House
author Mary Pope Osborne that informs Ms. Osborne of customs and traditions
that have endured in a culture from ancient to modern time. This task addresses
NYSP12 ELA CCLS W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.7, W.3.8, L.3.1h, L.3.1i,
L.3.2f, and L.3.3a.

Guiding Questions And Big Ideas


What defines culture?
How do authors learn and share their knowledge on a topic?
Culture is the way of life that has been passed from one generation to the next.
Authors review, examine, and discuss multiple sources to gather information and build knowledge on a topic.
Authors share knowledge on a topic through literary or informational texts.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Researching to Build Knowledge and Teaching Others:
Connecting Literary and Informational Texts to Study Culture Then and Now

Performance Task
Throughout the module, students have built an understanding of how customs and traditions reflect a countrys culture, and have read a Magic Tree House book and
accompanying informational texts to gather a rich collection of information. The performance task gives students a chance to share their learning about the culture of the
country they have researched. Students will be writing a letter to Mary Pope Osborne, the author of the Magic Tree House books, urging her to write a new book, set in
the present day, about the country they have researched. In this informative/explanatory letter, students present their research about the culture of the country and
suggest ideas for the plot of the new book. This task addresses NYSP12 ELA CCLS W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.7, W.3.8, L.3.1h, L.3.1i, L.3.2f, and L.3.3a.

Content Connections
This module is designed to address English Language Arts standards as students read literature and informational texts about the cultures of various countries. However,
the module intentionally incorporates Social Studies practices and themes to support potential interdisciplinary connections to this compelling content.
These intentional connections are described below.
Big ideas and guiding questions are informed by the New York State Common Core K8 Social Studies Framework:
Unifying Themes (pages 7-8)
Theme 2: Development, Movement, and Interaction of Cultures: Aspects of culture such as belief systems, religious faith, or political ideals as influences on other parts
of a culture such as its institutions or literature, music, and art.
Social Studies Practices, Gathering, Using, and Interpreting Evidence, Grades K4:
Descriptor 1: Form questions about the world in which we live (page 16).
Key Ideas and Conceptual Understandings, Grade 3, Communities around the WorldLearning about People and Places:
Development, Movement, and Interaction of Cultures: 3.1b Communities around the world can be diverse in terms of their members, languages spoken, customs and
traditions, and religious beliefs and practices. People in world communities celebrate various holidays and festivals.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


English Language Arts Outcomes

CCS Standards: ReadingLiterature

Long-Term Learning Targets

RL.3.1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text,


referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

I can ask questions to deepen my understanding of a literary text.

RL.3.2. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse
cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is
conveyed through key details in the text.

I can retell a story using key details from the text.

I can answer questions using specific details from a literary text.

I can identify the main message or lesson of a story using key details from the
text.

RL.3.3. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings)


and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

I can describe the characters in a story (traits, motivations, feelings).

RL.3.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story.

RL.3.7. Explain how specific aspects of a texts illustrations contribute to what is


conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a
character or setting).

I can explain how an illustration contributes to the story (e.g., mood, tone,
character, setting).

RL.3.9. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written
by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a
series).

I can compare and contrast elements (themes, setting, plots) of stories by the
same author (e.g., series books).

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I can explain how a characters actions contribute to the events in the story.

I can identify literal and nonliteral language in a story.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


English Language Arts Outcomes

CCS Standards: ReadingInformational

Long-Term Learning Targets

RI.3.1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text,


referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

I can ask questions to deepen my understanding of an informational text.


I can answer questions using specific details from an informational text.

RI.3.2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain
how they support the main idea.

I can determine the main idea of an informational text.

RI.3.3. Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific


ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that
pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

I can describe how events, ideas, or concepts in an informational text are


related.

RI.3.4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words


and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

I can determine the meaning of unknown words in an informational text.

RI.3.5. Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks)
to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

I can use text features to locate information efficiently.

RI.3.7. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and
the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when,
why, and how key events occur).

I can use information from illustrations (maps, photographs) to understand


informational texts.

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I can retell key ideas from an informational text.

I can describe steps in a procedure, in the order they should happen.

I can use information from the words to understand informational texts.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


English Language Arts Outcomes

CCS Standards: Writing

Long-Term Learning Targets

W.3.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas


and information clearly.

I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and information


clearly.

a. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include


illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to
connect ideas within categories of information.
d. Provide a concluding statement or section.

a. I can write an informative/explanatory text that has a clear topic.


a. I can group supporting facts together about a topic in an
informative/explanatory text using both text and illustrations.
b. I can develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
c. I can use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to
connect ideas within categories of information.
d. I can construct a closure on the topic of an informative/explanatory text.

W.3.4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the
development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Gradespecific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 13 above.)

With support from adults, I can produce writing that is appropriate to task and
purpose.

W.3.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to plan, revise,
and edit my writing.

W.3.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

I can conduct a research project to become knowledgeable about a topic.

W.3.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print


and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided
categories.

I can recall information from experiences.

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I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes.


I can sort evidence into provided categories.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


English Language Arts Outcomes

CCS Standards: Speaking and Listening

Long-Term Learning Targets

SL.3.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in


groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts,
building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly.

I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about third-grade


topics and texts.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material;


explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the
topic to explore ideas under discussion.

a. I can prepare myself to participate in discussions.


a. I can draw on information to explore the ideas in a discussion.
b. I can follow our class norms when I participate in a conversation.
c. I can ask questions so Im clear about what is being discussed.

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in


respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about
the topics and texts under discussion).

c. I can ask questions that are on the topic being discussed.

c. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on


topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.

d. I can explain what I understand about the topic being discussed.

c. I can connect my questions to what others say.

d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.


SL.3.3. Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering
appropriate elaboration and detail.

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I can ask questions when I am confused about what a speaker is saying.


I can answer questions to show what I know when listening to a speaker.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


English Language Arts Outcomes

CCS Standards: Foundational Skills

Long-Term Learning Targets

RF.3.3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding
words.

I can use a variety of strategies to read words.

a. Identify and know the meaning of the most common prefixes and
derivational suffixes.
b. Decode words with common Latin suffixes.
c. Decode multi-syllable words.

a. I can identify the meaning of common prefixes and suffixes.


b. I can read words with common suffixes.
c. I can read words with more than one syllable.
I can read high-frequency words that dont play fair .

d. Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.


RF.3.4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

I can read third-grade-level texts accurately and fluently to make meaning.

a. Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.

a. I can read third-grade-level texts with purpose.

b. Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate,
and expression.

b. I can read third-grade-level texts with fluency.

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding,


rereading as necessary.

c. I can reread to make sure that what Im reading makes sense.

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c. I can use clues in the text to check my accuracy.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


English Language Arts Outcomes

CCS Standards: Language

Long-Term Learning Targets

L.3.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar


and usage when writing or speaking.

I can use grammar conventions to send a clear message to a reader or listener.

a. Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in


general and their functions in particular sentences.

a. I can explain the functions of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and


adverbs.
b. I can use regular and irregular plural nouns.

b. Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.

c. I can use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).

c. Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).

d. I can use regular and irregular verbs.

d. Form and use regular and irregular verbs.

e. I can use simple verb tenses (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk).

e. Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk) verb tenses.

f. I can make subjects and verbs agree in my writing.

f. Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.*

f. I can make pronouns and antecedents agree in my writing.

g. Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and
choose between them depending on what is to be modified.

g. I can use adjectives to describe nouns.

h. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.


i. Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.

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g. I can use adverbs to describe actions.


h. I can use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
i. I can write simple, complex, and compound sentences.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


English Language Arts Outcomes

CCS Standards: Language

Long-Term Learning Targets

L.3.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English


capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

I can use conventions to send a clear message to my reader.


a. I can capitalize appropriate words in titles.

a. Capitalize appropriate words in titles.

b. I can use commas in addresses.

b. Use commas in addresses.

c. I can use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.

c. Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.

d. I can use possessives in my writing.

d. Form and use possessives.

e. I can spell words that have suffixes added to base words correctly.

e. Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and
for adding suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).

f. I can use spelling patterns to spell words correctly.

f. Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, positionbased spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in
writing words.

g. I can use resources to check and correct my spelling.

g. Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to


check and correct spellings.
L.3.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking,
reading, or listening.

I can express ideas using carefully chosen words.


I can compare how people use language when they write versus when they talk.

a. Choose words and phrases for effect.


b. Recognize and observe differences between the conventions of spoken and
written standard English.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


English Language Arts Outcomes

CCS Standards: Language

Long-Term Learning Targets

L.3.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word


and phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a
range of strategies.

I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases.

a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.


b. Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known affix is
added to a known word (e.g., agreeable/disagreeable,
comfortable/uncomfortable, care/careless, heat/preheat).
c. Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with
the same root (e.g., company, companion).
d. Use glossaries or beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to
determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

a. I can use what the sentence says to help me to determine what a word or
phrase means.
b. I can use common prefixes to help me determine what a word means (e.g.,
agreeable/disagreeable, comfortable/uncomfortable, care/careless,
heat/preheat).
c. I can use the meaning of root words to help me determine the meaning of
new words with the same root (e.g., company, companion).
d. I can use resource materials (glossaries and dictionaries) to help me
determine the meaning of key words and phrases.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


English Language Arts Outcomes

Texts
1. Mary Pope Osborne, Magic Tree House #37: Dragon of the Red Dawn (New York: A Stepping Stone Book by Random House, 2007), ISBN: 978-0-375-83727-2.
2. Colleen Sexton, Exploring Countries: Japan (Minneapolis: Bellwether Media, 2012), ISBN: 978-1-60014-674-9.
3. Mary Pope Osborne, Magic Tree House #33: Carnival at Candlelight (New York: A Stepping Stone Book by Random House, 2007), 978-0-375-83034-1. (Enough
texts for one-third of the class.)
4. Mary Pope Osborne, Magic Tree House #34: Season of the Sandstorms (New York: A Stepping Stone Book by Random House, 2007), 978-0-375-83032-7. (Enough
texts for one-third of the class.)
5. Mary Pope Osborne. Magic Tree House #45: A Crazy Day with Cobras (New York: A Stepping Stone Book by Random House, 2007), 978-0-375-86795-8. (Enough
texts for one-third of the class.)
6. Walter Simmons, Exploring Countries: Italy (Minneapolis: Bellwether Media, 2012), 978-1600146732. (Enough texts for one-third of the class.)
7. Jim Bartell, Exploring Countries: India (Minneapolis: Bellwether Media,, 2011), 978-1600145551. (Enough texts for one-third of the class.)
8. Lisa Owings, Exploring Countries: Iraq (Minneapolis: Bellwether Media, 2011), 978-1600145926. (Enough texts for one-third of the class.)
9. Discovering Culture, written by Expeditionary Learning for instructional purposes.
10. Rachel Grack, Exploring Countries: France (excerpts) (Minneapolis: Bellwether Media, 2011), ISBN 978-1-60014-480-6. (no purchase necessary; excerpt only).
11. "Republic of Iraq." In CultureGrams Kids Edition 2013. Proquest. 2013. PDF.
12. Cynthia Hatch, Soccer Mania, in Faces (Vol. 22, No. 2), Oct. 2005, 4041.
13. Shruti Priya and Katherine Darrow, The Ancient Art of Rangoli, in Calliope (Vol. 23, No. 6), March 2013, 3436.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Long-Term Targets

Assessments

Unit 1: Building Background Knowledge: Learning about Culture through Literary and Informational Texts
Weeks 1-3

Building background knowledge on the


concept of culture

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1.)

Close reading of informational text


Discovering Culture

I can answer questions using specific details


from literary text. (RL.3.1.)

Asking and answering questions about


Dragon of the Red Dawn

I can retell a story using key details from the


text. (RL.3.2)

Identifying customs and traditions in a


literary text

I can identify the main message or lesson of


a story using key details from the text.
(RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using
clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can identify literal and nonliteral language
in a story. (RL.3.4)
I can ask questions to deepen my
understanding of an informational text.
(RI.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific details
from an informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can determine the main idea of an
informational text. (RI.3.2)
I can retell key ideas from an informational
text. (RI.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of unknown
words in an informational text. (RI.3.4)
I can use information from illustrations
(maps, photographs) to understand
informational texts. (RI.3.7)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Weeks 1-3,
continued

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

I can use information from the words to


understand informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can document what I learn about a topic by
taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can sort evidence into provided categories.
(W.3.8)
I can effectively engage in discussions with
diverse partners about third-grade topics
and texts. (SL.3.1).
I can use a variety of strategies to determine
the meaning of words and phrases. (L.3.4)
I can use resource materials (glossaries and
dictionaries) to help me determine the
meaning of key words and phrases. (L.3.4d)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Long-Term Targets

Assessments

Weeks 1-3,
continued

Introduce homework routine to complete


Dragon of the Red Dawn

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1.)

Using text features to locate information

I can answer questions using specific details


from a literary text. (RL.3.1.)

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Reading for Key


Details recording form: Chapter 6 of Dragon
of the Red Dawn (RL.3.1 and RL.3.4)

Identifying customs and traditions in


informational text

I can retell a story using key details from the


text. (RL.3.2)
I can identify the main message or lesson of
a story using key details from the text.
(RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using
clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can identify literal and nonliteral language
in a story. (RL.3.4)
I can explain how an illustration contributes
to the story (e.g., mood, tone, character,
setting). (RL.3.7)
I can ask questions to deepen my
understanding of an informational text.
(RI.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific details
from an informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can determine the meaning of unknown
words in an informational text. (RI.3.4)
I can use text features to locate information
efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can use information from illustrations
(maps, photographs) to understand
informational texts. (RI.3.7)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

I can use information from the words to


understand informational texts. (RI.3.7)

Weeks 1-3,
continued

I can document what I learn about a topic by


taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can sort evidence into provided categories.
(W.3.8)
I can effectively engage in discussions with
diverse partners about third-grade topics
and texts. (SL.3.1).
Introduce paragraph writing
Collating customs and traditions from a
literary text with customs and traditions
from an informational text

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1.)
I can answer questions using specific details
from a literary text. (RL.3.1.)

End of Unit 1 Assessment: On-Demand


Writing of a Research-Based Informational
Paragraph (RL.3.1, RI.3.5, W.3.2, L.3.3, and
L.3.2f)

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of an informational text.
(RI.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific details
from an informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can use text features to locate information
efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can use information from illustrations
(maps, photographs) to understand
informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can use information from the words to
understand informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can write informative/explanatory texts
that convey ideas and information clearly.
(W.3.2)
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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Weeks 1-3,
continued

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

a. I can group supporting facts together


about a topic in an
informative/explanatory text using both
text and illustrations.
b. I can develop the topic with facts,
definitions, and details.
c. I can use linking words and phrases to
connect ideas within categories of
information (e.g., also, another, and,
more, but).
d. d. I can construct a closure on the topic
of an informative/explanatory text.
With support from adults, I can produce
writing that is appropriate to task and
purpose. (W.3.4)
With support from peers and adults, I can
use the writing process to plan, revise, and
edit my writing. (W.3.5)
I can document what I learn about a topic by
taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can sort evidence into provided categories.
(W.3.8)
I can effectively engage in discussions with
diverse partners about third-grade topics
and texts. (SL.3.1).
I can use spelling patterns to spell words
correctly. (L.3.2f)
I can express ideas using carefully chosen
words. (L.3.3)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

I can compare how people use language


when they write versus when they talk.
(L.3.3a)

Weeks 1-3,
continued

Unit 2: Case Study: Researching A Countrys Culture Then and Now


Weeks 4-6

Launching book club systems and structures


Preparing for ongoing discussions
Launching expert Magic Tree House books
Asking and answering questions about the
Magic Tree House books
Identifying customs and traditions in a
literary text

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1.)
I can answer questions using specific details
from a literary text. (RL.3.1.)
I can retell a story using key details from the
text. (RL.3.2)
I can identify the main message or lesson of
a story using key details from the text.
(RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using
clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can identify literal and nonliteral language
in a story. (RL.3.4)
I can read third-grade-level texts accurately
and fluently to make meaning. (RF.3.4)
a. I can read third-grade-level texts with
purpose.
b. I can read third-grade-level texts with
fluency.
c. I can use clues in the text to check my
accuracy.
c. I can reread to make sure that what Im
reading makes sense.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

I can document what I learn about a topic by


taking notes. (W.3.8)

Weeks 4-6,
continued

I can sort evidence into provided categories.


(W.3.8)
I can effectively engage in discussions with
diverse partners about third-grade topics
and texts. (SL.3.1).
I can ask questions when I am confused
about what a speaker is saying. (SL.3.3)
I can answer questions to show what I know
when listening to a speaker. (SL.3.3)
Continued discussions about texts
Launching Exploring Countries books
Using text features to locate information
Identifying customs and traditions in
informational texts

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1.)
I can answer questions using specific details
from a literary text. (RL.3.1.)

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Book Discussions


and Text-Dependent Questions on the Magic
Tree House Books (RL.3.1, W.3.8, SL.3.1,
and SL3.3)

I can retell a story using key details from the


text. (RL.3.2)
I can identify the main message or lesson of
a story using key details from the text.
(RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using
clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can identify literal and nonliteral language
in a story. (RL.3.4)
I can compare and contrast stories (themes,
setting, plots) of stories by the same author
(e.g.. series books). (RL.3.9)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Weeks 4-6,
continued

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of an informational text.
(RI.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific details
from an informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can use text features to locate information
efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can use information from illustrations
(maps, photographs) to understand
informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can use information from the words to
understand informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can read third-grade-level texts accurately
and fluently to make meaning. (RF.3.4)
a. I can read third-grade-level texts with
purpose.
b. I can read third-grade-level texts with
fluency.
c. I can use clues in the text to check my
accuracy.
c. I can reread to make sure that what Im
reading makes sense.
I can write informative/explanatory texts
that convey ideas and information clearly.
(W.3.2)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Weeks 4-6,
continued

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

a. I can group supporting facts together


about a topic in an
informative/explanatory text using both
text and illustrations.
b. I can develop the topic with facts,
definitions, and details.
c. I can use linking words and phrases to
connect ideas within categories of
information (e.g., also, another, and,
more, but).
d. I can construct a closure on the topic of
an informative/explanatory text.
I can document what I learn about a topic by
taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can sort evidence into provided categories.
(W.3.8)
I can effectively engage in discussions with
diverse partners about third-grade topics
and texts. (SL.3.1).
I can ask questions when I am confused
about what a speaker is saying. (SL.3.3)
I can answer questions to show what I know
when listening to a speaker. (SL.3.3)
I can use spelling patterns to spell words
correctly. (L.3.2f)
I can express ideas using carefully chosen
words. (L.3.3)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

I can compare how people use language


when they write versus when they talk.
(L.3.3)

Weeks 4-6,
continued

Continued discussions of information in


texts
Collating customs and traditions from
literary texts with customs and traditions
from informational texts
Using a variety of resource materials
Synthesizing research
Discussions comparing texts

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of an informational text.
(RI.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific details
from an informational text. (RI.3.1)

End of Unit 2 Assessment: Reading and


Writing about a New Informational Text:
Exploring France excerpts (RI.3.1, RI.3.2,
RI.3.5, W.3.2, and W.3.8)

I can determine the main idea of an


informational text. (RI.3.2)
I can retell key ideas from an informational
text. (RI.3.2)
I can use text features to locate information
efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can use information from illustrations
(maps, photographs) to understand
informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can use information from the words to
understand informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can write informative/explanatory texts
that convey ideas and information clearly.
(W.3.2)
a. I can group supporting facts together
about a topic in an
informative/explanatory text using both
text and illustrations.
b. I can develop the topic with facts,
definitions, and details.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

21

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Weeks 4-6,
continued

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

c. I can use linking words and phrases to


connect ideas within categories of
information (e.g., also, another, and,
more, but).
d. I can construct a closure on the topic of
an informative/explanatory text.
With support from adults, I can produce
writing that is appropriate to task and
purpose. (W.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a topic by
taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can sort evidence into provided categories.
(W.3.8)
I can effectively engage in discussions with
diverse partners about third-grade topics
and texts. (SL.3.1).
I can use spelling patterns to spell words
correctly. (L.3.2f)
I can express ideas using carefully chosen
words. (L.3.3)
I can compare how people use language
when they write versus when they talk.
(L.3.3a)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

22

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Long-Term Targets

Assessments

Unit 3: Culminating Project: Writing A Research-based Letter to Mary Pope Osborne


Weeks 7-8,
continued

Preparing to write a letter to Mary Pope


Osborne

I can describe how events, ideas, or concepts


in an informational text are related. (RI.3.3)

Capturing key details from research for letter

I can use text features to locate information


efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can write informative/explanatory texts
that convey ideas and information clearly.
(W.3.2)

Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Writing a First Draft


of Research-Based Letter to Mary Pope
Osborne about Expert Country (RI.3.5, RI3.3,
W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.7,W.3.8., and
W.3.10)

a. I can group supporting facts together


about a topic in an
informative/explanatory text using both
text and illustrations.
b. I can develop the topic with facts,
definitions, and details.
c. I can use linking words and phrases to
connect ideas within categories of
information (e.g., also, another, and,
more, but).
d. I can construct a closure on the topic of
an informative/explanatory text.
With support from adults, I can produce
writing that is appropriate to task and
purpose. (W.3.4)
With support from peers and adults, I can
use the writing process to plan, revise, and
edit my writing. (W.3.5)
I can conduct a research project to become
knowledgeable about a topic. (W.3.7)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

23

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

I can document what I learn about a topic by


taking notes. (W.3.8)

Weeks 7-8,
continued

I can sort evidence into provided categories.


(W.3.8)
I can use coordinating and subordinating
conjunctions. (L.3.1h)
I can compare how people use language
when they write versus when they talk.
(L.3.3b)
Using the writing process to write a letter to
Mary Pope Osborne

I can use text features to locate information


efficiently. (RI.3.5)

Revising carefully for language standards.

I can write informative/explanatory texts


that convey ideas and information clearly.
(W.3.2)

Editing for conventions

a. I can group supporting facts together


about a topic in an
informative/explanatory text using both
text and illustrations.

End Unit 3 Assessment: On-Demand


Revising and Editing Research Based Letter
to Mary Pope Osborne about Expert Country
(W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, L.3.1, L.3.2, and L.3.3)
Final Performance Task: Research-Based
Letter to Author about Expert Country
(W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.7, W.3.8, L.3.1h,
L.3.1i, L.3.2f, and L.3.3a)

b. I can develop the topic with facts,


definitions, and details.
c. I can use linking words and phrases to
connect ideas within categories of
information (e.g., also, another, and,
more, but).
d. I can construct a closure on the topic of
an informative/explanatory text.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

24

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Week-at-a-Glance

Week

Instructional Focus

Weeks 7-8,
continued

Long-Term Targets (continued)

Assessments

With support from adults, I can produce


writing that is appropriate to task and
purpose. (W.3.4)
With support from peers and adults, I can
use the writing process to plan, revise, and
edit my writing. (W.3.5)
I can conduct a research project to become
knowledgeable about a topic. (W.3.7)
I can document what I learn about a topic by
taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can sort evidence into provided categories.
(W.3.8)
I can use coordinating and subordinating
conjunctions. (L.3.1h)
I can write simple, complex, and compound
sentences. (L.3.1i)
I can spell words that have suffixes added to
base words correctly. (L.3.2e)
I can use spelling patterns to spell words
correctly. (L.3.2f)
I can express ideas using carefully chosen
words. (L.3.3a)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

25

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: OVERVIEW


Researching to Build Knowledge and Teaching Others:
Connecting Literary and Informational Texts to Study Culture Then and Now
Preparation and Materials
Released along with this module is a stand-alone document entitled the Foundational Reading and Language Standards Resources Package for Grades 3-5. This resource
package is designed to give teachers resources and guidance for addressing the CCSS foundational reading and language ELA standards. The package includes resources
for literacy instruction that occurs alongside the modules. It also cites example lessons within the modules in which these standards are addressed.
The package includes the following resources:
Overview:
Organization and Contents Chart: A visual representation and written description of the resources in this package
Research Base: Research review, implications for instruction, and associated resources for each aspect of foundational reading and language standards
instruction.
Sample Schedule: A sample two-week alternating schedule that outlines one way to organize a foundational reading and language instructional block.
RF and L Standards within the Module Lessons: A list of examples of foundational reading and language instruction in the 6-minute module lessons, by
grade.
References: Citations for those who would like to do further study.
Word Study Criteria: Specific suggestions and criteria for approaches to word work that teach phonics and word analysis.
Additional Work with Complex Text: Guidance for how to provide additional and more heavily scaffolded support with the complex texts found in the modules.
Fluency Resource: Resources and guidance for fluency instruction.
Show the Rule Strategy 1: Resources and guidance for contextualized grammar and conventions instruction.
Independent Reading Grades 3-5: Resources and guidance for launching independent reading with students.
This resources will be referenced throughout Module 2B, when opportunities exist for connecting and differentiating instruction in the module lessons. Before launching
this module, review the Foundational Reading and Language Standards Resources Package for Grades 3-5 and determine how your current literacy schedule aligns with
the guidelines in this package.
For Grade 3, review the Fluency Resource, aligned with RF.3 and RF.4, before Unit 2, as this unit provides opportunities for fluency work with students.
The Show the Rule sample lesson is included in Unit 3.

Used by permission, Eloise Ginty, Vermont Writing Collaborative. For more information and resources, go to www.vermontwritingcollaborative.org.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Overview June 2014

26

Grade 3: Module 2B:


Assessment Overview
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B:


ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

Note: As each unit is written, often assessments are revised. Use this document as a general guideline. But be sure to refer to each specific unit overview document for the
most correct and complete write-ups of each assessment.

Final Performance Task

Research-Based Letter to Author


Throughout the module, students have built an understanding of how customs and traditions reflect a countrys culture, and
have read a Magic Tree House book and accompanying informational texts to gather a rich collection of information. The
performance task gives students a chance to share their learning about the culture of the country they have researched.
Students will be writing a letter to Mary Pope Osborne, the author of the Magic Tree House books, urging her to write a new
book, set in the present day, about the country they have researched. In this informative/explanatory letter, students present
their research about the culture of the country and suggest ideas for the plot of the new book.
This task addresses NYSP12 ELA CCLS W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.7, W.3.8, L.3.1h, L.3.1i, L.3.2f, and L.3.3a.

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment

Reading to Capture Key Details: Chapter 6 of Dragon of the Red Dawn


This assessment centers on NYSP12 ELA CCLS RL.3.1 and RL.3.4. Before this assessment, students will have practiced
identifying key details while reading each chapter of Magic Tree House: Dragon of the Red Dawn. Students will apply these
skills to Chapter 6: The Banana Tree from Dragon of the Red Dawn to complete a chart and answer several text-dependent
questions, including those that require them to determine the meaning of words and phrases using context clues. Because this
is a reading assessment, struggling writers could be accommodated by dictating their answers or by drawing.

End of Unit 1 Assessment

On-Demand Writing of a Research-Based Informational Paragraph


This assessment centers on NYSP12 ELA CCLS RL.3.1, RI.3.5, W.3.2, L.3.3, and L.3.2f. Students reread pages 3640 of
Dragon of the Red Dawn to identify some customs or traditions of ancient Japan. Students then locate additional information
about two of these customs and traditions in the nonfiction text Exploring Countries: Japan. They synthesize this information
by writing a short paragraph about two customs and traditions from Dragon of the Red Dawn that have remained important
in modern-day Japan.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Assessment Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B:


ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment

Book Discussions and Text-Dependent Questions on the Magic Tree House Books
This assessment centers on standards NYSP ELA CCSS RL.3.1, RL.3.9, W.3.8, SL.3.1, and SL.3.3. After reading a Magic Tree
House book independently, students prepare for a small group discussion by gathering evidence from their notes on the
Expert Research Matrix. These written notes are collected at the end of the assessment and will be used to assess RL.3.1,
RL.3.9, and W.3.8. Students also work in triads t0 discuss key details about the plot of the book they have read and what they
have learned about their countrys culture. During the discussion, the teacher circulates, using a checklist to assess SL.3.1 and
SL.3.3.

End of Unit 2 Assessment

Reading and Writing about a New Informational Text: Exploring France excerpts
This assessment centers on standards NYSP ELA CCSS RI.3.1, RI.3.2, RI.3.5, W.3.2, and W.3.8. In the second portion of Unit
2, students practiced using text features to locate information during a close reading of the informational texts about a country
featured in the Magic Tree House books. In this on-demand assessment, students apply these skills to an informational text
about a new country. Students locate information in the text and write a short, informative paragraph about the customs and
traditions in that country. The NYS 4-point writing rubric will be used to score this assessment.

Mid-Unit 3 Assessment

Writing a First Draft of Research-Based Letter to Mary Pope Osborne about Expert Country
This task addresses NYSP12 ELA Standards RI.3.5, RI3.3, W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.7, W.3.8, and W3.10 After conducting
research in Unit 2, students use the information they have gathered to write the first draft of a letter to Mary Pope Osborne,
urging her to write a new book, set in the present day, about the country they have researched. In an Informative/Explanatory
letter, students present their research about the culture of the country and suggest ideas for the plot of the new book.

End of Unit 3 Assessment

On-Demand Revising and Editing Research Based Letter to Mary Pope Osborne about Expert Country
This task addresses NYSP12 ELA Standards W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, L.3.1, L.3.2, and L.3.3 After receiving feedback from peers
and teachers on drafts of the Japan Letter to Ms. Osborne, students identify three things they will do to revise (W 3.2, W.3.4,
L3.3) and edit (L3.1, L3.2, W.3.5) their letters. Students then use time during the assessment to revise and edit. Students
highlight the changes they made on their drafts and discuss the thinking behind them with a peer.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Assessment Overview June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B:


Performance Task
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: PERFORMANCE TASK


Research-Based Letter to Author about Expert Country

Summary of Task
Throughout the module, students have built an understanding of how customs and traditions reflect a countrys culture, and have read a Magic Tree House book and
accompanying informational texts to gather a rich collection of information. The performance task gives students a chance to share their learning about the culture of the
country they have researched. Students will be writing a letter to Mary Pope Osborne, the author of the Magic Tree House books, urging her to write a new book, set in
the present day, about the country they have researched. In this informative/explanatory letter, students present their research about the culture of the country and
suggest ideas for the plot of the new book. This task addresses NYSP12 ELA CCLS W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.7, W.3.8, L.3.1h, L.3.1i, L.3.2f, and L.3.3a.

Format
A four-paragraph letter
An introductory paragraph (scaffolded writing during Unit 3; first draft of expert country written as on-demand in the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment)
Two body paragraphs (scaffolded writing during Unit 3; first draft of expert country written as on-demand assessment in the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment)
A closing paragraph (scaffolded writing during Unit 3; first draft of expert country written as on-demand assessment in the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Performance Task June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: PERFORMANCE TASK


Research-Based Letter to Author about Expert Country

Standards Assessed through This Task


W.3.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
a. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information.
d. Provide a concluding statement or section.
W.3.4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose.
W.3.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
W.3.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
W.3.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided
categories.
L.3.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
h. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
i. Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.
L.3.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
f. Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words.
L.3.3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
a. Choose words and phrases for effect.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Performance Task June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: PERFORMANCE TASK


Research-Based Letter to Author about Expert Country

Student-Friendly Writing Invitation/Task Description


Author Mary Pope Osborne has announced she will write a new Magic Tree House book! Instead of traveling to a place in the past, however, Ms. Osborne has decided
that Jack and Annie will return in the present to a country theyve already visited. Before she begins writing, Ms. Osborne wants to be sure there are plenty of
interesting things about the culture of the country that she can include in her new story.
You have been invited to conduct this research for her! After conducting research with your small group about your assigned country, you will individually write a
letter to the author of the Magic Tree House series to inform her about the culture of your country today. This will help her decide whether she should write a new
book on this country. Include information about two aspects of culture that you discovered in your Exploring Countries text. Use accurate facts, definitions, and
details from your research to explain each. At the end of your letter, provide a brief description of how Mary Pope Osborne might use the information you found in a
new book on this country. This task addresses NYSP12 ELA CCLS W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.7, L.3.1h, L.3.1i, L.3.2f, and L.3.3a.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Performance Task June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: PERFORMANCE TASK


Research-Based Letter to Author about Expert Country

Key Criteria for Success (Aligned with NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


Below are key criteria students must address when completing this task. Specific lessons during the module build in opportunities for students to understand the criteria,
offer additional criteria, and work with their teacher to construct a rubric on which their work will be critiqued and formally assessed.
Your letter will meet these criteria:
A clear and inviting introduction that states the topic and purpose for writing
Demonstrates an understanding of audience
Includes two informative paragraphs: one detailed paragraph about each aspect of culture chosen
Has body paragraphs that each contain a clear topic sentence, supporting details and a concluding statement
Uses accurate facts, definitions, and details from the research to explain each aspect of culture.
Uses linking words and phrases to connect ideas together
Provides a conclusion to wrap up the ideas

Options for Students


Student letters could be accompanied by illustrations. These could be photos or artwork.

Options for Teachers


Students may type their final letter.
Students may present their letter to their own class, to other classes in the school, or to parents or other adults.
Teachers could create a letter-writing contest for the grade level. After students have completed their letters, a panel of teacher judges could choose one letter to send
to Mary Pope Osborne as a representative of their school.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Performance Task June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: PERFORMANCE TASK


Research-Based Letter to Author about Expert Country

Resources and Links


Visit the Magic Tree House books Web site to learn more about the author, Mary Pope Osborne: http://www.magictreehouse.com/.

Central Text and Informational Texts


Magic Tree House books
Magic Tree House #37: Dragon of the Red Dawn by Mary Pope Osborne (one per student)
Book Club Book (Students are assigned one book from the following list.)
Magic Tree House #33: Carnival at Candlelight by Mary Pope Osborne (590L)
Magic Tree House #34: Season of the Sandstorms by Mary Pope Osborne (580L)
Magic Tree House #45: A Crazy Day with Cobras by Mary Pope Osborne (570L)
Informational Texts from the Exploring Countries series from Bellwether Publishing
Exploring Countries: Japan by Colleen Sexton (740L) (one per student)
Texts for Research (Students use one book from the following list to conduct research.)
Exploring Countries: Italy by Walter Simmons (840L)
Exploring Countries: India by Jim Bartell (840L)
Exploring Countries: Iraq by Lisa Owings (810L)
Republic of Iraq in CultureGrams Kids Edition
Soccer Mania by Cynthia Hatch
The Ancient Art of Rangoli by Shruti Priya and Katherine Darrow

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: Performance Task June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1:


Overview
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Building Background Knowledge:
Learning about Culture through Literary and Informational Texts

Unit 1: Building Background Knowledge: Learning about Culture through Literary and Informational Texts
In this unit, students read both informational texts and a Magic Tree House book
as they learn about the concept of culture generally, and the culture of ancient and
modern Japan specifically. They will read Magic Tree House: Dragon of the Red
Dawn, collecting textual evidence as they begin to explore the question What is
culture? They explore the concept of culture as the story of a group of people
constructed through the generations, which can be evidenced through ancient and
modern-day customs and traditions (see Content Connections, below). For the
mid-unit assessment, students will cite evidence from the text as well as answer

text-dependent questions and define vocabulary words from Dragon of the Red
Dawn. Students then will collect textual evidence from the accompanying
informational text Exploring Countries: Japan. They will begin to learn how
evidence in literary texts correlates with evidence in informational texts. They will
write about ancient and modern Japan in an on-demand informational paragraph.
This whole class study of Japan, in Unit 1, prepares students to do similar work in
small groups in Unit 2 about other countries ancient and modern-day customs and
traditions.

Guiding Questions And Big Ideas


What defines culture?
How do authors learn and share their knowledge on a topic?
Culture is the way of life that has been passed from one generation to the next.
Authors review, examine, and discuss multiple sources to gather information and build knowledge on a topic.
Authors share knowledge on a topic through literary or informational texts.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Building Background Knowledge:
Learning about Culture through Literary and Informational Texts

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment

Reading to Capture Key Details: Chapter 6 of Dragon of the Red Dawn


This assessment centers on NYSP12 ELA CCLS RL.3.1 and RL.3.4. Before this assessment, students will have practiced
identifying key details while reading each chapter of Magic Tree House: Dragon of the Red Dawn. Students will apply these
skills to Chapter 6: The Banana Tree from Dragon of the Red Dawn to complete a chart and answer several text-dependent
questions, including those that require them to determine the meaning of words and phrases using context clues. Because this
is a reading assessment, struggling writers could be accommodated by dictating their answers or by drawing.

End of Unit 1 Assessment

On-Demand Writing of a Research-Based Informational Paragraph


This assessment centers on NYSP12 ELA CCLS RL.3.1, RI.3.5, W.3.2, L.3.3, and L.3.2f. Students reread pages 3640 of
Dragon of the Red Dawn to identify some customs or traditions of ancient Japan. Students then locate additional information
about two of these customs and traditions in the nonfiction text Exploring Countries: Japan. They synthesize this information
by writing a short paragraph about two customs and traditions from Dragon of the Red Dawn that have remained important
in modern-day Japan.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Building Background Knowledge:
Learning about Culture through Literary and Informational Texts

Content Connections
This module is designed to address English Language Arts standards as students read literature and informational text about the cultures of various countries. However,
the module intentionally incorporates Social Studies practices and themes to support potential interdisciplinary connections to this compelling content. These
intentional connections are described below.
Big ideas and guiding questions are informed by the New York State Common Core K8 Social Studies Framework:
Unifying Themes (pages 78)
Theme 2: Development, Movement, and Interaction of Cultures: Aspects of culture such as belief systems, religious faith, or political ideals as influences on other parts
of a culture such as its institutions or literature, music, and art.
Social Studies Practices, Gathering, Using, and Interpreting Evidence, Grades K4
Descriptor 1: Form questions about the world in which we live (page 16).
Key Ideas and Conceptual Understandings, Grade 3, Communities around the WorldLearning about People and Places
Development, Movement, and Interaction of Cultures: 3.1b Communities around the world can be diverse in terms of their members, languages spoken, customs and
traditions, and religious beliefs and practices. People in world communities celebrate various holidays and festivals.

Texts
1. Mary Pope Osborne, Magic Tree House #37: Dragon of the Red Dawn (New York, NY: Random House, 2007), ISBN: 978-0-375-83727-2.
2. Colleen Sexton, Exploring Countries: Japan (Minneapolis, MN: Bellwether Media, 2012), ISBN: 978-1-60014-674-9.
3. Discovering Culture, written by Expeditionary Learning for instructional purposes.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

This unit is approximately 3 weeks or 15 sessions of instruction.

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

I can talk with my partner or group to


reflect and record what I notice and
wonder about pictures and text.

Students contributions to
conversation norms

Class Norms for Discussion


anchor chart

Observations of discussions

I can follow our class norms when I


participate in a conversation.

Mystery Pictures and


Excerpts: Personal
Reflection recording form

Guiding Questions anchor


chart

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 1

Observing, Reading, and Talking


with Peers: A Carousel of Photos
and Texts about Culture

I can ask and answer questions to


deepen my understanding of a literary
text. (RL.3.1)
I can ask and answer questions to
deepen my understanding of
informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)

Lesson 2

Reading Closely to Build


Understanding: Discovering
Culture Part 1

I can determine the main idea of an


informational text. (RI.3.2)
I can retell key ideas from an
informational text. (RI.3.2)
I can use information from the words
and illustrations (Photographs,
captions) to understand informational
texts. (RI.3.7)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

Carousel Brainstorm
protocol
Think-Pair-Share protocol

I can identify the main idea of the article


Discovering Culture by reading the
text closely.
I can list key details in the text that
support the main idea.
I can explain how information in the
words and illustrations help me
understand the concept of culture.

Observation of partner
discussions

Things Close Readers Do


anchor chart

Close Reading as
Researchers (Main Ideas
and Details) recording form

Close reading as
Researchers: Main Idea
and Details anchor chart
Think-Pair-Share protocol
Carousel Brainstorm
protocol

I can discuss how the main ideas in this


article are conveyed through key details.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Lesson 3

Reading Closely to Build


Understanding: Discovering
Culture Part 2

I can answer questions using specific


details from informational text.
(RI.3.1)

I can answer questions using specific


details from Discovering Culture.

Questions from the Text:


Discovering Culture

Word Tracker anchor chart

I can choose specific details to answer


questions about the text.

Word Tracker recording


form

I can determine the meaning of


unknown words in informational text.
(RI.3.4)
I can use a variety of strategies to
determine the meaning of words and
phrases. (L.3.4)

I can define the social studies concept of


culture.
I can determine the meaning of key
words related to culture using a glossary
or dictionary.

Things Close readers Do


anchor chart
Close Readers as
Researchers: Main Idea
and Details anchor chart
Think-Pair-Share protocol

I can use resource materials (glossaries


and dictionaries) to help me determine
the meaning of key words and phrases.
(L.3.4d)

Lesson 4

Reading to Capture the Key


Details of a Chapter: Dragon of
the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

I can answer questions using specific


details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by sorting evidence into
categories. (W.3.8)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

I can determine the key details of


Chapters 1 and 2 by identifying the
important parts of the chapter
(who/where/what).
I can identify and record key details in
Chapter 2 that connect with evidence of
ancient Japans culture.

Capturing Key Details


recording form: Dragon of
the Red Dawn Chapter 2

Structural Features of a
Chapter Book anchor chart
Structural Features of
Informational Text anchor
chart
Where/Who/What anchor
chart
Capturing Key Details
anchor chart
Think-Pair-Share protocol

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 5

Reading to Capture the Key


Details of a Chapter: Dragon Of
the Red Dawn Chapter 3

I can retell a chapter in a story using


key details from the text. (RL.3.2)

I can determine the key details of


Chapter 3 by identifying the important
parts of the chapter (who/where/what).

I can determine the meaning of words


using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by sorting evidence into
categories. (W.3.8)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Lesson 6

Capturing the Key Details of a


Chapter and Launching the
Performance Task: Dragon of
the Red Dawn Chapter 5

I can retell a chapter in a story using


key details from the text. (RL.3.2)

I can identify and record key details in


Chapter 3 that connect with the culture
of ancient Japan.

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Capturing Key Details


recording form: Chapter 3

Things Readers Do When


Reading Chapter Books
anchor chart

Working with Context Clues


recording form: Chapter 3
Exit Ticket: Working with
Context Clues

Capturing Key Details


recording from (For
Chapter 4 from homework)

I can answer questions using specific


details from literary text. (RL.3.1)

I can identify and record key details in


Chapter 5 that connect with the culture
of ancient Japan.

Working with Context Clues


recording form: Dragon of
the Red Dawn Chapter 5

I can document what I learn about a


topic by sorting evidence into
categories. (W.3.8)

I can use context clues to determine the


meaning of words in Chapter 5 of
Dragon of the Red Dawn.

Questions from the text:


Dragon of the Read Dawn
Chapter 5

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

I can answer questions about Chapter 5


of Dragon of the Red Dawn using
details from the text.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

Think-Pair-Share protocol

I can use context clues to determine the


meaning of words in Chapter 3 of
Dragon of the Red Dawn.
I can determine the key details of
Chapter 5 by identifying the important
parts of the chapter (who/where/what).

I can determine the meaning of words


using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)

Capturing Key Details


anchor chart

Guiding Questions anchor


chart
Concentric Circles protocol

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Lesson 7

Mid-Unit Assessment: Reading


to Capture Key Details: Dragon
of the Red Dawn (pages 55-61)

I can answer questions using specific


details from literary text. (RL.3.1)

I can determine the key details of pages


55-61 by identifying the important parts
of the chapter (who/where/what).

Context Clues: Dragon of


the Red Dawn Chapter 5,
Part 2 (from homework)

How Do Authors of Literary


Text Reveal Information
about a Topic? Anchor chart

I can determine the meaning of words


using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)

I can identify and record key details in


pages 55-61 that connect with the
culture of ancient Japan.

Questions from the text:


Dragon of the Red Dawn
Chapter 5 (from homework)

Capturing Key Details


anchor chart

I can document what I learn about a


topic by sorting evidence into
categories. (W.3.8)

I can use context clues to determine the


meaning of words in pages 55-61 of
Dragon of the Red Dawn.

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

I can answer questions about pages 5561 of Dragon of the Red Dawn using
details from the text.

I can use text features and search tools


(e.g. key words, sidebars, hyperlinks)
to locate information relevant to a
given topic efficiently.(RI.3.5)

I can use text features to efficiently find


information in the text Exploring
Counties. Japan.

Lesson 8

Close Reading Guide: Using


Informational Text Features and
Learning about Japans Culture

I can retell a chapter in a story using


key details from the text. (RL.3.2)

I can use information from the words


to understand informational text.
(RI.3.7)
I can use information from the
illustrations (maps, photographs) to
understand informational texts.
(RL.3.7)

I can use text features to learn new


information about Japan.
I can accurately record information I
find about Japan.

Guiding Questions anchor


chart

Tracking My Progress:
Mid-Unit 1 recording form

How Mary Pope Osborne


Teaches Us about Culture
anchor chart

Text Features Scavenger


Hunt recording form

Structural Features of
Chapter Books (Magic Tree
House) anchor chart

Word Tracker recording


form

Structural Features of
Informational Text anchor
chart
Text Feature Scavenger
Hunt anchor chart
Concentric Circles protocol

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes (W.3.8)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 9

Close Reading as a Researcher:


Reading with a Question in Mind

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of informational text.
(RI.3.1)

I can ask and answer questions about


Japan and its culture using the
information text Exploring Countries:
Japan.

I can answer questions using specific


details from informational text.
(RI.3.1)
I can determine the meaning of
unknown words in informational text.
(RI.3.4)
I can prepare myself to participate in
discussions. (SL.3.1)

Lesson 10

Using Informational Text:


Learning about Japans Customs

I can ask and answer questions about


informational texts. (RI.3.1)
I can use information from the words
and illustrations to understand
informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can use a variety of strategies to
determine meaning of words and
phrases. (RL.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

I can answer text-dependent questions


using specific details from Exploring
Countries: Japan.
I can use the glossary to help me
understand important words about
culture.

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Independent Reading
recording form: Chapter 7
(from homework)

Reading with a Question in


Mind anchor chart

Explore Culture recording


form

Guiding Questions anchor


chart

Reading with a Question in


Mind recording form

Mystery Letter anchor chart

Word Tracker anchor chart

Word Tracker recording


form

I can talk effectively with my partner


about what important culture words
mean.
I can read with a question in mind to
find information about the culture of
Japan.

Independent Reading
recording form: Chapter 8
(from homework)

Japans Culture anchor


chart

I can record my thinking about Japans


customs in the Exploring Culture
recording form.

Exploring Culture recording


form

Ink-Pair-Share protocol

I can use text features efficiently to help


find information about Japans customs.
I can answer text-dependent questions
about the customs of Japan using
evidence from the text.

Working with Context Clues


recording form

Mystery Letter anchor chart


Think-Pair-Share protocol

Japans Culture anchor


chart

I can use context clues to determine the


meaning of words in Exploring
Countries: Japan.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Lesson 11

Using Informational Text:


Learning More about Japans
Culture

I can ask and answer questions about


informational texts. (RI.3.1)

I can read with a question in mind to


find information about the culture of
Japan.

Independent Reading
recording form: Chapter 9
(from homework)

Japans Culture anchor


chart

I can record my thinking about Japans


customs in the Exploring Culture
recording form.

Exploring Culture recording


form

Reading with a Question in


Mind anchor chart

Japans Culture anchor


chart

Mix and Mingle protocol

Independent Reading
recording form: Chapter 10
(from homework)

How to Hold a Chalk Talk


anchor chart

Observations of students
actions and writing during
the Chalk Talk

Japans Culture anchor


chart

Culture Research matrix

Criteria for a ResearchBased Informational


Paragraph anchor chart

I can use information from the words


and illustrations to understand
informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Lesson 12

Discussion Skills: Chalk talk


about the Culture of Japan

I can effectively participate in a


conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)

I can answer text-dependent questions


about the customs of Japan using
evidence from the text.
I can effectively participate in a Chalk
Talk about Japans culture.
I can follow our class norms when I
participate in a conversation.
I can prepare for the conversation by
using evidence from informational text.

Mystery Letter anchor chart

Think-Pair-Share protocol

Mystery Letter anchor chart

Chalk Talk protocol

I can seek patterns about the topic being


discussed.

Lesson 13

Writing a Research-Based
Informational Paragraph: The
Culture of Japan

I can produce writing that is


appropriate to task and purpose (with
support). (W.3.4)

I can record details about Japans


customs and traditions on the Culture
Research matrix.

I can use the writing process to plan,


revise, and edit my writing (with
support). (W.3.4)

I can identify criteria for a strong


research-based informational
paragraph.

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can sort evidence into established
categories. (W.3.8)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

Culture Research Matric


anchor chart
Exploring Culture anchor
chart
Give One, Get One, Move
On (GoGoMo) protocol

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 14

Writing a Research-Based
Informational Paragraph: The
Culture of Japan, Continued

I can produce writing that is


appropriate to task and purpose (with
support). (W.3.4)

I can assist in creating a plan for a


research-based informational paragraph
about a custom or tradition of Japan
using a Paragraph Writing Accordion
graphic organizer.

I can use the writing process to plan,


revise, and edit my writing (with
support). (W.3.4)
I can express ideas using carefully
chosen words. (L.3.3a).

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Culture Research matric

Criteria for a ResearchBased Informational


Paragraph anchor chart

Paragraph Writing
Accordion graphic
organizer.

Culture research Matric


anchor chart

I can identify criteria for a strong


research-based informational
paragraph.
I can write sentences that are both
accurate and interesting.

Lesson 15

On-Demand Assessment:
Informational Paragraph on
Japans Culture

I can write an informative text that has


a clear topic. (W.3.2)

I can write an informative paragraph


about customs and traditions in Japan.

I can develop the topic with facts,


definitions and details. (W.3.2)

I can find specific information about


ancient Japanese culture in a literary
text.

I can construct a closing statement on


the topic of an informative text.
(W.3.2)
I can use spelling patterns to spell
words correctly. (L.3.2f)
I can express ideas using carefully
chosen words. (L.3.3)
I can use text features to location
information efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can answer questions using specific
details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific
details from informational text.
(RI.3.1)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

End of Unit 1 Assessment

I can use text features to locate


information about modern day Japan
efficiently.
I can write an opening sentence that
identifies my topic.
I can support my topic with accurate
details from text.
I can write a sentence to conclude my
paragraph.
I can use working and terms to help the
reader learn about a custom or tradition
of Japan.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Building Background Knowledge:
Learning about Culture through Literary and Informational Texts

Optional: Experts, Fieldwork, And Service


Experts:
Invite a guest speaker who has either lived in or spent significant time in Japan.
Invite an anthropologist who studies ancient and modern cultures to speak with the class.
Watch short video clips about the culture of Japan.
Fieldwork:
A local museum that has exhibits on Japanese culture could offer expanded opportunities for learning about Japans culture.
If there is a local Japanese cultural center, plan a visit to immerse students in the culture of Japan.
Service:
Many organizations support recovery efforts from the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami. Research organizations that may be appropriate for your students to
learn about.

Optional: Extensions
With a librarian or media specialist: Study of Japan through storybooks, poems, and other literature.
With a technology/media specialist: Explore Japans culture through searches on the computer (e.g., Web sites, online videos, maps, etc.).
Geography: Research the unique physical features of Japan. Research the different natural forces that affect Japan (e.g., volcanoes, earthquakes, typhoons, tsunamis,
etc.).

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: OVERVIEW


Readers Notes:
Dragon of the Red Dawn, Chapters 110
The calendar below shows reading that is due daily for Dragon of the Red Dawn.
Teachers can modify this document to include dates instead of lessons.
Students are responsible for reading chapters in class and at home.
Students will share what they have done in class through various protocols and recording forms.

Due at Lesson #

Chapters read or reviewed in class

Chapters read and recording form


completed for homework

Prologue, 12

Prologue, 12

4 and Capturing Key Details recording form

5 and Questions from Text recording form

Independent Reading recording form introduced

7 and Independent Reading recording form

7 (reviewed in class)

8 and Independent Reading recording form

10

8 (reviewed in class)

9 and Independent Reading recording form

11

9 (reviewed in class)

10 and Independent Reading recording form

12

10 (reviewed in class)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights


Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Overview June 2014

12

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1:


Recommended Texts
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: RECOMMENDED TEXTS

The list below includes texts with a range of Lexile text measures about the
people and culture of Japan. This provides appropriate independent reading for
each student to help build content knowledge about the topic. Note that districts
and schools should consider their own community standards when reviewing this
list. Some texts in particular units or modules address emotionally difficult content.
It is imperative that students read a high volume of texts at their reading level in
order to continue to build the academic vocabulary and fluency demanded by the
CCLS.

Where possible, texts in languages other than English are also provided. Texts are
categorized into three Lexile measures that correspond to Common Core Bands:
below grade band, within band, and above band. Note, however, that Lexile
measures are just one indicator of text complexity, and teachers must use their
professional judgment and consider qualitative factors as well. For more
information, see Appendix 1 of the Common Core State Standards.
Common Core Band Level Text Difficulty Ranges:
(As provided in the NYSED Passage Selection Guidelines for Assessing CCSS ELA)
Grades 23: 420820L
Grades 45: 7401010L

Title

Author and Illustrator

Text Type

Lexile Measure

Lexile text measures below band level (under 420L)


Night of the Ninjas

Mary Pope Osborne (author)

Literature

280

A Look at Japan

Helen Frost (author)

Informational

400*

My Japan

Etsuko Watanabe (author)

Informational

420*

The Boy from the Dragon Palace: A


Folktale from Japan

Margaret Read MacDonald (author)


Sachiko Yoshikawa (illustrator)

Literature

420*

*Lexile based on a conversion from Accelerated Reading level.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Recommended Texts June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: RECOMMENDED TEXTS

Title

Author and Illustrator

Text Type

Lexile Measure

Lexile text measures within band level (420820L)


Erika-San

Allen Say (author)

Literature

540

The Funny Little Woman

Arlene Mosel (author)


Blair Lent (illustrator)

Literature

570

Tsunami!

Kimiko Kajikawa (author)


Ed Young (illustrator)

Literature

620

Japan in Colors

Sara Louise Kras (author)

Informational

640

Japan

Thomas Streissguth (author)

Informational

640

Himeji Castle: Japans Samurai Past

Jacqueline A. Ball (author)

Informational

650

Cultural Traditions in Japan

Lynn Peppas (author)

Informational

740*

Thea Stilton and the Cherry Blossom


Adventure

Thea Stilton (author)

Literature

760

Crow Boy

Taro Yashima (author)

Literature

760

*Lexile based on a conversion from Accelerated Reading level.


Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Recommended Texts June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: RECOMMENDED TEXTS

Title

Author and Illustrator

Text Type

Lexile Measure

Lexile text measures above band level (over 820L)


Japanese Celebrations: Cherry
Blossoms, Lanterns and Stars!

Betty Reynolds (Author)

Informational

830*

Hachiko: The True Story of a Loyal


Dog

Pamela S. Turner (author)


Yan Nascimbene (illustrator)

Informational

830

K Is for Kabuki: A Japan Alphabet

Gloria Whelan and Jenny Nolan


(authors)
Oki S. Han (illustrator)

Informational

950*

Momotaro and the Island of Ogres: A


Japanese Folktale

Stephanie Wada (author)

Literature

970*

Recipe and Craft Guide to Japan

Juliet Mofford (author)

Informational

970*

Colors of Japan

Holly Littlefield (author)


Helen Byers (illustrator)

Informational

1010

Lexile is a trademark of MetaMetrics, Inc., and is registered in the United States and abroad. Copyright 2013 MetaMetrics
*Lexile based on a conversion from Accelerated Reading level.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1: Recommended Texts June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask and answer questions to deepen my understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can ask and answer questions to deepen my understanding of informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults (SL.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can talk with my partner or group to reflect and record what I notice and wonder about pictures and
text.

Students contributions to conversation norms

I can follow our class norms when I participate in a conversation.

Mystery Pictures and Excerpts: Personal Reflection


recording form

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Observation of discussions

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

This module opens in a similar way to Module 1, with a Carousel Brainstorm protocol. The Carousel
Brainstorm protocol is a simple way to engage students with new content, in this case components of
culture, by getting them up moving, thinking, and talking. In this lesson, students look at some images
to pique their curiosity. The images will need to pertain to world cultures from countries around the
world. Students also examine text excerpts from both literary and informational texts that pertain to the
culture of ancient Japan. Do not reveal what the images or excerpts are about.

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)


B. Practicing Observing Closely: I Notice/I Wonder (5
minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Carousel Protocol: Images of Culture (20 minutes)

Do not tell students the guiding questions for the module until the end of the lesson.

B. Debriefing the Carousel (20 minutes)

During this unit, students will use a variety of recording forms to respond to their reading and develop
vocabulary. Consider developing a workable organization system to help students keep track of their
materials; a folder, binder, or notebook could be used for this purpose (see the Module Overview,
Preparation and Materials section).

