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* THE fashionably late GREEN ISSUE *

For College Students, By College Students with

SHOWER WITH YOUR ROOMIE 33
AND MORE WAYS YOU CAN SAVE THE PLANET
+PLUS

JASON SCHWARTZMAN
The Coppola Connection

STUDIES THAT SIZZLE
From B.A. to Gourmet
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green fever
Back to School: Green for a Week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

departments
Sports: A League of Their Own . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Current asks one ordinary student to take on a lifestyle that would make Al Gore proud. “Inconvenient” doesn’t even begin to describe it.
Eat Your Words (And Veggies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Are big-spending schools making a financial foul by blowing money on the court when they should be funding the classroom?

How to shop green without breaking bank.
Making an Eco-Abode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

From silk and hemp undies to stapleless staplers, everything you need for a greener school year.
Cover Story:

features: next_step
Divining Their Futures
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .

Health: Killing Ourselves Softly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

32

We’re all going to die. Does anyone care?
Running on Empty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Easy Being Green

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .

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Most of us can’t even decide what to wear each day, let alone what we’re called to do with our lives. But these faithful few are ready to do God’s work.

When working out gets out of control.
Relationships:

Kermit was wrong—well, partially. It may take a lot of hard work and ingenuity, but these six campuses are proving that college students can save the world, one group shower at a time.
Plus: Campus Green-o-Meter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Fast Money

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Let’s Talk About Sext, Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

I-banking lures a host of liberal arts grads with promises of big bucks and a lavish lifestyle in exchange for long days and longer nights. Will you be seduced, too?

Text messages change the rules of romance. A vibrator that talks back.
YourTurn: Returning to Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

What 16 tree-hugging campuses are doing right... and wrong.

One student reflects on the school year ahead.

Cooking by the Books

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clipfile
current’s news and tips for campus life.
Therapy Pets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blind science, footbaths, fundraising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Freshmen, theses and bad speeches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Pogs, underage drinking and cellies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Rutgers b-ball and bad applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Second Life and summer jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Blending an undergrad education with a dash of daring, a new breed of Top Chef hopefuls bring the classroom to the kitchen.
Last Word:

interview
Arnold Schwarzenegger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

backspin
Student Body. . . . . . . 43 Talent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

The Kindergarten Cop has graduated to tackling global challenges, using his famous face (and bod) along with his political clout to take on the biggest issues of tomorrow.

Not quite hippie, not quite hipster. We dare you to define Alex.
Fashion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Keep an eye out for these young virtuosos.
Spinto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

On the Cover:

Six guys, three guitars, one state: Delaware.
Playlists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Christina Bell, Shannon Holste and Emily Richardson, environmental activists at Washington College. Photographed by Jim Graham.

Word art tees.
Film. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Ugh, not another 3rd.
Schwartzman . . . . . . 46

Like Party Shuffle, but made by humans.

His wild ride.

This page: Photo by Mirando Popkey; Illustration by Phillip Fivel Nesson; Photo by Ari Gunnarson

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...because we know you haven’t actually changed your lightbulbs yet...
You might think that, in the fall of 2007,

Bright Green Ideas

we’re coming a bit late to the green game. Just about every magazine on the planet has shared its two cents about saving the planet, and it’s fair to wonder what remains to be said. As it turns out, putting off the green issue couldn’t have worked out more perfectly—because the story just keeps getting better and better. On campuses around the country, initiatives that kicked off two or three years ago have blossomed into powerful, mature examples of environmental activism. Writers Jody Pollock and Veronique Greenwood crisscross the country to find six outstanding programs, taking us from California, where student activists have changed the face of sustainability across the UC school system, to small-town Carbondale, Ill., where one young woman’s bright idea put buckets of worms hard at work recycling. We hope that you’ll be inspired by the example of this new generation of the globeconscious—and if you are, we’ve put together four pages of tips and picks for kicking off a more sustainable school year yourself. For more ideas and more of everything, make sure to check out the new website we’re launching this month in beta: newsfreak.com. As the semester begins, the just-grads of the class of 2007 are coming to the wistful realization that it’s not, in fact, time to return to campus. In the spirit of looking forward, we’ve created next_step, a special features section to explore one of the hottest jobs you’ve heard about—i-banking—and two you might never have considered: becoming a top chef or a religious leader. If none of

