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Freshman starts
nonprofit to
raise awareness
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THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 2016 | VOLUME 130 ISSUE 25

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN


THE STUDENT VOICE SINCE 1904

Second Title
IX lawsuit filed
against KU
KELLY CORDINGLEY & VICKY
DIAZ-CAMACHO
@KansanNews

A second student athlete has


filed a Title IX lawsuit against the
University this year. The student is
unnamed in the lawsuit; however,
in the complaint she alleges she was
assaulted in Jayhawker Towers in
August 2015 by the same football
player listed in former rower Daisy
Tacketts lawsuit from March.
She said in the lawsuit that the
University created a hostile educational environment after she reported her alleged assault, which violates
Title IX. She said the University also
violated the Rehabilitation Act when
it discriminated against her because
of a disability, which was unnamed.
The lawsuit says the University
excluded her from participating in
the rowing team. The lawsuit also
alleges a University physician told
her she was a liability.
KU made me feel worthless,
the student said in a statement,
which was submitted by her lawyer,
Dan Curry, who is also representing
Tackett. After I reported my assault, everything KU did made me
feel like they were trying to get me to
crack and leave.
My rowing team coaches didnt
care, didnt help, and they did not
protect me.
She, like Tackett, was on the rowing team. She withdrew from the
team in February of 2016 and one
day later, the University cancelled
her athletic grant effective after the
2016 spring semester, the lawsuit
says.
She was also allegedly assaulted
in Jayhawker Towers, like Tackett.
In 2014, 10 rapes were reported to
have happened in University dorms
on campus, according to Clery data.
The alleged assailant was expelled from the University in March
2016. The lawsuit was filed in the
District Court of Douglas County.
The plaintiff, Jane Doe, says in the
lawsuit she confided in a friend following the alleged assault but chose
not to immediately report it.
In October 2015, she met with the
teams sport psychologist, Sheriece
Sadberry, according to the lawsuit.
On the same day, she reported her
alleged assault to Lawrence Police
and the KU Public Safety Office,
according to the lawsuit.
Later that month, she met with
the office of Institutional Opportunity and Access and filed her complaint, according to the lawsuit. It
goes on to say that from January
2016-March 2016, IOA kept extending the time for the investigation.
"How many women need to be
victimized before KU will take action? I reported my assault, and KU
turned my experience into a living
nightmare," another portion of her
statement said.
The lawsuit says that because of
the Universitys conduct, she has
suffered and continues to suffer
great pain of mind, shock, emotional
distress, physical manifestations of
emotional distress, embarrassment,
loss of self-esteem, disgrace, humiliation, missed educational opportunities and out-of-pocket costs.
Erinn Barcomb-Peterson, director for news and media relations,
said the University does not comment on cases of sexual assault.
"To protect the rights of all parties involved, the University of Kansas does not comment on individual
sexual assault investigations," she
said in a statement. "When the university receives a report of sexual assault, we quickly take action to support the person who came forward
and work to investigate and resolve
the matter. Any suggestion otherwise is simply false."

Contributed Photo
Tom Babb, a University freshman from Evergreen, Colo., sits with his Beta Theta Pi brothers at a Denver Nuggets basketball game at the Pepsi Center.

Road to recovery: Paralyzed fraternity


pledge inspires brothers to better KU
BEN FELDERSTEIN
@Ben_Felderstein

om Babb turned on
the television for the
first time since being
paralyzed.
Staring out the window from his hospital bed
he could see Honolulus
grass-covered mountains
reaching into the clouds.
But the landscape was out
of reach, particularly now.
The movie Forrest
Gump fills the TV screen.
After losing his legs in the
Vietnam War, Lt. Dan Taylor sits motionless in his
hospital bed. He realizes
that without legs, his future,

his life isnt the one he had


planned.
Babb began to sob. He
understood his life, too, had
changed forever. Being paralyzed from the chest down
as a 19-year-old carries a
daunting realization. Babb
reflects about his life before
the accident. Then he con-

templates his future.


After a couple of hours,
Babb comes to a conclusion. He finds a new determination, one that says he
is stronger than his disability. He wasnt going to give
up. He wasnt going to feel
sorry for himself. He was
going to beat this.
Life before the accident

I want to succeed
and get better. I still
want to be the best
I can be.
Tom Babb
freshman

Babb arrived at the University as a freshman in fall


2015. He finished rushing
and moved into the Beta
Theta Pi house, excited to
begin a new chapter in his
life with his new brothers.
Babbs father Steve Babb
said he is a good student,

had a full pledge class worth


of friends and was ready to
spend the next year meeting some of his older brothers. He was involved in a
community service group
called Natural Ties, which
is a Greek life program that
pairs students with people
who have developmental
disabilities.
His pledge father, John
Killen Jr., was excited to introduce Tom both to older
brothers and traditions of
the Beta house. Killen and
his pledge brother, Mitch
Simmons, described Tom
as a brand in himself,
saying he always held court
during dinner and group
activities.

"He just has a very


charismatic
personality
and always had something
interesting to talk about,
Simmons said.
Babbs parents said he
has never been afraid to try
new things and take risks.
As a high school junior,
Tom left his familys Evergreen, Colo., home to study
abroad in a rural Spanish
town for 10 months. He
wasnt getting along with
his parents and felt complacent in his life.
"He was in a small rural
town two and half hours
south of Madrid. That is
SEE BABB PAGE 2

Administrators reframe student retention goals


CONNER MITCHELL
@ConnerMitchell0

Increasing the retention and graduation rates


for students is a top priority for the University. The
goal is to reach 90 percent
retention and 70 percent
graduation by 2022, according to the Universitys
Bold Aspirations strategic
plan, released by Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little
in 2012.
According to the Office
of Institutional Research
and Planning, in 2014,
80 percent of students returned to the University after one year, and 76.3 percent returned after three
semesters. Matt Melvin,
vice provost of enrollment
management, said the University takes a holistic
view towards enrollment
marketing, which is directly tied to the Universitys
retention goals.
We take a very holistic
view towards enrollment
in terms of trying to make
sure that the recruitment
enterprise is linked and
aligned with the retention
agenda, he said. So obviously there is a direct
and powerful correlation
between entering student
profile and ultimate retention and graduation rates.
Melvin said his views
on retention differ slightly
from the goals outlined in
the Bold Aspirations plan.
I think retention is a

graphic by Cassidy Ritter

bad metric, he said. The


national drumbeat is all
about retention. I tend to
talk, and were trying to
reframe the orientation
here to talk not necessarily about retention but talk
about progression. Retention without progression is
almost the worst case scenario. Our aspirations are
not to retain students. Our
aspirations are to graduate
students.
Retention is measured
by students coming back
for their third semester
with a pulse, Melvin said.
He said students can come

back for that semester


with only 12 credit hours
built up, which makes the
Universitys aspiration to
graduate students more
difficult.
Youre measured as
a success because youre
retained. I would say that
student has a harder time
graduating than a student
that has completed that
threshold in terms of academic momentum, he
said.
DeAngela Burns-Wallace, vice provost for undergraduate studies, said
enrollment and retention

management goes beyond


students simply walking
onto campus.
I think a lot of times
when we say enrollment,
people think of just students coming in the door,
she said. But when you
really are managing enrollment, and what enrollment
management as a field was
designed to be, was actually the management of your
enrollment across a period
of time.
Burns-Wallace
said
a key focus has been the
importance of helping
students understand the

progression of their degree. She said the University has begun the process
of offering one-on-one
advising appointments at
initial student orientations
as opposed to the previous
system of small group advising appointments.
The goal is that overall
what were trying to do is
ensure students are feeling
like they have an individualized experience, that students feel like they have a
SEE ENROLLMENT
PAGE 2

news
Kansan
staff

NEWS MANAGEMENT

Editor-in-chief
Vicky Diaz-Camacho
Managing editor
Kate Miller
Brand & creativity
manager
Hallie Wilson
Digital operations editor
Anissa Fritz
Print production manager
Candice Tarver
ADVERTISING
MANAGEMENT

Business manager
Gage Brock
Sales manager
Katie Bell
SECTION EDITORS

News editor
Kelly Cordingley
Associate news editor
Cassidy Ritter
Sports editor
Scott Chasen
Associate sports editor
Shane Jackson
Arts & culture editor
Ryan Wright
Associate
arts & culture editor
Christian Hardy
Opinion editor
Maddy Mikinski
Visuals editor & design
chief
Roxy Townsend
Chief photographer
Caroline Fiss
Investigations editor
Miranda Davis
ADVISER

