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FOUR YEAR

REVIEW
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THURSDAY, APRIL 28, 2016 | VOLUME 130 ISSUE 27

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN


THE STUDENT VOICE SINCE 1904

Alex Robinson/KANSAN
Student activist Kat Rainey addresses Full Senate on March 9, urging them to fund the Multicultural Student Government.

Multicultural Student Governments funding awaits


chancellors decision as deadline approaches
LARA KORTE
@lara_korte

t is a waiting game for


the newly created Multicultural Student Government at the University.
The groups funding is
part of the fee review bill
and hinges on Chancellor
Bernadette
Gray-Littles
decision. Gray-Little must
approve or modify the bill
by the end of the semester.
If she doesnt agree
with any part of the budget,
she could veto that part or
strike that part, said Mike
Williams, University Senate President.
The senate fee review
bill, which becomes the
campus fee students pay
every semester, allocates
funds to campus organizations. Student Senate voted
51-9-6 to fund the Universitys first-ever Multicul-

tural Student Government


on March 9. If the chancellor approves of the entire
bill, it will go to the Board
of Regents for final approval before becoming part
of the University's official
budget for the fall.
Right now, the MSG
exists as a registered organization through the
Student Involvement and
Leadership Center. Proponents said it is one of the
first multicultural student
governments in the nation;
however, its path forward
is unclear.
Although Student Senate approved the government last month, Williams said the University
Senate code would need
to be changed before the
MSG could function independently of Student Senate. He said members of
MSG consulted him a few

weeks ago about how to become a government.


The concern I have
with where things stand
right now, is the timing of
what they hope to accomplish, Williams said.
And it is unlikely for the
administration to create
a code that includes another student government
because it takes time. The
faculty senate has been
in the process of revising
its own code for over five
years, he said.
With roughly three
weeks left in the semester,
Williams said it is virtually impossible to make the
changes and establish the
new government as part of
the University code.
The problem with a
parallel government is
that, by my read of the
code, is thats not really a
possibility, Williams said.

If MSG is unable to exist


as a separate government,
there are other options,
Williams said. One would
be for MSG to be a caucus
group within Student Senate instead of a separate
student government.
A caucus within a representative group like Student Senate can actually
wield a lot of power, and in
many ways it still requires
that members be elected,
that certain distribution of
membership be allocated,
Williams said.
Regardless of what power or recognition the MSG
receives from the University Senate, Williams said it
can still exist as a student
group. He said it could
use that platform to voice
its opinions and influence
senate actions.
Outside of University
Senate, there is potential

for representation on the


state level, although the
process is difficult.
Currently no Regents
policy exists to mandate
that a University can only
have one student government, said Breeze Richardson, Communications
Director for the Regents.
But the Student Advisory
Committee, which makes
recommendations to and
helps advise the Regents,
allows only one representative from each of the six
universities.
Each
representative
must be the highest student executive officer, according to Kansas statute
74-3229. For the University, that would mean the
Student Body President.
Richardson said the
statute would have to be
changed for the Multicultural Student Government

to obtain representation
on SAC. That adds roughly
another year or more to the
process.
They'd have to introduce the bill to the legislature, and wouldn't have an
opportunity for that until
the legislative session in
2017, Richardson said.
Then depending on the
success of that bill, there's
lots of steps.
Williams said it is highly unlikely the state legislature would be open to giving the University a second
seat on SAC for a member
of MSG when it wouldnt
do the same thing for every
other school.
Every other school in
Kansas hasnt gone down
this path, Williams said.
SEE MSG PAGE 2

Campus accessibility information


available on new ADA website
TANNER HASSELL
@thassell17

The newly restructured


ADA Resources Center for
Equity and Accessibility recently unveiled its new umbrella website, designed to
help members of the University community with disabilities find and utilize resources to get around on campus
and around Lawrence.
According to the new
website, the Center in conjunction with the Academic Achievement & Access
Center (AAAC) and other
campus partners, seeks to
create an environment that
is friendly and accessible to
University community members, as well as visitors with
disabilities.
Before the new website
was unveiled, there wasnt
a place you could go to have
access to every single type of
accessibility thats available
on campus or in Lawrence,
ADA Resources Center Director Catherine Johnson
said. The new site serves as
an umbrella website for all of
these services.
Johnson, who took over
as the director in January,
said the new website is part
of restructuring how ADA resources are delivered at the
University.

She said the Resources


Center was called the Office
of Accessibility and ADA Education before she arrived. It
was renamed to better reflect
the image was what she had
in mind for the service.
My vision of what were
doing is looking at both accessibility under the ADA
and accessibility issues
across campus, Johnson
said. We also do a lot of
work with inclusion on campus, making sure the environment is inclusive for individuals with disabilities.
Johnson and University
graduate student Jennifer
Marcinkowski currently run
the Resources Center. For
Marcinkowski, a student
with disabilities, she said
creating the website helped

address issues she experienced when first coming to


the University.
I suffer from reflex
sympathetic dystrophy, a
nerve disorder that sometimes affects my ability to
move my arm, push, pull
or lift things. Some days I
cant lift my arm above my
head. Marcinkowski said.
I also have a brain disorder called pseudotumor
cerebri, where the brain
behaves as though it has a
tumor when it doesnt. It
creates excess fluid, which
creates pressure on the
brain and eyes. It can eventually lead to loss of eyesight.
SEE ADA PAGE 2

Tanner Hassell/KANSAN
Graduate student Jennifer Marcinkowski currently helps run the Resource
Center.

Alex Robinson/KANSAN
Gabby Naylor, new student body vice president, speaks to Student Senate.

Senate meets for last time this semester


CONNER MITCHELL
@ConnerMitchell0

The final Student Senate meeting of the 2015-16


academic year saw a transition from the current
Senate body to the newly-elected OneKU coalition. Senate also passed a
bill raising the University
Daily Kansans fee for the
next three years.
Newly elected Student
Body President Stephonn
Alcorn, Student Body Vice
President Gabby Naylor
and elected senators took
over the positions.
Three holdover Senators were elected from
the current Senate body to
continue serving as senators for the 2016-17 Senate session: Isaac Bahney,
Adam Steinhilber and Sophia Templin.
Seven
undergraduate students were elected

to serve as representatives on University Senate


for the 2016-17 academic
year: Zoya Khan, Nobus
Oghenekaro, Loic Njiakin,
Victoria Snitsar, Jacob
Murray, Dylan Jones and
Tymon Wall. Danica Hoose
and Brittney Oleniacz were
elected as University Senate
graduate representatives.
Khan, Murray and Oleniacz were also elected to
serve as representatives on
the Student Executive Committee.
Alcorn and Naylor also
presented members of their
Executive Staff, all of whom
the new Senate body approved unanimously.
Chief of Staff: Danny Summers
Policy and Development Director: Dalton Wiley
Diversity and Inclusion Director:
Abdoulie Njai
Communications Director: Connor Birzer
Internal Affairs Director: Mitch

Reinig
Government Relations Director:
Mady Womack
Treasurer: Allyssa Castilleja
Assistant Treasurer: Whit Collins
Graduate Affairs Director: Amy
Schumacher

Senate also passed a


funding bill from the Student Executive Committee
raising the University Daily Kansans fee from $1 to
$2.50 per student for the
next school year. For the
following two years, the
Kansan will receive $2 per
student of the student fee.
Senators approved the bill
by a vote of 42-2-4.
After Fiscal Year 2019,
the Kansan will no longer
request funding from Student Senate.

Edited by Madi
Schulz

news
Kansan
staff

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KANSAN.COM/NEWS | THURSDAY, APRIL 28, 2016

KUs Project for Innocence helps bring


justice to wrongfully-convicted man
MATT OSTROWSKI
@matto1233

fter spending a
night at the TownePlace
Suites
in
downtown Lawrence, Floyd
Bledsoe walked to the lobby
for coffee.
The desk clerk looked up
from his newspaper when
Bledsoe entered the lobby.
His eyes darted from the
newspaper, to the television
screen, and back to Bledsoe.
Can I ask you a personal question? Is that you?
the clerk asked, pointing to
the television.
That December 2015
morning was Bledsoes
first day of his new life. The
previous day, he had been
released from prison after
being sentenced to life in
2000. Bledsoes case was
all over the newspapers and
televisions.
He was convicted in
2000 for the murder of his
14-year-old sister-in-law,
Camille Arfmann. She was
raped, shot, and had her
body left in the family trash
MSG FROM PAGE 1
Joe Monaco, spokesperson for the Chancellors office, said in an email Tuesday that the Chancellor has
received the Student Senates budget proposal, but
no action has been taken.
Gabby Naylor, the recently elected Student
Body Vice President for the
2016-17 year as a part of
the OneKU coalition, said
regardless of the outcome
of the Chancellors decision, she, Student Body
President-Elect Stephonn
Alcorn and the rest of the
coalition, will continue to
support MSG.
We are committed to
finding ways to represent
multicultural
students,
no matter what happens,
Naylor said.
Richardson said the
board plans to meet May
18. Universities typically present their budget
proposals at the meeting. However, that day is
a floating deadline and
there is no guarantee budgets will be discussed if the

dump.
Other than a brief ninemonth period from 2008
to 2009, Bledsoe spent the
better part of 15 years serving a life sentence for that
crime which he didnt
commit.
In
December
2015,
Bledsoe was freed with the
assistance of the Universitys Project for Innocence,
a law school program that
specializes in post-conviction litigation. Earlier this
month, three professors
accepted the Sean OBrien
Award for outstanding
work on this case.
The project receives
about 200 letters a year
requesting its assistance.
Alice Craig, a Project for Innocence staff attorney, said
the team opens about 100
cases per year, and currently they have 12 open.
After his release, Bledsoe soon learned that being
free still had a price. He had
no identification, no wallet,
no money no clothes and
nowhere to turn. When he
was finally released, the

Project for Innocence lawyers and law students were


the ones he could rely on for
everyday life questions.
They were constantly
checking on me, and talking
with me and calling me to
make sure every things
all right, Bledsoe said.
Whenever I had a question, or burned eggs, they
would so lovingly make fun
of me and help me through
it.
The beginning
University law professor Paul Wilson founded
the Project for Innocence
in 1965. Now, it exists as an
opportunity for University
law students to gain real
experience in conviction reversals, having won 28 cases since 2009.
The Project for Innocence first became involved
in the Bledsoe case in 2004.
Bledsoe had just lost his
direct appeal at the state
level, and was about to begin state post-conviction,
which happens after a di-

legislature is still in session, Richardson said.