3. Closing and Assessment


A. Student Written Reflection (5 minutes)
B. Debrief (8 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Tell an adult you know about the photographs you
saw and the text excerpts you read. What will you
learn about in the coming weeks?

In Work Time A, as students have conversations about what they notice and wonder, use the
Conversation Criteria checklist to assess their ability to follow the conversation norms. Adapt this
checklist to suit your personal preferences. Before the lesson, review the targeted conversation norms to
assess students ability to engage effectively in collaborative discussions.
In advance:
Locate seven photographs/illustrations to use for the lesson (one for modeling, six for the carousel).
Of the six photographs for the carousel, try to find images that show customs and traditions from
around the world. The photographs/illustrations could come from magazines or an internet search.
They can be of any country you choose. These pictures are intended to arouse curiosity and serve as a
mystery for the forthcoming study of culture. Note: The pictures do not need to match the excerpts.
Do not reveal what the photographs/illustrations are about, or tell students the guiding questions for
the module.
Post 12 Carousel Station charts around the room (see sample in supporting materials). Six of the
charts will each have one of the photographs/illustrations, with the phrase What I Notice/What I
Wonder written below the photo/image. Six additional charts will each have one of the excerpts,
with the phrase What I Notice/What I Wonder written below the excerpt. There will be 12 charts
total. See sample in supporting materials.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture

Agenda

Teaching Notes (continued)


Post Class Norms for Discussion anchor chart (from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 4) or create a new
chart. During this lesson, students identify norms for a quality classroom conversation (e.g., everyone
gets a chance to speak, students ask questions of one another to extend conversation, etc.).
Review: Think-Pair-Share and Carousel Brainstorm protocols (see Appendix).

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

notice, wonder, reflect, norms, record,


details, excerpt

Class Norms for Discussion anchor chart (from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 4; one to display)
Document camera
Photograph/illustration for modeling (one for modeling in Opening B; see Teaching Notes)
What I Notice/What I Wonder T-chart (new; co-created with students; see Opening B)
Mystery text excerpt for Opening B (one to display)
Carousel Station charts (12 total; see Teaching Notes and sample in supporting materials)
Markers (one per group of four students; ideally a different color for each group)
Conversation Criteria checklist (from Module 1; provided again here for ease of reference; one for teacher reference)
Mystery Pictures and Excerpts: Personal Reflection recording form (one per student)
Guiding Questions anchor chart (new; teacher-created)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)


Congratulate students on their successful completion of Module 1. They learned a lot and took great strides to become better
readers and writers. Tell students its time to move on to the next module.

Provide an illustrated anchor chart


of question words (e.g., a clock for
when) to assist students needing
additional support with learning the
structures needed to ask questions.

Orient students to todays learning targets. Circle the key terms notice and wonder. Ask students to talk with a partner about
what these words mean. Ask a few volunteers to share out to check for understanding.
Review the Class Norms for Discussion anchor chart (from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 4).
Remind students that these are targets they have worked with before. Today they will practice with different pictures, in
addition to text excerpts, as they begin their new topic of study as readers and writers. Tell students that they will try to solve
a mystery today by looking at pictures and reading excerpts from text. As they are looking, reading, and discussing with
peers, their job is to try to figure out what they will study in this module based on the details they see in the pictures and text
excerpts. Briefly define excerpt in this context: a short part of a book.

Consider providing nonlinguistic


symbols (e.g., a question mark over
a students head for ask questions,
or a magnifying glass over a picture
for find) to assist ELLs in making
connections with vocabulary. These
symbols can be used throughout the
year with posted targets.
Some students may need other basic
vocabulary words clarified:
question, conversation, excerpt,
mystery.

B. Practicing Observing Closely: I Notice/I Wonder (5 minutes)


Gather students whole group. Do not tell students the topic of the module. Present it as a mystery for them to puzzle
through.
Place students in pairs or ask them to identify a person close to them with whom they can think and talk.
Using a document camera, display one photograph/illustration for modeling, similar to the ones they will see
during the Carousel Brainstorm protocol in Work Time.
Briefly review the I Notice/I Wonder process with students (which they should be familiar with from Module 1). For What I
Notice, tell students: When we look at a picture, or a book, we notice details. Ask students to identify the meaning of the
word details. Ask:

* What details do you notice about this picture? For example, when I look at this picture, I notice [discuss a detail from
picture] but it also makes me wonder [insert a question].

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Emphasize the importance of referring directly to what they see in the picture to help students continue to understand the
importance of evidence.
Co-create a What I Notice/What I Wonder T-chart. Use Think-Pair-Share protocol. Give students about 30 seconds to
think, and then ask them to share with a partner what they noticed. Invite a few volunteers to share with the class the ideas
that their partner had. As students share, record their ideas in the What I Notice column on the T-chart.
For What I Wonder, ask students now to think of and then share with a partner questions they had about the picture.
Record the questions students generate in the What I Wonder column. Use this opportunity to reinforce how to format a
question using correct ending punctuation.
Display the mystery text excerpt for Opening B:
The Japanese bow when they greet each other. A bow can also mean thank you or I beg your pardon.
A small group of people, called the Ainu, is native to Japan. Their ancestors are thought to be the first people to live in
Japan. Most Ainu live on the island of Hokkaido. They fish and grow food in the same way as their ancestors.
Use the Think-Pair-Share protocol. Give students about 30 seconds to think, and then ask them to share with a partner what
they noticed about the excerpt. Invite a few volunteers to share with the class the ideas that their partner had. Using the
same T-chart, record students ideas in the What I Notice column of the T-chart.
For What I Wonder, ask students now to think of and then share with a partner questions they had about the excerpt.
Record the questions students generate in the What I Wonder column.
Note: It is important that students have this supported experience of noticing and wondering about images and text before
heading into the carousel. This is the first time excerpts are used with the I Notice/I Wonder carousel.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Carousel Protocol: Images of Culture (20 minutes)

ELLs can write notices in their


native language if they dont know a
word in English. For students
needing additional support, notices
can also be drawn, circled, or
marked with a sticky note on the
pictures.

Be sure to have set up 12 Carousel Station charts spread around the classroom:

The six photographs/illustrations with a T-chart with the phrase What I Notice/What I Wonder written below
The six text excerpt charts with a T-chart with the phrase What I Notice/What I Wonder written below (see sample in
supporting materials)
Do not tell students the topic of the module or what the pictures or excerpts are about. Present this as a mystery for them to
puzzle through and wonder about.
Tell students that they will be using Carousel Brainstorm protocol and remind them of their experience with this protocol in
Module 1. Explain that there are charts set up around the classroom. Each station has a photograph or image, or a text
excerpt chart. All charts have What I Notice/What I Wonder written on them to record students thinking.

For students needing additional


support to complete multistep
directions, provide a step-by-step
visual of the protocol.

Tell students that they will continue to become great readers during this study, encountering both literary and informational
texts. On the excerpt charts, they will find excerpts from both informational and literary text.
Remind students: When we look at a picture or read from a book, we notice details. Ask students to identify the meaning of
the word details. Emphasize the importance of referring directly to what they see in the picture or read in the excerpt to
help students continue to understand the importance of evidence, and explain that they will write these details in the What I
Notice column of the T-chart.
Remind students that when they wonder, they ask questions based on the details they see in the image or read in the
excerpt. They will write these questions in the What I Wonder column of the T-chart. Use this opportunity to reinforce how
to format a question using correct word order and ending punctuation.
Ask each pair of students to join another pair to form groups of four.
Briefly review expectations with students about this protocol: taking turns, making sure everyone gets to write, etc. Remind
students about good conversational norms. Refer back to the work started in Module 1 with the Class Norms for Discussion
anchor chart. Tell students that as they are working, you will be watching them and listening to their conversations, and that
you will be taking notes about what you see and hear.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Each group of four will begin at a different station for the carousel. Give students directions:

When reviewing the graphic


organizers or recording forms,
consider using a document camera
to visually display the document for
students who struggle with auditory
processing.

1. Look carefully at the photograph or carefully read the excerpt.


2. Talk with your group about details you notice in the photograph or details within the excerpt.
3. Talk with your group about the questions you wonder about related to the photograph or excerpt.
4. Then, after you talk, use your marker to add to the chart in the same way you practiced as a class.

Providing models of expected work


supports all learners but especially
supports challenged learners.

5. Remember to use question words for your wonderings: who, what, when, where, why, and how.
Ask students if they have any clarifying questions about the task. Answer questions as needed.
Start each group of four at one of the stations. Distribute one marker to each group.
While students are working, circulate and use the Conversation Criteria checklist to assess how well students are
following the conversation norms. Every 2 or 3 minutes, students rotate to a new station. Use the transition points to briefly
reinforce the steps of the task. Gauge the time based on discussions groups are having.
After students have completed a couple of the stations, take the opportunity to stop and praise them on their conversation
skills, and remind them of expectations if necessary.
Time permitting, repeat until students have interacted with each photograph and excerpt.
Note: It is important to end Work Time A after 20 minutes to allow for sufficient time to debrief the carousel. If students do
not get to all charts, leave the charts up for students to visit at other times during the day.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Debriefing the Carousel (20 minutes)

If its not possible for students to


visit all stations for the debrief,
given the physical limitations of the
classroom, make sure to have all
station materials with you in the
whole-group area for the debrief.

Gather students whole group to debrief the carousel. Since each station had a photograph or excerpt, and a T-chart, consider
debriefing the carousel by traveling as a class to each station.
As you debrief each station, ask students to take a few moments to reflect on whats written on the T-chart. Then ask a
handful of students to share out what they noticed and wondered.
Focus heavily on what students noticed about each of the images and excerpts. Be purposeful about leading students to state
that the photographs are showing things that seem to be in different places around the world. Students may be familiar with
the Magic Tree House series and may notice the names Jack and Annie. Confirm that there were some excerpts from a
Magic Tree House book, but dont say which one.
If necessary, make summary statements about the excerpts. For example: With Excerpt 1, it seems as though were getting
an idea about behaviors that we see from people living in China or Japan since the text says theyre using chopsticks.
As you move the discussion to each new station, a key instructional move will be to help students look for patterns on the Tcharts. If you are physically traveling from station to station, take the T-charts with you and encourage students to look for
patterns on the T-charts.
If they are not already assembled, gather students whole group in the normal meeting area of the classroom. Push students
to connect the carousel text excerpts and images. Ask:

* How does what you see in the photographs connect to what you read in the excerpts?
Think-Pair-Share: Invite students to discuss what the big themes or ideas of this module might be. Model as needed. (For
example: I see many _____, so I think we might be learning about _____.)
Students may want to say that the theme or idea of the module is about Japan. If students try to connect Japan to the
modules theme, point out that none of the seven photographs were just about Japan. This should refocus their thinking.
Invite volunteers to share out their ideas. Accept a range of answers that students can support based on what they saw,
discussed, and read today. Probe with statements such as: Why do you think that? or How does that fit with what you saw
in the pictures and read in the text excerpts? Remind students that their ideas have to take both the photographs and the
excerpts into consideration. This is a good opportunity to emphasize the importance of providing evidence, which will be
reinforced throughout the module.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1


Observing, Reading, and Talking with Peers:
A Carousel of Photos and Texts about Culture

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Student Written Reflection (5 minutes)


Distribute the Mystery Pictures and Excerpts: Personal Reflection recording form to students. Go over the
directions and invite students to write about their thinking.
B. Debrief (8 minutes)
Gather students whole group. Display the Guiding Questions anchor chart. Share the first guiding question for the
module:

* What defines culture?

Posting sentence frames can assist


ELLs and other students needing
additional support in contributing
to classroom discussions.

Explain that the images and text students examined today are all examples of the culture of different places. Ask: Based
on your observations, what might the term culture mean?
Note: It is important that you do not define the term culture for students at this point. Lessons 2 and 3 take students on a
close read of an informational article about culture. That is when they will begin to learn what this term means.
Explain that the class will be doing some work in the next two lessons that will help them understand what the word means,
and also what the guiding question means.
Share with students that they will return to this question often during the next few weeks. Tell students that they will also
learn about how authors share knowledge on a topic through research. Briefly discuss the word research with students and
show the other guiding questions for the module:

* How do authors conduct research and build knowledge to inform their writing?
* How can authors share knowledge on a topic gained through research?
Post these guiding questions somewhere prominent in the classroom.
Mention to students that they will be reading a lot about different countries and cultures as a class. Point out that they also
have opportunities to build their expertise by reading even more books on their own.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Tell an adult you know about the photographs you saw and the text excerpts you read. What will you learn about in the
coming weeks?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 1


Supporting Materials
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1

Mystery Text Excerpt for Opening B


The Japanese bow when they greet each other. A bow can also mean thank you
or I beg your pardon.
A small group of people, called the Ainu, is native to Japan. Their ancestors are thought to be the first
people to live in Japan. Most Ainu live on the island of Hokkaido. They fish and grow food in the same
way as their ancestors.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights


Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1

Mystery Text Excerpts for Carousel Stations


Teacher Directions: Do not identify the texts that each excerpt is taken from. The source is listed here
for teacher reference only.
Station 1
(from page 38, Dragons of the Red Dawn)
At the entrance, Basho slipped off his sandals. Jack and Annie did the same.
They placed their sandals in a row of shoes that other people had left by the
door.
Inside the teahouse, cooks stirred steaming pots over a wood-burning stove.
People sat at long low tables, eating with chopsticks and drinking from small
cups. Several customers smiled shyly and bowed before Basho.
Station 2
(from page 15, Exploring Countries: Japan)
In the countryside, people live in wooden homes on farms or in small towns.
Most homes have at least one room styled in the Japanese tradition. Straw mats
called tatami cover the floor. People sit on cushions and sleep on thick pads
called futons.
Station 3
(from page 26, Exploring Countries: Japan)
The arts have been an important part of life in Japan for hundreds of years.
People enjoy going to a traditional theater. They see puppet plays set to music,
called bunraku. Kabuki features lively actors in colorful costumes and makeup.
The actors dance and perform the same way ancestors did hundreds of years
ago.

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Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1

Mystery Text Excerpts for Carousel Stations


Station 4
(from pages 4445, Dragons of the Red Dawn)
A large ring had been marked off on the ground with straw. In the middle of the
circle, two enormously fat men squatted at opposite sides of the ring. Each man
looked as if he weighed more than four hundred pounds. They clapped their
hands. They each began stomping his feet.
Who are they? said Annie, her eyes wide.
Station 5
(from page 23, Exploring Countries: Japan)
Before eating, Japanese people say the word itadakimasu. It means I receive
this food. It is a way to thank the person who cooked the meal.
Station 6
(from page 95, Dragons of the Red Dawn)
Thanks, said Jack.
Good-bye, said Annie.
They both bowed to Basho.
Basho bowed to them. Then the great poet turned and left them. Falling cherry
blossoms floated on the wind as he walked away.

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Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1

Carousel Station Chart


(Sample, for Teacher Reference)
Image or Excerpt here:

What I Notice

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Reserved.

What I Wonder

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1

Conversation Criteria Checklist


(Repeated from Module 1 for teacher use; adapt to suit personal preferences.)
Learning Targets:
I can follow our class norms when I participate in a conversation.
I can speak with complete sentences when I participate in group discussions.
(Teachers: Please insert the conversation norms from class to assess students ability to engage effectively in collaborative
discussions. Code responses based on the setting in which the criteria is observed. For example: P = Partner, G = Small Group, C
= Whole Class)
Student Name

Complete
Sentences

Norm 1

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Reserved.

Norm 2

Norm 3

Norm 4

Norm 5

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1

Mystery Pictures and Excerpts: Personal Reflection Recording Form

Name:
Date:
Based on the photographs you saw, the excerpts you read, and the discussions you had with your
peers, what do you think you will be learning about in this module? Use evidence from your work to
support your thinking.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 1

Guiding Questions Anchor Chart

What defines culture?


How do authors conduct research and build knowledge to inform their writing?
How can authors share knowledge on a topic gained through research?

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L1 June 2014

17

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 2


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 1
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 1

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can determine the main idea of an informational text. (RI.3.2)
I can retell key ideas from an informational text. (RI.3.2)
I can use information from the words and illustrations (photographs, captions) to understand informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can identify the main idea of the article Discovering Culture by reading the text closely.

Observations of partner discussions

I can list key details in the text that support the main idea.

Close Reading as Researchers (Main Ideas and Details)


recording form

I can explain how information in the words and illustrations help me understand the concept of culture.
I can discuss how the main ideas in this article are conveyed through key details.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 1

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

In this lesson, students are introduced to the concept of culture. They embark on a two-day study of this
concept by doing a close reading of the selected informational text about culture For the purposes of this
module, students are focusing on finding evidence of culture through customs and traditions. Students
are working not to define what culture is, but to find evidence of it. In Units 1 and 2, students learn
about culture through both literary and informational texts. In both units, students are looking for
customs and traditions.

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)


B. Engaging the Reader: What Is Culture? (5 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Rereading on Your Own: Capturing the Gist (20
minutes)
B. Reading Again for Important Details: Discovering
Culture (20 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Debrief: Building an Understanding of Culture (6
minutes)
B. Revisiting Learning Targets (4 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Reread Discovering Culture

Customs: A custom is an accepted way of doing something or an accepted way of behaving that is special
to a certain group, a certain place, or a certain time. It is something done regularly.
Traditions: A tradition is a behavior or action that has been handed down from a previous generation.
There are many different types of traditions, including family and religious traditions.
As noted in the Module Overview, this module is designed to connect with social studies topics. It does
not fully address the social studies standards, which merit much deeper study during social studies
time.
Completion of the Close Reading as Researchers: Main Ideas and Details recording form may prove
challenging for students. Be ready to provide additional support for students who struggle. They use this
form throughout the module, and will build confidence over time.
Throughout this module, students again discuss their reading in groups. Use purposeful grouping, and
consider whether to continue with the same groups as Module 1 or to change them.
It is an expectation that teachers have a clear and purposeful system in place for students to be engaged
in independent reading on a consistent and regular basis. As in Module 1, students are encouraged to
read additional texts on this topic from the Recommended Texts list (review this in advance) or other
books that fit the content of the module from public, school, classroom, or home libraries. There is not
time allocated in this lesson to introduce students to some of these books; this activity should be done
during another part of the school day as early in Unit 1 as possible.
In advance:
Review: Think-Pair-Share protocol and Helping Students Read Closely (see Appendix).
Review: Cold call and Fist to Five in Checking for Understanding Techniques (see Appendix).

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 1

Agenda

Teaching Notes (continued)


Prepare the Close Reading as Researchers: Main Idea and Details anchor chart (for Discovering
Culture) (an enlarged version of the student recording form with this same name; see supporting
materials).
Post: Learning targets.

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

culture, generation, custom, tradition,


fact, definition

Discovering Culture (article; one per student)

(Note: These words will be explicitly


addressed in Lesson 3, when students
begin their work with vocabulary.)

Document camera
Close Reading as Researchers: Main Ideas and Details recording form (for Discovering Culture) (one per student)
Things Close Readers Do anchor chart (from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2; or see supporting materials)
Sticky notes (one pack per student; see Work Time A )
Conversation Criteria checklist (from Lesson 1; for teacher use)
Close Reading as Researchers: Main Idea and Details anchor chart (for Discovering Culture) (new; teacher-created; see
Teaching Notes)
Photographs/illustrations (from Lesson 1 Carousel Brainstorm protocol; see Closing A)
Mystery text excerpts (from Lesson 1 Carousel Brainstorm protocol; see Closing A)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 1

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)


Read each target individually with students. Explain that these targets should seem familiar since they worked with
informational text when they read My Librarian is a Camel in Module 1.

When introducing new vocabulary,


consider having the words written
on index cards. Show the card to
students when talking about the
word. Then post the word on a word
wall. This supports visual learners.

Give students time to think, then cold call a student to explain what a main idea is. Cold call another student to explain what
a key detail is.
Note: As stated in Lesson 1, do not define culture for students at this time. The purpose of the close reading in this lesson and
Lesson 3 is for students to build their understanding of this important term on their own using the text.
B. Engaging the Reader: What Is Culture? (5 minutes)
Gather students whole group. Tell students that today they are going to read a text that will help them begin to understand
culture and the aspects that show evidence of it. Explain that they will be reading literary and informational texts, and they
will need to be able to recognize when an author includes information about a countrys culture within a story or article.
Note: It is important that this text is read fluently and without interruption to acquaint students with the text. As with other
read-alouds in this unit, ask students to follow along on their copy of the text.
Distribute the Discovering Culture article. Using a document camera, display a copy for students to see. Read aloud
slowly, fluently, and without interruption. If students want to talk or ask questions about the text, remind them: Just like
the books and texts we have read before, you will have a chance to reread this article and talk about it later in the lesson and
tomorrow as well.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

When reading aloud, encourage


students to use strategies such as
whisper reading to follow along. Ask
students to track with their finger
and whisper read as you read aloud.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 1

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Rereading on Your Own: Capturing the Gist (20 minutes)


Distribute the Close Reading as Researchers (Main Ideas and Details) recording form (for Discovering
Culture). Orient students to this recording form as needed. Point out that like the forms they used during Module 1, the
purpose of this type of recording form is to help students take notes and focus on important ideas and details within
informational text.

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to visually display
the document for students who
struggle with auditory processing.

Remind students of the close reading routines they built in Module 1 and briefly display the Things Close Readers Do
anchor chart.

To support ELL learners and


struggling readers, consider creating
a chart that represents the reading
routine pictorially along with key
phrases.

Read, think, and jot notes on my own.


Talk with my group about the text.
Write notes or answer questions about the text.
Give students 10 minutes to reread the text on their own. Circulate and support students as they read. Tell students that as
they read, they should underline words that they dont know and they should stop after each paragraph to record the gist of
the section they just read.
As you circulate around the room, remind students to capture unfamiliar words on sticky notes or by underlining them in
the text.
After students have read for 10 minutes, stop them in their work. (Its fine if they did not finish, since they will continue to
reread and discuss throughout the lesson.)
Place students in groups. If needed, remind students of the criteria for a quality conversation. Then give students 5 minutes
in their groups to discuss what they wrote and marked. Consider posing questions such as: Do you have similar words
underlined? or Did you capture a similar gist? As students work in their discussion groups, continue gathering data on the
Conversation Criteria checklist.
After the discussion, ask students to take 3 to 5 minutes to fill in the top box on their Close Reading as Researchers (Main
Ideas and Details) recording form (for Discovering Culture) about the main idea of this article. Students should not work
on the two detail boxes at this time.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

During this Work Time, you may


want to pull a small group of
students to support in finding
evidence from Discovering
Culture. Some students will need
more guided practice before they
are ready for independent work.
Consider providing smaller chunks
of the text for ELLs. Teachers can
check in on students thinking as
they write or speak about their text.
Consider providing an alternate
version of the article that has
writing space directly after each
paragraph for students to record the
gist.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 1

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Reading Again for Important Details: Discovering Culture (20 minutes)


Gather students whole group. Direct their attention to the Close Reading as Researchers: Main Ideas and Details
anchor chart (for Discovering Culture).

To support struggling students with


vocabulary acquisition, consider
providing these learners with index
cards with the word or phrase on
one side and the definition on the
other. Work with these words from
time to time at other ELA parts of
the school day.

Invite a few students to share what they wrote in the top box of their recording form (their thinking about the main idea).
Point out to students that they need to learn everything they can about culture because this will help them read and
understand both the literary and informational texts in this module. Explain that they should always try to gather as many
facts, definitions, and details as they can while they read. Clarify these terms as needed.
If needed, do a brief guided practice. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share about a detail they noticed in the first two
paragraphs that seemed important and why. Listen for students to share details such as: Culture is passed down from one
generation to the next.
Tell students that they will now read the article again, this time focusing on the details within the text.
Give students 1013 minutes to reread the text on their own, writing down key details on their recording form. Tell them to
wait to answer the question at the bottom.
After 15 minutes, invite students to briefly discuss with their groups:

* What key details from the text and illustrations seemed to support the main idea?
* Has your thinking about the main idea changed?
Remind students that this kind of reading is what helped them build their expertise in reading about superheroes in Module
1. Encourage all students to share details.
Give students 5 minutes in their groups to discuss what they wrote. As students are in their discussion groups, continue
gathering data on the Conversation Criteria checklist.
Direct students attention to the Close Reading as Researchers: Main Ideas and Details anchor chart (for Discovering
Culture). Have students share out details they found and document them on the anchor chart.
Orient students to the question at the bottom of the recording form. Ask them to take 2 minutes to write their answer to this
question:

* What is culture?
Note: Students will have multiple opportunities to revisit this question and refine their thinking. Students will work with the
Discovering Culture text again in Lesson 3. Either hold on to their articles or have students file them.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Consider partnering an ELL with a


student who speaks the same
language when discussion of
complex content is required. This
allows students to have more
meaningful discussions and clarify
points in their own language.
Encourage partners to employ
strategies like whisper reading.
Sitting with a partner, students
move their hands over the text as
they read and whisper the words
together. This way, you can visually
track the progress of all the
students, and the students can
support each other.
Providing models of expected work,
by doing the first two paragraphs as
guided practice, supports all
students but especially supports
challenged learners.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 1

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Debrief: Building an Understanding of Culture (6 minutes)


Gather students whole group. Give students specific positive feedback for their efforts today reading and learning from a
challenging text. Remind students about the article they read today and ask them to think of what they have learned so far
about culture.

For students needing additional


support producing language,
consider offering a sentence frame,
sentence starter, or a cloze sentence
to assist with language production
and provide structure.

Display some of the photographs/illustrations from the Carousel Brainstorm protocol in Lesson 1, as well as some of the
mystery text excerpts. Give students a few moments to look over the photographs and excerpts on display. Then ask:

* Why do you think these images and excerpts were chosen as examples of culture?
Have students do a quick Think-Pair-Share. Give them time to talk and then cold call one or two students to share out. At
this point, its okay for students to have responses that may lack depth or sophistication since this is a difficult concept.

Consider allowing students to draw


their observations, ideas, or notes
when appropriate. This lets ELLs
participate in a meaningful way.

Repeat the Think-Pair-Share and cold call with the question:

* What is a specific example of culture?


Students answers may refer to either the article or the images and excerpts from Lesson 1.
Invite students to assist in completing the Close Reading as Researchers: Main Idea and Details anchor chart (for
Discovering Culture). Focus on the question at the bottom: What is culture? Call on a few volunteers and document their
thinking on the anchor chart.
Remind students that knowing about and understanding culture is going to be really useful as they begin reading literary
and informational texts about different countries. Build up the excitement about the new learning experience they are about
to embark on.
Collect students Close Reading as Researchers: Main Ideas and Details recording forms. Review these as an informal
assessment. If research folders were created, put these recording forms in their folders after a quick review.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 1

Closing and Assessment (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Revisiting Learning Targets (4 minutes)


Display todays learning targets. Direct students to read the targets to themselves silently. Use Fist to Five as a check for
success with each target individually.

Monitor students responses during


Closing and Assessment B and note
target(s) that seemed to be a
sticking point for students. Clarify
the meaning of each target as
needed to ensure that the wording
of the target was clear. Make sure to
check in with students who indicate
lack of success with the targets at
another point in the school day.

Ask students to think about todays lesson and all the work they did. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share: What was most
helpful to you today as a learner in meeting your learning targets?

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Reread Discovering Culture.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 2


Supporting Materials
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2

Discovering Culture
Culture refers to a groups way of life, or how they do things. The culture of a community is the way of
life for a group that has been passed from one generation to the next.
Every community in the world has a culture. Culture is reflected in how a communitya group of
peoplehas lived in the past and how they live now. It is a collection of many things like the members
of the community, languages spoken, customs and traditions, and religious beliefs and practices.
These are preserved in the present, and given to future generations. From ancient civilizations to the
present, there are ways to discover what a group of people believe in, what they value as important,
and how they live their lives.
A custom is an accepted way of doing something or an accepted way of behaving that is special to a
certain group, a certain place, or a certain time. It is something done regularly. Customs are one way
to learn about a communitys culture. For example, in America when people meet for the first time, it
is a custom to shake right hands firmly, make eye contact, and introduce yourself. It is also a custom
in the United States to stand, face the flag, and place your right hand over your heart when the
Pledge of Allegiance is recited. Some cultures have customs that are special ways of celebrating
birthdays or specific ways to greet each other.

English tradition of dancing around the


maypole

Pledge of Allegiance

Fireworks on the
Fourth of July

Photo credits:
Copyright Paul Barnett and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence
USDA.gov http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 2nd Class Mark O'Donald. Public Domain

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2

Discovering Culture
A tradition is a behavior or action that has been handed down from a previous generation. There are
many different types of traditions. Examples include family traditions, social traditions, patriotic
traditions, and religious traditions. The traditions of a group or community can tell a lot about their
culture. Traditions can often relate to the way a holiday is celebrated. For example, May Day is a
spring holiday celebrated in many countries in the northern hemisphere, and one May Day tradition
is to dance in costume around a Maypole. The Matabele women in Zimbabwe, Africa, are known for
their detailed beadwork. It is a tradition for this skill to be passed from generation to generation, and
it helps them make a living.
Customs and traditions are some ways to find evidence of a communitys culture. Each of these
captures part of the story that allows us to know what a group of people believes in, what they value
as important, and how they live their lives.
Glossary
culture:

the way of life for a group that has been passed from one generation to the next

custom:

a common practice followed by people in a group; a way of doing something that is


repeated

generation all the people living at the same time or of approximately the same age
tradition:

a behavior or action handed down from a previous generation

Discovering Culture
Written by Expeditionary Learning for Instructional Purposes

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2

Close Reading as Researchers: Main Idea and Details Recording Form


(for Discovering Culture)
Main idea of the text

Key details from the text that help me understand the main idea

Key details from the illustrations that help me understand the main idea

Revisiting the main idea: What is culture?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2

Close Reading as Researchers: Main Idea and Details Recording Form


(for Discovering Culture)
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Main idea of the text
Culture is about how people live and whats important to them. Culture is passed down
from one generation to the next. There are many things that are part of a communitys
culture.
Key details from the text that help me understand the main idea
Customs are one way to discover culture. Customs are an accepted way to act or
behave. Yodeling is one example of the Swiss culture. Traditions are another way to
discover culture. Traditions are repeated over time. A tradition like celebrating May
Day is an example of a communitys culture.
Key details from the illustrations that help me understand the main idea
Custom: yodeling
Traditions: dancing in around the maypole, fireworks on the Fourth of July
Revisiting the main idea: What is culture?
Culture is about what a group of people believe in and feel is important to them. There
are many things that show what a country or groups culture is. Cultural heritage is
passed down from one generation to the next.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 2

Things Close Readers Do Anchor Chart


(If the Module 1 anchor chart no longer exists, create a new anchor chart with the following points,
along with any other strategies you want your students to consistently use.)
We reread the text multiple times.
We reread first for gist.
Then we identify unfamiliar words.
Then we think about the main idea and details.
We read again to answer the questions.
We ask ourselves question

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L2 June 2014

14

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 3


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 2
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 2

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask questions to deepen my understanding of informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific details from informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can determine the meaning of unknown words in informational text. (RI.3.4)
I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases. (L.3.4)
I can use resource materials (glossaries and dictionaries) to help me determine the meaning of key words and phrases. (L.3.4d)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can answer questions using specific details from Discovering Culture.

Questions from the Text: Discovering Culture

I can choose specific details to answer questions about the text.

Word Tracker recording form

I can define the social studies concept of culture.


I can determine the meaning of key words related to culture using a glossary or dictionary.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 2

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

This is the second of two lessons focusing on a close read of the informational text Discovering
Culture. Students continue to work with the concept of culture and finding evidence of it. The goal of
this lesson is to help students develop a firmer grasp on the challenging concept of culture, with an
understanding of what defines culture. This aligns directly with the guiding questions for the module.

A. Engaging the Reader: Things Close Readers Do (3


minutes)
B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Answering Text-Dependent Questions (30 minutes)
B. Introducing Word Trackers (20 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. 3-2-1 Exit Ticket (4 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Complete Questions from the Text Discovering
Culture
B. Share Words from your Word Tracker with someone
at home.

As in Lesson 2, students discuss the text in groups. Consider keeping the same groupings for the whole
unit to allow students to build a rapport and a productive working relationship.
The purpose of the vocabulary work in this lesson is to encourage students to carefully attend to words.
While it is important to give students opportunities to practice finding the meaning of words in context,
there are times when they need to navigate through a glossary or dictionary to know the meaning of a
word (L.3.4d). It is not necessary for students to memorize these words, nor is there a need to quiz
them, but students do need to have a deeper awareness of words they dont know and strategies to help
them find the meaning of any unknown words.
Consider creating an Interactive Word Wall so students can refer to these words throughout the unit.
Be sure to limit Work Time A to 30 minutes so there is enough time to for Work Time B, which
establishes a new vocabulary routine. Students homework includes time for them to finish Questions
from the Text: Discovering Culture (begun in Work Time A).
In advance:

Prepare the Word Tracker anchor chart (an enlarged version of the student recording form with this
same name; see supporting materials).

Review: Think-Pair-Share protocol and Helping Students Read Closely (see Appendix).
Review: Cold call in Checking for Understanding Techniques (see Appendix).

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 2

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

glossary, definition, culture,


generation, custom, tradition

Document camera
Things Close Readers Do anchor chart (from Lesson 2; one to display)
Close Readers as Researchers: Main Idea and Details anchor chart (for Discovering Culture) (from Lesson 2; one to
display)
Discovering Culture (from Lesson 2; one per student)
Close Reading as Researchers: Main Idea and Details recording form (for Discovering Culture) (from Lesson 2; one per
student)
Questions from the Text: Discovering Culture (one per student)
Word Tracker recording form (one per student)
Word Tracker anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
Dictionaries (preferably one per student, but at least one per pair)
3-2-1 Exit Ticket (one per student)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 2

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Things Close Readers Do (3 minutes)


Gather students whole group. Using a document camera, display the Things Close Readers Do anchor chart. Ask
students to read the chart aloud with you.

Using total participation techniques


such as cold call or equity sticks
encourages a wider range of voices
in whole class shares.

Invite students to look at the anchor chart and reflect back on the work they did in Lesson 2. Invite students to think and
then talk with a partner:

* Where are we in terms of reading this text closely?


Then cold call a few students to share out their thinking. Listen for them to notice that they have read for gist and are ready
to reread and answer questions. Emphasize that close reading is not a formulaic set of steps.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)


Orient students to the learning targets:

* I can answer questions using specific details from Discovering Culture.


* I can choose specific details to answer questions about the text.
* I can define the social studies concept of culture.
* I can determine the meaning of key words related to culture using a glossary or dictionary.
Invite students to think and share with a partner about possible definitions of culture. Tell students that their hard work in
Lesson 2 has helped them have a clearer understanding of what culture is and how to find evidence of it.
Tell students: Today we will continue to work with the informational text Discovering Culture to complete our close
reading cycle and learn more about culture.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 2

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Answering Text-Dependent Questions (30 minutes)


Direct students to the posted Close Reading as Researchers: Main Ideas and Details anchor chart (for
Discovering Culture) that they created in Lesson 2.

Consider allowing students to draw


their answers to questions when
appropriate. This allows all students
to participate in a meaningful way.

Remind students that they have already heard or read this text four times: the read-aloud for enjoyment and to get the flow
of the passage, once on their own and with groups to get the gist and find unfamiliar vocabulary, on their own and with
groups to find and record important details and think about the meaning of culture, and then a fourth time for homework.
Redistribute or ask students to locate their article Discovering Culture as well as their Close Reading as
Researchers: Main Idea and Details recording form (for Discovering Culture) (from Lesson 2).
Distribute Questions from the Text: Discovering Culture. Review with students the process they went through to
answer questions about other texts they have read this year.

First, read the questions.


Then, read the entire text again, keeping the questions in mind.
When you find details that could be used as evidence to answer a question, underline that sentence or section of the text.
Talk about your answers before writing complete sentences.
If needed, ask for students to explain why each of the steps is needed. Review the word evidence with the class: something
we use to prove an idea we have.
Give students 10 minutes to reread the text on their own. Circulate and support students in finding evidence. Students
should be encouraged to underline the evidence they find and notate which question the evidence can be used to answer by
jotting the questions number in the margin.
After 10 minutes, place students in groups. Then ask students to take 5 minutes to discuss with their group the evidence they
found for each question. They dont need to write their answers down yet.
Direct students to write their answers to the questions from the text independently. Give students time to write their
answers. If needed, briefly review how to write answers using a full sentence. (The first half of the sentence is pulled directly
from the question. The second half of the sentence is the evidence found in the text.) Invite a volunteer to model if needed.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Consider writing and displaying


steps to answering text-dependent
questions and use nonlinguistic
symbols to match each step.
Students can return to steps to
make sure they are on track.
During this Work Time, you may
want to pull a small group of
students to support in finding
evidence from the article
Discovering Culture. Some
students will need more guided
practice before they are ready for
independent work.
Some students may benefit from
receiving direct support to answer
the text-dependent questions.
Consider allowing these students to
address one question at a time.
Read the question, look for and
underline evidence, and then
answer the question.
Oral rehearsal is another technique
that may benefit struggling students
in answering the text-dependent
questions.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 2

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

After about 10 minutes, stop students in their work. They will get to finish their answers for homework.

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to visually display
the document for students who
struggle with auditory processing.

Note: Hold to the timing allocated for Work Time A in order to get to the remainder of the lesson.

B. Introducing Word Trackers (20 minutes)


Refocus students whole group. Introduce the word tracker vocabulary routine, reminding students how important it is to
build their word power. One way they will do this is by carefully recording important words and definitions. We are going to
do this using a word tracker.
Distribute the Word Tracker recording form and show students the Word Tracker anchor chart (which looks just
like their Word Tracker recording form).
Project the text Discovering Culture. Direct students to the bold word generation.
On the anchor chart, model how to complete each column of the Word Tracker recording form using the word generation:

Providing models of expected work


supports all learners but especially
supports challenged learners.
Closely monitor students who have
difficulty with near-point copying.
If students are using dictionaries,
consider working with a small group
to help them find the needed
word(s).

1. In Column 1 (Vocabulary Word) of the anchor chart, write generation (on students sheets, the three preselected words
already appear).
2. Show students how to find the definition in the glossary at the bottom of page 2 of the text. In Column 2 of the anchor
chart, write the definition as it appears in the glossary (giving students 12 minutes to write the glossary definition on
their page).
3. Tell students that they should then think about the meaning in their own words. Invite students to turn and tell a partner
what the word generation means to them. Ask a few students to share out their definition. In Column 3 of the anchor
chart, students should write a simplified version of the definition in Column 2 using their own words. Students may give
a definition such as: This word means all the people that are around the same age as each other.
4. Ask students to follow the same process with the words custom and tradition. Circulate and provide assistance as
needed. Make sure that each student fills out Column 3 of the anchor chart for the preselected words.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 2

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Next, ask students to look at the words they underlined in Discovering Culture in Lesson 2. Ask:

* Are there other words you underlined yesterday when you were reading the text?
Invite a few volunteers to share their responses with the group. As students share, you can record their words/phrases in
Column 1 of the anchor chart, placing each word/phrase in its own box in Column 1. For this activity, its recommended that
you focus on Tier 3 (content-specific) words, as this will better assist students in gaining an understanding of culture.
Place students in pairs or small groups to work on Columns 2 and 3 of their Word Tracker recording form for the
words/phrases just added. Students should have their text and also have access to a student-level dictionary. Encourage
students to be more time efficient by using the dictionary guide words. (Each student could be responsible for finding one of
the words in the dictionary and then they share the definition they found with the members of their group.)
Gather students whole group. Invite a few volunteers to share the definitions they found and then record these on the anchor
chart. (It is not necessary to record anything in Column 3 since these are individual to each student.)
Tell students that they will use Word Tracker recording forms again later in this unit and in Unit 2. They will keep paying
attention to important social studies words about culture, as well as other important words that will help them as readers.
These vocabulary words will help them build word power and learn lots of new information about the culture of people and
places around the world.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3


Reading Closely to Build Understanding:
Discovering Culture Part 2

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. 3-2-1 Exit Ticket (4 minutes)


Gather students whole group and congratulate them on their hard work with close reading and vocabulary.

It may be necessary to assist some


students with the writing of the 3-21 Exit ticket given the short time
frame provided.

Distribute the 3-2-1 Exit ticket and review each prompt. Give students a few minutes to complete the exit ticket.
If time permits, ask students to share out one idea from their exit ticket with a partner.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Complete any answers to Questions from the Text: Discovering Culture that you didnt finish in class.
Share words from your Word Tracker that you learned about today with someone at home.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 8

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 3


Supporting Materials
Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc.
Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to
Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 9

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3

Questions from the Text: Discovering Culture

Name:
Date:
Text Dependent Questions
1. According to the article, what can traditions tell us about a groups culture? Use details from the
text to support your answer.

2. According to the article, what is a custom? Use details from the text to support your answer.

3. According to the article, what can customs and traditions tell us about a community or country?
Use details from the text to support your answer.

4. What does culture mean (in your own words)?

Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc.


Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to
Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3

Questions from the Text: Discovering Culture


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Text-Dependent Questions
1. According to the article, what can traditions tell us about a groups culture? Use details from the
text to support your answer.
According to the article, traditions can tell about a behavior of a group that has
passed down. There are different types of traditions like family traditions and
patriotic traditions. Traditions can tell us about what holidays a group celebrates
and the ways the holidays are celebrated. Traditions can tell us a lot about what is
important to a group or country.
2. According to the article, what is a custom? Use details from the text to support your answer.
According to the article, a custom is an accepted way of behaving or acting by a
group of people. Customs are things that people do regularly. Customs can be how
people greet each other like a firm handshake in America.
3. According to the article, what can customs and traditions tell us about a community or country?
Use details from the text to support your answer.
According to the article, customs and traditions can tell us what the community or
country values or holds as important and special. They can tell us what the people
believe in and how they live.
4. What does culture mean (in your own words)?
Answers will vary by student. Possible responses could be:
Culture is how people share what they do and what they celebrate.
Culture is passing down how to act and what to do from one family member to
another.

Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc.


Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to
Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3

Word Tracker Recording Form


Vocabulary word or phrase

Definition

Definition in my own words

generation

custom

tradition

Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc.


Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to
Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3

Word Tracker Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Vocabulary word or phrase

Definition

Definition in my own words

generation

all the people living at the


same time or of
approximately the same
age

answers will vary by


student

custom

a common practice
followed by people in a
group; a way of doing
something that is repeated

answers will vary by


student

tradition

a behavior or action
handed down from a
previous generation

answers will vary by


student

Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc.


Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to
Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 3

3-2-1 Exit Ticket


3 vocabulary words I learned more about today:
1.
2.
3.
2 things I learned about culture today:
1.
2.
1 thing I know about a glossary:
1.

Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc.


Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to
Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L3 June 2014 14

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can answer questions using specific details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)
I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can determine the key details of Chapters 1 and 2 by identifying the important parts of the chapter
(who/where/what).

Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the


Red Dawn Chapter 2

I can identify and record key details in Chapter 2 that connect with evidence of ancient Japans culture.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

In this lesson, students begin reading Magic Tree House: Dragon of the Red Dawn together. Based on
the needs of your class, this launch lesson may run longer than 60 minutes. Consider continuing at
another time during the day, or breaking this lesson into two class sessions.

A. Engaging the Reader: Taking a Book Walk of


Dragon of the Red Dawn (8 minutes)
B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Reading Chapter 1 and Introducing
Where/Who/What (10 minutes)
B. Reading Chapter 2 and Introducing Capturing Key
Details (15 minutes)
C. Tracking Evidence of Culture through Chapter 2 (20
minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Debrief: Jacks Research Book (5 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Tell someone at home about the chapters we read
today.
B. Explain to someone at home how Dragon of the Red
Dawn will help you learn about the culture of
ancient Japan.

When launching this historical fiction chapter book, it is important to emphasize to students how the
author did research before crafting the story. This module uses the Magic Tree House book both to
introduce students to this highly popular chapter book series by Marty Pope Osborne and as a
springboard into learning more about culture. Students do consider the main events in each chapter
(aligned with RL.3.1) and do examine Jack and Annies character (with a particular focus on Jack as a
researcher). But this module does not involve an extensive study of authors craft in literary text. As
you launch students work with Dragon of the Red Dawn, strive to simultaneously engage students in
the story itself and begin to lay the groundwork that stories like the Magic Tree House books begin with
real research.
Dragon of the Red Dawn is number 37 in the Magic Tree House book series. This specific book in the
series was chosen based on its text complexity and on how it connects to the NYS content frameworks
(in terms of helping students learn about culture, specifically customs and traditions). Some students
may have read this text before, and now will be rereading to think about what the story teaches us about
culture in ancient Japan. Other students may be totally new to this series, and may get hooked. Consider
encouraging these students to read other Magic Tree House books during independent reading, perhaps
beginning with book number one.
This lesson includes a new Structural Features of a Chapter Book (Magic Tree House) anchor chart. This
will be used to contrast with the Structural Features of Informational Text anchor chart later in the unit.
Be sure to clarify for students that not all chapter books have identical structures: This anchor chart is
just to give a general sense of how the Magic Tree House books are structured differently from the
informational texts students will read later.
In advance: Preview the final performance task (see separate stand-alone teacher-facing document) to
understand more fully the research-based letter students will write to Mary Pope Osborne.
Throughout the module, students can work in reading partnerships to support struggling readers. For
students who need even more support, consider the following:

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Agenda

Teaching Notes (continued)


1. Pull several partnerships together for guided support during their reading.
2. Devote an instructional aide or another adults time to supporting students while they read the
chapters aloud. This gives students guidance for both decoding and comprehension.
3. After students have made a first attempt on their own, find another time in the day to review
sticking points they had and support their comprehension.
Certain chapters of Dragon of the Red Dawn are designated to be read as homework. For students
needing more support, arrange for other accommodations (e.g. support from a teaching aide during
another part of the school day), so they do not fall behind on the reading.
Consider preparing audio recordings of the texts used in the module.
There are many methods of checking for understanding whether individual students have met a
learning target. Fist to Five is one common technique. Other engaging, quick techniques include:
Thumb-O-Meter; Glass, Bugs, Mud; Red Light, Green Light; Sticky Bars; Learning Line-ups; Human
Bar Graph; and Table Tags. Depending on the purpose, any of these techniques can be used for students
to self-assess their level of understanding while also letting you check their progress. For descriptions,
see Checking for Understanding Techniques in the Appendix.
In advance:

Create Structural Features of a Chapter Book (Magic Tree House) anchor chart.
Consider preparing the Mary Pope Osborne quote on a chart to display throughout the module.
Review: Think-Pair-Share protocol and cold call in Checking for Understanding Techniques (see
Appendix).
Post: Learning targets.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

ancient, prologue, historical fiction,


setting, characters, events, custom,
tradition, passport, imperial

Document camera
Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student and one for teacher use)
Mary Pope Osborne quote (one to display)
Structural Features of a Chapter Book (Magic Tree House) anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
Where/Who/What anchor chart (new; teacher-created from Part 1 of the Capturing Key Details recording form)
Capturing Key Details anchor chart (new; teacher-created from the recording form with this same name)
Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 2 (one per student)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Taking a Book Walk of Dragon of the Red Dawn (8 minutes)
Using a document camera, project the cover of the book Dragon of the Red Dawn. Ask students to indicate whether they
are familiar with this series. Consider inviting a few students to share what they know about the Magic Tree House books.

Using total participation techniques


such as cold call or equity sticks
encourages a wider range of voices
in whole class shares.

Do not give too much about the book away: just tell students that this literary text is one that many young people have loved.
It is one of many books written by Mary Pope Osborne about a brother and sister who go on exciting adventures. Mary Pope
Osborne wanted to create an exciting chapter books for readers. While they read this book, students get to think about these
adventures, including getting to learn about different cultures by reading about how Jack and Annie interact with the people,
the customs, and the traditions in that country. Introduce the concept of historical fiction (which will be reinforced
throughout the module): this is an imaginary story set in a real time and place.
Tell students that the setting of Dragon of the Red Dawn is ancient Japan. Clarify briefly for students the meaning of the
word ancient.
Point out that the author, Mary Pope Osborne, always did a lot of research about the countries where her books take place.
Project the Dear Reader letter from Mary Pope Osborne (precedes the table of contents). Read the letter aloud to students.
Then, highlight this Mary Pope Osborne quote by reading it aloud again:

* I wanted to live in the scenes the artists created. I wanted to ride on the fishing boat, sip tea in a teahouse, see cherryblossom petals float down a river. When Im writing a book, I feel as if I am living in another place and time.
Have students Think-Pair-Share:

* How can this chapter book help you learn about ancient Japans culture?
Gather students whole group. Distribute one copy of Dragon of the Red Dawn to each student. Tell students this is the
special book that they will read together. For the first two chapters, they follow along as the text is read aloud to them. In
future chapters, they will get to read the text on their own.
Invite students to take a Book Walk. Encourage them to notice the books structure by flipping through pages, noticing
chapter headings and illustrations. Tell students they wont be reading the book right now but may be pausing at places that
look interesting.
Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* What did you notice about the structure of this book?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Students likely will notice things like the prologue, the letter from the author, the table of contents (with titled chapters),
illustrations in each chapter, and additional information and activities (at the back). Chart students responses on a new
Structural Features of a Chapter Book (Magic Tree House) anchor chart. Clarify as needed the purpose or role of
these different structural components. (Keep this chart posted. Students will revisit it again specifically in Lesson 8 when
they do a Book Walk with the informational text Exploring Countries: Japan.)
Direct students attention to the prologue. Ask if any students know what this word means; define it for them if necessary.
Briefly explain the purpose of prologues in general and why this prologue specifically is important. (Since this is number 37
in the Magic Tree House series, students need to have the background that is established in the prologue to set the scene of
this new adventure for Jack and Annie. (See Teaching Notes.)
Read the prologue aloud to students. To avoid confusion, briefly review the characters mentioned in the prologue. Ask:

* Who are Jack and Annie? (the main characters who live in Frog Creek, Pennsylvania, and travel to real places back in
time)

* Who are Teddy and Kathleen? (young sorcerers who assist Morgan le Fay)
* Who is Morgan le Fay? (the magical librarian from the legendary realm of Camelot)
* Who is Merlin? (the magician of Camelot)
B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)
Read the targets aloud or invite a volunteer to do so.

* I can determine the key details of Chapters 1 and 2 by identifying the important parts of the chapter (who/where/what).
* I can identify and record key details in Chapter 2 that connect with evidence of ancient Japans culture.
Then invite students to talk with a partner about todays work as readers.
Focus students whole group. Ask students to discuss what they think they might do to reach the first target. Help students
identify that they will read Chapter 1 of Dragon of the Red Dawn so they can think about the important parts of this chapter.
Point out that the second target relates to the work students have been doing with culture and finding evidence of culture in
Lessons 2 and 3.
Use Fist to Five as a check for understanding of these two learning targets.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Reading Chapter 1 and Introducing Where/Who/What (10 minutes)


Ask students to read along in their books as you read Chapter 1 aloud, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.

Reading aloud to students as they


read along helps build their fluency.
ELLs and struggling ELA students
benefit from hearing a text read
aloud before they read it on their
own.

Display the Where/Who/What anchor chart. Explain to students that when reading a chapter book, its important for
readers to keep track of important parts of the chapter: where the action is (setting), who the important characters are, and
what the most important events are. Clarify the meaning of the words setting, characters, and events as needed. Explain to
students that they will be using a two-part recording form as they read Dragon of the Red Dawn. This recording form will be
an important tool to help them follow the story as it unfolds chapter by chapter. Point out to students that Part 1 of that
recording form looks just like this anchor chart.
Taking the questions one at a time, ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

All students developing academic


language will benefit from direct
instruction of academic vocabulary.
Consider allowing students to draw
their observations, ideas, or notes
when appropriate. This allows all
students to participate in
meaningful way.

* What is the setting of this chapter? In other words, when and where does this chapter take place?
* Who are the important characters in the chapter?
* What are the most important events in this chapter? In other words, what happens?
As students share, record their responses on the Where/Who/What anchor chart.
Tell students that you want them to really get familiar with this chart, since it is just like part of a recording form they will be
using (Part 1 of the Capturing Key Details recording form) in Work Time B. Ask students to look over the anchor chart and
then discuss:

* In looking at this anchor chart, do you feel the information that we wrote captures the key details of Chapter 1?

Provide nonlinguistic symbols (e.g.,


a person for character) to assist
ELLs and other struggling readers
in making connections with the
headings on the Where/Who/What
anchor chart.
The anchor chart provides a model
of expected work. This supports all
students but especially supports
challenged learners.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Reading Chapter 2 and Introducing Capturing Key Details (15 minutes)


Tell students that you will now read Chapter 2 aloud as they again follow along. Invite them to keep the where/who/what
categories in mind as they listen. After they read the chapter, they will again work together to complete the chart.
Read Chapter 2 aloud, fluently, with expression, and without interruption. Stop at page 15 after the word passports is
mentioned the first time to briefly ask:

* Think about where the chapter is taking place right now. Is it the same as Chapter 1? What are passports?
Make sure students correctly identify that Jack and Annie are now in ancient Japan in a beautiful garden (the Imperial
Garden) outside the Imperial Palace. Define imperial for students: Imperial means that it relates to emperors or empires.
It is something for kings, queens, or emperors. Finish reading the remaining pages of Chapter 2 without any additional
stops.
Display the Capturing Key Details anchor chart and ask students what they notice. Listen for them to recognize that
the upper part of this anchor chart is the Where/Who/What anchor chart used earlier with Chapter 1.
Distribute the Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 2 to students (which
looks exactly like the anchor chart).
Work with students to fill out Part 1 of the recording form for Chapter 2. As suggestions are shared, record them on the
anchor chart for students to copy onto their recording forms.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

C. Tracking Evidence of Culture through Chapter 2 (20 minutes)

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

Display and read aloud the Mary Pope Osborne quote:

* Whenever I start work on a new Magic Tree House book, I begin the great adventure of research. I visit libraries, the
Internet, bookstores, and museums. I talk to people who are knowledgeable about my subject, and if Im able, I visit the
place where the story occurs. From Carnival at Candlelight: Authors Research Note
Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* What does Mary Pope Osborne do to research a book? If Mary Pope Osborne wanted information about a countrys
culture, what kinds of information might she be looking for?
Explain to students that when an author is writing a historical fiction book, he or she must conduct research. A historical
fiction text is one that has made-up characters and plots but takes place in a real, ancient setting. Thats the only way to
guarantee that the information they include as part of the story is accurate and true. Tell students that the author, Mary
Pope Osborne, wanted us to feel like we were in ancient Japan with Jack and Annie. To do that, she had to include accurate
details about what life was like in that time period and what the people living there held dear and considered important. She
had to research before she could write.
Display the Capturing Key Details anchor chart again. This time, have students focus on Part 2 on the lower half of the
recording form. Ask: What do you notice? Direct students to briefly share their observations with a nearby partner.
Then, ask students to respond to the following question:

* What kind of information goes in the first column?


Remind students that customs and traditions were words they encountered in the Carousel Brainstorm protocol in Lesson 1,
and again in the article they read about culture in Lessons 2 and 3.
Focus students on the final column and ask:

* What kind of information goes in the second column?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Tell students that you will be reading Chapter 2 aloud a second time, and this time they need to be very actively listening and
looking for evidence of customs or traditions in ancient Japan that Mary Pope Osborne placed within the chapter.
Show students how to use a silent signal to indicate they heard a custom or tradition. Consider having students put thumbs
at their hearts to signal they heard a custom or tradition in ancient Japan during the second read.
Begin reading Chapter 2 aloud for a second time. Direct students to use the appropriate hand gesture if they think there is a
custom or tradition mentioned.
As students offer suggestions, record their responses on the Capturing Key Details anchor chart. Help students become
familiar with the recording form. Direct students to fill in the same information on their recording form that you write on the
anchor chart.
Note: Hold on to this anchor chart for Lesson 7.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapters 1 and 2

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Debrief: Jacks Research Book (5 minutes)


Remind students that Teddy gave Jack and Annie a book called A Journey to Old Japan in Chapter 1. Ask:

For students needing additional


support producing language,
consider offering a sentence frame
or starter or a cloze sentence to
assist with language production and
provide structure.

* Why did Teddy give them the book?


Listen for students to note that the book was needed to help transport Jack and Annie from Frog Creek Woods,
Pennsylvania, to ancient Japan. But the other reason Teddy gave them the book is because its full of information about
where they are: ancient Japan.
Have students work with a partner to revisit the places in Chapter 2 when Jack is reading information from the book on
Japan. If students are struggling, point out that this is signaled in the text by indentations and bold print.
Invite a few volunteers to share when in Chapter 2 Jack read from the book on Japan. Encourage students to point to
specific examples.
Connect back to the learning targets. Remind students that just as Jack and Annie are learning about an ancient culture by
reading a text, we are learning as well by reading about their adventures.
Reread the learning targets. Ask for a Fist to Five on how students felt they did in meeting the targets today.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Tell someone at home about the chapters we read today. (If possible, let students take home their Capturing Key Details
recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 2).

