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Development Administration:

Development Administration is administration for


development purpose. It is a version of public administration for
underdeveloped or developing nations who want to improve themselves using public
administration.

Sector- Health and Social Sector


Case Study
Pustikar an initiative for change
Pustikar is retail centre, provided by State government through
which SHGs can sell their product. So through Pustikar SHGs are
able to market the products of SHGs. Some other assistance is also
provided under OLM.
The selected SHGs are supplying branded products of HUL, ITC & Britannia
in Tribal Residential Schools also the products manufactured by SHGs of
inside (Sanitrary napkin of baripada) and outside districts like coconut oil
from keojhar and turmeric from kandhmal.
Pustikar is also supplying raw material to Chhatua Producer groups
Chhatua is ready to eat mix prepared with lentils, wheat, flattened rice, milk
power and dry fruits,
District administratin has provided an opportunity for strengthening sustainable
livelihood of the SHGs by engaging then in trading and retail marketing of products
through Pustikar retail centres. The SHGs have been selected by CDPOs and most of
the SHGs are financed under SGSY. Besides, other assistances have been provided
under OLM (Odisha livelihood mission). The selected SHGs are supplying branded
products of HUL, ITC & Britannia in Tribal Residential Schools also the products
manufactured by SHGs of inside (Sanitrary napkin of baripada) and outside districts
like coconut oil from keojhar and turmeric from kandhmal. The SHGs are also selling
their products to local community and to AWCs under SNP. The ever expanding
market is enhancing the profit margin of the SHGs and making them self reliant
economically. Now these selected SHGs have formed their own producer group where
production and packaging units have been established under the assistance of OLM
and ORMAS. So far, they are supplying products in 421 schools and made a sales
turnover of Rs 1511 crore within the span of eleven months.
Implementation Design
1. Selection of SHGs for retailing of product and for procurement of raw material
and processing
2. Identification of infrastructure and transportation
3. Sources of fund

4. Training
5. Regular interaction between head master of school and SHG
6. Collection of regular indent
7. Regual monitoring of stocks and quality
8. Consolidation of information both on production, procurement and demand for
supply management and distribution logistics.
Supply of raw material to chhatua producing groups
Based on the requirement of raw material of chhatu (RTE) in district
the Pustikar retail bring the raw material in bulk from farmers and
wholesaler and sales the same to the chhua group in the lesser
price. With this system pustikar retail is also getting the margin of
profit and chhatua marking group gets the benefit on quality and
supply of raw material in time. Based on the requirement of raw
material of RTE-Chhatua under ICDS supplememtary nutrition
programme in the district, the Pustikar retail centres brings the raw
material in bulk from farmers and wholesaler and supply the same
to the RTE-cHHATUA PROCESSING GROUPS AT LESSER PRICE THAN
THE PREVAILING MARKET PRICE. With this system Pustikar retail is
also getting the margin of profit and chhatua processing groups
reaping the benefit on getting quality raw material and also in time.
Monitoring mechanism
BLOCK LEVEL
BDO and CDPO
District level
Collector and District Magistrate
Project Director-DRDA
DWO/DSWO and CE-DSMS
2013-14
Financial
Benefits
in Rupees
March
April
July
August
September
October
November
December

Sales
405321
607376
1599505
1930685
2046769
1945355
1868007
944057

January
Fabruary

Mar-14

1247931
1805395
144004
01

713818

Sales 2013-14
2500000
2000000
1500000
1000000

Sales

500000
0

HEALTH

Total Population (Census 2011) (In Crore)


Decadal Growth (%) (Census 2011)
Crude Birth Rate ( 2013)
Crude Death Rate (2013)
Infant Mortality Rate (2013)
Maternal Mortality Rate (2010-12)
Total Fertility Rate (SRS 2012)
Sex Ratio (Census 2011)
Child Sex Ratio (Census 2011)