Sales and marketing


adviser
Jon Schlitt
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BABB FROM PAGE 1


what made it even more challenging and an accomplishment," Steve said. "There was
not a big urban sprawl to help
entertain him or places where
he could turn to find English.
It was a small town of a few
thousand people. No one
spoke English."
Tom said that exemplifies
one of his best traits.
One of my best characteristics is that Im really adaptable, he said. I can adapt to
any new situation.
The accident
It was 80 degrees on
December 27, 2015. There
wasn't a cloud in the sky.
The Babbs had finished a late
breakfast at their resort and
were excited for a day of cliff
diving. They left the restaurant and walked a half mile to
Black Rock, a popular spot for
cliff diving in Maui.
The cliff was 15-feet high
and sat atop 20-foot deep
water, making it perfect for
novice cliff divers. After taking a few leaps from the cliff,
the Babbs made their way
to Kaanapali Beach outside their resort. Tom was
in waist-deep water and remained in the ocean as the
rest of the Babb family headed to a beachside restaurant
for fish tacos.
As Tom began heading toward shore a few minutes later, a two-foot wave crested toward him. Instead of getting
pushed toward the beach, he
spun around and dove head
first into the wave.
The waters grabbed Tom
and ripped him downward,
knocking his forehead against
a rock, breaking his neck on
impact. He laid motionless
in the water for more than a
minute, unable to move his
extremities.
He floated to the top of the
water, face down. He heard
kids laughing and playing.
He thought this was going to
be the last thing he heard. He
thought the ocean floor was
going to be the last thing he
saw.
Tom thought he was going
to drown.
Then, he heard his name
being called. Tommy! Tommy!, his father screamed.
Steve and a few tourists the
Babbs did not know ran into
the water and carried Tom
out, carefully laying him in
the sand. Soaking wet, Tom
was covered in sand, but
he could not feel the grains
clinging to his body. He was
gasping for air, hyperventilating. He didnt know how to
breathe without the function
of his abs.
Moments later, Tom was
surrounded by vacationing
doctors. The doctors centered Toms neck, helped
him maintain his breathing
and comforted him until the
paramedics arrived. Tom was

ENROLLMENT FROM
PAGE 1
connection to an individual
in the unit that will be advising them in the fall, and that
students have a space and a
place where they can ask the
questions, she said.
There is no easy way to
measure a students progression, Burns-Wallace said.
She said since there is
not a technology to measure
progression, the attitude of
the University needs to be
geared toward helping freshmen think about their experience from day one and how
to build a fluid four-year degree plan.
Mitch George, a freshman double-majoring in
journalism and political science from Byron, Minn., said
he was not given a four-year
plan during his initial advising appointment during orientation, but when he made
a four-year plan in October,
his progress towards graduation made much more sense.
It definitely helped, he

in shock but knew he was paralyzed.


He was taken to Honolulus Queen's Hospital, which
specializes in spinal cord procedures. After surgery, Tom
was in a drug-induced state
for a few days. When he came
out of it, reality sunk in.
This really sucks, Tom
remembers thinking. I am
going to be paralyzed for the
rest of my life; what am I going to do?
Unable to breathe on his
own, the 19-year old was
hooked to a ventilator for 23
days. He had a feeding tube in
his nose. He could not speak
so he developed an eye-blinking system and a letter board
to communicate. When Tom
began using the letter board,
his initial message will stick
with his parents forever.
Im so fucked, he spelled.
As Tom sat in the hospital
for the first week, he cried. He
cried, and his family cried.
Steve described it as a period
of mourning. The Babbs were
mourning the life that Tom
had planned, his dreams, his
aspirations.
Then, Tom turned the TV
and saw the the scene from
Forrest Gump. Initially, he
was upset, thinking Lt. Dans
life was now his life. After he
gathered himself, his mindset
changed. He stopped feeling
sorry for himself. He began
thinking about how he could
better himself and how he
could change the stigma that
comes with being in a wheelchair.
I want to succeed and get
better, Tom said. I still want
to be the best I can be.

One of my best
characteristics
is that Im really
adaptable. I can
adapt to any new
situation.
Tom Babb
freshman

TomStrong 5K
On April 24, Tom will return to campus for the first
time since his accident. He
will be surrounded by more
than 400 supporters. His
family, fraternity brothers,
other friends, and complete
strangers will be there.
That day, Beta Theta Pi
will sponsor a 5K run, walk
and roll in Toms honor. Betas philanthropy chair Killen
organized the event to help
Tom and raise awareness
for students with disabilities
on campus. Funds from the
event will go to the Tom Babb
Student Accessibility Scholarship.
Earlier in the semester, a
group of 50 Betas jumped on
a bus to visit Tom in Colorado. Killen said Tom told him
it was the best day of his life.
said. Im double majoring
and studying abroad so I was
unsure whether I would be
able to [graduate on time],
but its actually going to happen with time to spare.
Burns-Wallace said they
should focus on how a student navigates the University.
Our work has to be not
about how were structured
or what our office titles are
or where our reporting lines
are, but if we think about how
a student moves through the
University and we ensure
that our systems and policies
and procedures help that
movement and dont impede
that movement, we are going
to be better for it as an institution, Burns-Wallace said.
Edited by Mackenzie
Walker

KANSAN.COM/NEWS | THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 2016

If 50 people going to visit


him was the best day of his
life, Killen said, I can only
imagine what over 300 people showing up for him will
mean to Tom.
When Killen first began
his tenure as philanthropy
chair in April 2015, he wanted to find a passion project to
support.
Once I heard of Toms accident I said to myself, This is
it,' Killen said. Tom is going
to be our inspiration; he is
how we are going to better
KU.
Tom is Killens pledge
son, or little brother, in Beta.
With both Toms father and
grandfather being Beta Theta
Pi fraternity members, Killen
knew the fraternity needed to
get involved.
The TomStrong 5K website has Toms story and a
video the family had made
to further explain what happened. The website allows
for donations, registration for
the race and purchase TomStrong merchandise with
the proceeds benefiting the
scholarship.
Killen and the Beta chapter developed the Tom Babb
Student Accessibility Scholarship to continue helping
students with disabilities
on campus. The chapter
set guidelines for the scholarship, and $1,300 will be
granted to an incoming student every year that best fits
the description set forth.
Killen said the Babb family
wants to help Jayhawks with
disabilities any way they can.
To prepare for Toms return to school in fall, Simmons said alumni are helping install a wheelchair ramp
at the house and make renovations to one of the seniors
first-floor rooms.
Tom doesnt want extra
attention from any of this,
Simmons said. He just
wants to be a normal kid.
Inspiration is a twoway street
Like Tom, his parents
mourned the loss of the life
their son had planned. Steve
said knowing all the goals
Tom had set for himself wont
come to fruition as planned.
The goals remain; the path to
achievement has changed.
Toms parents have had
to learn how to care for him.
While the Babbs are learning
valuable lessons from doctors and specialists, the most
important lessons have come
from their teenage son.

Contributed Photo
Kevin Durant of the Oklahoma City Thunder holds a sign for the
TomStrong 5K.

I never thought I would


learn such incredible lessons
from a 19-year-old, Steve
said. His attitude is amazing.
Toms father recalls one
specific moment in particular
when he truly felt inspired by
Tom. When using the letter
board Tom spelled out, I
have a new outlook on my
life. This was only a week
after the accident. Tom decided he was ready to push
forward.
When Tom is not in therapy, he is still doing his exercises and learning how to get
stronger to navigate a world
of paralysis. He has begun
using his arms more. He expects to eventually regain full
use and strength of his hands.
Tom is receiving support
from some of his athlete-heroes as well. He was recently
invited to be a special guest
at an Oklahoma City Thunder game and got to meet
Kevin Durant and Russell
Westbrook, who both signed
Toms forehead. Durant has
also been pictured holding a
TomStrong sign in support of
Tom in the past.
With his family at his side
each day, his friends visiting,
the TomStrong 5K, and the

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scholarship foundation, Tom


says he's not alone. He has
the support of people close to
him, and they have the inspiration of a 19-year old college
freshman regaining his life
after an accident tried stealing it away. It wasnt a fight he
was expecting, but he knows
its his fight. And hes ready.
Im really excited to get
out of this bed and start kicking ass, Tom said. I am not
going to let this accident define me; I am going to define
it."
Edited by Mackenzie
Walker

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KANSAN.COM

Where communication is key: Student-led Project


Consent gets people talking about sexual assault
LARA KORTE
@Lara_Korte

hen Sara Li was


a junior in high
school, she felt
isolated after being sexually
assaulted.
It was the summer of
2014, and Li was dealing
with her own experience
with sexual assault when
she said she felt a sense of
desperation. She knew she
wanted to help others who
might be in her position.
I cant really go back
in time and rewind time,
Li said. But maybe I can
be this pillar of support for
someone else.
Thats when Li began the
first steps in a campaign that
would eventually become
Project Consent, a nonprofit organization dedicated to
raising awareness and educating people about sexual
assault.
At first, Li said the campaign began on Instagram,
where people would submit
pictures themselves with the
word no to show they stood
against sexual assault.
The project began to pick
up steam after a few celebrities joined in, and Li decided it was time to expand.
She bought a domain name,
built a website and soon had
a multi-functional platform
where people could share
their stories and get involved
in the fight against sexual assault.
Li is now a freshman at
the University. Although
Project Consent began in
her hometown of Topeka, its
contributors are now worldwide. Li said the 38-person
team behind Project Consent
consists of writers, graphic
designers and interns from
places like Texas, Canada,

the U.K. and South America.