those feels like a perfect fit, catch up with some of your more adventurous peers’ summer internships on Clipfile’s global summer jobs map. Looking forward this fall holds a whole new meaning for the students of Virginia Tech, site of the tragic April shootings that resulted in 33 student deaths. Tech’s Robert Bowman takes us inside his and his classmates’ thoughts as they struggle to begin anew while remembering those they lost. Our Backspin (A&E) section was largely designed as a space to highlight some of the most talented 20-somethings out there, and that makes Jason Schwartzman an unusually good subject for a profile. Now co-writing and co-starring in Wes Anderson’s next movie, The Darjeeling Limited, Jason—only 27—talks with Peter Fritch about his famous family, writing a film with the indie master and shying away from VIP status. For words from another famous Schwarz—Schwarzenegger, that is—check out Last Word. Speaking with Current’s Daniel Stone outside his Sacramento office about his front-and-center role in the green movement, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger called ours the “generation that’s going to take this thing through the roof.” That may sound like a tall order, but really, who among us wants to disappoint Arnold? After all, he’s ongoing proof that it’s never too late to discover your greener side. Rachel Johnson and Rebecca Rohr

For the Record
As a student-activist working closely with antiwar veterans, I’m struck by Matt Mireles’ April article about veterans returning to campus. Mireles and Current not only misidentify the name of our organization, International Socialist Organization (ISO), and our newspaper, Socialist Worker, but mischaracterize our beliefs and actions. Most striking is the story’s lack of any reference to veterans organizing against the Iraq War. The idea that the antiwar movement was (or is) hostile to veterans returning from war is a bizarre inversion of reality, one that gained traction only after the Vietnam War. During the war, soldiers were the backbone of the antiwar movement. Further, Mireles writes that the ISO, a “nagging bone of contention” for veterans, “argues in favor of North Korean nukes” and has “been known to call U.S. soldiers ‘baby killers.’” In fact, as can be verified by a glance through the web archives of our newspaper, Socialist Worker, the ISO is neither for North Korea nor for nukes, while the bit about calling veterans “baby killers” has been a Ramboinspired right-wing fantasy for going on three decades. Antiwar veterans like Agustìn Aguayo and Suzanne Swift have done jail time for refusing to return to Iraq. Their contention is not with antiwar organizations but with the war machine and its apologists, who, it seems, would like to bury their stories as deeply as those of their predecessors. — Chris Dols, ISO, U. of Wisconsin-Madison ’07 Current regrets the mistakes in the names of the ISO and its newspaper and should have contacted the organization for its response. We welcome letters and feedback at currentmag@newsweek.com.

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Current Editorial Staff
Executive Editors | Rachel Johnson, Rebecca Rohr Managing Editors | Sarah Kliff, Daniel Stone Section Editors | Alexandra Hiatt,

Rebecca Kaden, Chip Sheridan
Staff Writers | Jane Gagnon, Temilola Sobowale Copy Editors | Sophie Brickman,

If you went to… You’d be able to…
Art Institute in Philadelphia: go from Appetizers to Zeitgeist, p.37 Arizona State: say no to Styrofoam, p.30

Vivek Ravishanker, Kurt Soller
Staff Editors | Alicia Cowley, Lina Jun, Cecilia Soler Creative Consultant | Michael E. Jones Editorial Director | Samantha Henig Editorial Advisor | Mark Starr

Berea: call a biodome your home, p.29
Bowdoin: help Step It Up, p.30

In This Issue...
Jen Ator Allie Baker Taylor Barnes Alex Benenson David Benjamin Lyndsie Bourgon Robert Bowman Hillary Brody Katie Connolly Ariel Davis Matt Donnelly Ben Eisen Sabina Ellahi Katherine Evans Michael Fodera Peter Fritch Jane Gagnon Nikki Greenwood Dan Haley Matt Harper Isia Jasiewicz Candice Jones Maura Judkis Rebecca Kaden Sarah Kliff Carolyn Kylstra Tatiana Lau Catherine Lauigan Elizabeth Lewis Dan Loeterman Janie Lorber Jackie Mantey Danielle McNally Joseph Midkiff Jemimah Noonoo Ruth Olson Robert Padnick Jennifer Pelly Julianne Pepitone Jody Pollock Miranda Popkey Oscar Raymundo Sarina Rosenberg Kiersten Rowland Chip Sheridan Temilola Sobowale Daniel Stone Tara Tavernia Rory Wallace Trisha Wolf Jordan Worley Amanda Yezerski