Richardson said tuition
proposals would be postponed if the legislature
were still in session because the Regents would
still be waiting to see the
state budget, so allocation
of funds would be difficult.
She said it is typical for
Universities to submit budgets about two weeks prior
to the meeting. The first
reading would take place at
the May 18 meeting, and a
final vote would take place
in June.
Although some details
about MSG are up in the
air, its leaders have gone
forward with meetings and
plan to begin in the fall semester.
At MSGs first community forum on April 14,
leader and advocate for
the group Katherine Rainey said the MSG will work
in a similar way to Student Senate. For example,
it would include executive
officers and senators, but
the two entities would be
separate.
Were going to oper-

ate the way that a student


government would, but
with our new spin and
our specific purpose and
our specific goals, Rainey
said during the meeting. I
think the notion of centering multicultural students
is just so different.

SEE PROJECT PAGE 3

We are
committed
to finding
ways to represent
multicultural
students,
no matter what
happens.
Gabby Naylor
student body vice
president

She added: Its literally


never been done before, so
by nature its going to be
different, and its going to
be set apart.
Part of the approval of
the MSG was the agree-

Contributed Photo
Floyd Bledsoe after being released from prison, where he served nearly 17
years for a crime he didnt commit.

ment that the dispersal of


the Multicultural Education Fund, or MEF, would
be up to the discretion of
the MSG. Naylor said she
does not expect the two entities to be isolated.
I definitely anticipate a
lot of collaboration, especially with [Multicultural
Education Fund], Naylor
said. I think they can go
through MSG, and I also
see those groups still being
able to come through Student Senate and get that
money that they deserve
as well.
At the forum, Rainey
said she expects MSG and
senates relationship to be
driven by a common goal:
To provide for students at
the University.
Understanding that
there are going to be differences, she said. And
there are going to be disagreements, and there are
going to be times where
were going to be frustrated.
Right now, plans for
the MSG are in the beginning stages. Rainey said

the summer will be a time


to hold workshops and
additional meetings. That
way they can figure out
how the MSG will operate beside Student Senate,
who will be involved and
how it will serve multicultural students at the University.
Edited by Brendan
Dzwierzynski

THIS WEEK
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ADA FROM PAGE 1


She said when she first
came to campus, she learned
there were many resources
that werent widely publicized.
Of course everybody
points you to the AAAC,
which is resource number
one. But there are other parts
to having a disability than
just the classroom, she said.
If youre in the classroom or
on campus or out in the community, you still have to deal
with a disability.
Marcinkowski said her
experience as an independent living specialist helping people in several Kansas
counties live at home with
disabilities helped establish
what resources needed to be
available on the site.
After two years working
in the field, I was able to pull
together all of these different
resources to cover all different aspects of life with a
disability not just for students, but for the KU community as a whole, Marcinkowski said.
Some of the resources
available on the website include the Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns
and Alphapointe, which services vision/low vision. Part
of bringing these resources
together is helping members
of the University community
with disabilities that come
not only from Lawrence and

Kansas, but from around the


country and the world as
well.
We want to provide as
much of a one-stop shop as
possible for students, faculty
and staff, no matter where
they are coming from, Marcinkowski said.
When it comes to accessibility on campus, Johnson
said the Hawk Route, the accessibility path around campus, is a resource the Center
has worked to promote.
Weve filmed some brief
videos of faculty, staff and
students using the Hawk
Route,
Johnson
said.
Weve filmed six or seven so
far. We hope to film 25 total,
for the number of years ADA
has been around.
Johnson also said the
Center will host more lunchtime conversations, where
KU community members
are invited to eat and discuss
topics like equity and inclusion in regards to disabilities.
We hosted the first
lunchtime conversation on
[April] 15, Johnson said.
"We had around 20 people
show up to talk about the
new website and what the
future lunches will be like.
Anyone on campus is invited
to come.
Johnson said the next
lunch will likely happen in
late May or early June.

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NEWS

KANSAN.COM
PROJECT INNOCENCE
FROM PAGE2
Jean Phillips, the director for the Project for Innocence, testified as an expert
witness during Bledsoes
state post-conviction trial
in 2004. Phillips cited an
ineffective defense attorney
and said there was prosecutorial misconduct for Bledsoes initial hearing.
But that failed, and after a case fails the state
post-conviction, it goes to
federal court, which is when
Project for Innocence began
its litigation.
2004 is when we first
became involved and 2007
we entered our appearance
as attorneys, Phillips said.
Bledsoe was set free in
2008 by a United States
District Court, citing an ineffective assistance of counsel, meaning Bledsoes
attorney was ineffective,
thus denying him his right
to a fair trial. But the 10th
Circuit Court of Appeals ultimately reversed the decision, simply because it was
a higher court, Phillips said.
Bledsoe returned to prison
in 2009.
They reinstated it without ever evaluating whether
or not Floyd was innocent,
she said. And thats the
hardest thing to swallow,
right?
The next step
With Bledsoe behind
bars, the Project for Innocence team turned its focus
to DNA evidence to exonerate Bledsoe.
It received permission
to conduct DNA testing in
2013. The group believed
the DNA evidence would
show Bledsoes innocence,
but they werent entirely sure they could gather
enough DNA to permanently free him.
One of the problems
with DNA testing or going
back and doing DNA testing is you have to rely on
the original investigation,

Craig said. So if they didnt


do a good job collecting evidence or samples, you cant
test anything.
Project for Innocence
teamed up with the Midwest Innocence Project, a
project that fights for similar innocence cases in Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska,
Iowa and Arkansas. The
Midwest Innocence Project
ultimately paid for the DNA
testing. And the news was
what they had hoped.
They were able to
take some of what was left
and do some DNA testing, which did show male
DNA there, and it excluded
Floyd, Craig said. But it
included Tom.

They were
constantly
checking on me,
and talking with
me and calling
me to make sure
everythings all
right.
Floyd Bledsoe
helped by KU Project for
Innocence

With DNA evidence in


hand, the team filed a motion in October of 2015 and
awaited a trial date with the
district court where Floyd
was originally convicted.
A tragic turn and a
bittersweet ending
It was November 2015.
The members of the Project
went to work in the morning and found a voicemail
from Floyds uncle on the
answering machine: Tom
Bledsoe, Floyds brother,
had committed suicide.
Tom left a suicide note
which, according to the
Project team, left little
doubt as to who committed the murder. It included

details about the murder


that werent yet known, including a map that guided
investigators to evidence,
indicating that Tom had actually committed the crime.
It all fit, and it fit so
perfectly that it would have
been very hard for someone
who hadnt actually have
done it to sort of fit the timing in, Phillips said.
For Floyd, it was bittersweet. While the DNA evidence gave him hope for
release from prison, it was
his brothers suicide note
that was the clincher.
They never knew where
she was killed and they never knew the details of what
happened that day that she
disappeared, Craig said.
Tom not only provided details and said Floyd was innocent but directed them to
evidence.
With more evidence in
hand, the group awaited the
Dec. 8 hearing.
The Dec. 8, 2015, hearing would be Floyds last
hearing. The same court
that convicted him of the
murder about 15 years prior
found Toms suicide letters
as enough evidence to reverse Floyds conviction.
Its the words youve
longed to hear, and then
when you hear them, youre
like, Did this really happen? Floyd said. And
then youre scared to move
because you think youre
dreaming.
Four months later, Floyd
lives in Hutchinson and is
trying to start a home improvement business but
still comes and visits the
team in Lawrence.
Where the family dynamic started, I really cant
tell you, Floyd said. It
went from just an attorney, to people that actually
cared. People that if you
dont call for a while, they
call to check on you. That
shows the willingness and
depth of how much they
truly care.

Graphic by Cassidy Ritter

Contributed Photo
Floyd Bledsoe poses with his attorneys. He was freed through the work of the Universitys Project for Innocence.

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opinion
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WE HEAR
FROM YOU

KANSAN.COM | THURSDAY, APRIL 28, 2016

Text your #FFA


submissions to
785-289-UDK1
(8351)
I woke up covered
in parmesan cheese
and there was mulch
all over me I was
inside. mondays
amirite
Hownis it possible to
wake up and already
be ready to go back to
sleep for the night
I hope this tornado
comes and sucks up
all my problems.

Illustration by Jake Kaufmann/KANSAN

I know I'm burnt out


with school when my
favorite thing to look
forward to about the
week is the end of it
People who chew with
their mouth open can
u not

Burbank: Optimism is crucial in


todays ever-changing world

I just tried to come up


with a funnier way to
say this but I was so
freakin disappointed
in Jurassic World
JESSE BURBANK
@Jburbank1

I miss the days of


going to the dentist
and being able to pick
out a prize when I was
done
There's always that
one person who talks
really slow during
group presentations
that puts everyone to
sleep
Always need a nap
or a snack in my 3
o'clock class

mong its many lessons, this years


presidential
election shows the strength of
pessimism in American life.
Donald Trump captured
this feeling in his uniquely disjointed way, asking,
So, when was the last time
youve seen our country win
at anything? We dont win
anymore [] Whether its
ISIS or whether its China
with our trade agreements,
no matter what it is it seems
that we dont seem to have
it. Statements like this

have propelled him to victories across the country, and


may eventually usher him
into the White House.
But Trumps appeal cannot be fully explained by his
celebrity, media prowess or
ability to capitalize on bigotry (remember banning all
Muslims?).
No, Trump is tapping
into something much deeper in the American psyche
a sense of decline, of
instability and decay that
seems to be shared by an increasing number of Americans. Indeed, 56 percent of
Americans believe the next
generation will be worse off
than this one, according to
a recent CNN poll.
But reasons for optimism, both in our nation
and the broader world, far
outweigh reasons for pessimism.
We live in a healthier,
wealthier and better educated world than ever before. According to World

Bank, over 90 percent of


the world now completes
primary education, up
from 81 percent 25 years
ago. During the same time,
extreme poverty has more
than halved, falling from
43.1 percent to 20.6 percent
of the world as globalization
has spread opportunity to
billions of people formerly
denied a chance to succeed.
Global life expectancy has
risen simultaneously, with
the average person now living five years longer today
than in 1990.
Domestically, signs of
economic and social progress persist. We now live in
a more open, tolerant society. As The New York Times
writer David Brooks puts it,
the United States has never
seen a time when so many
global cultures percolated
in the mainstream, when
there was so much tolerance for diverse ethnicities,
lifestyles and the complex
directions of the heart,

when there was so little tolerance for disorder, domestic violence and prejudice.
Likewise, real GDP per
capita in the U.S. is at its
highest point according to
the Federal Reserve, and
unemployment now rests at
5 percent, which is considered full employment by the
Bureau of Labor statistics.
Of course, optimism is
not cause for complacency.
We still face tremendous
challenges, including domestic inequality, climate
change and terrorism.
These threats require
national and international responses. For example,
real wages in the United
States have remained stagnant for the last several
decades, contributing to a
surge in income inequality,
according to the Economic
Policy Institute.
National governments
must take steps to combat
these threats, like vastly
unequal opportunities and

outcomes. As historian
Tony Judt warned in his
book, "Ill Fares the Land,"
Grotesquely unequal societies are also unstable
societies. They generate internal division and, sooner
or later, internal strife
usually with undemocratic
outcomes.
But never in the history
of our species has the opportunity to a live free and
fulfilling life been so available to so many different
types of people. Dont fall
prey to cynicism or nostalgia for a romanticized,
imaginary past. The present
is the greatest time to be
alive. And, with sustained
effort, it will continue to be
better than before.

