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1.

1INTRODUCTION
The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 complete a series
of six sets of health and safety regulations implementing EC Directives, and
replace a number of old and often excessively detailed laws.
They cover a wide range of basic health, safety and welfare issues and, unlike
the Factories Act 1961 and the Offices, Shops and Railway Premises Act 1963;
apply to most workplaces (except construction sites and some mineral
extraction sites).
This leaflet gives a brief outline of the requirements of the Regulations, and has
been produced as part of the Health and Safety Commission's commitment
under the Review of Regulation to produce simple guidance for small firms to
cover key areas of risk.
REQUIREMENTS UNDER THESE REGULATIONS
Employers have a general duty under section 2 of the Health and Safety at Work
etc Act 1974 to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and
welfare of their employees at work. People in control of non-domestic premises
have a duty under section 4 of the Act towards people who are not their
employees but use their premises. The new Regulations expand on these duties
and are intended to protect the health and safety of everyone in the workplace,
and ensure that adequate welfare facilities are provided for people at work.
These Regulations aim to ensure that workplaces meet the health, safety and
welfare needs of all members of a workforce, including people with disabilities.
Several of the Regulations require things to be 'suitable'. Regulation 2(3) makes
it clear that things should be suitable for anyone. This includes people with
disabilities. Where the workforce includes people with disabilities, it is
important to ensure the workplace is suitable for them, particularly traffic
routes, toilets and workstations.
Interpretation
'Workplace' -These Regulations apply to a very wide range of workplaces, not
only factories, shops and offices but also, for example, schools, hospitals, hotels
and places of entertainment. The term workplace also includes the common
parts of shared buildings, private roads and paths on industrial estates and
business parks, and temporary worksites (but not construction sites).
'Work' means work as an employee or self-employed person.

'Premises' means any place including an outdoor place.


'Domestic premises' means a private dwelling. These Regulations do not apply
to domestic premises, and exclude home workers. However, they do apply to
hotels, nursing homes and to parts of workplaces where 'domestic' staff are
employed, such as the kitchens of hostels.
HEALTH
The measures outlined in this section contribute to the general working
environment of people in the workplace.
Ventilation
Workplaces need to be adequately ventilated. Fresh, clean air should be drawn
from a source outside the workplace, uncontaminated by discharges from flues,
chimneys or other process outlets, and be circulated through the workrooms.
Ventilation should also remove and dilute warm, humid air and provide air
movement which gives a sense of freshness without causing a draught. If the
workplace contains process or heating equipment or other sources of dust,
fumes or vapors, more fresh air will be needed to provide adequate ventilation.
Windows or other openings may provide sufficient ventilation but, where
necessary, mechanical ventilation systems should be provided and regularly
maintained.
These Regulations do not prevent the use of unglued heating systems designed
and installed to be used without a conventional flue.
Temperatures in indoor workplaces Comfort depends on air temperature, radiant
heat, air movement and humidity. Individual personal preference makes it
difficult to specify a thermal environment which satisfies everyone.
For workplaces where the activity is mainly sedentary, for example offices, the
temperature should normally be at least 16 degrees Celsius. If work involves
physical effort it should be at least 13 degrees Celsius (unless other laws require
lower temperatures).
WORK IN HOT OR COLD ENVIRONMENTS
The risk to the health of workers increases as conditions move further away
from those generally accepted as comfortable. Risk of heat stress arises, for
example, from working in high air temperatures, exposure to high thermal

radiation or high levels of humidity, such as those found in foundries, glass


works and laundries. Cold stress may arise, for example, from working in cold
stores, food preparation areas and in the open air during winter.
Assessment of the risk to workers' health, from working in either a hot or cold
environment, needs to consider two sets of factors - personal and
environmental.
Personal factors include body activity, the amount and type of clothing, and
duration of exposure. Environmental factors include ambient temperature, and
radiant heat; and if the work is outside, sunlight, wind velocity and the presence
of rain or snow.
Any assessment needs to consider:
Measures to control the workplace environment, in particular heat from
any source. Minimizing the risk of heat stress may mean insulating plant
which acts as a source of radiant heat, using local cooling by increasing
ventilation rates and maintaining the appropriate level of humidity. If it is
not reasonably practicable to avoid workers being exposed to cold
environments you should consider using local environmental controls, for
example cab heaters in fork-lift trucks used in cold stores;
Restriction of exposure by, for example, re-organizing tasks to build in
rest periods or other breaks from work. This will allow workers to rest in
an area where the environment is comfortable and, if necessary, to replace
bodily fluids to combat dehydration or cold. If work rates cause sweating,
workers may need frequent rest pauses for changing into dry clothing;
medical pre-selection of employees to ensure that they are fit to work in
these environments;
use of suitable clothing (which may need to be heat resistant or
insulating, depending on whether the risk is from heat or cold);
acclimatization of workers to the environment in which they work;
training in the precautions to be taken; and
Supervision, to ensure that the precautions identified by the assessment
are taken.

LIGHTING
Lighting should be sufficient to enable people to work and move about safely. If
necessary, local lighting should be provided at individual workstations, and at
places of particular risk such as crossing points on traffic routes. Lighting and
light fittings should not create any hazard.
Automatic emergency lighting, powered by an independent source, should be
provided where sudden loss of light would create a risk.
Cleanliness and waste materials
Every workplace and the furniture, furnishings and fittings should be kept clean
and it should be possible to keep the surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings clean.
Cleaning and the removal of waste should be carried out as necessary by an
effective method. Waste should be stored in suitable receptacles.
Room dimensions and space
Workrooms should have enough free space to allow people to move about with
ease. The volume of the room, when empty, divided by the number of people
normally working in it should be at least 11 cubic meters. All or part of a room
over 3.0 m high should be counted as 3.0 m high. Eleven cubic meters per
person is a minimum and may be insufficient depending on the layout, contents
and the nature of the work.
Workstations and seating
Workstations should be suitable for the people using them and for the work.
People should be able to leave workstations swiftly in an emergency. If work
can or must be done sitting, seats which are suitable for the people using them
and for the work done there should be provided. Seating should give adequate
support for the lower back, and footrests should be provided for workers who
cannot place their feet flat on the floor.
SAFETY
Maintenance
The workplace, and certain equipment, devices and systems should be
maintained in efficient working order (efficient for health, safety and welfare).
Such maintenance is required for mechanical ventilation systems, equipment
and devices which would cause a risk to health, safety or welfare if a fault
occurred.