Clemson: live life on the beat, p.9
College of the Atlantic: take apart Big Boxes, p.6
Columbia: be wined and dined, p.36

Cornell: turn a tropical paradise even greener, p.9;

stand the heat in Hell’s Kitchen, p.40

Delaware Valley: summer with lions, tigers and bears, p.9
Drake: dial up the heat, p.14

Earlham: meet “Jesus,” p.32
Eastern Illinois University: explode onto the scene, p.8

Emory: watch your food grow, p.31; bump into the Dalai Lama, p.34 Florida: win the big game...x2, p.10 Harvard: smell Robert from a mile away, p.18;

send your avatar to class, p.9
Haverford: help kids play nice, p.9
Macalester: save your change, p.24

Northwestern: fight the power, p.6 Ohio State: travel in high style, p.10
Penn: work hard and party harder, p.37
Parsons: turn your shoes into a hat, p.49

Current Project for Student Journalism
Current Business Staff
Director of Business Operations | Chip Sheridan Director of Marketing | Peipei Zhang Director of Recruitment | Ada Pema Staff Director | April Qian Interim Director of Finance | Rebecca Anders Legal Counsel | David S. Korzenik Business Advisor | Paul Gillespie

Reed: sleep with the fishes, p.31
Rochester Institute of Technology: share the Big Love, p.6

School for Visual Arts: cross-dress with confidence, p.43
Southern Illinois: warn friends not to order the worm tea, p.25

Tufts: do it in the dark, p.30

UC-San Diego: put stars on the map, p.9

Newsweek, Inc.
Chairman and Editor-in-Chief | Richard M. Smith President and Chief Operating Officer | Harold Shain Executive Vice President, World Wide Publisher | Gregory J. Osberg Editor | Jon Meacham Managing Editor, Design | Amid Capeci Consulting Editors | Brian Braiker, David Kaplan, Barbara

University of New Orleans: get a virtual tan, p.9 UMich-Dearborn: keep your feet squeaky-clean, p.5 UNC-Chapel Hill: lose your training wheel, p.49 UNC-Asheville: set your soundtrack a-simmer, p.51
Union: have a beer without fear, p.7

UVA: cook the books, p.38
Washington College: bathe by the buddy system, p.26
West Virginia: make your mark in outer space, p.9

Kantrowitz, Raina Kelley, Lisa Miller, Mark Starr, Peg Tyre
Senior Vice President, Manufacturing and Distribution | Angelo Rivello Manufacturing | Bill Barone, Becky Cassidy,

Yale: be a real-life Planeteer, p.23; stay in Goldman Sachs’ sights, p.37

Kristin Denninger, Paul Smith, Lauren Pangione, Kathy Magennis, Cintia Senmartin, John Nallen, Vicki Randolph, Bob Serrano, Karen Stark Distribution | Scott Bauer, Jack Widener

Advertising
Advertising Contact | Mongoose Atlantic, Inc.

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646-467-6605, currentads@mongoosemedia.com

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UNLEASHED

“One of the few good things about modern times: If you die horribly on television, you will not have died in vain. You will have entertained us.”
— from Breakfast of Champions, by Kurt Vonnegut, an American novelist who attended Cornell, Carnegie Mellon and the University of Tennessee and died in April at age 84

PROZAC POOCHES

by Sarina Rosenberg, Northwestern
Colleges no longer bat an eye at offering students extra time for tests or an array of on-campus counseling. But now some university health officials say they’re facing disability requests of a different animal. A growing number of students with a range of psychological disorders want their “therapy pets,” which include ferrets and tarantulas along with more traditionally cuddly pups and cats, to move into campus housing—and even attend lectures. “Almost all the literature I read in the disabilities services field says that these are becoming more frequent requests,” says Becky Lambert, director of Student Support Services Sevick, who at Arkansas’ John Brown suffers from PTSD, began University. She began rehaving panic viewing nationwide policies attacks when after JBU received its first forced to part than meet a physiwith her pet therapy pet petition earlier ferret, Lilly. cal need. this year. That was a critiTherapy pets are a new trend cal distinction to officials at Our in psychiatric care, and an undeLady of the Lake University in veloped legal framework means San Antonio, Texas two years that universities must handle the ago. Sarah Sevick, an incoming issue on a case-by-case basis. The freshman suffering from postAmericans with Disabilities Act traumatic stress disorder, asked (ADA) requires universities to to have her ferret, Lilly, join her accommodate disabled students, on campus to ease her panic atbut it doesn’t discuss therapy tacks. But the school refused, citpets, intended to comfort rather ing concerns that a ferret hang-