The website features several articles by staff members, news about upcoming
campaigns and a few videos
that depict cartoon body
parts giving a clear definition
of their consenting slogan,
If its not yes, its no.
Although the project
aims to make sexual assault
easy to talk about, Li said she
thinks for some people, its a
difficult topic to broach.
I think that, as a whole,
no one wants to talk about
sexual assault, Li said. I
mean, we hear it so often,
but we dont want to actually
have a conversation about it
because were either desensitized to it or we dont want to
accept that as a reality, and I
think thats the biggest thing
when discussing consent.
Besides
the
stigma
around sexual assault, Li
said one of the challenges
has been what she regards
as the politicization of the
organization. She said many
people have tried to write
off Project Consent as liberal propaganda or feminist
rants. When it comes down
to it, however, Li said all she
wants to do is have a conversation about consent and
sexual assault.
I think if you take away
like all the weird attachments to it, we can have a
conversation. Regardless of
your own religious, political,
whatever affiliation, we can
talk about sexual assault as
an issue that applies to everyone, as an issue that concerns everyone, Li said.
Inclusion is an important
part of Project Consent, Li
said. Creating a community
where anyone feels comfortable to share their story or
get advice is at the center of
their outreach.

We want to make it as
approachable as possible, Li
said. Because we dont think
that talking about consent
should have to be as scary; it
shouldnt have to be difficult
or intimidating to talk about;
we should just be, like, You
have the right to your own
body, you get to decide
whether or not you say yes
or no, and if someone tries to
force that on you, its something thats definitely not
your fault, and they should
be held responsible for their
actions.
Part of making the project approachable is having
strong social media outreach.
Mackenzie Cakebread, a
student at the University of
Toronto in Canada, is the
communications director for
Project Consent. Cakebread
said she thinks social media is a great way to make a
daunting topic like sexual assault more accessible.
I think communication
is so key and it can be hard

to bring up, so I think thats


why we try to make it as easy
as possible, so you know,
thats what I love about social media is that I can go on
and it doesnt have to be serious 100 percent of the time,
Cakebread said.

We like to say, Were


not old men sitting behind
a computer running a campaign, Cakebread said. We
know whats out there; were
going to teach it like that.
The point of the social
media campaign, she said,
is not to give people the full
course in consent and sexual assault but to instead get
them thinking and get them
talking.
As long as theres still
those little pockets of people
being like, Hey, did you ever
consider consent like this?
it just sort of continues that
conversation that we facilitate, both online, in our articles and hopefully in person
coming soon, Cakebread
said. I think thats one of
the most important things
that we can do.
Although Project Consent
is mostly online right now, Li
said the organization is looking at ways to expand its outreach. Li, along with other
directors, have been invited

But at the end


of the day, we
just remind
ourselves that
theres nothing
were trying to
accomplish but
trying to fight
sexual assault.
Sara Li
freshman

Cakebread said having


a staff of high school to college-aged students makes
communicating easier.

Annie Grabowsky/KANSAN
Sara Li is the founder and executive director of Project Consent, a global nonprofit dedicated to the fight against sexual assault and rape culture.

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to college campuses to speak


about their efforts against
sexual assault. She said she
will visit Indiana University
and UCLA in the upcoming
months to speak on the organizations behalf.
For now, Li said she plans
to continue her work at the
University and running the
nonprofit, balancing her life
as a student and executive
director. Although its a hard
line to walk, Li said knowing
shes making a difference for
someone else makes it all
worth it.
Its very stressful, she
said. But at the end of the
day, we just remind ourselves that theres nothing
were trying to accomplish
but trying to fight sexual assault.
Edited by Sarah
Kruger

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opinion
FREE-FOR-ALL
WE HEAR
FROM YOU

KANSAN.COM | THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 2016

Text your #FFA


submissions to
785-289-UDK1
(8351)
You dont know what
youve got til its gone
--- my feelings about
my broken computer.
Is it graduation yet?
* watches baseball
instead of doing
homework *
at this point in the
semester, my brain
is essentially a herd
of kittens that keep
getting distracted and
wandering off to play
with yarn for an hour.
I realized my crushing
headache is probably
because I havent
eaten an actual meal
since Sunday. I need
to get my life together.
Job interview person
just asked me to meet
for wine and Im not
21 is this a trap help.
LinkedIn makes me
feel so special with
this message: youre
getting noticed. k, so
can I have a job?

Illustration by Jake Kaufmann/KANSAN

Nasseri: Surveillance should be done by


citizens, not an overbearing government

BROOK NASSERI
@enasseri32

Hyperboles are
my favorite literary
device. I use them like
5,000 times a day.
Just did a Harry Potter
house sorting quiz on
JK Rowlings website. I
cant let go.
the highlight of my
week was the offbrand box of triscuts I
splurged on.
This one goes out
to the squirrell who
had diahrrea on my
roommates head.
Another day, another
parking ticket
i think ill just crawl
under a blanket and
eat ice cream 2day
bc summer is too far
away

Pokemon > real life

Who am I?

READ MORE AT
KANSAN.COM
@KANSANNEWS
/THEKANSAN
KANSAN.NEWS
@UNIVERSITY
DAILYKANSAN

eorge Orwells chilling classic 1984


begins with a reminder that Big Brother is
Watching You. Some believe that security surveillance is bringing us closer to
Orwells dystopian vision.
Many riders on New Jersey trains are unhappy about
new signs proclaiming that
video and audio systems
in use on their commutes.
This audio and visual recording of passengers, however, is nothing new.

Many buses and trains


in the U.S. utilize audio and
video surveillance on their
commuters in order to deter criminal activity, said
acting executive director of
NJ Transit Dennis Martin,
in an interview with NPR.
NJ Transit installed the additional monitoring system
earlier this month. Although
most recordings are erased
after 30 days, most transit
agencies refuse to explain
any details about the retention or use of these recordings.
While surveillance intends to protect the general
public, newer technologies
can hurt more people than
they help.
In early 2013, the Los
Angeles Police Department
installed 16 cameras with
facial recognition capability.
While in theory, these cameras could provide an objective lens with which to catch
criminals on the street, the
technologies themselves ac-

tually enforce racial bias.


A 2011 study examining facial recognition algorithms made in East Asian
versus Western counties
demonstrates that the software is more accurate at recognizing East Asian or Caucasian faces, respectively. In
spite of the theoretical lack
of prejudice from a camera,
the accuracy of the algorithms represents the biases
of the engineers that develop them, people who design
the software to focus on various facial features that vary
to different degrees between
different groups of people.
While the bias of some
surveillance methods is subtle, at other times prejudice
can manifest more overtly.
The information-gathering procedure of the Los
Angeles Police Department
was widely criticized in 2012
for spying on local Muslim
groups. Its revised policy
allowed the LAPD to continue gathering information

on suspicious activities,
but surveillance collected on
behavior that is not actually
criminal will no longer be
retained in counter-terrorism databases.
Still, this disproportionate surveillance of Muslim
groups only creates a divide
between these groups and
law enforcement, mongering fear and distrust. This
type of monitoring is quickly becoming outdated, as in
2011 the White House unveiled new U.S. government
policy to focus on countering terrorism by forming
relationships between local
officials and communities.
The widespread utilization of advanced surveillance methods, including
facial recognition software
and audio recording devices, are opaque and frightening to many ordinary
citizens, and the efficacy of
these technologies in fighting crime is not transparent
to the public. If U.S. policy

truly values community involvement in countering domestic crime and terrorism,


then these invasive and unreliable methods that withhold information from the
people should not be prioritized.
Instead, more attention
should be given to what ordinary citizens often already
do to help: use their smartphones.
Rather than creating further divides between government and the people,
creating mass fear and panic, law enforcement agencies would be wise to prioritize eyewitnesses and their
ready ability to help gather
evidence, without holding
information in mysterious
databases or practicing algorithmic discrimination.
Brook Nasseri is a
sophomore from Topeka
studying microbiology and
English.