Jesse Burbank is a junior from Quinter studying


history, political science
and economics.

Edited by Samantha
Harms

say this until you


believe it: Im gonna
b ok
It's so cool that chips
are edible spoons for
dips

They say fake it til you


make it. Sounds like
what Ive been doing
my whole college
career
My feelings about this
semester: !@&!*@(&jgf

Once I sneezed at a
stoplight and the guy
next to me thought I
dabbed so he dabbed
back....

READ MORE AT
KANSAN.COM
@KANSANNEWS
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CONTACT US
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Editor-in-chief
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THE KANSAN
EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan
Editorial Board are Vicky
Diaz-Camacho, Kate Miller,
Gage Brock and Maddy
Mikinski

arts & culture


HOROSCOPES
WHATS YOUR

KANSAN.COM | THURSDAY, APRIL 28, 2016

SIGN?

Aries (March 21-April 19)


Double-check financial data
over the next few weeks, with
Mercury retrograde. Review
statements and account
activity for errors. Pay off
bills. Secure what youve
gained. Re-affirm important
commitments.
Taurus (April 20-May 20
Get into a three-week
revision phase with Mercury
retrograde in your sign.
For the next three weeks,
grant extra patience around
communications. Organize
your many ideas. Backup
computers and files.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Go through data to find
the truth over the next
three weeks with Mercurys
retrograde. Guard against
communications breakdown
with patient reminders.
Revisit creative ideas from
the past.

Hannah Edelman/KANSAN
Alejandra Villasantes character, Molly, gets caught writing graffiti on a wall by DeAngelo Davis character, Officer Derek.

Welcome to Arroyos delves into hip-hop culture


SAMANTHA SEXTON
@Sambiscuit

Cancer (June 21-July 22)


Practice makes perfect over
the next three weeks, with
Mercury retrograde, especially with group activities.
Nurture old connections.
Keep or change your promises. Keep your team in the
loop. Have backup plans.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Be cautious with tools and
time for the next several
weeks, with Mercury retrograde, and make repairs
immediately. Avoid misunderstandings at work. Revise
and refine the message.
Rethink your professional
core values.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Make plans and itineraries
over the next three weeks,
with Mercury retrograde,
for travel after direct.
Disagreements come easily.
Communicate carefully. Keep
confidences and secrets.
Organize, sort and file
papers, especially regarding
academics.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Sort, file and organize
paperwork with Mercury
retrograde over the next
three weeks. Allow extra
time for travel, transport,
invoices and collections, and
double-check numbers. Over
about three weeks, review
shared accounts.

icole Hodges Persley, associate professor of theatre,


made a strategic decision
this spring to produce the
University Theatre's upcoming show, "Welcome to
Arroyos." The play, written
by Kristoffer Diaz in 2011,
focuses on a brother and
sister, Alejandro and Amalia
(Molly) Arroyo, as they deal
with the loss of their mother
and discover that she may
have been a key actor in the
foundation of hip-hop in the
late '70s.
The play takes place in
the '90s and has allowed
Persley to incorporate her
academic interests in a way
that both entertains and
sparks conversations.
I think that hip-hop offers us an opportunity to
hear a lot of life narratives
very differently in the sense
that theyre not always linear narratives with a beginning, middle and end, Persley said.

As an actress, director
and producer, Persley has
been trained to take an interdisciplinary look at cross
racial and ethnic coalitions
with a specialty in African-American performance.
She has taken her time as a
professor and director at the
University to select and produce plays that she hopes
will encourage not only conversation but action.
Persley said she hopes
that when the audience sees
an uncomfortable moment,
they wont turn a blind eye
and walk away but understand that change happens
when questions are asked.
Were never going to
learn about each other if
we dont ask questions and
if we dont in turn have the
willingness to answer those
questions without judgement, Persley said. Its
okay to not understand why
something is the way it is or
how something might affect
someone else differently;
dont be afraid to ask why.
Persley's actors had very
little exposure to hip-hop

when they first began production of the play, and she


said it was interesting to
see how each actor brought
their own style to their roles.
Juan Gonzalez, a senior
from Overland Park who
plays Alejandro, said he
had no idea how to mold his
character at first, having no
experience with the hip-hop
culture in his day-to-day life
in Kansas.
However, Gonzalez said
it was Persley's insistence
that hip-hop was a medium
for storytelling and could be
applied to anyones life that
made him come around to
the art form.
She really insisted that
it was our music, Gonzalez
said. Hip-hop isnt for one
ethnicity or for one generation but for anyone who
wants to listen and for anyone to be inspired by. After
we got over the initial uncomfortableness, we really
grew together as a group.
You dont see theater kids
shedding their gender or
ethnic borders and really getting together like we

have during this play. Hiphop brought us together as


a unit.
Gonzalez also appreciated the value in the play
allowing for nonwhite leads
to be cast.
Plays like this that are
predominantly played by
minorities are very underrepresented at the University, and I think its great for
KU to be putting on a play
like this, Gonzalez said.
It definitely sends a message and, of course, allows
for nonwhite students to be
represented and to have a
chance to perform a large
role.
Nathan Kruckenberg, a
senior from Wichita, said he
was probably a little too excited for the upcoming play
because of its heavy hip-hop
themes.
Hip-hop is a major part
of my life since I was really
young, Kruckenberg said.
My buddies and I freestyle
when they come over, and
I literally listen to hip-hop
and rap every single day.
Kruckenberg, a new-

ly-declared theater major,


said hes grateful to have
a role in "Welcome to Arroyos" as his first big performance at the University
Theatre. He portrays Trip
Goldstein in the play.
This is a really important story that shows a narrative that is strongly underrepresented in theater
as a whole, not only at the
University, Kruckenberg
said. Im glad that I could
be a part of it and its been
a really great experience for
me, and I think the rest of
the cast as well.
"Welcome to Arroyos"
will premiere at 7:30 p.m.
this Friday, April 29, in the
William Inge Memorial Theater in Murphy Hall. The
play will also be performed
at 7:30 p.m. on April 30,
May 3, May 4, and May 5. A
matinee will be performed
at 2:30 p.m. on May 1. Tickets to opening night are currently sold out.
Edited by Madi Schulz

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)


Allow extra time to resolve
misunderstandings with
a partner over the next
three weeks with Mercury
retrograde. Support each
other through breakdowns.
Practice and review. Develop
shared goals.

Contributed Photo/KANSAN

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)


For the next three weeks, with
Mercury retrograde, reminisce,
review and put in corrections
at work. Listen carefully and
stay respectful. Revise strategies
and plans. Edit work carefully
before submitting. Keep equipment repaired.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Romantic overtures can
backfire over the next three
weeks with Mercury retrograde. Avoid arguments by
clarifying misunderstandings
right away. Find your sense
of humor and reconnect.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Clean, sort and organize
at home over the next three
weeks with mercury retrograde. Go through old
papers, photos and possessions. Repair appliances and
backup computers and files.
Revise and refine household
infrastructure.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Take extra care reviewing
and editing communications. Clean up messes and
misunderstandings as soon
as possible. Wait to launch
new creative projects with
Mercury retrograde for the
next three weeks. Plan and
prepare.

Two pet lovers from Austin, Texas, design and customize accessories for pets.

Alumnus snags deal in ABCs Shark Tank


RYAN MILLER

@Ryanmiller_UDK

Last month University


alumnus Steven Blustein
went on ABC's Shark Tank."
Blustein and company
co-founder Sean Knecht
presented PrideBites, which
offers customizable dog toys
and other pet products such
as collars, beds, blankets and
more. Blustein, who graduated in 2011, said it was a
different perspective to be
on the show though he had
watched the show many
times.
Walking down the hallways and getting there and
looking at those investors is a
chilling experience," he said.
"I just couldnt stop smiling."
He added: "You know,
it was like, Ive seen these
guys a million times, I know
all the questions theyre
about to ask me [] and I
just want[ed] to have a really
good time."
Knecht, a 2009 graduate
of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said he

and Blustein made for a good


duo because of his background in pitching sales and
Blusteins experience in investor pitches.
I only spoke when they
spoke about the sales stuff,
Steven spoke when they talked about the numbers and
the investors side, so we had
a good dynamic, but it was
definitely nerve wracking, an
incredible experience nonetheless, Knecht said.
PrideBites made a deal
with two of the show's investors, Robert Herjavec
and Lori Greiner. And, as a
result of their appearance
on the show, Blustein and
Knecht said their business
has kicked off. Blustein said
this included contact with
big box stores in the country,
partnerships and more.
We got on [the show]
and the next day I wasnt
able to clear my inbox at any
given point and I pride myself on getting back to people
and being available, Blustein said. "[The] opportunity
weve had has just been in-

credible."
Knecht said since the
show aired on April 8, his
idea of the word "busy" has
changed completely.
I thought I knew what
busy was until now," Knecht
said. "I wake up with 50-plus
emails in my inbox. I used to
be able to clear my inbox."
Blustein said today their
main focus is to keep and
choose the right opportunities.
After 'Shark Tank', its a
little bit different," Blustein
said. "Its kind of keeping up
with it and managing your
head above water and making sure that you see and pick
up the right opportunities instead of every one that comes
your way."
PrideBites started back at
the University when Blustein
was still in school. A mutual love for their dogs united
several University students,
who helped make PrideBites
happen. Those students were
Sam Lampe, a 2012 University graduate, Daniel Lium, a
2011 graduate, and Ting Liu,

a 2011 graduate.
Were all big pet lovers.
We all wanted to do something at KU with our pets
that could benefit the students of KU, Blustein said.
When youre a college student you dont have much
cash and you go into a pet
store often, you want something that is a quality product, and thats cheap in terms
of price point.
Blustein said one of the
biggest challenges they had
was getting their ideas off
paper and turning them into
a feasible product.
The real hard part is
making that switch from that
idea, that concept, that you
create with your time and
putting it into action with
dollars and cents, Blustein
said.
Looking to the future,
Blustein said hes excited to
launch new products. He is
also looking ahead for more
customization options for
customers both online, and
soon in-store with a customizable kiosk.