Pet Doctor: Furry friends can make portable therapists, too.

ing out in classrooms and dorms would endanger other students and raise a number of sanitary issues. Sevick said she began suffering panic attacks when forced to part with her pet. She filed an ADA complaint, but the case was never heard because she dropped out of school. Some universities have been open to admitting four-legged creatures through their gates, Lambert says. But school officials

shouldn’t assume that these pets will simply snuggle up to life on campus, says Jane Jarrow, president of the national group Disability Access Information and Support. Guide dogs for the blind undergo years of training before they are deemed fit to roam the ivory tower. “Pets make all of us feel good,” she says, “but unless they perform a specific service, they don’t belong on campus.” ■
Photo: Veer

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SCIENCE

NanoSight
by Julianne Pepitone, Syracuse
“We’re all blind at the nanoscale,” says Andrew Greenberg, education and outreach coordinator of the nanotech program at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Scientists depend on models to visualize data at that level, since a nanometer is only 1 x 10-9 of a meter—1/1000th the width of a human hair. “I wondered,” says Greenberg, who knew a blind science student in grad school, “can we build a model that gives an idea of shape in a different way, such as touch?” So he co-founded the Independent Laboratory Access for the Blind. Taking a lesson from Braille, ILAB constructs 3-D models by converting 2-D images of nano material into numerical values and then into layers of plaster. Cary Supalo, another co-founder—who, as a blind chem major at Purdue, received only a Braille textbook and relied on lab partners to describe all visuals—says the concept is catching “like wildfire.” Blind people do have one big advantage, he adds. “We have to problem-solve every day—the epitome of what scientists do.” ■

CAMPAIGN ’08

POLITICAL PAYBACK
by Janie Lorber, Duke
In the first-ever U.S. presidential election of the YouTube world, 2008 hopefuls vie to prove that they can upload videos and personalize Facebook pages. But Republican Mitt Romney believes he knows what students really want, and it’s not tech savvy—it’s cold, hard cash. His campaign’s campus wing, Students for Mitt, rewards student fundraisers by paying out 10 percent commission to those who

ing earnings to the campaign. Others wonder if the program toes a fine line. According to the non-partisan Association of Fundraising Professionals, accepting commission is unethical because it detracts from a candidate’s real cause. But the tactic doesn’t violate campaign finance laws. “Professional fundraisers get paid too,” says professor Richard Hasen, an election law specialist at Loyola Law School in L.A. “It doesn’t strike me that there’s anything legally or necessarily ethically suspect about it.” raise more than $1,000. Other Still, unless students can extop prizes include sports tickets, ploit adult connections, they may video iPods and limited edition have a tough time cashing in: Mitt Bobbleheads. So far the proonly 1.4 percent of college stugram is one of a kind on campus. dents reported contributing to a Grant Starrett, a sophomore campaign in 2000. at Stanford University and the Barack Obama’s website innational chairman stead asks supporters to Romney of Students for Mitt, skip their daily caramel believes he knows what says students join for macchiatos and donate students Romney’s fresh apthat $4.95 to the camreally want. proach to politics, not paign—a tactic likely the profits. “A lot of these kids more in line with the resources of are just enthralled with his new your typical college kid, but a lot ideas,” says Starrett, who contribless sweet a deal. ■ —with Trisha uted 100 percent of his fundraisWolf

RELIGION

Next to Godliness
by Matt Donnelly, BU
Once-calm bathrooms at the University of Michigan at Dearborn are making waves. In June, the school announced plans to install two foot-washing stations—a $25,000, severalmonth project—to better accommodate devout Muslim students, who must wash their hands, face and feet several times a day before prayer. But the plan sent some religious groups into an uproar, arguing that the school’s decision to fund the baths with student fees constitutes discrimination and