Letter to editor: Ahead of concealed carry


implementation, University policy needs to
focus on making campus safe for all
THE COUNCIL OF
DISTINGUISHED
PROFESSORS
Sixty-four
members
of the Council of Distinguished Professors at the
University of Kansas have
sent a letter to Chancellor Gray-Little expressing
concerns about the July 1,
2017 implementation of
the Family and Personal
Protection Act permitting
the concealed carry of
handguns on campus.
In a previous public
statement, we, members
of the Council of Distinguished Professors at the
University of Kansas, have
expressed our views that
(A) campuses should be
able to make their own
policies on guns, and (B)

guns should be banned


from campuses. We adhere to those positions and
urge the state legislature to
repeal the concealed carry
law or to exempt colleges
and universities from this
law.
If the law is not
changed, we urge the University of Kansas to reframe the discussion from
a focus on guns to a focus
on safety. Our understanding is that the purpose of
the concealed carry law is
to make Kansans feel safe.
We embrace that goal. The
purpose of the new policy at KU, then, should be
making all students, faculty and staff feel safe. We
recommend the new policy
be a campus safety policy,
not a policy on concealed

carry of guns. A campus


safety policy should make
safety of the whole community its top priority.
Although
concealed
carry may make a minority of KU employees and
students feel safer, it will
make a majority feel endangered. The majority
has the same right to a
sense of safety as the minority. We urge the development of a comprehensive policy on campus
safety that would not only
address compliance with
the Personal and Family Protection Act but also
address broader concerns
affecting campus safety:
Enhance resources for
training students, faculty and staff in gun safety,
peaceful conflict resolu-

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR


LETTER GUIDELINES: Send
letters to editor@kansan.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the
email subject line.
Length: 300 words

The submission should include the


authors name, year, major and
hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at
kansan.com/letters.

tion, and anger and crises


management;
Expand training for how
to identify and respond
to potentially dangerous
or troublesome behaviors. Current procedures
are limited to student behaviors and the Student
of Concern review. This
approach, including bystander education and
other efforts directed at
prevention,
education,
consultation, and assessment, should be extended
to address faculty and staff
behaviors as well as those
of campus visitors.
We must address gun
safety through education
and training; we must reduce the risk of suicide
and accidental shootings
through a focus on men-

CONTACT US
Vicky Diaz-Camacho
Editor-in-chief
vickydc@kansan.com

Gage Brock
Business Manager
gbrock@kansan.com

tal health, anger management, and peaceful ways


to protest; we must restore
a climate of trust, respect,
tolerance, and openness to
diversity, inquiry and free
speech. Without addressing these concerns, there
is little here to defend
either with words or with
guns.
Sincerely,
On Behalf of the Council of
Distinguished Professors:
Susan Kemper, Psychology
Ed Russell, History
Edited by Mackenzie
Walker

THE KANSAN
EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan
Editorial Board are Vicky
Diaz-Camacho, Kate Miller,
Gage Brock and Maddy
Mikinski

arts & culture


HOROSCOPES
WHATS YOUR

KANSAN.COM | THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 2016

ART IN FOCUS

SIGN?

Aries ( March 21-April


19)
Reach a turning point with a
joint account, with this Scorpio Full Moon. Manage a
financial transition. Question
authority. New circumstances are revealed. Work
together. Your partner shows
the way to harmony.
Taurus ( April 20-May
20)
One door closes as another
opens with collaborations
and partnership. Honor and
acknowledge support before
welcoming the next phase.
Seek a compassionate
route. Share what you're
inventing.
Gemini ( May 21-June
20)
Begin a new direction in
your work. Finish old projects to clear room for what's
next. Polish the presentation
before delivering. Your
excellent service speaks well
for you.
Cancer ( June 21-July
22)
One game folds as another
begins with this Scorpio
Full Moon. Take leave of outgoing players as you greet
new ones. Discover love all
over again. Practice your
passion.
Leo ( July 23-Aug. 22)
Household changes arise
with this Full Moon in
Scorpio. Bid farewell to the
old phase, as you greet the
new. Pay extra attention to
home and family.
Virgo ( Aug. 23-Sept.
22)
Creative completions and
new beginnings arise with
this Full Moon. Finish up one
project before embracing
the next. Stop doing something that's unprofitable. Get
what you want with a smile.
Libra ( Sept. 23-Oct.
22)
This Full Moon illuminates
financial transitions. One
phase closes as the next begins. Creative ideas abound
... not all are practical.
Choose the option that's
best for family. Compute
expenses, and focus on
making money.

Colleen OToole/KANSAN
Four of Richard James dolls stand together. James, a ceramist, said the art form came naturally after growing up working on a farm.

Richard James, graduate student and ceramist


BRIANNA CHILDERS
@breeanuhh3

s a child, Richard
W. James said he
never
considered
doing anything else but
art. James, who is currently finishing up his graduate
degree in ceramics at the
University, said his interest started when he was in
elementary school and one
of his teachers suggested he
start reading "Calvin and
Hobbes."
Before college, James
said he thought he was
going to be a painter because in high school that
was all he had access to.
Now a ceramist, it wasnt
until he was forced to take
a clay class that something
clicked.
It was working in the
round and it was the smell,
feel, and manual labor,
James said.
Growing up in rural Lex-

ington, Tenn. James had to


work on the farm and was
used to doing things with
his hands.
It clicked in my head
more than just sitting down
and thinking There, you
just created a masterpiece,'
James said. "It was more of
a lifestyle than a medium
which, being in your early 20s, you are looking for
that.
After graduating with
a degree in art from the
University of Tennessee at
Martin in 2001, James went
on to do a post at Indiana
University. His post consisted of working in a graduate studio and building up
a portfolio.
Right now, James is finishing up his last semester
at the University and plans
to go do a residency for a
year at Arrowmont School
of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, Tenn.
Tanya Hartman, a pro-

fessor of visual arts in the


Department of Visual Arts,
said James has a powerful intellect and is a person who is always thinking
about meaning.
He asks so much of
himself, more than any
other student with whom
I have worked, Hartman
said. I respect him because
he cares so deeply about
communicating
complex
thoughts and emotions."
As for his work, James
dabbles in a lot of different variants of ceramics,
including anatomical ceramics which he took at the
University with Jon Swindell, a professor in the Department of Visual Art.
I had to learn the muscles and the bone structure, James said. You
build from the inside out
which is hugely beneficial
to my work and it gave me
a lot of confidence.
Besides
anatomical,

James said his main work is


in what he refers to as the
doll format, which consists
of him making the heads
and hands out of clay and
then sewing the other body
parts on as well as incorporating other objects he finds
in antique shops.
I can get burned out
on things really quick and
Ill do doll format and then
work on slip cast and then
come back to dolls, James
said. Having different bodies of work helps me focus
on each thing.
One thing that James
said he enjoys is not knowing what a piece is going to
look like when it's completed.
I have had pieces where
it looks good and everything
is done like its supposed to
be done, but Im bored with
it, James said. Then you
have some where I keep
looking at it and I dont understand why I did this and

those are the things that


keep you wanting to come
back to the studio.
Hartman said James
pieces are interdisciplinary
and like fragments from a
dream.
His figures exist in an
era that is neither future
nor past, but some invented environment unique to
Richards imagination and
principles," Hartman said.
As for what he wants to
portray through his pieces,
James said he doesnt really
care.
Im scared about trying
to convey anything because
you sound like a horses ass
when you start getting clever about stuff and telling
people what to think, he
said. This is for me and it
helps me figure out why I
think about things the way
I think about them.
Edited by Shane
Jackson

Scorpio ( Oct. 23-Nov.