Blustein said they plan


to implement in-store kiosks where customers can
customize their pet products there instead of online.
Knecht said before Shark
Tank, the business plan was
years away from becoming
reality.
Our long-term grand
goals and aspirations actually have the ability to come
to life," Knecht said. "We had
dreams of a kiosk model that
we thought were actually a
couple of years away. Turns
out it might only be a couple
of months away now."
Blustein said his advice
for prospective entrepreneurs is to have a good work
ethic.
I think its [obvious] to
always try, to always take a
chance. Do your homework
and work hard at it. Prepare
yourself," he said. "I think
that as long as you have any
idea thats good enough,
hard work is what sets it
apart. And its hard, smart
work."
Edited by Garrett Long

ARTS & CULTURE

6A

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music in Focus: pianist Kai Ono sets sights on NYC


JACKSON DODD
@snooopdodd

A student sat on the


fourth floor of the Kansas
Union, confidently playing
the piano.
Do you know 'Turkish
March?' one onlooking
student said to the student
playing the piano.
The musician immediately started playing the
familiar tune.
Oh, play 'River Flows
in You,' I know youll know
that one, the student said
once more.
Yet again, he played,
and a group of students
gathered around to listen.
They were observing
Kai Ono, a junior majoring
in piano performance and
composition. Ono is originally from Orange County,
Calif., where he attended
the Yamaha Music Center.
He is a jazz musician who
performs with the jazz and
wind ensemble as the pianist. He started playing piano at the age of five.
Where Im from, that
was the typical age kids
started learning piano,"
Ono said. "Me starting piano wasnt different from
any other kid's story. I kind
of started just because my
parents wanted me to. My
compliant self said, 'Sure,
why not?'
He described Yamaha
as mainly a piano school,
with one private session
and one group session
each week.
In high school, I was
serious but not that focused on piano," Ono said.
"I have this stupid thing
where I want to learn every musical instrument.
For really no reason at all,
I just took an advantage
and tried to take a learning curve on every instrument.
Other instruments Ono
can play include the cello,
clarinet, saxophone and
percussion.
Ono has a talent that he
and his classmates developed in high school, perfect pitch, which is when a
person can hear any note
and know immediately
what it is without reference. The school taught
the kids to sing, dance, and
recognize different notes
at a young age.
For me, at the time
it just became instinct,"
Ono said. "My entire class
graduated with perfect
pitch, and I thought everyone who didnt have it was
grossly untalented. I eventually learned that most
people dont have it.
He won the Young Pianist's Beethoven Compe-

tition in San Jose in high


school but went on to bigger things during his time
in Lawrence.
What brought Ono to
the University is a current
professor of piano pedagogy at the University, Scott
McBride Smith.
Smith was Onos piano
mentor, and used to teach
at the University of Southern California. Smith started teaching at the University six years ago, but Ono
has known him since first
grade. He was Ono's mentor throughout high school
and was good friends with
his former piano teacher.
"Kai was always talented," Smith said. "I encouraged him to come to KU
since I knew he could explore all his many musical
interests and find the focus
to achieve excellence."
Ono said Smith helped
him decide on colleges and
said the University was his
top choice.
We talked throughout
high school, and he was a
great source of guidance,
even though he wasnt my
teacher because he was
here [in Lawrence]," Ono
said. "I didnt apply to
many schools, and it was a
pretty obvious decision to
come here.
When Ono came to
Lawrence, he noticed the
School of Music was relatively small compared to
other colleges.

new piece, Everybody is


with Everybody Else." Ono
said he gains influence for
his music by pretty much
everyone he listens to.
Whenever
I
come
across any piece of music I
really love, it shows in my
music, either in my playing
or writing," Ono said. "I
heard legendary organist
and pianist Cory Henry,
and that was incredible."
Onos long-term plan is
to end up in New York. He

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students take.
Smith, who was instrumental in getting Ono to
the University, said he's
proud of the young pianist
and is excited for what his
future holds.
"My job has been to help
guide him and give him
the tools he needs," Smith
said. "Its been a lot of fun.
Hes a great young guy. Im
really proud of him."

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BRO SAFARI
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ZIGGY MARLEY
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Alex Robinson/KANSAN
Kai Ono is a piano and composition major who is the pianist for the KU Jazz and Wind Ensemble. He also plays
and composes his own music.

THE CLAYPOOL LENNON DELIRIUM


8&%/&4%": KVOF

BRANDI CARLILE
4"563%": KVOF

SAMANTHA FISH

I encouraged
him to come to
KU since I knew
he could explore
all his many
musical interests
and find the
focus to achieve
excellence.

8&%/&4%": KV-:

311
MATISYAHU
56&4%": KV-:

PHILLIP PHILLIPS
MATT NATHANSON
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SUBLIME
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TRIBAL SEEDS

Scott McBride Smith


professor of piano
pedagogy

UIVST%": KVMZ

DR. DOG
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Its really easy to find


other opportunities, there
are a crazy amount of
openings," Ono said. "One
thing that got me started
was simply responding to
emails really fast."
He composes and performs music with the
jazz ensemble, who hes
performed with since his
sophomore year. He said
he wrote most of his serious music in early high
school.
The jazz ensemble recently got back from a trip
to New York, where they
performed at the Lincoln
Center. Ono performed his

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summer to be an accompanying pianist and said


he believes he has a strong
chance of working there after graduation.
During the nights, I
just hope to go to every
jam session and new concert and meet new people,"
Ono said. Most music students go to grad school,
but Im not trying to do
that. Im not pursuing a
teacher career, and thats
the typical route music

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told himself in February


that hed strive to land a
job in New York but wasnt
gaining any headway on
receiving responses from
any dance schools there.
I emailed every dance
school in New York, and
got replies from two of
them. My last hope was
a studio named Steps on
Broadway and thankfully
it worked out," Ono said.
He recently landed a
day job in New York this

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MAWSON FROM
PAGE 10

Keeping in touch

Missy Minear/KANSAN
There is provided seating on the first floor of the DeBruce Center, with a cafeteria and coffee stand.

DeBruce Center opens,


rules yet to be installed
SKYLAR ROLSTAD
@SkyRolSports

KANSAN.COM

SPORTS

8A

fter being built


for most of the
2015-16
school
year, construction of the
DeBruce Center was finished Monday. The new
building stands next to
Allen Fieldhouse and
will house the original
rules of basketball, which
were purchased in 2010
by University donor and
alumnus David Booth,
who donated them to the
University.
"[The opening of the
DeBruce Center] means a
great deal to the athletic
department and the university as a whole. I think
for the university its a
place where students,
faculty and staff can
catch a meal or meet,"
Jim Marchiony, associate athletics directer at
the University, said. "It's
also a huge drawing card
for people who are interested in the original rules
of basketball."
The Center features
a rules of basketball gift
shop along with a cafeteria. Outside the Center
is a statue of James Naismith, the creator of basketball, holding a peach
basket and a ball.
The cafeteria in the
new University building is now open, but the
area housing the original
rules of basketball has
not been completed. This
area is at the back of the
DeBruce Center on the
second floor.
Curtis Marsh, director of the DeBruce Center and KU Info, said the
University hopes to be
ready to install the rules
into the DeBruce Center
in the next few weeks.

Marsh was named Director of the DeBruce Center


in January.
"We get to enjoy the
tangible elements that
helps us tell the story of
how unique the KU athletic program really is,"
Marsh said. "There are a
lot of places around the
country that can claim
historic success in a
sport, but to talk about
the consistent success
of our program and own
and display the rules of
the game, that just sends
it home for me that students get to enjoy that."
He added: "You dont
just come here to enjoy a
museum experience. Its
a great opportunity to
enjoy both the rules and
a space on campus that is
for our students, alumni
and guests."

We get to enjoy
the tangible
elements that
helps us tell the
story of how
unique the KU
athletic program
really is.
Curtis Marsh
Debruce Center director

Once the area where


the rules will be housed
is completed, the University will be able to conduct tests to make sure
the rules are preserved
in a safe environment.
The case holding the
document will be tested
to ensure it maintains a
safe environment to be
displayed. These tests include the case's ability to
keep the document in the
appropriate temperature

and away from light that


could damage it.
Marsh said he is reluctant to give a date for
when the rules will be
housed in the DeBruce
Center because the University must coordinate
these tests.
"As soon as [the rules
are installed,] it becomes
a real draw for this campus for people all around
the state," Marchiony
said. "And the country,
really, if you're a basketball fan."
When the rules are installed, Marsh said, the
case that holds them will
have a button that when
pressed makes the rules
visible. This is to protect
the document from light.
Along with the exhibition of the rules will be
a presentation about the
origin of the game of basketball and how the sport
came to Kansas. Marsh
said the University is
looking forward to bringing other things to the
DeBruce Center in the future. One idea is a theater
that shows a video about
the rules of basketball.
After the completion
of McCarthy Hall last October and the School of
Business Capitol Federal
Hall, the DeBruce Center
is another construction
project in the area around
Allen Fieldhouse to be
completed. Other projects in the area include
the new Burge Union and
the new student-athlete
dorms.
"I think it really begins
to tie this part of campus
in with the other parts
of campus," Marchiony
said, "particularly in light
of the impressive new
construction it is starting
in this area now."

s
n
o
p
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Clip and Save!

Mawson officially retired from coaching in


1975. She left the University in 1990. Still, youd
be hard pressed to find
someone within KU Athletics who hasnt heard
her name.
And today, she continues to promote womens
sports by speaking with
players, coaches and administrators. Shes perhaps most present in volleyball, where she can be
seen in the crowd at home
games.
Kansas volleyball coach
Ray Bechard said shes
always welcome whenever she wants to stop by,
whether its at games or
behind the scenes.
"I introduced her to
the team, and they quickly
figured out that obviously
we have things a little bit
better than what they did
back then," Bechard said.
One thing that has
changed is the venues.
Whereas in 1968, the
womens athletics programs were relegated to
a lesser facility, things are
different.
Mawson described her
first time visiting Rock
Chalk Park a $39 million facility that will eventually house five sports,
four of which are womens. As she walked onto
the concourse, she felt a
sense of pride for what
had happened over the
last five decades.
Today, the focus on the
athletics staff is on equity,
which sends a very clear
message to the athletes,
according to Van Saun.
When
you
know
youre important and you
see things being built for

you [...] that goes a long


way, Van Saun said.
Still, the job is not
done. In 2016, things are
not perfect. Total gender
equality in sports has yet
to be reached.
This year, the budget
for mens athletics at Kansas is just over $37 million, with more than $32
million coming from the
"revenue sports," football
and men's basketball. On
the other side, the budget
for womens athletics is
$15 million.