Now You See It: Greenberg and senior Mohammed Farhoud with 3-D model of ‘NanoBucky.’

violates the First Amendment. pus’ Muslim Student Association, UM-Dearborn officials say says many opposing the plan the project is meant to include believe—erroneously—that the students of all creeds. Kiera Mcproject is state-funded. He has Caffrey, spokeswoman for the fought for the installations deCatholic League for Religious and spite threatening emails and even Civil Rights, disagrees. accusations of terrorism. “Give me a break. Not having The university’s primary goal tests or days off on holidays is is to preserve a safe, sanitary showing respect,” she environment for all “A lot of the time it feels says. “This is special students, according to like Muslims privilege.” She acknowla written statement. versus nonedges that other student Muslims.” Proponents stress that groups receive a porthe baths can be used tion of student fees, but feels the by athletes or sandal wearers too. money is dispensed unfairly— Senior Laura Lloyd says this is “Christians can’t even get $25 for just another example of religious Holy water,” she says. Dearborn tension in Dearborn, which has a officials could not be reached for large Muslim population. “A lot of comment. the time it feels like Muslims verMajed Afana, VP of the camsus non-Muslims,” she says. ■ fall 2007 |

Illustration by Eric Shansby; Photo by Aaron Mayes / University of Wisconsin-Madison

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THEN+NOW

STUDENTS ARE A-CHANGIN’
by Oscar Raymundo, Northwestern
We all want to believe we’re nothing like our parents were at our age, and new evidence shows we’re right—sort of. UCLA’s Higher Education Research Institute has given a survey to hundreds of thousands of incoming college freshmen each year since 1966, successfully collecting data from more than 8 million students at more than 1,200 colleges and universities. How do we measure up? Some of the findings aren’t at all surprising: kids from rich families continue to attend private universities—no shocker there—while the number of minority students enrolling in college is steadily growing, especially among Asian and Latino populations. But when it comes to slightly more taboo topics, the report noted shifting beliefs about politics, God and race. > Polar Opposites: Political from 13.6 percent in 1966 to 19.1 percent in 2006. The most significant decline was reported by Jewish and Protestant freshmen, while the proportion of self-reported Catholics remained fairly stable. > Race Card Denied: Over a third of students in 2006 claimed that racial understanding is “essential” or “very important,” but 19.1 percent declared racism is no longer a major social concern. > Family Guy: Despite the changing times, we haven’t completely abandoned our family values—raising a family is students’ No. 1 priority for life after college, a response that has held mostly constant since 1966. Our eagerness to develop a meaningful philosophy of life, however, has steadily dwindled. ■

OUT LOUD

Grad Speak
No graduation is complete without it: the often hokey, sometimes moving, rarely unique commencement speech. Here are some ’07 high- (and low-) lights. THE SAD BUT TRUE Microsoft’s Bill Gates, Harvard Radcliffe was a great place to live. There were more women [than men] up there, and most of the guys were science-math types. That combination offered me the best odds, if you know what I mean. This is where I learned the sad lesson that improving your odds doesn’t guarantee success. THE BUSH JOKE Washington Post’s Bob Woodward, Bucknell I sent a copy of that 21-page memo to President Bush. My colleagues at the Washington Post said, “You sent George W. Bush a 21-page memo? You’re crazy. There’s no evidence in all of Bush’s years at Yale and Harvard Business School that he ever read anything that long.” HEARD THAT ONE BEFORE

Fight the Man: Core values may have shifted, but we’re still our parents’ kids.

moderation is definitely on the decline: more students than ever are labeling themselves either liberal or conservative. > God Is Dead: The percentage of students claiming no religious affiliation jumped

THESES PIECES

Every year, tens of thousands of your classmates write thesis papers. Most are too long, some are weirdly specific and a bunch are just plain boring. We combed last year’s batch to find a handful that seem worth a second glance.