Consider ways to allow students to


listen to Dragon of the Red Dawn at
home (on audiobooks or read aloud
by a caregiver) as students read
along silently.

Explain to someone at home how Dragon of the Red Dawn will help you learn about the culture of ancient Japan.
Note: Be sure to emphasize the importance of students returning the book to school the next day.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

11

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 4


Supporting Materials
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4

Mary Pope Osborne Quote

Whenever I start work on a new Magic Tree House book, I begin the great
adventure of research. I visit libraries, the Internet, bookstores, and museums. I
talk to people who are knowledgeable about my subject, and if Im able, I visit
the place where the story occurs.
From Carnival at Candlelight: Authors Research Note

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4

Structural Features of a Chapter Book (Magic Tree House) Anchor Chart


(For Teacher Reference)

1. Dedication
2. Dear Reader letter
3. Table of Contents
4. Prologue
5. Chapters with titles
6. Additional information
7. Activities
8. Preview of next book in series

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 2

Name:
Date:

Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?


Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Part 2: Focusing on Culture


What evidence did you find of customs or traditions in ancient Japan? How do those help you
learn about the culture?
What evidence did you find of a custom or tradition in ancient Japan?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page in text

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events


in this chapter?

The Imperial Garden


outside the Imperial
Palace in Edo, Japan

Jack and Annie


Samurai

Jack and Annie arrive in


ancient Japan using the tree
house and use Jacks research
book to learn a little bit about
where they are.
They discover they need a
passport to travel safely since
outsiders are not welcome in
Japan.
They see a shogun traveling
with his samurai. They decide
to leave the garden and head
into Edo.
They get chased by the samurai
and saved by a man who
pretends to know them.

Part 2: Focusing on Culture


What evidence did you find of customs or traditions in ancient Japan? How do those help you
learn about the culture?
What evidence did you find of a custom or tradition in ancient Japan?

Page in text

wearing kimonos

p. 13

carrying a passport

p. 15

procession of the shogun

p. 1618

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L4 June 2014

16

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 5


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can determine the key details of Chapter 3 by identifying the important parts of the chapter
(who/where/what).

Capturing Key Details recording form: Chapter 3

I can identify and record key details in Chapter 3 that connect with the culture of ancient Japan.

Exit Ticket: Working with Context Clues

Working with Context Clues recording form: Chapter 3

I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Chapter 3 of Dragon of the Red Dawn.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

This lesson includes a structure of partner reading. Students sit side-by-side with a partner, and each
reads the text silently and independently. Students then discuss what they read with their partners.
They do not read the text aloud to each other; rather, they have someone next to them to support their
reading. Partner students strategically; pair students with similar reading skills who can work well
together. This allows you to support the struggling reader partnerships during independent reading
time. It also allows students who read at about the same pace to discuss the text at similar points in the
story. Plan these partnerships ahead of time. For this partner reading experiences, you may need to
have different groupings from those established at the outset of the module.

A. Engaging the Reader: Reading Chapter Books (4


minutes)
B. Unpacking Learning Targets and Reviewing
Capturing Key Details Recording Form (6 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Capturing the Key Details of Chapter 3 (30 minutes)
B. Working with Context Clues: Chapter 3 Words (15
minutes)

In advance: Prepare Things Readers Do When Reading Chapter Books anchor chart.
Post: Learning targets.

3. Closing and Assessment


A. Exit Ticket: Working with Context Clues (5 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Read Chapter 4 and complete the Capturing Key
Details recording form.
B. Complete context clues work for the word
pedestrians.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

context clues; seek (25), foreigners


(25), harmony (25), pedestrians (33),
briskly (26), moat (27)

Things Readers Do When Reading Chapter Books anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Opening A)
Capturing Key Details anchor chart: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 2 (from Lesson 4)
Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student and one for teacher use)
Document camera
Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3 (one per student)
Working with Context Clues recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3 (one per student)
Exit Ticket: Working with Context Clues (one per student)
Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 4 (one per student)

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Reading Chapter Books (4 minutes)


Give students specific positive feedback on their work so far reading two chapters of Dragon of the Red Dawn and learning
how to complete a new recording form.
Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* What do thoughtful readers need to do when reading chapter books?


Provide sentence frames to support students conversation: Readers need to _____ when they read chapter books.
Cold-call a few students to share their ideas and track their comments on the Things Readers Do When Reading
Chapter Books anchor chart. Students may mention behaviors such as:
When listening to the chapter book read aloud, think about the gist, or what the chapter is mostly about.
When reading a chapter on your own, think about the main components: the setting (where), character(s) (who), and
important events (what).
When starting a new chapter, you may want to reread the last page of the chapter that came before to refresh your memory.
Remind students that throughout this year, they are building their reading powers; this is one part of that larger goal.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Unpacking Learning Targets and Reviewing the Capturing Key Details Recording Form (6 minutes)
Read aloud the first and second learning targets.

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

* I can determine the key details of Chapter 3 by identifying the important parts of the chapter (who/where/what).
* I can identify and record key details in Chapter 3 that connect with the culture of ancient Japan.
Point out that these are very similar to targets from the previous lesson, when students worked with Chapters 2. Ask
students to show their understanding of the target by using a Fist to Five.
Ask students to recall the name of the new recording form they began using yesterday in Chapter 2. After the recording form
has been named, briefly display the Capturing Key Details anchor chart: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 2
(from Lesson 4).
Focus on the third target. Read it aloud with students:

Providing models of expected work


supports all students but especially
supports challenged learners.
Support struggling readers by
having them work with a partner
during independent reading time.

* I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Chapter 3 of Dragon of the Red Dawn.
Point out that students are going to be practicing a strategy that readers use to help figure out new or unknown words. We
will be focusing on context clues. Ask for a volunteer to share what they know about context clues. Clarify for students that
context clues are the words or phrases around an unknown or new word that help us figure out what it means. Students will
be going through a process to practice using context clues to figure out unknown words.
Briefly review the meaning of the word culture with students, as well as the evidence students are looking for:

* Culture is a groups way of life or how they do things.


* Culture can be evidenced through a countrys customs or traditions.
Again display the Capturing Key Details anchor chart: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 2 (from Lesson 4). Focus on Part 2
of the recording form. Remind students that this part of the recording form is a way for them to keep track of discoveries
related to ancient Japans culture.
Ask students what was revealed in Chapter 2 about ancient Japans culture. Listen for answers like:
kimonos
straw sandals
shogun as military ruler
samurai warriors as guards

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Capturing the Key Details of Chapter 3 (30 minutes)


Have students take out their Dragon of the Red Dawn books and direct them to turn to Chapter 3 (page 22).
Begin to read Chapter 3 aloud, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
Using a document camera, project a blank Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn
Chapter 3 and distribute one to each student. Reorient students to the structure of this recording form by asking:

* Look at the first part of the recording form. What do you have to do? Why?
* Look at the second part of the recording form. What information will you record here?
Tell students they will be using this recording form again but with Chapter 3.
Tell them next they will be reading Chapter 3 again with a partner. For some students, this may be a different partner than
for the other work done so far in this module. Direct partnerships to spread out around the classroom and sit side-by-side or
back-to-back. Explain that each student will read the text silently and independently, but may ask their partner for help if
needed. They do not read the text aloud to each other. By sitting side-by-side or back-to-back, they have someone near them
to support their reading if needed. Tell students that after they read, they will work with their partners on completing the
Capturing Key Details recording form.
When both partners have finished reading, they should work together to complete the Capturing Key Details recording form:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3.
Note: Keep a solid student sample of the Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3 (or a
copy) for use in Lesson 7.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Working with Context Clues: Chapter 3 Words (15 minutes)


Gather students whole group. Say: As you know, it is important for readers to build their word power. Part of this is
building a strong vocabulary to use when you speak and write. But word power also means knowing how to figure out what
words mean as you read. In Lesson 3, you used a glossary and dictionary to find out what some words meant. But since you
dont always have those around, you will need to have other strategies as a reader. One thing you can do is determine the
meaning of unknown words by looking at clues in the text surrounding the unknown word. You did this in Module 1, starting
with the very first story, Rain School.

During this Work Time, you may


want to pull a small group of
struggling students to support their
work with determining the meaning
of words using the context. Some
students will need more guided
practice before they are ready for
independent work.

Distribute the Working with Context Clues recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3 and post a copy
on the document camera. Remind students that they learned in Module 1 that one way to figure out the meaning of a word is
to look at other words in the sentence and think about clues the sentence gives you, and then try to replace the word with a
word you know. Briefly review the sequence of steps shown at the top of the recording form.
Tell students: Lets practice this with a couple example words from Chapter 3. Even if you know these words, it is important
to work through these examples with the class.
Direct students to look at Example 1. Read the sentence aloud: I believe that is something we all seek. Have students turn
to the page indicated on their recording form and locate the actual sentence in the text of Dragon of the Red Dawn.
Ask students to Think-Pair-Share what the word seek means and cold call a few students to share their thinking but do not
confirm anything.
Briefly model the steps by thinking aloud and recording for students to view: When I read this sentence and look at the
other words in the sentence, it makes me think that seek is something you do. It seems like a verb. And in the sentence
before, Annie is talking about searching for a secret of happiness. I think it could mean look or search, or it might mean
need. I am going to try replacing the word with these three words and see if any of them seems like a good fit and makes
sense in the story.
Repeat with Examples 2 and 3, gradually encouraging students to take more responsibility for the process until you are only
providing occasional prompts and recording the collective thinking. (As you can see on the recording form, students do not
record anything at this point.)
Ask students to take 5 minutes with their reading partner to work on the terms briskly and moat on the back of their
recording form.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5


Reading to Capture the Key Details of a Chapter:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

After 5 minutes, bring students back together and ask for volunteers to share whole class to check understanding for all.
Listen for definitions such as:
Briskly means quickly, actively, or with great energy.
A moat is a deep, wide trench or ditch, usually filled with water surrounding a place such as a town or castle.
Note: Students will have one additional word to work with independently as an exit ticket during Closing and Assessment.

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Exit Ticket: Working with Context Clues (5 minutes)


Distribute the Exit Ticket: Working with Context Clues, and if necessary, review each prompt. Give students a few
minutes to complete the exit ticket.

It may be necessary to help some


students complete the exit ticket
given the short time frame provided.

If time permits, ask students to share out one idea from their exit ticket with a partner.
Preview homework. Distribute the Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 4.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Read Chapter 4 of Dragon of the Red Dawn and complete the Capturing Key Details recording form (Chapter 4)

Consider ways to allow students to


listen to Dragon of the Red Dawn at
home (on audiobooks or read aloud
by a caregiver) as students read
along silently.

Complete Working with Context Clues: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3, Part 2.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 5


Supporting Materials
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3

Name:
Date:
Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Part 2: Focusing on Culture


What evidence did you find of customs or traditions in ancient Japan?
What evidence did you find of a custom or tradition in ancient Japan?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page in text

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3

Name:
Date:
Target: I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Chapter 3 of Dragon of the Red
Dawn.
How to Work with Context Clues:
Read the sentence a few times, focusing on the unknown word.
Look at the other words in the sentence and think about what clues the sentence gives you.
Try to replace the unknown word with a word you know.
Part 1: Classwork
1. seek. Turn to page 25. Find and read the sentence:
I believe that is something we all seek.
Think:
What clues in and around the sentence can help me determine the meaning of this word?
What do I think the word might mean? (Try some replacements.)
2. foreigners. Also on page 25, find and read the sentence:
The shogun does not allow foreigners into our country.
Think:
What clues in and around the sentence can help me determine the meaning of this word?
What do I think the word might mean? (Try some replacements.)
3. harmony. Also on page 25, find and read the sentence:
You must remember, seek harmony with your surroundings, said the man.
Think:
What clues in and around the sentence can help me determine the meaning of this word?
What do I think the word might mean? (Try some replacements.)
Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3
4. briskly (page 26)
He started walking briskly through the garden.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

5. moat (page 27)


They walked over a wide stone bridge that crossed a moat.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What does this word


mean?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3
Part 2: Homework
pedestrians (page 33)
Soon they came to a busy road crowded with pedestrians and travelers on horseback.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What does this word


mean?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Exit Ticket:
Working with Context Clues

Name:
Date:
Target: I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Dragon of the Red Dawn.
DIRECTIONS: Follow the steps we used in class today for using context clues to determine the
meaning
of an unknown word.
How to Work with Context Clues:
Read the sentence a few times, focusing on the unknown word.
Look at the other words in the sentence and think about what clues the sentence gives you.
Try to replace the unknown word with a word you know.
barges (page 31)
Now there were many boats floating on the wide river: big sailboats, barges loaded with lumber,
and ferries filled with passengers holding parasols.
What clues in and around
the sentence can help me
determine the meaning of
this word?

What do I think the word


might mean? (Try some
replacements.)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What does this word mean?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

In and around Edo, along


the Sumida River, in the
market

Jack, Annie, Basho, the


three samurai

Basho saves Jack and Annie


from the samurai by
pretending they are his
students. Jack and Annie
are invited to travel with
Basho into Edo to seek a
secret of happiness. They
see many sights: the river,
the outdoor market, Mt.
Fuji in the distance, and the
Great Bridge.

Part 2: Focusing on Culture


What evidence did you find of customs or traditions in ancient Japan?
What evidence did you find of a custom or tradition in ancient Japan?

Page in text

bowing to say sorry

p. 23

calling teachers Most Honored

p. 24 and 26

having passports in Edo to prove you lived there

p. 25

naming houses after how many mats a floor can hold, like Thousand
Mat Hall

p. 31

carrying fish baskets on your head in the market

p. 32

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3
(Sample, for Teacher Reference)
Target: I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Chapter 3 of Dragon of the Red
Dawn.
How to Work with Context Clues:
Read the sentence a few times, focusing on the unknown word.
Look at the other words in the sentence and think about what clues the sentence gives you.
Try to replace the unknown word with a word you know.
Part 1: Classwork
1. seek. Turn to page 25. Find and read the sentence:
I believe that is something we all seek.
Think:
What clues in and around the sentence can help me determine the meaning of this word?
What do I think the word might mean? (Try some replacements.)
2. foreigners. Also on page 25, find and read the sentence:
The shogun does not allow foreigners into our country.
Think:
What clues in and around the sentence can help me determine the meaning of this word?
What do I think the word might mean? (Try some replacements.)
3. harmony. Also on page 25, find and read the sentence:
You must remember, seek harmony with your surroundings, said the man.
Think:
What clues in and around the sentence can help me determine the meaning of this word?
What do I think the word might mean? (Try some replacements.)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3
(Sample, for Teacher Reference)
4. briskly (page 26)
He started walking briskly through the garden.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

started walking
Jack and Annie hurried
after him

quickly, fast

It means to walk quickly


through the garden.

5. moat (page 27)


They walked over a wide stone bridge that crossed a moat.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

bridge crossed a moat


on a river

river
creek
water

It means a stream of water


that bridges go over.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 3
(Sample, for Teacher Reference)
Part 2: Homework
pedestrians (page 33)
Soon they came to a busy road crowded with pedestrians and travelers on horseback.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

busy road crowded


travelers on horseback

people
workers
walkers

People who are in the


street.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 4

Name:
Date:
Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Part 2: Focusing on Culture


What evidence did you find of customs or traditions in ancient Japan?
What evidence did you find of a custom or tradition in ancient Japan?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page in text

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 4
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

In the city past a theater


In a teahouse

Jack, Annie, Basho

They see many sights


include women dancing
with painted faces and a
puppet theater.
They drink tea and eat
sushi in a teahouse. They
eat with chopsticks.
When they leave they see
a sumo wrestling match.

Part 2: Focusing on Culture


What evidence did you find of customs or traditions in ancient Japan?
What evidence did you find of a custom or tradition in ancient Japan?

Page in text

women dancing with painted faces and wearing shiny kimonos

p. 36

a puppet show of the legend Cloud Dragon

p. 37

drinking tea in a teahouse

p. 38

taking shoes off at the door before going inside

p. 38

eating sushi with chopsticks

p. 39

a sumo wrestling match

p.4446

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L5 June 2014

19

Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter and
Launching the Performance Task: Dragon of the
Red Dawn Chapter 5
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can answer questions using specific details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can determine the key details of Chapter 5 in Dragon of the Red Dawn by identifying the important
parts of the chapter (who/where/what).

Capturing Key Details recording form (for Chapter 4;


from homework)

I can identify and record key details in Chapter 5 that connect with ancient Japans culture.

Working with Context Clues recording form: Dragon of


the Red Dawn Chapter 5

I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Chapter 5 of Dragon of the Red Dawn.
I can answer questions about Chapter 5 of Dragon of the Red Dawn using details from the text.

Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc.


Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

Questions from the Text: Dragon of the Red Dawn


Chapter 5

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

Many lessons in this unit use the same two recording forms: Capturing Key Details (first distributed in
Lesson 4) and Working with Context Clues (first distributed in Lesson 5). Reinforce this pattern with
students.

A. Engaging the Reader: Concentric Circles to Share


Lesson 5 Homework (8 minutes)
B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Capturing the Key Details of Chapter 5 (25 minutes)
B. Working with Context Clues: Chapter 5 Words (10
minutes)
C. Answering Text-Dependent Questions (10 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Revisiting Guiding Questions and Launching the
Performance Task (5 minutes)

Students share their Capturing Key Details recording form (Chapter 4), which they completed for
homework. Keep solid samples of students completed recording forms for Chapters 35 (or copies), to
use as models in Lesson 7.
This lesson again uses a partner reading structure. Keep students with their same partner from Lesson
5.
In the Closing of this lesson, students are introduced to the performance task. To prepare for this,
review the stand-alone teacher-facing document Performance Task. Consider how to frame the purpose
of this task in a way that will really resonate with your students, including ways to build on strong
observations they have made in Lessons 4 and 5 about how Mary Pope Osborne wove factual
information into her fictional stories.

A. Finish Working with Context Clues: Dragon of the


Red Dawn Chapter 5, Part 2.

Consider teaching new protocols and techniques outside of the lesson time so that valuable lesson time
is not lost. It is recommended and encouraged that you use the module protocols, routines, and
techniques in other parts of the curriculum. The more versed the students are with these, the better, so
lessons will not be slowed down by the process of teaching and learning new routines and protocols.

B. Complete Questions from the Text: Dragon of the


Red Dawn Chapter 5.

In advance: Review Concentric Circles protocol and Glass, Bugs, Mud in Checking for Understanding
Techniques (see Appendix).

4. Homework

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

historical fiction, concentric;


frantically, peddlers, wares, clearing,
research

Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student)


Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5 (one per student)
Document camera
Working with Context Clues recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 4 (from Lesson 5; one to display)
Working with Context Clues recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5 (one per student)
Questions from the Text: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5 (one per student)
Questions from the Text: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5 (answers, for teacher reference)
Sticky notes (one pack per student)
Guiding Questions anchor chart (from Lesson 1)
Performance Task Prompt (one to display)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Concentric Circles to Share Lesson 5 Homework (8 minutes)


Invite students to gather whole group and bring their homework from Lesson 5: Capturing Key Details recording form:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 4.

Protocols like Concentric Circles


allow students an opportunity to be
accountable for work they have
done as well as a way to share it
with their peers in an engaging way.
Some students may need support
with expressing themselves either
accurately or clearly.

Tell students that they will use Concentric Circles protocol to review their homework. Tell students: Concentric circles are
circles inside of circles.
Review directions:
1.

Ask half the students to form an inner circle, facing out; ask the other half to form an outer circle, facing in.

2.

All students should be facing a partner. If numbers are uneven, make a triad.

3.

When directed, students will move two places to the left.

Prompt students with: Your homework was to read Chapter 4 of Dragon of the Red Dawn and complete the Capturing Key
Details recording form for the chapter. You will be sharing one aspect of your homework each time you face a new partner.
When I say the word share, you will share something specific with your talking partner, the person youre facing at that
moment.

Consider a contingency for students


who do not complete the homework
for reasons having to do with ability
or lack of home support.

Ask students if theyre ready. When they are, prompt students by saying: With your first talking partner, share your notes
from Part 1 of the recording form: the where/who/what of the chapter. Ready? Share.
After 1 minute, say: Stop. Wait a few seconds and say: Move two places to your left. When students are in their new place
say: With your second talking partner, share one thing from Part 2 of your recording form: the evidence of customs or
traditions in the chapter. Ready? Share.
After 1 minute, say: Stop. Wait a few seconds and say, Move two places to your left. When students are in their new place
say: With your third and final talking partner, share one additional thing from Part 2. Ready? Share.
After 1 minute, say: Stop. Congratulate students on their work with a new protocol and have them place their homework in
a place that fits your classroom routine. If this is not the first time using the Concentric Circles protocol, you will be able to
adjust the pacing since students will not need to be instructed on the steps of the protocol.
Display the learning targets for todays lesson. Since the learning targets for this lesson are almost identical to those of
Lesson 5, students should be feeling very comfortable with and clear about the learning targets.

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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

Consider using visual pictures of


clear glass, bugs on a windshield,
and mud on a windshield to support
ELLs.

Introduce a new check for understanding technique called Glass, Bugs, Mud. Say to students: Have you ever been in or seen
a car or bus when the windshield was covered with bug splatter and it was hard to see through it? After allowing students a
couple of moments to confirm this, say: And sometimes the windshield is so dirty, perhaps splattered with mud and dirt
from the other cars tires, that you cant see at all? After allowing students a couple of moments to confirm this, explain that
today to show their understanding of the learning targets, they will say either:

Glass: meaning like completely clean glass, the learning target is totally clear to you; you fully understand it
Bugs: meaning the windshield is only partly clean, so the learning target is somewhat clear to you but you are fuzzy or
only understand it partially

Mud: meaning like a windshield is very dirty, so the learning target is not clear to you; you do not understand it or you do
not feel comfortable with it
Read each target one at a time and poll students by asking them to indicate whether they are Glass, Bugs, or Mud.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Capturing the Key Details of Chapter 5 (25 minutes)

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

Have students take out their Dragon of the Red Dawn books and invite them to turn to Chapter 5 (page 48).
Tell students that with Chapter 5, they will be reading on their own but they will be sitting with the same partner with whom
they worked in the previous lesson. Remind them that each student will read the text silently and independently. They do
not read the text aloud to each other. By sitting side-by-side or back-to-back, they have someone near them to support their
reading if needed.
Distribute the Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5. Tell students that they
will work on this form on their own after they finish their partner reading.
Encourage pairs to spread out around the classroom and sit side-by-side or back-to-back with their partners.
Circulate to listen in and support students as they read. Encourage them to support each other as needed.

During Work Time A, you may want


to pull a small group of students to
support in finding details from the
text. Some students will need more
guided practice before they are
ready for independent work.

As students complete their reading, invite them to begin working on the recording form.
Students will finish their recording forms at different paces. Invite students who are done to come to a designated area of the
room, find a new partner, and go off to share their thinking and writing with each other.
Since students will have to read somewhere within the classroom, support this transition in such a way that valuable lesson
time is not lost. It may be necessary to direct each partnership to a specific place and it would help if they went to the same
places as they did Lesson 5.
Note: Keep a solid student sample of the Capturing Key Details recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5 (or a
copy) for use in Lesson 7.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Working with Context Clues: Chapter 5 Words (10 minutes)

During Work Time B, you may want


to pull a small group of students to
support their work with
determining the meaning of the
words using the context. Some
students will need more guided
practice before they are ready for
independent work.

Gather students whole group. Say: Yesterday you did some great work using context clues to determine the meaning of a
word. Its important for you as a reader to have strategies to help you when come across a word that confuses you. Using
context clues is a very effective strategy.
Using a document camera, project the Working with Context Clues recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn
Chapter 4 (from Lesson 5). Say: Remember that you can figure out the meaning of a word by looking at other words in the
sentence and thinking about clues the sentence gives you, and then trying to replace the word with a word you know.
Briefly, review the sequence of steps shown at the top of the recording form.
Tell students: Lets practice this with an example word from Chapter 4 that you read for homework yesterday. Even if you
know this word, you still need to work through this example with the class.
Write this sentence from Chapter 4, page 46 of Dragon of the Red Dawn for students to view: A waiter with a kerchief
around his head hurried to the table. Read the sentence aloud. Encourage students to turn to page 46 in their books and
locate the actual sentence in the text.
Ask students to Think-Pair-Share what the word kerchief means and remind them to use the steps:

Students who did not finish


answering the text-dependent
questions are likely ELLs or
struggling readers or writers.
Consider finding another time to
work with these students and assist
them.

1. Read the sentence a few times, focusing on the unknown word.


2. Look at the other words in the sentence and think about what clues the sentence gives you.
3. Try to replace the unknown word with a word you know.
After 12 minutes, cold call a few students to share their thinking.
Distribute the Working with Context Clues recording form: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5. Ask students to
take 5 minutes with their reading partner to work on the terms frantically and peddlers on their recording forms.
After 5 minutes, bring students back together and ask for volunteers to share whole class in order to check understanding for
all. Listen for definitions such as:

Frantically means with great excitement; desperately.


Peddlers are people who sell things along the street.
Remind students that they will complete Part 2 of this Working with Context Clues recording form for homework.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

C. Answering Text-Dependent Questions (10 minutes)


Reorient students to the learning target:

During Work Time C, you may want


to pull a small group of students to
support their work with answering
text-dependent questions. Some
students will need more guided
practice before they are ready for
independent work.

* I can answer questions about Chapter 5 of Dragon of the Red Dawn using details from the text.
At this point in the year, students should be quite familiar with targets related to asking and answering questions based on
evidence from the text. Distribute Questions from the Text: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5. Tell students they
will be rereading portions of the text. Suggest that they read the questions over first and then look back through the chapter
to see if they can locate the places within the chapter where there is evidence. When they find evidence, they can mark the
place with a sticky note and write the question number on the sticky note.
Practice these steps with students using the following text-dependent question: How do the samurai feel about Basho?
Read the question aloud.

Direct students to read page 48. Ask for a student to state the answer: The samurai respect Basho.
Direct students to show whether they agree or disagree by using thumbs-up or thumbs-down.
Encourage students to find evidence on page 48 that supports the statement that the samurai respect Basho and write the
evidence on a sticky note. Examples of evidence include: The samurai bow to Basho as soon as they see him. or They
greet him politely and call him by a respectful title, Good afternoon, Master.
Give students time to write their answers to the questions from the text independently. Circulate and support students in
finding evidence and, if necessary, with writing their answers using a full sentence. If needed, remind students how to write
answers using a full sentence. (The first half of the sentence is pulled directly from the question. The second half of the
sentence is the evidence found in the text.)
After 10 minutes, stop students in their work. They will have to finish their answers for homework or at another point in the
school day.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 8

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Revisiting Guiding Questions and Launching the Performance Task (5 minutes)


Focus students on the Guiding Questions anchor chart. Remind them that in Lesson 1 they were introduced to three
guiding questions:

What defines culture?


How do authors conduct research and build knowledge to inform their writing?
How can authors share knowledge on a topic gained through research?
Explain that when you guide someone or something, you help them reach a destination. These guiding questions are meant
to lead students on a journey to a destination.
Explain to students that for Mary Pope Osborne to write a story like Dragon of the Red Dawn, she had to conduct research.
Thats the only way to guarantee that the information she presents as part of the story is accurate and true. Remind students
that this chapter book is historical fiction. It has fictional characters and plots in a real-life setting from the past. Say
something like: Dont you think Mary Pope Osborne wanted us to feel like we were there in ancient Japan with Jack and
Annie? Well, to do that she had to include accurate details about what life was like in that time period long ago. She had to
research before she could write.
Focus students on the third guiding question: How can authors share knowledge on a topic gained through research?
Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* How does Mary Pope Osborne do this in Dragon of the Red Dawn?
Push students thinking. Listen for responses like:

She makes sure Jack and Annie have a research book (really a reference book) on the country and time period.
She builds the story around the facts and details from her research.
Remind students about the Accessing Books around the World bookmarks they created in Module 1. Tell them that just as
they did in Module 1, they will be working hard throughout the next several weeks and will conclude their work with the
creation of a special product.
Share with students that author Mary Pope Osborne always sends Jack and Annie back in time to places and countries that
existed long ago, which means that these stories are always set in the past. To write these stories, Mary Pope Osborne has to
conduct research about the places Jack and Annie visit.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 9

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6


Capturing the Key Details of a Chapter
and Launching the Performance Task:
Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Closing and Assessment (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Display the Performance Task Prompt.


Frame this task for students. Say something like: Magic Tree House books are really powerful historical fiction. But some
readers like to read fiction about modern times, about places and things that are happening today. Later in this module, you
will work in small groups to research a country and its culture. You will read informational texts, take notes, and have
discussions with your research group. After you conduct your research and learn about the countrys culture through
customs and traditions, you will write a letter to Mary Pope Osborne! The purpose of your letter will be to get Mary Pope
Osborne to consider sending Jack and Annie to a country in the present day. Your letter will need to be full of facts and
details and will need to give information specifically about a custom or tradition that Mary could use in her story.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Finish Working with Context Clues: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5, Part 2.

Students who cannot yet read


independently will benefit from
hearing books read to them, either
by a caregiver or through audio
recordings.

Complete Questions from the Text: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5 if you did not do so during class.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 10

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 6


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Name:
Date:
Text Title and Chapters:
Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Part 2: Focusing on Culture


What evidence did you find of customs or traditions in ancient Japan?
What evidence did you find of a custom or tradition in ancient Japan?

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Page in text

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Text Title and Chapters: Dragon of the Red Dawn, Chapter 5
Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

In the streets of Edo, and a Jack, Annie, Basho,


clearing along the banks
samurai
of a river

What are the most important


events in this chapter?
More samurai confront
Jack and Annie and again
Basho saves them by saying
theyre his students. Jack is
asked to recite poetry for
the samurai. Later, they
walk through the market
and across a bridge to a
clearing to Bashos home.

Part 2: Focusing on Culture


What evidence did you find of customs or traditions in ancient Japan?
What evidence did you find of a custom or tradition in ancient Japan?

Page in text

bowing when you greet someone

p. 48

reciting poetry

p. 49

watching a sumo wrestling match

p. 52

people selling items by carrying them on long poles and shouting what
they have

p. 5253

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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Questions from the Text:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Name:
Date:
1. How does Jack feel about having to recite poetry for the samurai? Use details from the text to
support your answer.

2. As Jack, Annie, and Basho traveled to Bashos home, what were some of the sights they saw?
Use details from the text to support your answer.

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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Questions from the Text:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5
3. Reread this excerpt from the story:
No thank you, said Jack. He loved books, but he kept going. He was afraid the
samurai might show up again at any moment.
A boy carried birdcages and shouted, Birds! Birds!
Suddenly Jack felt a hand on his shoulder. He nearly had a heart attack! But it was
just Basho.
Why did Jack react this way when Basho touched his shoulder? Use details from the text to
support your answer.

Questions from the Text:


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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
1. How does Jack feel about having to recite poetry for the samurai? Use details from the text to
support your answer.
Jack feels nervous and anxious at the thought of reciting poetry for the samurai.
In the text it says, What talent? Jack wondered frantically. If Jack was frantic, it
means he was upset and worried. In the text it also said that Jack spoke in a
squeaky voice, which is evidence that he was nervous or anxious.
2. As Jack, Annie, and Basho traveled to Bashos home, what were some of the sights they saw?
Use details from the text to support your answer.
As Jack, Annie, and Basho traveled to Bashos home, they saw many sights like
peddlers selling things like shoes, pastries, and books at the market. They also
saw a bridge over a canal, a temple, bamboo houses, and a river.
3. Reread this excerpt from the story:
No thank you, said Jack. He loved books, but he kept going. He was afraid the
samurai might show up again at any moment.
A boy carried birdcages and shouted, Birds! Birds!
Suddenly Jack felt a hand on his shoulder. He nearly had a heart attack! But it
was just Basho.
Why did Jack react this way when Basho touched his shoulder? Use details from the text to
support your answer.
When Basho touches Jack on his shoulder, Jack thinks it is the samurai who have
returned. In the text it says, He was afraid the samurai might show up again.
There are so many people in the market and Jack is afraid that among them are
the samurai who check people for passports. Jack and Annie dont have passports
so if they get caught, they will be in trouble.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5

Name:
Date:
Target: I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Chapter 5 of Dragon of the Red
Dawn.
How to Work with Context Clues:
1. Read the sentence a few times, focusing on the unknown word.
2. Look at the other words in the sentence and think about what clues the sentence gives you.
3. Try to replace the unknown word with a word you know.
Part 1: Classwork
1. frantically (page 49)
What talent? Jack wondered frantically.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

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Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

What does this word


mean?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5
2. peddlers (page 52)
Peddlers carried long poles over their shoulders with baskets swinging on the ends.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc.


Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to
Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

What does this word


mean?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5
Part 2: Homework
wares (page 53)
They shouted about their wares: Shoes and socks! Cakes and pastries! Rope and twine!
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

clearing (page 54)


Through the deepening shadows of twilight, Basho led them to a clearing not far from the river.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


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Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5


Answers, for Teacher Reference
Target: I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Chapter 5 of Dragon of the Red
Dawn.
How to Work with Context Clues:
1. Read the sentence a few times, focusing on the unknown word.
2. Look at the other words in the sentence and think about what clues the sentence gives you.
3. Try to replace the unknown word with a word you know.
Part 1: Classwork
1. frantically (page 49)
What talent? Jack wondered frantically.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

Jack is nervous around the


samurai. When the
samurai ask him to share
his talent, you can tell Jack
is panicked because the
font changes to show me
what Jack is thinking. The
word has an ly ending so it
is an adverb.

Frantic means kind of


crazy or out of control. I
think it might mean
panicked.

It means in an out of
controlled way.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5
Answers, for Teacher Reference
2. peddlers (page 52)
Peddlers carried long poles over their shoulders with baskets swinging on the ends.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

Peddlers are people


because it says in the text
that theyre carrying long
poles that have baskets on
them. Jack and Annie are
walking in an area where
people are selling things.

sellers, merchants

Someone who sells


something

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 21

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Working with Context Clues Recording Form:


Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5
Answers, for Teacher Reference
Part 2: Homework
wares (page 53)
They shouted about their wares: Shoes and socks! Cakes and pastries! Rope and twine!
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

On page 53, it says the


peddlers shout about their
wares. Shoes and socks!
Cakes and pastries!
Rope and twine!

objects, items, things

things to be sold

clearing (page 54)


Through the deepening shadows of twilight, Basho led them to a clearing not far from the river.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word might


mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

Jack and Annie are going to


Bashos home and Basho is
leading the way through
the woods and along the
river. The text says they
come to the clearing and it
says in the center is a pond
and a hut.

I think clearing means like


an open spot because when
you clear something off,
you move things out of the
way. Basho would need a
place to put his home.

An open area of land with


no trees

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 22

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 6

Performance Task Prompt


Author Mary Pope Osborne has announced she will write a new Magic Tree House book! Instead of
traveling to a place in the past, however, Ms. Osborne has decided that Jack and Annie will return in
the present to a country theyve already visited. Before she begins writing, Ms. Osborne wants to
research this countrys customs and traditions. She wants to know what customs and traditions from
the past still exist today, and how they can influence her storys plot.
You have been invited to conduct this research for her! After conducting research with your small
group about your assigned country, you will individually write a letter to the author of the Magic Tree
House series to inform her about customs and traditions that existed in the past and are still used
today. This will help her know what she should include in her story and why. Include information
about at least one custom and one tradition that you researched in your Magic Tree House book that
was also included in your Exploring Countries text. Use accurate facts, definitions, and details from
your research to explain how these aspects of culture are important to the country. At the end of your
letter, provide a brief description of how Mary Pope Osborne might use the information you found in
a new book on this country.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L6 June 2014 23

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 7


Mid-Unit Assessment: Reading to Capture Key
Details: Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can answer questions using specific details from literary text (RL.3.1)
I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can determine the key details of pages 5561 by identifying the important parts of the chapter
(who/where/what).

Context Clues: Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 5, Part


2 (from homework)

I can identify and record key details from pages 5561 that connect with the culture of ancient Japan.

Questions from the Text: Dragon of the Red Dawn


Chapter 5 (from homework)

I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words from pages 5561 of Dragon of the Red
Dawn.
I can answer questions about pages 5561 of Dragon of the Red Dawn using details from the text.

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Mid-Unit 1 Assessment
Tracking My Progress: Mid-Unit 1 recording form

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

In this lesson, students independently apply the reading skills they have been building in Lessons 26.

A. Engaging the Reader: Learning about Culture


through Literary Text (10 minutes)

Note: In Lessons 5 and 6, you were encouraged to keep solid student samples of the Capturing Key
Details recording forms to use in this lesson. If necessary, cover the students names.

B. Preparing for the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (5 minutes)

Students may finish the reading of pages 5561 of Dragon of the Red Dawn at different paces. Be sure
to have an activity prepared for students who finish early.

2. Work Time
A. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (30 minutes)
B. Tracking My Progress (5 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Read-aloud: Chapter 6 (3 minutes)
B. Anchor Chart: How Do Authors of Literary Text
Reveal Information about a Topic? (7 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Tell someone at home what you learned about
culture from Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 6.

After this lesson, students move on to using informational text to learn about the culture of Japan. They
will finish reading Dragon of the Red Dawn as part of a structured homework routine. For the
remainder of the unit, students will read, complete a recording form, and share what they learned in the
beginning of the following lesson. Students will revisit Dragon of the Red Dawn near the end of the unit
to make connections of literary text to informational text.
Students formally self-assess where they are with the key learning targets up to this point in the unit.
After the mid-unit assessment, they complete the Tracking My Progress: Mid-Unit 1 recording form.
Remind students that they have been doing this sort of self-assessment orally during lesson debriefs; in
this lesson, they will do it in writing.
Review students assessments to gauge their comprehension, and also their ability to recognize customs
and traditions. Analyzing the mid-unit assessment and the Tracking My Progress: Mid-Unit 1 recording
form will help you identify students needing more support. Determine if the challenge lies with the
students ability to recognize the information as pertinent or whether it is an issue with note-taking.
Prepare to give these students extra support and additional opportunities to do this kind of work using
other similar materials.
Use the short response rubric to score students short answer responses on the assessment.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

literary

Document camera
Capturing Key Details anchor chart (from Lesson 4)
Sample student work: Capturing Key Details recording forms for Chapters 35 (collected in Lessons 5 and 6)
Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student)
Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Reading to Capture Key Details: Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561) (one per student)
Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Reading to Capture Key Details: Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561) (answers, for teacher
reference)
Tracking My Progress: Mid-Unit 1 recording form (one per student)
Guiding Questions anchor chart (from Lesson 1)
How Mary Pope Osborne Teaches Us about Culture anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Closing and Assessment B)
2-point Rubric: Writing from Sources/Short Response (for teacher reference)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Learning about Culture through Literary Text (10 minutes)
Note: In Lessons 5 and 6, you were encouraged to keep solid student samples of the Capturing Key Details recording forms to
use in this lesson. If necessary, cover the students names.
Using a document camera, display the Capturing Key Details anchor chart (from Lesson 4), and sample student
work: Capturing Key Details recording forms for Chapters 35 (collected in Lessons 5 and 6).
Remind students that they have used these recording forms a few times now. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

What does the information on these recording forms tell you?


Listen for students to comment that if they had not read the chapters, they would know something about the chapter based
on the recording form. Guide students toward this as needed.
Remind students that we are discovering some pieces of the culture of ancient Japan by looking for evidence of customs and
traditions.
B. Preparing for the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (5 minutes)
Direct students to take a few silent moments to carefully reflect on all the work theyve done in the last three lessons as
theyve read chapters of Dragon of the Red Dawn. Tell them that at this point its time to check on how theyre doing with
the things weve been working on in Unit 1. Explain that in doing this work, they will also learn more about the culture of
ancient Japan. Use the analogy of a jigsaw puzzle: the things written on their recording forms are like the pieces of the
puzzle. As more and more pieces are added to the puzzle, the picture becomes clearer and more complete. As they read
more, their picture of ancient Japans culture will become clearer and more complete.
Tell students they will now read part of Chapter 6 on their own as their Mid-Unit 1 Assessment. Tell students that there are
no surprises on this assessment; its just what they have been practicing for the past few days in class.
Examine the learning targets with students. Address any clarifying questions.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (30 minutes)


Be sure students have their text, Dragon of the Red Dawn. Tell students that for the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, they will
only read part of a chapter: from the beginning (page 55) up to and including page 61. Remind students that they can read
that portion of the text multiple times.

Consider various accommodations


for students who qualify.

Distribute the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Reading to Capture Key Details: Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 55
61). Review the directions with students. Answer any clarifying questions.
Give students 30 minutes to complete the assessment. Circulate to observe.

For students who struggle with


decoding, fluency, or
comprehension of the text, consider
reading the text and questions
aloud.
For students who struggle with
responding in writing, consider
using assistive technology.

Collect students assessments.

Students may also be


accommodated with additional time
to complete the assessment.
Students who struggle to recognize
evidence of culture within the pages
used for the mid-unit assessment
will need extra support and
additional opportunities to do this
kind of work using other similar
materials.
B. Tracking My Progress (5 minutes)
Distribute the Tracking My Progress: Mid-Unit 1 recording form. Explain that this is a chance for students to think
about how well they are doing meeting the main targets they have been working on.
Briefly examine the Tracking My Progress: Mid-Unit 1 recording form with students to provide clarification as necessary.
Invite students to independently complete their Tracking My Progress: Mid-Unit 1 recording form.

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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)
Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Read-aloud: Chapter 6 (3 minutes)


Gather students whole group in a circle. Give them specific positive feedback for their focus during the Mid-Unit 1
Assessment.
Have students follow along in their books while you read aloud the remainder of Chapter 6 (since students only read pages
5561 during Work Time).
B. Anchor Chart: How Do Authors of Literary Text Reveal Information about a Topic? (7 minutes)
Refer back to the Guiding Questions anchor chart. Either post the guiding questions or read them aloud to students.
Ask students to Think-Pair-Share: What have you learned from your work so far? Students may approach this question
differently. They may talk about what its like to read a chapter book or they may talk about things theyve learned about
ancient Japan. They may talk about what they do to figure out the meaning of unknown words or to answer text-dependent
questions.
Remind students that Dragon of the Red Dawn is a literary text. Clarify the meaning of the word literary if needed. Using a
simple Thumb-O-Meter (thumbs-up means yes, thumbs-down means no and thumbs-sideways means unsure), ask students
whether Dragon of the Red Dawn contains any information about the culture of ancient Japan. Students should respond
that yes, the book does contain information about ancient Japan and what life was like for people in Japan long ago. Connect
this to the key concepts related to culture.
Ask students to Think-Pair-Share: How did the author, Mary Pope Osborne, teach us about the culture of ancient Japan?
One answer is through Jacks research book, but Mary Pope Osborne also weaves information about Japans culture into the
characters, setting, and plot of the story. During this discussion, it will be important for you to clarify, extend, and guide
students toward some of these understandings. Chart this thinking on a new How Mary Pope Osborne Teaches Us
about Culture anchor chart. Keep this chart to refer back to in future lessons.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Tell someone at home what you learned about culture from Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 6.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 6

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 7


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)

Name:
Date:
Directions:
1. Read pages 5561 from Chapter 6: The Banana Tree in Dragon of the Red Dawn.
2. Reread the same pages, thinking about the gist and the facts and details related to cultural
heritage.
3. Take notes on the Where/Who/What recording form below, just as we have been doing together in
class.
4. Answer the specific Questions from the Text in Part 2.
Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this part of the
chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this section of the
text?

What are the most important


events in this section of the text?

Learning Target: I can determine the key details of pages 5561 by identifying the important
parts of the chapter (who/where/what).

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 8

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)
Part 2: Questions from the Text
1. Describe the inside and outside of Bashos home. Use details from the story to support your answer.

2. What does Jack find puzzling about Bashos house? Use at least two details from the story to
support your answer.

3. On page 55, Basho says that his humble castle is grander than all the castles of the samurai.
What does he mean by this? Use specific details from other parts of the chapter to support your
response.

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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)
4. Which of the following sentences from the chapter gives you information about the culture of
ancient Japan?
a) Jack and Annie stared at the large plant with the long, droopy leaves.
b) He pulled three tiny bowls and a small cloth bag from the bamboo chest.
c) I like this house, though, said Annie, Its cozy.
5. A: What does the word scrawny mean as it is used on page 56?
a) large
b) thin
c) bright
d) strong
B: Which of these phrases from the text best helps you understand the meaning of scrawny as it is
used in this scene?
a)
b)
c)
d)

Its nice here


slipped off his sandals
droopy banana tree
beauty of the Imperial Garden

6. When Annie sees Bashos house, she says, I guess this is a three mat house. What does she mean
by this?
a) There are three mats on the floor.
b) Its a very small house.
c) The house is decorated with mats.
d) The house looks like it belongs to a famous person.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read pages 5561 from Chapter 6: The Banana Tree in Dragon of the Red Dawn.
2. Reread the same pages, thinking about the gist and the facts and details related to cultural
heritage.
3. Take notes on the Where/Who/What recording form below, just as we have been doing together in
class.
4. Answer the specific Questions from the Text in Part 2.
Part 1: What are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this part of the
chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this section of the
text?

What are the most important


events in this section of the text?

Bashos house, both inside


and outside

Basho, Annie, Jack

Annie and Jack realize


Basho does not live in a
castle. He lives in small,
rundown house.
Basho takes them inside
and makes green tea. Jack
looks up Basho in his book
and they realize Basho is
one of Japans greatest
poets. They ask Basho
about his poems and how
he teaches the samurai.

Learning Target: I can determine the key details of pages 5561 by identifying the important
parts of the chapter (who/where/what).

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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part 2: Questions from the Text
1. Describe the inside and outside of Bashos home. Use details from the story to support your answer.
The outside of Bashos home was shabby with a droopy banana tree in the yard.
Inside Bashos home there is only a low wooden table and a bamboo chest. The floor
is made of dirt and is covered by three straw mats. There is also a fireplace and a
small oil lamp.
2. What does Jack find puzzling about Bashos house? Use at least two details from the story to
support your answer.
Jack is surprised that such an important person has such a shabby house. When he
first sees it, he says, This is your castle? He also says that he thought a famous
teacher of the samurai would have a 50 mat house.
3. On page 55, Basho says that his humble castle is grander than all the castles of the samurai. What
does he mean by this? Use specific details from other parts of the chapter to support your response.
Basho means that he doesnt have to live in a castle to be happy. He says a poet
doesnt need a castle, just nature, and his house has a garden and a banana tree and
the sound of the river outside. He has the wind, clouds, flowers, and birds to help
him write his poetry.
4. Which of the following sentences from the chapter gives you information about the culture of
ancient Japan?
a) Jack and Annie stared at the large plant with the long, droopy leaves.
b) He pulled three tiny bowls and a small cloth bag from the bamboo chest.
c) I like this house, though, said Annie, Its cozy.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment:
Reading to Capture Key Details:
Dragon of the Red Dawn (pages 5561)
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
5. A: What does the word scrawny mean as it is used on page 56?
a) large
b) thin
c) bright
d) strong
B: Which of these phrases from the text best helps you understand the meaning of scrawny as it is
used in this scene?
a) Its nice here
b) slipped off his sandals
c) droopy banana tree
d) beauty of the Imperial Garden
6. When Annie sees Bashos house, she says, I guess this is a three mat house. What does she mean
by this?
a) There are three mats on the floor.
b) Its a very small house.
c) The house is decorated with mats.
d) The house looks like it belongs to a famous person.

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Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

Tracking My Progress:
Mid-Unit 1
Name:
Date:
Learning Target 1: I can answer questions using specific details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
1. Target 1 in my own words is:

2. How am I doing? Circle one.


I need more help to learn this

I understand some of this

I am on my way!

3. The evidence to support my self-assessment is:

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

Tracking My Progress:
Mid-Unit 1
Learning Target 2: I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
1. Target 2 in my own words is:

2. How am I doing? Circle one.


I need more help to learn this

I understand some of this

I am on my way!

3. The evidence to support my self-assessment is:

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

Tracking My Progress:
Mid-Unit 1
Learning Target 3: I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
1. Target 3 in my own words is:

2. How am I doing? Circle one.


I need more help to learn this

I understand some of this

I am on my way!

3. The evidence to support my self-assessment is:

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 7

2-point Rubric: Writing from Sources/Short Response


2-point Response

1-point Response

0-point Response

1From

The features of a 2-point response are:

Valid inferences and/or claims from the text where required by the
prompt

Evidence of analysis of the text where required by the prompt

Relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, and/or other information


from the text to develop response according to the requirements of the
prompt

Sufficient number of facts, definitions, concrete details, and/or other


information from the text as required by the prompt

Complete sentences where errors do not impact readability

The features of a 1-point response are:

A mostly literal recounting of events or details from the text as required


by the prompt

Some relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, and/or other


information from the text to develop response according to the
requirements of the prompt

Incomplete sentences or bullets

The features of a 0-point response are:

A response that does not address any of the requirements of the


prompt or is totally inaccurate

No response (blank answer)

A response that is not written in English

A response that is unintelligible or indecipherable

New York State Department of Education, October 6, 2012.

If the prompt requires two texts and the student only references one text, the response can be scored no higher than a 1.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L7 June 2014 17

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 8


Close Reading Guide: Using Informational Text
Features and Learning about Japans Culture
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8


Close Reading Guide:
Using Informational Text Features and Learning about Japans Culture

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can use information from the words to understand informational text. (RI.3.7)
I can use information from the illustrations (maps, photographs) to understand informational texts (RL.3.7)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can use text features to efficiently find information in the text Exploring Countries: Japan.

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt recording form

I can use text features to learn new information about Japan.

Word Tracker recording form

I can accurately record information I find about Japan.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8


Close Reading Guide:
Using Informational Text Features and Learning about Japans Culture

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

This lesson begins by introducing a routine for independently reading the remaining chapters in
Dragon of the Red Dawn. Students will read a chapter each night and complete the Independent
Reading recording form. The next days lesson will begin by briefly sharing and discussing what was
read the night before. Feel free to move this work to an independent reading time if one is available.

A. Establishing a Homework Routine: Completing


Dragon of the Red Dawn (10 minutes)
B. Engaging the Reader: Book Walk of Exploring
Countries: Japan (5 minutes)
C. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Close Reading Guide: Using Informational Text
Features (20 minutes)
B. Text Feature Scavenger Hunt (14 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Concentric Circles: Sharing from Our Scavenger
Hunt (5 minutes)
B. Target Check (1 minute)
4. Homework
A. Read Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 7 and
complete the Independent Reading recording form.

In the second half of Unit 1, students dive into informational text to find information directly related to
Japans culture. The majority of time in the second half of the unit will be spent working with Exploring
Countries: Japan.
This shared research in Unit 1 lays the foundation for students more independent work in Unit 2, when
they will work in small groups to learn more about a new country and its culture, through the use of
both literary and informational texts. Students will be using a new Magic Tree House book and various
informational texts connected with their focus country.
This lesson opens with a Book Walk, similar to that used in Lesson 4 when launching the Magic Tree
House book. A Book Walk is always intended to build interest and excitement, but it should also have a
specific intent. The comments you make and questions you pose can set the stage for the lesson.
During the Book Walk, encourage students to take note of and compare the structure of this text to the
literary text Dragon the Red Dawn.
The informational text used in this lesson has a glossary; encourage students to use it to help clarify
some of the focus words. Throughout the year, continue to reinforce the idea of using the features of
informational texts to learn and navigate information.
Consider creating an Interactive Word Wall so students can refer to these words throughout the unit.
Equity sticks are an easy way to randomly call on students to answer questions or share thinking.
In advance:

Post the Structural Features of Chapter Books (Magic Tree House) anchor chart (from Lesson 4).
Prepare an anchor chart that is an enlarged versions of the student handout Text Feature Scavenger
Hunt recording form.
Review: Concentric Circles protocol (see Appendix).
Post: Learning targets.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8


Close Reading Guide:
Using Informational Text Features and Learning about Japans Culture

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

text features, efficiently, research,


caption, glossary, definition, index,
table of contents

Document camera
Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 7 (one per student)
Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student)
Exploring Countries: Japan (book; one per student)
Structural Features of a Chapter Book (Magic Tree House) anchor chart (from Lesson 4)
Structural Features of Informational Text anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Opening B)
Mary Pope Osborne quote (from Lesson 4)
Text Feature Scavenger Hunt anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
Text Features Scavenger Hunt recording form (one per student)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8


Close Reading Guide:
Using Informational Text Features and Learning about Japans Culture

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Establishing a Homework Routine: Completing Dragon of the Red Dawn (10 minutes)

Consider adding nonlinguistic


symbols to the learning targets to
help students understand them.

Explain that students are going to finish reading Dragon of the Red Dawn independently. They will use their close reading
skills to read one chapter each night for homework and record key details from the text on a recording form. Using a
document camera, show students the Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 7. Explain that each night,
students will complete one sheet for homework. The next day, these sheets will be discussed in class and collected by the
teacher.
Review the directions at the top of the sheet. The chart should look familiar; if needed, briefly review what kind of
information belongs in each of the columns. Read the directions for the word puzzle. Explain that the word puzzle at the
bottom of the sheet provides a clue to a key word or phrase in the chapter. Students should read the clue, look on the page
indicated, and try to find a word or phrase with the right number of letters that matches the clue.

Drawing parallels and using


analogies for students or providing
them with real-life examples is an
effective way to bring unfamiliar
vocabulary in the targets into focus.

Demonstrate by inviting students to open their Dragon of the Red Dawn books to page 55. Tell students that you will
read a clue aloud and then they will try to find the word or phrase that solves the clue. Draw five short lines on the board.
Read the clue: the Japanese word that means banana tree. Invite students to scan the text for the answer. When they
think they have it, students should put a thumb at their heart to show that they are ready.
Have students quickly talk with a neighbor about the answer. Cold call a student to share. The answer is Basho. Model
writing the answer on the lines you drew on the board.
Ask for students to show a Fist to Five to indicate how well they understand the homework task. Clarify as needed.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8


Close Reading Guide:
Using Informational Text Features and Learning about Japans Culture

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Engaging the Reader: Book Walk of Exploring Countries: Japan (5 minutes)


Gather students together and display the cover of Exploring Countries: Japan. Tell students that they will read this
book throughout the remainder of the unit to learn about modern day Japan and its culture.
Tell students that they will spend the next few minutes taking a Book Walk to get an idea of some of the information they
might find within Exploring Countries: Japan. They might choose to look at the pictures or read some of the words.
Remind students that they did something similar when they started reading Dragon of the Red Dawn. Briefly point to the
Structural Features of a Chapter Book (Magic Tree House) anchor chart (from Lesson 4).
Distribute one copy of Exploring: Countries Japan to each student. Invite students to take 3 minutes to flip through the
pages to see what they notice. Remind them that, just like their Book Walk with Dragon of the Red Dawn, they should try to
take note of the books structure. Refer back to the Structural Features of a Chapter Book anchor chart.
Then invite students to Think-Pair-Share one interesting idea they read or photograph they saw in the text.
Cold call a few students to share their responses with the class. Chart these responses on a new Structural Features of an
Informational Text anchor chart. Ask probing questions, encouraging students to notice the books structure.
Provide clarification (as needed) of the purpose or role of these different structural components.
C. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)
Direct students attention to todays learning targets. Ask:

* Based on the learning targets, what will we be working on today?


Highlight text features in the first target. Ask students to think about what this phrase means and then talk with a partner.
Cold call a few students to share text features they see. Confirm accurate responses and correct any misconceptions. Explain
to students that text features are the parts of a book that stand out from the rest of the text.
Now underline the word efficiently in the first target. Ask students if they know the meaning of this word. Make sure they
understand that it means to be quick but accurate. (Perhaps give some examples students can relate to from their own
experiences as children.)
Help students understand that they will use resources and text features to find information in their new text.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Unpacking learning targets is a


crucial early step in every lesson.
Targets help the students see where
theyre going and what they will be
doing and learning. Its important
that you help your students
understand that in this part of the
lesson, they must work hard to
understand the learning targets.
Make sure they feel comfortable
enough to speak up and ask for
clarification.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8


Close Reading Guide:
Using Informational Text Features and Learning about Japans Culture

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Close Reading Guide: Using Informational Text Features (20 minutes)


Encourage students to think about the word research. Ask:

Consider adding a small image of


the page where each text feature is
located (with an arrow pointing to
the feature) to the Scavenger Hunt
anchor chart and/or recording form
to remind students what each text
feature looks like.

* What does it mean to do research?