21)
Reach a turning point in
your personal growth and
development, with this
Scorpio Full Moon. Use your
power responsibly. Begin a
new phase toward realizing
a dream. Pay it forward.
Sagittarius ( Nov. 22Dec. 21)
Begin a new phase in your
thoughts, philosophies and
spiritual contemplation
under this Full Moon in Scorpio. Quietly listen. Remain
sensitive to what is wanted.
Nurture health and wellness.
Concentrate on clean-up.
Capricorn ( Dec. 22Jan. 19)
Complete one phase in a
community effort or group
project, and begin the next
under this Full Moon. Confer
with allies and teams. Share
gratitude and appreciation.
Get into party mode.
Aquarius ( Jan. 20-Feb.
18)
Close one professional door
and open the next. This
Full Moon highlights career
transitions. Hoarding leads
to strife. Let go of the past,
and begin an exciting new
phase.
Pisces ( Feb. 19-March
20)
Reach a turning point
in a journey under this
Full Moon. Begin a new
adventure or exploration.
New opportunities deserve
investigation. Don't believe
everything you've read. Use
your own good sense.

This is for
me and it
helps me
figure out
why I think
about things
the way I
think about
them.

-Richard James

photos by Colleen OToole/KANSAN


Richard James, a ceramist, inside his studio.

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KANSAN.COM

Once praised by Metallica frontman, Norweigan


rock group Kvelertak will perform at Granada
JACKSON DODD
@snooopdodd

orwegian
rock
group
Kvelertak
will perform at The
Granada as part of its North
American tour on April 26.
The group is composed of
frontman Erlend Hjelvik,

guitarists Vidar Landa, Bjarte Lund Rolland and Maciek Ofstad. The band also
includes Marvin Nygaard
on bass and Kjetil Gjermundrd on drums. The
group is promoting its recently announced third studio album, "Nattesferd."
Hjelvik was influenced

Contributed Photo

by some of the metal music in Stavanger, Norway,


which is where they formed
the band.
I don't think we'd be
topping the charts in many
other countries. It's, of
course, been an influence
since we listened to a lot
of rock and metal when we
started our band. We've
been influenced by everything from '70s rock to
black metal which is pretty
obvious when you hear our
music, Hjelvik said.
The group, formed in
2007, creates a hard-hitting, punk-rock style that
has garnered success since
the release of its self-titled
first studio album in 2010.
Once its second album,
"Meir," was released in
2013, the band was put on

many end-of-the-year lists


including No. 2 on Rolling Stones Best Albums of
2013 list.
"Meir" even received
praise from Metallica frontman James Hetfield, Hjelvik said.
I think it's cool that
people like James still find
time to discover new music
even if you are in one of the
biggest bands on the planet.
It's just a cool surprise and
a bonus when things like
that happen, Hjelvik said.
Roadrunner Records label spokesman Dave Rath
described their music as
"'70s-influenced, aggressive
and multi-layered."
"The band continues to
modify their songwriting
style by developing shorter and more catchy songs

without ever sacrificing the


grit and aggression that
we always expect from the
band," Rath said.
Hjelvik said the process
of creating its newest record, "Nattesferd," was different compared to how the
band recorded the first two
albums. He said the members recorded the album
live in Oslo, Norway, and
produced it themselves.
The whole band has
been contributing a lot
more to the songwriting,
Hjelvik said. I would call
this a practice space record if that makes sense.
Im really happy with how
it ended up sounding. This
probably the most accurate
representation of Kvelertak
yet in terms of the general
sound and feel.

The band's new single


off the record, "1985," was
recently released on NPR,
and a music video was put
out early this month.
"These new songs are
more concise and to the
point," Rath said. "They've
also found a way to expand
their use of background vocal melody in all the right
places."
Tickets are still available
online at The Granada's
website. Doors open at
6:30 p.m. on April 26,
and the show begins at
7:30 p.m. Kvelertak will
be joined by guests and
fellow Roadrunner Records
labelmates Wild Throne
and Torche.

Edited by Samantha
Harms

SUA will give LGBTQ+ students a welcoming


dance experience with its first Queer Prom
COURTNEY BIERMAN
@courtbierman

Students entering the


Union Ballroom Friday
might feel like theyre not in
Kansas anymore.
Student Union Activities
will host a Wizard of Ozthemed Queer Prom on April
22. The event is designed to
be a space where non-heterosexual and/or non-cisgender
students and community

members can have the prom


experience they might not
have gotten in high school.
The event is part of Spectrums Gaypril, a monthlong celebration of pride
with various events around
campus.
According to PFLAG
Parents, Families and
Friends of Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual and Transgender
People nearly 1/5 of students are physically assault-

ed at public schools because


of their sexual orientation
and more than 1/10 because
of their gender expression.
Prom can be an especially
difficult time of year, said
Vanessa Delgado of the Center for Sexuality and Gender
Diversity.
Any time you say dance,
that is a straight space, she
said. All dances are heterosexual spaces, heteronormative areas of the world.

KANSAN
CLASSIFIEDS
785-864-4358

JOBS

Rapidly expanding Property Management company seeks outgoing


& friendly P/T & F/T leasing
agents. Flex weekday schedule &
weekends required. Exp. in customer service, marketing & sales
highly
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Background
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employment or email resumes to
saddlebrook@sunflower.com. EOE
Sunflower State Games seeks energetic and responsible summer
interns to assist in event planning
and promotions for Olympic Style
Sports Festival. Visit sunflowergames.com or call
785-235-2295 to inquire.

Collin Cox and Autumn


Crafton, the current events
coordinator and the current
events assistant coordinator
of SUA, respectively, said the
Queer Prom is one of SUAs
most important events of the
semester. They came up with
the idea for a gay prom
after realizing that such an
event isnt normally found in
academic environments.
SEE QUEER PROM
PAGE 8

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Lawrence Gymnastics Academy is


hiring preschool, recreation & competitive team instructors. Gymnastics exp. preferred but will train the
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for more info 785-865-0856 or apply in person at 4930 Legends Dr.
KU Office of Admissions has
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5781BR. KC Metro Admissions
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EO/AAE. All qualified applicants
will receive consideration for employment without regard to race,
color, religion, sex(including pregnancy), age, national origin, disability, genetic information or protected Veteran Status.

Paige Stingley/KANSAN
Vanessa Delgado is the Assistant Director Coordinator for the Center for
Sexuality and Gender Diversity, and is assisting in the planning of Queer
Prom, happening April 22.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Festival Preview: Public Enemy joins


fifth-annual Free State Festival lineup
OMAR SANCHEZ
@OhMySanchez

ublic Enemy, a hip-hop


group that drew acclaim
with its interpretations
of racial injustice in the 1990s,
will be the headliner for this
year's Free State Festival, organizers announced last week.
Public Enemy will perform
a free outdoor concert for the
fifth-annual festival, which is
hosted by the Lawrence Arts
Center to celebrate popular art
and media. It runs from June
20-25.
"I think what we are trying
to do is hopefully bring something to the community that
hasnt happened before and
that theyll find engaging and
fun," said Ben Ahlvers, artistic
director of art and music for
the festival.
Last year the big concert
was George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic and the year
before that Johnny Winter.
Public Enemy has a vast
catalogue of music and was inducted into the Rock and Roll
Hall of Fame in 2013. Before
that, Public Enemy garnered
other achievements, such as
placing 44th in the "Immortals: 100 Greatest Artists of
All Time" list by Rolling Stone

magazine.
This year the Free State
Festival's theme is activism
through art. Marlo Angell, artistic director of film and performance at the LAC said Public Enemy will satisfy in both
entertainment and historical
resonance.
"They are a perfect fit for
this years programming as
they have been a voice for racial injustice and several of the
films in this years program
tackle the topic of race in various ways," Angell said.
Sarah Bishop, festival director and ideas programming coordinator seconds this notion.
She said she believes Public
Enemy's visit to Lawrence will
hit home many of the intentions the festival sets out for.
"Public Enemy is an extremely exciting group to bring
in for a free concert, and we
feel that their appearance is
very timely as our state and
our nation continue to think
about issues of race and equality, as well as how art can play
a role in galvanizing political
change," Bishop said.
The Free State Festival is
about much more than free
music. It provides activities
to the community from film,
art and educational activities.

These pillars support the festival's proceedings, which began


in 2011, according to the Free
State Festival website.