PAPERS THAT POP “‘Products From the Bottom of Hell’: Rap Performances of the American Gothic Narrative.” Joe Bernstein, Northwestern University. An analysis of how rap albums from the late ’80s and ’90s by N.W.A., Public Enemy and the Gravediggaz adopt and complicate the cultural tradition of fearing the “other” as a threat. “‘Polygamy Loves Company’: The Narrative Construction of ‘Family’ in Big Love.” Carly Gioia, Rochester Institute of Technology. Looks at the hit HBO show about a polygamous family in Utah, arguing that

its narrative encourages viewers to understand polygamy as an alternative lifestyle and question their accepted notions of family. ALTERNATIVE MEDIUM Instead of writing about legislation for a senior thesis, Elsie Fleming and Daphne Loring created it. The ’07 grads of the College of the Atlantic in Maine used their theses to create an initial draft of a bill requiring an impact study of all companies seeking to build a “big box” store in a Maine community. That legislation passed—earning a real-world summa—this June. ■

Cartoon Meta: In an animated movie by Anthony Mair at the School of Visual Arts, characters find themselves acting in a student film that lacks a story.

New York Times’ David Brooks, Wake Forest The average collegiate GPA for a self-made millionaire is 2.7. You know all those morons who sat in the back of the classrooms goofing off? In a few years you’re going to have a new name for them: Boss. OBLIGATORY ATTEMPT TO RELATE BY MENTIONING BEER GM’s Rick Wagoner, Duke 400 years ago today, Captain John Smith landed in America, met Pocahontas and, well, you know the rest. It took months before he could get a message back to England: “Have landed in Virginia. Send more beer.” ■

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REMMEMBER THIS?

POGS 19 96

It sounds like the sort of oldtimey playground game you’d see in sepia hues in a battered old photograph—children entertaining themselves by chucking a metallic circle at a pile of cardboard pieces. Yet it was only a decade ago that youngsters spent hours doing exactly that with pogs.

The rules of the game, originally from Hawaii, are simple: players put an equal number of circular cardboard pogs in a center pile and take turns throwing a “slammer,” a heavier plastic or metallic disc about twice as thick, at the pile in an effort to flip the pogs, then pocket the ones they successfully overturn. It’s kind of like craps for kids—only without the risk of squandering much more than a 50-cent game piece.

The game’s popularity unleashed a flood of intricate pog designs, featuring everything from celebrity mugs to holographed unicorns, many of which can still be purchased on eBay. Despite the fun (and perhaps anticipating the birth of the Texas Hold ’Em generation), numerous schools banned the activity as gambling. It seems overzealous principals feared that toying around with one kind of slammer could land kids in the other. ■

ON CAMPUS

Drink Up!
by Chip Sheridan, Dickinson College
The Greeks dominate many campus’ social scenes, making admins struggle to take back the

night. But Union College found its answer in the Minerva program, which turns a blind eye to underage drinking as a tactic to encourage partying responsibly. Now in its fourth year, the program assigns all freshmen to one of seven Minerva Houses where students can play

pool, meet with professors and attend meals. They can also, regardless of age, imbibe with dinner. The program provides a needed alternative to the binge-drinking scene, says Tom McEvoy, the dean of residential life and director of the Minerva program.

Some student scoff. One calls the Minerva parties “really lame” and says he only goes for the free booze. Even so, the push for moderation may be working. “When people drink at the Minervas,” another student says, it’s “not to go out and get trashed.” ■

START-UP SUCCESS

SELLULARPHONE
by Jenna Youngs, U. Missouri-Columbia
After breaking his fifth cell phone in a year, Brian Laoruangroch, a graduate of the University of Missouria at Columbia’s business school, was fed up. Determined to avoid shelling out another $250 to Sprint, Laoruangroch scoured eBay for a phone compatible with his plan. Then he thought, if he could do this for himself, why not for other hapless dialers in need of a low-cost phone replacement? So Green Mobile, Inc. was born. Gathering five fraternity brothers as business partners, Laoruangroch set off on a mission to make replacing cell phones easier and cheaper. Initially selling used models on eBay, Laoruangroch soon ex-

panded to his own aptly named site, sellyoularphone.com, which he later replaced with gogreenmobile.com. Now the six friends run both the website and a location in a Columbia, Mo. mall. Green Mobile purchases used

phones in bulk from distributors, replaces old batteries with new ones and tests the phones to ensure quality. Then they categorize them by service provider compatibility on the site. Partner Davie Holt says the

company sells an average of 1,000 phones per month on their website, and they’ve generated more than $500,000 in total sales in the past six months, according to Laoruangroch. As part of its expansion plan to open more stores, including one in Champaign, Ill., Green Mobile produced an advertising campaign featuring Laoruangroch costumed as the “Green Mobile Man”—a hero determined to save customers from expensive cell phone purchases. Holt says customers come to them both to replace broken and lost phones and to upgrade to better models at a lower price. “They want to change their phones like they change their shoes,” Holt says. “With our phones they can just remove the SIM card, switch it out to a new phone and go.” That's a plan that should get good reception. ■ fall 2007 |