Cold call a few students to share their thinking. Then share the Mary Pope Osborne quote (from Lesson 4):
Whenever I start work on a new Magic Tree House book, I begin the great adventure of research. I visit libraries, the
Internet, bookstores, and museums. I talk to people who are knowledgeable about my subject, and if Im able, I visit the
place where the story occurs.
Remind students that good researchers are also good readers. Discuss with students how reading informational text is very
different from reading literary text. As readers of informational text, they need to learn how to navigate the text and learn
how to use the text features. Say: One way we are going to become stronger readers is by learning to read the text features in
informational books. Tell them that they probably already know something about this from previous years in school and
from their work during Module 1.
Show students the glossary and index at the back of the book and briefly explain the function of each. Say to students: We
learned in Module 1 that the glossary is like a mini-dictionary that helps the reader learn the definition, or meaning, of
important words in the text. The index is an alphabetical list of important information in a text with page numbers. Zoom in
on the index and ask students to Think-Pair-Share and name a topic and the page number they see in the index. Provide
guidance as necessary, with examples such as: If I wanted to learn about holidays, I would turn to pages 2425. Using the
index helps me find the information efficiently because I dont have to turn to every page in the book to find what Im
looking for. Invite student questions about the glossary and index, and clarify misunderstandings as necessary.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

For students needing additional


support producing language,
consider offering a sentence frame
or starter or a cloze sentence to
assist with language production and
provide structure.
ELL language acquisition is
facilitated by interacting with native
speakers of English who provide
models of language.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8


Close Reading Guide:
Using Informational Text Features and Learning about Japans Culture

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Tell students that the table of contents is a very important text feature found at the front of some texts. Project the table of
contents on page 3. Say to the class: The table of contents helps the reader identify key topics in the book in the order they
are presented. Help students understand that the sections listed in the table of contents are titled and that they need to
think about what topics are likely to be in each section based on those titles. Ask students to name one topic they might be
able to find in this text based on the sections listed in the table of contents. Support as needed with a statement such as: If I
wanted to find out the animals that live in Japan, I could go to page 10, because that section is titled Wildlife.
Post or project the Text Feature Scavenger Hunt anchor chart (this should look just like students recording form).
Cold call a few students to share whole group what they notice on the anchor chart. Listen for responses such as: captions,
photographs, or bold words, etc. As they name features that appear on the anchor chart, point to them on the anchor
chart and then read the descriptions of those features aloud. This will help students realize that the text features are defined
on the recording form.
Briefly orient students to the format of the anchor chart (and therefore the format of their recording form). Point out that
the text features are listed on the left, and that a brief description of each text feature appears in the box as well.
Project page 13. Point to the Fun Fact caption. Ask students about the information they could learn from this text feature.
Provide a sentence frame such as: When I see the _____, I learn_____. Guide students with an example as needed, such
as: When I look more carefully at this photograph, I realize that the Ainu are dressed in ceremonial costumes. This might be
related to some sort of tradition or celebration.
Ask students to close their books for a few moments. Project page 17 but cover up the caption. Direct students attention to
the photograph. Ask: What do you see in this photograph? Students will likely offer basic information such as The
photograph shows a girl or student in a classroom, Shes wearing a uniform, and Shes writing. Now uncover the
caption. Before talking about the content of the caption, ask: What are the words called that are shown below the
photograph? Cold call a student for the response.
Now read the caption aloud and ask students to listen for important information.
Tell students to look at the photograph again, but this time think about what the caption says. Ask: Does the photograph
mean more to you now that youve read the caption?
Follow up by asking why that is true. Ask: What did you learn from this caption?
Track students ideas on the Text Feature Scavenger Hunt anchor chart in the box to the right of the Caption heading.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8


Close Reading Guide:
Using Informational Text Features and Learning about Japans Culture
Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Direct students to partner with another student to find another text feature in the book and examine it carefully to learn
something new. After a few minutes, ask a partnership to share the feature they found and what they learned from it. If the
text feature is one listed on the anchor chart, track ideas on the anchor chart to the right of the heading for that text feature.
Close out this part of the lesson by telling students that there are many things to be learned by reading and understanding
the text features in an informational book. It may be necessary to remind students of the definition of text feature: the parts
of a book that stand out from the rest of the text.

Consider writing and breaking down


the directions for the Text Feature
Scavenger Hunt into numbered
elements. ELLs can return to these
guidelines to make sure they are on
track.

Review the three steps to the Text Feature Scavenger Hunt:

Pre-mark a few text features with


sticky notes in the text for students
who might struggle with this task.

1.

Find the text feature.

2.

Use the text feature to read closely and learn something new.

3.

Track the new information you learned on the recording form.

Inform students that they will now be doing this same task on their own on their Text Feature Scavenger Hunt recording form.

ELLs and other students can record


new vocabulary in places such as
their personal dictionaries or
vocabulary logs to reference
throughout the module.
Increase interactions with
vocabulary in context. This
increases the rate of vocabulary
acquisition for ELLs.

B. Text Feature Scavenger Hunt (14 minutes)


Distribute the Text Feature Scavenger Hunt recording form. Tell students that they will now use their Exploring
Countries: Japan texts to find and learn information efficiently using text features. Students should work with a partner.
Give students 14 minutes to work together to complete the Text Feature Scavenger Hunt recording form. Clarify that
students should work together but they will each record their work on their own recording forms. Make sure students know
that they record new information they learn from reading the text feature closely. Circulate and provide support and
clarification as needed.
After 14 minutes, stop students. Tell them it is fine if they did not finish, because the main purpose was to introduce them to
this text and its features.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 8

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8


Close Reading Guide:
Using Informational Text Features and Learning about Japans Culture

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Concentric Circles: Sharing from Our Scavenger Hunt (5 minutes)


Call students together in an open area of the classroom. Ask them to bring their Text Feature Scavenger Hunt recording
form with them.

Consider allowing students to draw


their observations, ideas, or notes
when appropriate. This allows ELLs
to participate in a meaningful way.

Use the Concentric Circles protocol to allow students to share the new information they learned from the text features in
Exploring Countries: Japan. Gauge time carefully before stopping students and having them move two or three places to the
left and repeating the process. Students will need to have enough time to allow each partner to share something different
from their recording forms.

Provide the necessary support for


ELLs to share orally, including as
part of a triad if that is helpful.

Remind students of the new independent reading routine they will begin for homework tonight.
B. Target Check (1 minute)
Refer to the learning targets for the day. Reread them to the class. Ask students to quickly show a thumbs-up, thumbssideways, or thumbs-down for each target in regards to how they felt they did in accomplishing the target. Take note of
students who are giving thumbs-sideways or thumbs-down. Students who feel they may be struggling could benefit from
additional support later in the day or during the next days lesson.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Read Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 8 and complete the Independent Reading recording form.

Students who cannot yet read


independently will benefit from
hearing books read to them, either
by a caregiver or through audio
recordings.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 9

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 8


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8

Independent Reading Recording Form: Chapter 7

Name:
Date:
Independently read the next chapter in Dragon of the Red Dawn.
Complete the chart below to capture key details.
Solve the word puzzle using a word or phrase from the chapter.
Be prepared to share your work with your classmates.
Capturing Key Details: Record important details from the chapter in the chart below.
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events


in this chapter?

Word Puzzle: Finding Specific Details in the Chapter


Find a word or phrase in the chapter that matches the clue. Write the letters on the lines below. The
letter with a star under it will help you figure out the answer to an important question once you have
finished the book.
CLUE: The capital city of ancient Japan that nearly burned to the ground (page 73)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8

Independent Reading Recording Form: Chapter 7


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)

Independently read the next chapter in Dragon of the Red Dawn.


Complete the chart below to capture key details.
Solve the word puzzle using a word or phrase from the chapter.
Be prepared to share your work with your classmates.
Capturing Key Details: Record important details from the chapter in the chart below.
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Bashos house
lumberyard
river

Basho
Jack and Annie
men helping on the fire
brigade

Jack and Annie wake up to


bells ringing.
The lumberyard is on fire
and people are trying to
save it.
Basho runs to help and so
do Jack and Annie.
They try to help but realize
they need more help from
magic.
They run back to Bashos
to get the wand and get
magic help.

Word Puzzle: Finding Specific Details in the Chapter


Find a word or phrase in the chapter that matches the clue. Write the letters on the lines below. The
letter with a star under it will help you figure out the answer to an important question once you have
finished the book.
CLUE: The capital city of ancient Japan that nearly burned to the ground (page 73)
E
*

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt Recording Form

Name:
Date:
Directions: Use your copy of Exploring Countries: Japan to find the named text features. Once you
have found each text feature, write down the page number and the new information you learned
from that feature.
Text Feature That Helps Us
Find Information
Efficiently

Page
#

Information I Learned

Photographs
(Picture that shows the reader
what something looks like)

Map
(Image showing part of the
earths surface, usually
including land and water
features)
Caption
(Words that describe a picture
or photograph so the reader can
better understand it)
Bold Words
(Words in heavy type that help
the reader spot the most
important words)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt Recording Form


Text Feature That Helps Us
Find Information
Efficiently

Page
#

Information I Learned

Index
(Alphabetical list of important
topics in the text with page
numbers, found at the end of
the text)
Glossary
(Mini-dictionary that helps the
reader define important words
in the text)
Table of Contents
(List of key topics in the order
they appear to help the reader
find information more easily)
Other

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions: Use your copy of Exploring Countries Japan to find the named text features. Once you
have found each text feature, write down the page number and the new information you learned
from that feature.
Text Feature that Helps Us
Find Information
Efficiently

Page
#

Information I Learned

Photographs
(Picture that shows the reader
what something looks like)

21
23
11

People play baseball in Japan.


The Japanese eat miso soup and sushi.
Animals include the Iriomote wildcat, the crane,
and the Japanese macaque.

Map
(Image showing part of the
earths surface, usually
including land and water
features)

45

Japans neighbors are China, Russia, South


Korea, and North Korea.
Japan has four main islands.
Tokyo is the capital of Japan.
The Pacific Ocean is to the east and the Sea of
Japan is to the west.

Caption
(Words that describe a picture
or photograph so the reader can
better understand it)

6
9
15
22

Mt. Fuji is the tallest mountain in Japan.


Japan has about 1,500 earthquakes per year.
There are fast trains in Japan called bullet trains.
Gohan is the Japanese word for cooked rice.

Bold Words
(Words in heavy type that help
the reader spot the most
important words)

12
13
19

Ancestors
Ainu
Natural resources

Index
(Alphabetical list of important
topics in the text with page
numbers, found at the end of
the text)

32

kanji, page 17
anime, page 27
Nagoya, page 14

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 8

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Text Feature that Helps Us
Find Information
Efficiently

Page
#

Information I Learned

Glossary
(Mini-dictionary that helps the
reader define important words
in the text)

30

chopsticks: a pair of short, thin sticks that


Japanese people use to eat food
tsunami: a powerful wave caused by an
underwater earthquake

Table of Contents
(List of key topics in the order
they appear to help the reader
find information more easily)

Some of the things you can read about are daily


life, holidays, wildlife, the land, and food.

Other

28
29

Hinomaru is the name of Japans flag.


Japans unit of money is the yen.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L8 June 2014 16

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 9


Close Reading as a Researcher: Reading with a
Question in Mind
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9


Close Reading as a Researcher:
Reading with a Question in Mind

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask questions to deepen my understanding of informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific details from informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can determine the meaning of unknown words in informational text. (RI.3.4)
I can prepare myself to participate in discussions. (SL.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can ask and answer questions about Japan and its culture using the information text Exploring
Countries: Japan.

Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 7 (from


homework)

I can answer text-dependent questions using specific details from Exploring Countries: Japan.

Exploring Culture recording form

I can use the glossary to help me understand important words about culture.

Reading with a Question in Mind recording form

I can talk effectively with my partner about what important culture words mean.

Word Tracker recording form

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9


Close Reading as a Researcher:
Reading with a Question in Mind

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

This lesson reinforces the independent reading routine with literary text and has students digging into
an informational text. Based on the needs of your class, this launch lesson may run longer than 60
minutes. Consider continuing at another time of the day, or breaking this lesson into two sessions.

A. Engaging the Reader: Homework Routine (5


minutes)
B. Unpacking Learning Targets and Revisiting Guiding
Questions (10 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Asking and Answering Questions about
Informational Text (20 minutes)
B. Reading with a Question in Mind: Answering TextDependent Questions (15 minutes)
C. Using Word Trackers: Learning New Words (5
minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Reading with a Question in Mind Anchor Chart and
Debrief Learning Targets (5 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Read Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 8 and
complete the Independent Reading recording form.

Before beginning this lesson, prepare a Mystery Letter anchor chart to use when reviewing homework
each day. Add the starred letters from the homework to the chart each day (see sample chart in
supporting materials).
Students begin this lesson by reviewing their Lesson 8 homework. Be sure to reinforce this new
independent reading routine, which they will use to read the remainder or Dragon of the Red Dawn.
Students will read Chapter 8 for homework. As noted in Lesson 7, feel free to move this homework
assignment work to an independent reading time if one is available.
In this lesson, students are shown how to read with a question in mind. This sets a specific purpose for
reading. After looking through their Exploring Countries: Japan books and recording facts on the
Exploring Countries recording form, students generate questions that could support them in learning
more about those facts. Students are practicing this skill to meet standard RI.3.1 (asking questions that
will deepen their understanding of the text).
Since students only read select sections of each text, these lessons also provide another opportunity for
students to practice using a table of contents or index to navigate through an informational text quickly.
Question 4 on the Reading with a Question in Mind recording form gives you a good opportunity to
formatively assess students thought processes as they decide which text features help them effectively
find answers to text-dependent questions.
Students revisit the word tracker vocabulary routines introduced in Lesson 3. Prepare a new Word
Tracker anchor chart that mirrors the student Word Tracker recording form. This will be used for
modeling the routines.
In the Closing of this lesson, a new Reading with a Question in Mind anchor chart is co-constructed with
students. If you prefer, use the sample anchor chart provided in the supporting materials and share it
with students point by point.
Post: Learning targets.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9


Close Reading as a Researcher:
Reading with a Question in Mind

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

text feature, glossary, index, heading,


definition, tradition, chopsticks

Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student)


Mystery Letter anchor chart (new; co-created with students throughout remainder of unit; see Teaching Notes)
Document camera
Exploring Countries: Japan (book; one per student)
Guiding Questions anchor chart (from Lesson 1)
Exploring Culture recording form (one per student)
Reading with a Question in Mind recording form (one per student)
Word Tracker recording form (one per student)
Word Tracker anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
Reading with a Question in Mind anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Closing A)
Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 8 (one per student)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9


Close Reading as a Researcher:
Reading with a Question in Mind

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Homework Routine (5 minutes)


Be sure students have their text Dragon of the Red Dawn. Gather whole group to discuss the Lesson 8 homework. Ask
students to take out their Independent Reading recording form for Chapter 7. Have students turn and talk to a partner for 2
minutes about something they learned about ancient Japan from last nights reading.

Consider partnering an ELL with a


student who speaks the same L1
when discussion of complex content
is required. This can let students
have more meaningful discussions
and clarify points in L1.

Then cold call a few students to briefly share their responses in the Where, Who, and What columns on the chart.
Ask a volunteer to share the answer to this chapters word puzzle (Edo). Point out that the letter E has a star under it. Show
the class the Mystery Letter anchor chart you have posted. Explain that the letters with a star under them are clues that
will help the class to answer the question at the top of the chart: What do Jack and Annie learn from their adventures in
ancient Japan? You will record these letters on the class chart each day. At the end of the story, the class will unscramble the
letters to discover a mystery word that will help them answer this important question. Add the starred letter, E to the
Mystery Letter anchor chart.
Continue to reinforce this new routine in which students read chapters independently for homework. Give specific positive
feedback for ways in which you see students reading stamina growing.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9


Close Reading as a Researcher:
Reading with a Question in Mind

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Unpacking Learning Targets and Revisiting Guiding Questions (10 minutes)


Remind students that today they will be focusing on the informational text Exploring Countries: Japan. Orient students to
the first two learning targets:

* I can ask and answer questions about Japan and its culture using the informational text Exploring Countries: Japan.
* I can answer text-dependent questions using specific details from Exploring Countries: Japan.
Ask students if they have any questions about the targets. At this point in the year, students should be quite familiar with
targets related to asking and answering questions based on evidence from the text.
Using a document camera, display the title page of Exploring Countries: Japan for students to see. Have them take
note of the authors name shown on the title page.
Post the Guiding Questions anchor chart. Focus students of these two questions:

How do authors conduct research and build knowledge to inform their writing?
How can authors share knowledge on a topic gained through research?
Ask students if they think that Colleen Sexton had to conduct research in order to write the book Exploring Countries:
Japan. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* What do Mary Pope Osborne and Colleen Sexton have in common as authors?
Draw students out to name some of the commonalities:

Both authors had an interest in Japan.


Both authors had to decide what information about Japan was important to include in their books.
Both authors had to conduct research.
Both authors had to make decisions on how organize and share the information with readers.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9


Close Reading as a Researcher:
Reading with a Question in Mind

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Asking and Answering Questions about Informational Text (20 minutes)


With students seated at their desks, have them take out their Exploring Countries: Japan books. Distribute the Exploring
Culture recording form and project a copy.

For ELL students, consider


providing a partially filled-in
Exploring Culture recording form
that includes the question sentence
stems: What is , Why is , and
How is . This provides students
with a model for starting a sentence.

Explain to students that they will have 5 minutes to look through the book for the purpose of finding facts about Japan and
its culture. You may want to suggest that they use the I Notice/I Wonder approach from earlier in this module. Decide if its
necessary to model with an example.
Invite students to examine the Exploring Culture recording form together as a class. After finding information that piques
their interest, students will record facts in the left-hand column.
Emphasize that for now, students should leave the second column blank.
Set a time limit of 5 minutes and tell students that its okay if they dont get all of their facts written down. Have students
begin. Circulate and assist as necessary, making sure students are not doing an in-depth reading at this point, but rather, are
taking a quick look and recording facts they find on the Exploring Culture recording form. (Note: Students may have more
facts than they can record in the time allowed. Whats most important is that students engage with the text and begin to read
like a researcher. In the next part of the lesson, students will practice reading with a question in mind.)
After 5 minutes, refocus students whole group. Ask them to take 3 minutes to meet with their reading partners to share their
facts with each other.
With students back at their desks, explain that they will now generate questions that could support them in learning more
about their interesting fact from their Exploring Countries: Japan book.
Reorient students to the Exploring Culture recording form. This time, ask them to take note of the column at the right. Tell
students that when they read with a question in mind, it helps to be focused on something specific and this way they can be
much more efficient.
Model for students how to generate a question that would allow them to learn more about the fact. Use the examples in the
supporting materials as a resource.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Partner ELLs with a student who


speaks the same language to help
them discuss complex content.
During this Work Time, you may
want to pull a small group of
students to support their work with
asking and answering questions.
Some students will need more
guided practice before they are
ready for independent work
Providing models of expected work
supports all students but especially
supports challenged learners.
When reviewing the graphic
organizers or recording forms,
consider using a document camera
to display the document for
students who struggle with auditory
processing.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9


Close Reading as a Researcher:
Reading with a Question in Mind

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Tell students to pick one of their facts to start with. They will go into the text and try to find where the fact is located in the
book. Encourage students to use the table of contents and the index, as well as headings and photographs. After locating the
fact, students will generate questions about the fact that might be answered within the text.
Set a time limit of 5 minutes and tell students that its okay if they dont get to all of their questions. Have students begin.
Circulate and assist as necessary, encouraging students to reread where they found the fact in the text and think about what
they could ask to learn more. If they have time, they can work on more than one question. (Note: Hold to 5 minute for this
activity. Students likely will not answer all of their questions in the time allowed. Whats most important is for them to
engage with the text and read with a question in mind).
After 5 minutes, refocus students whole group. Ask them to take 23 minutes with their reading partner to share questions
and answers. Allow 3 minutes for sharing.
Ask for a few volunteers to share a question paired with the answer they found in the text.
B. Reading with a Question in Mind: Answering Text-Dependent Questions (15 minutes)
Gather students whole group. Congratulate them on their hard work asking and answering questions about the text. Tell
them it was exciting to see them read like researchers with specific questions in mind.
Explain that now they will be answering some text-dependent questions. Distribute the Reading with a Question in
Mind recording form.
Review the format of the recording form by projecting it and going over the directions with students, clarifying as necessary.
Give students 15 minutes to write the answers to the questions from the text independently.
Circulate and support students in finding evidence as needed. If necessary, remind students how to write and answer using a
full sentence. (The first half of the sentence is pulled directly from the question. The second half of the sentence is the
evidence found in the text.)
After 15 minutes, stop students in their work. Tell them that they should finish for homework (or at another point in the
school day if you choose).

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9


Close Reading as a Researcher:
Reading with a Question in Mind

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

C. Using Word Trackers: Learning New Words (5 minutes)


Remind students that they were introduced to the Word Tracker vocabulary routine back in Lesson 3. Say: We have talked
about how important it is for readers to build their word power. One way to do this is by carefully recording important words
and definitions.

All students developing academic


language will benefit from direct
instruction in academic vocabulary.

Distribute the Word Tracker recording form and display the Word Tracker anchor chart (an enlarged version of
students Word Tracker recording form).
Direct students to find the bold word tradition on page 15. Explain to students that it is very common in informational books
for certain words to appear in a bold font. Words appearing in bold are usually defined in the glossary at the back of the
book. Ask students to see if that is true for the word tradition.
On the anchor chart, model how to complete each column of the word tracker using the word traditions:
1. In Column 1 (Vocabulary Word), write traditions on the anchor chart, and have students do the same on their
recording forms.
2. Have students find the definition in the glossary. In Column 2, write the definition as it appears in the glossary and give
students 1 minute to write the glossary definition on their recording forms.

To support struggling students with


vocabulary acquisition, consider
providing index cards that have the
word or phrase on one side and the
definition on the other. Work with
these words from time to time at
other ELA parts of the school day.
Use thoughtful pairings: ELL
language acquisition is facilitated by
interacting with native speakers of
English who provide models of
language.

3. Tell students that they should think about the meaning in their own words. Invite students to turn and tell their partners
what the word traditions means to them. Ask a couple of volunteers to share their definitions. In Column 3, students
should write a simplified version of the definition shown in Column 2 using their own words. Students may give a
definition such as: This word means something people do regularly because it is important to them.
Ask students to follow the same process with the word chopsticks (page 23). Circulate to assist as needed.
Ask students to keep their Word Tracker recording form to use again later in the unit.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 8

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9


Close Reading as a Researcher:
Reading with a Question in Mind

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Reading with a Question in Mind Anchor Chart and Debrief Learning Targets (5 minutes)
Return to the overall focus of this lesson: reading informational text with a question in mind. Work with students to name
the steps that readers take when they read with a question in mind.

For students needing additional


support producing language,
consider offering a sentence frame,
sentence starter, or cloze sentence
to assist with language production
and provide structure.

Chart students thinking on a new Reading with a Question in Mind anchor chart (or project the sample provided in
the supporting materials). Listen for students to name these steps, clarifying as needed:

Examining the text


Naming a question
Writing the question
Rereading the text looking for clues
Looking for clues in the text features
Reading again
Finding the answer
Tell students that they will continue to practice this together in class.
Preview the homework and distribute the Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 8.

Monitor students responses and


take note of any target(s) that seem
to be a sticking point for students.
Clarify the meaning of each target as
needed to make sure that the
wording of the target was clear. For
students who indicate lack of
success with the targets, make sure
to check in with them at another
point in the school day.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Read Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 8 and complete the Independent Reading recording form.

Students who cannot yet read


independently will benefit from
hearing books read to them, either
by a caregiver or through audio
recordings.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 9

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 9


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Mystery Letter Anchor Chart


Teacher Directions: Create and post a chart like this one before beginning this lesson. Leave the
chart posted and add to it when you review student homework.
Add the starred letters to the chart as you find them.

What do Jack and Annie learn from their adventures in ancient Japan?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Exploring Culture Recording Form

Name:
Date:
Asking and Answering Questions about Japans Culture to deepen my understanding of
the text
Directions:
1. Look through your informational text.
2. Identify facts that capture your attention. These could be in a heading, caption, or text feature.
3. Write down a question that would help you to learn more.
Facts
What facts about culture did you find in the
text?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page in
Text

Questions
What question would help you
understand more?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Exploring Culture Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Asking and Answering Questions about Japans Culture to deepen my understanding of
the text
Directions:
1. Look through your informational text.
2. Identify facts that capture your attention. These could be in a heading, caption, or text feature.
3. Write down a question that would help you to learn more.
Facts
What facts about culture did you find in the
text?

Page in text

Questions
What question would help you
understand more?

There is a monkey called the


Japanese macaque.

11

Where does this monkey live in


Japan?

Japanese people bow when they greet


each other.

13

Does everyone bow all the time?


Are there different types of bows?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Reading with a Question in Mind Recording Form

Name:
Date:
Answering Text-Dependent Questions about Japans Culture:
Follow these steps for each question:

1. Read each question.


2. Use the table of contents and the index to make a decision about where in the text you can find
the information needed to answer the question.
3. Go to that part of the text. Read with the question in mind. You may want to read the page(s)
multiple times.
4. Write the answer using a full sentence and making sure to use evidence from the text.
5. Record the part of the text where you found the information.
1. What type of theater have Japanese people enjoyed for hundreds of years? Use evidence from the
text to support your thinking.

What was the title of the heading for the section that had the information you
needed?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Reading with a Question in Mind Recording Form


2. On page 12, the text says, Then, for many years, Japans leaders closed the country off from the
rest of the world. What do you think closed means? Use evidence from the text to support your
thinking.

3. What text features did you use to locate your answers?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Reading with a Question in Mind Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Answering Text-Dependent Questions about Japans Culture:
1. Read each question.
2. Use the table of contents and the index to make a decision about where in the text you can find
the information needed to answer the question.
3. Go to that part of the text. Read with the question in mind. You may want to read the page(s)
multiple times.
4. Write the answer using a full sentence and making sure to use evidence from the text.
5. Record the part of the text where you found the information.
1. What type of theater have Japanese people enjoyed for hundreds of years? Use evidence from the
text to support your thinking.
Kabuki is a type of traditional theater in Japan that has been around for hundreds of
years. The actors wear makeup and costumes. The way Kabuki is performed today is
the same as it has been for hundreds of years.
What was the title of the heading for the section that had the information you
needed?

Page(s)

The Arts of Japan

26 and 27

2. On page 12, the text says, Then, for many years, Japans leaders closed the country off from the
rest of the world. What do you think closed means? Use evidence from the text to support your
thinking.
In the sentence Then, for many year, Japans leaders closed the country off from
the rest of the world, I think the word closed means that the leaders wouldnt let
anyone come in the country.
3. What text features did you use to locate your answers?
Answers will vary by student.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Word Tracker Recording Form

Name:
Date:
Vocabulary word or phrase

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Definition

Definition in my own words

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Word Tracker Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)

Vocabulary word or phrase

tradition

chopsticks

Definition

Definition in my own words

a story, belief, or way of


life that families or groups
hand down from one
generation to the next

something that people do


regularly that is important
to them

a pair of short, thin sticks


that Japanese people use
to eat food

the type of eating tools that


Japanese people use to eat

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Reading with a Question in Mind Anchor Chart

We name what we want to find.


We ask ourselves questions to help us focus our research and learn more.
We write the question down so we dont forget it.
We read the text to find clues for the answer.
We look for clues in the text features.
We reread.
We sometimes find the answer in the text.
We sometimes have to keep researching.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Independent Reading Recording Form: Chapter 8

Name:
Date:
Independently read the next chapter in Dragon of the Red Dawn.
Complete the chart below to capture key details.
Solve the word puzzle using a word or phrase from the chapter.
Be prepared to share your work with your classmates.
Capturing Key Details: Record important details from the chapter in the chart below.
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events


in this chapter?

Word Puzzle: Finding Specific Details in the Chapter


Find a word or phrase in the chapter that matches the clue. Write the letters of in the blank spaces
below. The letter with a star under it will help you figure out the answer to an important question once
you have finished the book.
CLUE: The legendary guardian animal that commands the rain clouds (page 84)
ANSWER:
_____ ______
* *
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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 9

Independent Reading Recording Form: Chapter 8


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)

Independently read the next chapter in Dragon of the Red Dawn.


Complete the chart below to capture key details.
Solve the word puzzle using a word or phrase from the chapter.
Be prepared to share your work with your classmates.
Capturing Key Details: Record important details from the chapter in the chart below.
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events


in this chapter?

on a mountain
high up in the clouds
flying high over the fires in
Edo
back in the river

Jack
Annie
Cloud Dragon

Jack and Annie used the wand to get


help put out the fires.
They were magically transported to
the top of a mountain, high in the
clouds.
The Cloud Dragon appeared.
Jack and Annie rode the Cloud
Dragon as it swooped across the fires
and put them out.
Jack and Annie dropped back into
the river.

Word Puzzle: Finding Specific Details in the Chapter


Find a word or phrase in the chapter that matches the clue. Write the letters in the
blanks below. The letter with a star under it will help you figure out the answer to an
important question once you have finished the book.
CLUE: The legendary guardian animal that commands the rain clouds (page 84)
ANSWER:
CLOUD DRAGON
* *

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L9 June 2014 21

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 10


Using Informational Text: Learning about Japans
Customs
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10


Using Informational Text:
Learning about Japans Customs

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask and answer questions about informational texts. (RI.3.1)
I can use information from the words and illustrations to understand informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can use a variety of strategies to determine meaning of words and phrases. (RL.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can read with a question in mind to find information about the culture of Japan.
I can record my thinking about Japans customs on the Exploring Culture recording form.

Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 8 (from


homework)

I can use text features efficiently to help find information about Japans customs.

Exploring Culture recording form

I can answer text-dependent questions about the customs of Japan using evidence from the text.

Working with Context Clues recording form

I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Exploring Countries: Japan.

Japans Culture anchor chart

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10


Using Informational Text:
Learning about Japans Customs

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

Students have been learning about Japans culture through both literary and informational texts. In this
lesson, students begin to use informational text to explore the culture of Japan. This lesson specifically
leads students in examining Japans culture as expressed by its customs.

A. Engaging the Reader: Homework Routine (5


Minutes)
B. Understanding How Customs Can Be Evidence of
Culture and Unpacking Learning Targets (10
minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Reading and Writing about Japans Customs (20
minutes)
B. Asking Questions about the Text: Customs of Japan
(10 minutes)
C. Working with Context Clues: Words from Exploring
Countries: Japan (10 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Beginning the Japans Culture Anchor Chart (5
minutes)
4. Homework
A. Read Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 9 and
complete the Independent Reading recording form.
B. Complete Answering Questions about Japans
Customs of Exploring Culture (Customs) recording
form, Part 2.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

In the Opening of this lesson, the handshake is used as an example of a greeting custom in the United
States. Not all subcultures within the United States greet each other this way, but it provides a fairly
simple and concrete example of customs. Based on your student population, feel free to offer a different
example of a customary greeting, and/or to clarify that there are subcultures within the United States,
each with its own customs. The intent of showing these examples is for students to understand that
customs are one piece of evidence that people can examine to learn about a culture. Greetings are just
one example of a custom in a country.
This lesson again includes partner reading, designed to support students with comprehension.
Ink-Pair-Share protocol is used in this lesson. Students should be familiar with this from Module 1; it is
a variation of Think-Pair-Share. When a question is posed to students, they think about it, write down
their thinking, then share with a partner. The activity ends with whole group selective sharing. Note that
as with Think-Pair-Share, the Share portion of Ink-Pair-Share requires students to share their
partners thinking, not their own. This promotes active and careful listening between the partners.
In advance:

Gather several images (from books, magazines, or the internet) of different ways people greet each
other around the world (for Opening A). Consider images like bowing, handshakes, hugs, etc.
Students will be viewing these to make connections to what a custom is and how it can contribute to
learning about the culture of a country.
Review: Ink-Pair-Share protocol (see Appendix).
Post: Learning targets.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10


Using Informational Text:
Learning about Japans Customs

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

custom, text features, object,


document, catches (n), founding

Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student)


Mystery Letter anchor chart (begun in Lesson 9)
Document camera
Images of people greeting each other in different cultures (see Teaching Notes)
Exploring Culture (Customs) recording form (one per student)
Exploring Countries: Japan (book; one per student)
Working with Context Clues recording form (one per student and one to project)
Japans Culture anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Closing A)
Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 9 (one per student)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10


Using Informational Text:
Learning about Japans Customs

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Homework Routine (5 minutes)


Be sure students have their text Dragon of the Red Dawn. Gather as a group to discuss the homework. Ask students to
take out the Independent Reading recording forms they completed for Chapter 8. Have students turn and talk to a partner
for 2 minutes about something they learned about ancient Japan from last nights reading.

Using total participation techniques


such as cold call or equity sticks
encourages a wider range of voices
in whole class shares.

Then cold call a few students to briefly share their responses in the Where, Who and What columns on the chart. Ask a
volunteer to share the answer to this chapters word puzzle and add the starred letter to the Mystery Letter anchor
chart.

Use thoughtful pairings of students


for protocols such as Think-PairShare. ELL language acquisition is
facilitated by interacting with native
speakers of English who provide
models of language.

Clarify any other aspects of the chapter as needed. Continue to emphasize that one of the joys of historical fiction is that
readers can simultaneously read an engaging story and learn about a real time and place in history.

B. Understanding How Customs Can Be Evidence of Culture and Unpacking Learning Targets (10 minutes)
Gather the class together. Ask students to turn and talk:

* What is a custom?
Cold call on a student to answer. Listen for: A custom is accepted or typical practice. Follow up by asking students to call
out a few examples of customs they might know about.
Ask for a volunteer to engage in a quick demonstration with you. Invite a student to come to the front of the room and show
how strangers in the United States often first greet other. If students are unfamiliar with this, quickly inform them that in
the United States when adults greet a stranger, they usually offer their right hand, give a quick but gentle handshake, make
eye contact, say hello, and introduce themselves.
After modeling in front of the class, have students practice with others who are near them. Remind students that in many
parts of the United States, greeting each other in this way is a custom. It is part of our culture. People in other countries may
have this same greeting custom, or may greet each other in different ways.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10


Using Informational Text:
Learning about Japans Customs

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Using a document camera, show students images of people greeting each other in different cultures (such as the
kiss on the cheek for a greeting in France, or a slight bow of the head in Korea for greeting friends). Ask students:

* What did you notice about the images?


Confirm that the images were of people greeting each other in different ways. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* How can we learn about a culture by examining these greetings?


Ask for volunteers to share what they discussed. Confirm responses that allude to greetings being one accepted behavior or
practice of people and therefore evidence of culture.
Clarify for students that many of the customs that are used each day can be evidence of a groups culture. Explain to students
that customs can have their own history and because of that, they can reflect a cultural meaning for a group of people. In a
way, a custom has a story to tell. It can say something significant about the lives of a group of people, both in the past and in
the present.
Tell students that every country will have a number of customs that hold special meaning for them as a group or country.
Project the learning targets one at a time. Ask students to turn and talk:

* What do you think youll be doing today?


Tell students that these targets should seem familiar to them. Reread each target, one at a time, and have students use a Fist
to Five as a way to show their understanding of the targets.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10


Using Informational Text:
Learning about Japans Customs

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Reading and Writing about Japans Customs (20 minutes)

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

Gather students and distribute the Exploring Culture (Customs) recording form. Tell students that they will continue
to practice a strategy that good readers use: asking questions to learn more. Remind them that they did this in Lesson 9, but
today they are going to take a fresh look at some specific sections of the text. Project a copy of the Exploring Culture
(Customs) recording form in order to orient students to the layout of the recording form. Draw students attention to the fact
that there is a distinct focus on customs.
Be sure students have their text Exploring Countries: Japan. Review the term text features (parts of a book that stand
out from the rest of the text) if necessary.
Ask students to look at the table of contents in their own books and try to identify possible chapters that may have
information about customs.
Invite volunteers to share out, suggesting chapters by their titles, and ask them to explain the potential of that chapter to
reveal information about customs. (For example, a student may suggest Daily Life or Food, to which you could respond :
Yes, its quite possible that the chapter on Daily Life could contain information about some daily customs. We learned in
Dragon of the Red Dawn about bowing to each other, which characters in the book did in daily life.)

Consider partnering an ELL with a


student who speaks the same
language when discussion of
complex content is required. This
lets students have more meaningful
discussions and clarify points in
their native language.
Providing models of expected work
supports all students but especially
supports challenged learners.

Reiterate to students that their focus today is on customs. Continue to clarify the definition of this key term. Have students
look in the index for the word customs. (They will discover that its not listed in the index). Help them to understand that
customs is a broad category and that an index will usually include only very specific things.
Invite students to work with a partner to complete a first read of pages 1217 and 2223. Students should read and take
notes on the customs they are finding in the text in second column of their recording forms.
Tell students they will complete Part 2 of this recording form for homework, after they have spent more time reading the
text.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10


Using Informational Text:
Learning about Japans Customs

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Asking Questions about the Text: Customs of Japan (10 minutes)

During Work Time B, you may want


to pull a small group of students to
support in finding evidence in the
text. Some students will need more
guided practice before they are
ready for independent work.

Tell students they will now work with their partner to reread sections in Exploring Countries: Japan to see if they can
construct questions that will help them to learn more about the customs of Japan. Remind students they should take note of
any text features on these pages that might help them efficiently find information or contribute to their learning about
customs of Japan.
Ask students to give a thumbs-up if they understand the task and thumbs-down if they have questions related to the task.
Address students questions quickly.
Give directions:

* Focus on pages 1217 and 2223 as they relate to the customs recorded in Part 1.

Students who cannot yet read


independently will benefit from
hearing books read to them through
audio recordings.

* Read with your partner.


* Complete the right-hand column of the recording form on your own.
* Leave the final question about customs blank for now.
Circulate and confer with students as they work.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10


Using Informational Text:
Learning about Japans Customs

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

C. Working with Context Clues: Words from Exploring Countries: Japan (10 minutes)

Some students may benefit from


receiving direct support working
with context clues.

Gather students together whole group. Review students previous work with using context clues, drawing on specific
examples from your class as much as possible. A general review might sound something like: Weve talked several times
about how important it is for you as readers to always be building your word power. As a reader, you need to have strategies
for determining what words mean. The first strategy you should try is using context clueslooking for clues around the
unknown word as a way to help you get to the words meaning. With informational texts, its possible that the word youre
stuck on is in glossary. Or you may have to use a dictionary to locate the definition of the word. Today were going to work
with that first strategy againdetermining the meaning of words using the context.
Distribute and display the Working with Context Clues recording form. Remind students that they used this
recording form when reading Dragon of the Red Dawn.
Remind students that one way to figure out the meaning of a word is to look at other words in the sentence, think about what
clues the sentence gives, and then try to replace the word with a word they know. Briefly review the sequence of steps shown
at the top of the recording form. Since this is a familiar routine, students should be able to proceed with their partner with
relative ease.
Ask students to take 5 minutes with their partner to work on the terms catches and founding on their Working with Context
Clues recording form. Suggest that students focus only on the left-hand and center columns (the right-hand column will be
filled out whole group). Circulate and assist as needed.

Providing models of expected work


supports all students but especially
supports challenged learners.
Closely monitor students who have
difficulty with near-point copying.
To support struggling students with
vocabulary acquisition, consider
providing index cards with the word
or phrase on one side and the
definition on the other. Work with
these words during other ELA parts
of the school day.

After 5 minutes, bring students back together and invite volunteers to share whole class the information they recorded in the
first two columns. Bring students to the final step by sharing the actual definitions for the two words:
1. Catches are groups of something caught, like fish.
2. Founding is the beginning or start of something, like the founding of a country.
Direct students to write these definitions in the right-hand column on their recording forms.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 8

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10


Using Informational Text:
Learning about Japans Customs

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Beginning the Japans Culture Anchor Chart (5 minutes)


Gather students together and give them specific feedback on some of the things you heard that they learned about Japans
customs today. Ask the question at the bottom of their Exploring Culture (Customs) recording form:

Consider partnering an ELL with a


student who speaks the same
language. This lets students have
more meaningful closure to the
lesson.

* Based on your work today, what are some customs of Japan?


Help students justify why the custom they named can be considered evidence of culture. It may be necessary to remind
students about the work done in the Opening about how different ways of greeting tell us about different cultures. Provide
the sentence frame: A ____ can be considered a custom of Japan because _____.
Invite students to Think-Pair-Share. Co-create a new Japans Culture anchor chart by adding students thinking to a
section delegated for customs. (This anchor chart is an opportunity to informally assess students understandings of Japans
culture).
Congratulate students on their excellent research. Ask students to turn to a partner and share one interesting fact they
learned about Japan from the text today.
Distribute the Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 9, to be completed for homework.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Read Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 9 and complete the Independent Reading recording form.

Students who cannot yet read


independently will benefit from
hearing books read to them, either
by a caregiver or through audio
recordings.

Complete Answering Questions about Japans Customs of Exploring Culture (Customs) recording form, Part 2.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 9

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 10


Supporting Materials
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Exploring Culture (Customs) Recording Form


Name:
Date:
Part 1: Asking and Answering Questions about Japans Culture to Deepen My
Understanding of the Text
Directions:
1. Read pages 1213, 1415, 1617, and 2223.
2. Identify facts about customs that capture your attention.
3. Write down question that would help you to learn more.
Category

Facts
What facts about culture did you find in the
text?

Page in
Text

Questions
What question would help
you understand more?

Customs

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Exploring Culture (Customs) Recording Form


Based on your work today, what are some customs of Japan?

Part 2: Answering Questions about Japans Customs


1. According to the text, why do people bow to each other? Use evidence from the text to support
your thinking.

2. According to the text, what is sushi and how is it eaten? Use evidence from the text to support
your thinking.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Exploring Culture (Customs) Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part 1: Asking and Answering Questions about Japans Culture to Deepen My
Understanding of the Text
Directions:
1. Read pages 1213, 1415, 1617, and 2223.
2. Identify facts about customs that capture your attention.
3. Write down question that would help you to learn more.
Category

Facts
What facts about culture did you find
in the text?

Page in
Text

Questions
What question would
help you understand
more?

Customs

The Japanese bow when they


greet each other.

13

Do people always
bow or do they use
handshakes as
well?

People have one room in their


home decorated in traditional
Japanese style.

15

What are the


traditional rooms
used for?

Students write in kanji.

17

Is all writing done


in kanji or other
forms too?

Japanese people use chopsticks


to pick up and eat food.

23

Why did people


start using
chopsticks?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Exploring Culture (Customs) Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Based on your work today, what are some customs of Japan?
Some of the customs in Japan are bowing to each other, decorating rooms in
traditional style, writing in kanji, and using chopsticks to eat.
Part 2: Answering Questions about Japans Customs
1. According to the text, why do people bow to each other? Use evidence from the text to support
your thinking.
According to the text, people in Japan bow to greet each other. They can also bow to
say thank you or I beg your pardon.
2. According to the text, what is sushi and how is it eaten? Use evidence from the text to support your
thinking.
According to the text, sushi is a food Japanese people eat that is made of raw fish
and rice that is wrapped in seaweed. Sushi is eaten with chopsticks. Japanese people
use chopsticks to pick up food like sushi.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Working with Context Clues Recording Form


Name:
Date:
Target: I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Exploring Countries: Japan.
How to Work with Context Clues:
1. Read the sentence a few times, focusing on the unknown word.
2. Look at the other words in the sentence and think about what clues the sentence gives you.
3. Try to replace the unknown word with a word you know.
1. catches (page 19)
Japans fishing crews bring large catches of eel, mackerel, squid, and tuna.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word


might mean? (Try some
replacements.)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What does this word


mean?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Working with Context Clues Recording Form


2. founding (page 25)
On February 11, National Foundation Day marks the founding of the nation of Japan.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word


might mean? (Try some
replacements.)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What does this word


mean?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Working with Context Clues Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Target: I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words in Exploring Countries: Japan.
How to Work with Context Clues:
1. Read the sentence a few times, focusing on the unknown word.
2. Look at the other words in the sentence and think about what clues the sentence gives you.
3. Try to replace the unknown word with a word you know.
1. catches (page 19)
Japans fishing crews bring large catches of eel, mackerel, squid, and tuna.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word


might mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

I think catches is a noun


in this sentence because
the adjective large is
before it to describe it. You
catch fish, and the
sentence has names of
different kinds of fish like
tuna.

groups, amounts

groups of something
caught, like fish

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Working with Context Clues Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
2. founding (page 25)
On February 11, National Foundation Day marks the founding of the nation of Japan.
What clues in and around the
sentence can help me
determine the meaning of this
word?

What do I think the word


might mean? (Try some
replacements.)

What does this word


mean?

Its something to do with


the nation or country, like
maybe the countrys
birthday or when it
became a country.

starting, beginning

the beginning or start of


something

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Independent Reading Recording Form: Chapter 9

Independently read the next chapter in Dragon of the Red Dawn.


Complete the chart below to capture key details.
Solve the Word Puzzle using a word or phrase from the chapter.
Be prepared to share your work with your classmates.
Capturing Key Details: Record important details from the chapter in the chart below.
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Word Puzzle: Finding Specific Details in the Chapter


Find a word or phrase in the chapter that matches the clue. Write the letters in the blank spaces below.
The letter with a star under it will help you figure out the answer to an important question once you
have finished the book
CLUE: What the ferry boat glided under (page 91)
ANSWER

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Independent Reading Recording Form: Chapter 9


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)

Independently read the next chapter in Dragon of the Red Dawn.


Complete the chart below to capture key details.
Solve the word puzzle using a word or phrase from the chapter.
Be prepared to share your work with your classmates.
Capturing Key Details : Record important details from the chapter in the chart below.
Where does this chapter take
place?

the river
Bashos home
ferryboat
the Imperial Garden

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

Jack
Annie
Basho

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Jack and Annie are safe


after saving Edo from fires
with the help of the Cloud
Dragon.
Bashos house has burned.
They travel on the
ferryboat up the river to
the Imperial Garden.
They say goodbye to
Basho.
They are stopped by the
samurai, who asks them
for their passports.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 10

Independent Reading Recording Form: Chapter 9


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Word Puzzle: Finding Specific Details in the Chapter
Find a word or phrase in the chapter that matches the clue. Write the letters in the blank spaces below.
The letter with a star under it will help you figure out the answer to an important question once you
have finished the book.
CLUE: What the ferry boat glided under (page 91)
ANSWER:
G
*

R
*

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L10 June 2014 21

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 11


Using Informational Text: Learning More about
Japans Culture
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11


Using Informational Text:
Learning More about Japans Culture

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask and answer questions about informational texts. (RI.3.1)
I can use information from the words and illustrations to understand informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can read with a question in mind to find information about traditions of Japan.
I can record my thinking about Japans traditions on the Exploring Culture recording form.

Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 9(from


homework)

I can answer text-dependent questions about traditions in Japan using evidence from the text.

Exploring Culture recording form


Japans Culture anchor chart

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L11 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11


Using Informational Text:
Learning More about Japans Culture

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

The Work Time of this lesson unfolds much as it did in Lesson 10, but this time students focus on
traditions of cultural significance to Japan. The procedure should feel and look similar. Keep students
with the same partner as in Lesson 10.

A. Engaging the Reader: Homework Routine (5


minutes)
B. Unpacking Learning Targets and the Special
Significance of Traditions (10 minutes)

Review: Mix and Mingle protocol (see Appendix).

2. Work Time
A. Reading and Writing about Japans Traditions (15
minutes)
B. Asking Questions about the Text: Traditions of
Japan (15 minutes)
C. Answering Text-Dependent Questions (10 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Adding to Japans Culture Anchor Chart and
Identifying Traditions (5 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Read Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 10 and
complete the Independent Reading recording form.
B. Complete Exploring Culture (Traditions) recording
form, Part 2, if not completed.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L11 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11


Using Informational Text:
Learning More about Japans Culture

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

tradition

Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student)


Mystery Letter anchor chart (begun in Lesson 9)
Japans Culture anchor chart (begun in Lesson 10)
Exploring Countries: Japan (book; one per student)
Reading with a Question in Mind anchor chart (from Lesson 9)
Exploring Culture (Traditions) recording form (one per student and one for display)
Document camera
Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 10 (one per student)

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Homework Routine (5 minutes)

Using total participation techniques


such as cold call or equity sticks
encourages a wider range of voices
in whole class shares.

Be sure students have their text Dragon of the Red Dawn. Gather students whole group. Ask students to take out the
Independent Reading recording form they completed for homework last night. Have students turn and talk to a partner
about something they learned about ancient Japan from last nights reading of Chapter 9.
Then cold call a few students to briefly share their responses in the Where, Who, and What columns on the chart. Ask a
volunteer to share the answer to this chapters word puzzle and add the starred letter to the Mystery Letter anchor
chart.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Use thoughtful pairings of students


for protocols such as Think-PairShare. ELL language acquisition is
facilitated by interacting with native
speakers of English who provide
models of language.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L11 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11


Using Informational Text:
Learning More about Japans Culture

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Unpacking Learning Targets and the Special Significance of Traditions (10 minutes)

For ELLs or students new to the


country, consider posting visuals of
the Fourth of July or showing a short
video clip. Some students may not
have background knowledge about
celebrations in the United States such
as the Fourth of July.

Ask students to focus on todays learning targets. Ask students if the targets seem familiar. (Because these targets are
identical to those in Lesson 10 except for the focus on traditions rather than customs, they should seem familiar.)
Review the Japans Culture anchor chart (begun in Lesson 10). For each item listed, ask for students (by volunteer or
cold call) to elaborate on the custom by describing it and/or talking about how it is evidence of the culture in Japan.
Tell students that the work they do today will follow the same pattern as the previous lesson, but the focus will be on
traditions of cultural significance to Japanese people.
Ask students to close their eyes as you describe a holiday that happens every summer in America.
Say to students: I want you to close your eyes and pretend you are sitting with your friends and family on a hot July night.
Maybe you are sitting on the grass or in a park. There are many people around you and everyone is excited and looking up
at the sky. It is dark outside but suddenly you hear a loud BOOM! and the sky is filled with amazing colors! Where are
you?
Ask students to turn and talk with a partner:

* Where do you think you are?


* What holiday is this?
Ask for a volunteer to respond. Listen for: the Fourth of July, a holiday that happens every summer in the United States.
Tell students that the Fourth of July is a holiday in America and is one of our countrys traditions. It is a tradition because
it is a way to remind us of when our country won its independence. The Fourth of July has been celebrated for many
generations.
To help students understand this, name some other traditions important to our culture. If necessary, refer to the definition
of tradition from the article Discovering Culture in Lessons 2 and 3.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L11 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11


Using Informational Text:
Learning More about Japans Culture

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Reading and Writing about Japans Traditions (15 minutes)

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

Be sure students have their text Exploring Countries: Japan.


Gather students whole group. Review the Reading with a Question in Mind anchor chart (from Lesson 9). Emphasize
that they are practicing a key skill that is particularly useful when reading informational text.
Distribute the Exploring Culture (Traditions) recording form. Tell students that just as they did in the previous
lesson, they will continue to practice the reading strategy of asking questions to learn more. Reading with a question in mind
is a way to target your reading in a more specific way.
Using a document camera, project a copy of the Exploring Culture (Traditions) recording form to orient students to the
layout. Draw students attention to the fact that there is a distinct focus on traditions. As they are reading, students will see
information about many things, but their job is to be focused on traditions.
Remind students that like in Lesson 10, looking in the index for the word traditions will not work because this term is a
broad category. An index will usually only include very specific things.
Have students work with a partner to complete a first read of pages 20, 21, 24, and 2527. Students should read and take
notes on the traditions they are finding in the text in the second column of their recording forms.

Consider partnering an ELL with a


student who speaks the same
language when discussion of
complex content is required. This
allows students to have more
meaningful discussions and clarify
points in their native language.
Providing models of expected work
supports all students but especially
supports challenged learners.

Ask students to give a thumbs-up if they understand the task and thumbs-down if they have questions related to the task.
Address students questions quickly.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L11 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11


Using Informational Text:
Learning More about Japans Culture

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Asking Questions about the Text: Traditions of Japan (15 minutes)

During Work Time B and C, you


may want to pull a small group of
students to support in finding
evidence in the text. Some students
will need more guided practice
before they are ready for
independent work.

Tell students they will now work with their same partner to reread the sections in their Exploring Countries: Japan books to
see if they can create questions that will help them learn more. Remind students they should take note of any text features
on these pages that might help them efficiently find information or contribute to their learning about some customs of
Japan.
Ask students to give a thumbs-up if they understand the task and thumbs-down if they have questions related to the task.
Address students questions quickly.
Ask partners to reread pages 20, 21, 24, 25, 26, and 27 as they relate to the traditions recorded in Part 1. Remind them that
even though they will work with their partner, they should complete the right-hand column of the recording form on their
own. Tell students to leave the final question about traditions blank for now. They will discuss this in the closing of the
lesson.

Students who cannot yet read


independently will benefit from
hearing books read to them through
audio recordings.

Circulate and confer with students as they work; provide support as needed.
C. Answering Text-Dependent Questions (10 minutes)
Reorient students to the learning target:

* I can answer text-dependent questions about traditions in Japan using evidence from the text.
At this point in the year, students should be familiar with targets related to asking and answering questions based on
evidence from the text. The text-dependent questions are Part 2 of the Exploring Culture (Traditions) recording form.
Suggest to students that they read the questions first and then look back through the text to see if they can locate the places
where there is evidence.

Consider writing and displaying


steps for answering text-dependent
questions, using nonlinguistic
symbols to match each step.

Give students 10 minutes to write their answers to the questions from the text independently. Circulate and support students
in finding evidence. If needed, remind students how to write answers using a full sentence. (The first half of the sentence is
pulled directly from the question. The second half of the sentence is the evidence found in the text.)
After 10 minutes, refocus students whole group. Remind them that they will have time to finish their answers for homework
or at another point in the school day.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L11 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11


Using Informational Text:
Learning More about Japans Culture

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Adding to Japans Culture Anchor Chart (5 minutes)


Gather students whole group and congratulate them on all they have learned about Japans traditions today. Ask the
question at the bottom of their Exploring Culture (Traditions) recording form. Invite students to add to the Japans
Culture anchor chart by recording students thinking using a section delegated for traditions.

Posting sentence frames can assist


ELLs and other students needing
additional support in contributing
to classroom discussions.

Use a sentence frame to support students such as: I think a tradition in Japan is________because______.
Direct students to complete the last question on Part 1 of the Exploring Culture (Traditions) recording form:

* Based on your work today, what are some traditions in Japan?


Distribute the Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 10, to be completed for homework.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Read Dragon of the Red Dawn Chapter 10 and complete the Independent Reading recording form.

Students who cannot yet read


independently will benefit from
hearing books read to them, either
by a caregiver or through audio
recordings.

Complete Exploring Culture (Traditions) recording form, Part 2, if not completed.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L11 June 2014 7

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 11


Supporting Materials
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11

Exploring Culture (Traditions) Recording Form


Name:
Date:
Part 1: Asking and Answering Questions about Japans Culture to Deepen My
Understanding of the Text
Directions:
1. Read pages 20, 21, 24, and 2527.
2. Identify traditions that capture your attention.
3. Write down questions that would help you to learn more.
Category

Facts
What facts about culture did you find in
the text?

Page in
Text

Questions
What question would help you
understand more?

Traditions

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: U1:L11 June 2014 9

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11

Exploring Culture (Traditions) Recording Form


Based on your work today, what are some traditions of Japan?

Part 2: Answering Questions about Japans Traditions


1. According to the text, how are the Ainu different from other people living in Japan?

2. According to the text, how do you know watching sumo wrestling is part of the Japanese culture?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: U1:L11 June 2014 10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11

Exploring Culture (Traditions) Recording Form


3. According to the text, what are the traditions involved with Kabuki ?

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: U1:L11 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11

Exploring Culture (Traditions) Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part 1: Asking and Answering Questions about Japans Culture to Deepen My
Understanding of the Text
Directions:
1. Read pages 20, 21, 24, and 2527.
2. Identify traditions that capture your attention.
3. Write down questions that would help you to learn more.
Category

Facts
What facts about culture did you find in
the text?

Page in
Text

Questions
What question would help you
understand more?

Traditions

Sumo is Japans national sport.

20

Why is sumo so popular?

The New Year is Japans biggest


holiday.

24

Why is New Year the most


important holiday?

They celebrate their daughters with


Dolls Festival.

24

Do they have a tradition to


celebrate boys?

They have many holidays that


celebrate emperors, children, and
the founding of the country.

25

Why do their traditions


focus mostly on people?

Bunraku is a puppet theater.

26

Are these plays just for


children?

Kabuki is a theater with lively


characters.

26

Do they have theater shows


like we do in America?

There are traditional arts like


ikebana, origami, manga, and
anime.