They have been


a voice for racial
injustice and
several of the
films in this years
program tackle
the topic of race
in various ways
Sarah Bishop
festival director

It began with LAC's artistic


director of film and performance: Marlo Angell. She said
she thought of the concept of
the Free State Festival in 2011
and presented a five year plan
to Lawrence Arts Center executive director Susan Tate and
artistic director of performing
arts Ric Averill.
"They responded right
away and took the project under the wings of the Arts Center and allowed it to fly," Angell
said.
What was once a small film
festival grew to be much bigger

with the help of people in and


around Lawrence, she said.
Somewhere in that five year
plan, Angell constructed the
map of what would become
the Free State Festival of today:
a series of communal events
that bring the people of Lawrence to experience something
powerful and engaging.
"I revisited that five year
plan for the festival just the
other day, and it was very rewarding to see that the festival
has truly kept course with the
vision as I intended: A weeklong celebration of film, music, art and ideas in multiple
venues that captures the heart
and soul of Lawrence, Kansas,"
Angell said.
Other acts announced include comedian Maria Bamford, who will donate part of
her festival proceeds to a lo-

cal LGBTQ+ charity Angell


said. Others are: MacArthur
Genius award winner Jad
Abumrad, whose "Radiolab"
podcast has won a Peabody
award, author Thomas Frank
of "What's the Matter with
Kansas?" and nationally-recognized Langston Hughes
scholars, who will engage in a
film screening and ideas panels to celebrate the life of the
writer/activist.
The full schedule of acts
will be available on May 1.
Passes for the festival are
available on the Free State
Festival website. The Free
State Festival will be held in
different locations and venues
throughout downtown Lawrence.
Edited by Michael
Portman

KANSAN.COM

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US Air Guitar Championships come to Lawrence


JACKSON DODD
@snooopdodd

For the first time ever,


Lawrence is hosting the US
Air Guitar Championships
at the Bottleneck on April
22. The event will be sponsored by KJHK and Student
Union Activities.
US Air Guitar is an organization responsible for
finding the best air guitar
players, and will host the
championships. Founded
in 2003, the US Air Guitar
Championships is a national event that has traveled to
many different cities and
garnered a unique fan base.
The show will be hosted by 2013 US Air Guitar
champion and University alumnus Eric Mean
Melin.
Melin, a 2006 graduate,
said he reached out to US
Air Guitar because he recognized the potential that a
type of town like Lawrence
holds for a special event like
this.
I alerted the organization, based on the fact that
Lawrence is an amazing
arts town with all kinds of
community support for fun,

bizarre, fringe culture stuff


like this," Melin said. "They
opted to give us a qualifying round. The show is going to be like WWE crossed
with Jimmy Fallon's Lip
Sync Battle. It's big, showy,
dumb, clever, and hilarious
all at the same time.
The championships will
feature 20 local competitors who will fight for a spot
to represent the U.S. and
compete in the World Air
Guitar Championships in
Oulu, Finland, in August.
The rules of the championships state that each
performance must be exactly one minute long and
the competition consists
of two rounds. Round one
is a freestyle round where
each competitor performs a
song of their choice. Round
two, however, is a compulsory round, meaning that
the top competitors from
round one perform a surprise song.
One of the contestants
is Travis Arey, who is performing under his stage
name "Eddie Hans Flailin."
Arey, a University graduate,
is also the lead singer for
local punk rock band Stiff

Gracie Williams/KANSAN
Eric Mean Melin shows off his air guitar moves. Melin won the 2013 Air
Guitar World Champion title in Finland.

QUEER PROM FROM


PAGE 7
It really gets people
thinking about the fact
that your typical prom is
predominantly heteronormative, Crafton said. You
dont really think about
that unless you have a
negative experience with
prom.
SUA approached Delgado about its idea to host
a school dance that was a
queer space that is accepting of allies, rather than
a straight space thats accepting of the LGBT community, said Crafton.
One of our biggest
struggles was how to make
this event an all-inclusive

event while not making it


seem like its just another
prom, Cox said.
One of the most important pieces of advice
Carlton and Cox said the
center gave to them was
on the usage of the word
queer, which is an umbrella term for sexual and
gender minorities. Since
the late 1980s, much of the
LGBTQ+ community has
been working to reclaim
the word from its pejorative origins.
Even just calling it
Queer Prom I think is
huge, because it really does
say something specific and
intentional, Delgado said.
Although the event was
not organized for straight

Middle Fingers.
Arey said he initially met
Melin in 2013 when Melin
was hosting aireoke, a
type of air guitar karaoke,
at the Bottleneck.
I am of the opinion that
everyone is into air guitar
whether they compete, perform or not, its a natural
instrument that everyone
is automatically equipped
with whether they realize it
or not, Arey said.
Arey said the competitiveness of the championships will be different to
adjust to after a two-year
absence from air guitar.
I actually have some
mixed feelings about the
competition angle," Arey
said. "I really like jamming
to the entire song like Aireoke requires as opposed
to the one minute cuts required for this competition.
Another
contestant,
Whitney Glory Wholesome Young, has been performing for over four years
all over the Midwest.
Young got into air guitar
through the same Aireoke
shows that Arey went to.
Young said that she
could foresee Air Guitar
getting bigger in the future because it is already
popular in Finland, where
the world championships
are held. Young added that
behind all of the fun and
costumes, air guitar is ultimately about something
you wouldn't think of:
world peace.
I will gladly put on my
cat leggings and perform
air guitar for as long as it
continues to promote that
[world peace], Young said.
Other contestants in-

and cisgender students, allies are welcome to attend.


I think its awesome
when heterosexual and
cisgender people do come
to these events because it
really does show a visible
support for a community
that is underrepresented,
Delgado said.
Queer Prom will be at
7 p.m. on April 22. Cox
said he hopes the event becomes annual.
This is something we
will try to strive to keep going every year, Cox said.
It needs to happen.
Edited by Mackenzie
Walker

clude CindAIRella, a University graduate who is


currently ranked ninth in
the world after her Finland
debut last year. Also, the
LattAIR-Day Saint is another University graduate who
placed second in K.C. last
year and moved on to the
Chicago semifinals.
Friday, April 22's show

has doors opening at 8


p.m. with the competition
beginning at 9 p.m. All
ages are welcomed and
tickets are still going for
$8 on The Bottleneck's
website. The Bottleneck is
located at 737 New Hampshire.
Edited by G.J. Melia

UMPHREYS McGEE
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MISTERWIVES

SPORTS

KANSAN.COM

2016 Kansas Relays


schedule of events
DYLAN SHERWOOD
@dsherwoodku

Every year around this


time, one of the biggest
track and field meets takes
place at Rock Chalk Park.
The 89th Kansas Relays
began on Wednesday and
will go until Saturday,
but there will be other
activities that fans can do
throughout the weekend.
All events are at Rock
Chalk Park unless otherwise noted.
Thursday, April 21:
9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.: Conclusion of decathlon and
heptathlon
Field events begin at 10
a.m.
All-day mens: Long jump,
hammer throw, shot put,
high jump, pole vault
All-day womens: Shot
put, long jump, javelin,
high jump, hammer throw
Track events begin at 5
p.m.
800 meters, 1,500 meters,
3,000 steeplechase, 5,000
meters, and 10,000 meters
Kelcie Matousek/KANSAN
Erik Harken, a freshman hurdler from Prairie Village, Kansas participates in the decathlon high jump at the
Kansas Relays.

KU Relays day one recap


GRIFFIN HUGHES
@GriffinJHughes

The 89th Kansas Relays


began Wednesday afternoon with the beginning
of the womens heptathlon
and mens decathlon.
On the womens side,
Texas Tech dominated,
landing three athletes within the top five competitors,
including both of the top
two through four events.
Kansas has only one athlete
competing in the heptathlon, junior Talia Marquez.
Marquez sits in ninth after day one, just one point
behind Monica Howard
from Emporia State. She
has a ways to go before
catching the leaders, however, as she remains 500
points behind the leader.
Most
of
Marquezs
points came in the first

event of the day; she got 768


points from a 15.57 time in
the 100-meter hurdles.
On the mens side, the
Jayhawks sent two athletes
to the track on day one:
junior Dylan Poirier and
sophomore Lucas Shaw.
Shaw couldnt claw his way
into the top 10, trailing the
next closest competitor by
80 points.
Porier enjoyed more success in day one: his 3,441
points are good enough for
fifth and he remains within
striking distance of the top
athlete at 3,795.
Just like the heptathlon,
one school dominated the
ten-event competition on
the mens side, but on that
side the Nebraska Cornhuskers are at the top. Each
of the top three competitors are from Nebraska, although the man currently

in first place, freshman Cale


Wagner, is competing unattached.
The multis will restart
again tomorrow bright and
early at 9 a.m. The rest of
the collegiate events wont
start again until Friday,
when Daina Levy leads an
extremely talented womens throwing roster to the
hammer throw at 3 p.m.
The majority of the
quadrangular events will
go on Saturday morning
through the evening. The
stacked field includes twotime All-American Sharon
Lokedi, competing in her
first ever outdoor 5,000
meters, and junior Strymar
Livingston, competing in
the 800 meters.
Edited by Brendan Dzwierzynski

s
n
o
p
u
o
c
n
a
kans
Clip and Save!