I was 28 when I
came to KU. You
think about a
28-year-old now
and you think,
Oh they cant do
that, but nobody
ever told me I
couldnt.
Marlene Mawson

KU womens athletics founder

However, the 2.5-to-1


ratio between the mens
and womens athletics
budgets varies sharply
from the 270.5-to-1 ratio
that existed in 1968.
Furthermore,
the
smallest budget for an individual women's sport is
golf, which still receives
upwards of 300 times
what Mawson had for all
six sports in her first season.
But for Mawson, this is
an issue larger than budgets and facilities. Similar to her coaching philosophy, it's about doing
things the right way.
Mawson said she has
spoken with Kansas' Athletics Director Sheahon
Zenger about moves that
affect womens sports,

most recently expressing


her concerns with the hiring of the current womens basketball coach.
She's certainly not shy
with her beliefs.
Off campus and online, the Lawrence Journal-World has published
three letters to the editor
from Mawson, all advocating for expanded coverage of womens sports.
"Even though the media is not held legally to
Title IX compliance, it is
time for the J-W to equitably report the competitive coverage for all of
the sports teams at KU,"
Mawson said in a letter
to the editor on Dec. 13,
2013.
Women's athletics have
progressed far from where
they were in the 1960s.
The journey may not be
complete, but Mawson
said things are still moving in the right direction,
even if the progress is
slower than it was decades
ago.
And looking at Kansas, it can be argued that
the change in culture occurred because Mawson
was brought in as the right
person at the right time to
lead the charge.
When she came on
campus, she was far from
as established as she is
today. Yet she persevered
and left an impact that remains nearly five decades
later.
I was 28 when I came
to KU. You think about a
28-year-old now and you
think, Oh they cant do
that, Mawson said. But
nobody ever told me I
couldnt.

Edited by Mackenzie

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KANSAN.COM/SPORTS | THURSDAY, APRIL 28, 2016

Scott Chasen/KANSAN
Some of the awards and honors Marlene Mawson has accumulated over the course of her life.

Paige Stingley/KANSAN
Marlene Mawson watches Kansas volleyball take on Oklahoma in Lawrence on Oct. 21.

Contributed photo/KU Athletics


Marlene Mawson walks across Naismith Court in Allen Fieldhouse, being inducted into the Kansas Hall of Fame.

Marlene Mawson, mother of KU womens athletics,


continues to impact University nearly 5 decades later
SCOTT CHASEN
@SChasenKU

arlene Mawson
knew it wouldnt
be easy to bring
the 1971 national volleyball tournament to Kansas. With a budget that
was less than one half of 1
percent of what the mens
athletic program had, she
knew everything had to
run perfectly.
Before finalizing the
request, she reached out
to staff members at Al-

A competitor, a coach
and a teacher

A self-described competitor, Mawson holds


her athletic achievements
in high regard. She was
a multi-sport athlete in
high school, which carried over into college.
At the University of
Central Missouri, Mawson
played softball, basketball
and volleyball. She continued to play basketball
and volleyball while she
attended graduate school
at the University of Colorado and coached at the
high school level.
However, for Mawson,
that competitive spirit
wasnt something left only
for games.
"I think that applies to
my entire life," she said.
"I was always looking for
that next edge. What else
can we do?"
For that, even at the
age of 75, Mawson has
adopted a unique mantra.
She drew a comparison to
golf, saying its not about
trying to get the best score
in any given group of people. Instead, theres another focus.
"Even when its not
against somebody else,
its my own competition
to see if I can match my
score or better it," Mawson said. "Its my nature."
As a coach, it only
seemed logical that her
philosophies would be the
same: focus on yourself
and focus on the details;

len Fieldhouse, hoping


the tournament could be
hosted there. She recalled
the answer as short and
dismissive.
"We cant schedule that
here, period," Mawson
said. "We dont have to
negotiate with you."
Four decades later,
Mawson walked across
Naismith Court in the
building that once marked
forbidden ground for female athletes. Standing
at center court, she was
inducted into the Kansas

Athletics Hall of Fame.


She smiled as she recalled the memory.
"We did it," she said.
It had all come full circle for Mawson, yet the
path was never easy.
The "Mother of KU
Womens Athletics" was
nothing of the sort when
she accepted an unknown, undefined job as a
28-year-old in 1968.
Armed with a $2,000
budget and what she
viewed as a clear message that there would be

good things will come.


A big emphasis for her
was on the little things,
helping athletes improve
even without the widespread competition that
would be seen in todays
game.

the bench and call out


to players. The only real
coaching occurred in
practices and during
timeouts.
However,
Mawson
still embraced the role as
a teacher. She wanted to
win, but she also wanted
to make sure things were
being done the right
way.
"The thing I remember most about her was
she was very professional," Wells said.
The professionalism
spurned from another
idea that Mawson carried throughout her career. For Mawson, being
able to compete was a
thrill. It was special. It
meant something.
When she got to the
college level and realized
that feeling wasnt universal, it laid the building blocks for her future.
She said she believed
everyone deserved that
feeling of competition,
which is something she
preached then and continues to with current
athletes.
"Their grandmothers
did not get to play; their
mothers may not have
even gotten to play,
Mawson
said.
This
is not something they
should take for granted."

A lot of people
wouldnt step up
and be active
in professional
organizations.
She did.
Joan Wells
former athlete

However, that didnt


mean her coaching style
was authoritarian.
Joan Wells, who played
volleyball and softball
for Mawson from 196871, credited Mawson as a
coach in a couple of different ways.
She said Mawson was
clearly intelligent when it
came to the actual games,
but that wasnt her only
distinguishing characteristic.
"A
lot
of
people
wouldnt step up and be
active in professional organizations," Wells said.
She did.
The 60s and 70s
marked a different era for
coaches. Mawson wasnt
allowed to stand up off

no additional support,
Mawson set out to establish a womens athletics
program in a time when
gender equity wasnt considered a pressing issue.
Those priorities were
reflected in the budget.
"When I got to KU, it
was sort of like, 'Wow, we
got $2,000. Thats a lot of
money,'" Mawson said. "I
didnt realize the men had
[$541,000]."
But she made do.
In 1971, with the door
to Allen Fieldhouse shut,

The challenges
In Mawsons first
year at the University, she met with representatives from other
schools to create a rotation of games for various womens sports.
Before long, a constitution had been established. The meeting
became recurring and
those attending the
meeting became official
representatives of their
Universities.
"Every year we met to
[make] a schedule. And
every year the schedule
got a little bit fuller,"
Mawson said.
The progress was
there, but it was still
slow moving before Title IX was signed into
action in 1972.
In 1971, Mawsons
womens
basketball
team travelled to Cullowhee, N.C., for what
eventually became the
NCAA womens tournament.
That same year the
mens basketball team
reached the Final Four
in Houston. It took
planes and stayed in hotels, according to Mawson. The women didnt
have that luxury.
Instead, the team
rode in station wagons,
rotating drivers and
passengers, who slept
on air mattresses in the
back. When they finally
arrived at the Western

Mawson finalized the proposal for the tournament;


the venue became the
smaller Robinson Gymnasium.
Mawson's
proposal
won out. Kansas became
the host site.
Faced with adversity,
Mawson persevered. She
came into her position
knowing there were going
to be challenges, but she
had goals she wanted to
accomplish, and she continued to push for them
regardless of what was

happening around her.


And according to Mawson, it all went back to
the feelings she had as an
athlete. She said she loved
competition and felt others should have the same
opportunities that she
had.
"I was trying to find any
route to do what we possibly could do," Mawson
said. "Of course it wasnt
full fledged like the mens,
but it was something. And
it grew and grew."

Carolina University host


site, they pulled mattresses off bunk beds and
slept in a lounge on the
second floor of a dorm.
It was a different time.
In the pre-Title IX days,
colleges didnt have to
strive for equity. There
was no legal basis holding
them accountable, something that is obviously
different today.
"Dr. Mawson clearly
did some groundbreaking
work," said Debbie Van
Saun, Kansas associate
athletics director and senior woman administrator. "We are a long ways
from [1968]. Our men
and women eat the same;
they travel the same."
From the start, Mawson said she realized that
she was going to be alone.
It wasnt so much that a
portion of the staff was
actively trying to suppress what she was doing,
but that didn't mean they
were offering help either.
When the team wanted
to go on trips, it was up to
players to volunteer cars
and pay for gas they
were reimbursed $0.05
per mile.
Even on the trip to
Cullowhee, N.C. in
which the team had help
from Emily Taylor, dean
of women, in securing
two leased station wagons the team still needed drivers for the 20-hour
trip.
"I was a senior, and I
didnt play basketball,

but I was 21, Wells said.


So she asked me to go on
the trip and drive."
It was the same way
for most trips, but it was
the reality of the situation. Mawson wasnt getting any handouts from
the administration.
The name "Kansas"
was stitched across their
jerseys, but in many
ways, it could be argued
they were their own entity. Certainly Mawson said
she felt that way from the
start.
"Who was going to help
me?" Mawson said. "We
had 14 faculty members;
10 of them were men who
couldnt have cared less."
But there was never
really one moment where
it stopped. Each day presented a unique challenge. And it wasnt just
for Mawson.
Even after Title IX
was implemented, those
associated with womens
athletics at the University
faced the challenges day
after day.
But that was the challenge Mawson accepted.
Even though it wasn't
easy, she said it was
important to do. And
throughout her 22 years
with the University, she
continued to fight what
she believed was and is
a crucial fight.

SEE MAWSON
PAGE 8

FOUR YEAR
REVIEW

READ MORE ON
KANSAN.COM

FOUR YEAR REVIEW: NEWS

2B

KANSAN.COM

Editors Note: Four Year Review


MIRANDA DAVIS
@MirandaRDavis

Every spring, I find


myself looking back at
my time at the University and thinking about
how Ive changed. This
year, like many of you,
when I look back at my
time at the University it
feels different since Im
a graduating senior.
But when looking
back at our time here,
whats equally important is the understanding
that while our experience at KU changes us,

weve changed KU, too.


In the last four years
at the University weve
seen protests, a masked
man, more than our fair
share of football coaches
and a continuation of the
success of our basketball
program. These events,
how they affected us,
and how they affected the greater whole of
campus, can help serve
as the bookmarks of our
college careers.
Im a big believer in
the idea that the classroom is only a starting
point for the learning

that happens in college.


Often I think theres
more to be gained by
watching a Wescoe protest, joining a student
senate committee, or sitting in the stands at Allen Fieldhouse than doing the required reading.
This concept is reflected
in my GPA.
By the time were seniors, we understand
that we shift and change
and push through discomfort to become better people while we are
here, but we so often
forget that our institu-

tion and our community


has done the same.
So in the pages of
this section, youll find
a review of your time at
the University. Think
of this special issue as
the conversation youve
had with your friends
where everyone is sitting
around, drinking beer
and reminiscing. Some
memories are funny,
some are good and some
are bad. But they all
happened and they were
a part of the formative
experience weve had the
last four years.