Floors and traffic routes


Traffic route means a route for pedestrian traffic, vehicles, or both, and
include any stairs, fixed ladder, doorway, and gateway, loading bay or ramp.
There should be sufficient traffic routes, of sufficient width and headroom, to
allow people and vehicles to circulate safely with ease.
Floors and traffic routes should be sound and strong enough for the loads placed
on them and the traffic expected to use them. The surfaces should not have
holes, be uneven or slippery and should be kept free of obstructions.
Restrictions should be clearly indicated. Where sharp or blind bends are
unavoidable or vehicles need to reverse, measures such as one-way systems and
visibility mirrors should be considered. Speed limits should be set. Screens
should be provided to protect people who have to work where they would be at
risk from exhaust fumes, or to protect people from materials likely to fall from
vehicles.
Additional measures need to be taken where pedestrians have to cross or share
vehicle routes. These may include marking of routes, provision of crossing
points, bridges, subways and barriers.
Open sides of staircases should be fenced with an upper rail at 900 mm or
higher and a lower rail. A handrail should be provided on at least one side of
every staircase and on both sides if there is a particular risk. Additional
handrails may be required down the centre of wide staircases. Access between
floors should not be by ladders or steep stairs.
Where a load is tipped into a pit or similar place, and the vehicle is liable to fall
into it, barriers or portable wheel stops should be provided at the end of the
traffic route.
Loading bays should have at least one exit point from the lower level or a
refuge should be provided to avoid people being struck or crushed by vehicles.

1.1.1NEED OF THE STUDY


The organization provided safety & welfare to the employees who are working in the
organization. A study of safety & welfare measures analyzes the effectiveness of safety &
welfare measures provided by the somappa comfort system India (p) ltd.
Employees safety & welfare is a comprehensive term including various services,
facilities and amenities provided to employees for their betterments.
The basic purpose in to improve the lot of the work class, the employees welfare is a
dynamic concepts. It measures are also know as fringe benefits and services. Welfare
measures may be both voluntary statutory.
Employees safety & welfare is a critical aspect which has to be in to consideration.
Unless the organization cares for the safety of its employees the employees will not care for
the growth of the organization.
Hence employee safety measures are vital to be followed. Above all employees safety
measures decides and determines a company brand name, credibility, reputation, etc.

1.1.2SCOPE OF THE STUDY


The research to be complete & correct in all aspects, it should first decide upon its
boundaries of its operation. The scope of the study is to find out the welfare measures
between the employees in the l&p somappa comfort system India (p) ltd
The workplace, and certain equipment, device and systems should be maintained in
efficient working order (efficient for health safety and welfare). Such maintenance is required
for mechanical ventilization systems equipment and device which would cause a risk to
health, safety or welfare if a fault occurred and equipment indented to prevent or reduce
hazard.
The condition of the building needs to be monitored to ensure that they have appropriate
stability and solidity for their use. This includes risks from the normal running of the work
process (e.g. vibration, floor loadings) and foreseeable risks (e.g. fire in a cylinder store)

1.1.3OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY


Primary objectives:

To study an employees satisfaction towards safety and welfare measures L&P


SOMAPPA COMFORT SYSTEM INDIA [P] LTD.

Secondary objectives:

To study the employees satisfaction & morale towards safety & welfare measures.

To study whether the employees are satisfied with the overall benefits provided by the
organization.

To analyze the effectiveness of safety measures provided by the organization.

To ascertain the need and expectation of the employees of the about or regarding the
safety & welfare measures in the organization.

To give suggestions to the company to improve the welfare schemes effectively.

1.1.4RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
The research work undertaken is based on the research methodology, which is given
below:
Definition of research:
Research in common parlance refers to a search for knowledge. One can also define
research a scientific and systematic search for pertinent information on a specific topic. In
fact, research is an art of scientific investigation
Research is an academic activity and as such the term should be used in technical
sense.
According to Clifford woody, research comprise defining and redefining problem,
formulating hypothesis or suggested solution. Collecting, organizing and evaluating data,
making deduction and reaching conclusion and at last carefully testing the conclusion to
determine whether they fit the formulating hypothesis.
Research refers to the systematic method consisting of enunciating the problem,
formulating a hypothesis, collecting the fact or data analyzing the fact and reaching certain
conclusion either in the form of solution towards the concerned problem or in certain
generalization for some theoretical formulation.

1.1.4.1 RESEARCH DESIGN


A research design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of data in a
manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with economy in procedure.

Historical Research Design - The purpose is to collect, verify, synthesize evidence to


establish facts that defend or refute your hypothesis. It uses primary sources, secondary
sources, and lots of qualitative data sources such as logs, diaries, official records, reports, etc.
The limitation is that the sources must be both authentic and valid.

Descriptive or Survey Research Design - It attempts to describe and explain


conditions of the present by using many subjects and questionnaires to fully describe a
phenomenon. Survey research design /survey methodology is one of the most popular for
dissertation research. There are many advantages. I have used Descriptive research design in
this project.

Correlation or Prospective Research Design - It attempts to explore relationships to


make predictions. It uses one set of subjects with two or more variables for each.

Causal Comparative or Ex Post Facto Research Design - This research design


attempts to explore cause and affect relationships where causes already exist and cannot be
manipulated. It uses what already exists and looks backward to explain why.

Developmental or Time Series Research Design - Data are collected at certain


points in time going forward. There is an emphasis on time patterns and longitudinal growth
or change.

Experimental Research Design - This design is most appropriate in controlled


settings such as laboratories. The design assumes random assignment of subjects and random
assignment to groups (E and C). It attempts to explore cause and affect relationships where
causes can be manipulated to produce different kinds of effects. Because of the requirement
of random assignment, this design can be difficult to execute in the real world (non
laboratory) setting.

Quasi Experimental Research Design - This research design approximates the

experimental design but does not have a control group. There is more error possible in the
results.
This study has been based on Descriptive research, which is concerned with describing the
characteristics of a particular individual, or of a group. It includes surveys and fact-finding
enquiries of different kinds.
1.1.4.2 DATA SOURCES
After identifying and defining the research problem and determining specific
information required to solve the problem, the researcher`s task is to look the type and
sources of data which may yield the desired results. Data sources are of two types through
which data is collected.
Data sources may be classified as
1. Primary data
2. Secondary data
PRIMARY DATA
Primary data is the original data collected by the researcher first hand. It is collected
for the first time through field survey. These are those that are gathered specifically, for the
problem at hand. The various sources for collecting primary data are questionnaire,
observation, interview etc. The primary source used for the study is questionnaire.
SECONDARY DATA
Secondary data is the information which is already available in published or
unpublished form. When the needed information is collected from the census of population
available in a library means then it is a secondary data. It is also used for collecting historical
data. The various sources of secondary data are books, periodicals, journals, directories,
magazines, statistical data sources etc. The secondary source used for this study is company
profile, scope, need, review of literature.