Fan events begin at 5:30


p.m.
5:30 p.m.: Mens street
pole vault in Salty Iguana
parking lot at 6th & Wakarusa Streets
Eight male competitors will compete in an
exhibition style pole vault
event. The rules will be the
same as normal pole vault
events with the competi-

tors getting three attempts


to clear the bar, according
to a KU Athletics release.
Big Jay and Baby Jay
will make an appearance,
while local businesses
around the Salty Iguana
will sell food and beverages.
Friday, April 22:
Field events begin at 8
a.m.
Morning events:
school field

High

Evening events: College


field
Track events begin at 9
a.m. and will last all day.
High school and college
meets will swap events
throughout the day. High
schools will have preliminaries in several events on
Friday.
Fan events begin at 6:00
p.m.
6 p.m.: Downtown shot
put at 8th Street between
Massachusetts and New
Hampshire Streets.
For the sixth-consecutive year, Street Shot Put
will take place in downtown Lawrence. The event
is put on by eXplore of
Lawrence and will feature some of the top shot
putters in the nation, according to a KU Athletics
release.
Saturday, April 23:
Field events:
All remaining high school
meet field events begin at
10:30 a.m.

Quadrangular events begin at 4 p.m.


Track events
10:30 a.m.

begin

at

10:30 a.m. to approximately 3:10 p.m.: High


school relays and finals
4:37 p.m.: Quadrangular
and college finals
Fan events begin at 7 a.m.
All-day: On Friday and
Saturday Lane10, which
is a food and beverage tent
will be available for fans.
Included in the Lane10
tent will be food and beverages from Salty Iguana,
Mr. Bacon Barbecue and
Torched Goodness, according to a KU Athletics
release. This will be the
second year the tent will
be at the meet.
A beverage garden will
also be available at 3:30
p.m. on Saturday, while a
family fun zone will be
available from 1-5 p.m.
That will include inflatable
games along with other
family-friendly activities,
according to the release.
Along with the fun zone,
the Army ROTC and National Guard will provide
a climbing wall, along with
a military police vehicle on
site.
8 p.m.: There will be fireworks in conjunction with
final race of the meet the
4x400 meter relay.
Edited by Mackenzie
Walker

10

SPORTS

KANSAN.COM

Quarterbacks Montell Cozart and Deondre Ford


receive additional year of eligibility from Big 12
SCOTT CHASEN
@SChasenKU

Gracie Williams/KANSAN
Quarterback Montell Cozart looks for a pass in the Kansas football 2016
spring game.

AP PHOTO
Quarterback Deondre Ford throws the ball against Rutgers last September.

On Wednesday, Kansas
football received some good
news as quarterbacks Montell Cozart and Deondre Ford
received hardship waivers
from the Big 12 Conference
for the 2015 season, according to a KU Athletics release.
It is great to see the Big
12 is giving Montell and Deondre a year back after both
of these guys had their junior
seasons end prematurely,
Kansas coach David Beaty
said in the release. They
have worked tirelessly with
our medical staff, and we are
fortunate to have two more
seasons with them in our
program.
Cozart appeared in four
games last season; Ford ap-

peared in two. The duo combined for 884 yards and two
touchdowns.
Both Cozart and Ford will
enter next year as redshirt
juniors, meaning theyll have
two years of eligibility remaining.
Most recently, the duo
was on display at the 2016
spring game. Cozart started
the game, completing 10-of19 passes for 137 yards. He
threw one touchdown and
three interceptions.
Ford, on the other hand,
attempted just nine passes,
completing four for 39 yards.
Last year, the team finished 0-12, failing to win a
single game in a season for
the first time since 1954.
Kansas will kick off the 2016
season Sept. 3 against Rhode
Island.

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WEDNESDAY MAY 4
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JESSICA PAIGE
7:45-8:15
BASKERY
8:30-9:15
ANNIE ELLICOTT
9:30-10:30 ENSEMBLE IBERICA
10:45-11:45 KRYSTLE WARREN
CALIFORNOS PATIO:
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CAPTIVA
8-8:45
ATLAS
9-9:45
VIA LUNA
10-10:45
FULLBLOODS
11-12
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7:45-8:15
NICHOLAS ST. JAMES
8:30-9
QUIRK & RUCKUS
9:15-10
COW GIRLS TRAINSET
10:15-11
JULIAN DAVIS
11:15-12:15 ROOSEVELT DIME
ERNIE BIGGS:
7:30-8
MAX JUSTUS
8:15-8:45
UH BONES!
9-9:45
L.A. WITCH
10-10:45
SAHARAN GAZELLE BOY
11-11:45
SALES
12-1
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MILLS RECORD:
6-6:45
BE/NON
7-7:45
JORGE ARANA TRIO
8-8:45
MONTA AT ODDS

THURSDAY MAY 5
CALIFORNOS:
7-7:30
SHADOW RABBITS

7:45-8:15
8:30-9:15
9:30-10:30
10:45-11:45

GOLDEN GROVES
FOXES IN FICTION
YOUR FRIEND
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CALIFORNOS PATIO:
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THE BLACKBIRD REVUE
8-8:30
MY OH MY
8:45-9:30
THE SLUTS
9:45-10:30 MIGRANT KIDS
10:45-11:30 VARIOUS BLONDE
WESTPORT SALOON:
7-7:30
AJ GAITHER
7:45-8:15
LAUREN ANDERSON
8:30-9
TRACY HUFFMAN &
THE WALKING STICKS
9:15-10
SUGAR BRITCHES
10:15-11:15 LEVI PARHAM
11:30-12:30 FORD THEATRE REUNION
ERNIE BIGGS:
7:30-8
YOUTH POOL
8:15-8:45
AMY FARRAND & THE LIKE
9-9:30
SPIRIT IS THE SPIRIT
9:45-10:30 THE PHILISTINES
10:45-11:45 LA SERA
12-1
THE BESNARD LAKES
MILLS RECORD:
6-6:45
PSYCHIC HEAT
7-7:45
THE CONQUERORS
8-8:45
SHY BOYS

FRIDAY MAY 6
CROSSROADS KC:
6-6:30
THETA INTELLECT
6:45-7:15
RACHEL MALLIN & THE WILD TYPE
7:30-8
KANGAROO KNIFE FIGHT
8:15-8:45
THE NOISE FM

9:15-10
THE STRUTS
10:30-11:45 COLD WAR KIDS
ARVEST BANK THEATER AT THE MIDLAND:
6:30-7
BLK FLANL
7:15-7:45 EBONY TUSKS
8-8:45
GALLANT
9-10
VINCE STAPLES
10:30-12
ZHU
THE BRICK:
10-10:40
11-11:40
12-12:40
1-2

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SHEL
THE GRISLY HAND
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TANK ROOM:
7:45-8:30 THE AUTHOR & THE ILLUSTRATOR
8:45-9:30 DREAMGIRL
9:45-10:30 KISSISSIPPI
10:45-11:30 THE FREE YEARS
11:45-12:30 YES YOU ARE
12:45-1:30 GGOOLLDD
RECORD BAR:
8-8:45
NOT A PLANET
9-9:45
WESTERNERS
10-10:45 BERWANGER
11-11:45
ME LIKE BEES
12-1
THE GOOD LIFE

SATURDAY MAY 7
CROSSROADS KC:
6-6:30
PINK ROYAL
6:45-7:30 LIGHT MUSIC
8-8:45
BASSH
9:15-10
ALL GET OUT
10:30-11:45 MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA
ARVEST BANK THEATER AT THE MIDLAND:
6:30-7
JOHN VELGHE & THE
PRODIGAL SONS
7:15-7:45 TBA
8-8:45
SON LITTLE

9:15-10:15

CHARLES BRADLEY &


HIS EXTRAORDINAIRES
AIMEE MANN

10:45-12
THE BRICK:
2-2:40
PEOPLES PUNK BAND
3-3:40
DEAN MONKEY &
THE DROPOUTS
4-4:40
TOUGHIES
5-5:40
MAJOR GAMES
6-6:40
REAL ADULTS
8-8:30
THOM HOSKINS
8:45-9:15
ALTOS
9:45-10:30 SANTAH
10:45-11:30 ARCHIE POWELL
11:45-12:45 THE ROCKETBOYS
1-1:45
BONZO MADRID
TANK ROOM:
2-2:40
RIALA
3-3:40
IVORY BLACK
4-4:40
RED KATE
5-5:40
HEIDI LYNNE GLUCK
6-6:40
THE ROSELINE
9:30-10
SECOND HAND KING
10:15-10:45 HEARTFELT ANARCHY
11-11:30
DUNCAN BURNETT &
THE RIOT
12-12:45
ILLPHONICS
1:15-2
THE PHANTASTICS
RECORD BAR:
2-2:40
THE WIDOWS RIDE
3-3:40
SISTERS OF.
4-4:40
BARREL MAKER/LION
5-5:40
HIPSHOT KILLER
6-6:40
VALLEY HUSH
10-10:30
FAKE DRUGS
10:45-11:45 COM TRUISE
12:15-1:15 STRFKR
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COASTLESS
3-3:40
CONNOR LEIMER
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KANSAN.COM/SPORTS | THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 2016

Paige Stingley/KANSAN
Freshman catcher Jessie Roane takes a swing at a pitch during Sunday
afternoons game against Texas Tech.