27

Why are their arts like


anime so popular
throughout the world?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: U1:L11 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11

Exploring Culture (Traditions) Recording Form


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Based on your work today, what are some traditions of Japan?
Japan has many traditions, such as holidays that celebrate important people and
important days. Japan also has many traditions in the arts. They have different types of
theater, and art like anime that has spread throughout the world. Some traditions, like
sumo wrestling, are also well-known around the world.
Part 2: Answering Questions about Japans Traditions
1. According to the text, how are the Ainu different from other people living in Japan?
The Ainu people are different because they eat and grow food like their ancestors did.
2. According to the text, how do you know watching sumo wrestling is part of the Japanese culture?
It is part of the culture because it is the national sport.
3. According to the text, what are the traditions involved with Kabuki ?
The traditions involved are wearing colorful costumes and makeup like they have for
hundreds of years.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: U1:L11 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11

Independent Reading Recording Form: Chapter 10

Name:
Date:
Independently read the next chapter in Dragon of the Red Dawn.
Complete the chart below to capture key details.
Solve the word puzzle using a word or phrase from the chapter.
Be prepared to share your work with your classmates.
Capturing Key Details: Record important details from the chapter in the chart below.
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Word Puzzle: Finding Specific Details in the Chapter


Find a word or phrase in the chapter that matches the clue. Write the letters in the blank spaces below.
The letter with a star under it will help you figure out the answer to an important question once you
have finished the book.
CLUE: The journey of a thousand miles begins with this (page 99)
ANSWER:

*
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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: U1:L11 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 11

Independent Reading Recording Form: Chapter 10


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)

Independently read the next chapter in Dragon of the Red Dawn.


Complete the chart below to capture key details.
Solve the word puzzle using a word or phrase from the chapter.
Be prepared to share your work with your classmates.
Capturing Key Details: Record important details from the chapter in the chart below.
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

the Imperial Garden


the Magic Tree House
Frog Creek

Jack
Annie
samurai

Jack and Annie were going


back to the tree house to go
home.
They were stopped by a
samurai who asked to see
passports.
They said they burned in
the fire and they were
students of Bashos.
They recited poems and
Jack got it right this time.
They were happy to be
home.

Word Puzzle: Finding Specific Details in the Chapter


Find a word or phrase in the chapter that matches the clue. Write the letters in the blank spaces below.
The letter with a star under it will help you figure out the answer to an important question once you
have finished the book.
CLUE: The journey of a thousand miles begins with this (page 99)
ANSWER:
O
N
*

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B: U1:L11 June 2014 15

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 12


Discussion Skills: Chalk Talk about the Culture of
Japan
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 12


Discussion Skills:
Chalk Talk about the Culture of Japan

Long-Term Target Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can effectively participate in a Chalk Talk about Japans culture.

Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 10 (from


homework)

I can follow our class norms when I participate in a conversation.


I can prepare for the conversation by using evidence from informational text.
I can seek patterns about the topic being discussed.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Observations of students actions and writing during the


Chalk Talk

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L12 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 12


Discussion Skills:
Chalk Talk about the Culture of Japan

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening
A. Engaging the Reader: Homework Routine and
Culminating Discussion of Dragon of the Red Dawn
(20 minutes)

This lesson uses the Chalk Talk protocol (see Appendix). A Chalk Talk is a silent discussion that
provides students with the opportunity to collectively theorize on and react to each others ideas in
writing. These talks can provide a window into students thinking, as well as reveal any misconceptions
students might have.

B. What is a Chalk Talk and Why Hold One? (10


minutes)

To prepare for the Chalk Talk, students will use evidence from their recording forms from Lessons 411
(see supporting materials).

2. Work Time
A. Preparing Evidence and Questions for the Chalk Talk
(10 minutes)
B. Conducting the Chalk Talk (15 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Debrief the Chalk Talk: Looking for Patterns (5
minutes)
4. Homework
A. Explain to someone at home what a Chalk Talk is
and how it works. Identify two stars for your work in
the Chalk Talk (things you did well) and one step
(something you could work on in the future or do to
improve).

In advance: Pre-assemble evidence folders for each student. Assemble recording forms for each student
from Lessons 411 in a folder created by folding an 11 x 17 piece of paper in half.
In advance: Prepare the How to Hold a Chalk Talk anchor chart (see supporting materials).
In advance: Prepare Chalk Talk charts. There are four stations, each station with a different question.
Consider using lined paper to help contain the size of students printing and prevent it from taking up
more space than it needs to. Have extra chart paper on hand at each station in case a chart fills up. The
Chalk Talk charts should have the following questions written at the top or written separately and
posted above or directly next to the charts:

What traditions did you read about in Japan? Were any of these also in Dragon of the Red Dawn?
The text uses many fact boxes such as Fun Fact and Did You Know? as well as illustrations. How
did the fact boxes and illustrations help you as a reader?

What customs in Japan did you read about? Where any of these also in Dragon of the Red Dawn?
How would you define culture?
Set each chart out on a flat surface like a table or grouping of desks.
In advance: Group the class into four or eight groups. When it comes time to start the Chalk Talk, assign
each group to a different chart as their starting point. Each small group will only discuss with each other
and not the other groups. Be strategic in your grouping. If you have a few struggling readers in your
class, put them in a group together so that you can more directly support them while allowing other
students to be more independent. If you have many struggling readers, place them in groups with
stronger readers, but carefully monitor that they are reading and contributing. Your ELLs may benefit
from being in a group with others who speak their native language.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L12 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 12


Discussion Skills:
Chalk Talk about the Culture of Japan
Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

evidence, pattern

Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student)


Mystery Letter anchor chart (begun in Lesson 9)
How to Hold a Chalk Talk anchor chart (new; one for display)
Exploring Countries: Japan (book; one per student)
Japans Culture anchor chart (begun in Lesson 10)
Evidence folders with students recording forms from Lessons 4-11 (see Teaching Notes)

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt (from Lesson 8)


Word Tracker (from Lesson 9)
Exploring Culture (Customs) (from Lesson 10)
Exploring Culture (Traditions) (from Lesson 11)
Chart paper (one sheet for each Chalk Talk station, four charts total; see Teaching Notes)
Colored pencils or markers (one per student)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L12 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 12


Discussion Skills:
Chalk Talk about the Culture of Japan

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Homework Routine and Culminating Discussion of Dragon of the Red Dawn (20
minutes)
Be sure students have their text Dragon of the Red Dawn. Gather as a group to discuss the homework. Ask students to
take out their Independent Reading recording form: Chapter 10.
Cold call a few students to briefly share their responses in the Where, Who, and What columns on the chart.
Congratulate students on finishing the book! Ask a volunteer to share the answer to this chapters word puzzle and then add
the last starred letter to the Mystery Letter anchor chart. Point out that students have now found their last mystery
letter! Explain that the letters they have found make up a scrambled word. Give students a few minutes to talk to a partner
about what the word might be, but do not allow them to share their ideas with the full group yet. Let the excitement build.
Explain that this word is part of the answer to the question, What do Jack and Annie learn from their adventures in ancient
Japan? Now you are going to give them a final clue. The unscrambled word will fit into this sentence:

* Jack and Annie learn that a secret of happiness lies in finding beauty in __ __ __ __ __ __.
Allow students to work with their partners to try to solve the puzzle. After a few minutes, ask for a volunteer to come up and
fill in the blanks to complete the sentence. Reread the question and have the class read the answer chorally: What do Jack
and Annie learn from their adventures in ancient Japan? Jack and Annie learn that a secret of happiness lies in finding
beauty in NATURE.
Lead a culminating discussion on Dragon of the Red Dawn.

* What did Jack and Annie learn from Basho?


* How did Jack and Annie feel about ancient Japan?
* What do you think was the best part of Jack and Annies adventure? Why?
B. Engaging the Reader: What is a Chalk Talk and Why Hold One? (10 minutes)
Display two of the learning targets:

* I can effectively participate in a Chalk Talk about Japans culture.


* I can follow our class norms when I participate in a conversation.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Anchor charts provide a visual cue


to students about what to do when
you ask them to work
independently. They also serve as
note-catchers when the class is coconstructing ideas.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L12 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 12


Discussion Skills:
Chalk Talk about the Culture of Japan

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Tell students that they will be using a new protocol called Chalk Talk. In a Chalk Talk, they have a written discussion with
others about something important. Ask:

* How do you think you can discuss something through writing?


Allow students a few moments to think and then cold call until a student correctly states that they will write down what they
want to say in order to communicate.
Point out that every student has important ideas to share about what they know of Japans culture. Say: You have

built a lot of knowledge about the culture of Japan as it relates to customs and traditions. The Chalk Talk will be a
great way to let all your voices be heard, but it will be done by each of you writing down what you want to say.
Display the How to Hold a Chalk Talk anchor chart. Ask for volunteers to read aloud one step at a time.
After each point is read aloud, have students silently reread the entire list. Then ask students if they have any questions
about the Chalk Talk protocol. Clarify as necessary. Some questions may be best answered by allowing the protocol to play
out.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L12 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 12


Discussion Skills:
Chalk Talk about the Culture of Japan

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Preparing Evidence and Questions for the Chalk Talk (10 minutes)

Students who need support with


reflecting back over previous work,
consider pairing them with a peer or
teachers aide who can ask strategic
questions such as, Tell me what
this recording form is showing us.

Display the learning target:

* I can prepare for the conversation by using evidence from informational text.
Tell students that all of their hard work in Lessons 411 produced some great evidence of Japans culture. Quickly name the
recording forms students can use for evidence (see Teaching Notes for complete list).
Tell students to think back to the work of the last four lessons and all they have learned about Japans culture. Give students
8 minutes to review their recording forms. They may also look back in the informational text Exploring Countries:
Japan.
Also, draw students attention to and display the Japans Culture anchor chart and encourage them to review what is
recorded on this anchor chart. Leave this anchor chart out on display through Work Time B.
B. Conducting the Chalk Talk (15 minutes)

Create small groups that are


heterogeneous so that students can
support each other during the Chalk
Talk. Consider a mix of reading
abilities and writing abilities.

Tell students that their Chalk Talk will be based on four different questions.
Before beginning the Chalk Talk, briefly review the steps again with students.
Divide students into small groups, and send groups to their assigned charts to begin.
As students work, observe whether they are following the protocol and provide guidance as needed.
Continue to circulate and observe, reading students comments. Gently point students to interesting comments, encouraging
them to keep writing, reading, and responding.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Consider pairing ELL students with


a partner who speaks the same
language.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L12 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 12


Discussion Skills:
Chalk Talk about the Culture of Japan

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Debrief the Chalk Talk: Looking for Patterns (5 minutes)


Bring the class back together whole group. Display the final learning target:

Discussing ideas with peers allows


students to process the task orally,
helping to support their ability to
engage with the task.

* I can seek patterns about the topic being discussed.


Explain to students that its time to for them to search for patterns in the writing on the charts. Working with a partner,
students will read through all the postings on the charts and search for patterns and themes (I Notice/I Wonder).
Allow students a few minutes to view and carefully examine the charts with a partner. Encourage partnerships to quietly
converse about the patterns they see.

Consider offering a sentence frame


or starter to assist students with
language production and provide
structure.

Then, gather students whole group. Revisit each chart one at a time as a class. Read a few responses from each chart and
circle or underline critical understandings. Ask some students to read a few of the ideas aloud to the class. Ask partnerships
to report out patterns and themes. Try to call on different partnership so more have a chance to share out.
After all the charts have been viewed, gather students whole group. Ask them to turn and talk:

* What was the experience like of talking through writing in the Chalk Talk?
Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Explain to someone at home what a Chalk Talk is and how it works. Identify two stars for your work in the Chalk Talk
(things you did well) and one step (something you could work on in the future or do to improve).

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L12 June 2014 7

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 12


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 12

How to Hold a Chalk Talk Anchor Chart


1. We read the question at the top of the chart.
2. We each write down our response on the chart. We each have our own marker.
3. We talk in our group about what to write. We dont talk to other groups.
4. We read what other people write.
5. We must respond in writing. We can write new thoughts or comment on what someone else wrote.
6. We put our initials at the end of what we wrote. This is so that we can go back later and see what
we wrote.
7. There is no right or wrong. We are free to write what we want. Theres no criticizing or correcting
what someone else has written.
8. We move to every chart once everyone in our group has finished.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L12 June 2014 9

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational
Paragraph: The Culture of Japan
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can produce writing that is appropriate to task and purpose (with support). (W.3.4)
I can use the writing process to plan, revise, and edit my writing (with support). (W.3.5)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I sort evidence into established categories. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can record details about Japans customs and traditions on the Culture Research matrix.

Culture Research matrix

I can identify criteria for a strong research-based informational paragraph.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

Throughout Unit 1, there has been a focus on customs and traditions in Japan. In the first half of the
unit, students focused on ancient customs and traditions. In the second half, students read and gathered
information on customs and traditions in modern-day Japan. For the End of Unit 1 Assessment (Lesson
15), students will write a research-based informational paragraph about culture. The evidence that
students use will link the literary and informational texts.

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)


B. Generating Criteria for a Research-Based
Informational Paragraph (12 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Modeling and Guided Practice: Using Dragon of the
Red Dawn to Complete the Culture Research Matrix
Part A (20 minutes)
B. Modeling and Guided Practice: Using Exploring
Countries: Japan to Complete the Culture Research
Matrix Part B (20 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Reviewing the Writing Moves (5 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Share with someone at home what you did in class
today. How have you been reading like a researcher?
What have you learned about how to keep track of
your learning by taking notes on the Culture
Research matrix?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Preview Lesson 15 in advance. The work done in Lessons 13 and 14 is intended to be highly structured
and scaffolded to show students how to examine and synthesize the information theyve collected to
write a concise paragraph.
In this lesson, you model the process of gathering research on customs and traditions. Students both
observe and participate. They have a chance to record information on both customs and traditions.
Typically, research would require students to use multiple resources. The scaffolding in the second half
of the unit is designed to give students some basic experience with the steps involved in research and
show them how to use the information collected to write to a prompt.
In advance: Prepare the Culture Research Matrix anchor chart (a larger version of the recording form of
the same name; see supporting materials).
Review: Give One, Get One, Move On (GoGoMo) protocol (see Appendix).
Post: Learning targets.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

matrix, plan, informational, researchbased, ancient, modern

Index cards (three to five per student)


Criteria for a Research-Based Informational Paragraph anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
Culture Research Matrix anchor chart (new; teacher created; see Teaching Notes)
Culture Research matrix (one per student)
Culture Research matrix (sample, for teacher reference; see supporting materials)
Exploring Culture anchor chart (from Lessons 1012)
Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student)
Exploring Cultures: Japan (book; one per student)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)


Begin by acknowledging students hard work learning so much about the culture of Japan. Frame the work ahead, saying
something like: You have read both literary and informational texts and talked with your peers to learn about the culture of
Japan. Today, we will see how to go about choosing the important details from the research and then use it to complete a
Culture Research matrix.
Display the first learning target:

* I can record details about Japans customs on the Culture Research matrix.
Define the word matrix as a tool to organize information.
Display and ask students to deconstruct the second learning target:
I can identify criteria for a strong research-based informational paragraph. Circle the phrase research-based and ask
students what they think the phrase means. Clarify by telling students it means that the information within the paragraph
will come from the facts theyve gathered in their research.
Ask students to Think-Pair-Share: Why do thoughtful writers plan before they begin writing? Guide students toward an
understanding that planning is essential so writers know what they are going to write about and can begin to organize their
ideas before they actually write. Remind students about the good work they did in Module 1, planning their paragraph about
their own reading goals and about a librarian or organization that helps people access books around the world. They have
learned a lot as writers so far this year!

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Generating Criteria for a Research-Based Informational Paragraph (12 minutes)


Distribute three index cards to each student. Have them write their first and last name at the top of each card.
Ask students to think about the qualities of a good paragraph. Inform students they will be sharing out what they think. Ask:
What does a quality paragraph need to have? Rather than have students share out at this point, direct them to write each
idea on a separate index card. Tell them to write their ideas carefully because other students will have to be able to read what
theyve written. Students do not need to write in sentence form. For example, they could simply write, strong topic
sentence, or detail sentences, or good word choice. Give students 2 minutes to write out their ideas. Have additional
index cards on hand for students who come up with more than three ideas. Students should keep their cards for now.
Reread the second learning target: I can identify criteria for a strong research-based informational paragraph.
Ask students if they feel theyve already met this target by writing their ideas on their index cards. Many will think the
answer is yes. However, students thinking needs to push into the research-based informational paragraph part of the
target.
Read the target aloud again somewhat slowly. Ask students to look again at their index cards and silently read them over.
Ask students if they feel they have any new ideas to write down on index cards. Give students 1 minute to write any new
ideas. Some students may feel satisfied with the cards they have, which is fine.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Tell students that they will be using a new protocol today called GoGoMo (which stands for Give One, Get One, Move On).
Explain how the protocol works.

Students will stand with their index cards in hand.


They mingle for approximately 15 seconds until you call out, Give One, at which time each will hand one of their cards to
the person nearest to them.

That student passes on his/her card as well, therefore each student will also Get One. Tell students that for now, they
are just trading their cards; later, they will read the cards they end up with.

Then you call out, Move On and students resume mingling and moving about.
After about 15 seconds, you again call out, Give One and students give another one of their index cards to the nearest
student, also getting a card before moving on when they hear you call out, Move On again.

Students should make sure to give out the cards they wrote first.
Address clarifying questions and then begin. GoGoMo should be quick and lively.
Rounds of GoGoMo continue until no student has any of their own cards left. This may require some students to give cards
they received from other students. Students should end with the same number of cards they started with.
At the end of GoGoMo, invite students to return to their seats with the cards they ended up with. Direct students to lay all
the cards out face up and read them. Students will feel a level of comfort reading ideas similar to their own. Its also possible
that they will end up with cards that have other ideas that they hadnt thought of or that another student may have had a
similar idea but stated it in a more concise way.
Tell students they will create a new Criteria for a Research-Based Informational Paragraph anchor chart (see the
sample in supporting materials as a reference: your chart should contain your students own language). Ask volunteers to
share a card with the class by reading it aloud, including identifying whose idea it is since names were written on the index
cards at the start of the activity. Chart the ideas on the new anchor chart.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Modeling and Guided Practice: Using Dragon of the Red Dawn to Complete the Culture Research Matrix
Part A (20 minutes)

Add nonlinguistic symbols to the


Culture Research matrix to help
clarify the categories.

Point out that a strong research paragraph must begin with strong research!
Display the Culture Research Matrix anchor chart and distribute the Culture Research matrix. Invite students to
spend a few moments examining the matrix, then briefly turn and talk about what they notice.
Review that a matrix is a way to organize information. Today they are going to see how to organize the most important
information they have learned about customs and traditions of Japan.
Display the Exploring Culture anchor chart. Remind students that this anchor chart has information gathered from
their reading and research in Lessons 1012. Also remind students that they have gathered a lot of information from their
research on their recording forms from Lessons 412.

Consider allowing students to work


with a partner while planning and
choosing details. Each student
should complete their own
organizer and write their own
paragraph in the next lesson, but
the thinking work could be done in
pairs.

Model and think aloud to demonstrate how information can be placed within the matrix. Use the Culture Research
matrix (sample, for teacher reference) in supporting materials as a guide.

You and the students should have copies of Dragon of the Red Dawn and Exploring Countries: Japan on hand.
Read aloud the Part A directions. Tell students you will be working together to learn how to write an informative
paragraph using information from two different texts.

Begin by locating and recording examples of customs and traditions in Chapter 9 of Dragon of the Red Dawn. Tell
students you will reread the chapter together. When students hear evidence of a custom or tradition, they should raise
their hands so you can stop and record the information on the Culture Research matrix.

Model rereading the specified pages in Dragon of the Red Dawn. Encourage students to whisper-read along with you.
Stop and share your thinking as you find each custom or tradition. If students have difficulty knowing where to stop,
prompt them with questions like: I think there is information here that we need to record. Can anyone figure out what
part of the text Im referring to? Where should I record this information? What page number should I write down?

Proceed with filling in the matrix, guiding and reflecting, while taking input from the class.
When you have filled in the matrix, check for understanding. Ask students to show a thumbs-up, thumbs-down, or thumbssideways based to show how well they understand the process you modeled of having your notes and other materials out to
use and reference as you recorded things onto the matrix.
Clarify as needed and if necessary quickly repeat the steps for students, possibly even charting them.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Modeling and Guided Practice: Using Exploring Countries: Japan to Complete the Culture Research
Matrix Part B (20 minutes)
Explain that you have now gathered evidence that shows some of the customs and traditions of ancient Japan. The culture of
a country can change over time. How could you find out whether these customs and traditions are still part of modern day
Japanese culture? Lead students to recognize that they can use Exploring Countries: Japan to look for evidence that a
custom or tradition is still part of modern Japanese life today.
Using a process similar to the one used in Part A , show students how to search for more information on each of the customs
and traditions on the Culture Research matrix in Exploring Countries: Japan.

Emphasize using the index and table of contents, and scanning the photos and section heads to efficiently locate specific
information. Model entering additional information in Columns 3 and 4 on the Culture Research matrix.

For some of the customs and traditions identified, no additional information will be available in the nonfiction text. Be
sure to point out that this does not necessarily mean that this custom is no longer part of Japanese culture, just that more
research would be needed to confirm.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Reviewing the Writing Moves (5 minutes)


Invite students to name the steps that were taken as researchers and writers today. Listen for students to suggest:
1.

Reread sections of text, thinking about customs and traditions.

2. Record customs and traditions in Columns 1 and 2.


3. Going back into Exploring Countries: Japan, find information that supports customs and traditions from Columns
1 and 2.
4. Record additional information in Columns 4 and 5.
Ask students to turn and talk:

* What step seemed easiest? Why?


* What step seemed hardest? Why?
As time permits, share out some of students comments you overheard.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Share with someone at home what you did in class today. How have you been reading like a researcher? What have you
learned about how to keep track of your learning by taking notes on the Culture Research matrix?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 13


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13

Criteria for a Research-Based Informational Paragraph Anchor Chart


1. Opens with a clear topic sentence
2. Contains detail sentences within the body of the paragraph
3. Detail sentences contain facts based on documented research
4. Detail sentences show sentence variety
5. Words and phrasing are chosen that exhibit accuracy and interest
6. Shows attention to grade-appropriate control of spelling and mechanics
7. Closes with a conclusion sentence

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13

Culture Research Matrix


Part A:
Directions: Reread pages 8695 in Dragon of the Red Dawn to find examples of some of the customs
and traditions in ancient Japan. Add three examples from the story to Column 1 of the chart below. Be
sure to include the page where you found the information in Column 2.
Please wait for your teachers directions before going on to Part B.
PART A
Column 1: Ancient Japanese
Custom or Tradition

PART B
Column 2:
Page in
Dragon of
the Red
Dawn

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Column 3: More information


about this custom or tradition
from my research

Column 4:
Page in
Exploring
Countries:
Japan

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13

Culture Research Matrix


Part B:
Directions: Use what you know about locating information in informational texts to find more
information about at least two of the customs and traditions on your chart in Exploring Countries:
Japan. Add this new information to Column 3 in the chart. Write the page number where you found
each piece of information in Column 4.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13

Culture Research Matrix


(Sample, for Teacher Reference)
Part A:
Directions: Reread pages 8695 in Dragon of the Red Dawn to find examples of some of the customs
and traditions in ancient Japan. Add three examples from the story to Column 1 of the chart below. Be
sure to include the page where you found the information in Column 2.
Please wait for your teachers directions before going on to Part B.
PART A

PART B

Column 1: Ancient Japanese


Custom or Tradition

Column 2:
Page in
Dragon of
the Red
Dawn

Column 3: More information


about this custom or tradition
from my research

Column 4:
Page in
Exploring
Countries:
Japan

After the fire, Jack saw


people drinking tea together
in the teahouse.

91

Tea is served with every


meal in Japan.

23

Annie said that the Cloud


Dragon put out the fire.
Basho told her most people
dont believe that anymore.

92

Jack and Annie bow to Basho


when leaving. He bows back.
They also said, Thanks.

95

A bow in Japan can mean


thank you.

13

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 13

Culture Research Matrix


(Sample, for Teacher Reference)
Part B:
Directions: Use what you know about locating information in informational texts to find more
information about at least two of the customs and traditions on your chart in Exploring Countries:
Japan. Add this new information to Column 3 in the chart. Write the page number where you found
each piece of information in Column 4.
Use what you know about locating information in informational text to find more
information about at least 2 of the customs and traditions on your chart in Exploring
Countries: Japan . Add this new information to the third column in the chart. Write the
page number where you found each piece of information in the last column.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L13 June 2014

15

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 14


Writing a Research-Based Informational
Paragraph: The Culture of Japan, Continued
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 14


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan, Continued

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can produce writing that is appropriate to task and purpose (with support). (W.3.4)
I can use the writing process to plan, revise, and edit my writing (with support). (W.3.5)
I can express ideas using carefully chosen words. (L.3.3a)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can assist in creating a plan for a research-based informational paragraph about a custom or tradition
of Japan using a Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer.

Culture Research matrix


Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer

I can identify criteria for a strong research-based informational paragraph.


I can write sentences that are both accurate and interesting.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L14 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 14


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan, Continued

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

The work in Lessons 13 and 14 is highly structured and scaffolded to show the students how to examine
and synthesize the information theyve collected to write a concise paragraph.

A. Unpacking Learning Targets and Reviewing the


Criteria for a Research-Based Informational
Paragraph (10 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Modeling: Planning with the Paragraph Writing
Accordion Graphic Organizer (20 minutes)
B. Modeling: Writing a Paragraph Using the Graphic
Organizer (25 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Reviewing the Writing Moves (5 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Share with someone at home the work you did in
class today to write a research-based informational
paragraph. Tell them about how the accordion
organizer made the paragraph writing easier, better,
and more organized.

In this lesson, students plan an informational paragraph, first synthesizing their culture research into
categories on a Culture Research matrix, and then planning the paragraph using a modified accordion
graphic organizer from Module 1. Because the Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer is
somewhat familiar to students, teachers may elect to only briefly review the tool rather than use lesson
time to reorient students to it and show a completed model. The Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic
organizer has been modified to support students in connecting literary text and informational text. Be
sure to carefully review this with students.
Students will write a similar paragraph on-demand in Lesson 15. The writing task in Lesson 15 is meant
as formative assessment. In Unit 2, students will receive additional instruction and practice in writing
research paragraphs. The results of the End of Unit 1 Assessment should inform your instruction as
students begin a similar process with new content in Unit 2.
In advance: Prepare a large chart to look exactly like the Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer
shown in the Supporting Materials. Make sure its the one with all boxes blank except for the headings.
Or plan to just project a blank graphic organizer using a document camera.
In advance: Review the research-based informational paragraph (sample, for teacher reference; see
supporting materials) to use in Work Time C.
Post: Learning targets.

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

research-based, categories, matrix,


plan, assist, explain

Criteria for a Research-Based Informational Paragraph anchor chart (from Lesson 13)
Culture Research Matrix anchor chart (from Lesson 13)
Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer (blank; one to display)
Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer (sample, for teacher reference; see supporting materials)
Research-based informational paragraph (sample, for teacher reference)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L14 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 14


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan, Continued

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets and Reviewing the Criteria for a Research-Based Informational Paragraph
(10 minutes)
Tell students that today they will continue their work from Lesson 13. Review as needed, saying something like: You have
read both literary and informational texts and talked with your peers to learn about the culture of Japan. Today, we will see
how to go about choosing the important details from the research and then use them to complete a Culture Research
matrix.

Add nonlinguistic symbols to the


Culture Research matrix to help
clarify the categories.

Display and ask students to deconstruct the first learning target:

* I can assist in creating a plan for a research-based informational paragraph about a custom or tradition of Japan using a
Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer.
Circle and discuss the words plan, informational, and paragraph, and add visuals as necessary to ensure that students
understand the target.

Consider allowing students to work


with a partner while planning and
choosing details. Each student
should complete their own
organizer and write their own
paragraph in the next lesson, but
the thinking work could be done in
pairs.

Circle the phrase research-based and review as needed. Clarify by telling students it means that the information in the
paragraphs they write will come from the facts theyve gathered in their research.
Underline the word assist and explain that the work done today will be shared and done together as a group. The reason for
this is to build some experience and a level of comfort for students before moving on to planning and writing their own
research-based informational paragraph.
Display and ask students to deconstruct the second learning target:

* I can identify criteria for a strong research-based informational paragraph.


Review the Criteria for a Research-Based Informational Paragraph anchor chart.
Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* Why do thoughtful writers plan before they begin writing?


Guide students toward an understanding that planning is essential so that writers know what they are going to write about
and can begin to organize their ideas before they actually write. Remind students about the good work they did in Module 1,
planning their paragraph about their own reading goals and about a librarian or organization that helps people access books
around the world. They have learned a lot as writers so far this year!

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L14 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 14


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan, Continued

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Modeling: Planning with the Paragraph Writing Accordion Graphic Organizer (20 minutes)
Display and review the completed Culture Research Matrix anchor chart (from Lesson 13), which contains the
information charted on customs and traditions. Explain to students that you want to write a paragraph about two customs or
traditions in Japan.
Model thinking-aloud as you weigh your options for which custom to write about.
Perhaps start by saying: Hmm, when I look at my research matrix, I see I have several customs listed: bowing, drinking
tea, and the Cloud Dragon.
Then say something like: My paragraph is going to be about customs and traditions that are still part of Japanese culture
today. I notice that only some topics were found in both texts. There are also some topics that I feel I have stronger details
for. These are the customs and traditions I will choose to write about.
Remind students that great writers do not just start writing. They think hard and they plan. And when writers are writing an
informational piece, they make sure they have good information about their topic before they begin to write.
Continue by saying: As good writers always do, we will make a plan and organize our thoughts before we actually start
writing.
Project the Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer. Ask students to remind themselves about how to use
the accordion graphic organizer by looking it over and thinking back to Module 1. Ask students questions about how this
organizer is different. (The difference is that students will be asked to give examples of how the informational fact was show
in Dragon of the Red Dawn).
You will now be modeling and completing a shared writing to demonstrate how information from the Culture Research
matrix can be placed within the Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer. Use the Paragraph Writing Accordion
graphic organizer (sample, for teacher reference) as a guide for your modeling. As you think-aloud, model how to
fill in the accordion organizer. Continue doing this until it contains all of the information included on the Paragraph Writing
accordion graphic organizer (sample, for teacher reference).
Because students have experience with the Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer, engage them in working with
you to craft each section of the organizer using the topic of bowing.
When the accordion organizer is fully filled in, ask students to give a thumbs-up, thumbs-sideways, or thumbs-down as a
check for understanding of the process you just modeled. Point out that you did not write in sentences, but rather used
short, but clear and correct phrases. Clarify as needed and if necessary quickly repeat the steps for students.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L14 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 14


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan, Continued

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Modeling: Writing a Paragraph Using the Graphic Organizer (25 minutes)


Tell students that its time to actually write the paragraph. But first, have them briefly reflect on the steps that were taken
over the last several days.
They read and conducted research.
They took notes in an organized fashion.
They discussed what they were learning with their peers.
Say: You were shown how to pull information from your notes and place it in a Culture Research matrix. And following that,
we used the matrix to make an informed decision about what specific topic to write about. It seemed that the best decision
was to pick a topic that we had a lot of information about from both texts. Once the decision was made, you helped use the
matrix to fill in the Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer.
Be purposeful about having the completed accordion graphic organizer out and visible as you write the paragraph. Use the
research-based informational paragraph (sample, for teacher reference) as a guide. Invite students to construct
the paragraph with you as you write , one sentence at a time, thinking-aloud as you go.
Make sure to think-aloud with each part of the paragraph (topic sentence, detail sentences, conclusion) and repeatedly
reference the graphic organizer. As you model and think-aloud, include language related to word choice and having sentence
variety.
After the paragraph is written, again show correct writing behavior by reading the paragraph aloud to check it for things like
sentence flow, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. You should even do a final check of the graphic organizer to
demonstrate the step of being sure that all parts of the graphic organizer were addressed within the paragraph.
Note: Students will be asked to write a similar paragraph on-demand in Lesson 15. The writing task in Lesson 15 is meant as
formative assessment.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L14 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 14


Writing a Research-Based Informational Paragraph:
The Culture of Japan, Continued

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Reviewing the Writing Moves (5 minutes)


End the lesson by asking students to name the steps that were taken as researchers and writers over the past two lessons.
Listen for:
1. Reread sections of text, thinking about customs and traditions.
2. Record customs and traditions in Columns 1 and 2 of the Culture Research matrix.
3. Go back to Exploring Countries: Japan, finding information that supports customs and traditions from Columns 1 and
2.
4. Record additional information in Columns 4 and 5.
5. Plan paragraph in Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer.
6. Draft paragraph.
Ask students to turn and talk with a nearby student about the hard work done today. Perhaps they can even share what step
they found difficult to understand or what step seemed easier or more straightforward for them. Listen in as students talk
and if theres time, you can share some of the things you heard students say.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Share with someone at home the work you did in class today to write a research-based informational paragraph. Tell them
about how the accordion organizer made the paragraph writing easier, better, and more organized.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L14 June 2014 7

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 14


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 14

Paragraph Writing Accordion Graphic Organizer


Describe two customs or traditions of ancient Japan that are still important in Japan today. Use
details from the chart you just completed and the accordion graphic organizer below to write a
paragraph describing these important parts of Japanese culture.
Topic:

Detail 1: From Exploring Countries: Japan

Detail 2: From Dragon of the Red Dawn

Detail 1: From Exploring Countries: Japan

Detail 2: From Dragon of the Red Dawn

Conclusion:

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY.


All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L14 June 2014 9

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 14

Paragraph Writing Accordion Graphic Organizer


(Sample, for Teacher Reference)
Describe two customs or traditions of ancient Japan that are still important in Japan today. Use
details from the chart you just completed and the accordion graphic organizer below to write a
paragraph describing these important parts of Japanese culture.
Topic:
bowing and drinking tea are important customs

Detail 1: From Exploring Countries: Japan


tea is served with every meal

Detail 2: From Dragon of the Red Dawn


people were drinking in the teahouse after the fire
Jack and Annie were in one earlier

Detail 1: From Exploring Countries: Japan


bowing can mean thank you

Detail 2: From Dragon of the Red Dawn


Jack and Annie said, Thank you, to Basho and bowed

Conclusion:
bowing and drinking tea are two important customs from ancient Japan that are still
today

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY.


All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L14 June 2014 10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 14

Sample Research-Based Informational Paragraph


(for Teacher Reference)
Japan has many customs and traditions that define its culture. Two important customs in
ancient Japan that are still used today are bowing and drinking tea. In Japan, people bow to each
other when they are greeting one another. Bowing can also be a way of saying, Thank you.
When Basho was leaving Jack and Annie, Jack said, Thank you, and they all bowed to each
other. Drinking tea is another important custom in Japan. Tea is served with every meal. In the
text Dragon of the Red Dawn, when Jack and Annie were heading home after the fire, they saw
people coming together and drinking tea in the teahouse. Bowing and drinking tea are important
customs in Japan. They are customs that have been around for many generations.

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All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L14 June 2014 11

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 15


On-Demand Assessment: Informational Paragraph
on Japans Culture
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15


On-Demand Assessment:
Informational Paragraph on Japans Culture

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can write an informative text that has a clear topic. (W.3.2)
I can develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details. (W.3.2)
I can construct a closing statement on the topic of an informative text. (W.3.2)
I can use spelling patterns to spell words correctly. (L.3.2f)
I can express ideas using carefully chosen words. (L.3.3)
I can use text features to locate information efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can answer questions using specific details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific details from informational text. (RI.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can write an informative paragraph about customs and traditions in Japan.

End of Unit 1 Assessment

I can find specific information about ancient Japanese culture in a literary text.
I can use text features to locate information about modern day Japan efficiently.
I can write an opening sentence that identifies my topic.
I can support my topic with accurate details from text.
I can write a sentence to conclude my paragraph.
I can use wording and terms to help the reader learn about a custom or tradition of Japan.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15


On-Demand Assessment:
Informational Paragraph on Japans Culture

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

In this assessment, students pull together the reading, research, and writing skills they have developed
to connect literary and informational texts. Students will use the texts about Japan that they have been
working with to identify and write a paragraph about customs and traditions discussed in Dragon of the
Red Dawn that are still important in Japan today.

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)


2. Work Time
A. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part A: Locating
Information in a Literary Text (15 minutes)
B. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part B :Locating
Information in an Informational Text (15 minutes)
C. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part C: On-Demand
Writing of an Informational Paragraph about
Japanese Culture (20 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Target Check, Celebrate, and Say Goodbye to Japan
(5 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Tell someone at home what five things you will
remember most about Japan.

This is the first formal writing in Module 2. Emphasize to the class that writing is more than just
organizing ideas or editing for conventions. To write well about something, you need to know a lot about
it. Students have been building knowledge about culture, and specifically about Japans culture, during
their reading and through the various other activities in Unit 1.
This End of Unit 1 Assessment requires students to draw information from two texts and to write an ondemand paragraph. While their work in Unit 1 should have made students familiar with each part of this
process, third graders are not yet expected to independently initiate and complete a short research
project. To provide some support, this assessment has been broken into three parts. Review and clarify
directions with students before they begin each part of the assessment. If needed, allow short stretch
breaks between sections. While you may clarify directions, it is important that all of the actual research
and writing in this section be done independently.
A sheet containing the writing prompt for the assessment is included in supporting materials. If
students need more writing space, provide lined paper. Alternatively, display the assessment writing
prompt and allow students to write on any lined paper or in a notebook or journal.
Assessment of students on-demand paragraphs will derive from the criteria for a research-based
informational paragraph (developed in Lesson 13), as well as the NYS four-point writing rubric. Note
that this writing also serves as formative assessment, since students will do similar writing again in Unit
2.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15


On-Demand Assessment:
Informational Paragraph on Japans Culture

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials
Dragon of the Red Dawn (book; one per student)
Exploring Countries: Japan (book; one per student)
End of Unit 1 Assessment: On-Demand Writing of a Research-Based Informational Paragraph (one per student)
Lined paper (optional; see Teaching Notes)
New York State Grade 3 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (for teacher reference)http://www.engageny.org/sites/default/files/resource/attachments/grade-3-ela-guide_0.pdf

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15


On-Demand Assessment:
Informational Paragraph on Japans Culture

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)


Tell students that today they will complete a formal assessment in which they will, on their own, use much of what they have
been learning and practicing. They will need to:
1. Read informational and literary texts.
2. Identify examples of Japanese culture from both texts and record them on a graphic organizer.
3. Write a short paragraph to explain what they have found in their research.
Explain that students will need to refer back to both Dragon of the Red Dawn and Exploring Countries: Japan to complete
a graphic organizer and write a paragraph about Japans culture.
Encourage students to do their best. Let them know that this is a chance to show what they know and how much effort they
are making to read carefully and identify important details in an informational text. This also is an opportunity to
communicate some of the information they have learned in writing .
Ask students to listen as you read the learning targets aloud:

* I can write an informative paragraph about customs and traditions in Japan.


* I can find specific information about ancient Japanese culture in a literary text.
* I can use text features to locate information about modern day Japan efficiently.
* I can write an opening sentence that identifies my topic.
* I can support my topic with accurate details from text.
* I can write a sentence to conclude my paragraph.
* I can use wording and terms to help the reader learn about a custom or tradition of Japan.
For each target, ask students to give a thumbs-up if they are clear on what they will be expected to do, a thumbs-sideways if
they understand part but not all of what to do, and a thumbs-down if they are very unsure about what they should do.
Address any clarifying questions before beginning the assessment.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15


On-Demand Assessment:
Informational Paragraph on Japans Culture

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part A: Locating Information in a Literary Text (15 minutes)
Ask students to take out the two texts needed for the assessment: Dragon of the Red Dawn and Exploring Countries:
Japan. Distribute the End of Unit 1 Assessment: On-Demand Writing of a Research-Based Informational
Paragraph. You may also want to distribute sheets of lined paper, or have some available for students who need more
space to write (see Teaching Notes).

Allow ELLs additional time to


complete their paragraphs. They
will receive extra time on the New
York State assessment.

Read aloud the directions for Part A. Help students to locate pages 3640 in Dragon of the Red Dawn. You may want to
guide students in marking the beginning and ending pages of the section they are to work with, using sticky notes or
bookmarks. Clarify directions as needed for this section. Allow 15 minutes to complete Column 1 and Column 2 in the
graphic organizer in Part A independently.
B. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part B: Locating Information in an Informational Text (15 minutes)
Read aloud the directions for Part B. Answer questions as needed to clarify the directions. Be sure students understand that
they can look for information in any section of their Exploring Countries: Japan book.
Allow 15 minutes for students to locate information and add it to Column 3 and Column 4 of the chart.
If needed, allow a short stretch break before moving on to Part C.
C. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part C: On-Demand Writing of an Informational Paragraph about Japanese
Culture (20 minutes)
Read aloud the directions for Part C. Be sure students understand that the information for their paragraph will come from
the graphic organizer they have just completed.
Answer any clarifying questions students have. Remind students that they will have a lot of practice writing paragraphs this
year. Today, they are doing what is called on-demand writing: the best writing you can do in a set and limited time.
Give students 20 minutes to write their paragraphs. Circulate, supporting students only by providing general encouragement
and reminding them that the criteria for an effective paragraph is given in the assessment question. Students should
complete the writing independently for this on-demand assessment. For students who seem to struggle, praise their efforts
and encourage them to push on and try their best.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15


On-Demand Assessment:
Informational Paragraph on Japans Culture

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

If students finish early, encourage them to reread and carefully check their responses. Then invite them to quietly read from
their Exploring Countries: Japan text, or to choose a text from the Recommended Texts list (or another text that fits with
the content of the unit) to read and enjoy while other students finish their writing.
Collect both the graphic organizer and on-demand paragraphs to assess.

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Target Check, Celebrate, and Say Goodbye to Japan (5 minutes)


Post the learning targets again. Read each target aloud, asking students to engage in a quick target check. Tell them that
after you read the target, they should: give it thumbs-up if they felt they really got it, thumbs-sideways if they think they
need more work on this, or thumbs-down if they felt really confused by this and found it difficult. Assess student confidence
based on these responses.
Celebrate with students the good work they have done in learning about Japans culture and developing a research-based
informational paragraph. Tell them that in Unit 2, they will get to continue to build their knowledge about culture by
learning about a new country.
With any remaining time, allow students a final opportunity to enjoy and learn from Exploring Countries: Japan.
Encourage students to read with a partner or in a small group to promote a sense of community and celebration.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Tell someone at home what five things you will remember most about the wonderful country of Japan.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 1: Lesson 15


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15

End of Unit 1 Assessment:


On-Demand Writing of a Research-Based Informational Paragraph
Part A:
Reread pages 3640 in Dragon of the Red Dawn to find examples of some of the customs and
traditions in ancient Japan. Add three examples from the story to Column 1 of the chart below. Be
sure to include the page where you found the information in Column 2.
Please wait for your teachers directions before going on to Part B.
PART A
Column 1: Ancient Japanese
Custom or Tradition

PART B
Column 2:
Page in
Dragon of
the Red
Dawn

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Column 3: More information


about this custom or tradition
from my research

Column 4:
Page in
Exploring
Countries:
Japan

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15

End of Unit 1 Assessment:


On-Demand Writing of a Research-Based Informational Paragraph
Part B:
Now use what you know about locating information in an informational text to find more information
about at least two of the customs and traditions on your chart in Exploring Countries: Japan. Add
this new information to Column 3 in the chart. Write the page number where you found each piece of
information in Column 4.
Please wait for your teachers directions before going on to Part C.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15

End of Unit 1 Assessment:


On-Demand Writing of a Research-Based Informational Paragraph
Part C:
In reading Dragon of the Red Dawn, you learned a lot about the customs and traditions of ancient
Japan. In Exploring Countries: Japan you learned about the culture of modern day Japan. Some
Japanese customs and traditions were found in both books. These are customs and traditions that are
still important in Japan today. Use the graphic organizer you just completed to write a paragraph
about these important parts of Japanese culture.
Write a paragraph describing two customs or traditions that Mary Pope Osborne used in her book
that are still important in modern day Japan. Use details from the text to support your response.
In your response, be sure to:
introduce the topic
use specific facts and examples from both texts to describe each custom or tradition
choose words that express your ideas in an interesting and clear way
end with a concluding statement
Be sure to check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15

End of Unit 1 Assessment: Sample Responses


(for Teacher Reference)
Sample Response for Parts A and B: Note: Students must find three customs and traditions in
Dragon of the Red Dawn. They locate more information on any two of these in Exploring Countries:
Japan.
PART A

PART B

Column 1: Ancient Japanese


Custom or Tradition

Column 2:
Page in
Dragon of
the Red
Dawn

Column 3: More information


about this custom or tradition
from my research

Column 4:
Page in
Exploring
Countries:
Japan

Special dance, women in


kimonos with white painted
faces

36

Called Kabuki, dancers


wear colorful costumes
and makeup

26

Sitting on a straw mat

39

Watched a kind of puppet


show with giant puppets
moved around by people in
black clothes

37

Puppet plays set to music


are called bunraku

26

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15

End of Unit 1 Assessment: Sample Responses


(for Teacher Reference)
Other possible responses:
PART A

PART B

Column 1: Ancient Japanese


Custom or Tradition

Column 2:
Page in
Dragon of
the Red
Dawn

Column 3: More information


about this custom or tradition
from my research

Column 4:
Page in
Exploring
Countries:
Japan

Sitting on a straw mat

39

Straw mats are called


tatami, part of Japanese
tradition, most houses
have one

15

Going to a teahouse

38

Tea ceremony, special way


of making green tea

27

Eating sushi

40

Chefs top rice with raw fish


and wrap it in seaweed

23

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15

End of Unit 1 Assessment: Sample Responses


(for Teacher Reference)
Part C: Sample Response
Many of the Japanese traditions that Mary Pope Osborne wrote about are still important in Japan
today. The Japanese still enjoy puppet plays set to music, called bunraku. People wear black clothing
and work giant puppets like the Cloud Dragon in Dragon of the Red Dawn. They also watch special
performances called Kabuki. The dancers wear special makeup and colorful clothing just like the
women with white painted faces in kimonos that Jack and Annie saw when they crossed the great
bridge. Many of the traditions from long ago are still important to the Japanese.
Criteria:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Opens with a clear topic sentence


Contains detail sentences within the body of the paragraph
Detail sentences contain facts based on documented research from both texts
Detail sentences show sentence variety
Words and phrasing are chosen that exhibit accuracy and interest
Shows attention to grade-appropriate control of spelling and mechanics
Closes with a concluding sentence

Use the 4-point rubric on the following page for determining scores on your paragraph in this
assessment.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15

New York State Grade 3 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric


CRITERIA

CCLS

Essays at this level:

Essays at this level

Essays at this level

Essays at this level:

Essays at this level:

CONTENT AND
ANALYSIS: the
extent to which the
essay conveys ideas
and information
clearly and
accurately in order
to support analysis
of topics or text

W.2,
R.19

clearly introduce a topic


in a manner that follows
logically from the task
and purpose
demonstrate
comprehension and
analysis of the text

clearly introduce a topic


in a manner that follows
from the task and
purpose
demonstrate gradeappropriate
comprehension of the
text

introduce a topic in a
manner that follows
generally from the task
and purpose
demonstrate a confused
comprehension of the text

introduce a topic in a
manner that does not
logically follow from the
task and purpose
demonstrate little
understanding of the text

demonstrate a lack
of comprehension of
the text or task

COMMAND OF
EVIDENCE:
the extent to which
the essay presents
evidence from the
provided text to
support analysis and
reflection

W.2
R.18

develop the topic with


relevant, well-chosen
facts, definitions, and
details throughout the
essay

develop the topic with


relevant facts, definitions,
and details throughout
the essay

partially develop the


topic of the essay with the
use of some textual
evidence, some of which
may be irrelevant

demonstrate an
attempt to use evidence,
but only develop ideas
with minimal, occasional
evidence which is
generally invalid or
irrelevant

provide no
evidence or provide
evidence that is
completely
irrelevant

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15

New York State Grade 3 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric


CRITERIA

CCLS

4
Essays at this level:

3
Essays at this level

2
Essays at this level

1
Essays at this level:

0
Essays at this level:

COHERENCE,
ORGANIZATION,
AND
STYLE: the extent to
which
the essay logically
organizes
complex ideas,
concepts, and
information using
formal
style and precise
language

W.2
L.3
L.6

clearly and consistently


group related information
together
skillfully connect ideas
within categories of
information using linking
words and phrases

provide a concluding
statement that follows
clearly from the topic and
information presented

generally group related


information together
connect ideas within
categories of information
using linking words and
phrases
provide a concluding
statement that follows
from the topic and
information presented

exhibit some attempt to


group related information
together
inconsistently connect
ideas using some linking
words and phrases
provide a concluding
statement that follows
generally from the topic
and information
presented

exhibit little attempt at


organization
lack the use of linking
words and phrases
provide a concluding
statement that is illogical
or unrelated to the topic
and information
presented

exhibit no
evidence of
organization
do not provide a
concluding
statement

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 1: LESSON 15

New York State Grade 3 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric


CRITERIA

CCLS

4
Essays at this level:

3
Essays at this level

2
Essays at this level

1
Essays at this level:

0
Essays at this level:

CONTROL OF
CONVENTIONS:
the extent to which
the essay
demonstrates
command of the
conventions of
standard
English grammar,
usage,
capitalization,
punctuation, and
spelling

W.2
L.1
L.2

demonstrate gradeappropriate command of


conventions, with few
errors

demonstrate gradeappropriate command of


conventions, with
occasional errors that do
not hinder
comprehension

demonstrate emerging
command of conventions,
with some errors that may
hinder comprehension

demonstrate a lack of
command of
conventions, with
frequent errors that
hinder comprehension

are minimal,
making assessment
of conventions
unreliable

If the student writes only a personal response and makes no reference to the text(s), the response can be scored no higher than a 1.
Responses totally unrelated to the topic, illegible, incoherent, or blank should be given a 0.
A response totally copied from the text(s) with no original student writing should be scored a 0.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U1:L15 June 2014

16

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2:


Overview
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Case Study:
Researching a Countrys Culture

Unit 2: Case Study: Researching a Countrys Culture


In Unit 2, students continue to develop their skills through careful reading of both
literary and informational texts. Class members extend their expertise of learning
about culture beyond Japan and begin studying three different countries. Students
build their ability to share learning about these countries through reading and
structured book discussions. The class begins the unit by reading a new Magic Tree
House book and discovering the evidence of culture within that country. They read
the book in class and at home, sharing and supporting each other through a
structured Book Club. Students are also supported to pay attention to key
vocabulary and begin a routine to practice reading fluently. For a mid-unit
assessment, students demonstrate their reading and discussion skills through a
two-part assessment in which they prepare key information to share with others
who have not read the same Magic Tree House book. Next, students continue to

hone their ability to read and understand informational text. The class builds its
knowledge of culture by closely reading Exploring Countries texts that correlate
with the country portrayed in the Magic Tree House book they read. Students
continue to learn more about how to use features of informational text when
learning about a topic. During this time, students are also expanding their
definition of what culture is. After learning from the Exploring Countries texts,
they are given a supplemental article that offers additional research to build their
content knowledge of the culture of their country. As an end of unit assessment,
students will demonstrate their skill with informational texts by reading excerpts
from a new text about a different country: France. Students also write an ondemand paragraph about the customs and traditions they discovered in this new
text.

Guiding Questions And Big Ideas


What defines culture?
How do authors learn and share their knowledge on a topic?
Authors review, examine, and discuss multiple sources to gather information and build knowledge on a topic.
Authors share knowledge on a topic through literary or informational texts.
Culture is the way of life that has been passed from one generation to the next.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Case Study:
Researching a Countrys Culture

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment

Book Discussions and Text-Dependent Questions on the Magic Tree House Books
This assessment centers on standards NYSP ELA CCSS RL.3.1, RL.3.9, W.3.8, SL.3.1, and SL.3.3. After reading a Magic Tree
House book independently, students prepare for a small group discussion by gathering evidence from their notes on the
Expert Research Matrix. These written notes are collected at the end of the assessment and will be used to assess RL.3.1,
RL.3.9, and W.3.8. Students also work in triads t0 discuss key details about the plot of the book they have read and what they
have learned about their countrys culture. During the discussion, the teacher circulates, using a checklist to assess SL.3.1 and
SL.3.3.

End of Unit 2 Assessment

Reading and Writing about a New Informational Text: Exploring France excerpts
This assessment centers on standards NYSP ELA CCSS RI.3.1, RI.3.2, RI.3.5, W.3.2, and W.3.8. In the second portion of Unit
2, students practiced using text features to locate information during a close reading of the informational texts about a country
featured in the Magic Tree House books. In this on-demand assessment, students apply these skills to an informational text
about a new country. Students locate information in the text and write a short, informative paragraph about the customs and
traditions in that country. The NYS 4-point writing rubric will be used to score this assessment.

Content Connections
This module is designed to address English Language Arts standards as students read literature and informational text about the cultures of various countries. However,
the module intentionally incorporates Social Studies Practices and Themes to support potential interdisciplinary connections to this compelling content.
These intentional connections are described below.
Big ideas and guiding questions are informed by the New York State Common Core K-8 Social Studies Framework:
Unifying Themes (pages 78)
Theme 2: Development, Movement, and Interaction of Cultures: Aspects of culture such as belief systems, religious faith, or political ideals as influences on other parts
of a culture, such as its institutions or literature, music, and art.
Social Studies Practices, Gathering, Using, and Interpreting Evidence, Grades K4:
Descriptor 1: Form questions about the world in which we live (page 16 of 29).
Key Ideas and Conceptual Understandings, Grade 3, Communities around the WorldLearning about People and Places:
Development, Movement, and Interaction of Cultures: 3.1b Communities around the world can be diverse in terms of their members, languages spoken, customs and
traditions, and religious beliefs and practices. People in world communities celebrate various holidays and festivals.
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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Case Study:
Researching a Countrys Culture

Texts
1. Mary Pope Osborne, Magic Tree House #45: A Crazy Day with Cobras (New York: A Stepping Stone Book by Random House, 2011), ISBN: 978-0-375-86795-8.
(Enough texts for 1/3 of the class).
2. Mary Pope Osborne, Magic Tree House #33: Carnival at Candlelight (New York: A Stepping Stone Book by Random House, 2005), ISBN: 978-0-375-83034-1.
(Enough texts for 1/3 of the class).
3. Mary Pope Osborne, Magic Tree House #34: Season of the Sandstorms (New York: A Stepping Stone Book by Random House, 2005), ISBN: 978-0-375-83032-7.
(Enough texts for 1/3 of the class).
4. Jim Bartell, Exploring Countries: India (Minneapolis: Bellwether Media, 2011), ISBN 978-1-60014-555-1. (Enough texts for 1/3 of the class).
5. Lisa Owings, Exploring Countries: Iraq (Minneapolis: Bellwether Media, 2011), ISBN 978-1-60014-592-6. (Enough texts for 1/3 of the class).
6. Walter Simmons, Exploring Countries: Italy (Minneapolis: Bellwether Media, 2012), ISBN 978-1-60014-673-2. (Enough texts for 1/3 of the class).
7. Rachel Grack, Exploring Countries: France (excerpts) (Minneapolis: Bellwether Media, 2011), ISBN 978-1-60014-480-6. (no purchase necessary; excerpt only).
8. "Republic of Iraq." In CultureGrams Kids Edition 2013. Proquest. 2013. PDF.
9. Cynthia Hatch, Soccer Mania, in Faces (Vol. 22, No. 2), Oct. 2005, 4041.
10. Shruti Priya and Katherine Darrow, The Ancient Art of Rangoli, in Calliope (Vol. 23, No. 6), March 2013, 3436.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

This unit is approximately 3 weeks or 16 sessions of instruction.

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 1

Working with Peers to Ask and


Answer Questions: Launching
the Magic Tree House Books

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of a literary text.
(RL.3.1)

I can answer questions


(who/what/where) using specific details
from Chapter 1 of my Magic Tree House
book.

I can answer questions using specific


details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can retell a chapter in a story using
key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words
using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)

Lesson 2

Working with Peers to Ask and


Answer Questions: Continuing
to Read and Discuss the Magic
Tree House Books

Capturing Key Details


recording form (for Chapter
1)

Class Norms for


Conversation anchor chart

Book Discussion checklist

Holding a Book Discussion


anchor chart

Capturing Key Details


recording form

Fluent Reader Criteria


anchor chart

Book Discussion checklist

Holding a Book Discussion


anchor chart

I can use context clues to determine the


meaning of words and phrases in
Chapter 1 of my Magic Tree House
book.
I can effectively participate in a
discussion with my peers about my
Magic Tree House book.
I can use the criteria of a fluent reader
to read aloud a selected part of my
Magic Tree House book.

I can retell a chapter in a story using


key details from the text. (RL.3.2)

I can retell Chapter 2


(who/what/where) of my Magic Tree
House book using specific details.

I can read third grade level texts


accurately and fluently to make
meaning. (RF.3.4)

I can use context clues to determine the


meaning of words and phrases in
Chapter 2 of my Magic Tree House
book.

I can document what I learn about a


topic by sorting evidence into
categories and taking notes. (W.3.8)

I can effectively participate in a


discussion with my peers about my
Magic Tree House book.

I can effectively participate in a


conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)

I can identify, categorize, and record key


details from the assigned chapter that
connect with the customs and traditions
of my country.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

I can explain why I chose specific details


to answer questions about the text.