1.1.4.3 RESEARCH INSTRUMENTS


Research instrument are the instruments which is used for gathering or collecting
information. The used in the study are
1. Direct questions
2. Close end questions
3. Dichotomous questions
4. Multiple choice questions
DIRECT QUESTIONS
Direct questions are just what their names indicates. They explicitly ask for the
desired data. However the directness of the question also relates to the way a response is
interpreted.
CLOSE END QUESTIONS
Such questions are also called fixed alternative questions they refer to those questions
in which the respondent is given a limited number of alternative response frame which he/she
is to select one that most closely matches his/her opinion or attitude.
DICHOTOMOUS QUESTIONS
A dichotomous question refers to one which offers the respondent a choice between
only two alternatives and reduces the issue to its simple terms. The fixed alternatives are of
the type, yes/no, agree/disagree, true/false etc.
MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS

A multiple choice question refers to one which provides several set alternatives for its
answers. Thus, it is a middle ground between free answers and dichotomous question.
SAMPLING
Collecting data about each and every unit of the population is called census method.
The approach, where only a few units of population under study are considered for analysis is
called sampling method. There are two main categories under which various sampling
method can be put.
The two categories are
1. Probability sampling
2. Non-probability sampling
The sampling method adopted for the study is convenience sampling under non-probability
sampling.
NON-PROBABILITY SAMPLING
In non-probability sampling, the chance of any particular unit in the population being
selected is unknown, since randomness is not involved in the selection process. But this does
not mean that the findings obtained from non-probability sampling are of questionable value.
If properly conducted their findings can be accurate as those obtained from probability
sampling. The three frequencies used non-probability designs are
1. Judgment sampling
2. Convenience sampling
3. Quota sampling
CONVENIENCE SAMPLING:
In this method, the sample units are chosen primarily on the basis of the convenience
to the investigator. The units selected may be each person who comes across the investigator.
SAMPLE FRAME:
A Sample frame may be defined as the listing of the general components of the
individual units that comprise the defined population.
SAMPLE DESIGN

Sample design is the theoretical basis and the practice means by generalizing from
characteristics of relatively few of the comprising population. It is the method by which the
sample is chosen.
SAMPLE SIZE
It refers to the number of elements of the population to sample. The sample size
chosen for the survey is 150.

SAMPLE PROCEDURE
Sampling procedure explains about as to how the survey has to be conducted. It
depends upon the research objectives to be accomplished through investigation.
PILOT SURVEY
For testing the quality the questionnaire was administered to 25 samples, based on
their feedback modification were made in the questionnaire.

1.1.4.4 ANALYTICAL TOOLS


ANALYSIS USING KARL PEARSONS CORRELATION:
Correlation analysis is the statistical tool used to measure the degree to which two
variables are linearly related to each other. Correlation measures the degree of association
between two variables
CHI SQUARE
A chi-square test is any statistical hypothesis test in which the sampling distribution of the
test statistic is a chi-square distribution when the null hypothesis is true, or any in which this
is asymptotically true, meaning that the sampling distribution (if the null hypothesis is true)
can be made to approximate a chi-square distribution as closely as desired by making the
sample size large enough.
Chi square method is popularly known as. It is denoted by the symbol x
Formula for Chi square x =

(OE)
E

.
PERCENTAGES
Percentages refer to a special kind of ratio. Percentages are used in making
comparison between two or more series of data. Percentages are used to describe
relationships, it is expressed as.
Percentage = (no of employees/total no of employees) 100
CHARTS:

Charts are graphic displays of data for easy understanding of relative positions that is
not always possible with descriptive words or numbers. Types of charts commonly used in
business data presentation are: Bar and pie.
BAR CHARTS:
The bar chart is commonly used for presentation of qualitative data. The data can be
continuous or discrete data, which are plotted against discrete data intervals. The vertical bar
diagram, also called bar chart where the length or height of bars represent the numerical value
of the event or measurement. Width or gap between the bars is of no significance to the bar
chart data, but they are uniform in a diagram.

PIE DIAGRAM:
Pie charts are circle graphs that display 100% of data as a circle. The circle was
divided into proportionate slices that represent categories whose size is defined by the
percentage of a category in the total. Pie diagram is very suitable for presentation various
business results and quality issues, such as analysis of company earnings from various heads,
causes of products and services complaints, cost built-up etc.

1.1.5LIMITATION OF THE STUDY

The study is limited only to L&P SOMAPPA COMFORT SYSTEM INDIA (P) LTD.
The time allotted for study is only three month which is a very short period to conduct
an expensive survey.
Interview cannot be carried out with all the employee of the organization.
The information collected may be based to some extent it is not possible to review the
biased information completely.
Some of the employees were not able to understand the English.
Employees are reluctant to give their suggestions open Mindy.
Finding and suggestions may or may not be applicable for long period.

1.2.1 COMPANY PROFILE

L&P Somappa Comfort


Systems
(India) Private Limited
A
Leg
gett
&
Platt
Com
pan
y

CORPORATE DESCRIPTION: Leggett & Platt (NYSE: LEG) is a FORTUNE 500


diversified manufacturer that conceives, designs and produces a broad variety of
engineered components and products that can be found in virtually every home,
office, retail store, and automobile. The company serves a broad suite of customers
that comprise U.S. manufacturers and retailers. The 125-year-old firms Continuing
Operations are composed of 21 business units, 24,000 employee-partners, and more
than 250 facilities located in 20 countries.
Leggett & Platt is North Americas leading independent manufacturer of:
a) Components for residential furniture and bedding;
b) Retail store fixtures and point of purchase displays;
c) Components for office furniture;

d) Drawn steel wire;


e) Automotive seat support and lumbar systems;
f) Carpet underlay;
g) Adjustable beds; and
h) Bedding industry machinery.
COMPANY DESCRIPTION: Leggett & Platt Automotive Group provides quality
engineered products for every manufacturing need, including lumbar, suspension, and
bolster systems; wire forms, mechanical control cables, welded seating components,
tubular products, and seating motors and actuators. Its objective is to provide ultimate
comfort in automotive seating.
With technical and engineering expertise in Asia, Europe, and North America, L&P
Automotive Group is able to provide the global support and services today's top
OEMs and Tier 1's demand. With the addition of new global locations as well as
continuous improvement of current products and innovation of new products, the
L&P Automotive Group continues to grow and flourish as a leader in the Automotive
Seating Components Market.
L&P AUTOMOTIVE GROUP - HISTORY
1985 - Leggett & Platt Automotive Group established
1988 - Acquisition of Flex-O-Lators, Carthage, Missouri, USA
1994 - Acquisition of Pullmaflex, Wevelgem, Belgium
2000 - Acquisition of Schukra Group, UK
2002 - Acquisition of Pneumatic Technology (formally made by ByTec)
2003 - Established 3 JVs in China and 1 in Korea
2004 - Leggett & Platt Wire Forms Hungary, Tarjan, Hungary
2005 - Expansion to L&H Guangzhou, China
2006 - Acquisition of Korea JV, L&K
2007 - Establishment of L&I (JV in Chennai, India)

Factory:

Unit No. C-13, Ambattur Industrial Estate, Ambattur, Chennai,


India 600 058. Tel: +91 - 44 2635 0511 - 14 & 16
Tele Fax
: +91 - 44 2635 0510

Registered Office:

No. 201, Prestige Sigma, 3,Vittal Mallya Road,Bangalore, India 560 001.
Tel: 91-80-4112 4994; Fax: 91-80 41124998
Websites: www. leggett.com; www. lpautomotive.com