KU heads to Baylor
to fight for second
place in Big 12
BRIAN MINI

@brianminimum

Although its early in the


Big 12 conference season,
it looks like the Jayhawks
are flipping the script from
last year. In 2015, a strong
non-conference season propelled the Jayhawks into
the postseason, but it looks
like this years team has
saved the best for last.
When Kansas played
Baylor last year, the team
had just five wins through
four series. In only two
three-game series this season, Kansas has already
picked up four wins, including a sweep of Texas Tech,
who came into the series at
4-2 in conference play.
Depending on how this
years series against Baylor
goes, Kansas could find itself in second place in the
Big 12 by next week.
Baylors offense ranks
second in the Big 12 in batting average and first in
runs. Kansas ranks fourth
in both categories, although
its played seven less games
than Baylor.
Baylors offense has also
shown its base running
ability with 62 stolen bases,
while Kansas has only attempted 14 this season.
Baylor senior infielder
Sarah Smith is a big reason
for its high scoring offense.
Through 47 games, shes
batting .410 and is tied for
the team lead with 39 RBIs.
As a whole, Baylors offense doesnt strike out
much 140 times this season which could prove
difficult for Kansas sophomore pitcher Andie Formby, who will get the majority of innings this weekend.
In terms of pitching,
Baylor has two shutdown
pitchers in senior Heather Stearns and sophomore
Kendall Potts. They both
have ERAs under 2.00 and,

like Formby, can strike out


plenty of batters.
For Kansas, the aforementioned Formby has her
own impressive statistics.
Formbys ERA currently
sits at 1.79 and holds opposing batters to a .227 batting
average.
We can take a deep
breath and relax, knowing
that she isnt going to give
up many runs, sophomore
catcher Harli Ridling said
about Formby after her
shutout over the weekend
against Texas Tech.
Offensively,
Kansas
senior shortstop Chaley
Brickey is having a career
year. Her .398 batting average leads the team, and her
nine home runs tie her for
the team lead.
Being in the leadoff
spot for as much as she has
been and to get the number of RBIs that she does
is a testimate to the bottom
half of our order, Kansas
coach Megan Smith said
after Brickeys four RBI day
against Texas Tech.
Kansas has the blueprint
to beat Baylor, as evidenced
by the Oklahoma series.
While Kansas managed
to go 1-2 against a dominant Oklahoma team, Baylor was swept in Waco. The
difference? Kansas kept
every game close with runs
on the board while Baylor scored just four runs in
three games.
Kansas pitching was
able to hold Texas Tech to
three runs in their last series, and it will need to find
a way to stifle a much more
potent offense this week.
The series against Baylor
will start at 6:30 p.m. Friday in Waco.
Edited by Madi
Schulz

Missy Minear/KANSAN
Junior catcher Michael Tinsley hits the ball against Wichita State. Kansas beat Wichita State on Tuesday night at Hoglund Ballpark.

Michael Tinsley continues to


anchor surging Kansas offense
WESLEY DOTSON
@WesleyDee23

he offense for Kansas


baseball was on full
display in Tuesdays
midweek game against
Wichita State.
The team has recently
found consistent offensive production and showcased that in the 9-3 win
against a Wichita State
team that ranks last in the
Missouri Valley Conference in pitching.
A large part of that recent upswing in offense
is junior catcher Michael
Tinsley.
As a team, the Jayhawks have scored 28
runs in their last four
games against Division I
competition. Tinsley has
played a significant role in
that production, with nine
hits and four RBIs in the
same stretch.
Hes
unbelievable,
Kansas coach Ritch Price
said. Hes dialed in.
Against Wichita State,
Tinsley extended his sea-

son-long hitting streak to


11 games, as he blasted a
two-run homer to right in
the third inning. It was his
first home run of the season.
After the game, Tinsley
said it felt great to finally
get that blast out of the
way.
A running joke between me and [senior
outfielder] Joe Moroney
is that he has more home
runs than me, Tinsley
said. Now were tied, so
now we can just kind of
joke about who is going to
hit the next one.
He extended the hitting streak to 12 games on
Wednesday, with two hits
against Baker, an NAIA
school.
In his last 11 games,
Tinsley is hitting better
than .500 with five doubles and seven RBIs.
My approach feels better, he said. Throughout
the season, Ive just kind
of been adjusting my approach a little bit more.
Right now I just feel that
my approach is solid.

Tinsley has been a


model of consistency in
his three seasons at Kansas, which has been especially important this year.

Throughout the
season, Ive just
kind of been
adjusting my
approach a little
bit more. Right
now I just feel
that my approach
is solid.
Michael Tinsley
junior catcher

At times, the teams offense has struggled with


some of the other players
failing to find that consistency, including key players like sophomore shortstop Matt McLaughlin and
senior second baseman
Colby Wright.
However, while others
have struggled at times, a
hitter to keep a tab on for
the rest of the season is

freshman outfielder Devin


Foyle. He had five hits
and seven RBIs over the
weekend against Texas in
a three-game span.
Foyle
followed
up
that performance against
Wichita State with an
RBI-single. He then had
two more hits against Baker and now has 22 RBIs on
the season, second on the
team behind Tinsley.
The guy is probably
the most on-fire Ive ever
seen anybody, Tinsley
said. Its amazing to see
a switch-hitting freshman
come in and just tear it
up as he has. Hes both a
great kid and a great hitter, and I couldnt be happier for him.
While hitters like Foyle
are making their presence
felt, Kansas will need Tinsley to continue to anchor
the lineup when traveling
to Samford for a threegame set this weekend in a
non-conference tilt.
The first game in that
series will be Friday, April
22, at 6 p.m.

Miller and Campbell earn Big 12 honors


ERIK NELSON
@erikthefan

Kansas senior Chelsie Miller and coach Clark


Campbell were honored by
the Big 12 yesterday after
the completion of the 201516 season.
Miller was named Big
12 Swimmer of the Year,
while Campbell was named
Big 12 Coach of the Year.
Miller is the first swimmer
from Kansas to receive this
honor.
Campbell, on the other
hand, earned Big 12 Coach
of the Year honors for the
second time in his career.
He last won the award in
2014.
This year with Campbell
at the helm, the teams record was 9-4, losing only
part of one meet at home
in Robinson Natatorium:

a January 23 split against


Denver and Missouri State.
Miller owns six school
records, more than any other Kansas swimmer, and
will represent Kansas at the
2016 U.S. Olympic Trials.
She will compete in
the 200- and 400-meter
individual medleys, the
200-meter butterfly and the
800-meter freestyle.
Its an incredible honor.
These awards are generated
by people noticing whats
been done in the program,
and Chelsie has had a storied career in swimming,
Campbell said in a KU Athletics release. Shes one
of the best that weve ever
had, and for her to be recognized by the conference
for all of her accomplishments through the years is
special.
If Miller does well, she

may have the opportunity to compete in the 2016


Summer Olympics in Rio
de Janeiro, with the likes of
California-Berkeleys Missy
Franklin.
It means so much to get
Kansas the recognition,
Miller said in the release.
I wouldnt be anywhere
without the program, the
coaches and especially the
team. To have my name attached to Kansas is special
in itself.
Campbell echoed a similar message with regard to
his own award.
Its simply a reflection
of the program, Campbell
said in the release. The
award happens to go to the
coach, but it would never
happen if you didnt have
everyone around you and
yourself performing at a
high level on a daily basis.

Missy Minear/KANSAN
Senior Chelsie Miller races against Missouri State and Denver University Saturday afternoon in Lawrence.