Orissa
India
4.19
121.01
13.97
17.64
19.6
21.4
8.4
7
51
40
235
178
2.1
2.4
978
940
934
914

NRHM

Health Infrastructure of Orissa


Particulars

Require In
d
positio

shortfal
l

n
Sub-centre
Primary Health Centre
Community Health Centre
Health worker (Female)/ANM at Sub
Centres & PHCs
Health Worker (Male) at Sub Centres
Health Assistant (Female)/LHV at PHCs
Health Assistant (Male) at PHCs
Doctor at PHCs
Obstetricians & Gynecologists at CHCs
Pediatricians at CHCs
Total specialists at CHCs
Radiographers at CHCs
Pharmacist at PHCs & CHCs
Laboratory Technicians at PHCs & CHCs
Nursing Staff at PHCs & CHCs

8136
1308
327

6688
1226
377

7914
6688
1226
1226
1226
377
377
1508
377
1603
1603
3865

8211
3827
629
0
1069
152
76
317
55
1515
371
867

1448
82

2861
597
1226
157
225
301
1191
322
88
1232
2998

The National Rural Health mission (NRHM) was on 12th April


2005, to provide accessible, affordable and quality health care to
the rural population, especially the vulnerable groups.
The key features in order to achieve the goals of the Mission
include making the public health delivery system fully functional
and accountable to the community, human resources management,
community involvement, decentralization, rigorous monitoring &
evaluation against standards, convergence of health and related
programmes form village level upwards, innovations and flexible
financing and also interventions for improving the health indictors.
Mayurbhanj, which is the largest district of Orissa, has a
population of 2519738 (2011 census) of which about 60% are
tribals. Only 23% of deliveries conducted in the district are
institutional. Untrained personnel do 30% of deliveries. 15% children
do not receive desired immunization in their first year of life. Only
68% of pregnant ladies complete three antenatal check ups.
mayurbhanj
Santion
post

In
position

short fall

medical officer (assistant


surgen)
specialist
ANM
Multi purpose Worker
MPW (M)
staff nurse
lab technician

161
111
666

150
96
607

11
15
59

264
130
66

61
112
57

203
18
9

STRENGTHS

Adequate number of health institutions in the district

Liaisons with NGOs / PRI / UNICEF / CARE and other


organizations

Good networking with ICDS (W&C Dept.) and District Social


Welfare Officer

Well maintained system of waste management in hospitals-bio


medical waste.

WEAKNESSES

Poor and Limited infrastructure

Overcrowding of indoors of the hospitals at district, sub-division and


CHCs
(FRUs) without any space for accommodation of attendants of
the admitted patients

Non-availability of Attendants Rest shed


OPPORTUNITIES

Widespread network of ICDS and Health department

Efficient and willing manpower

Availability of adequate space for construction of labor rooms


and Attendants Rest shed. ZSS/ IRCS will manage the facilities
thus there wont be any problem for maintenance.

THREAT

Inaccessible hilly and forest area, absence of infrastructure for


institutional delivery.

INDUSTRY
Cottage industries- SABAIGRASSPRODUCT:
Sabai grass is grown in a wide part of Mayurbhanj district which is mainly
used for making Sabai Rope. Sabai Ropes are mostly sold out side the state for use in
weaving Charpai (Cots) and in paper manufacturing concerns. Sabai rope is also used
in making Sofa sets, Chairs, Tea Poy etc. The main body frames of the Chairs and
sofas are made in Bamboo and wood and Sabai rope is woven and coiled over the
frame to give a finishing shape, which attains exceptional excellence. The civil Jail of
Baripada is pioneer in introducing such Sofa and some other items namely Car mats,
Screens, Carpets etc.

In recent years utility articles like Dining mat; Fruit Basket/Tray; Flower vess
etc. are produced by using jute twine along with Sabai rope with intervention of
National Council of Jute Development.