1.2.2 INDUSTRY PROFILE


The automotive industry in India is one of the largest in the world and one of the
fastest growing globally. India's passenger car and commercial vehicle manufacturing
industry is the sixth largest in the world, with an annual production of more than 3.7 million
units in 2010. According to recent reports, India is set to overtake Brazil to become the sixth
largest passenger vehicle producer in the world, growing 16-18 per cent to sell around three
million units in the course of 2011-12. In 2009, India emerged as Asia's fourth largest
exporter of passenger cars, behind Japan, South Korea, and Thailand.. In 2010, India reached
as Asia's third largest exporter of passenger cars, behind Japan and South Korea beating
Thailand.
As of 2010, India is home to 40 million passenger vehicles. More than 3.7 million
automotive vehicles were produced in India in 2010 (an increase of 33.9%), making the
country the second fastest growing automobile market in the world. According to the Society
of Indian Automobile Manufacturers, annual vehicle sales are projected to increase to 5
million by 2015 and more than 9 million by 2020. By 2050, the country is expected to top the
world in car volumes with approximately 611 million vehicles on the nation's roads.
The majority of India's car manufacturing industry is based around three clusters in
the south, west and north. The southern cluster near Chennai is the biggest with 35% of the
revenue share. The western hub near Maharashtra is 33% of the market. The northern cluster
is primarily Haryana with 32%. Chennai, is also referred to as the "Detroit of India" with the
India operations of Ford, Hyundai, Renault and Nissan headquartered in the city and BMW

having an assembly plant on the outskirts. Chennai accounts for 60% of the country's
automotive exports. Gurgaon and Manesar in Haryana form the northern cluster where the
country's largest car manufacturer, Maruti Suzuki, is based. The Chakan corridor near Pune,
Maharashtra is the western cluster with companies like General Motors, Volkswagen, Skoda,
Mahindra and Mahindra, Tata Motors, Mercedes Benz, Land Rover, Fiat and Force Motors
having assembly plants in the area. Aurangabad with Audi, Skoda and Volkswagen also
forms part of the western cluster. Another emerging cluster is in the state of Gujarat with
manufacturing facility of General Motors in Halol and further planned for Tata Nano at
Sanand. Ford, Maruti Suzuki and Peugeot-Citroen plants are also set to come up in Gujarat.[14]
Kolkatta with Hindustan Motors, Noida with Honda and Bangalore with Toyota are some of
the other automotive manufacturing regions around the country.
The Indian Automobile Industry manufactures over 11 million vehicles and exports
about 1.5 million each year. The dominant products of the industry are two-wheelers with a
market share of over 75% and passenger cars with a market share of about 16%. Commercial
vehicles and three-wheelers share about 9% of the market between them. About 91% of the
vehicles sold are used by households and only about 9% for commercial purposes. The
industry has a turnover of more than USD $35 billion and provides direct and indirect
employment to over 13 million people
The supply chain is similar to the supply chain of the automotive industry in Europe
and America. Interestingly, the level of trade exports in this sector in India has been medium
and imports have been low. However, this is rapidly changing and both exports and imports
are increasing. The demand determinants of the industry are factors like affordability, product
innovation, infrastructure and price of fuel. Also, the basis of competition in the sector is high
and increasing, and its life cycle stage is growth. With a rapidly growing middle class, all the
advantages of this sector in India are yet to be leveraged. With a high cost of developing
production facilities, limited accessibility to new technology, and increasing competition, the
barriers to enter the Indian Automotive sector are high. On the other hand, India has a welldeveloped tax structure. The power to levy taxes and duties is distributed among the three
tiers of Government. The cost structure of the industry is fairly traditional, but the
profitability of motor vehicle manufacturers has been rising over the past five years. Major
players, like Tata Motors and Maruti Suzuki have material cost of about 80% but are
recording profits after tax of about 6% to 11%.

The level of technology change in the Motor vehicle Industry has been high but, the rate of
change in technology has been medium. Investment in the technology by the producers has
been high. System-suppliers of integrated components and sub-systems have become the
order of the day. However, further investment in new technologies will help the industry be
more competitive. Over the past few years, the industry has been volatile. Currently, India's
increasing per capita disposable income which is expected to rise by 106% by 2015 and
growth in exports is playing a major role in the rise and competitiveness of the industry.
Tata Motors is leading the commercial vehicle segment with a market share of about
64%. Maruti Suzuki is leading the passenger vehicle segment with a market share of 46%.
Hyundai Motor India and Mahindra and Mahindra are focusing expanding their footprint in
the overseas market. Hero Moto Corp is occupying over 41% and sharing 26% of the twowheeler market in India with Bajaj Auto. Bajaj Auto in itself is occupying about 58% of the
three-wheeler market.
Consumers are very important of the survival of the Motor Vehicle manufacturing
industry. In 2008-09, customer sentiment dropped, which burned on the augmentation in
demand of cars. Steel is the major input used by manufacturers and the rise in price of steel is
putting a cost pressure on manufacturers and cost is getting transferred to the end consumer.
The price of oil and petrol affect the driving habits of consumers and the type of car they buy.
The key to success in the industry is to improve labour productivity, labour flexibility,
and capital efficiency. Having quality manpower, infrastructure improvements, and raw
material availability also play a major role. Access to latest and most efficient technology and
techniques will bring competitive advantage to the major players. Utilizing manufacturing
plants to optimum level and understanding implications from the government policies are the
essentials in the Automotive Industry of India.
Both, Industry and Indian Government are obligated to intervene the Indian
Automotive industry. The Indian government should facilitate infrastructure creation, create
favourable and predictable business environment, attract investment and promote research
and development. The role of Industry will primarily be in designing and manufacturing
products of world-class quality establishing cost competitiveness and improving productivity
in labour and in capital. With a combined effort, the Indian Automotive industry will emerge
as the destination of choice in the world for design and manufacturing of automobiles.

History
The first car ran on India's roads in 1897. Until the 1930s, cars were imported directly,
but in very small numbers.
Embryonic automotive industry emerged in India in the 1940s. Mahindra & Mahindra
was established by two brothers as a trading company in 1945, and began assembly of Jeep
CJ-3A utility vehicles under license from Willys. The company soon branched out into the
manufacture of light commercial vehicles (LCVs) and agricultural tractors.[20]
Following the independence, in 1947, the Government of India and the private sector
launched efforts to create an automotive component manufacturing industry to supply to the
automobile industry. However, the growth was relatively slow in the 1950s and 1960s due to
nationalization and the license raj which hampered the Indian private sector. After 1970, the
automotive industry started to grow, but the growth was mainly driven by tractors,
commercial vehicles and scooters. Cars were still a major luxury. Japanese manufacturers
entered the Indian market ultimately leading to the establishment of Maruti Udyog. A number
of foreign firms initiated joint ventures with Indian companies.
In the 1980s, a number of Japanese manufacturers launched joint-ventures for
building motorcycles and light commercial-vehicles. It was at this time that the Indian
government chose Suzuki for its joint-venture to manufacture small cars. Following the
economic liberalization in 1991 and the gradual weakening of the license raj, a number of
Indian and multi-national car companies launched operations. Since then, automotive
component and automobile manufacturing growth has accelerated to meet domestic and
export demands.
Following economic liberalization in India in 1991, the Indian automotive industry
has demonstrated sustained growth as a result of increased competitiveness and relaxed
restrictions. Several Indian automobile manufacturers such as Tata Motors, Maruti Suzuki
and Mahindra and Mahindra, expanded their domestic and international operations. India's
robust economic growth led to the further expansion of its domestic automobile market which
has

attracted

significant

India-specific

investment

by

multinational

automobile

manufacturers. In February 2009, monthly sales of passenger cars in India exceeded 100,000
units and have since grown rapidly to a record monthly high of 182,992 units in October
2009. From 2003 to 2010, car sales in India have progressed at a CAGR of 13.7%, and with
only 10% of Indian households owning a car in 2009 (whereas this figure reaches 80% in
Switzerland for example) this progression is unlikely to stop in the coming decade.
Congestion of Indian roads, more than market demand, will likely be the limiting factor.
SIAM is the apex industry body representing all the vehicle manufacturers, home-grown and
international, in India.