Photo by Kiersten Rowland; Illustration by Michael Jones

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COURTSIDE

ESSENCE ON IMUS
by Matt Harper, Dickinson College
Essence Carson, the six-foot Current to discuss her whirlwind guard for the Rutgers women’s year and her hopes for her last basketball team, was thrust into season as a collegiate star. the national spotlight along with Current: Looking back on the her teammates last April during controversy surrounding Imus’ the Scarlet Knights’ exhilarating comments, how do you feel about run to the NCAA championship how the situation unfolded? game against the Tennessee Lady Essence Carson: A lot of Vols—and again soon after, when people were pretty much expectradio “shock jock” Don Imus made ing it to be a long, drawn-out soap his infamous comments about opera, but I believe we did a great the team. As the team’s captain, job of keeping it short and sweet Carson led the ladies through the and just being precise about what media storm, appearing on TV message we wanted to convey to programs including Larry King people across the country. I beLive, The Today Show and Oprah. lieve that we helped a lot of people Carson has been lauded for open their eyes. her eloquence in the Current: You told “Whenever face of controversy as anyone thinks the country that Imus well as her abilities on of this year’s “stole a moment of pure championship the court, having been they automati- grace” from your team. cally connect twice named Big East EC: Not only from it with Imus.” Defensive Player of the us, but also from the Year and winning four gold medchampionship team. Whenever als with USA Basketball. Off the anyone thinks of this year’s chamcourt, the Paterson, N.J. native is a pionship they automatically conmusic major who plays the piano, nect it with Imus. The only people bass guitar, drums and saxophone. that pretty much realize that TenThis summer she sat down with nessee won the championship are

Brave Knight: Essence Carson takes charge on the court and in the Imus fallout.

the people of their home state and at Rutgers. Current: There has been a lot of buzz recently about Imus returning to radio in coming months. How do you feel about that prospect? EC: We expected him to come back. For him to come back on the radio, more power to him. Who knows how he would host his show now? Maybe, just maybe, he might watch what he says, but I don’t think he needs to prove anything to anyone.

Current: You’ve said that you would like to cap off your career with an NCAA championship. Are you and the team determined to accomplish that this year? EC: Definitely. We realize that, you know what, it’s going to be that much harder than it was last year to return to that same stage because right now we have a target on our backs. So we have to walk into every game like everyone’s going to play their best game when they play Rutgers. ■

DON’T BE THAT GIRL

THIS APPLICATION BOMBED
by Current Staff
suspicious appearance compelled university officials to call the bomb squad to inspect the package. It took about five hours—and a run through an X-ray machine—for the investigators to declare the application and the mail center area safe. It comes as something of a surprise, then, that EIU administrators decided to accept the student just 11 days later. According to campus spokesperson Vicki Woodard, the envelope held a completed application, including three pieces of paper and a check to pay the submission fee. Apparently that’s about all it takes to become a Panther at EIU, where the acceptance rate is a whopping 73 percent. This student may have secured herself a slot in the freshman class, but we still think her application faux pas was enough to earn admission into the ranks of girls and guys you so don’t want to be. ■

Ah, the college application process. A universally beloved chance to cobble together 18 years of history—GPA, SATs, list of clubs you went to once—into a package of paperwork that conveys the very core of your being. For one woman, that package got her more attention than she bargained for. Her application to Eastern Illinois University arrived on campus in an envelope that seemed too small and overstuffed

to contain normal documents, without a return address and with the institution’s name misspelled. Its

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Top Photo courtesy of Cereality, bottom illustration by Veer Photo by Jim O’Connor/Rutgers University; Illustration by Cat Lauigan