I can ask questions to deepen my


understanding of a literary text.
(RL.3.1)

I can determine the meaning of words


using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)

Ongoing
Assessment

Book Club Steps anchor


chart
Stars and Steps protocol

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 3

Building Confidence with Book


Clubs: Continuing to Read and
Discuss the Magic Tree House
Books

I can ask and answer questions to


deepen my understanding of a
literary text. (RL.3.1)

I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of


my Magic Tree House book using
specific details (who/what/where).

I can retell a chapter in a story using


key details from the text. (RL.3.2)

I can explain why I chose specific details


to answer questions about the text.

I can determine the meaning of


words using clues from the story.
(RL.3.4)

I can use context clues to determine the


meaning of words and phrases in the
assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree
House book.

I can document what I learn about a


topic by sorting evidence into
categories and taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and
adults. (SL.3.1)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Capturing Key Details


recording form

Class Norms for Discussion


anchor chart

Book Discussion checklist

Book Club Steps anchor


chart

I can effectively participate in a


discussion with my peers about my
Magic Tree House book.
I can identify, categorize, and record key
details from the assigned chapter that
connect with the customs and traditions
of my country.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 4

Practicing Fluency and


Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Deepen
Understanding of Magic Tree
House books.

I can ask and answer questions to


deepen my understanding of a
literary text. (RL.3.1)

I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of


my Magic Tree House book using
specific details (who/what/where).

I can retell a chapter in a story using


key details from the text. (RL.3.2)

I can explain why I chose specific details


to answer questions about the text.

I can determine the meaning of


words using clues from the story.
(RL.3.4)

I can use context clues to determine the


meaning of words and phrases in the
assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree
House book.

I can read third grade level texts


accurately and fluently to make
meaning. (RF.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by sorting evidence into
categories and taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and
adults. (SL.3.1)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Capturing Key Details


recording form

Fluent Reader Criteria


anchor chart

Book Discussion checklist

Class Norms for


Conversation anchor chart
Concentric Circles protocol

I can effectively participate in a


discussion with my peers about my
Magic Tree House book.
I can identify, categorize, and record key
details from the assigned chapter that
connect with the customs and traditions
of my country.
I can use the criteria of a fluent reader
to read aloud a selected part of my
Magic Tree House book.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 5

Independent Book Clubs:


Finishing the Magic Tree House
books

I can ask and answer questions to


deepen my understanding of a
literary text. (RL.3.1)

I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of


my Magic Tree House book using
specific details (who/what/where).

I can retell a chapter in a story using


key details from the text. (RL.3.2)

I can explain why I chose specific details


to answer questions about the text.

I can determine the meaning of


words using clues from the story.
(RL.3.4)

I can use context clues to determine the


meaning of words and phrases in the
assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree
House book.

I can document what I learn about a


topic by sorting evidence into
categories. (W.3.8)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and
adults. (SL.3.1)

Lesson 6

Beginning the Mid-Unit 2


Assessment: Expert Research
Matrix, Part 1

I can answer questions using specific


details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by sorting evidence into
categories. (W.3.8)

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Capturing Key Details


recording form
Book Discussion checklist

I can effectively participate in a


discussion with my peers about my
Magic Tree House book.
I can identify, categorize, and record key
details from the assigned chapter that
connect with the customs and traditions
of my country.
I can record what I will share about my
Magic Tree House book on my MidUnit 2 Assessment: Expert Research
Matrix.

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
expert Research Matrix,
Part 1

Jigsaw protocol
Fishbowl Discussion
protocol

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Lesson 7

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued:


Fishbowl Discussion of Magic Tree
House books

I can read third grade level texts


accurately and fluently to make
meaning. (RF.3.4)

I can answer questions about my Magic


Tree House book using specific details
from the text.

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Expert Research Matrix
(began in Lesson 6)

Procedure for Mid-Unit 2


Assessment Discussion
anchor chart

I can answer questions using specific


details from literary text. (RL.3.1)

I can effectively engage in a


conversation with my peers about our
Magic Tree House book.

Teacher Assessment
Checklist for Discussion

Fluent Reader Criteria


anchor chart

I can compare and contrast stories


by the same author. (RL.3.9).
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Fishbowl protocol

I can compare and contrast stories in


the Magic Tree House series.

I can effectively engage in


discussions with diverse partners
about third-grade topics and texts.
(SL.3.1)
I can express my own ideas clearly
during discussions. (SL.3.1)
I can build on others ideas during
discussions. (SL.3.1)
I can ask questions when I am
confused about what a speaker is
saying. (SL.3.3)
I can answer questions to show what
I know when listening to a speaker.
(SL.3.3)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Lesson 8

Completing the Mid-Unit 2


Assessment: Continuing Fishbowl
Discussion and Completing Expert
Research Matrix, Part 2

I can read third grade level texts


accurately and fluently to make
meaning. (RF.3.4)

I can answer questions about my Magic


Tree House book using specific details
from the text.

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Expert Research Matrix
(began in Lesson 6)

Procedure for Mid-Unit 2


Assessment Discussion
anchor chart

I can answer questions using specific


details from literary text. (RL.3.1)

I can effectively engage in a


conversation with my peers about our
Magic Tree House book.

Assessment Checklist for


Discussion (begun in
Lesson 7)

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively engage in
discussions with diverse partners
about third-grade topics and texts.
(SL.3.1)

I can compare and contrast stories in


the Magic Tree House series.

I can express my own ideas clearly


during discussions. (SL.3.1)
I can build on others ideas during
discussions. (SL.3.1)
I can ask questions when I am
confused about what a speaker is
saying. (SL.3.3)
I can answer questions to show what
I know when listening to a speaker.
(SL.3.3)
I can compare and contrast stories
by the same author. (RL.3.9)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 9

Close Reading: Launching the


Exploring Countries Books, Part
1

I can answer questions to deepen my


understanding of informational text.
(RI.3.1)

I can learn about my country by doing


close reading, with teacher guidance, on
my Exploring Countries text.

I can use text features and search tools


(e.g. key words, sidebars, hyperlinks)
to locate information relevant to a
given topic efficiently. (RI. 3.5)

I can accurately record information I


find about my country.

I can use information from the words


to understand informational text.
(RI.3.7)

I can use text features to efficiently find


information in my Exploring Countries
text.

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Text-Dependent Questions
(Italy Research Group only)
Text Feature Scavenger
Hunt recording form

Structural Features of
Informational Text
(Exploring Countries)
anchor chart

Fact Hunt/Flag Activity


recording form

Work Time Tasks anchor


chart
Think-Pair-Share protocol

I can use text features to learn new


information about my country.

I can use information from the


illustrations (maps, photographs) to
understand informational texts.
(RI.3.7)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Lesson 10

Close Reading: Launching the


Exploring Countries Books, Part
2

I can answer questions to deepen my


understanding of informational text.
(RI.3.1)

I can learn about my country by doing


close reading, with teacher guidance, on
my Exploring Countries text.

I can use text features and search tools


(e.g. key words, sidebars, hyperlinks)
to locate information relevant to a
given topic efficiently. (RI. 3.5)

I can accurately record information I


find about my country.

I can use information from the words


to understand informational text.
(RI.3.7)

I can use text features to efficiently find


information in my Exploring Countries
text.

Word Tracker homework


(from Lesson 9)

Work Time Task anchor


chart

Text-Dependent Questions
(Iraq Research group only)

Concentric Circles protocol

Text Feature Scavenger


Hunt recording form

I can use text features to learn new


information about my country.

I can use information from the


illustrations (maps, photographs) to
understand informational texts.
(RI.3.7)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 11

Close Reading: Launching the


Exploring Countries Books, Part
3

I can ask and answer questions to


deepen understanding of
informational text. (RI.3.1)

I can learn about my country by doing


close reading, with teacher guidance, on
my Exploring Countries text.

I can use text features and search tools


(e.g. key words, sidebars, hyperlinks)
to locate information relevant to a
given topic efficiently. (RI. 3.5)

I can accurately record information I


find about my country.

I can use information from the words


to understand informational text.
(RI.3.7)

I can use text features to efficiently find


information in my Exploring Countries
text.

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Word Tracker homework


(from Lesson 9)

Work Time Tasks anchor


chart

Text-Dependent Questions
(India Research group only)

Concentric Circle protocol

Text Feature Scavenger


Hunt recording form

I can use text features to learn new


information about my country.

I can use information from the


illustrations (maps, photographs) to
understand informational texts.
(RI.3.7)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 12

Using the Culture Research


Matrix: Learning and Talking in
Research Groups, Part 1

I can ask and answer questions to


deepen understanding of
informational text. (RI.3.1)

I can use text features to efficiently find


information in the Exploring Countries
text for my country.

I can use text features and search tools


(e.g. key words, sidebars, hyperlinks)
to locate information relevant to a
given topic efficiently. (RI. 3.5)

I can use text features to learn new


information about my country.

I can use information from the words


to understand informational text.
(RI.3.7)

I can effectively participate in a


discussion with my Research Group
peers about the information found
within my Exploring Countries book.

I can use information from the


illustrations (maps, photographs) to
understand informational texts.
(RI.3.7)

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Culture Research Matrix


recording form

Research Group Routine for


Informational Text anchor
chart

Book Discussion checklist

Culture Categories anchor


chart

I can accurately record information I


find about my country as I read.

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

I can use text features to efficiently find


information in the Exploring Countries
text for my country.

Culture Research Matrix


recording form
Book Discussion checklist

Research Group Routine for


Informational Text anchor
chart

I can use text features and search tools


(e.g. key words, sidebars, hyperlinks)
to locate information relevant to a
given topic efficiently. (RI. 3.5)

I can use text features to learn new


information about my country.

Text-Dependent Questions
(book-specific)

Culture Categories anchor


chart

I can use information from the words


to understand informational text.
(RI.3.7)

I can effectively participate in a


discussion with my Research Group
peers about the information found
within my Exploring Countries book.

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 13

Using the Culture Research


Matrix: Learning and Talking in
Research Groups, Part 2

I can ask and answer questions to


deepen understanding of
informational text. (RI.3.1)

I can use information from the


illustrations (maps, photographs) to
understand informational texts.
(RI.3.7)

I can accurately record information I


find about my country as I read.

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

I can use text features to efficiently find


information in the Exploring Countries
text for my country.

Culture Research Matrix


recording form
Book Discussion checklist

Research Group Routine for


Informational Text anchor
chart

I can use text features and search tools


(e.g. key words, sidebars, hyperlinks)
to locate information relevant to a
given topic efficiently. (RI. 3.5)

I can use text features to learn new


information about my country.

Text-Dependent Questions
(book-specific)

Culture Categories anchor


chart

I can use information from the words


to understand informational text.
(RI.3.7)

I can effectively participate in a


discussion with my Research Group
peers about the information found
within my Exploring Countries book.

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 14

Using the Culture Research


Matrix: Learning and Talking in
Research Groups, Part 3

I can ask and answer questions to


deepen understanding of
informational text. (RI.3.1)

I can use information from the


illustrations (maps, photographs) to
understand informational texts.
(RI.3.7)

I can accurately record information I


find about my country as I read.

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

Lesson 15

Close Reading Supplemental


Articles: Gathering More
Culture Research and
Synthesizing Learning

I can ask and answer questions to


deepen understanding of
informational text. (RI.3.1)

I can identify the gist of my


supplemental article by reading the text
closely.

Culture Research Matrix


recording from:
Supplemental Articles

Things Close Readers Do


anchor chart

I can determine the main idea of an


informational text. (RI.3.2)

I can identify evidence of culture for my


assigned country by reading the text
closely.

I can use text features and search tools


(e.g. key words, sidebars, hyperlinks)
to locate information relevant to a
given topic efficiently. (RI. 3.5)

Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face
protocol

I can record new evidence of culture on


my Culture Research Matrix recording
form.

I can use information from the words


to understand informational text.
(RI.3.7)

I can discuss how the culture of my


assigned country has stayed the same
from the past to the present.

I can use information from the


illustrations (maps, photographs) to
understand informational texts.
(RI.3.7)

I can discuss how the culture of my


assigned country has changed from the
past to the present.

I can answer questions using specific


details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can document what I learn about a
topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a
conversation with my peers and adults.
(SL.3.1)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Unit-at-a-Glance

Lesson

Lesson Title

Long-Term Targets

Supporting Targets

Lesson 16

End of Unit 2 Assessment:


Reading and Writing about a
New Informational Text:
Exploring Countries: France

I can write an informative text that has


a clear topic. (W.3.2)

I can answer questions about the culture


of France by reading excerpts from an
informational text closely.

I can develop the topic with facts,


definitions, and details. (W.3.2)
I can construct a closing statement on
the topic of an informative text.
(W.3.2)
I can use text features to locate
information efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can answer questions using specific
details from informational text.
(RI.3.1)
I can determine the main idea of an
informational text. (RI.3.2)
I can retell key ideas from an
informational text. (RI.3.2)

Ongoing
Assessment

Anchor Charts &


Protocols

End of Unit 2 Assessment


Tracking My Progress, End
of Unit 2 recording form

I can identify the main idea of a


paragraph in Exploring Countries:
France by reading closely.
I can identify key details that support
the main idea in a paragraph from
Exploring Countries: France.
I can use text features to help me
answer questions about the text.
I can record evidence I find of customs
and traditions in France.
I can write an informative paragraph
about some of the customs and
traditions in France.

I can document what I learn about a


topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can sort evidence into provided
categories. (W.3.8)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Case Study:
Researching a Countrys Culture

Optional: Experts, Fieldwork, And Service


Experts:
Invite a guest speaker who has either lived in or spent significant time in Iraq, India, or Italy.
Invite an anthropologist who studies ancient and modern cultures.
Watch short video clips about the cultures of Iraq, India, or Italy.
Consider hosting a cultural event at school. Students could invite locals who have connections to these countries to share their experiences with others.
Fieldwork:
If there is a local museum that has exhibits on cultures around the world, that could offer expanded opportunities for learning about the culture of these countries.
Service:
Research organizations that are supporting service to these countries in various ways.

Optional: Extensions
Library/media specialist: study of Iraq, India, or Italy through storybooks, poems, and other literature
Technology/media specialist: Explore the culture of these countries through searches on the computer (e.g., Web sites, online videos, maps, etc.).

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Preparation and Materials

Preparation and Materials


This unit includes a number of routines.

1. Book Clubs/Research Groups


Book Clubs are a key design feature of this unit. For the purposes of this module, a Book Club is defined as a group of students reading and interacting with the same
texts. Students will work within their Book Clubs to actively practice the SL.3.1 standard. In the first half of the unit, these groups are called Book Clubs as they read
their Magic Tree House book. In the second half of the unit, the groups are renamed as Research Groups, to emphasize the skill they are working on as they research
more about their country.
Students will be assigned to a new country: Iraq, Italy, or India. They will again use a Magic Tree House book as a literary text to explore the customs and traditions of
their assigned country. They will also use a book within the Exploring Countries series as their primary informational text. Other informational texts will be available
in the form of articles for students to read. Using additional articles will allow them to expand their understanding of culture beyond customs and traditions.
The Magic Tree House books used in Lessons 1-8 are as follows: #33, Carnival at Candlelight (Italy), 590L; #34, Season of the Sandstorms (Iraq), 580L; and #45, A
Crazy Day with Cobras (India), 570L. The text level and number of chapters in the books differ, so teachers will have to group students according to the demands of
the texts. Group them strategically. Stronger readers should read A Crazy Day with Cobras (partially because this book has 12 chapters, which means students need to
read two chapters for some homework assignments). Struggling readers should read Carnival at Candlelight with 9 chapters, which means students will be able to
receive more in class support by reading 1 chapter in class and 1 for homework. This will allow for better support of the struggling readers during independent reading
time. It also will allow students who read at similar rates to discuss the text at required points in the story. Plan these groups carefully ahead of time.
When students are reading, they will sit together with fellow Book Club members at designated meeting spots, but each student will read the text silently and
independently. They will then use various recording forms to discuss their reading with their Book Club members. For these reasons, Book Club group size should not
exceed five; in most classrooms, there will be more than one Book Club for each country.
Each Book Club group will need a work area to gather to do their work. Decide in advance where each Book Club will meet. These meeting spots should stay consistent
throughout the unit. Consider the needs of each group; some may be comfortable and productive working on the floor, but others may need to be seated at a table or
collection of desks. Since conversation plays a critical role in this unit, meeting spots should allow for easy interactions. These meeting spots are introduced in this
lesson.
In the second half of the unit, the routines above continue, but students are reading informational text. The Exploring Countries books used in Lessons 9-15 are
Exploring Countries: Italy, Exploring Countries: India, and Exploring Countries: Iraq. These three texts are paired with the Magic Tree House books set in the same
country.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Preparation and Materials

2. Graphic Organizers
In Unit 1, students were shown how to work with both literary and informational text to learn about the culture of Japan, with a focus on customs and traditions.
Routines were established that allowed them to capture details and gather evidence of customs and traditions. Many of these routines will be used in Unit 2. Some
recording forms used in Unit 1 are slightly altered to support the Book Club structure.
Students will have multiple copies of the Capturing Key Details recording form from various chapters of their Magic Tree House text as well the Capturing Key Details
recording form is reintroduced in this lesson and is used consistently during the reading of the literary text. Students use the Capturing Key Details recording form to
respond to their reading, strengthen vocabulary acquisition skills, and chart evidence of customs and traditions revealed within the text.
As a new recording form students will also use Book Discussion checklist in Lessons 1-5. Each day, students will get a new copy of each of these forms.
Establish a simple organization system so that they can keep track of their materials. A two-pocket folder is highly recommended. Materials used in Lessons 15 are
critical for the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment. All Unit 2 recording forms also need to be kept for use in Unit 3. Consider what organizational system will best help students
keep track of these recording forms. For example, you may want to use five different colors of paper, one for each day. Since the forms have the same title and will look
similar, having each days form on a different color paper may lessen confusion, particularly for those who have difficulty with organization.
In the second half of the unit, students use a Research Matrix to gather notes about their country. Preview Lesson 9.

3. Homework and Independent Reading


The Magic Tree House titles used range in length from nine to twelve chapters. These Magic Tree House books need to be read, in their entirety, before the mid-unit
assessment, which begins in Lesson 6. This means that some chapters will need to be read for homework. The homework routine includes reading and accountable
purposeful work that will help students further their understanding of the story and the countrys culture.
Students may finish the independent reading at different times; make sure there is a clear expectation outlined for those who finish ahead of other group members.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Preparation and Materials

4. Supporting Struggling Readers


For students who need more support with independent reading, consider these supports:
1. Pull groups for guided support during reading.
2. Devote an instructional aide or another adult to supporting students while they read the chapters aloud. This gives students guidance with both decoding and
comprehension, as well as with adherence to the steps for Book Club.
3. Once students have completed a first read on their own, find another time in the day to review, as needed, and support their comprehension.
4. Provide audio recordings of the chapters to replace a first read for struggling readers.
For students unable to follow through with reading chapters for homework, other accommodations will need to be made to ensure that they do not fall behind with the
reading or have gaps in their learning.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: OVERVIEW


Readers Calendar

The calendar below shows reading that is due daily for each Magic Tree House book..
Teachers can modify this document to include dates instead of lessons.
Students are responsible for reading chapters in class and at home.
Students will share what they have done in class through various protocols and recording forms.
Book: A Crazy Day with Cobras

Due at Lesson #

Chapters read or reviewed in class

Chapters read and recording form


completed for homework

Prologue, 1

Prologue, 1

3 and Homework recording form

4-5

6 and Homework recording form

7-8

9 and Homework recording form

10-11

12 and Homework recording form

Book: Carnival at Candlelight

Due at Lesson #

Chapters read or reviewed in class

Chapters read and recording form


completed for homework

Prologue, 1

Prologue, 1

3 and Homework recording form

5 and Homework recording form

7 and Homework recording form

9 and Homework recording form

Book: Season of the Sandstorms

Due at Lesson #

Chapters read or reviewed in class

Chapters read and recording form


completed for homework

Prologue, 1

Prologue, 1

3 and Homework recording form

5 and Homework recording form

6-7

8 and Homework recording form

10 and Homework recording form

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Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Overview June 2014

21

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2:


Recommended Texts
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: RECOMMENDED TEXTS

The list below includes texts with a range of Lexile text measures about India,
Iraq, and Italy. This provides appropriate independent reading for each student to
help build content knowledge about the topic. Note that districts and schools
should consider their own community standards when reviewing this list. Some
texts in particular units or modules address emotionally difficult content.
It is imperative that students read a high volume of texts at their reading level in
order to continue to build the academic vocabulary and fluency demanded by the
CCLS.

Where possible, texts in languages other than English are also provided. Texts are
categorized into three Lexile measures that correspond to Common Core Bands:
below grade band, within band, and above band. Note, however, that Lexile
measures are just one indicator of text complexity, and teachers must use their
professional judgment and consider qualitative factors as well. For more
information, see Appendix 1 of the Common Core State Standards.
Common Core Band Level Text Difficulty Ranges:
(As provided in the NYSED Passage Selection Guidelines for Assessing CCSS ELA)
Grades 23: 420820L
Grades 45: 7401010L

Title

Author and Illustrator

Text Type

Lexile Measure

Lexile measures below band level (under 420L)


Camels

Megan Borgert-Spaniol (author)

Informational

325*

Tigers at Twilight

Mary Pope Osborne (author)

Literature

370

Rudyard Kiplings The Jungle Book


(adaptation)

Carl Bowen (author)


Gerardo Sandoval (illustrator)

Graphic Novel

370

*Lexile based on a conversion from Accelerated Reading level;

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Recommended Texts June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: RECOMMENDED TEXTS

Title

Author and Illustrator

Text Type

Lexile Measure

Lexile measures within band level (420820L)


Bengal Tigers

Lyn Sirota (author)

Informational

500

Italy

Annabel Savery (author)

Informational

550

Rama and the Demon King: An


Ancient Tale from India

Jessica Souhami (author)

Literature

550

A Crazy Day with Cobras

Mary Pope Osborne (author)

Literature

570

Season of the Sandstorms

Mary Pope Osborne (author)

Literature

580

Carnival at Candlelight

Mary Pope Osborne (author)

Literature

590

Monday with a Mad Genius

Mary Pope Osborne (author)

Literature

590

Monkey: A Trickster Tale from India

Gerald McDermott (author)

Literature

630

India ABCs: A Book about the People


and Places of India

Marcie Aboff (author)


Francis Moore (illustrator)

Informational

710

India in Colors

Nathan Olson (author)

Informational

710

Leonardo da Vinci: A Nonfiction


Companion to Monday with a Mad
Genius

Mary Pope Osborne (author)

Informational

740

Spotlight on Italy

Bobbie Kalman(author)

Informational

810

Day of the Blackbird: A Tale of


Northern Italy

Tomie dePaola (author)

Literature

810

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Recommended Texts June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: RECOMMENDED TEXTS

Title

Author and Illustrator

Text Type

Lexile Measure

Lexile measures above band level (over 820L)


Iraq

Mel Friedman (author)

Informational

840

The Golden Sandal: A Middle Eastern


Cinderella Story

Rebecca Hickox (author)


Will Hillenbrand (illustrator)

Literature

870

Iraq

Paul Mason (author)

Informational

940

Looking at Italy

Jillian Powell (author)

Informational

940

The Food of Italy

Sara Kras (author)

Informational

990

Ancient India Maurya Empire

John Bankston (author)

Informational

990

Children of the World: How We Live


Learn and Play in Poems, Drawings
and Photographs

Anthony Asael and Stephanie


Rabemiafara (authors)

Poetry

NP

Lets Celebrate: Festival Poems from


Around the World

Debjani Chatterjee and Brian DArcy


(Authors)
Shirin Adl (illustrator)

Poetry

NP

Lexile is a trademark of MetaMetrics, Inc., and is registered in the United States and abroad. Copyright 2013 MetaMetrics
Book content may have higher-maturity-level text
Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2: Recommended Texts June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 1


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer
Questions: Launching the Magic Tree House Books
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Launching the Magic Tree House Books

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask questions to deepen my understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can answer questions using specific details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can answer questions (who/what/where) using specific details from Chapter 1 of my Magic Tree
House book.

Capturing Key Details recording form (for Chapter 1)


Book Discussion checklist

I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in Chapter 1 of my Magic Tree
House book.
I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Launching the Magic Tree House Books

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

Book Clubs are a key design feature of this unit. For the purposes of this module, a Book Club is defined
as a group of students reading and interacting with the same texts (both literary and informational).
Students will work within their Book Clubs to actively practice the SL.3.1 standard.

A. Launching Unit 2: Introducing Book Clubs and the


Magic Tree House Books (5 minutes)
B. Unpacking the Learning Targets (2 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Magic Tree House Books Scavenger Hunt (16
minutes)
B. Launching the Book Clubs (25 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Debriefing the Discussion (10 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Finish Chapter 1 of your Magic Tree House book if
you did not do so in class.
B. Pick two paragraphs from Chapter 1 of your Magic
Tree House book that are interesting to you. Read
them aloud to someone at home or to yourself in
front of a mirror. Be prepared to share your fluency
selection in class tomorrow.

See the Unit 2 overview for details regarding how to group students, assign texts, ensure students have
an appropriate workspace, support homework routines, and support struggling readers.
Note that students need to have finished their Magic Tree House book by Lesson 7 (the mid-unit
assessment).
Note that when students are reading, they will sit together with fellow Book Club members at designated
meeting spots, but each student will read the text silently and independently.
This lesson includes intentional scaffolding to help students understand the steps they will be using in
their Book Clubs. Using a catch and release approach, a portion of the work will be modeled, then
released to students.
The Capturing Key Details recording form is reintroduced in this lesson and is used consistently during
the reading of the literary text in order to respond to their reading, strengthen vocabulary acquisition
skills, and chart evidence of customs and traditions revealed within the text. For each of the Capturing
Key Details recording forms, there are sample answers (for teacher reference) in the supporting
materials.
This unit also introduces a new Book Discussion checklist. Each day, in Lessons 15, students will get a
new copy of each of these forms. It is critical that students keep these forms for their assessments in
Units 2 and 3. See Unit 2 overview for details, including suggestions for systems to help students
organize their work.
In advance:
Locate a world map.
Post learning targets and Class Norms for Conversation anchor chart.
Decide whether you will use the provided Holding a Book Discussion anchor chart in the supporting
materials or co-create one with students during the Closing.
Review Fist to Five Checking in Checking for Understanding techniques (see Appendix).

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Launching the Magic Tree House Books

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

conversation, discussion, cite, notes,


opinion, evidence

Carnival at Candlelight (book; one per student in Italy Book Clubs and one for display)
Season of the Sandstorms (book; one per student in Iraq Book Clubs and one for display)
A Crazy Day with Cobras (book; one per student in India Book Clubs and one for display)
World map (one to display)
Class Norms for Discussion anchor chart (from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 4)
Magic Tree House Book Scavenger Hunt (one per student and one to display)
Capturing Key Details recording form (one per student for their assigned Book Club, and one to display)
Document camera or projector
Holding a Book Discussion anchor chart (new; teacher-created or co-created with students during Closing; see supporting
materials)
Book Discussion checklist (one per student)
Book Discussion anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Launching the Magic Tree House Books

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Launching Unit 2: Introducing Book Clubs and the Magic Tree House Books (5 minutes)
Gather students together. Congratulate them on a successful completion of Unit 1. Tell students its time for them to leave
Japan and travel to new lands! Build up the excitement in whatever way suits your teaching style.
Display or project the covers of the three Magic Tree House texts: Carnival at Candlelight, Season of the
Sandstorms, and A Crazy Day with Cobras.
Explain that students will each read a Magic Tree House book in something called a Book Club. Tell them that they have
been placed in a Book Club with three or four other students. Each Book Club will focus on reading and discussing a Magic
Tree House book that is set in a different country. Tell students that they will be working closely with the other students in
their Book Club throughout Units 2 and 3.
Explain the Book Club by saying something like: As you read your Magic Tree House book, you will be sitting with your
Book Club members. You will be assigned chapters to read, but you will read on your own. You will read each chapter two
times, each time for a different purpose. The best thing about a Book Club is you get to have great conversations about what
youre reading with your Book Club members. This helps you to understand the story even better. You can share
observations with each other. You can ask questions of each other. You can answer other group members questions. A Book
Club is a fabulous way to experience a book.
Introduce the setting for each of the literary texts. Display a world map and show students the location of India, Iraq, and
Italy. Say something like: Just like Jack and Annie, who are always willing to explore new places and head to unknown
lands, you too will begin an exploration of a faraway land by journeying through a Magic Tree House text.
B. Unpacking the Learning Targets (2 minutes)
Direct students attention to the posted learning targets. Read aloud one target at a time, examining the language within
each target and allowing students to ask questions to clarify the targets meaning.
Use the Fist to Five Checking for Understanding technique as a way for students to show their understanding of each target.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Launching the Magic Tree House Books

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Magic Tree House Books Scavenger Hunt (16 minutes)

For groups with struggling readers,


provide strategic partnerships
within the group to support
students with the scavenger hunt.

Display the Class Norms for Discussion anchor chart.


Briefly review the norms by reading them aloud. Remind students of the need for discussion work to be authentic and
conversational. Students have used these norms since they were introduced in Module 1. Tell them that these conversation
norms will be more important than ever as they work in their Book Clubs.
Announce Book Club groups and which book each group will read.
Distribute students Magic Tree House books.
Distribute the Magic Tree House Book Scavenger Hunt recording form. Explain to students that the scavenger hunt
has three purposes:
to go on a book walk and notice things about the new book

Demonstrate for students how to


chunk the scavenger hunt by using
a piece of paper to cover the
sections that students are not
currently working on. This will help
to visually chunk the text and offer
support.
Read aloud the scavenger hunt to
support struggling readers.

to begin to develop a working relationship with fellow Book Club members


to deepen the ability to have conversations about a book
Tell students that throughout the unit, each Book Club will need a place to meet and work together. These locations will be
called meeting spots. Explain to groups that, for each lesson, it will be important for them to assemble quickly and quietly in
order to start working.
Tell Book Clubs their assigned meeting spots. Ask students to move to their meeting spots, taking their Scavenger Hunt
recording forms, books, and pencils with them.
After Book Club groups are settled in their meeting spots, direct students to begin the scavenger hunt. They should be
familiar with a book scavenger hunt from Unit 1, Lesson 8. Tell Book Club groups they have 12 minutes to complete as much
of the scavenger hunt as they can.
After 12 minutes, tell students you hope the scavenger hunt helped get them excited about going on a new Magic Tree House
adventure and learning about a new countrys culture through this literary text.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Launching the Magic Tree House Books

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Launching the Book Clubs (25 minutes)

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

Redirect students whole group. Remind them about the Capturing Key Details recording form used in Unit 1. Explain that
this recording form has been modified for use in their Book Clubs. Tell them that today they will get to see the first portion of
this units Capturing Key Details recording form.
Distribute the Capturing Key Details recording forms and ask students to look them over. These are specific to each
book.
Ask for and clarify any questions about the recording forms.
Invite students to begin to independently read Chapter 1 in their Magic Tree House books and complete the
Where/Who/What details from Part A of the Capturing Key Details recording form. Tell them they have 10 minutes to do
this; if they do not finish, they may do so for homework.
After 10 minutes, invite students to share what they wrote in Part A with their Book Clubs. Remind them that they should
make sure their discussion sounds and looks like a conversation. Allow 3 to 5 minutes for the discussion. Included within
this will be one student doing a quick oral retelling of the chapter using the details recorded within Part A. Remaining group
members will offer feedback on the oral retelling.
Stop students after 5 minutes (or earlier if it appears groups are finished). Do a process-check by asking students how their
discussions went (Whats working well? What needs work?).
Tell students its time to move on to the next section of the Capturing Key Details recording form: Part BKey Words and
Phrases. Display using a document camera or projector one of the groups recording forms and direct students
attention to Part B.
Students should be familiar with working with context clues from Unit 1. Briefly review the steps for working with context
clues to ascertain the meaning of unknown words or phrases:

During this work time, you may


want to pull a small group of
students to support in finding
details from the text. Some will need
more guided practice before they
are ready for independent work.
Additionally, the work with
unknown words and phrases will
likely need to be supported.
A parent volunteer can also be
assigned to any group that struggles
with the text complexity or would
benefit from assistance with task
management. It is important to
acclimate any parent volunteers to
the tasks and help them know what
level of assistance is expected and
allowed.

Read the sentence a few times, focusing on the unknown word or phrase.
Look at the other words in the sentence and think about clues the sentence gives you.
Consider the other sentences around the sentence containing the unknown word or phrase.
Try to replace the unknown word or phrase with a different word/phrase that seems to fit and make sense.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Launching the Magic Tree House Books

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Explain to students that, for this part of the recording form, they will work together as a group. They will use their books and
turn to the pages indicated on the recording form. One group member should read the sentence that contains the word or
phrase aloud while the other members follow along in their own books. The group should then discuss what they think each
word or phrase means based on the text and then decide what to record together. The group members should also be able to
articulate what clues they used and record those on the recording form as well. Allow 10 minutes for this work.

Since its important to tier the task


and not the text, adjustments and
modifications may need to be made
for students who struggle. Some
suggestions include: providing
audio recordings, allowing students
to dictate written responses, and
highlighting context clues that
would allow students to determine
the meaning of the identified
unknown words. It is important that
these supports be gradually
removed as students gain the skills
they are designed to teach.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Launching the Magic Tree House Books

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Debriefing the Discussion (10 minutes)


Invite students to return to their desks.
Either display the already-created Holding a Book Discussion anchor chart or co-create one with students by asking:

* What does a book discussion look like? What does it sound like?
If co-creating the anchor chart, write students responses.
Distribute the Book Discussion checklist. Have students fill in their names and the date, as well as the chapter number.
Using a document camera, project an enlarged version of the Book Discussion checklist to function as the Book
Discussion anchor chart. Orient students to the format and contents of the checklist by reading each of the criteria
aloud.
Ask students what additional things might need to be added to the Holding a Book Discussion anchor chart. Cold call
students to share out.
Review the three descriptors at the top of the Book Discussion checklist. Read each criteria and direct students to self-assess
by placing an X or a checkmark in the column that best matches their own discussion work today.
Students should then self-reflect to complete the question below the chart:

* What is a goal for yourself the next time you have a discussion?
Explain that deep, robust conversations about books are at the heart of Unit 2. Every day, students will have conversations
with their groups about what theyre reading. They will use the Book Discussion checklist to assess themselves on the
discussion criteria. It will be important for them to build their capacity for having meaningful conversations.
Emphasize that their work with their Book Club, and their notes, is a really important way for them to keep track of their
thinking. Encourage students to keep all of the checklists, so they can monitor their growth with discussion skills and see
patterns in their learning.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Finish Chapter 1 of your Magic Tree House book if you did not do so in class.

Arrange for students who do not


have the support at home to read to
an adult at school.

Pick two paragraphs from Chapter 1 of your Magic Tree House book that are interesting to you. Read them aloud to
someone at home or to yourself in front of a mirror. Be prepared to share your fluency selection in class for the next lesson.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 8

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 1


Supporting Materials
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Magic Tree House Book Scavenger Hunt


As you conduct the scavenger hunt, begin developing solid discussion habits with your
new Book Club group members.

Examine the cover of your Magic Tree House book. Look carefully at the details of the cover art.
What do you see? What do you notice? What does the cover art reveal about the story?
Read the Dear Reader letter from author Mary Pope Osborne. Does she reveal the reason for
writing your Magic Tree House story? What is it?
Examine the table of contents. Take note of how many chapters are in your book. Read and
think about the chapter titles. What chapter titles make you the most curious? What are some
things you think may happen in the story based on the chapter titles?

Read the epigraph (the quote on the page before the prologue). What does it mean to you? Why
do you think Mary Pope Osborne chose this quotation as the epigraph?

Use the paragraph breaks within the prologue and read it aloud as a group. What is the purpose
of a prologue? Why does Mary Pope Osborne include the same prologue in all the Magic Tree
House books?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 1
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 1, and as you read, pay close attention to the key words and phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 1
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 1, p. 6
Your mission is to journey to
Baghdad of long ago and help
the caliph spread wisdom to the
world.
Ch. 1, pp. 67
Your mission is to journey to
Baghdad of long ago and help
the caliph spread wisdom to the
world.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 1
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 1, and as you read, pay close attention to the key words and phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Frog Creek woods

Jack

Get letter from Merlin

Magic Tree House

Annie

Travel to Baghdad to
spread wisdom

Travel to Baghdad

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 1
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 1, p. 6
Your mission is to journey to
Baghdad of long ago and help
the caliph spread wisdom to the
world.

an important person

It says, You must help the


caliph. That means you might
be helping a certain person.

Ch. 1, pp. 67
Your mission is to journey to
Baghdad of long ago and help
the caliph spread wisdom to the
world.

Spread is to cover and


wisdom is a sort of deep
knowledge, so it means to
share your deep
knowledge around the
world knowledge.

I broke apart the words I


knew: spread and wisdom.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 1
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 1, and as you read, pay close attention to the key words and phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 1
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 1, p. 4
She stood up, drawing her
cloak around her.

Ch. 1, p. 5
He is also wary of magic being
used outside the realm of
Camelot.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 1
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 1, and as you read, pay close attention to the key words and phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter take
place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Frog Creek

Jack

Magic Tree House

Annie

Jack and Annie go to the


tree house.

Kathleen
Teddy

Kathleen and Teddy tell


them that they are going
to use magic on a special
mission.
They are given a book
about Venice, Italy.
They go to Venice, Italy.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 1
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 1, p. 4
She stood up, drawing her
cloak around her.

to pull

It said she was drawing her


cloak around her. A cloak is
like a coat, so she was pulling
it around herself to keep
warm.

Ch. 1, p. 5
He is also wary of magic being
used outside the realm of
Camelot.

careful

It said cautious before, and it


said that he is wary, or
careful, of magic outside
Camelot.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapter 1
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 1, and as you read, pay close attention to the key words and phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapter 1
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 1, p. 6
Morgan forbids us to try any
spells on our own, but I
disobeyed when I found a simple
one that turns things into stone.

Ch. 1, p. 9
You will have to pretend to
be ambassadors.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapter 1
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 1, and as you read, pay close attention to the key words and phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

school

Jack

Magic Tree House

Annie

Jack and Annie are leaving


school. Jack has good news
because he got an A+ on his story.

Kathleen
Teddy

Teddy and Kathleen see them and


tell them to hurry to the tree
house.
The penguin Penny has been
turned to stone and must be
saved. Teddy did this by mistake
with a spell.
Jack and Annie must help by
going to India to find an emerald
rose.
They will have to be ambassadors.
Annie will have to pretend to be a
boy. They also have some magic
to help them.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 21

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapter 1
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 1, p. 6
doesnt allow, orders
not to
Morgan forbids us to try any
spells on our own, but I
disobeyed when I found a
simple one that turns things into
stone.

I can tell its a verb. I tried a


replacement and it seemed to
make sense.

Ch. 1, p. 9
You will have to pretend to
be ambassadors.

visiting ambassadors

famous people

ambassadors are
usually grown-ups

soldiers
representatives
I think that they are adults
who are important and visit
other places.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 22

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Holding a Book Discussion


We will use the Class Norms for Discussion as our guiding principles.
We will be prepared by reading the same pages/chapters.
We will keep our conversation centered on the assigned topic. We will stay on task.
We will record our conversations through writing. We will use the assigned recording forms.
We will talk about what were reading by sharing our thinking with the group and asking questions.
We will encourage all members to be actively involved.
We will support each other when we are confused.
If we cant find an answer, we will seek help.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 23

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 1

Book Discussion Checklist


Name:
Date:
Book: __________________________ Chapter(s): ______________________
#

Discussion Criteria

I read the pages I was assigned to read.

I am prepared for the discussion and have


my notes and book with me.

I follow our class norms for discussion.

I listen carefully and ask questions of


others to make sure I understand.

I share my ideas with my group members,


stay on topic, and explain my thinking.

I encourage and respect others opinions.

I answer questions from others in my


group.

I refer to the text to support my ideas. This


means I use page numbers and cite lines
or words as needed.

I need more work


or time with this.

Im getting
there.

Ive got
it!

What is a goal for yourself the next time you have a discussion?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L1 June 2014 24

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer
Questions: Continuing to Read and Discuss the
Magic Tree House Books
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask and answer questions to deepen my understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can read third grade level texts accurately and fluently to make meaning. (RF.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories and taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can use the criteria of a fluent reader to read aloud a selected part of my Magic Tree House book.

Capturing Key Details recording form

I can retell Chapter 2 (who/what/where) of my Magic Tree House book using specific details.

Book Discussion checklist

I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in Chapter 2 of my Magic Tree
House book.
I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
I can identify, categorize, and record key details from the assigned chapter that connect with the
customs and traditions of my country.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

In this lesson, students continue to read, write, and discuss their Magic Tree House books with the
Book Clubs established in Lesson 1.

A. Engaging the Reader: Fluency Partners (7 minutes)


B. Unpacking the Learning Targets (3 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Review Book Discussion Checklist (2 minutes)
B. Magic Tree House Book Clubs: Parts A and B of
Capturing Key Details Recording Form (12
minutes)
C. Magic Tree House Book Clubs: Parts C and D of
Capturing Key Details Recording Form (26
minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Debriefing the Discussion (10 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Read the assigned chapter. Complete the homework
version of the recording form.

Book pacing and homework chapter (see Unit 2 overview for a Reading Calendar for each Magic Tree
House book)
A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 2 in class; Chapter 3 as homework
Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 2 in class; Chapter 3 as homework
Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 2 in class; Chapter 3 as homework
In the Opening, students choose one member of their Book Club to be their fluency partner. This same
person will be their fluency partner later in the unit, as well. Students read the paragraphs they chose
for homework in Lesson 1 to their fluency partners. Their partners should offer them specific,
constructive feedback while also identifying their strengths. Consider using the Stars and Steps protocol.
As in Lesson 1, there is intentional scaffolding used throughout Work Time to help students understand
the steps they will be using in their Book Clubs. Using a catch and release approach, a portion of the
work will be modeled, and then released to students. With each new step, students will be pulled back
in with teacher modeling before being released again to work more independently.
For many lessons in this unit, students will be given a new Book Discussion checklist and Capturing Key
Details recording form for the days work. To save time in the lesson and to streamline logistics,
distribute the checklist and recording form to students before the start of the lesson. If students are
using a two-pocket folder for the unit materials (highly recommended), the checklist and recording form
could be placed in their folders before the lesson.
Remember that the Capturing Key Details recording form is book-specific. The focus question is the
same for all groups and will be consistent over the next three days, as well.
You may want to suggest that when students observe the group or themselves using one of the behaviors
on the Book Discussion checklist, they place a small tally mark within the appropriate box in the leftside column. At the end of the lesson, the areas of the checklist with many tallies will show them which
discussion behaviors are more secure for them, and this will help with their self-assessments.
Remind students that materials used in Lessons 15 are critical for the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment. Be sure
students have a organization system for students to keep track of their materials.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books
Agenda

Teaching Notes (continued)


This is the first lesson requiring a chapter to be read for homework. The homework also includes a
recording form that is an abbreviated version of the steps followed in class. For students who are unable
to complete reading chapters for homework, make other accommodations so that they do not fall behind
in the reading or have gaps in their learning.
Preview the mid-unit assessment (Lesson 7), which centers on speaking and listening standards.
Students will discuss evidence of culture found in their Magic Tree House text. In addition, they will
compare and contrast the setting of their books with the settings of the other two Magic Tree House
titles. They will have an opportunity to prepare for the discussion ahead of time.
Note that this lesson includes fluency work. For more details regarding how to support students with
fluency, see the stand-alone document Foundational Reading and Language Standards: Resource
Package for Grades 3-5. See in particular the Fluency Packet.
For students who will move quickly through their Magic Tree House text, encourage them to read
additional texts on this topic from the Unit 1 Recommended Texts list. Review this list in advance.
Consider any books from the public, school, classroom, or home libraries that fit the content of the
module. This module assumes that you have established a clear and purposeful system in place to
engage students in independent reading consistently and regularly. See the stand-alone document
Foundational Reading and Language Standards: Resource Package for Grades 3-5. See in particular the
document Independent Reading: the Importance of a Volume of Reading and Sample Plan.
One specific purpose of this unit is to get students hooked on a book series (Magic Tree House), in
alignment with RL.3.9.
There are many Checking for Understanding techniques (see Appendix) to see whether a concept or
learning target has been understood or reached. In this module, Fist to Five is commonly used. Other
engaging, yet quick techniques can be used interchangeably, depending on the need or purpose, as a
way for students to self-assess their level of understanding while making you aware as well. based on
your preferences and the needs of your students (e.g. for physical movement, visual cues, etc.). Some
techniques include: Thumb-O-Meter, Glass-Bugs-Mud, Red Light-Green Light, Sticky Bars, Learning
Line Ups, Human Bar Graph, and Table Tags.
In advance:
Post learning targets, Fluent Reader Criteria anchor chart, Holding a Book Discussion anchor chart.
Create and post the Book Club Steps anchor chart.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books
Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

criteria, cite, notes, opinion, customs,


traditions, evidence

Magic Tree House books (one per student for their assigned Book Club group)
Fluent Reader Criteria anchor chart (begun in Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 8; also provided in supporting materials for this
lesson)
Book Discussion checklist (from Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student; see Teaching Notes)
Document camera
Capturing Key Details recording form (one per student for their assigned Book Club and specific chapter; see Teaching
Notes)
Capturing Key Details recording form (answers, for teacher reference, for each of the assigned Magic Tree House books and
specific chapters)
Book Club Steps anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
Holding a Book Discussion anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
Lesson 2 Homework: Chapter 3 (one per student)
Lesson 2 Homework: Chapter 3 (answers, for teacher reference)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Fluency Partners (7 minutes)


Congratulate students on a great first day. Remind them of their Lesson 1 homework.

Offer coaching strategies for fluency


partnerships, such as having one
partner read aloud and the other
repeat, or reading together.

Direct students to take their Magic Tree House books and join their Book Clubs at their designated meeting spots.
Remind them that in Unit 2 of Module 1, they worked very formally on oral reading fluency by saying something like:

* Back in Module 1, we developed a list of criteria of what makes a fluent reader. This list contained characteristics of a
fluent reader. We had five main criteria: phrasing, rate, observing punctuation, expression, and accuracy.
Direct students to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

* I can use the criteria of a fluent reader to read aloud a selected part of my Magic Tree House book.
Tell students they are now going to focus on addressing this learning target.
Display the Fluent Reader Criteria anchor chart. Go through each of the criteria. Explain and expand as necessary.
Tell students to spend 2 minutes softly reading aloud the passage they selected for homework to themselves, focusing on
reading fluently. They can refer to the anchor chart as often as necessary.
Invite students to choose one member of their Book Club to be their fluency partner for today and move to sit with that
person.
Ask students to read their selected fluency paragraphs to their fluency partner. After they are done reading, their partner
should provide them with verbal feedback about their fluency using the sentence frames: I like how you_______ and I
think you would be more fluent if you_______.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Unpacking the Learning Targets (3 minutes)


Redirect students attention to the learning targets and read the next three aloud:

When unpacking a learning target


with key words, consider using a
different pen/marker to highlight or
circle the key words that are being
focused on.

* I can retell Chapter 2 (who/what/where) of my Magic Tree House book using specific details.
* I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in Chapter 2 of my Magic Tree House book.
* I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
Point out that these three targets are identical to those in Lesson 1, except that they are working with a new chapter from
their Magic Tree House books.
Read the final learning target:

* I can identify, categorize, and record key details from the assigned chapter that connect with the customs and traditions
of my country.
Deconstruct the target by underlining the key words identify, categorize, and record and asking students to name other
words that mean the same thing (such as tell, sort, write). Ask students if they have additional questions about the targets
meaning. It may be necessary to review the meaning of the words details, customs, and traditions.

\
Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Review Book Discussion Checklist (2 minutes)

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

Direct students to return to their desks.


Distribute a new Book Discussion checklist to students. Using a document camera, display the checklist so you can
gesture to the criteria as you review its format.
Read each of the criteria and remind students of the need to focus on these discussion behaviors when they are with their
group. Students will not complete the Book Discussion checklist until later. However, having the checklist now to refer to
will help them focus on the discussion behaviors as they work.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Work Time (Continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Magic Tree House Book Clubs: Parts A and B of Capturing Key Details Recording Form (12 minutes)

During this work time, you may


want to pull a group aside to
support. Some students will need
more guided practice before they
are ready for independent work.

Distribute the Capturing Key Details recording forms to the respective groups.
Briefly tell students that the version of this recording form for todays work includes a Part C and Part D. Tell them that for
now, they should direct their attention only to Parts A and B, which they are familiar with from Lesson 1.
Display one of the Capturing Key Details recording forms via the document camera.
Review the directions listed as First Read Directions (directions for Parts A and B). Students are familiar with these steps
from Lesson 1. Read the directions one at a time, pausing after each to clarify if needed.
Direct students attention to the heading First Read Directions. Say something like:

* Starting today, you will read each chapter two times, each time for a different purpose or with a different focus. When
you read Chapter 1 yesterday, you completed Part A: where/who/what and Part B: key words and phrases. That was the
work of your first read of a chapter. Were going to practice that again right now with Chapter 2.
Have students assemble their materials and move to their Book Clubs designated meeting spots. They need:
Magic Tree House book
Book Discussion checklist
Capturing Key Details recording form
Pencil with an eraser
Continue to reinforce the Book Club routine by giving specific positive feedback for groups that make a quick and quiet
transition.

Even though students will be


grouped somewhat by ability, they
may finish the independent reading
at different times, so make sure
there is a clear expectation about
what to do if they finish ahead of
other group members.
Consider the use of a literacy aide or
other adult who can also circulate
and assist groups with the
procedural steps.
Providing models of expected work
supports all learners, but especially
challenged learners.

Have students independently read Chapter 2 and complete Part A of their Capturing Key Details recording form.
Then, invite group members to take 1 or 2 minutes to share and discuss the evidence they recorded in Part A, followed by a
transition to Part B to work with the identified key words and phrases together as a group through discussion.
As groups are working, circulate and focus primarily on the process of this work. Jot down specific observations to share
with the group as a whole (both actions to praise and also cautions).

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

C. Magic Tree House Book Clubs: Parts C and D of Capturing Key Details Recording Form (26 minutes)

During this work time, you may


want to pull a small group of
students to support in finding
evidence from the text. Some will
need more guided practice before
they are ready for independent
work.

Refocus students whole group. Praise their efforts and accomplishments with Parts A and B. Briefly share your observations
from Work Time B, providing both positive feedback and cautions.
Direct students attention to the Second Read portion of the displayed Captured Key Details recording form.
Tell them to look closely at Part C. Ask them if Part C looks familiar. They should easily recognize this part of the recording
form as the same chart they used when reading Dragon of the Red Dawn in Unit 1. Ask:

* What do you remember about using this type of chart?


Now draw students attention to the Second Read Directions. Remind them that they will read each chapter two times
from now on. Go over the Second Read Directions together.
Make special note of Step 2: Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
Make it very clear to students that this means that as they are reading, if they come across a custom or tradition, they will
pause in their reading long enough to record the evidence in the Part C section of their recording form. So, rather than
rereading the chapter and then going back to look for evidence to record, they should record as they read. Clarify any steps
as necessary.

Students who struggle to recognize


evidence of culture found within the
text may need extra support and
additional opportunities to do this
kind of work using other similar
material.

According to the directions, before group members begin reading Chapter 2 a second time, they first need to examine the
focus question together and discuss what evidence they will be looking for. Tell students this should take them 1 or 2
minutes. After that, they will independently read Chapter 2 again.
Ask students to proceed with working on Part C. As groups are working, circulate and focus primarily on the process of this
work. Jot down specific observations to share with the group as a whole (both actions to praise and also cautions).
Refocus students attention whole group. Briefly share your observations from Part C, both the positives you observed and
the cautions.
Students are now ready for Part D of the Capturing Key Details record form:

* Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in Part D.
Clarify this step as necessary. Invite students to complete Part D. Since they will be discussing the focus question before
writing their response, its very likely that students within a given group will have identical or similar responses. This is
perfectly fine, since it means that students are socially constructing meaning, deepening their learning through talking with
each other.
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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 8

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Debriefing the Discussion (10 minutes)

When reviewing anchor charts, use


a document camera to more
prominently display the anchor
chart for students who struggle with
smaller sharing mechanisms such as
chart paper.

Direct students to return to their desks. Help them to reflect on all they accomplished today and to think about the specific
actions they took. Say something like: The Capturing Key Details recording form was so important to todays work. It served
as a guide to the steps you needed to take in your Book Club.
Review the Book Club Steps anchor chart with students:
1. Read the assigned chapter for the first time.
2. Record in Part A (where/who/what).
3. Discuss Part A evidence with group members.
4. Work with key words/phrases in Part B with group members and record thinking.
5. Read the focus question with group members and discuss what kind of evidence you will be looking for when you read
the chapter again.
6. Reread the assigned chapter and, while reading, record evidence of culture (customs and traditions) in Part C.
7. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with group members.
8. Revisit the focus question with group members and record a response.
Display the Holding a Book Discussion anchor chart from Lesson 1. Remind students that this anchor chart identifies
the things that the class agreed would occur in a book discussion.
Direct students attention to their Book Discussion checklist. Have them fill in their names and the date, as well as the
chapter number.
Quickly review the three descriptors at the top. Read each criteria and direct students to self-assess by placing an X or a
checkmark in the column that best matches their own discussion work today.
Students should then self-reflect to complete the question below the chart:

* What is a goal for yourself the next time you have a discussion?
Encourage students to truly be self-reflective and establish a concrete and appropriate goal for themselves.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 9

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2


Working with Peers to Ask and Answer Questions:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Closing and Assessment (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Distribute Lesson 2 Homework: Chapter 3.

If students lack support at home


and are unable to follow through
with this homework, make other
accommodations so that they do not
fall behind with the reading.

Direct students to look over their homework task. Tell them that the homework is a shortened version of the longer
Capturing Key Details recording form used in todays work with Chapter 2. Clarify as needed.
Stress the importance of completing this work for homework carefully. All groups will be starting up with Chapter 4 in
tomorrows lesson, so it is imperative that they read Chapter 3 for homework.

Homework

Consider preparing audio


recordings of the texts used in the
module.

Meeting Students Needs

Read the assigned chapter of your Magic Tree House book and complete the shortened version of the Capturing Key Details
recording form. Be sure to bring your book back to school.
Note: The Book Discussion checklist from this lesson will be used at the beginning of Lesson 3.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 10

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 2

Supporting Materials
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Fluent Reader Criteria

Accuracy

I can read the words correctly.

Phrasing

I can group the right words together as I read to help the words flow.

Rate

I can read like I talk, and I stop only when it makes sense in the text.

Observing
Punctuation

I can pay attention to the punctuation, and I use it to help me know how
to read the text.

Expression

I can use expression to read, and it helps me understand the story.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 2
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 2 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 2
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 2, p. 10
Burning sunlight was flooding
into the tree house.

Ch. 2, p. 12
During that time, a ruler
known as a caliph governed an
empire that stretched for
thousands of miles.

Ch. 2, p. 13
Okay, okay--- Annie broke in.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 2
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 2
Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 2 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Desert near Baghdad

Jack
Annie

Land in the desert near


Baghdad

helpers on camels

Sandstorm comes
Use magic rhyme to get helpers
to them

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)

Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 2, p. 10
Burning sunlight
was flooding into the tree
house.

pouring or streaming

Bright sunlight would pour


through windows like a flood
of water.

Ch. 2, p. 12
During that time, a ruler
known as a caliph governed an
empire that stretched for
thousands of miles.

a ruler

Its defined directly in the


sentence.

Ch. 2, p. 13
Okay, okay--- Annie broke
in.

interrupted

Theres a little line after


Annies second okay that
means she stopped speaking.
This may mean that feels she
annoyed or upset.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Wearing head cloths and long robes in the desert (protection from heat
and blowing sand)

pp. 1011

Caliphs were rulers at this time period.

p. 12

Baghdad was a center for learning and trade.

p. 12

Using camels as a means of transportation and to carry people and goods;


traveling in caravans (groups of travelers)

p. 17

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
I can tell that the country where this story takes place is in a desert. They have to use
things like camels because it helps them survive. The people there have to learn how to
survive in a place that is hot and dry.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 2
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 2 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 21

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 2
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand


it

Ch. 2, p. 12
A man called a gondolier stands
in the back of the boat and uses a
long oar to propel the gondola
through the water.

Ch. 2, p. 12
A man called a gondolier stands
in the back of the boat and uses a
long oar to propel the gondola
through the water.

Ch. 2, p. 17
The persons voice was muffled
behind the white mask.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 22

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 2
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 23

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 2
Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 24

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 2 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Venice, Italy

Jack

In a boat

Annie

Jack and Annie land in Venice


dressed in clown clothes with
red slippers.

two people in bird


costumes

They get into a gondola and go


to the Carnival.
A storm is coming, and the
water is rough. Jack is nervous.