Supply Chain of Automobile Industry


The supply chain of automotive industry in India is very similar to the supply chain of
the automotive industry in Europe and America. The orders of the industry arise from the
bottom of the supply chain i. e., from the consumers and go through the automakers and
climbs up until the third tier suppliers. However the products, as channeled in every
traditional automotive industry, flow from the top of the supply chain to reach the consumers.
Automakers in India are the key to the supply chain and are responsible for the products and
innovation in the industry.
The description and the role of each of the contributors to the supply chain are
discussed below.
Third Tier Suppliers: These companies provide basic products like rubber, glass, steel,
plastic and aluminum to the second tier suppliers.
Second Tier Suppliers: These companies design vehicle systems or bodies for First Tier
Suppliers and OEMs. They work on designs provided by the first tier suppliers or OEMs.
They also provide engineering resources for detailed designs. Some of their services may
include welding, fabrication, shearing, bending etc.
First Tier Suppliers: These companies provide major systems directly to assemblers.
These companies have global coverage to follow their customers to various locations around
the world. They design and innovate to provide "black-box" solutions for the requirements of
their customers. Black-box solutions are solutions created by suppliers using their own
technology to meet the performance and interface requirements set by assemblers.

First tier suppliers are responsible not only for the assembly of parts into complete
units like dashboard, breaks-axle-suspension, seats, or cockpit but also for the management of
second-tier suppliers.
Automakers/Vehicle Manufacturers/Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs):
After researching consumers' wants and needs, automakers begin designing models which are
tailored to consumers' demands. The design process normally takes five years. These
companies have manufacturing units where engines are manufactured and parts supplied by
first tier suppliers and second tier suppliers are assembled. Automakers are the key to the
supply chain of the automotive industry. Examples of these companies are Tata Motors,
Maruti Suzuki, Toyota, and Honda. Innovation, design capability and branding are the main
focus of these companies.

TABLE: 2.1.1
GENDER
PARTICULARS

S.NO

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
112

PERCENTAGE

MALE

FEMALE

38

25

TOTAL

150

100

CHART: 2.1.1
GENDER
80
70
60
50
PERCENTAGE

40
30
20
10
0
MALE

FEMALE
PARTICULARS

INFERENCE

75

From the above table it is inferred that 80% of the respondents are male and the rest of
them are female in organization.

TABLE: 2.1.2
MARITAL STATUS
S.NO

PARTICULARS

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
43

PERCENTAGE

MARRIED

29

SINGLE

107

71

TOTAL

150

100

CHART: 2.2.2
MARITAL STATUS
80
70
60
50
PERCENTAGE 40
30
20
10
0
MARRIED

SINGLE
PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 71% of the respondents are single and the rest of
them are married in the organization.

TABLE: 2.1.3
AGE
S.NO
1
2
3
4

PARTICULARS

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
85
53
8
4
150

20-29
30-39
40-49
ABOVE50
TOTAL

PERCENTAGE
57
35
5
3
100

CHART: 2.2.3
AGE

20-29
30-39
40-49
ABOVE50

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 57% of the respondents are between the ages of 2029, 35% of the respondents are between the ages of 30-39, 5% of the respondents are between
the ages of 40-49, 3% of the respondents were above 50 in the organization.

TABLE: 2.1.4
EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION
S.NO
1
2
3
4
5

PARTICULARS

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
42
79
22
5
0
150

SSLC
HSS
DIPLOMA
UG
PG
TOTAL

PERCENTAGE
28
53
16
3
0
100

CHART: 2.2.4
EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION
60
50
40
PERCHANTAGE 30
20
10
0
SSLC

HSS

DIPLOMA

UG

PG

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 53% of the respondents completed diploma holders,
28% of the respondents have completed SSLC , 16% of the respondents completed HSS, 5%
of the respondents are graduates in organization.

TABLE: 2.1.5
S.NO
1
2
3
4

DEPARTMENT
PARTICULARS
NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
PRODUCTION
64
QUALITY
27
MAINTENANCE
39
STORES
20
TOTAL
150

PERCENTAGE
43
18
26
13
100

CHART: 2.2.5
DEPARTMENT

ST
O
RE
S

M
AI
N

TE
N

AN

CE

AL
IT
Y
Q
U

PR
O
D
U

CT
IO
N

PERCENTAGE

45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 43% of the respondents belong to production
department, 26% of the respondents belong to maintenance, 18% of the respondents are from
quality department and 13% of the respondents belong to stores in the organization.

TABLE: 2.1.6

EXPERIENCE
PARTICULARS
NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
LESS THAN
98
5YEARS
5 TO 10 YEARS
38

11 TO 20 YEARS

14

10

TOTAL

150

100

S.NO
1

PERCENTAGE
65
25

CHART: 2.2.6
EXPERIENCE

YE
AR
S
20
11

TO

10
TO
5

LE
SS

TH
AN

5Y
EA
RS

PERCENTAGE

YE
AR
S

70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 65% of the respondents are of experience less than 5
years, 25% of the respondents with 5-10 experience and the rest of the respondents with 1120 experience in the organization

TABLE: 2.1.7
SINO

FIRST AID BOX


PARTICULARS
NO.OF
RESPONDENTS

PERCENTAGE

1
2
3

HIGHLY SATISFIED
SATISFIED
MODERATELY
SATISFIED
DISSATISFIED
HIGHLYDIS
SATISFIED
TOTAL

4
5

21
38
71

14
25
48

12
8

8
5

150

100

CHART: 2.2.7
FIRST AID BOX

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

H
IG
H
LY
D
IS

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

M
O
D
ER
AT
EL
Y

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

PERCENTAGE

50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 25 % of the respondents are satisfied with the first
aid box facility, 48 % of respondents are moderately satisfied, 14% of the respondents are
highly satisfied, 8% of the respondents are dissatisfied, and the rest of the respondents are
highly dissatisfied with the first aid box facility in the organization.

