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MDM Webcast

May 25, 2011


2 - 3 p.m. Eastern

Motor Management Truths


and Consequences:
Understanding Electric Motor
Rewinds and Efficiency

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Todays Web cast


MDM and motor management strategies

Overview of motor repair and rewinds


Mechanical rebuilding and rewinding
Effects of repair and rewind on efficiency
Resources and considerations

Questions and Answers


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Motor Decisions MatterSM


Managed by CEE, a national awareness campaign to:

Encourage sound motor management, including


Demonstrate financial benefits of life cycle cost analysis
Inform motor repair-replace decisions
Promote premium efficiency motors and
best practice motor repair

Effective Motor Management

Motor Management
Truths and Consequences: Understanding
Electric Motor Rewinds and Efficiency

Tom Bishop, P.E.


Electrical Apparatus
Service Association, Inc.
St. Louis, MO

Background: What is EASA


Electrical Apparatus Service Association
Trade association serving the electrical and

mechanical apparatus sales, service and repair


industry
Founded in 1933
More than 1,900 member firm locations worldwide;
approximately 1,400 in the U.S.
Supports its members with industry research,
engineering services, and education
Establishes industry standards and practices
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Motor Repair and Rewind


Overview
All repairs include mechanical rebuilding
Some repairs require rewinding

Repair truths and consequences


Key resources
Key factors that influence the repair
decision

Rewind versus All Repairs

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Source: A Survey of Faults ..., IEEE Petroleum and Chemical Industry Paper No. PCIC-94-01.

Mechanical Rebuilding
Consists of
Test and inspect
Disassemble
Cleaning/overhaul
Measurement of mechanical fits
Bearing replacement
Restore mechanical fits and components
Assemble and test

Most repairs are mechanical rebuilding


without rewinding

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Mechanical Rebuilding
Test and inspect
Disassemble
Cleaning/overhaul

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Mechanical Rebuilding
Measurement of fits
Bearing replacement
Restore mechanical fits
and components

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Mechanical Rebuilding
Assemble and test
Final step after
mechanical repair with
or without rewind

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Rewinding
A sub-process to
mechanical rebuilding
Random (round wire)
windings
Form coil windings

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Rewinding
Resin treatment
and curing

Electrical testing

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Effect of Repair and Rewind on


Efficiency
Truths

and Consequences

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Truths
Rewinding using
best practices
Maintains efficiency
May improve
efficiency

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Truths
Maintain efficiency by
Copy-rewind or winding
pattern improvement
Using same winding
coil wire area
Using same average
length of turns

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Truths
Opportunity to improve
efficiency by

Wire
Wire Size:
Size:

AWG 17

Bare
BareDiameter
Diameter == .0453
.0453

Wire Size:

AWG 16

Bare Diameter = .0508

Using larger winding


coil wire area
Reducing average
length of turns
Average length of turn
= (2 x Ls) + (4 x Lc)
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Truths
Efficiency does not change with
subsequent rewinds
Core losses do not increase
Winding data rarely changes

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Truths
Repairing can restore:
Reduction in efficiency
due to prior repairs
Restoration associated
with a rewind
Restoration associated
with mechanical repair

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Truths
Repairing can restore:
Reduction in efficiency
due to damage from
motor failure(s)
Associated with
winding failure(s)
Associated with
mechanical failure(s)

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Truths
Repairing can restore:
Motors to like-new
condition
Sometimes even better
than new

Repairs can enhance


suitability of motor for
its application and
environment
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Consequences
Consequences of poor
practice repairs:
Reduced efficiency
Reduced reliability

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Consequences
Reduction in efficiency
can occur
Core damage due to
winding removal
Not the only reason for
reduction in efficiency
during repair
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Consequences
Reduction in efficiency
-- other factors
Winding copper
losses increased due to
incorrect winding data or
method
Bearing friction losses
increased due to
incorrect bearings, fits,
improper lubrication
(I2R)

Wire Size:

AWG 16

Bare Diameter = .0508

Wire Size:

AWG 17

Bare Diameter = .0453

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Consequences
Consequences of best practice repairs:
Efficiency maintained
Efficiency may be improved
Reliability maintained
Reliability may be improved
Motor description

Efficiency
before rewind

Efficiency
after rewind

Efficiency change

Comments

7.5hp 4 pole

83.2%

84.0%

+0.8%

concentric to lap
5 burnouts 1 rewind

100hp 4 pole

93.0%

93.6%

+0.6%

full to half slot lap

100hp 4 pole

93.0%

93.7%

+0.7%

3rd rewind

0.0%

full to half slot lap


1st and 2nd rewinds

150hp 2 pole

95.9%

Source: EASA/AEMT Motor Rewind Study, 2003

95.9%

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Key Resource Documents


ANSI/EASA AR100 2010
Recommended Practice for the Repair of
Rotating Electrical Apparatus

EASA/AEMT Rewind Study


The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Motor
Efficiency

EASA Tech Note 16


Guidelines for Maintaining Motor Efficiency
During Rebuilding
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ANSI/EASA AR100
The American National
Standard for repair of
rotating electrical apparatus
Purpose: establish
guidelines in each step of
electrical apparatus
rewinding and rebuilding
Concisely (22 pages)
describes best practice
repairs
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ANSI/EASA AR100 Benefits


Provides guidance for service centers to
perform best practice repairs
End users are assured that compliant
repairs follow a national standard

Results:
Quality repairs
Reliable repairs
Efficiency maintained

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ANSI/EASA AR100 Content


General
Identification, inspection, condition assessment,
failure analysis, cleaning, transport

Mechanical repair
Shafts, bearings, lubrication
14 fit and tolerance tables

Rewinding
Core inspection, winding removal, winding
specification

Testing
Insulation resistance, high-potential, surge,
core laminations, no-load

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EASA/AEMT Rewind Study


Key content: Good Practice Guide

Inspection and dismantling


Testing
Winding removal and rewind
Mechanical repairs
Reassembling

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EASA/AEMT Rewind Study


Key content: Good Practice Guide

Lessons learned
Guide good practices
AR100 best practices
Provides source details for
good/best practices
Repair reference document
for service centers
Specification reference
document for end users
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EASA Tech Note 16*


Key content

Dos include
Core test before and after
winding removal
Repair or replace defective
laminations
Evaluate impact on efficiency if
winding design changes

Donts include
Overheat stator core/use open
flame
Short laminations when
grinding/filing
Increase winding resistance

* Guidelines for Maintaining


Motor Efficiency During
Rebuilding
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Key factors in repair or rewind


decision
Horsepower rating
Economic evaluation

Motor type/features
Availability of new

Maintenance history
Evaluate reliability

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Questions?

Thank You!
www.easa.com
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Contact Information
Motor Decisions Matter Campaign
www.motorsmatter.org
Email: mdminfo@cee1.org
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