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 25

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand


it

Ch. 2, p. 12
a person who drives the
A man called a gondolier stands boat
in the back of the boat and uses a
long oar to propel the gondola
through the water.

It says that a man called a


gondolier stands in back of
the boat and uses a long oar
to propel the gondola
through the water.

Ch. 2, p. 12
to move
A man called a gondolier stands
in the back of the boat and uses a
long oar to propel the gondola
through the water.

It says an oar is used, and


oars move boats like
rowboats and canoes.

Ch. 2, p. 17
The persons voice was muffled
behind the white mask.

covered or mumbly
sounding

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

The mask would make


someones voice harder to
hear, like if you have your
hand partly over your
mouth.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 26

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Wearing costumes and mask in Venice during Carnival

pp. 11, 17
18

Traveling on the canals (waterways) in Venice using boats and gondolas


(there are no roads in Venice)

p. 12

Carnival (famous yearly festival) in Venice

p. 19

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 27

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In this chapter, I learned that Italy has a special festival called Carnival. People dress in
costumes. I think that people must like to celebrate by dressing up, like we do on
Halloween.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 28

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapter 2
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
1. Read Chapter 2 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 29

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapter 2
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand


it

Ch. 2, p. 14
The trees stood next to a red
fort with a moat, a drawbridge,
and massive red battlements.

Ch. 2, p. 14
The trees stood next to a red
fort with a moat, a drawbridge,
and massive red battlements.

Ch. 2, p. 14
Yeah, and theres a bazaar like
the one we saw in Baghdad,
said Jack.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 30

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapter 2
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 31

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapter 2
Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 32

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
1. Read Chapter 2 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Magic Tree House

Jack

Red Fort in India

Annie

Jack and Annie land in a


crowded city in India. They are
dressed in clothes like
ambassadors. Jack still has his
bag with his schoolwork in it.

guard

They see the palace and a


bazaar. They also see the other
ambassadors going into the
palace.
They make a plan to run after
the ambassadors and pretend
they are trying to catch up.
A guard stops them. They
explain that they are
ambassadors who are young
and learned. Jacks bag has the
gifts for the Great Mogul.
Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 33

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand


it

Ch. 2, p. 14
The trees stood next to a red
fort with a moat, a drawbridge,
and massive red battlements.

a special bridge

moat

a bridge that closes

breaking up the word into


two parts: draw and
bridge

I think it is a bridge that can


be raised and lowered. I
think that because of the
picture and because it
reminds me of ancient
castles.

the picture helps

Ch. 2, p. 14
The trees stood next to a red
fort with a moat, a drawbridge,
and massive red battlements.

part of the castle

It has the word massive


before it, and massive
means really big. There
are battles at castles, so
battlements might be the big
walls around a castle.

Ch. 2, p. 14
Yeah, and theres a bazaar like
the one we saw in Baghdad,
said Jack.

a market

street lined with tents and


stalls

I think that a bazaar is a


market where people buy
and sells things.

the pictures

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 34

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapter 2
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Women wearing veils to cover their faces and heads

pp. 1415

Outdoor markets called bazaars

p. 14

Using elephants as a means of transportation

p. 15

Great Moguls were rulers in India at this time period. They lived within
forts. Moguls had the title of shah and were protected by Imperial Guards.
The forts had moats and drawbridges. Kings and queens of Europe would
give very valuable gifts to the Great Moguls.

p. 17
pp. 2021

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.


Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In this chapter, I learned that when ambassadors would visit the Great Mogul, they
would bring him rare and precious gifts. This made me think that it is a tradition in
India to be able to honor and show respect to rulers by offering gifts from where you
live.
Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 35

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Lesson 2 Homework: Chapter 3


Name:
Date:
Text Title: _____________________________________________________
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 3.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Words/Phrases: Write the word or phrase and note the page number.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 36

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Lesson 2 Homework: Chapter 3


Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 37

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 3


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Text Title: _____________________________________________________
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 3.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.

Words/Phrases: Write the word or phrase and note the page number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Men wore long white robes, pointy shoes, and head cloths.

pp. 19, 21

Traveled by camel; saddles and decorated blankets adorned the camels


backs

p. 21

Merchants traveled across the desert to Baghdad; would stop at an oasis to


rest, get out of the sun, get water and food (dates from date palms).
Merchants would trade spices, jewels, beads.

pp. 2224
p. 27

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 38

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 3


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 3.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.

Words/Phrases: Write the word or phrase and note the page number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Venice had many famous and well-known painters.

p. 26

Saint Marks Square (ruler lived there in a palace); Saint Marks Square
watchtower with weather vane (used by sailors), tallest building in Venice
at that time

pp. 2729

Winged lion

p. 32

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 39

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 3


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 3.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.

Words/Phrases: Write the word or phrase and note the page number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Court nobles lived in the palace. The Great Mogul would hold daily public
audiences. Ambassadors from the countries of Europe would visit the
Great Mogul, bringing gifts.

pp. 2223
pp. 2425

The Great Mogul sat in the Peacock Throne under a golden canopy. All had
to be silent. People bowed to the Great Mogul and spoke only if given
permission.

pp. 2628

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 40

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 2

Book Club Steps


1. Read the assigned chapter for the first time independently.
2. Independently record in Part A (where/who/what).
3. Discuss Part A evidence with group members.
4. Work with key words/phrases in Part B with group members and record thinking.
5. Read the focus question with group members and discuss what evidence you will be looking for
when you read the chapter a second time.
6. Read the assigned chapter a second time independently and, while reading, record evidence of
culture (customs and traditions) in Part C.
7. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with group members.
8. Revisit the focus question with group members and record a response.
9. Complete the Book Discussion checklist independently.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L2 June 2014 41

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs: Continuing
to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask and answer questions to deepen my understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories and taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree House book using specific details
(who/what/where).

Capturing Key Details recording form


Book Discussion checklist

I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in the assigned chapter(s) of my
Magic Tree House book.
I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
I can identify, categorize, and record key details from the assigned chapter(s) that connect with the
customs and traditions of my country.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

This lesson follows a similar pattern to Lessons 1 and 2 in terms of outcome: Students read a chapter (or
two) from their Magic Tree House books and complete a Capturing Key Details recording form with
their Book Clubs. However, this lesson has less scaffolding and more independent work time, as
students should be familiar with the recording form and processes.

A. Engaging the Reader: Review Book Discussion


Checklist (10 minutes)
B. Reviewing the Learning Targets and the Routine of
Book Club (5 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Magic Tree House Book Clubs (35 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Debriefing the Discussion (10 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Read the assigned chapter(s). Complete the
homework version of the recording form.

Book pacing and homework chapter (see Reading Calendars in the Unit 2 overview):
A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapters 4 and 5 in class, Chapter 6 as homework (see note directly
below)
Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 4 in class, Chapter 5 as homework
Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 4 in class, Chapter 5 as homework
The Class Norms for Discussion were established in Module 1. Students may need to be reminded how
these norms are their own separate list of things like speaking in full sentences, establishing eye contact
with the speaker, having enough voice volume, making sure everyone gets to speak, etc.
Also similar to Lessons 1 and 2, students debrief by self-assessing their group work.
There is time in the Opening of this lesson to review the routines. In todays work, as well as in Lessons
4 and 5, Book Club groups will function more independently and will need to know how to transition
themselves from one step to the next. In this lesson, that transitioning will need to be closely monitored,
and for some groups it may be necessary to facilitate the transition.
For many lessons in this unit, students will be given a new Book Discussion checklist and Capturing Key
Details recording form for the days work. Remember that the Capturing Key Details recording form is
book and chapter-specific.
Before the lesson, find time to tell the A Crazy Day with Cobras group(s) that they will read two
chapters in todays lesson. The Capturing Key Details recording form is modified with the two chapters
for this book club. Show students the recording form ahead of time so it will be clear to them. This book
has 12 chapters, which is one of the reasons to have the more secure readers assigned to this book.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Teaching Notes (continued)


The homework includes written work that is an abbreviated version of the steps followed in class. If
some students are unable to follow through with reading chapters for homework, accommodations will
need to be made so that they do not fall behind with the reading or have gaps in their learning.
For students who are moving quickly through their Magic Tree House text, they are encouraged to read
additional texts from the Recommended Texts list or consider any books from the public, school,
classroom, or home libraries that fit the content of the module. This will help to increase their volume of
reading.
In advance: Prepare three charts using the column headings on the Book Discussion checklist. These
charts will be set at stations around the classroom for use in Closing A.
I Need More Work or Time with This
Im Getting There
Ive Got It! Im on My Way!

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

cite, notes, opinion, objects, places,


traditions, evidence

Book Discussion checklist (from Lesson 1; completed version from Lesson 2 plus one new blank copy per student)
Document camera
Class Norms for Discussion anchor chart (from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 4)
Capturing Key Details recording form (one per student for their assigned Book Club and specific chapter)
Capturing Key Details recording form (answers, for teacher reference, for each of the assigned Magic Tree House books and
specific chapters)
Book Club Steps anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
Magic Tree House books (one per student for their assigned Book Club group)
Three charts with headings from Book Discussion checklist (see Teaching Notes)
Homework for Season of the Sandstorms or Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 5 (one per student in those groups)
Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 6 (one per student in this group)
Homework for Season of the Sandstorms or Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 5 (answers, for teacher reference)
Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 6 (answers, for teacher reference)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Review Book Discussion Checklist (10 minutes)


Instruct students to take out their Book Discussion checklist from Lesson 2.

Consider providing students with a


discussion starter for partner
conversations. Possible starters
could be: I think this
means_____ and It is important
because______.

Gather students together whole group. Direct them to spend a minute looking over the checklist. Then say:

* We have been talking about how a big part of your work in this unit is learning how to talk with each other about your
reading. Our Book Discussion checklist has some very specific things listed on it. Lets look at each item again before you
start your Book Club work today.
Using a document camera, display the Book Discussion checklist but show only one book club behavior at a time (or have
each discussion behavior written on an electronic white board or chart paper).
Direct students attention to the first Book Club behavior:
I read the pages I was assigned to read.
Have students Think-Pair-Share with someone not in their Book Club about what this means and, more specifically, why its
important.
Move on to the next Book Club behavior and repeat the Think-Pair-Share:
I am prepared for the discussion and have my notes and book with me.
Spend a little more time with the next Book Club behavior:
I follow our class norms for conversation.
Move on to the next four Book Club behaviors, one at a time, and repeat the Think-Pair-Share for each about what each one
means and, more specifically, why its important:
I listen carefully and ask questions of others to make sure I understand.
I share my ideas with my group members, stay on topic, and explain my thinking.
I encourage and respect others opinions.
I answer questions from others in my group.
Consider displaying the Class Norms for Discussion anchor chart again here and reviewing it, since these norms are
referenced in the Book Discussion checklist.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

When sharing and discussing the final Book Club behavior, make sure students fully understand what the word cite means.
I refer to the text to support my ideas. This means I use page numbers and cite lines or words as needed.
Explain that this means they will refer directly to the text to a specific sentence or part on a specific page.
Distribute a new Book Discussion checklist to students for todays work. Remind them that they will not complete the Book
Discussion checklist until later in the lesson. However, having the checklist with them through the lesson will help them to
focus on the Book Club behaviors as they work.
Note: You may want to suggest to students that when they observe one of the behaviors on the checklist, they place a small
tally mark within the appropriate box in the left-side column. At the end of the lesson, the areas of the checklist with many
tallies will show them which discussion behaviors are more secure for them.
B. Reviewing the Learning Targets and the Routine of Book Club (5 minutes)
Direct students attention to the learning targets and ask for volunteers to read them aloud:

* I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree House book using specific details (who/what/where).
* I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
* I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree
House book.

* I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
* I can identify, categorize, and record key details from the assigned chapter(s) that connect with the customs and
traditions of my country.
Point out that most of these targets are identical to those in Lesson 1 except that they are working with a new chapter (or
chapters).

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display them
for students who struggle with
auditory processing.
When reviewing anchor charts, use
a document camera to more
prominently display the anchor
chart for students who struggle with
smaller sharing mechanisms such as
chart paper.

Distribute the Capturing Key Details recording form for todays work. Remind students how this recording form will
keep them moving from one step to the next as they work in their Book Club.
Display the Book Club Steps anchor chart from Lesson 2. With students referencing their Capturing Key Details
recording form, read each step on the anchor chart and ask students what part (A, B. C, or D) the step aligns with. For
example, the first three steps on the anchor chart are all from Part A, the fourth step is from Part B, and so on. The last step
on the anchor chart refers to the Book Discussion checklist.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Magic Tree House Book Clubs (35 minutes)


Have students assemble their materials in preparation for moving to their group meeting spots. They need:

Providing models of expected work


supports all learners, but especially
challenged learners.

Magic Tree House book


Book Discussion checklist
Capturing Key Details recording form
Pencil with an eraser
Send groups off to their meeting spots. Praise those that make a quick, yet quiet transition.
When all groups are settled, ask if there are any lingering questions. If there is a group that seems unclear or uncertain,
allow the other groups to begin their work and go directly to the group in need and help them to get started.
Tell students that it is natural that some students within a group may finish the independent reading/work at different
times, so make sure there is a clear expectation outlined for those who finish ahead of other group members. It will be
important that they remain silent and not distract their classmates. Suggest that they reread within the chapter, do quiet
fluency work, or go back and look for words or phrases that they were uncertain about to perhaps share with group members
later. Caution students not to move on in advance of the group.
Tell groups they have 35 minutes to complete all of their work, which includes reading the chapter two times and completing
all parts of the Capturing Key Details recording form.
As groups are working, circulate and focus primarily on the process of this work. Jot down specific observations to share
with the group as a whole (both actions to praise and also cautions). As you circulate, offer praise, cautions, or redirection to
each group specifically, as needed, rather than interrupt the flow of the work by addressing the whole class.
If necessary and desired, call out the halfway point in the work session. At that point, groups should be well into the second
read (Parts C and D on the Capturing Key Details recording form). The second read and the work associated with it will
likely require a little more time than the first read work.
Since the final portion of Work Time A (the last half of Part C and all of Part D) are all conversation-based, take note of
whether groups are in conversation for (approximately) the final 15 minutes of the 35-minute work time.

During this work time, you may


want to pull a small group of
students to support them with the
work. Some will need more guided
practice before they are ready for
independent work.
Consider the use of a literacy aide or
other adult who can also circulate
and assist groups with the
procedural steps.
Consider preparing audio
recordings of the texts used in the
module.
Consider chunking the chapters for
struggling readers or look for other
ways to tier the task.
Students who struggle to recognize,
categorize, and explain customs and
traditions found within the text may
need extra support and additional
opportunities to practice using
similar material.

When there are 5 minutes left, make sure all groups are on Part D, discussing and recording a response to the focus
question. If any group(s) is still working on Part C, make a note of this but have the group(s) stop and move on to Part D.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Debriefing the Discussion (10 minutes)


Gather students whole group. All materials should be left at students desks.
Direct their attention to this learning target:

* I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
Then, direct students attention to the three charts positioned at different locations in the classroom. Read each chart
aloud to students:

* I Need More Work or Time with This


* Im Getting There
* Ive Got It!
Students should recognize these as the column headings on their Book Discussion checklist.
Tell students to stand up.
In a loud, clear voice, read the first Book Club behavior on the Book Discussion checklist:

* I read the pages I was assigned to read.


Give students a few moments to think carefully about how they would categorize their own work today on that one behavior.
Direct them to move to the chart that best matches their self- assessment. Encourage them to be honest in their assessment
and not to be influenced by others choices.
Continue with each of the Book Club behaviors on the checklist. Notice whether there are any patterns, and use these to
inform instruction.
After the last movement, gather students back together to debrief the activity. The purpose of this activity is twofold. It
allows you, as the teacher, to see which book discussion skills need work or which students are in need. It also allows
students who may not yet be fully secure on certain skills to see that there are other students who are also still developing.
Tell students to return to their desks.
Ask them to take out their Book Discussion checklist and fill in the information at the top.
Review the three descriptors at the top. Read each criteria and direct students to self-assess by placing an X or a checkmark
in the column that best matches their own discussion work today.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 8

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3


Building Confidence with Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books
Closing and Assessment (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Students should then self-reflect to complete the question below the chart:

* What is a goal for yourself the next time you have a discussion?
Encourage students to truly be self-reflective and establish a concrete and appropriate goal for themselves and for the group.
Distribute and preview the Homework for Seasons of the Sandstorms, Carnival at Candlelight, and A Crazy
Day with Cobras recording forms. Clarify questions as they arise.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Read the assigned chapter of your Magic Tree House book at home for homework and complete the shortened version of the
Capturing Key Details recording form. Be sure to bring your book back to school for the next lesson.

If students lack support at home


and are unable to follow through
with this homework, make other
accommodations so that they do not
fall behind with the reading.
Consider preparing audio
recordings of the texts used within
the module.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 9

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 3

Supporting Materials
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 4
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 4 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 4
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.
Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 4, p. 31
Cutie rose awkwardly up from a
kneeling position to a full stand.

Ch. 4, p. 32
Annies camel began ambling
toward the other camels waiting
to head off into the desert.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 4
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your
country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 4
Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 4
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 4 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Desert near Baghdad


at night

Jack

Get on their camels

Annie

Jacks camel wont go, and he


calls her stupid.

Mamoon
Cutie and Beauty

Mamoon tells him that camels


are not stupid and shares the
great things about camels.
He says people must respect
and honor camels.
Bandits come.

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 4
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

Ch. 4, p. 31
I think it means clumsily
Cutie rose awkwardly up from a or not smoothly.
kneeling position to a full stand.

Ch. 4, p. 32
Annies camel began ambling
toward the other camels waiting
to head off into the desert.

I think it means a kind of


slow walk.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

What helped us understand it

I can visualize the camel


getting up with its long legs.
The hump must be heavy, so
it might be difficult to get
up.

I can tell its a word that is


describing what the camel is
doing.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 4
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your
country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Camel saddles are made with colorful cushions.

p. 31

Camels carry people across the desert (thousands of years).

p. 33

Desert people respect and need camels.

pp. 3335

Use of stars to navigate (reading the stars and wind)

p. 39

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.


Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In this chapter, I learned that people in this country show respect and honor for
creatures like the camel. They also enjoy telling stories and singing together like they
did when they were in the desert.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapters and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapters.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapters
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this
chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this
chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 4, p. 30
The Great Mogul sat crosslegged on a cushion and
looked coldly at his audience.

Ch. 4, p. 36
She solemnly showed it to
Jack.

Ch. 5, p. 39
The other ambassadors were
already entering the palace
quarters on the far side.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your
country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 21

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 22

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapters and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapters.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapters
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the


important characters
in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

palace

Jack

Peacock throne

Annie

Jack and Annie are waiting in


line to see the Great Mogul.
They watch how to bow and give
the gift.

Great Mogul

When it is Jack and Annies


turn, they bow and Jack
presents his story as the gift.
The Great Mogul looks over the
story and then Jack and Annie
are to choose a precious stone.
Annie finds the emerald cut like
a rose.
They succeed and try to find
their way out but instead are
told to go and watch the parade
in their honor.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 23

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the


important characters
in this chapter?

What are the most important


events in this chapter?

courtyard

Jack

balcony

Annie

Jack and Annie are taken to see


the parade.

ambassadors,
guards, Great Mogul

They are given silk robes,


turbans, and pointy shoes to
wear.
They go to the balcony and see
the parade.
The parade has horses,
cheetahs, oxen, and elephants.
The parade is interrupted when
an elephant breaks free.
Annie asks what will happen to
the elephant. The guard says
she will be punished for not
showing respect to the Great
Mogul.
Annie yells because it is just an
animal and should not be hurt.
Everyone is staring at Annie.

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 24

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 4, p. 30
The Great Mogul sat crosslegged on a cushion and
looked coldly at his audience.

I think it means like a stare


with no smiling.

The Great Mogul is like a king


and everyone must respect
him. He has to be very serious
and formal.

Ch. 4, p. 36
She solemnly showed it to
Jack.

quietly and calmly

Jack nodded, trying to


appear calm.

Ch. 5, p. 39
The other ambassadors were
already entering the palace
quarters on the far side.

I think it means to be very


quiet and calm. They have
to be quiet and calm in
front of the Great Mogul.
Jack is having a hard time
finding a stone, so Annie
does it quietly and calmly.
I think its a room in the
palace.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

and carefully picked up


They are not talking.

I can tell the word is used as a


noun, that its a place the
ambassadors are going into.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 25

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your
country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Great Mogul (leader) has lots of servants; must bow and treat him with the
utmost respect.

pp. 30, 34

People give Mogul precious things; he gives jewels as rewardsall kinds.

p. 32

Great Mogul makes everyone afraid.

p. 36

Women wear veils and keep out of sight. At court you wear jeweled turbans
and special clothes.

pp. 3941

Parades have lots of animals (horses, cheetahs, elephants). Animals are


trained to keep time to the music.

pp. 4445
p. 46

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 26

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 4 and 5
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In Chapter 4, I learned that jewels are very important. The Great Mogul wears them on
his clothing and gives them away as gifts. Jewels must be abundant in India, but they
are probably only for the very respected. In Chapter 5, I learned that animals are very
important to India. Some of the important animals are Arabian horses, cheetahs, and
elephants. Just like people, if animals do not show respect to the Great Mogul, they will
be punished.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 27

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 4
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 4 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 28

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 4
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
word/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 4, p. 42
The prison cells at ground
level in the palace were called
the pozzi, meaning wells or
pits.

Ch. 4, p. 48
Jack and Annie bounded
down the Golden Staircase two
steps at a time.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 29

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 4
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your
country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 30

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 4
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 31

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 4
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 4 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

rulers palace

Jack

prison cell

Annie

Jack and Annie are in the


rulers palace. They use a map
to help find their way around.

guards

They saw the rulers living


chamber, Giant Staircase, and
Map Room.
Guards caught them and took
them to the prison.
There were rats in the prison.
Jack and Annie used magic to
bend the bars and escape from
the prison.

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 32

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 4
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
word/phrases.

Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 4, p. 42
The prison cells at ground
level in the palace were called
the pozzi, meaning wells or
pits.

wells or pits

It said right after it that it


meant wells or pits.

Ch. 4, p. 48
Jack and Annie bounded
down the Golden Staircase two
steps at a time.

It means when you are


Jack and Annie are afraid of
hurrying or running down getting caught, so I know they
stairs and your feet are
are moving fast.
very heavy and loud
almost like you are leaping.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 33

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 4
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your
country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

There are statues of animals and Roman gods.

p. 35

Use lots of marble and gold.

p. 38

Pictures and statues of lions with wings.

p. 39

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.


Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In this chapter, I learned that the prisons in Italy were horrible places. The prison that
Jack and Annie were placed in was dark and full of rats. The guard who took them there
said that they would not be coming out for a long time. I think that this is teaching me
that in Italy, they believed that when you commit a crime, you should be severely
punished.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 34

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms or Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 5


Name:
Date:
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 5.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 35

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms or Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 5


Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 36

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 6


Name:
Date:

Directions:
1. Read Chapter 6.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.

Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.

Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 6


Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 37

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 38

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 5


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 5.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Caravans (groups traveling in the desert)

p. 42

Spice trade (cinnamon and pepper)

p. 43

Saddles on camels; clucking tongue to communicate with camel

pp. 44, 45,


47

Travel at night in the desert when its cool/cold.

p. 49

Wear head cloths for protection while traveling in the desert.

p. 50

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 39

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 5


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 5.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Puppet shows are a part of entertainment.

p. 49

Fireworks on the waterfront

pp. 5253

Paint pictures of Roman gods

p. 58

Neptune is the ruler of the sea and lives under the water (mythology).

pp. 5960

Venice is considered the Grand Lady of the Lagoon.

p. 62

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 40

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 3

Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 6


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 6.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Gifts are important to show respect and reward.

p. 50

Animals like elephants and camels kneel so you can climb on to ride.

p. 54

The palace has moats and a drawbridge.

p. 55

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L3 June 2014 41

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 4


Practicing Fluency and Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Deepen Understanding of Magic Tree
House books
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4


Practicing Fluency and Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask and answer questions to deepen my understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can read third grade level texts accurately and fluently to make meaning. (RF.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories and taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree House book using specific details
(who/what/where).

Capturing Key Details recording form


Book Discussion checklist

I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in the assigned chapter(s) of my
Magic Tree House book.
I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
I can identify, categorize, and record key details from the assigned chapter(s) that connect with the
customs and traditions of my country.
I can use the criteria of a fluent reader to read aloud a selected part of my Magic Tree House book.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4


Practicing Fluency and Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

This lesson follows a similar pattern to Lessons 13 in terms of outcome: Students read a chapter (or
two) from their Magic Tree House books and complete a Capturing Key Details recording form with
their Book Clubs. However, this lesson has less scaffolding and more independent work time, as
students should be familiar with the recording form and processes.

A. Engaging the Reader: Fluency Partners (9 minutes)


B. Unpacking the Learning Targets (1 minute)
C. Reflecting on Book Discussions: Concentric Circles
(5 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Book Clubs (35 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Debriefing the Discussion (10 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Read the assigned chapter(s). Complete the
homework version of the recording form.

Book pacing and homework chapter (see Reading Calendars in Unit 2 overview)
A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapters 7 and 8 in class; Chapter 9 as homework (see note directly
below)
Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 6 in class; Chapter 7 as homework
Season of the Sandstorms: Chapters 6 and 7 in class; Chapter 8 as homework (see note directly
below)
Students again are given a new generic Book Discussion checklist and chapter-specific Capturing Key
Details recording form. To save time in the lesson and streamline logistics, distribute the checklist and
recording form before the start of the lesson.
Also similar to Lessons 13, students debrief by self-assessing their group work.
Find time before the lesson to tell the A Crazy Day with Cobras group(s) and the Season of the
Sandstorms group(s) that they will be reading two chapters in todays lesson. Their Capturing Key
Details recording form is modified, with the two chapters grouped together. So in a way, they are to
treat the two chapters as one. You may want to show them the recording form ahead of time so it will be
clearer to them. These two books have more chapters than Carnival at Candlelight, so the volume of
reading had to be increased.
This lesson again requires a chapter to be read for homework. The homework also includes a worksheet
that is an abbreviated version of the steps followed in class. For students who are unable to follow
through with reading chapters for homework, other accommodations will need to be made so that they
do not fall behind with the reading or have gaps in their learning.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4


Practicing Fluency and Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Agenda

Teaching Notes (continued)


In advance:
Review the Concentric Circles protocol (see Appendix).
Post the learning targets, three charts for the Closing, Fluent Reader Criteria anchor chart, and Class
Norms for Conversation anchor chart.
Display the three charts with the headings from the Book Discussion Checklist (from Lesson 3).
As in Lesson 3, set three charts at stations around the room for use in Closing A.
I Need More Work or Time With This
Im Getting There
Ive Got It!

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

fluent, criteria, phrasing, rate,


punctuation, accuracy, cite, notes,
opinion, objects, places, traditions,
evidence, beneficial

Fluent Reader Criteria anchor chart (from Lesson 2)


Magic Tree House books (one per student for their assigned Book Club group)
Capturing Key Details recording form (one per student for their assigned Book Club and specific chapter; see Teaching
Notes)
Capturing Key Details recording form (answers, for teacher reference, for each of the assigned Magic Tree House books and
specific chapters)
Book Discussion checklist (from Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)
Three charts with headings from Book Discussion checklist (from Lesson 3)
Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 8 (one per student in this group)
Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 7 (one per student in this group)
Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 9 (one per student in this group)
Homework (answers, for teacher reference; book and chapter-specific)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4


Practicing Fluency and Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Fluency Partners (9 minutes)


Congratulate students on the fabulous work they are doing in their Book Clubs.

When reviewing graphic organizers


or anchor charts, consider using a
document camera to display them
on a larger screen for students who
struggle with looking at a chart.

Remind them of their fluency practice in Lesson 2 with their fluency partner.
Display the Fluent Reader Criteria anchor chart. Quickly go through each of the criteria, explaining and expanding as
necessary.
Direct students to have their Magic Tree House books out and to search within their homework chapter for a section or a
couple of paragraphs to use for some fluency practice.
Tell students to spend 2 minutes softly reading aloud the passage themselves, focusing on aspects of good oral reading
fluency. They can refer to the anchor chart as often as necessary.
After 2 minutes, tell students to sit knee-to-knee or shoulder-to-shoulder with their fluency partner from Lesson 2, taking
their book with them. Once settled, they should take turns reading their selected paragraphs aloud to each other.
After his or her fluency partner reads, each student should give verbal feedback using the star and step framework. Consider
using sentence frames: I like how you_______ and I think you would be more fluent if you_______.
B. Unpacking the Learning Targets (1 minute)
Direct students attention to the learning targets and read each one aloud.

* I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree House book using specific details (who/what/where).
* I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
* I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree
House book.

* I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
* I can identify, categorize, and record key details from the assigned chapter(s) that connect with the customs and
traditions of my country.

* I can use the criteria of a fluent reader to read aloud a selected part of my Magic Tree House book.
Have students turn to their partners and share in their own words what they targets are telling them to do as readers today.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4


Practicing Fluency and Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

C. Reflecting on Book Discussions: Concentric Circles (5 minutes)


Post three questions for students to see:

Protocols like Concentric Circles


allow students an opportunity to be
accountable for work they have
done and to share it with their peers
in an engaging way. Some students
may need support with expressing
themselves either accurately or
clearly.

1. What is something youve learned about your countrys customs or traditions?


2. What do you find beneficial about Book Club?
3. What is your biggest improvement with discussion skills?
Read the questions aloud to students. Inform them that the word beneficial in Question 2 means that something is good or
helpful.
Invite students to take a few moments to think about their response to each question (to prepare them for the Concentric
Circles activity).
Have students form concentric circles. Pick a number randomly and have students move that many spaces to their left. (This
pairs students with random partners.)
On your cue, tell students they will answer the question you pose with the person opposite them. After 30 seconds or so, tell
students to move two spaces to the left. Encourage them to maintain solid eye contact and to listen respectfully each time
they pair up. Decide whether you want to repeat the same question for a couple of turns or whether you will rotate through
the three questions for each turn. Use each question two or three times, time permitting.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4


Practicing Fluency and Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Book Clubs (35 minutes)


Distribute the Capturing Key Details recording form and the Book Discussion checklist for today.

Providing models of expected work


supports all learners, but especially
challenged learners.

Have students assemble their materials in preparation for moving to their Book Club meeting spots. They need:
Magic Tree House book
Book Discussion checklist
Capturing Key Details recording form
Pencil with an eraser
Remind students that some may finish earlier than others. Suggest that they reread within the chapter, do quiet fluency
work, or go back and look for words or phrases that they were uncertain about to perhaps share with group members
later. Caution students not to move on in advance of the group.
Send groups off to their meeting spots. Praise those that make a quick, yet quiet transition.
When all groups are settled, ask if there are any lingering questions. If there is a group that seems unclear or uncertain,
allow the other groups to begin their work and go directly to the group in need and help them to get started.
Tell groups they have 35 minutes to complete all of their work, which includes reading the chapter two times and completing
all parts of the Capturing Key Details recording form. Remind the A Crazy Day with Cobras and Season of the Sandstorms
groups that they have two chapters to work with.
As groups are working, circulate and focus primarily on the process of this work. Jot down specific observations to share
with the group as a whole (both actions to praise and also cautions). As you circulate, offer praise, cautions, or redirection to
each group specifically, as needed, rather than interrupt the flow of the work by addressing the whole class.
If necessary and desired, call out the halfway point in the work session. At that point, groups should be well into the second
read (Parts C and D on the Capturing Key Details recording form). The second read and the work associated with it will
likely require a little more time than the first read work.
Since the final portion of Work Time A (the last half of Part C and all of Part D) is conversation-based, try to take note of
whether groups are in conversation for (approximately) the final 15 minutes of the 35-minute work time.

During this work time, you may


want to pull a group aside to
support them with the work. Some
will need more guided practice
before they are ready for
independent work.
Consider the use of a literacy aide or
other adult who can circulate and
assist groups with the procedural
steps.
Consider preparing audio
recordings of the texts used in the
module.
Consider chunking the chapters for
struggling readers or look for other
ways to tier the task.
Students who struggle to recognize,
categorize, and explain cultural
objects, places, and traditions found
within the text may need extra
support and additional
opportunities to practice using
similar material.

When there are 5 minutes left, make sure all groups are on Part D, discussing and recording a response to the focus
question. If any group(s) is still working on Part C, make a note of this but have the group(s) stop and move on to Part D.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4


Practicing Fluency and Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Debriefing the Discussion (10 minutes)


Gather students whole group. All materials should be left at their desks.
Direct students attention to the three charts positioned at different locations in the classroom. Read each chart aloud:

* I Need More Work or Time with This


* Im Getting There
* Ive Got It!
Students should recognize these as the column headings on their Book Discussion checklist.
Invite students to stand up. Read the first Book Club behavior on the Book Discussion checklist:

* I read the pages I was assigned to read.


Give students a few moments to think carefully about how they would categorize their own work today on that one behavior.
Direct them to move to the chart that best matches their self- assessment. Encourage them to be honest in their assessment
and not to be influenced by others choices.
Continue with each of the Book Club behaviors on the checklist. Notice whether there are any patterns, and use these to
inform instruction.
After the last movement, gather students back together to debrief the activity. The purpose of this activity is twofold. One, it
allows you, as the teacher, to see which book discussion skills need work or which students are in need. Two, it allows
students who may not yet be fully secure on certain skills to see that there are others who are also still developing.
Invite students to return to their desks.
Ask them to take out their Book Discussion checklist and fill in the information at the top.
Quickly review the three descriptors at the top. Read each criteria and direct students to self-assess by placing an X or a
checkmark in the column that best matches their own discussion work today.
Students should then self-reflect to complete the two questions below the chart:

* What is a goal for yourself the next time you have a discussion?
* What is a goal for your group the next time you have a discussion?
Encourage students to truly be self-reflective and establish a concrete and appropriate goal for themselves and for the group.
Distribute Homework and preview as needed.
Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4


Practicing Fluency and Independent Book Clubs:
Continuing to Read and Discuss the Magic Tree House Books

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Read the assigned chapter(s) of your Magic Tree House book at home and complete the shortened version of the Capturing
Key Details recording form. Be sure to bring your book back to school for the next lesson.

If students do not have support at


home and are unable to follow
through with this homework, other
accommodations will need to be
made so that they do not fall behind
with the reading. These
accommodations could include
having a peer homework buddy who
can meet before class or at another
point in the day.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 8

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 4

Supporting Materials
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapters 6 and 7
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapters and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapters.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapters
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapters?
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B


Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapters 6 and 7
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.
Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 6, p. 60
Jack looked down to shield
his eyes from the burning
sunlight.

Ch. 7, pp. 6162


Jack and Annie rode
alongside boys driving sheep
and farmers in donkey carts.

Ch. 7, p. 67
At the end of the wide
cobbled road was another
green field.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapters 6 and 7
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your
country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this
chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapters 6 and 7
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs or traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapters 6 and 7
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapters and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapters.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapters
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapters?
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Desert near
Baghdad

-Jack

They are hit by a sandstorm.

-Annie

In the storm, the box with the


treasure is blown away.

Cutie and Beauty

Jack and Annie chase the box to


save it but get separated from
Mamoon.
They open the box and find a
book inside by Aristotle.
They ride to Baghdad to get the
book back.

in Baghdad

Jack

They make it to Baghdad.

Annie

They must pass three gates.

Cutie and Beauty

They pass a bazaar and kids


playing in the field.
They stop at the stable to put
the camels in. Annie gets in
trouble for bragging.
The camel ate the precious
treasure: the book.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapters 6 and 7
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.
Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 6, p. 60
Jack looked down to shield his
eyes from the burning
sunlight.

Protect like blocking


something out

The sun is so bright and hot in


the desert that it kind of hurts
Jacks eyes. A shield is
something to protect you in a
fight, so Jack looks down to
protect his eyes from the sun.

Ch. 7, pp. 6162


Jack and Annie rode alongside
boys driving sheep and farmers
in donkey carts.

Moving them along in a


certain direction

You dont drive sheep like you


drive a car, but the picture
shows the sheep walking and
the boys are like shepherds, so
it might just mean helping the
sheep move along.

Ch. 7, p. 67
At the end of the wide cobbled
road was another green field.

I just know its something


the road is made of.

I can tell its an adjective


describing the road.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapters 6 and 7
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this
chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Sandstorms a way of life in the desert; lay low to ground during


sandstorm; using saddlebags on camels

pp. 5153

Head scarf to cover face


Respect for learning (Aristotle)

p. 54
p. 58

Women wearing veils


Baghdad, a place that brings many people for many reasons; outdoor/open
air market called bazaar, with merchants (sellers, traders)

p. 62
pp. 59,64

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapters 6 and 7
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs or traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In Chapter 6, I learned that the precious treasure is actually a book from a famous
philosopher. This connects to the mission Jack and Annie have of helping to spread
wisdom to the world. I think that people in this culture value learning, especially
learning from books.
In Chapter 7, I learned that the city of Baghdad is not like the desert and has grass and a
river. There are many people who sell goods at the bazaar and kids playing ball. People
can enter the palace walls but not the palace. I think that means that this country has a
powerful ruler who welcomes people but is still not seen.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 6
Name:
Date:

Read, Think, Write, Talk


Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 6 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 6
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.
Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 6, p. 71
The air was damp and
musty.

Ch. 6, p. 71
Jack was breathing hard as he
pushed open a heavy door that
led out onto the bell terrace.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 6
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this
chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 6
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs or traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 21

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 6
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)

Read, Think, Write, Talk


Part A Directions:
1. Read Chapter 6 and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapter
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Venice

Jack

Venice is flooding.

St. Marks Square

Annie

Jack and Annie are trying to


save Venice.
They are searching for Neptune
to get help.
They climb the tower in St.
Marks Square.

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 22

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 6
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.
Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined
words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 6, p. 71
The air was damp and
musty.

A bad smell

Its with the word damp, so it


must be a word that describes
how air is when its damp.
You can tell its not a good
smell.

Ch. 6, p. 71
Jack was breathing hard as he
pushed open a heavy door that
led out onto the bell terrace.

I think its like a patio


outside a door, and a bell
terrace could be a patio
where the bell is kept.

I can tell its a noun, and it


seems like Jack is going
outside when hes pushing
through the door.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 23

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 6
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this
chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Prevention of flooding/high tides

pp. 6364

Bird masks

p. 64

Cafes

p. 64

Belief in mythology

p. 65

Footbridges for travel within Venice

p. 66

Fireworks

p. 67

Saint Marks Square as a place to gather

p. 71

Stone statue: lions with wings

p. 72

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 24

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 6
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs or traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In this chapter, I learned how the water in the canals is how the people travel from
place to place in Venice. Sometimes storms cause flooding, which can be very serious. I
also learned that fireworks are a part of the Carnival celebrations. The people wear
costumes and watch the fireworks at midnight.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 25

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapters and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapters.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapters
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 26

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 27

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.
Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean?
Key word/phrase

What we think it
means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 7, p. 58
Rogue elephant!

Ch. 7, p. 59
The merchants shouted with rage.

Ch. 7, p. 60
Sheep and goats bleated and
scuttled out of her way.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 28

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 29

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 30

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapters and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapters.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the chapters
using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the


important characters
in this chapter?

What are the most important events in this


chapter?

bazaar

Jack

outside of tow

Annie

Jack and Annie try to get Morning


Breeze out of the Red Fort. Morning
Breeze starts running.

Morning Breeze

She runs through the bazaar, ruining


everything as she goes. People yell
and shout at Jack and Annie.
They make it outside of town, and
Morning Breeze is still running. She
finally dumps them out and runs
away.
Jack and Annie try to find everything
that fell out of Jacks bag when they
were dumped out. The emerald rose
is missing.
Annie spots the emerald rose in a pile
of dead leaves. But the leaves start
moving.
A king cobra is right by the emerald
rose.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 31

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the


important characters
in this chapter?

What are the most important events in this


chapter?

scrubby forest
outside palace

Jack

Morning Breeze runs away into the


forest. Jack and Annie are surprised
by a king cobra, and they use the
research book to find out how to get
away safely. But they need to get the
emerald to save Penny. They use the
liquid in the blue bottle to make
themselves really small. They see a
cricket and butterfly, which look big
because they are so small.

Annie
Morning Breeze
(elephant)
King cobra
(snake)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 32

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.
Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean?
Key word/phrase

What we think it
means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 7, p. 58
Rogue elephant!

wild

-Sorry! Sorry! yelled Jack.


-sends everyone scrambling
-knocks over wooden poles
Morning Breeze is running free
through the streets and ruining
the bazaar. I think that rogue
means wild.

Ch. 7, p. 59
The merchants shouted with rage.

anger

The merchants are very upset


because Morning Breeze
knocked everything over. On
page 59, it says the merchants
grab sticks and charge at the
elephant.

Ch. 7, p. 60
Sheep and goats bleated and
scuttled out of her way.

ran, scurried

I can tell its a verb; its what


the animals are doing. They
would be afraid of a big
elephant, so they would move
quickly.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 33

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Men wear colorful coats and women in outfits that hide their faces

p. 58

bazaarselling figs, rice, peas, lemons, oranges, and pineapples

p. 59

silk shawls, carpets

p. 59

Huts are made of mud.

p. 63

Red Fort is protected by battlements, moats, and drawbridges.

p. 58

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 34

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day with Cobras, Chapters 7 and 8
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In this chapter, I learned about the places in India. India has fancy palaces like where
the Great Mogul lives, but it also has bazaars, a countryside, and a wild jungle. This is
teaching me that India is a country with many different climates. The bazaar with
people selling things is a commonplace thing. It is part of the way of life. There are tents
and stalls with merchants. People come from all over to buy and sell.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 35

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 8


Name:
Date:
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 8.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.

Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 36

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 8


Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 37

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 8


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 8.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Stables for animals

p. 78

Room of the Tree

p. 79

bowing to the caliph

p. 81

House of Wisdom (respected place of learning)

p. 91

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 38

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 7


Directions:
1. Read Chapter 7.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.

Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 39

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 7


Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 40

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 7


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 5.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Winged lion statues

p. 77

Fireworks at Carnival

p. 80

Belief in mythology: Neptune, god of the sea (mythology); three-pronged


spear (trident)

p. 83

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 41

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 9


Name:
Date:
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 9.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.

Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 42

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 43

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 4

Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 9


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 5.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

none

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L4 June 2014 44

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 5


Independent Book Clubs: Finishing the Magic Tree
House Books
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5


Independent Book Clubs:
Finishing the Magic Tree House Books

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can ask and answer questions to deepen my understanding of a literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can retell a chapter in a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story. (RL.3.4)
I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree House book using specific details
(who/what/where).

Capturing Key Details recording form


Book Discussion checklist

I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in the assigned chapter(s) of my
Magic Tree House book.
I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
I can identify, categorize, and record key details from the assigned chapter(s) that connect with the
customs and traditions of my country.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5


Independent Book Clubs:
Finishing the Magic Tree House Books

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Magic Tree House Book Clubs (35 minutes)

Students will again be given a new Book Discussion checklist and Capturing Key Details recording form
for the days work. To save time in the lesson and streamline logistics, distribute the checklist and
recording form before the start of the lesson. If students are using a two-pocket folder for the unit
materials (highly recommended), the checklist and recording form can be placed in their folders before
the lesson. Remember that the Capturing Key Details recording form is book-specific.

B. Debriefing the Discussion (20 minutes)

Book pacing and homework chapter (see Reading Calendars in Unit 2 overview):

A. Unpacking the Learning Targets (1 minute)


2. Work Time

3. Closing and Assessment


A. Revisiting the Learning Targets (4 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Read the assigned chapter(s). Complete the
homework version of the recording form.

A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapters 10 and 11 in class; Chapter 12 as homework (see note directly
below)
Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 8 in class; Chapter 9 as homework
Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 9 in class; Chapter 10 as homework
Since the homework chapters are the final chapters of all three books, there is not as much information
dealing with evidence of culture. The final chapter is always when Jack and Annie return home.
Find time before the lesson to tell the A Crazy Day with Cobras group that again they will read two
chapters in todays lesson. Their Capturing Key Details recording form is modified with the two chapters
grouped together. So in a way, they are to treat the two chapters as one. You may want to show them the
recording form ahead of time so it will be clearer to them.
Students will need all materials relating to the Magic Tree house books later in Unit 2.
This lesson again requires a chapter to be read for homework. The homework also includes a worksheet
that is an abbreviated version of the steps followed in class. For students who are unable to follow
through with reading chapters for homework, other accommodations will need to be made so that they
do not fall behind with the reading or have gaps in their learning. Consider creating peer homework
buddies so students can check in with a peer before class as a support system for completing homework.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5


Independent Book Clubs:
Finishing the Magic Tree House Books

Teaching Notes (continued)


Have ready the three charts from Lesson 3 that were used in the Closing. The charts read:
I Need More Work or Time With This
Im Getting There
Ive Got It!
Post: Learning targets.

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

cite, notes, opinion, customs,


traditions, evidence

Magic Tree House books (one per student for their assigned Book Club group)
Book Discussion checklist (from Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)
Capturing Key Details recording form (one per student for their assigned Book Club and specific chapter; see Teaching
Notes)
Capturing Key Details recording form (answers, for teacher reference, for each of the assigned Magic Tree House books and
specific chapters)
Book Discussion checklists from Lessons 25 (one set per student)
My Growth with Book Discussions recording form (one per student)
Document camera
Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 10 (one per student in this group)
Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 9 (one per student in this group)
Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 12 (one per student in this group)
Homework (answers, for teacher reference; book and chapter-specific)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5


Independent Book Clubs:
Finishing the Magic Tree House Books

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Unpacking the Learning Targets (1 minute)


Direct students attention to the learning targets and cold call a few students to read them aloud:

* I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree House book using specific details (who/what/where).
* I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
* I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree
House book.

* I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
* I can identify, categorize, and record key details from the assigned chapter(s) that connect with the customs and
traditions of my country.
Point out that these learning targets are similar to those found in earlier lessons. Clarify as necessary and answer any
questions.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5


Independent Book Clubs:
Finishing the Magic Tree House Books

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Magic Tree House Book Clubs (35 minutes)


Have students assemble their materials in preparation for moving to their group meeting spots. They need:

Providing models of expected work


supports all learners, but especially
challenged learners.

Magic Tree House book


Book Discussion checklist
Capturing Key Details recording form
Pencil with an eraser
Send groups off to their meeting spots. Continue to reinforce routines as needed. Remind students that they may finish at
different times: they may reread within the chapter, do quiet fluency work, or they go back and look for words/phrases that
they were uncertain about to perhaps share with group members at a later point. Caution students not to move on in
advance of the group.
When all groups are settled, ask if there are any lingering questions. If there is a group that seems unclear or uncertain,
allow the other groups to begin their work and go directly to the group in need and help them to get started.
Tell groups they have 35 minutes to complete all of their work, which includes reading the chapter two times and completing
all parts of the Capturing Key Details recording form.
As groups are working, circulate and focus primarily on the process of this work. Jot down specific observations to share
with the group as a whole (both actions to praise and also cautions). As you circulate, offer praise, cautions, or redirection to
each group specifically, as needed, rather than interrupt the flow of the work by addressing the whole class.
If necessary and desired, call out the halfway point in the work session. At that point, groups should be well into the second
read (Parts C and D on the Capturing Key Details recording form). The second read and the work associated with it will
likely require a little more time than the first read work.
Since the final portion of Work Time A (the last half of Part C and all of Part D) is conversation-based, try to take note of
whether groups are in conversation for (approximately) the final 15 minutes of the 35-minute work time.
When there are 5 minutes left, make sure all groups are on Part D, discussing and recording a response to the focus
question. If any group(s) is still working on Part C, make a note of this but have the group(s) stop and move on to Part D.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

During this work time, you may


want to pull a group aside to
support them with the work. Some
students will need more guided
practice before they are ready for
independent work.
Consider the use of a literacy aide or
other adult who can circulate and
assist groups with the procedural
steps.
Consider preparing audio
recordings of the texts used within
the module.
Consider chunking the chapters for
struggling readers, or look for other
ways to tier the task.
Students who struggle to recognize,
categorize, and explain cultural
objects, places, and traditions found
within the text may need extra
support and additional
opportunities to practice using
similar material.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5


Independent Book Clubs:
Finishing the Magic Tree House Books

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Debriefing the Discussion (20 minutes)


Tell students to return to their desks.
Direct their attention to the Book Discussion checklist and ask them to fill in the information at the top.
Quickly review the three descriptors at the top. Read each criteria and direct students to self-assess by placing an X or a
checkmark in the column that best matches their own discussion work today.
Students should then self-reflect to complete the two questions below the chart:

* What is a goal for yourself the next time you have a discussion?
* What is a goal for your group the next time you have a discussion?
Encourage students to truly be self-reflective and establish a concrete and appropriate goal for themselves and their group.
Have each student gather his/her four Book Discussion checklists together (from Lessons 24 as well as today).
Acknowledge students hard work and progress with being able to have robust, interesting conversations about reading.
Explain that they will look over their four checklists starting with the first one, going in order through to the one just
completed. The idea is for them to try to see evidence of growth or change in their discussion skills and habits.
Distribute the My Growth with Book Discussions recording form and display a copy via a document camera.
Ask students to read over the My Growth with Book Discussions recording form. If necessary, read through the questions
with them.
Ask them to complete the recording form, using the Book Discussion checklists as the basis for their responses.
Invite students to move to sit with their fluency partner from Lessons 2 and 4.
Ask partners to take turns sharing one area they feel has improved and one area they would still like to work on.
Circulate to listen in as students share.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5


Independent Book Clubs:
Finishing the Magic Tree House Books

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Revisiting the Learning Targets (4 minutes)


Redirect students attention to the learning targets.
Reread each target aloud. Pause after each to ask students to use Fist to Five as a means to show their perceived level of
success with each target.

* I can retell the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree House book using specific details (who/what/where).
* I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
* I can use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases in the assigned chapter(s) of my Magic Tree
House book.

* I can effectively participate in a discussion with my peers about my Magic Tree House book.
* I can identify, categorize, and record key details from the assigned chapter that connect with the customs and traditions
of my country.
Distribute Homework and preview as needed.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Read the assigned chapter of your Magic Tree House book at home and complete the shortened version of the recording
form. Be sure to bring your book back to the next class. This is the final chapter in your Magic Tree House book.

Other accommodations will need to


be made for students who do not
have the home support to complete
the homework assignment.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 7

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 5

Supporting Materials
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 9
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapter(s) and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter(s).
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the
chapter(s) using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.


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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 9

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 9
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 9, p. 89
But now that he knew
their friend Mamoon
was the mighty caliph,
he felt shy.

Ch. 9, p. 89
The caliph escorted
Jack and Annie through
the front door and
down a wide hallway.

Ch. 9, p. 90
The man was writing
furiously.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 9
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 9


Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 9
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapter(s) and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter(s).
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the
chapter(s) using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

House of Wisdom

Jack

Mamoon thanks Jack and


Annie for bringing the book
back.

Annie
Mamoon
great mathematicians
and scientists

He takes them to his House of


Wisdom.
He leads them to the library,
where great thinkers are
working.

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 9
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 9, p. 89
But now that he knew
their friend Mamoon
was the mighty caliph,
he felt shy.

powerful

I can tell its an adjective


describing a caliph, who is a
ruler, like a king. So the word
might mean famous or
powerful or strong,
because they are good words
to describe a ruler.

Ch. 9, p. 89
I think it means walked with
or took them.
The caliph escorted
Jack and Annie through
the front door and
down a wide hallway.

Ch. 9, p. 90
The man was writing
furiously.

I think it means quickly, like


hes nervous or really frantic.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

I can tell its a verb, and the


sentence makes me think that
Jack and Annie are going with
the caliph.

I dont think it means mad or


furious that way. The caliph
says the man is hunched over a
pile of papers, so I think hes
really busy.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Season of the Sandstorms, Chapter 9
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Carriage perched on camels with long poles attached to saddles (how the
caliph traveled in Baghdad)

p. 88

House of Wisdomrespect for knowledge

p. 90

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.


Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs or traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In this chapter, I learned that the caliph in Baghdad loves to share learning. He built a
House of Wisdom so that learning could be shared throughout the world. This tells me
that the culture in this country is one that loves to read and tell stories and learn.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 8
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapter(s) and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter(s).
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the
chapter(s) using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.


Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 8
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 8, p. 89
Venice was veiled in a
soft, pink light.

Ch. 8, p. 90
In an instant, his
shaggy mane, golden
back, powerful legs,
tufted tail, and
feathered wings all
turned to carved gray
stone.
Ch. 8, p. 93
Cobblers were sitting
at their workbenches
and cats were
stretching in the chilly
sunlight.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 8
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.


Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 8
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapter(s) and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter(s).
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the
chapter(s) using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapter?
Where does this chapter
take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

St. Marks Square,


Venice, Italy

Jack

Jack and Annie fly back to St.


Marks Square on the back of
the winged lion.

Annie

Venice is safe now, and Jack


and Annie prepare to leave.
They find Teddy and Kathleens
book of rhymes.
They see Lorenzo Tiepolo, who
gives them a painting.
They leave Venice in a gondola
(with a disguised Teddy and
Kathleen)

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 8
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.

Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 8, p. 89
Venice was veiled in a
soft, pink light.

covered

I can tell its a word to help me


imagine what Venice looks like
at night. A veil is something
that covers up something.

Ch. 8, p. 90
In an instant, his
shaggy mane, golden
back, powerful legs,
tufted tail, and
feathered wings all
turned to carved gray
stone.

I think it means fluffy.

Its a word describing the tail.

Ch. 8, p. 93
Cobblers were sitting
at their workbenches
and cats were
stretching in the chilly
sunlight.

workers

I know cobblers are people


who are doing work.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


Carnival at Candlelight, Chapter 8
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.

Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find
in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Venicetowers, domes, church spires

p. 89

pigeons

p. 92

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.


Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs and traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?
In this chapter, I learned that St. Marks Square is always very busy and it is traditional
for people to gather there regularly for various reasons.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 21

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapters 10 and 11
Name:
Date:
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapter(s) and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapter(s).
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the
chapter(s) using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapters?
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

10

11

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B


Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 22

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapters 10 and 11
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.
Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 10, p. 88
The elephants fuzzy hair felt
coarse and tickly.

Ch. 10, p. 90
Then she turned and
lumbered off with her baby at
her heels.
Ch. 11, p. 95
They walked up to the
looming gateway.

Ch. 11, p. 98
They are rich and stirring.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 23

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapters 10 and 11
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this
chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 24

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapters 10 and 11
Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs or traditions help you
understand the culture of your country?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 25

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapters 10 and 11
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Read, Think, Write, Talk
Part A Directions:
1. Read the chapters and, as you read, pay close attention to the key words/phrases listed on your
recording form.
2. Take notes in Part A about the where/who/what of the chapters.
3. After reading, discuss your notes with your group. Then have one person orally retell the
chapters using these details, followed by quick feedback from the group.
Part A: Retelling the story what are the important parts of the chapters?
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

What are the most important events in


this chapter?

10

in the forest

Jack

Morning Breeze carries Jack


and Annie to safety and stops in
the forest.

Annie
Morning Breeze
her baby
a guard

When they stop, her baby


elephant appears.
Jack and Annie know why she
ran away. They help her take off
all the decorations from the
parade.
They pet the baby and head for
the tree house.
They run back through the
forest to the dirt path.
At the dirt path, an imperial
guard stops them and tells
them they must come back to
the palace or go to prison.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 26

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapters 10 and 11
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
CH

Where does this


chapter take place?

Who are the important


characters in this chapter?

11

on a carriage ride Jack


with the guard
Annie
Taj Mahal
Great Mogul

What are the most important events in


this chapter?
The guard takes Jack and Annie
back to the Red Fort.
Instead of going in the fort, they
are brought to a huge gate. They
are told to go inside and wait.
They go inside and see a huge
dome that is shimmering. The
Great Mogul is there and meets
them.
He tells them he loved the story
and pictures. He loved the heart
in them. Now he will show them
his heart.
He explains that he once loved
his wife so much that when she
died, he built the Taj Mahal in
her honor.

Note to group: Complete all Part A work before moving to Part B

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 27

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapters 10 and 11
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Part B Directions:
Now work as a group to examine the words/phrases listed in Part B. Through discussion, decide
together what notes to record.
Part B: Key words and phrases what do the words mean? Focus on the underlined words/phrases.
Key word/phrase

What we think it means

What helped us understand it

Ch. 10, p. 88
The elephants fuzzy hair
felt coarse and tickly.

I think it might mean


rough like whiskers.

The words fuzzy and tickly


make me think the hair feels a
certain way, maybe like
whiskers. I imagined how it
would feel.

Ch. 10, p. 90
Then she turned and
lumbered off with her baby
at her heels.

walked heavily

turned and ___ off with her


baby at her heels

Ch. 11, p. 95
They walked up to the
looming gateway.

I think it might mean really


big.

Its a word describing or telling


about the gateway.

Ch. 11, p. 98
They are rich and
stirring.