TABLE: 2.1.10
S.NO
1
2

FIRE PROTECTION GLASS


PARTICULARS
NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
HIGHLY SATISFIED
12
SATISFIED
43

PERCENTAGE
8
29

MODERATELY
SATISFIED

67

45

4
5

DISSATISFIED
HIGHLYDIS
SATISFIED

20
8

13
5

TOTAL

150

100

CHART: 2.2.10
FIRE PROTECTION GLASS
5

13
HIGHLY SATISFIED
SATISFIED

29

MODERATELY SATISFIED
DISSATISFIED
HIGHLYDIS SATISFIED

45

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 29 % of the respondents are satisfied with the fire
protection glass, 45% of respondents are moderately satisfied, 13% of the respondents are
dissatisfied, 8% of the respondents are highly satisfied and the rest of the respondents are
highly dissatisfied with the fire protection glass given by the organization
TABLE: 2.1.8
SHOES
S.NO

PARTICULARS

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
74

PERCENTAGE

HIGHLY SATISFIED

SATISFIED

32

21

MODERATELY
SATISFIED

24

16

49

DISSATISFIED

HIGHLYDIS
SATISFIED

11

TOTAL

150

100

CHART: 2.2.8
SHOES

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

H
IG
H
LY
D
IS

M
O
D
ER
AT
EL
Y

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

PERCENTAGE

50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 49% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the
safety shoes, 21% of respondents are satisfied, 16% of the respondents are moderately
satisfied, 8% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied and the rest of the respondents are
dissatisfied with the safety shoes provided by the organization.
TABLE: 2.1.9
S.NO
1
2
3
4
5

GLOVES
PARTICULARS
HIGHLY SATISFIED
SATISFIED
MODERATELY
SATISFIED
DISSATISFIED
HIGHLYDIS
SATISFIED
TOTAL

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
34
47
54

PERCENTAGE

8
7

5
5

150

100

23
31
36

CHART: 2.2.9
GLOVES

SA
TI
SF
IE
D
H
IG
H
LY
D
IS

M
O
D
ER
AT
EL
Y

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

PERCENTAGE

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 23 % of the respondents are highly satisfied with
the gloves provided by the organization, 31 % of respondents are satisfied, and 36 % of
respondents are moderately satisfied with the gloves provided by the organization.

TABLE: 2.1.11
SAFETY TRAINING PROGRAM
S.NO

PARTICULARS

YES

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
99

NO

51

34

TOTAL

150

100

CHART: 2.2.11

PERCENTAGE
66

SAFETY TRAINING PROGRAM

34
YES
NO
66

INFERENCE
From the above table and graph, it is inferred that 66% of the respondents say yes that
they gain knowledge during safety training program, and the rest of respondents say no that
they didnt gain knowledge during safety training program.

TABLE: 2.1.12
OPINION ABOUT EXISTING SAFETY MEASURES
S.NO
1
2
3

PARTICULARS
GOOD
FAIR
BAD
TOTAL

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
107
31
12
150

CHART: 2.2.12
OPINION ABOUT EXISTING SAFETY MEASURES

PERCENTAGE
71
20
9
100

80
70
60
50
PERCENTAGE

40
30
20
10
0
GOOD

FAIR

BAD

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 71% of the respondents feel good about the
existing safety measures in the organization, 20% of the respondents feel fair about the safety
measures and about 9% respondents feel bad in organization.

TABLE: 2.1.13
USING SAFETY MEASURES PROVIDED
S.NO
1
2
3

PARTICULARS
ALWAYS
SOMETIMES
BAD
TOTAL

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
29
62
59
150

CHART: 2.2.13
USING SAFETY MEASURES PROVIDED

PERCENTAGE
20
41
39
100

45
40
35
30
PERCENTAGE

25
20
15
10
5
0
ALWAYS

SOMETIMES

BAD

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 20% of the respondents say that they always
follows the safety measures provided by the organization, 39% of the respondents say that
they badly follow the safety measures provided by the organization and the rest of the
respondents say that they sometimes follow the safety measures provided by the organization

TABLE: 2.1.14
SAFETY MEASURES AND REDUCTION IN ACCIDENTS
S.NO

PARTICULARS

1
2
3
4
5

STRONGLY AGREE
AGREE
NEUTRAL
DISAGREE
STRONGLY
DISAGREE
TOTAL

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
13
59
61
17
0

PERCENTAGE

150

100

CHART: 2.2.14
SAFETY MEASURES AND REDUCTION IN ACCIDENTS

9
39
41
11
0

ST
RO
N

G
LY

D
IS
AG
RE
E

AG
RE
E

PERCENTAGE

45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 39% of the respondents agree that the safety measures
will reduce the severity of the accidents and 41% of respondents are of neutral and 11% of
the respondents disagree that the safety measures will reduce the severity of the accidents.

TABLE: 2.1.15
SAFETY POLICY KNOWN
S.NO
1
2
3

PARTICULARS
COMPLETELY
PARTLY
TO SOME EXTENT
TOTAL

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
15
43
92
150

CHART: 2.2.15
SAFETY POLICY KNOWN

PERCENTAGE
10
29
61
100

70
60
50
40
PERCENTAGE

30
20
10
0
COMPLETELY

PARTLY

TO SOME EXTENT

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 10% of the respondents are completely awarded
about safety policy, 29% of the respondents partly and 61% of the respondents to some extent
about the safety policies.

TABLE: 2.1.16
DRINKING WATER
S.NO

PARTICULARS

NO.OF RESPONDENTS

PERCENTAGE

HIGHLY SATISFIED

30

20

SATISFIED

70

47

MODERATELYSATISFIED

23

15

DISSATISFIED

20

13

HIGHLY DISSATISFIED

150

100

CHART: 2.2.16
DRINKING WATER

H
IG
H
LY

D
IS
S

AT
IS
FI
ED

AT
IS
FI
ED
M
O
D
ER
AT
EL
YS

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

PERCENTAGE

50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 47% of the respondents are satisfied with the
drinking water facility, 20% of respondents are highly satisfied, 15% of the respondents are
moderately satisfied, 13% of the respondents dissatisfied and the rest of the respondents
highly dissatisfied with the drinking water provided by the company.
TABLE: 2.1.17
LATRINES & URINALS
S.NO

PARTICULARS

1
2
3

HIGHLY SATISFIED
SATISFIED
MODERATELY
SATISFIED
DISSATISFIED
HIGHLY
DISSATISFIED
TOTAL

4
5

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
23
32
55

PERCENTAGE

22
18

15
12

150

100

CHART: 2.2.17
LATRINES & URINALS

15
21
37

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

M
O
D
ER
AT
EL
Y

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

PERCENTAGE

40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 21% of the respondents are satisfied with the
latrines and urinals, 37 % of respondents are moderately satisfied, 15% of the respondents are
highly satisfied, and 15% of the respondents dissatisfied, 12% of the respondents are highly
dissatisfied.

TABLE: 2.1.18
CANTEEN FACILITY
S.NO

PARTICULARS

1
2
3

HIGHLY SATISFIED
SATISFIED
MODERATELY
SATISFIED
DISSATISFIED
HIGHLYDIS
SATISFIED
TOTAL

4
5

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
18
93
18

PERCENTAGE

14
7

9
5

150

100

CHART: 2.2.18
CANTEEN FACILITY

12
62
12

12

12

HIGHLY SATISFIED
SATISFIED
MODERATELY SATISFIED
DISSATISFIED
HIGHLYDIS SATISFIED

62

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 62 % of the respondents are satisfied with the
canteen facility, 12%of respondents are highly satisfied and 12% moderately satisfied, 9% of
the respondents are dissatisfied and the rest of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with the
canteen facility.