When we look back


at college, its important
to think not of how our
environment
affected
us, but we how affected
it. Isnt it something that
many of the most important events over the
last four years happened
because students started
something or spoke out?
Isnt that what we should
all strive to do in our
time here? We shouldnt
just hope for the self-realization and personal
growth that weve been
promised through movies and popular culture.

We should strive to do
something. To be someone that leaves something for the next four
years. And the four after
that.
All of the moments
and memories weve
collected over the past
four years matter. Those
experiences were crucial. And maybe most
importantly

they
changed things here.
Edited by Ryan
Wright

original run date:


Nov. 5, 2014

I am here on behalf
of the victims of the
sexual assault and
rape cases that have
been happening on
campus.

Johnny Cowan
masked man

File Photo/KANSAN
Johnny Cowan, wearing a Guy Fawkes mask, was arrested on Nov. 5, 2014, after disrupting classes.

Masked man on campus arrested after disrupting


multiple classes, two individuals in custody
KANSAN STAFF
@KansanNews

One
man
wearing
a wearing a military
uniform and Guy Fawkes
masks, recognizable from
the movie and novel V
for Vendetta, entered
University lecture halls
during classes around
1 p.m. Wednesday in
Budig and Wescoe halls
to protest the Universitys
handling of sexual assault.
I am here on behalf of
the victims of the sexual
assault and rape cases
that have been happening
on campus, said the
masked man. I am here
to let them know that they
are not alone.
He was arrested on
campus around 2 p.m. by
the Office of Public Safety,
said
Captain
James
Anguiano.
PSO has not confirmed
the exact number of
individuals
associated
with the protest, but
sent
a
campus-wide
alert at 2:30 p.m. saying
two individuals were in

custody after disrupting


classes wearing masks.
Anguiano said students
were alerted at that time
because
information
needed to be gathered
and verified. He said
PSO officers were aware
of threats posted on the
anonymous social media
app Yik Yak, and were
sent to perform a safety
sweep of Wescoe Hall.
PSO sent officers to
perform a safety sweep of
Wescoe Hall, according
to an alert updated at
3:32 p.m. Anguiano said
an investigation of the
individuals connections
to the protest is ongoing.
One of the individuals,
who did not give his name,
said his message was a
peaceful demonstration
and the only way to be
heard. He said most
students laughed and
pulled out their cell
phones, but the only
physical interaction he
had was with a professor
who tried to grab him and
remove his mask.
Courtney
Voorhees,

a
sophomore
from
Shawnee, said she was
in the Budig 110 lecture
hall when one of the
masked men entered her
classroom.
"The people all around
me said we all thought
he was going to shoot
everyone, Voorhees said.
It got to the point where
we all started ducking
down and me and my
friends next to me all
grabbed
each
other's
arms.
Nick
Benetti,
a
sophomore
from
St.
Charles, Ill., said the man
visited Wescoe 3140 and
relayed his message.
Everyone got quiet,
and we didnt really know
what was going on, said
Benetti.
He said the professor,
Brian
Staihr,
started
walking toward the man,
which prompted him to
leave the classroom.
Jade Hall, a senior
from Derby, was in Budig
when the man came in.
She said she thought little
of it until others around

her started wondering if


he had a gun.
After that it started
getting kind of scary
because I hadnt really
been thinking about that
and then people brought
it up, Hall said. I was
kind of like, Wow, this
could be really bad.
Jamie Gadd-Nelson, a
junior from Kansas City,
said that she supports
justice for victims of
sexual assault, but didnt
agree with the masked
mans approach.
People were terrified,
said Gadd-Nelson. Maybe
hang out on Wescoe Beach
and talk about it, but to go
into the classrooms like
that I think was definitely
overstepping
some
boundaries.
One of the masked
individuals threatened the
Kappa Sigma fraternity,
saying to a class in Wescoe,
all members who do not
dissociate
themselves
with this fraternity will
be seen as guilty parties
and they will be dealt with
accordingly.

Kappa Sigma president


Jack Schwartz, a junior
from St. Louis, said he
contacted police after he
heard about masked men
making threats against
the fraternity.
Lawrence
Police
Department
officers
patrolled the area around
the fraternity Wednesday
night and will potentially
for the next few days.
Schwartz said they want
to be prepared for the
worst and are taking the
situation seriously to
ensure everyones safety.
You cant let these
things go lightly, but
you also have to keep in
mind that this could be
anything, Schwartz said.
It could be just, you
know, some people trying
to gain attention.
Kappa Sigma is under
investigation
for
an
alleged sexual assault. The
University extended the
fraternitys
suspension
on Oct. 31. The University
is also investigating two
rapes that occurred in
Hashinger
Residence

Hall after two men, one a


University student, were
arrested on Oct. 3.
Morgan
Said,
a
senior from Kansas City,
Mo. and student body
president, said Greek
Life emailed members
Wednesday afternoon and
said they are not aware a
real threat exists but to
remain alert and report
suspicious activity to PSO
and the Lawrence Police
Department.
Will Nye, a junior
from Dallas and director
of public relations for
Interfraternity
Council,
said
on
Wednesday
afternoon that they don't
know anything more than
the public.

FOUR YEAR REVIEW: NEWS

KANSAN.COM

3B

It kind of seems like


KU handled it the way
protocol states, and I
just dont think that is
the right way that it
should be happening.

Michael Garrett
KU Student

original run date:


Sep. 4, 2014
File Photo/KANSAN
Student protestors gather on the lawn in front of Strong Hall to protest how the University handled a reported sexual assault.

Students respond with #AGreatPlaceToBeUnsafe


ALLISON KITE
@Allie_Kite

nger, disbelief, disappointment


and
horror
colored
students tweets on the
#AGreatPlaceToBeUnsafe
hashtag on Twitter.
The hashtag, based on
the Universitys slogan, A
great place to be called
attention to the issues students had with the way the
University handled a case
of sexual assault reported
in October.
The case, which placed
the University on a list of
76 universities under investigation by the federal
government, was recently
picked up by the Huffington Post, bringing national
attention.
The article reported
that the man confessed to
raping the woman and was
punished with a required
essay and counseling, expulsion from his dormitory
and disassociation from his
fraternity. Some students,
such as Lenexa senior Michael Garrett, said the punishment is too light.
In what other case
in todays world is a rape
charge going to be settled

with writing an essay, being


kicked out of your dormitory and going to take counseling courses? Garrett
said. ...any other place, if
you rape another person,
thats a huge crime, and
youre going to be dealt with
to the full extent of the law.
Why is this a different case
if theres a clear violation of
the law?
Garrett said he believes
the issue stems from the
Universitys
established
protocol and the University
needs to reevaluate those
standards.
It kind of seems like KU
handled it the way protocol
states, and I just dont think
that is the right way that it
should be happening, Garrett said.
Joey Hentzler, a senior
from Topeka, is not only
frustrated with the University, but local authorities
as well. Charles Branson,
Douglas County district attorney, decided not to press
charges despite a confession from the man, according to the Huffington Post
article.
When we talk about
the Universitys response,
we should talk about the
response of police and local officials like the D.A.,

Hentzler said. Its just a


consistent failure to provide
adequate redress, so the
victim is not given justice.
Its a part of our culture or
its a part of peoples misunderstanding of rape that
the transgressor even if hes
found guilty he admitted
to it is still not prosecuted.
Miranda Wagner, a senior from Shawnee and
a member of the Title IX
roundtable, said she believes there is an overall
cultural problem with how
rape victims are treated
that could lead people to
not want to report.
I think that overall in
our culture we have such
a prevalent attitude of victim-blaming and not asking
the right questions about
the situation, Wagner said.
Thats what leads people to not want to report:
those attitudes that we see
throughout different law
enforcement agencies and
apparently at the University
level too.
The use of phrases like
non-consensual sex in
the Universitys communications angered students
like Liz James, a sophomore from Overland Park.
James is the sexual assault

Administration lacks response


to Huffington Post case
ROCHELLE VALVERDE
@Rochelle Valverde

University and Lawrence offices have not responded after coming under national scrutiny based
on The Huffington Post
article published on Sept. 2
detailing the punishment a
student received for sexual
assault last year.
When contacted for
comment, the Alumni Association did not return The
Kansans call Wednesday.
The Kansas Board of
Regents did not return
The Kansans voicemail
Wednesday.
The Kansas Coalition
Against Sexual and Domestic Violence did not return
The Kansans voicemail
Wednesday.
Douglas County District
Attorney Charles Branson
failed to return The Kansans call and voicemail
Wednesday.
Watkins Health Center directed The Kansan to
speak with the Office of Institutional Opportunity and
Access (IOA) Wednesday.
The IOA investigates
each sexual assault reported and recommends sanctions for the perpetrator to
the Office of Student Conduct, which then decides
which recommendations to
implement.
The article said that an
investigation by the IOA determined the man guilty of
non-consensual sex and
punished him with probation and a ban from University housing. He was also
ordered to write a four-page
reflection paper and attend

counseling.
Jane McQueeny, the executive director of IOA, said
probation means that the
male involved had to meet
with the director of Student
Conduct and Community
Standards. The Office of
Student Conduct determines how the University
will address allegations of
non-academic misconduct.
IOA recommended the
man also do community
service, but the Office of
Student Conduct decided
that was too punitive, according to the article.
In an interview on Sept.
3, McQueeny said she
couldnt speak directly to
the specific case. She said
IOA investigated 20 reports of sexual assault and
harassment in 2013 and 17
so far this year. Of these 37,
she said 27 cases were sexual assault. McQueeny said
they try to do whats best
for victims.
I think it's important
to know that we can go
through an investigation
and do the best we can and
do everything right, but at
the end there is always going to be one side that isn't
happy, who's disgruntled,
who feels like they weren't
treated fairly, McQueeny
said. And so part of what
we try to do is to be a front
in our communications and
be transparent in the process, but that still doesn't
guarantee that someone's
not going to be unhappy
with the result.
A statement made by the
University on Wednesday
said they are committed
to creating a safe environ-

ment for everyone in the


community. The University
works with victims to determine appropriate sanctions
against the accused. In attempts to prevent sexual
assault from occurring, the
University provides sexual assault and harassment
training to all students, faculty and staff.
Background
information:
According to the Huffington Post article, both
students involved in the
case attended a party on
Oct. 18, 2013, hosted by
the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. After midnight, the
female student was drunk
and was assisted by the
male student, who walked
with her to the dorm where
they both lived, the article said. Once there, they
reportedly had sex in his
room.
The woman reported the assault on Oct. 20,
2013. The article said that
the man later told campus
police that he continued to
have sex with the woman
after she said no, stop
and I cant do this.
Paige Stingley, Emily
Donovan, McKenna Harford, Dalton Kingery and
Erica Staab contributed to
this article.

activism coordinator for


Students United for Reproductive and Gender Equity
at KU (SURGE KU). James
said she believed non-consensual sex didnt exist.
She said its rape.
The mans attorney, Michael J. Fisher, cited the
womans possession and
consumption of birth-control pills as consent and
evidence that no rape occurred, according to the article. Kailee Karr, a senior
from Cedar Rapids, Iowa,
said she was frustrated by
the use of birth-control as
evidence of consent in the
mans defense. Karr, who
said she intends to pursue
a career in higher education student affairs and
counseling, said there are
lots of non-sexual reasons
to use birth-control pills.
As a young woman on
birth control for non-sexual reasons, it made me
fearful that if something
were to happen to me, I
would have no support
from my community, from
the University that Ive

little for cases that take


place off campus or involve
alcohol.
I think that theres so
much in terms of consent
awareness and alcohol
education that I was not
involved in in my time at
KU, and looking from the
vantage point Ive got now,
thats where so many of
these problems are, Jones
said.