Development Commissioner Handicrafts Govt. of India through their


facilitating agency ANWESA, Bhubaneswar have conducted design development
program at village Churuni of Khunta Block by involving the traditional sabai craft
artisans and 17 (seventeen) prototypes in sabai rope has been developed, which looks
beautiful and shall fetch good market price. The sabai product making is thus a

flourishing handicraft trade of the district. At present about 50 artisans are engaged in
sabai product making exclusively in Baripada and Betnoti Block areas.
With growing demand for Sabai grass furniture and sabai products, one
training centres have been opened at Baripada by Director Handicraft and Cottage
industry Odisha to train local boys and girls particularly from Scheduled Caste and
Scheduled Tribe groups. There is one NGO in the name of DASI at Madhuban in
Baripada for production of Sabai-Jute diversified products. They have participated in
various State level and out state exhibition and sold their articles

3.5

TOURISM

Tourism is an important sector and provision of amenities as well as


beautification of the tourist sites will not only increase the tourist inflow but also it
will give a boost to the economic activities of the adjacent areas and people dependent
on tourism.
1.

Promoting eco-tourism at Similipal


This project is based on the hypothesis that involvement of local
communities in the tourism (called "eco-tourism' herein after) would
support their livelihood needs and consequently create their direct
stake in conservation of local culture, ecology, and environment.
Eco-tourism, in a very broad sense, means venturing into and
enjoying nature in such a way as to assure that the negative
impacts on the cultural and natural environment are minimized and
mitigated. It is, therefore, responsible tourism that, besides being
ecologically and culturally sensitive, helps the local communities in
realizing the social and economic benefits. The community based
eco-tourism" would also help in creating better understanding and
worldview about the state. Moreover, with the rising consciousness
about rural livelihoods and conservation - both cultural and
environmental - needs, a large number of responsible tourists would
have a reason to make the state a prime tourist destination.

The thick and green forests of SIMILIPAL with their extensive


grassy lands and meadows, cloud kissing peaks, precipitous and
sparkling

waterfalls,

meandering

rivers,

roaring

tigers

and

trumpeting tuskers, fleeing deer and flying squirrels, talking myna


and dancing peacocks etc make Similipal a dreamland of Nature in
the

wilderness

and

an

irresistible

destination

and

an

ideal

destination for the development of eco-tourism.


Covering a vast area of 2750 sq. km out of which 303 sq. km
from the core area, this biosphere reserve is a sanctuary and one of
the Tiger Projects and National parks of India. About 42 species of
mammals, 29 species of reptiles and 264 species of birds and 12
species of amphibians are the proud possession of this plateau. In
addition, Similipal offers a wide variety of attractions. The scenic
wonders here include waterfalls, spring and streams, rocks and
caves, hills and valley, meadows, stately trees and jungle trails. For
the green lovers, the lush green forests and the orchids in bloom in
the months of May and June are a major attraction. Trekking and hill
climbing are the activities for the adventure lovers. Desolate
wilderness,

monsoon

retreat

and

archaeological

sites

are

experiences in themselves. The animal lovers can go for the wild


animal viewing, basking crocodiles or the crocodile hatchery at
Ramtirtha. Bird watchers can go for bird watching for avian glimpse.
The primitive tribes present in the area are Khadias, Kolha,
Mankedia and Santhals.
Devgarh waterfallIndira Awas Yojna
Indira Awaas Yojana (IAY) was launched during 1985-86 as a sub-scheme of
Rural Landless Employment Guarantee Programme (RLEGP) and continued
as a sub-scheme of Jawahar Rozgar Yojana (JRY) since its launching from
April, 1989. It has been delinked from the JRY and has been made an
independent scheme with effect from January 1, 1996.

The major weaknesses in tourism sector are i) inadequate facilities ii)


inadequate lighting, iii) absence of ancillary attractions, pathways and safety measures
iv) absence of research facilities to preserve and popularize tribal Chhau dance.