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Verb Conjugation

1. Maya .. (work) since morning.


2. I .. (work) in the garden, when he (arrive).
3. I (work) in the garage for three hours when John ..
(call)
4. I . (write) my exam this time next week.
5. They already .. (leave) by the time I
(reach) home.
6. Im hungry. I .. (get) you something to eat.
7. Merlin . (write) lovely songs.
8. We .. often .. (not go) to the cinema.
9. I . (go) to Philadelphia last week.
10. The children (deliver) a splendid performance.

1. Maya has been working since morning.


2. I was working in the garden, when he arrived.
3. I had been working in the garage for three hours when Johncalled.
4. I will be writing my exam this time next week.
5. They had already left by the time I reached home.
6. Im hungry. I will get you something to eat.
7. Merlin writes lovely songs.
8. We dont often go to the cinema.
9. I went to Philadelphia last week.
10. The children delivered a splendid performance.

PRACTICE
Present
I practice
you practice
he/she/it practices
we practice

you practice
they practice
Preterite
I practiced
you practiced
he/she/it practiced
we practiced
you practiced
they practiced
Present continuous
I am practicing
you are practicing
he/she/it is practicing
we are practicing
you are practicing
they are practicing
Present perfect
I have practiced
you have practiced
he/she/it has practiced
we have practiced
you have practiced
they have practiced
Future
I will practice
you will practice
he/she/it will practice
we will practice
you will practice
they will practice
Future perfect
I will have practiced
you will have practiced
he/she/it will have practiced
we will have practiced
you will have practiced
they will have practiced
Past continuous
I was practicing
you were practicing
he/she/it was practicing
we were practicing
you were practicing
they were practicing
Past perfect
I had practiced
you had practiced
he/she/it had practiced
we had practiced
you had practiced
they had practiced

Future continuous
I will be practicing
you will be practicing
he/she/it will be practicing
we will be practicing
you will be practicing
they will be practicing
Present perfect continuous
I have been practicing
you have been practicing
he/she/it has been practicing
we have been practicing
you have been practicing
they have been practicing
Past perfect continuous
I had been practicing
you had been practicing
he/she/it had been practicing
we had been practicing
you had been practicing
they had been practicing
Future perfect continuous
I will have been practicing
you will have been practicing
he/she/it will have been practicing
we will have been practicing
you will have been practicing
they will have been practicing

Simple Past / Present Perfect


Since computers were first introduced to the public in the early 1980's,
technology (change)
a great deal. The first computers (be)
simple machines designed for basic tasks. They (have, not)
much memory and they (be, not)
very powerful. Early

computers were often quite expensive and customers often (pay)


thousands of dollars for machines which actually (do)
very
little. Most
computers (be)
separate, individual machines used mostly
as expensive typewriters or for playing games.
Times (change)
. Computers (become)
powerful machines with very practical applications. Programmers (create)
a large selection of useful programs which do everything from teaching
foreign languages to bookkeeping. We are still playing video games, but
today's games (become)
faster, more exciting interactive
adventures. Many computer users (get, also)
on the
Internet and (begin)
communicating with other computer
users around the world. We (start)
to create international
communities online. In short, the simple, individual machines of the past
(evolve)
into an international World Wide Web of
knowledge.

1. When Carol (call)


favorite show on television.

last night, I (watch)

my

2. I (work)
for this company for more than thirty years, and I
intend to stay here until I retire!
3. Sharon (love)
to travel. She (go)
almost every summer. Next year, she plans to go to Peru.

abroad

4. Thomas is an author. He (write)


mystery novels and travel
memoirs. He (write)
since he was twenty-eight. Altogether, he
(write)
seven novels, three collections of short stories and a
book of poetry.
5. We were late because we had some car problems. By the time we (get)
to the train station, Susan (wait)
for us for more than two hours.
6. Sam (try)
and (fell)

to change a light bulb when he (slip)


.

7. Everyday I (wake)
breakfast at 7 o'clock and (leave)
However, this morning I (get)
breakfast and (leave)
to set my alarm.

up at 6 o'clock, (eat)
for work at 8 o'clock.
up at 6:30, (skip)
for work late because I (forget)

8. Right now, Jim (read)


the newspaper and Kathy (make)
dinner. Last night at this time, they (do)
the same thing. She
(cook)
and he (read)
the newspaper. Tomorrow
at this time, they (do, also)
the same thing. She (prepare)
dinner and he (read)
. They are very predictable people!
9. By this time next summer, you (complete)
your studies and
(find)
a job. I, on the other hand, (accomplish, not)
anything. I (study, still)
and you (work)
in some
new high paying job.
10. The students (be, usually)
this week they (teach)

taught by Mrs. Monty. However,


taught by Mr. Tanzer.

11.
Jane talks on the phone.
Bob has been talking on the phone for an hour.
Mary is talking on the phone.

Who is not necessarily on the phone now?

13.
Jane left when Tim arrived.
Bob left when Tim had arrived.
When Tim arrived, Mary was leaving.
John had left when Tim arrived.
After Tim arrived, Frank left.

Who did not run into Tim?

15.
Jane never left Jamestown.
Bob has never left Jamestown.

Who is still alive?

Farther or Further?

Farther refers to length or distance. It is the comparative form of the word far when referring to
distance.
Further means "to a greater degree," "additional," or "additionally." It refers to time or amount. It is
the comparative form of the word far when meaning "much."
Correct: London is farther north than Juneau.
(Refers to distance)
Correct: This plan requires further study.
(Meaning "additional study," refers to amount)
Correct: According to my timetable, we should be further along.
(Refers to time)

Good or Well?
Good is an adjective. It describes nouns or pronouns. It may be used with descriptive linking verbs
like look, feel, sound, taste, or be to describe the subject.
Incorrect: The coffee tasted well this morning.
Correct: The coffee tasted good this morning.
Correct: The pitcher is looking good today.
Well is normally an adverb. It describes verbs (sometimes adjectives) and is used with most other
verbs.
Well as an adjective means "healthy."
Incorrect: He pitches good.
Correct: He pitches well.
Incorrect when speaking specifically of health: I do not feel very good.
Correct: I do not feel very well. (healthy)

Bad or Badly?

Bad is an adjective. It describes nouns or pronouns. It is often used with descriptive linking verbs
like look, feel, sound, or to be.
Incorrect: She felt badly about missing the date.
Correct: She felt bad about missing the date.
(Bad describes the pronoun she.)
Incorrect: Things looked badly for the Mudville nine.
Correct: Things looked bad for the Mudville nine.
(Bad describes the noun Things.)
Badly is an adverb (like well). It describes verbs and should be used with all verbs other than linking
verbs.
As many adverbs do, it usually answers the question "How?"
Incorrect: Mudville played bad last night.
Correct: Mudville played badly last night.
(Badly describes the verb played.)