Class of 2016

Celebrate Graduation
with the

KU Alumni Association!

GRAD
GRILL
Noon-3 p.m.
Friday, May 6 (Stop Day)
Adams Alumni Center Parking Lot
Join us for FREE Biggs BBQ, music, photo booth,
prizes and more. Its our way of saying
Congratulations on your graduation!
All graduating seniors are invited.

Edited by Hannah
Barling and Amelia Arvesen

original run date:


Sep. 4, 2014

spent the past four years


trying to give back to and
really trying to make a safe
place, Karr said.
Nolan Jones, an alumnus who graduated in 2007,
said he was a member of
Student Senate when he attended the University and
was active in the safe walk
program, which placed the
blue emergency lights on
campus. He said the initiative was helpful but does

Visit kualumni.org to learn


more about what the KU Alumni
Association has to offer you.
Questions? Call 785-864-4760.

FOUR YEAR REVIEW: NEWS

4B

KANSAN.COM

original run date:


Dec. 9, 2015

Change is possible,
and its a very real
expectation to have of
this University and of
students.

Katherine Rainey
RCIH Member

File Photo/KANSAN
Demonstrators walk across Jayhawk Boulevard to Strong Hall.

For Rock Chalk Invisible Hawk, demonstrations cap


a tense yet rewarding semester of advocacy
LARA KORTE
@Lara_Korte

he group began by entering classes in Blake


and Fraser Hall and
the dean of Social Welfares office, calling for allyship before moving on to
demonstrate on the steps of
Wescoe Hall. The demonstrations ended in a twohour sit-in and discussion
in the chancellors office.
Wednesdays
events
wrapped up a tense semester and what Kynnedi
Grant, a member of Rock
Chalk Invisible Hawk,
called a rollercoaster of
emotions.
The group first emerged
at the Nov. 11 town hall
meeting, where members
presented 15 demands and
called for an administrative
response to systemic discrimination against minorities on campus.
During the same meeting, Grant gave an account
of her own experience of an
alleged hate crime. Since
then, Grant and other members have been meeting
with faculty members, attending department forums
and talking with students in
an effort to continue advocating their demands.
Grant said she feels
the group has experienced
more growth in the past
three months than most
people would experience in
five years.
Its challenged us as
people first our humanity
and why we do what we do.
Its challenged our friendships. Its challenged our
relationships, our professionalism, she said. Its
challenged us in so many

ways that are just on a scale


that people never really
experience sometimes in a
lifetime.
Grant said that although
the work has been stressful
and exhausting, its important.
People see us as leaders and as people that they
trust to use their voices,
Grant said. They trust us
to voice on behalf of them,
because they either cant
physically do it themselves,
theyre not able, or they vocally cant articulate what
theyre experiencing. And
its just the most humbling
thing to have people that
trust what youre saying
and trust that youre going
to be representative and inclusive all the time.
Although Rock Chalk
Invisible Hawk has focused
largely over the past month
on combating anti-black
racism, the group has made
a point to consider intersectionality by being an
advocate for all marginalized groups on campus.
During the demonstrations
on Wednesday, Grant,
along with Rock Chalk Invisible Hawk members
Jyleesa Hampton, Caleb
Stephens and Katherine
Rainey spoke about issues
facing LGBTQ+ students
and students with disabilities, mental health care on
campus, and creating a safe
space for students of color.
Stephens said its important on issues like these
to be supportive of each
other.
Oftentimes when you
experience racism, sexism
or any of the -isms, you
get worn down, and you
feel like youre all alone so

you just try to survive, you


go into survival mode, Stephens said. Oftentimes,
speaking to the different
students of color and the
different intersectionalities,
were saying, Were fighting for you too, and you can
fight for yourself, and well
be here, and well stand
with you.
For Rainey, one of the
main things she has taken
away from the semester is
that change is possible.
Im in awe, and Im
definitely humbled by the
amount of students that
have come out in support
of us, and again, acknowledge us as leaders and as
people they can trust to
carry forward, Rainey said.
Change is possible, and its
a very real expectation to
have of this University and
of students.
The group has been publicly supported by several
departments and organizations on campus, including
the Emily Taylor Center for
Women and Gender Equity,
the Black Student Union,
the communications department, African and African American Studies and
the School of Social Welfare, among others.
Rainey also said the
group has received support
from the Interfraternity
Council and the Panhellenic Council.
To see that there are
people who understand
that in the context of this,
it is way bigger than them,
and they need to reach out
and they need to ask what
they can do, really makes a
difference and that lets us
know that our message is
getting through, and it lets

us know that there are systemic changes that can be


made, Rainey said.
A large part of the
groups mission over the
last month has been allyship and inclusion. Grant
said she wants to challenge
every person, regardless of
privilege or identities, to be
an advocate for marginalized and minority peoples.
Looking outside yourself is such a beautiful challenge, and I love it, Grant
said. There is a role for everyone, even if you can do
as much as filter hate mail,
or to defend us on social
media to control the narrative of Rock Chalk Invisible
Hawk being a movement
that is productive and fighting for change.

On Monday, Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little


said administration has
been looking at issues that
pertain to the demands
through the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Advisory
Board.
As the [advisory board]
is working, it may be there
will be some areas that
say we have this in place,
Gray-Little said. Others
will say we dont have it
in place, but we can have
it done in this amount of
time.
Grant and Rainey said
Rock Chalk Invisible Hawk
would meet with Senior
Vice Provost of Academic
Affairs Sara Rosen on Friday to discuss demands and
how to move forward.

Rainey said that although she thinks it is


promising they are meeting
with administration, she
remains skeptical on how
interactions will look in the
future.
I am glad to hear that
there are some deadlines
being set, and thats the biggest thing thats come out of
this, Rainey said. I think I
will be satisfied when they
make and release a statement, thatll determine my
feeling about us going forward and the way we interact.

Edited by Leah Sitz

FOUR YEAR REVIEW: NEWS

KANSAN.COM

5B

Its time to bring


this money back
to student groups.
Marcus Tetwiler
former student body
president

original run date:


March 12, 2014

File Photo/KANSAN
Student body president Marcus Tetwiler, a senior from Paola Kansas, looks over his notes before Call to Order. Student Senate met Wednesday, May
12th in Alderson Auditorium in the Union. cutline

Full Senate votes to eliminate womens


and non-revenue intercollegiate sports fee
MIKE VERNON
@KansanNews

t's now Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little's decision whether or not to


uphold Student Senate's
decision to eliminate more
than $1 million in student fee
money that goes to Kansas
Athletics.
In a 55-3 vote, Senate
passed a bill Wednesday
night to eliminate the $25
semesterly campus fee to offset travel expenses for women's and non-revenue sports.
Students will pay between
$1.2 and $1.3 million to the
athletic department in 2014
through the current fee. In
2012, the fee accounted for
1.6 percent of Athletics' rev-

enue.
It's time to bring this
money back to student
groups, student body president Marcus Tetwiler said.
Tetwiler said he will sign
the bill, sending it to Vice
Provost for Student Affairs
Tammara Durham. Senate said Durham does not
have the power to veto the
bill. From there, it goes to
Gray-Little's desk. If she vetoes the bill, it will be sent
back to Student Senate for
amendment.
Kansas Associate Athletics Director Jim Marchiony
has stressed how the fee
helps KU Athletics comply
with federally mandated Title IX standards.
No representative from

Athletics attended the meeting.


You think that would
make a difference? Marchiony asked.
Marchiony said Athletics
will not officially comment
until Gray-Little makes the
final decision.
Student Senator Patrick
Jacquinot defended the fee.
Jacquinot served on the
Women's and Non-Revenue Intercollegiate Advisory
Board, which is a group of
students tasked with providing a fiscal recommendation
to the overseeing Fee Review
Committee.
I think the fee shows
we support our student athletes, Jacquinot said. The
main point for me being

up here is to stress I feel we


need to keep a positive relationship between us and our
student-athletes and show
that the student body supports them.
Senate representatives,
including Tetwiler, have
questioned the necessity of
the fee to Athletics' - a $93.6
million corporation - well
being. The fee's original purpose coincided with federal
enforcement of Title IX in
1979. It started at $1.50 a semester.
Tetwiler stressed how
athletic departments' revenues across the country are
skyrocketing, reducing the
need for this fee.
If Gray-Little does not
veto the bill, Athletics will

////////
@kansannews // @kansansports
@kansan.news
@universitydailykansan

Connect with us //
The student voice for you

www.kansan.com

have to find an alternate way


to sustain its current level
of operation. This includes
the possibility of raising the
price of a voluntary $150
ticket package students can
pay to attend basketball and
football games.
On Feb. 20, Marchiony
was asked if Athletics will
consider raising the fee.
Everything would be on
the table, Marchiony said.
We would search in every
way possible to raise the
money.
On Feb. 17, Kansas Athletics' CFO, Pat Kaufman,
was asked the same question,
and said they might consider
looking at the ticket package.
Tetwiler shot down assumptions that Athletics

Director Sheahon Zenger


will raise the cost of student
tickets.
Of the four Big 12 schools
that have a required student
fee and an optional student
ticket package, Kansas' cost
of $150 is the cheapest by
$100.
The fee, officially known
as the Women's and
Non-Revenue Intercollegiate
Sports Fee, helps keep travel
equitable for those non-revenue sports. In 2013, Kansas
Athletics spent $6,601,009
on total travel expenses.
Our women's sports
teams are going to be great,
Tetwiler said. Our Athletics
Department is going to be
great without this.