TABLE: 2.1.19
REST ROOMS
S.NO

PARTICULARS

1
2
3

HIGHLY SATISFIED
SATISFIED
MODERATELY
SATISFIED
DISSATISFIED
HIGHLY
DISSATISFIED
TOTAL

4
5

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
21
64
38

PERCENTAGE

27
0

18
0

150

100

CHART: 2.2.19
REST ROOMS

14
43
25

H
IG
H
LY

D
IS
S

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

M
O
D
ER
AT
EL
Y

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

PERCENTAGE

AT
IS
FI
ED

45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 43% of the respondents are satisfied with the rest
room facility, 25% of respondents are moderately satisfied, 14% of the respondents are highly
satisfied, and 18% of the respondents are dissatisfied.

TABLE: 2.1.20
HEALTH SERVICES
S.NO
1
2
3
4
5

PARTICULARS
HIGHLY SATISFIED
SATISFIED
MODERATELY
SATISFIED
DISSATISFIED
HIGHLY SATISFIED

NO.OF RESPONDENTS
70
52
20

PERCENTAGE
47
35
13

8
0

5
0

150

100

TOTAL

CHART: 2.2.20
HEALTH SERVICES

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

M
O
D
ER
AT
EL
Y

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

PERCENTAGE

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 47 % of the respondents are highly satisfied with
the health service facility, 35% of respondents are satisfied, 13% of the respondents
moderately satisfied and 5% of the respondents are dissatisfied with the health service facility
provided by the organization.

TABLE: 2.1.21
WELFARE MEASURES
S.NO

PARTICULARS

YES

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
93

NO

57

38

TOTAL

150

100

CHART: 2.2.21
WELFARE MEASURES

PERCENTAGE
62

38

YES
NO
62

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 62% of the respondents awarded about the welfare
measures provided and the 38% of the respondents are not awarded about welfare measures
provided by the organization.

TABLE: 2.1.22
COMMITTEE FORMED FOR WELFARE MEASURES
S.NO
1
2

PARTICULARS
YES
NO
TOTAL

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
88
62
150

CHART: 2.2.22
COMMITTEE FORMED FOR WELFARE MEASURES

PERCENTAGE
59
41
100

60
50
40
PERCENTAGE 30
20
10
0
YES

NO
PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 59% of the respondents say that the committee is
formed for welfare measures and the 4% of the respondents say that there is no committee for
welfare measures in the organization.

TABLE: 2.1.23
OVER ALL LEVEL OF SATISFACTION
S.NO

PARTICULARS

1
2
3
4
5

HIGHLY SATISFIED
SATISFIED
NEUTRAL
DIS SATISFIED
HIGHLY DIS
SATISFIED
TOTAL

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
39
55
41
15
0

PERCENTAGE

150

100

CHART: 2.2.23
OVER ALL LEVEL OF SATISFACTION

26
37
27
10
0

45
40
35
30
25
PERCENTAGE 20
15
10
5
0
PARTICULARS

SATISFIED

DIS SATISFIED

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 37% of the respondents are satisfied with the welfare
measures, 27% of the respondents are neutral, 26% of the respondents are highly satisfied and
the 10% of the respondents are dissatisfied in the organization.

TABLE: 2.1.24
EFFECT OF WELFARE MEASURES HELPS
S.NO
1
2
3
4
5

PARTICULARS
CREATE A BETTER
INDUSTRIAL REALTION
BUILD GREATER
LOYALTY TO THE
COMPANY
INCREASE TEAM SPIRIT
MOTIVATE
DOESNT MADE ANY
DIFFERENCE
TOTAL

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
21

PERCENTAGE

59

39

45
25
0

30
17
0

150

100

CHART: 2.1.24
EFFECT OF WELFARE MEASURES HELPS

14

45
40
35
30
25
PERCENTAGE

20
15
10
5
0
CREATE A BETTER INDUSTRIAL REALTION
PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 39 % of the respondents feel that the welfare
measures helps to build greater loyalty to the company, 14% of them feel that it creates a
better industrial relations, 30% of respondents feel that it will increase the team spirit and
17% of them feel that it will motivate the employees.
TABLE: 2.1.25
OPINION ABOUT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
S.NO

PARTICULARS

NO.OF
RESPONDENTS
32

PERCENTAGE

HIGHLY SATISFIED

SATISFIED

89

59

NOT SATISFIED

29

20

TOTAL

150

100

CHART: 2.2.25
OPINION ABOUT WORKING ENVIRONMENT

21

60
50
40
30
20
10
0

SA
TI
SF
IE
D
N

O
T

H
IG
H
LY

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

SA
TI
SF
IE
D

PERCENTAGE

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 59% of the respondents are satisfied with the
working environment, 21 % of the respondents are highly satisfied and the 20% of the
respondents are not satisfied with the working environment.

TABLE: 2.1.26
RELATIONSHIP WITH SUPERIOR
S.NO
1
2
3
4
5

PARTICULARS
STRONGLY
AGREE
AGREE
NEUTRAL
DISAGREE
STRONGLY
DISAGREE
TOTAL

NO.OF
RESPONDENT
S
33

PERCENTAGE

45
43
22
7

30
29
14
5

150

100

22

CHART: 2.2.26
RALATIONSHIP WITH SUPERIOR

30
25
20
15
10
5

PERCENTAGE

D
IS
AG
RE
E

ST
RO
N

G
LY

AG
RE
E

PARTICULARS

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that 30% of the respondents agree that they maintain
good relationship with their superiors, 29% of the respondents are neutral, 5% of the
respondents strongly disagree and the 14% of the respondents disagree and the 22% of the
respondents strongly agree that they maintains good relationship with their superior.

STATISTICAL TOOL
CHI-SQAURE
NULL HYPOTHESIS HO:
There is no relationship between the awareness of welfare measures & committee formed to
Check welfare measures
ALTERNATIVE HYPOTHESIS H1:
There is no relationship between the awareness of welfare measures & committee formed to
Check welfare measures
S.NO
1
2

PARTICULARS
Awareness of
welfare measures
Committee
welfare measures
TOTAL

YES
93

NO
57

TOTAL
150

88

62

150

181

119

300

CALCULATION
2 = (Oi Ei)2/Ei
O
93
57
88
62
Level of satisfaction
Degrees of freedom

E
90.5
59.5
90.5
59.5
=5%
=(r-1) (c-1)
= (2-1) (2-1)
=1

Tabulated value
=3.841
Calculated value
=0.348
Calculated value > tabulated value
(i.e.) 0.348< 3,841
Therefore null hypothesis is accepted

INFERENCE

(O-E)2
6.25
6.25
6.25
6.25

(O-E)2/E
0.069
0.105
0.069
0.105
2 = 0.348

From the above analysis it is inferred that there is significant relationship between awareness
of welfare measures and the committee formed to check welfare measures in the
organization.