I think it means moving like


touching, that he really
likes the picture.

I can tell its a compliment, a


good thing. The Great Mogul is
describing Annies picture, and
he really likes it a lot.

I think that it means to walk


heavily, because she is
walking in the forest with her
baby, but elephants are huge
creatures, so they dont walk
lightly.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

This gives me the image that


she is turning around and I can
imagine how big elephants are
when they walk around. The
babies are smaller and would
be little compared to the huge
mom walking.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 28

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Capturing Key Details Recording Form:


A Crazy Day for Cobras, Chapters 10 and 11
(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Second Read Directions:
1. Read the focus question as a group. Discuss what evidence you will be looking for.
How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of your country?
2. Reread the chapter(s) on your own, recording text evidence in Part C that supports the focus
question.
3. Share and discuss text evidence recorded in Part C with your group.
4. Revisit the focus question with your group. Have a robust discussion and record your response in
Part D.
Part C: Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this
chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Decorating elephant with bells and jewels

p. 87

Traveling in the jungle

pp. 9293

Open-air bazaar

pp. 9596

Note to group: Hold a discussion after the second read.


Part D: Focus question: How did recognizing customs or traditions help you understand the culture of
your country?
In Chapter 10, I learned that elephants are in the wild in India and have babies there.
But people also make straw carriages to ride in on top of elephants. I think that this is
telling me how important elephants are to the Indian culture.
In Chapter 11, I learned that the Great Mogul can show deep love. The Taj Mahal was
built in honor of his wife who died. It is a symbol for the country of great love.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 29

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

My Growth with Book Discussions Recording Form


Name:
Date:

Lay out your five Book Discussion checklists in order of completion. Spend a few minutes examining
them. Look for evidence of growth and changes in your ability to discuss your reading with your
peers.
1. What area or areas show the most improvement for you? What is your evidence?

2. What area was the most challenging for you? What is your evidence?

3. What area or areas do you feel you still need to work on? What is your evidence?

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 30

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

My Growth with Book Discussions Recording Form


4. Read the goal statements you made at the end of each lesson for you as an individual. Do you feel
you focused on these goals from one day to the next? Explain.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 31

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 10


Name:
Date:
Directions:
1.

Read Chapter 10.

2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3.

After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.

4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.

Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 32

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 10


Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 33

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Homework for Season of the Sandstorms: Chapter 10(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 10.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Baghdadplace for scholars and scientists

p. 98

oasis

p. 102

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 34

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 9


Name:
Date:
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 9.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.

Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 35

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 9


Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 36

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Homework for Carnival at Candlelight: Chapter 9


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 9.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.

Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.
(will vary by student)
Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Gondolas used to travel; gondoliers operate the gondolas

p. 99

Masked people at Carnival

p. 101

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 37

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 12


Name:
Date:
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 12.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing.
Write them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 38

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 12

Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

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Page
number(s)

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 39

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 5

Homework for A Crazy Day with Cobras: Chapter 12


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Directions:
1. Read Chapter 12.
2. As you read, pay close attention to words and phrases that you find challenging or confusing. Write
them in the box.
3. After you read the chapter, name the where/who/what of the chapter out loud to yourself or to
someone at home.
4. Record the customs and traditions related to the countrys culture in the chart.
5. Be prepared to share this work in class with your group.
Write down the words or phrases you found challenging or confusing and note the page
number.
(will vary by student)

Focusing on culture what evidence of customs or traditions did you find in this chapter?
Customs and Traditions: Evidence from the Text

Page
number(s)

Taj Mahal, precious stones in marble, emeralds

pp. 101
103

Veiled women, oxen, sheep

p. 105

Red Fort

p. 105

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L5 June 2014 40

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 6


Beginning the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert
Research Matrix, Part 1
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6


Beginning the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Expert Research Matrix, Part 1

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can answer questions using specific details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Target

Ongoing Assessment

I can record what I will share with others about my Magic Tree House book on my Mid-Unit 2
Assessment: Expert Research Matrix.

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix, Part 1

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6


Beginning the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Expert Research Matrix, Part 1

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

This lesson is the first part of the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, which centers on standards NYSP ELA CCSS
RL.3.1, RL.3.9, W.3.8, SL.3.1, and SL.3.3. Students work on this assessment across Lessons 6-8:
preview these lessons in advance in order to have a full sense of the arc of students work. This series of
lessons is loosely based on the Jigsaw protocol (see Appendix).

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (10 minutes)


2. Work Time
A. Modeling: Organizing Research in the : Expert
Research Matrix (10 minutes)
B. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1: Expert Research
Matrix (30 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Debrief: Becoming an Expert (10 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Choose a chapter in your Magic Tree House book to
practice reading for fluency in class tomorrow.
Practice reading it fluently at home.

During Lesson 6, students gather evidence from their notes on the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert
Research Matrix, Part 1 only. These notes will help students prepare to share what they have learned
with peers who read different Magic Tree House books. Lesson 6 serves both as an authentic
preparation for students upcoming discussion and an assessment of RL.3.1, RL.3.9, and W.3.8.
Lessons 7 and 8 serve as an assessment of speaking and listening skills as well as RL.3.9. In Lesson 7,
students will leave their Book Clubs and share in new triads, made up of one student who read each of
the Magic Tree House books. In these new triads, students discuss key details about the plot of their
Magic Tree House book, as well as what they have learned about their countrys culture. The
discussion will take the form of a Fishbowl (see Appendix). During the discussion, you will circulate
and use a checklist to assess students progress toward mastery of SL.3.1 and SL.3.3.
At the end of Lesson 8, students complete the Expert Research Matrix, Part 2, writing down key
learning from their triad discussions.
To prepare to share their knowledge with others, students will use their Capturing Key Details recording
forms from Lessons 15, as well as their Magic Tree House books, to complete the Mid-Unit 2
Assessment: Expert Research Matrix.
To save time in the lesson and streamline logistics, distribute the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert
Research Matrix to students before the start of the lesson. If students are using a two-pocket folder for
the unit materials, the recording form could be placed in their folders before the lesson.
In addition to spending time on their Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix, students spend a
significant amount of time unpacking the learning target and self-assessing. It is essential for students
to continually reflect and check in on their learning. This helps them to self-assess where they stand and
understand where they need to go, and it also helps you to formatively assess students progress.
Work Time A includes some teacher modeling; adapt to suit your style and the needs of your students.
Review Jigsaw protocol and Fishbowl discussion protocol (see Appendix).
Post: Learning targets.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6


Beginning the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Expert Research Matrix, Part 1

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

expert, jigsaw, matrix,

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix (one per student; see Teaching Notes. Students only complete Part 1 in
Lesson 6)
Document camera
Capturing Key Details recording forms from Lessons 15 (one set per student)
Magic Tree House books (one per student for their assigned Book Club group)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6


Beginning the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Expert Research Matrix, Part 1

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (10 minutes)


Begin by acknowledging students hard work on their Magic Tree House books. They have read closely and talked with peers
to retell the story and learn about the culture of various countries. Today, they have the opportunity to think about the
important details from their reading and complete the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix. In the next
lesson, they will share what they know with someone who has not read their book through a discussion.

Consider using visuals or images to


support students in understanding
what an expert is. This will be
particularly helpful for ELLs.

Direct students attention to the learning target and read it aloud:

* I can record what I will share with others about my Magic Tree House book on my Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert
Research Matrix.
Circle and discuss the word expert and add visuals as necessary to ensure that students understand the target. Remind
students that, as in Unit 1, a matrix is a tool to organize information.

When unpacking a learning target


and circling key words, use a
different color pen/marker. Write
synonyms above or below the
circled words to support students in
understanding the key words in the
learning target.

Inform students that they will also be participating in a Fishbowl discussion in the next lesson.
Ask:

* Who is the expert on each Magic Tree House book?


Allow students some independent think time. Cold call someone to share with the class. Students should discuss that they
are the experts because they have read the stories and discussed them.
Ask:

* Why will you share your expertise with people who have not read your book?
Allow students to talk with a partner. Cold call another student to share with the class. They should discuss that they will
share their expertise so that they can teach others about the book and about the country that their book was set in.
Guide students toward understanding that they have become experts on the Magic Tree House stories they have read and
discussed, and they have also become experts on that countrys past culture. Remind students that one of the big questions
of this module is how researchers share their knowledge. Since they are now experts on these books, they will share their
knowledge with others through a discussion in Lessons 7 and 8. They will also get the chance to learn from others and
compare the settings of the different Magic Tree House stories.
Ask students to show a Fist to Five about their clarity on what they are being asked to do and think about today based on the
learning target. Clarify as needed.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6


Beginning the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Expert Research Matrix, Part 1
Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Modeling: Organizing Research in the Expert Research Matrix (10 minutes)


Focus the class whole group.

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

Distribute the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix and display a copy using a document camera. Ask
students to read the form over.
Call on volunteers to share out what they noticed about the form. Students should notice that this recording form is different
from others because it has questions listed within the recording form.
Then, say something like: We discovered from our learning target that today you are going to prepare to share your
expertise about your Magic Tree House books with others who have not read the book. This form is designed to support you
in being able to have a discussion about your book. Today you will be thinking about and answering the questions to help
you decide what you will say to people who have not read your book.

Providing models of expected work


supports all learners, but especially
challenged learners.

During this time, students will work individually to look through their Capturing Key Details recording forms (from
Lessons 1-5) and record their individual responses to the questions for the discussions. This will give them an opportunity to
prepare for the discussion and will also serve as a written component of the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment.
Ask students to take out their Capturing Key Details recording forms from Lessons 15, Magic Tree House book, and
Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix.
Say something like: Before you share with your new group, you will have the opportunity to look back through your
Capturing Key Details recording forms and record your own evidence. I will show you first how I might do this.
Model for students having your recording forms from Lessons 15, your Magic Tree House book, and your Mid-Unit 2
Assessment: Research Matrix in front of you.
Think out loud about the process you will be going through. Say something like: Now that I have all my materials, I need to
know what I am looking for. I will read the first question, What was the title of your book and where does the story take
place? That is an easy one! I just have to look at the cover of my book to make sure I get it right.
Model recording the title on the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix recording form. Continue to think aloud
for students: I also have to find the setting. I know that the setting is [India], but I am not sure which page that was
originally on. I better look back at my recording forms. It was probably somewhere near the beginning of the book. If I cant
find it, I will look back in the actual book.
After finding the page number, model recording it on the recording form. Be sure to model for students that they are going
to be filling out Part 1 today. Part 2 will be completed during Lesson 8.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6


Beginning the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Expert Research Matrix, Part 1

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Have students turn to a neighbor and share what they saw and heard you doing. Cold call students to share.
Read through the remaining questions to clarify directions.
B. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1: Expert Research Matrix (30 minutes)
Release students to work on Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1: Expert Research Matrix independently for 30 minutes.
Students may need assistance in clarifying directions. Be sure that students answer the questions themselves independently,
as they are part of the assessment
Remind students to only complete Part 1. Part 2 will be completed during Lesson 8.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6


Beginning the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Expert Research Matrix, Part 1

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Debrief: Becoming the Expert (10 minutes)

Offer a cloze sentence to students


who may struggle with the debrief.
A sample cloze sentence could be: I
feel (excited, nervous, ready) to
share with others because (my
group helped me, I know my book
really well, I really enjoyed this book
and am excited to share).

Refocus students whole group.


Reread the learning target for the day as a class.
Ask students to show a Fist to Five for how they felt they did in accomplishing the target.
Remind students that the process they went through today was so that they could be prepared to share their expertise with
others in the next lesson.
Ask:

* How do you feel about sharing your knowledge of your Magic Tree House book with others?
Have students turn to a neighbor and share how they are feeling. Ask for a couple of volunteers to share with the whole
group.
Thank students for their hard work today and let them know that you are excited that they will have the opportunity to share
their expertise with others in the next lesson.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Choose a chapter in your Magic Tree House book to practice reading for fluency in the next class. Practice reading it fluently
at home.
Note: Decide whether to collect students Mid-Unit 2 Assessments, Part 1 at this point or whether to have students hold on to
their research matrixes. They will need their matrix again in Lessons 7 and 8.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 7

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 6


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix


Name:
Date:
Focus question for discussion:
How are our Magic Tree House books similar? How are they different?
Part 1
Directions:
1. Read the Question that will be asked to yourself.
2. Think about your response to the question. Look back at your recording forms or in the book for
evidence.
3. Record your response to the question and the page(s) where you found it in the text.
4. When you are finished, reread your response to make sure you have completely answered the
questions that will be asked during discussion tomorrow.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 9

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix


PART 1
Question that will be asked

Evidence from my notes I want to share

Page(s) in
text

1. What was the title of your


book?
2. When and where does the
story take place?
3. Who are the important
characters?
4. What are two key events in
the story?

EVENT 1

EVENT 2

CUSTOM or TRADITION

WHAT I LEARNED
ABOUT CULTURE

5. What are two interesting


customs or traditions that
you found in the story?
6. What did you learn about the
countrys culture from each?

7. Find one new word or phrase


in your book that you found
interesting. What does the
word or phrase mean in the
text?

WORD or PHRASE:

DEFINITION:

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 6

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix


PART 2 Please fill in this part during discussion during Lesson 8.
Question that will be asked

Evidence from my notes I want to share

8. What is one way all three


Magic Tree House books are
similar?

The books are similar because

Evidence/examples from the discussion to support my thinking:

9. What is one way all three


Magic Tree House books are
different?

The books are different because

Evidence/examples from the discussion to support my thinking:

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L6 June 2014 11

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 7


Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued: Fishbowl
Discussion of Magic Tree House books
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued:
Fishbowl Discussion of Magic Tree House books

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can read third grade level texts accurately and fluently to make meaning. (RF.3.4)
I can answer questions using specific details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can compare and contrast stories by the same author. (RL.3.9).
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about third-grade topics and texts. (SL.3.1)
I can express my own ideas clearly during discussions. (SL.3.1)
I can build on others ideas during discussions. (SL.3.1)
I can ask questions when I am confused about what a speaker is saying. (SL.3.3)
I can answer questions to show what I know when listening to a speaker. (SL.3.3)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can answer questions about my Magic Tree House book using specific details from the text.
I can effectively engage in a conversation with my peers about our Magic Tree House books.

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix (begun


in Lesson 6)

I can compare and contrast stories in the Magic Tree House series.

Teacher Assessment Checklist for Discussion

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L7 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued:
Fishbowl Discussion of Magic Tree House books

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

In Lesson 6, students began their Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, completing Part 1 of the Expert Research
Matrix. In Lesson 7, students begin the second part of the assessment, starting their Fishbowl
discussion with their new triads. In Lesson 8, students will have time to complete their discussions and
also complete the Expert Research Matrix, Part 2. Preview Lessons 7-8 in advance to have a clear sense
of the arc of students work.

A. Engaging the Reader: Fluency Partners (10 minutes)


B. Unpacking the Learning Targets (5 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Fishbowl Model in Preparation for Discussion (10
minutes)

During the discussion in Lessons 7 and 8, circulate to assess students discussion skills, using the
checklist aligned to SL.3.1 and SL.3.3.

B. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion of Our


Magic Tree House Books (30 minutes)

To help students succeed with the Fishbowl discussion, model the discussion setup and process with
one of the established Book Clubs during Work Time A. Identify this group ahead of time and brief them
on their tasks: Let them know they will use Question 1 on the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research
Matrix for their model conversation. The group will need to practice the following:

3. Closing and Assessment


A. Turn and Talk (5 minutes)
4. Homework
A. 2-1 Homework: Tell someone at home 2 new facts
you learned about other Magic Tree House books
from your discussion and 1 book discussion skill you
are getting really good at.

Have one student volunteer act as facilitator for this discussion. This student will get the process
started.
Read the question aloud.
Each member of the group takes a turn sharing evidence and what page it is on
After everyone has shared, the student facilitator asks if there are any questions for anyone in the
group. If there are questions, the student asked must respond.
If there are no questions or clarifications needed, the facilitator asks the group to give a thumbs-up if
theyre ready to move on to the next question.
The facilitator chooses a new person to start.
The group then moves on to the next question.
To streamline logistics, distribute the Book Discussion checklist to students before the lesson start.
In advance:
Create strategic groups of three for the Fishbowl discussions. Each triad should have one
representative from each Magic Tree House book. Consider posting these groups on chart paper or
displaying them on the document camera to aid in quick transitions. If you have an uneven number of
students, form some groups of four, doubling up with two students who read the same text.
Post learning targets, Procedure for Mid-Unit 2 Assessment Discussion anchor chart.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L7 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued:
Fishbowl Discussion of Magic Tree House books

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Fishbowl, facilitator

Fluent Reader Criteria anchor chart (begun in Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 8


Magic Tree House books (one per student for their assigned Book Club group)
Procedure for Mid-Unit 2 Assessment Discussion anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix (from Lesson 6)
Book Discussion checklist (from Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)
Assessment Checklist for Discussion (for teacher reference)

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Fluency Partners (10 minutes)


Celebrate the strong work students have been doing in their Book Clubs. Remind them that today is the day they will share
their expertise with others. Say something like:

For students who need extra


support with fluency, allow them
time to practice whisper-reading to
themselves or using assistive
technology.

* Today, you will share your expertise with some of your peers not in your Book Clubs. To introduce our books to others in
the group, we will begin by reading a short passage. This will also help us to practice reading fluently.
Remind students of their fluency practice in Lessons 2 and 4. Let them know they will not be working with their fluency
partners, but rather with new Book Club members.
Inform students of the new triads they will work with today. Have them meet with their new triads in a circle in the room.
Direct students attention to the Fluent Reader Criteria anchor chart. Quickly review each of the criteria. Explain and
expand as necessary.
Ask students to take out their Magic Tree House books and search for a couple of paragraphs from the section they
practiced reading fluently for homework.
Tell students to spend 2 minutes softly reading aloud the passage they selected to themselves, focusing on aspects of good
oral reading fluency. They can refer to the anchor chart as often as necessary.
Students should take turns sharing their selected paragraphs with their new Book Clubs by reading aloud.
After a member of the group reads, each student should give verbal feedback using the star and step framework. Consider
using sentence frames: I like how you_______ and I think you would be more fluent if you_______.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L7 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued:
Fishbowl Discussion of Magic Tree House books

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Unpacking the Learning Targets (5 minutes)


Ask students to gather in a circle in the middle of the classroom.

When unpacking the learning


targets, consider using visuals to
support the meaning of key words in
the target.

Invite them to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

* Turn to your partner and tell him/her what work you did yesterday with your collection of Capturing Key Details
recording forms and the Magic Tree House Expert Jigsaw Research Matrix recording form. Talk to him/her about how
you were becoming an expert that can share your knowledge of the story and the culture of the country with others.
Cold call pairs to share what their partner told them.
Direct students attention to the learning targets and read them aloud:

* I can answer questions about my Magic Tree House book using specific details from the text.
* I can effectively engage in a conversation with my peers about our Magic Tree House books.
* I can compare and contrast stories in the Magic Tree House series.
Clarify the targets as needed.
Ask for volunteers to restate the learning targets in their own words.
Tell students that today they will complete Part 1 of the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Book Discussions of Our Magic Tree House
Books today, and tomorrow they will complete Part 2.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L7 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued:
Fishbowl Discussion of Magic Tree House books

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Fishbowl Model in Preparation for Discussion (10 minutes)

Allowing students to see a model of


the discussion from their own peers
lets them see how it can be done.
Students may feel more capable if
they see the model from their peers.

Students should still be gathered in the middle of the classroom in a circle.


Say something like:

* Now that you have organized your research, it is time to have a discussion with your Book Club. This discussion will give
you the opportunity to share with others the knowledge you gained from your Magic Tree House book. You will also get to
learn about the other Magic Tree House books that your classmates have been reading and discussing. I have asked one
Book Club to help me show you how this will look. This group is going to come sit in the center of what we call the
fishbowl.
Consider giving students a brief explanation as to why it is called a Fishbowl discussion:

When students are being asked to


talk with a neighbor, consider
pairing ELLs with a peer who
speaks their native language so they
can discuss in their native language.

* It is because, just like when we look at fish inside a bowl or aquarium, we can watch everything students are doing, but
we cant interrupt them. When students are in the center, we can watch and hear what they are doing, but we don't
interrupt. We watch and learn.
Display the Procedure for Mid-Unit 2 Assessment Discussion anchor chart and read each point aloud. Clarify as
necessary.
Have the model group sit in the center with their Magic Tree House books and Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert
Research Matrix.
Tell the class:

* I want you to watch and listen as this group has a conversation about their book. Notice how they use their Mid-Unit 2
Assessment: Expert Research Matrix to guide their conversations. I am going to display the research matrix for you so
that you can follow along with what the group is saying.
Ask if there are any clarifying questions. Prompt the group to begin. Set a time limit of 3 minutes for their model. See
Teaching Notes for how the group conversation should be organized.
After the group has finished, direct the rest of the class to turn to a neighbor and share what they saw and heard. Circulate
around to listen in on what students saw and heard.
Cold call a couple of students to share with the class. Ask whether there are any clarifying questions on how the conversation
will go or how to use the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix during the discussion.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L7 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 7


Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued:
Fishbowl Discussion of Magic Tree House books
Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion of Our Magic Tree House Books (30 minutes)

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

Assign groups for the discussions.


Ask students to take their Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Research Matrix and join their new group.
Once students are settled, display the Book Discussion checklist. Remind students that just like in other book clubs,
they will be responsible for tracking progress with discussion skills using this checklist.
Have students begin their discussions.
During the discussions, circulate and use the Assessment Checklist for Discussion to observe students and assess
standards SL.3.1 and SL.3.2. This lesson and the next have time allotted for students to engage in the discussions. This will
allow for them to participate in high-quality discussions and for teachers to be able to observe all groups.
If students do not complete the discussion in 30 minutes, reassure them that they will continue tomorrow. Monitor the pace
of discussions to support stopping them in an appropriate spot.

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Turn and Talk (5 minutes)


Refocus students whole group. Ask them to return to sitting in the circle in the middle of the room.

Consider using sentence starters for


ELLs to support them in talking
with their partner.

Recognize students for their hard work in preparing for the discussions and for sharing their expertise with each other.
Ask them to turn and talk:

* Tell your partner what has been going well so far in your discussion and something that you want to improve for
tomorrow.
Cold call a few pairs to share out. Remind students that this discussion will continue tomorrow and you will, again, be
listening in to conversations.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

2-1 Homework: Tell someone at home 2 new facts you learned about other Magic Tree House books from your discussion
and 1 book discussion skill you are getting really good at.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L7 June 2014 6

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 7


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 7

Procedure for Mid-Unit 2 Assessment Discussion


1. Choose someone in your group to start. You could ask for a volunteer or rock/paper/scissors for
who will go first.
2. The first person will begin by reading the question aloud.
3. After reading the question, the first person will respond with the evidence he or she wrote on the
Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix.
4. This person is then responsible for calling on another member to respond.
5. The person chosen cannot pass but must respond with the evidence he/she recorded on his/her
research matrix.
6. After sharing the evidence that he/she recorded, a new person is chosen to share and the pattern
continues.
7. A student cannot be called on a second time until everyone has had a turn.
8. After the first round, group members can ask clarifying questions of other members. To ask a
question, a group member should say: (Name), I have a question for you about what you said.
9. Whomever the question was directed to needs to answer the question.
10. For a second round, students continue the process, but with a new discussion question.
11. Make sure to refer to the page numbers in your book to support your ideas and help listeners stay
engaged.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L7 June 2014 8

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 7

Assessment Checklist for Discussion


(For Teacher Reference)
Teaching Directions:
This checklist is used to assess SL.3.1ad and SL.3.3. To use this checklist, record student names in
the column headings. Observe each group for about 5 minutes. During that time, circle behaviors
either observed or not observed for each student. This checklist can be used as an assessment tool
and as a tool during individual conferences with students after the discussion.
Group A

Student A

Student B

Student C

Observed
Come to discussions
prepared, having read or
Not yet
studied required
observed
material; explicitly draw
on that preparation and
other information known
about the topic to explore
ideas under discussion.

Observed

Observed

Not yet
observed

Not yet
observed

Observed

Observed

Not yet
observed

Not yet
observed

Notes:

(SL3.1a)
Follow agreed-upon rules Observed
for discussions (e.g.,
Not yet
gaining the floor in
observed
respectful ways, listening
to others with care,
speaking one at a time
about the topics and texts
under discussion).
(SL3.1b)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L7 June 2014 9

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 7

Assessment Checklist for Discussion


(For Teacher Reference)
Group A

Student A

Student B

Student C

Ask questions to check


understanding of
information presented,
stay on topic, and link
their comments to the
remarks of others.

Observed

Observed

Observed

Not yet
observed

Not yet
observed

Not yet
observed

Observed

Observed

Observed

Not yet
observed

Not yet
observed

Not yet
observed

Observed

Observed

Observed

Not yet
observed

Not yet
observed

Not yet
observed

Notes:

(SL3.1c)
Explain their own ideas
and understanding in
light of the discussion.
(SL3.1d)
Ask and answer
questions about
information from a
speaker, offering
appropriate elaboration
and detail.
(SL.3.3)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L7 June 2014 10

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 8


Completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Continuing Fishbowl Discussion and Completing
Expert Research Matrix, Part 2
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 8


Completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Continuing Fishbowl Discussion and Completing
Expert Research Matrix, Part 2

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can read third grade level texts accurately and fluently to make meaning. (RF.3.4)
I can answer questions using specific details from literary text. (RL.3.1)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)
I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about third-grade topics and texts. (SL.3.1)
I can express my own ideas clearly during discussions. (SL.3.1)
I can build on others ideas during discussions. (SL.3.1)
I can ask questions when I am confused about what a speaker is saying. (SL.3.3)
I can answer questions to show what I know when listening to a speaker. (SL.3.3)
I can compare and contrast stories by the same author. (RL.3.9)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can answer questions about my Magic Tree House book using specific details from the text.
I can effectively engage in a conversation with my peers about our Magic Tree House books.

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix (begun


in Lesson 6)

I can compare and contrast stories in the Magic Tree House series.

Assessment Checklist for Discussion (begun in Lesson 7)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L8 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 8


Completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Continuing Fishbowl Discussion and Completing
Expert Research Matrix, Part 2

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

In this lesson, students complete their Mid-Unit 2 Assessment. They finish their discussion with their
new triads (begun in Lesson 7). They then return to their Expert Research Matrix to fill in Part 2, in
which they write down what they learned from comparing and contrasting their Magic Tree House
books

A. Unpacking the Learning Targets (5 minutes)


2. Work Time
A. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued: Completing
Fishbowl Discussion of Our Magic Tree House
Books (20 minutes)

Work Time is broken up into three purposeful sections.


Work Time A provides students with time to wrap up unfinished discussions.

B. Model for Completing the Expert Research Matrix (5


minutes)

Work Time B gives the teacher time to model how students will complete Part 2 of the assessment,
and it serves as a clear transition period between group work to independent work.

C. Completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Part 2 of the


Expert Research Matrix (20 minutes)

In Work Time C, students will complete Part 2 of the Expert Research Matrix independently.

3. Closing and Assessment


A. Debrief (10 minutes)
4. Homework
A. Tell someone at home one similarity and one
difference between your Magic Tree House book
and another one of the Magic Tree House books.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

As students finish their discussions during Work Time A, teachers circulate and use the Teacher
Assessment Checklist for Discussion to assess any students they did not get to in Lesson 7.
Collect students Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix at the conclusion of this lesson. Use
the Teacher Assessment Checklist for Magic Tree House Expert Jigsaw Research Matrix to collect
assessment data on students progress toward mastery of standards RL.3.1, RL.3.9, and W.3.8.
Post: learning targets.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L8 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 8


Completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Continuing Fishbowl Discussion and Completing
Expert Research Matrix, Part 2

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials
Magic Tree House books (one per student for their assigned Book Club group)
Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix (from Lesson 6; students own, plus one for display)
Document camera
Book Discussion checklist (from Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)
Procedure for Mid-Unit 2 Assessment Discussion anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
Assessment Checklist for Discussion (from Lesson 7; for teacher reference)
Assessment Checklist for Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix (for teacher reference)

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L8 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 8


Completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Continuing Fishbowl Discussion and Completing
Expert Research Matrix, Part 2

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Unpacking the Learning Targets (5 minutes)


Ask students to gather in a circle in the middle of the room. Remind them that in the previous lesson, they started their
discussions to share about their Magic Tree House books and today, they will finish that discussion.

When unpacking the learning


targets, consider using visuals to
support the meaning of key words in
the target.

Ask them to turn and talk:

* Turn to your neighbor and tell him/her what work you did yesterday with your new Book Club and where your
discussion stopped.
Direct students attention to the learning targets and read them aloud:

* I can answer questions about my Magic Tree House book using specific details from the text.
* I can effectively engage in a conversation with my peers about our Magic Tree House books.
* I can compare and contrast stories in the Magic Tree House series.
Focus on the final learning target. Say something like:

* Lets focus on the last learning target. This was one you did not get to yesterday. Lets focus on two key words: compare
and contrast. Who can tell me what those words mean?
Call on a volunteer to share what the terms compare and contrast mean. Students should say that they mean to find things
that are the same and things that are different.
Let students know that today they will compare and contrast the different Magic Tree House books. Say something like:
Today, you will complete your discussions from the last lesson. Then, you will complete Part 2 of the Mid-Unit 2
Assessment. In this part of the assessment, you will discuss how your books are the same and different. As in the previous
lesson, you will record this information on the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix. I will show you a model a
little later on for how to complete this.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L8 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 8


Completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Continuing Fishbowl Discussion and Completing
Expert Research Matrix, Part 2

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, continued: Completing Fishbowl Discussion of Our Magic Tree House Books (20
minutes)
Ask students to take their Magic Tree House books, Magic Tree House Expert Jigsaw Research Matrix, and
Magic Tree House Book Discussion checklist and join their groups from the previous lesson.

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display the
document for students who struggle
with auditory processing.

Display the Magic Tree House Book Discussion checklist via a document camera. Remind students that just like in other
book clubs, they will be responsible for tracking progress with discussion skills using this checklist.
Tell students they have the next 20 minutes to complete the discussions they started yesterday. Encourage them to refer to
the Procedure for Mid-Unit 2 Assessment Discussion anchor chart for guidance during their discussions.
Ask students to begin.
Circulate and use the Assessment Checklist for Discussion to observe students and assess standards SL.3.1 and SL.3.2.

If students complete discussion


before the end of the work time,
encourage them to recheck their
notes from the discussion before
moving on to the next part.

B. Model for Completing the Expert Research Matrix (5 minutes)


Refocus students whole group. Tell students they will now move on to completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, and this part
will be done independently.
Using a document camera, display the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix, Part 2. Say something
like: I want to show you quickly how I would take notes on Part 2 of your mid-unit assessment. This part of the recording
form is where you will be showing me how you can compare and contrast your Magic Tree House book to the other Magic
Tree House books.
Do a quick think-aloud for students about how you would fill out this part of the recording form. Since you are modeling for
an assessment, it is important that you do not use actual information from the texts. Emphasize to students that you are
going to show how to think through Part 2 but that you will be creating fictitious information so that they can use their
own thinking during the assessment.
Model filling in the information on the Mid-unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix (Part 2)
Clarify questions as needed.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L8 June 2014

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 8


Completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment:
Continuing Fishbowl Discussion and Completing
Expert Research Matrix, Part 2

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

C. Completing the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Part 2 of the Expert Research Matrix (20 minutes)
Allow students 20 minutes to independently record responses to Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix, Part 2.
Remind them that you will be collecting these as an assessment piece.
During the work time, circulate to support students. If students complete the assessment before others, encourage them to
reread all of their work and revise it if necessary.

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Debrief (10 minutes)


Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* Was it easy or challenging to share your book with others? Why?


* Was it easy or challenging to compare and contrast your Magic Tree House books with others? Why?
Ask for volunteers to share out.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Tell someone at home one similarity and one difference between your Magic Tree House book and another one of the Magic
Tree House books.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L8 June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 8


Supporting Materials
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GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 8

Assessment Checklist for Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Expert Research Matrix


(For Teacher Reference)
Student A

Student B

Student C

I can answer
questions using
specific details
from literary
text. (RL.3.1)
Matrix Sections 16

I can document
what I learn
about a topic
by taking notes.
(W.3.8)
Matrix Sections 19

I can compare
and contrast
stories by the
same author.
(RL.3.9)
Matrix Sections 89

Key
S= Secure
D= Developing

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L8 June 2014

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 9


Close Reading: Launching the Exploring Countries
Books, Part 1
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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9


Close Reading:
Launching the Exploring Countries Books, Part 1

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)


I can answer questions to deepen my understanding of informational text. (RI.3.1)
I can use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently. (RI.3.5)
I can use information from the words to understand informational text. (RI.3.7)
I can use information from the illustrations (maps, photographs) to understand informational texts. (RI.3.7)
I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.3.8)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

I can learn about my country by doing close reading, with teacher guidance, on my Exploring Countries
text.

Text-Dependent Questions (Italy Research Group only)


Text Feature Scavenger Hunt recording form

I can accurately record information I find about my country.

Fact Hunt/Flag Activity recording form

I can use text features to efficiently find information in my Exploring Countries text.
I can use text features to learn new information about my country.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 1

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9


Close Reading:
Launching the Exploring Countries Books, Part 1

Agenda

Teaching Notes

1. Opening

In this lesson, students transition back to reading informational text. The informational texts, which
partner with the Magic Tree House texts, are as follows:

A. Engaging the Reader and Unpacking the Learning


Targets (5 minutes)
2. Work Time
A. Getting Ready for Work Tasks (7 minutes)
B. Work Time (40 minutes)
3. Closing and Assessment
A. Praise and Probe (6 minutes)
B. Review Word Tracker Routine (2 minutes)
4. Homework
A. A. Word Tracker homework.

Iraq Book Club groups: Seasons of the Sandstorm Exploring Countries: Iraq
Italy Book Club groups: Carnival at Candlelight Exploring Countries: Italy
India Book Club groups: A Crazy Day with Cobras Exploring Countries: India
In this lesson, students are given their informational texts.
Starting with this lesson, each country group will cycle through a series of activities by the end of Lesson
11. The activities include an independent read of pages 411 in their Exploring Countries text, a text
feature scavenger hunt with the group or a reading partner, a fact hunt/flag activity, and a guided close
reading with the teacher.
In this lesson, the Italy group completes a series of text-dependent questions with teacher guidance and
support during Work Time while the Iraq and India groups focus on the Text Feature Scavenger Hunt
recording form and Fact Hunt/Flag Activity recording form. The Iraq and India groups are expected to
work independently while completing these forms. Tailor this expectation to your students needs and
capabilities. Alter the lesson demands as necessary.
If students finish their work early, have another task in place for them to complete. One suggestion is for
them to read their independent reading books.
Use the Closing and Assessment to get an accurate understanding of how well students worked during
Work Time. Use this time to address any concerns as necessary and to use students self-assessments as
formative assessments. This will help inform how Work Time is implemented in Lessons 10 and 11.
In the homework for this lesson, students engage with selected vocabulary from the portions of text read
using the Word Tracker routine. Students have some familiarity with the Word Tracker routine and
recording form from Unit 1. The purpose of the vocabulary work in this lesson is to support students in
carefully attending to words. They need not memorize the words, but they do need to build strategies to
help them find the meaning of unknown words. These include knowing how to use a glossary or
dictionary.
Continue to use a simple organization system for students to keep track of all materials e.g. two-pocket
folder). Students will need all of their Unit 2 materials again in Unit 3.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 2

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9


Close Reading:
Launching the Exploring Countries Books, Part 1
Teaching Notes (continued)
In advance:
Review the Close Reading Guide: Exploring Countries: Italy (for teacher reference).
Create and post the Structural Features of Informational Text (Exploring Countries) anchor chart
and Lessons 9, 10, and 11 Work Time Tasks anchor chart.
Post: Learning targets.

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

text feature, culture, glossary, index,


caption, table of contents, definition,
close reading

Exploring Countries: Japan (one per student in that assigned group)


Exploring Countries: Italy (one per student in that assigned group)
Exploring Countries: India (one per student in that assigned group)
Structural Features of Informational Text (Exploring Countries) anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting
materials)
Text Feature Scavenger Hunt recording form (one per student)
Lessons 9, 10, and 11 Work Time Tasks anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
Fact Hunt/Flag Activity recording form (one per student)
Text-dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy (one per student studying Italy)
Close Reading Guide: Exploring Countries: Italy (for teacher reference)
Equity sticks
Word Tracker homework, Lesson 9 (one per student)
Word Tracker homework, Lesson 9 (answers, for teacher reference)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 3

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9


Close Reading:
Launching the Exploring Countries Books, Part 1

Opening

Meeting Students Needs

A. Engaging the Reader and Unpacking the Learning Targets (5 minutes)


Note: See Work Time Tasks chart (in supporting materials) for which groups work on text-dependent questions in this
lesson.

The unpacking of the learning


targets is a crucial early step in
every lesson. Targets help the
students see where theyre going,
what they will be doing and
learning. Its important that you
help your students understand that
in this part of the lesson, they must
work hard to understand the
learning targets. Make sure they feel
comfortable enough to speak up to
ask for clarification if its needed.

Gather students together. Tell them its once again time to think about digging in to some research.

* Remind students of this modules performance task (first mentioned in Unit 1, Lesson 6). Start by saying something like:
The performance task is always the creation of a special product of some sort. In Module 1, you created the Accessing
Books around the World bookmark. In your Magic Tree House Book Club, you have learned about cultures in Italy, Iraq,
or India from a time period in the past. As you know, author Mary Pope Osborne always sends Jack and Annie back in
time to places and countries that existed long ago. Her Magic Tree House stories are set in the past.
Continue by saying something like:

* You will continue to work with your group, but for the next several lessons, you will be working with informational texts
to research a country and its culture in the present day. You will read informational texts, take notes, and have discussions
with your research group. After you conduct your research and learn about the countrys culture, you will write a letter to
Mary Pope Osborne! The purpose of your letter will be to ask her to consider sending Jack and Annie back to a country
she has written about before, but in the present day. Your letter will need to be full of facts and details. You will need to
give specific information about the culture of your country that Ms. Osborne could use in a present-day story.
Explain that to do this, the students will first have to do some research.
Direct their attention to the learning targets and read the first two aloud:

* I can learn about my country by doing close reading, with teacher guidance, on my Exploring Countries text.
* I can accurately record information I find about my country.
Deconstruct the first learning target by underlining the phrases close reading and guidance. Students should be familiar
with the term close reading, but help them understand that when you will be guiding them through the work, helping with
the reading and gathering of details in a structured and purposeful way.
Tell students that across the next few lessons, each Book Club will take notes about text-dependent questions with your
guidance.
Redirect their attention back to the learning targets and read the next two aloud:

* I can use text features to efficiently find information in my Exploring Countries text.
* I can use text features to learn new information about my country.
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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 4

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9


Close Reading:
Launching the Exploring Countries Books, Part 1

Opening (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

Highlight the words text features in the targets. Remind students that text features are the parts of a book that stand out
from the rest of the text.
Ask them to name some examples of text features.
Cold call on a few students to share out. Confirm accurate responses and correct any misconceptions.
Tell students they need to think about how to use text features to find information efficiently, or quickly. Remind them that
good researchers are also good readers and that reading informational text is very different from reading literary text.
Say something like:

* Readers of informational text need to learn how to navigate the text and learn how to use the text features. One way you
are going to become stronger readers of informational text is by learning to use and read the text features in informational
books.
Underline the word efficiently in the first target and ask a volunteer to define this word.
Make sure students understand that it means being quick but accurate. Help students understand that they will use
resources and text features to find information in their new text.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 5

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9


Close Reading:
Launching the Exploring Countries Books, Part 1

Work Time

Meeting Students Needs

A. Getting Ready for Work Tasks (7 minutes)

When reviewing graphic organizers


or recording forms, consider using a
document camera to display them
for students who struggle with
auditory processing.

Ask students to move to their designated Book Club meeting spots.


Distribute the Exploring Countries informational texts to the appropriate Book Clubs.
Remind students of their work with Exploring Countries: Japan. Allow them 1 minute to page through their books. Direct
students to look at the table of contents of their books.
Display the Structural Features of Informational Text (Exploring Countries) anchor chart. Read through the
anchor chart together. Ask for volunteers to give a brief description of these standard nonfiction text features: table of
contents, index, glossary, and caption.
Distribute the Text Feature Scavenger Hunt recording form. Tell students that they will be using their Exploring
Countries informational texts to find and learn information efficiently using text features.
Display the Lessons 9, 10, and 11 Work Time Tasks anchor chart.
Explain that the work for these lessons will require students to carefully attend to four specific tasks:
1. Independently read pages 411 of their Exploring Countries text.
2. Complete the Text Feature Scavenger Hunt with a reading partner or their group.
3. Participate in a guided close reading of pages 411 of their Exploring Countries text led by the teacher.
4. Complete the Fact Hunt/Flag Activity.

Using total participation techniques,


such as cold call or equity sticks,
encourages a wider range of voices
in whole-class shares.
Use thoughtful pairings of students
for protocols such as Think-PairShare. ELL language acquisition is
facilitated by interacting with native
speakers of English who provide
models of language.
Providing models of expected work
supports all learners, but especially
challenged learners.

Help each group understand the flow of their work based on the anchor chart. Explain that you will need to do the close
reading work with each group without interruptions from the other groups. Ask students a few procedural questions to see if
they all understand how things will work in these lessons. Allow for any additional questions.
Distribute the Fact Hunt/Flag Activity recording form. Allow students a few moments to orient to this form. Ask them
to imagine doing the work of this activity in a quiet and independent way.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 6

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9


Close Reading:
Launching the Exploring Countries Books, Part 1

Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students Needs

B. Work Time (40 minutes)

During this work time, you may


want to assign an adult to monitor
the process of the work and assist
students who may struggle or lack
independence.

Remind students that they have 40 minutes to complete their work. If they finish early, they should read their independent
reading books.
Ask those students assigned to Italy to gather their Exploring Countries text and a pencil and gather with you in a particular
area in the classroom.
Distribute the Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy to the Italy group.
Guide students through the Close Reading Guide, referring to the Close Reading Guide: Exploring Countries: Italy
(for teacher reference) and providing extra support by doing the first read with them.
Check on the Iraq and India groups as necessary during this work time. Remind these students that they should work quietly
and productively for the duration of the period. If they finish early, they should read their independent reading books
silently.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Consider partnering an ELL with a


student who speaks the same home
language when discussion of
complex content is required. This
can let students have more
meaningful discussions and clarify
points in their language.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 7

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9


Close Reading:
Launching the Exploring Countries Books, Part 1

Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students Needs

A. Praise and Probe (6 minutes)


Gather students together and congratulate them on a strong and smooth transition back to informational text (praise).
Ask students to each think of key learning for them from todays lesson (probe).
Use equity sticks to determine which students share their key learning.
B. Review Word Tracker Routine (2 minutes)
Distribute the Word Tracker homework, Lesson 9. Remind students of the routine followed in Unit 1.
In Column 1, they write the word or term.
In Column 2, they copy the definition as it appears in the glossary (of their Exploring Countries book).
After thinking about the meaning of the word or term, in Column 3, students should write a simplified version of the
definition shown in Column 2 using their own words.
If necessary, project one of the books glossaries and practice the routine with a word from the glossary (or use Exploring
Countries: Japan).
Tell students they will need to take their Exploring Countries text home to do this work. Stress that they must be responsible
and return both the book and the Word Tracker homework to the next class.

Homework

Meeting Students Needs

Complete the Word Tracker homework. Bring the book and Work Tracker Homework back to school for the next lesson.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 8

Grade 3: Module 2B: Unit 2: Lesson 9


Supporting Materials
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Lessons 9, 10, and 11 Work Time Tasks


Lesson

India

Iraq

Italy

Text Feature
Scavenger
Hunt

Independently read pages 411

MEET WITH TEACHER

Fact Hunt/Flag

Read aloud pages 411

Independent
reading book
10

Independently
read pages 4
11

Close Reading

MEET WITH TEACHER

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt


Independent reading book

Close Reading
Fact
Hunt/Flag
11

MEET WITH
TEACHER

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt

Fact Hunt/Flag

Independent reading book

Independently reread pages 4


11

Close Reading

IMPORTANT:
Each work period is 40 minutes long. If you finish ahead of time, read your independent reading
book.
Your teacher needs to be completely focused on working with the group. If you are not working
with the teacher, your work cannot interfere with or disrupt the work of the other students/groups.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 10

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Structural Features of Informational Text (Exploring Countries)


1. Table of contents
2. Text in chapters with fact boxes, maps, insets, photographs, captions, graphic sources (maps, pie
chart)
3. Fast Facts
4. Glossary
5. Learn More section
6. Index

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 11

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt Recording Form


Name:
Date:
Directions: Use your copy of Exploring Countries to find the named text features. Once you have
found each text feature, write down the page number and the new information you learned from
that feature.
Text feature that helps us
find information efficiently

Page

Information I learned

Photographs
(Picture that shows the reader
what something looks like)

Map
(Image showing part of the
earths surface, usually
including land and water
features)
Did you know? Fun Facts
captions
(Words that describe a picture
or photograph so the reader can
better understand it)
Bold words
(Words in heavy type that help
the reader spot the most
important words)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 12

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt Recording Form


Text feature that helps us
find information efficiently

Page

Information I learned

Index
(Alphabetical list of important
topics in the text with page
numbers, found at the end of
the text)
Glossary
(Mini dictionary that helps the
reader define important words
in the text)

Table of contents
(List of key topics in the order
they appear to help the reader
find information more easily)
Other
(Extra information placed
within the text, such as graphs,
charts, or fact lists)

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 13

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Fact Hunt / Flag Activity


Use pages 28 and 29 to learn interesting facts about your country.
1. What is the main religion of the country? ______________________________
What percent of the people follow this religion? ______%
What other religions are practiced in this country? ________________________________
2. What is the official language of the country? ________________________________
3.Name four products that are grown in this country:
_______________________________ ________________________________
_______________________________ ________________________________
4. What is the capital city of the country? _________________________________
5.What is the currency (unit of money)? _________________________________
6. Name three other cities in the country:
____________________________________________________________________
7. Name four products that are manufactured (made) in this country:
_______________________________ ________________________________
_______________________________ ________________________________
8. What is the official name of the country?
_______________________________________
9. What is the population of the country? ______________________ as of ______________
10. What are three industries that are important to the countrys economy?
__________________________________________________________________
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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 14

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Fact Hunt / Flag Activity


Use page 28 to read about your countrys flag and see what it looks like.
Transform the rectangle below into the flag for your country. Draw before you color.

When was the flag adopted? __________________________________


What do the colors stand for?

What symbol is part of your countrys flag? _______________________________________


What does this symbolize? ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 15

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy


Name:
Date:

**You will use this sheet as I guide your group in rereading pages 411**
Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Look carefully at pages


4 and 5 but do not
reread them yet.

What can you find out by reading these pages?

Use what you notice to


answer the questions in
the box on the right.

_______________________________________

Read along as your


teacher reads page 5
aloud.

Reread this sentence out loud together:

With your group,


answer the question on
the right.

_______________________________________

How do you know? Turn and talk to a partner about the clues you used.

In the north, Italy borders France, Switzerland, Austria


and Slovenia
Look carefully at the map. Put one finger on Italy, then point to France,
Switzerland, Austria, and Slovenia with your other hand.
What do you think the word borders means?
______________________________________________

* What strategy did you use to figure out what this word means?
_____________________________________________________________________

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 16

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy


Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Read page 5 silently


and then answer the
question on the right.

List four seas that border Italy:


______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________

Look carefully at pages


6 and 7 but do not
reread them yet.

What can you find out by reading these pages?

Answer the questions in


the box on the right.

_______________________________________

_______________________________________

How do you know? Turn and talk to a partner about the clues you used.
Take turns reading the
paragraphs on page 6
aloud.

The text says, With a height of 15,770 feet (4,807 meters), this mountain
is the tallest in Europe.
15,770 feet is the same as _________ meters.

* How did you figure this out?


_____________________________________________________________________

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 17

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy


Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Discuss this question


with the group.

Which mountain is the tallest in Europe?


(Hint: carefully reread the other sentences in this paragraph.)
_________________________________________

Read along as
someone in your
group reads page 8
aloud.

The text says,


Mount Vesuvius, the only active volcano on Europes
mainland, rises near the city of Naples.
What is Mount Vesuvius?
______________________________________________
Underline the words in the sentence you used to answer this question.
Turn and talk to a partner. What do you notice? How are the commas in this
sentence like the parentheses on page 6?

* What strategy did you use to figure out what Mount Vesuvius is?
_____________________________________________________________________
Read along as your
teacher reads page 9
out loud.

Why is the word archeologist in bold (dark) print?


______________________________________________
What is an archeologist?
______________________________________________
______________________________________________

* What strategy did you use to figure out what an archeologist is?
_____________________________________________________________________

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 18

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy


Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Discuss this question


with your group.

Why are the archeologists in Pompeii?


______________________________________________
______________________________________________

Look carefully at
pages 10 and 11 but do
not reread them yet.

What can you find out by reading these pages?

Answer the questions


in the box on the right.

_______________________________________

_______________________________________

How do you know? Turn and talk to a partner about the clues you used.
Read along as your
teacher reads pages 10
and 11 out loud.

What is a marmot?
______________________________________________
______________________________________________

* What strategy did you use to figure out what this word means?
_____________________________________________________________________

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 19

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy


Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Reread page 11
silently, then answer
the question in the box
at the right.

What animals that live in Italy are featured in both the text and the photos?

_______________________________________
_______________________________________
Where did you find information about the wild boar?

_______________________________________
Finding Out More in a Nonfiction Text
Look back at your answers in the long boxes with *asterisks* in them.
List five different ways you can find out more information about a word, phrase, or topic when you are
reading nonfiction text.
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

SAVE THIS HANDOUT AND USE IT AS YOU CONTINUE READING YOUR EXPLORING
COUNTRIES BOOK.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 20

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Close Reading Guide: Exploring Countries: Italy


(For Teacher Reference)
Teacher Directions: Use this guide to help students move through their rereading of
pages 411

Italy/Activity
Have the group begin
by reading the
directions on the left
aloud.

Questions to Discuss and Answer


Then work through each question in the corresponding box at the right
together, using each as an opportunity for instruction and discussion.

Look carefully at pages


4 and 5 but do not
reread them yet.

What can you find out by reading these pages?


Where Italy is

Use what you notice to


answer the questions in
the box on the right.
Read along as your
teacher reads page 5
aloud.
With your group,
answer the question on
the right.

How do you know? Turn and talk to a partner about the clues you used.
Students should note the header in red at the top of the page, as
well as the map, on which Italy is circled.
Reread this sentence out loud together:
In the north, Italy borders France, Switzerland, Austria
and Slovenia
Look carefully at the map. Put one finger on Italy, then point to France,
Switzerland, Austria, and Slovenia with your other hand.
What do you think the word borders means?
Borders must mean is next to or beside.

* What strategy did you use to figure out what this word means?
I looked carefully at the illustrations (map) to help me figure out what the words in the
text might mean.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 21

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Close Reading Guide: Exploring Countries: Italy


(For Teacher Reference)
Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Read page 5 silently


and then answer the
question on the right.

List four seas that border Italy:


Adriatic Sea
Tyrrhenian Sea
Ionian Sea
Mediterranean Sea

Look carefully at pages


6 and 7 but do not
reread them yet.

What can you find out by reading these pages?


What the land is like in Italy

Answer the questions in


the box on the right.
Take turns reading the
paragraphs on page 6
aloud.

How do you know? Turn and talk to a partner about the clues you used.
Students should note the header in red at the top of the page, as
well as the photos on the page.
The text says, With a height of 15,770 feet (4,807 meters), this mountain
is the tallest in Europe.
15,770 feet is the same as 4,807 meters.

* How did you figure this out?


I looked inside the parentheses to find out more.
Students may not be familiar with the word parentheses. If not, introduce it here.
Discuss the use of parentheses to add additional information in the sentence above. Be
sure students understand the relationship between the information in parentheses and
the words just before the parentheses.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 22

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy


(For Teacher Reference)
Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Discuss this question


with the group.

Which mountain is the tallest in Europe?


(Hint: carefully reread the other sentences in this paragraph.)
Monte Bianco
Demonstrate how to reread the previous sentence to find this
information.

Read along as someone


in your group reads
page 8 aloud.

The text says,


Mount Vesuvius, the only active volcano on Europes
mainland, rises near the city of Naples.
What is Mount Vesuvius?
The only active volcano on Europes mainland
Underline the words in the sentence you used to answer this question.
Turn and talk to a partner. What do you notice? How are the commas in
this sentence like the parentheses on page 6?
Note: If students are unfamiliar with the word comma, review it
here. Be sure they notice that both the pair of parentheses and
pair of commas are used to provide additional information that
helps the reader better understand the words just before them.

* What strategy did you use to figure out what Mount Vesuvius is?
I looked between the commas for more information.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 23

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy


(For Teacher Reference)
Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Read along as your


teacher reads page 9
out loud.

Why is the word archeologist in bold (dark) print?


It can be found in the glossary.
What is an archeologist?
A scientist who studies the remains of past civilizations.

* What strategy did you use to figure out what an archeologist is?
I looked in the glossary at the back of the book.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 24

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy


(For Teacher Reference)
Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Discuss this question


with your group.

Why are the archeologists in Pompeii?


Reread and discuss to be sure students infer that the volcanic
eruption left Pompeii much as it was 2,000 years ago- providing a
very rich opportunity for archeologists to learn about the past.

Look carefully at
pages 10 and 11 but do
not reread them yet.

What can you find out by reading these pages?


The wildlife there are in Italy

Answer the questions


in the box on the right.
Read along as your
teacher reads pages 10
and 11 out loud.

How do you know? Turn and talk to a partner about the clues you used.
Students should note the header in red at the top of the page, as
well as the photos on the page.
What is a marmot?
A kind of squirrel that lives in the ground
Use this question to check to see if students understand how to
use the information between the commas to define the word,
marmot. Review if necessary.

* What strategy did you use to figure out what this word means?
I looked at the information between the commas.

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 25

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Text-Dependent Questions: Exploring Countries: Italy


(For Teacher Reference)
Italy/Activity

Questions to Discuss and Answer

Reread page 11
silently, then answer
the question in the box
at the right.

What animals that live in Italy are featured in both the text and the photos?
Porcupines, chamois, wild boar, and pink flamingos.
Where did you find information about the wild boar?
In the Did you know? section
Note: Introduce the term sidebar if students are unfamiliar with
it. Be sure they notice that information about the wild boar can
be found only in the Did You Know? sidebar and discuss the
importance of reading sidebars to deepen the understanding of a
particular topic in a text.

Finding Out More in a Nonfiction Text


Look back at your answers in the long boxes with *asterisks* in them.
List five different ways you can find out more information about a word, phrase, or topic when you are
reading nonfiction text.
1. Look at the illustrations, photos, or graphics.
2. Look at the words inside the parentheses.
3. Look at the words inside sets of commas.
4. Look in the glossary.
5. Read the sidebars.
SAVE THIS HANDOUT AND USE IT AS YOU CONTINUE READING YOUR EXPLORING
COUNTRIES BOOK.

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 26

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Word Tracker Homework, Lesson 9


Name:
Date:

Follow the Word Tracker routine using the words for your Exploring Countries text.
Exploring Countries: Italy

Exploring Countries: India

Exploring Countries: Iraq

peninsula, glaciers, fertile

peninsula, gulf, plateau

gulf, salt flats, fertile

Vocabulary word or phrase

Definition

Definition in my own words

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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 27

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Word Tracker Homework, Lesson 9

Vocabulary word or phrase

Definition

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

Definition in my own words

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 28

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Word Tracker Homework, Lesson 9


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Follow the Word Tracker routine using the words for your Exploring Countries text.
Exploring Countries: Italy

Exploring Countries: India

Exploring Countries: Iraq

peninsula, glaciers, fertile

peninsula, gulf, plateau

gulf, salt flats, fertile

Vocabulary word or phrase

Definition

Definition in my own words

peninsula (Italy)

a section of land that


extends out from a larger
piece of land and is almost
completely surrounded by
water

land with water on three


sides

glaciers (Italy)

fertile (Italy)

massive sheets of ice that


move slowly over large
areas of land

really large masses of ice


that move slowly
good for growing things

supports growth
peninsula (India)

gulf (India)

plateau (India)

a section of land that


extends out from a larger
piece of land and is almost
completely surrounded by
water
part of an ocean or sea that
extends into land
an area of flat, raised land

Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.

land with water on three


sides

like a bay, an area off an


ocean

raised land with a flat top

NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G3:M2B:U2:L9 June 2014 29

GRADE 3: MODULE 2B: UNIT 2: LESSON 9

Word Tracker Homework, Lesson 9


(Answers, for Teacher Reference)
Vocabulary word or phrase

Definition

Definition in my own words

gulf (Iraq)