FOUR YEAR REVIEW: SPORTS

KANSAN.COM

9B

original run date:


Nov. 12, 2014

The section filled


up quickly. As soon
as the donors knew
it was going to be
available, there were
requests for seats.

Jim Marchiony
associate athletics director

File Photo/KANSAN
Students throw confetti to show support for the Jayhawk starting line. Kansas defeated the TCU Horned Frogs on Saturday the 15th.

120 Fieldhouse student seats, previously said to be


reallocated, permanently cut for donors in section U
KYLE PAPPAS
@KylePap

he Kansas basketball
student section has
long been considered
among the best in the nation. It won the Naismith
Student Section of the Year
award in 2012 and played
a major part in NCAA.com
naming Allen Fieldhouse
the loudest and most intimdating arena in the nation
last December.
But that section has taken a bit of a hit this year,
following a decision made
by Kansas Athletics to permanently axe 120 student
seats.
Some of Kansas students' most valued space
in section U, which is adjacent to the Jayhawks
bench, became available to
University donors this summer after a student senate
proposal to remove the required $50 athletics fee that
all students pay each year.
Though the total elimination of the fee was eventually vetoed by KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little,
it was still reduced to only
$12 per student the lowest fee of any university in
Kansas.
In an attempt to recoup
as much lost revenue as
possible, the athletics department reallocated the
student seating in section U
to wealthy donors.
Change in plans
Initially, those 120 seats
were set to simply be moved
an alternate area that Associate Athletic Director Jim
Marchiony described as,
near where the students
are now that may have
been sold as General Admission in the past. But in
a recent change of events,
the department decided to

permanently cut the seats


from the remaining student
section.
Student body president Morgan Said said the
Student Senate originally
raised the issue because it
felt students "shouldn't be
required to pay an athletic fee to help keep Kansas
Athletics federally compliant with Title IX regulations." She also said she was
unaware athletics would respond to the reduction in
the fee by taking section U
away from the students.
With a seven-percent
increase in its budget this
year, Athletics projects
$84.2 million in revenue,
according to Said.
"It's unfortunate that
Kansas Athletics deemed
it necessary to eliminate
some of the best student
seats in the Fieldhouse to
compensate for the minor
cut in student fees," she
said. "The student fee cut
was a very small fraction of
the overall budget.
The decision to do away
with student seating in
section U has upset many
students who consider
the seats to be among the
top that were accessible to
them.
"It's the only part of the
student section that sits
courtside and closest to the
court," said Luke Miller, a
senior from Wichita. "In my
opinion, they were the best
seats available to us."
Marchiony said the athletics department is aware
of the student response,
saying the reaction has been
"about what we expected."
He also noted that the department stands to lose
approximately $350,000
from the reduction of the
fee; he expects it'll regain
roughly $180,000 of that

back by making section U


available to donors.
The move to reallocate
the student seats was in lieu
of several other options that
Kansas Athletics discussed
one of which was drastically raising the price of
the student sports package.
Even with the ultimate decision to give donors seating
in section U, the All-Sports
Combo still increased from
$150 to $175 this semester.
"The way to try to recover as much revenue as we
could, by affecting the fewest number of people was to
do it this way," Marchiony
said. "We essentially affected 120 people, and that was
the fewest amount of people we could affect by doing anything. And so, that's
what we did."
Pleasing the donors
Beginning in early June,
section U became officially
available to Williams Education Fund donors. The
fund, composed of various
Kansas alumni and fans,
raises around $18 million
for KU student-athletes
each year. While most priority seating for Williams
Fund donors bases off of
lifetime donations, section
U works a bit differently. In
order to encourage contributions in the short-term,
Athletics only took donors'
current amount of giving
into consideration when determining who had priority.
The initiative succeeded.
Immediately following
the announcement that the
seats would no longer be
designated for students,
donors showed significant
interest. Marchiony said it
didn't take long for the section to sell out.
"The section filled up
quickly," he said. "As soon

as the donors knew it was


going to be available, there
were requests for seats.
Within weeks, there were
enough requests to fill the
section."
Rudy Manes, a '92 KU
graduate, is part of a group
of Williams Fund donors
that was excited to have the
opportunity to grab some of
the newly available seats.
"We were just right up in
the other corner, just beside
the band," he said. "They
weren't bad seats, but obviously [section U] is a much
better deal."
Nobody turned
away?
Even with the reallocation of section U seating,
Marchiony stressed that no
student who wants to get
into a Jayhawks home game
will be denied that chance.
"I think the key point
is to make sure that people understand that every
student who wants to attend a game will get into
the game," he said. "We're
committed to that because
we think the students are
the main reason why Allen
Fieldhouse is such a great
place to watch a basketball
game."
It's a slightly different
narrative than the one given
on Kansas' website, which
still states the All-Sports
Combo ensures all students
entrance to football games
but "does NOT necessarily guarantee admission to
men's basketball."
Said said she's interested to see how exactly the
department plans on admitting all students.
"Athletics has indicated that no students will
be turned away from the
games, so I'm still on the
hunt as to how that is,"

she said. "If there's a sell


out and there's a student
excess, where do those students sit? And that's the
question that I don't yet
have an answer to."
It's an issue that other
universities have struggled
with as well. UCLA's "Den
Pass" is the equivalent of
Kansas' All-Sports Combo
and allows students entry to the Bruins' six home
football games and 18 home
basketball games for $129.
UCLA Sports Information
Director Liza David said
its athletics department is
"generally" able to accommodate all students who
want to attend a basketball
game, but if there's "a significant overage, seating is
on a first-come first-served
basis.
Its not all bad
Kansas coach Bill Self
said he hasn't noticed a major difference in regard to
students through Kansas'
two exhibition games.
"I guess it's a little bit
different, but I hadn't really noticed [the reduction
in students] at all," he said.
"I know why the decisions
were made to do certain
things, but there's still plenty of good seats for the students to get though."
Prior to the reduction,
Kansas athletics' annual
revenue from student fees
was approximately $1.1
million (just over one percent of its overall income),
the fourth-lowest in the Big
12. In contrast, West Virginia rakes in the most in
the conference, $4.3 million, while the University
of Texas and University of
Oklahoma have done away
with the fees entirely.
Despite the elimination
of student seating in Sec-

tion U, Allen Fieldhouse


actually remains among the
more student-friendly venues in college basketball.
Roughly 4,000 seats are
available to Kansas students for every home game
nearly a quarter of all
available seating. Conversely, UCLA's Pauley Pavillion
holds only 1,800 students
(14 percent of total capacity) and Duke's Cameron
Indoor has been said to
support around 1,600 (17
percent).

Atmospheric
changes?
Still, students such as
Miller have expressed concern over how the change
could have a detrimental
effect on the atmosphere
inside the Phog.
"Of course it will affect
the atmosphere. You're
replacing young, loud students with an older crowd
that just doesn't have the
same enthusiasm," he said.
"There are other ways to
bring in revenue without
taking from the students
the students that pay thousands of dollars a year to
attend."

Future outlook
The department may
consider other options
eventually; Marchiony said
that it'll assess the situation
again at the end of this year.
But for now, there's no intention to give section U
back to students in the near
future.
"We'll probably take a
look at it every year," he
said. "Right now, there are
no plans to change what's
there. It's something we'll
look at year-by-year."
Edited by Drew Parks

10B

FOUR YEAR REVIEW: SPORTS

KANSAN.COM

Juni
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Mens basketball through the years

original run date:


Dec. 17, 2015

Thinking about it,


we got this far, and
we worked so hard
for this. It was an
amazing journey.

Tiana Dockery
outside hitter

Caroline Fiss/KANSAN
Kansas volleyball huddles up before a tournament against South Dakota State.

Kansas volleyballs unprecedented run comes to an


end in Omaha with Final Four loss to Nebraska
AMIE JUST
@Amie_Just

OMAHA, NEB. Tiana


Dockery's eyes welled up
with tears. There was no
use in holding them back.
As she embraced fellow
senior Ryan Leary in the
locker room, the floodgates
opened. Her season and
career as a Kansas volleyball player was over.
"I feel like the one thing
people would think I would
say is (that I'm) sad, disappointed, something like
that, but I'm a very optimistic positive person," Dockery said. "Thinking about

it, we got this far, and we


worked so hard for this. It
was an amazing journey."
Sophomore right side
hitter Kelsie Payne dominated at the net with 22
kills and a .576 hitting percentage, but the No. 4 Nebraska Cornhuskers were
too much for the No. 9 Jayhawks, as they fell in four
sets (20-25, 21-25, 25-20,
16-25).
In the first two sets, the
Jayhawks appeared dazed
and confused, dropping the
first two frames for the first
time since playing at Texas.
"We
weren't
good
enough tonight in a couple

BEST
OF THE
BEST
as voted by each class

phases of the game," Kansas coach Ray Bechard said.


"Our serving has been up
and down all year, and our
passing has been pretty solid, and those two things put
us in a bit of a hole in the
first two sets."
Kansas recorded seven
service errors in the first
two sets, as well as three receiving errors and 13 attack
errors.
One of the biggest momentum shifts in the first
set came when a Nebraska
player flew near the scorer's
table for the third touch.
The ball inched over the net
and the Huskers won the

FRESHMEN:

point. The result: the score


was 19-17 instead of 18-18.
"That little bit of a difference had us on edge," junior
libero Cassie Wait said.
But after intermission,
the Jayhawks came out like
a different team, jetting out
to a 3-1 lead. Throughout
the majority of the third set
Kansas held the lead.
"I think that was the set
we played our most consistent volleyball," senior
defensive specialist Anna
Church said. "We came out
with a fire because that's
who we are. We worked
hard because that's who we
are. That was a great set for

SOPHOMORES:

us. Unfortunately the other


ones weren't as great, but
that was where we played
KU volleyball and the world
got to see Kansas volleyball."
Kansas remained alive
in the fourth set, as the Jayhawks held the Huskers to
a tied set at 8 apiece early
on, but after that, it was all
Nebraska. Nebraska capped
off its semifinal victory with
eight straight points to end
the match.
"This sucks," Havili said.
"Everybody hates this feeling."
The
three
matches
Kansas lost over the sea-

JUNIORS:

son came to the two teams


facing off for the national
championship, as Texas
and Nebraska advanced to
the season finale.
Kansas' season may be
over, but two of its players still have awards to
accept. On Monday, Havili and Payne were tabbed
to the AVCA First-Team
All-America list, becoming
the first athletes in Kansas
history to earn the honor.
The two women will accept
their awards this weekend
at a banquet in Omaha.

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