WEIGHTED AVERAGE
Formula: N1 W1+ N2W2+NnWn /W1+W2++Wn
Particular

Frequency

weights

Weighted
frequency/100
0.65

Rank

Weighted
frequency
65

Strongly
agree
Agree l
Neutral
Disagree
Strongly
disagree

13
59
61
17
0

4
3
2
1

236
183
34
0

2.36
1.83
0.34
0

2
1
3
5

INFERENCE
From the above table it is inferred that the maximum weightage is given to neutral which is
safety measures help to reduce the accidents.

CORRELATION
Correlation
X= level of satisfaction
Y=canteen facility

FORMULA:
Correlation coefficient = r=

x
y
39
18
55
93
41
18
15
14
0
7
x=150 y=150

NXY - XY
NX (X) NY (Y)

XY
702
5115
738
210
0
XY = 6765

X
1521
3025
1681
225
0
X = 6452

Y
324
8649
324
196
49
y =9542

N=5
r = 0.722
INFERENCE
r is positively correlated
There is a positive relation between level of satisfaction and the canteen facility.

FINDINGS
A survey among 150 workers in L&P SOMAPPA COMFORT SYSTEM INDIA PVT
LTD was conducted the following was the observation made.
1. 71% of the workers are singles.
2. 62% of the employees are awareness of safety and welfare measured undergone in the
company.
3. Majority of the employees agree that safety provisions are provided by the
organization.
4. 53% of the employees undergone safety program in the organization and 47% for the
employees did not undergone safety program.
5. Nearly 20% of the employees feel ok with the existing safety measures provided by
the organization and 71% of the employees feel good with the safety measures.
6. Majority of the employees satisfied with first aid facilities provided by the
organization.
7. 37% of employees are satisfied with the welfare measures and 10%are not satisfied
with the welfare measures.
8. 59% of employees aware of the safety committees in the organization.
9. 49% workers satisfied with the shoes in the organization..
10.59% of the employees say yes committee formed to welfare
measures in the organization
11.41% of the employees are of opinion neutral that the safety
measures will reduce the
Severity of the accidents.
12.37% of the employees are satisfied with the level of satisfaction
regarding welfare measures and 10% of the employees are dissatisfied.
13.62% of the employees are satisfied with the canteen facilities.
14. 30% of the employees agree that relationship with superior.
15.59% of the employees satisfied with the working environment

SUGGESTIONS
1. Most of the employees are young & enthusiastic we can candidates to guide them.
2. Safety programs and safety measures should be improved.
3. Company can provide extra benefits like education to the employees childrens.
4. Majority of them are aware of the safety measures and it is good that immediate
actions are undertaken during accidents.
5. Management is handled complaints in good manner and givens first preference.
6. Safety facilities offered are at satisfactory level only. The company shall develop this
aspect and achieve full satisfaction of workers.
7. The company as very high response for providing basic needs like rest room, shoes
and drinking water from its workers. The company should hold this status in future.
8. The basic facilities are high in the organization the sum of facilities like transportation
education scheme should be improved.
.
9. Employees feel good regarding the work environment and it could be maintained.
10. The employees and the superior relationship should be closure than only the highest
objective is achieved.
11. Safety provisions should be improved in the working area.

CONCLUSION
This study titled A STUDY ON EMPLOYEES SATISFACTION TOWARDS
SAFETY AND WELFARE IN L&P SOMAPPA COMFORT SYSTEM INDIA PVT LTD
Safety and Welfare measures are important to all employees in an organization. Nonstatutory benefits should be increased, which in return will increase the productivity of the
employees.
The study concluded that L&P SOMAPPA COMFORT SYSTEM INDIA PVT LTD is
proving all safety benefits and also welfare benefits. Employees are all satisfied with all
welfare measures, but it should consider providing some extra benefits like education to the
children of the employees.
Employees should play a more concerted role in safety and accident prevention
program and in arousing safety consciousness.
Safety should become a habit with the employers and workers instead of remaining a
mere ritual.
Every factory employing 150 or more workers should setup committees to ensure
continued participation of workers in matters connected with safety and welfare measures.

BIBILOGRAPHY
1. Personnel Management : C.B. Memoria
2. Industrial Psychology : P.K. Ghosh & M.B. Ghorpada
3. Personnel and Human Resource Management : P. Subba Rao
4. Principle and practice of Management : Dr. J.N. Chabra
5. Internet Sources

WWW.EMPLOYEES SAFETY AND WELFARE MEASURES.COM


WWW.GOOGLE.COM

A STUDY ON EMPOYEES SATISFACTION TOWARDS SAFETY & WELFARE


MEASURES AT SOMAPPA COMFORT SYSTEM (INDIA) PVT LTD.
QUESTIONNAIRE
PERSONAL DETAILS
Name

Gender

: A) Male

B) Female

Martial Status

: A) Married

B) Single

Age

: A) 20-29

B) 30-39

C) 40-49

B) Diploma

C) HSS

Educational Qualification: A) SSLC


D) Graduation

D) Above 50

E) PG

Department

:A) production

B) quality C) Maintenance D) Stores

Experience

: A) Less than 5 years

B) 5-10 years

C) 11-20 years

STATUTORY SAFETY MEASURES


1. What is your opinion about the safety measures in the company?
Facility

Highly
satisfied

Satisfied

Moderatel
y Satisfied

Dissatisfie
d

First aid box


Shoes
Gloves
Fire protection glass
2. Have you gained any knowledge during the safety training program?
A) Yes

B) No

3. What is your opinion about the existing safety measures in the organization?

Highly
dissatisfie
d

A) Good

B) Fair

C) Bad

4. Do you make use of the safety measures provided by the organization?


A) Always

B) Sometimes

C) Never

5. The safety measures help in reducing the severity of accidents?


A) Strongly Agree

B) Agree

C) Neutral

D) Disagree

E) Strongly disagree
6. How far you know about the safety policy in your company?
A) Completely

B) partly

C) To some extent

STATUTORY WELFARE MEASURES:


7. What is your opinion about the welfare measures in the company?
Facility

Highly
satisfied

Satisfied

Moderately
Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Highly
dissatisfied

Drinking water
Latrines and Urinals
Canteen facilities
Rest room
Health services

8. Are you aware of the welfare measures in the company?


A) Yes

B) No

9. Is any committee formed by the management to check welfare measures in company?


A)Yes

B) No

10. What is your level of satisfaction regarding welfare measures?

A) Highly Satisfied

B) Satisfied

C) Neutral

D) Dissatisfied

E) Highly Dissatisfied

11. Welfare measures helps to


A) Create a better industrial relation
company

C) Helps to increase team spirit

B) Build greater loyalty to the

D) Motivate

E) doesnt made any difference

12. What is your opinion about working environment?

A) Highly satisfied

B) Satisfied

C) Not satisfied

13. How is your relationship with your superior?

A) Strongly Agree
B) Agree
D) Disagree E) Strongly disagree

C) Neutral

14. Kindly give your suggestions for any desired improvements in the current welfare system.
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