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SECOND LIFE

Virtual U.
by David Benjamin, UCLA
In Hurricane Katrina’s wake, New Orleans’ colleges and universities shut down for months. If there is another such disaster, one local school intends to keep right on teaching. The University of New Orleans, a public university with an enrollment of more than 17,000, has opened a virtual campus within the digital world Second Life, allowing students to take courses online if their realworld campus is hit by another crippling storm. If you’ve somehow missed the buzz, Second Life, run by San Francisco’s Linden Lab, is a virtual 3-D universe where users create avatars (online characters) that interact. It’s like The Sims—only you have to spend real money to build a house, and anyone in the world can be your neighbor. The program serves as a cheap and efficient way to set up classes online: UNO paid only $980 for its 16-acre “island”—a slice of virtual real estate on Second Life—plus an ongoing monthly fee of about $200. More than 60 schools, including Harvard, Princeton, Stanford and MIT, have already established a presence in Second Life. Although UNO is not requiring students to create avatars—yet—several courses will be available online starting this fall. While many were happy to hear about the university’s participation, some, like junior Lauren Miller, were a bit put off. She feels that the university should “use resources elsewhere on campus” and says she had no trouble with Blackboard after Hurricane Katrina. That may be, but you can’t fly on Blackboard! ■

BEYOND THE BUBBLE
A quick look at a world of summer jobs you could have had.
JOHN RICE, CLEMSON ’09
HOMICIDE DIVISION

Greenville, SC Worked in County Sheriff’s Office for a taste of real police work

KRISTIN ANTONACCIO & DAVE KRAMER, DELAWARE VALLEY ’09
EXOTIC FELINE CARE

WILLIAM CHANG, UC-SAN DIEGO ’08
INDIE MUSIC BIZ

Boyd & Bridgeport, TX Prepared food and cleaned cages for lions, tigers, bobcats, cougars and grizzly bear cubs

London, England Kickstarted new U.K. & U.S. indie-rock groups for young agency Traffic Marketing, Ltd.
KATHRYN MONTALBANO, HAVERFORD ’09
CONFLICT ZONE

Belfast, N. Ireland Played team-building games with cross-religious groups of kids to break down social barriers

ANDREW HEILMANN, CORNELL ‘09
FOUR SEASONS GREEN GLOBE

Bali, Indonesia Met with local village chiefs to promote ecoawareness at two Four Seasons properties

TATIANA ROSTOVTSEVA, NORTHWESTERN ’09 REBECCA MCCAULEY, WEST VIRGINIA ’07
NASA SPACE FLIGHT RESEARCH EDUCATION REFORM

Greenbelt, MD Helped NASA scientists develop a Mars dust sample reader expected to be sent into space in 2009

Accra, Ghana Helped write a standardized curriculum for a nursery school in Ghana, learning hands-on about African education

Infographic by Amanda Yezerski, reporting by Tara Tavernia and Elizabeth Lewis

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Together Again: Florida and Ohio State battled it out for two championships last season. Coincidence?

NCAA High Rollers Spend Big, Win Big
Dan Loeterman wants schools to level the competition and trade in team jumbo jets for the campus good.

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two schools met for the NCAA football and basketball national championships in the same year, until Florida beat Ohio State in both 2007 title games. The twin meetings were hailed as a remarkable coincidence, but that’s hardly the case given the growing disparity in athletic budgets between a few high rollers, like Florida and Ohio State, and the rest of their NCAA competition. Ohio State and Florida rank as the first and fourth biggest spenders on sports among NCAA programs, according to in-

formation available on the website of the U.S. Department of Education. In the ’05’06 academic year, Ohio State became the first school ever to crack nine digits, with a sports budget of $101.8 million, while Florida spent $78.2 million on its sports programs that year. It’s no surprise that the schools spending the most are also among the most successful. Although colleges cannot bid for top players by offering them contracts the way pro teams can, the big spenders do have a huge advantage in wooing the best players. Imagine you’re a top football recruit being pursued tirelessly by multiple schools.

Texas draws you in with its recently renovated, $150-million stadium. Michigan ups the ante, showing you designs for its newly approved $226-million renovation plan. Then Florida calls. It may not have new stadiums and arenas, but it boasts two of the hottest coaches: basketball’s Billy Donovan and football’s Urban Meyer. With annual salaries of $3.5 and $3.25 million, the two are the highest- and second highest-paid coaches at public schools in their sports, according to the Orlando Sentinel. Wait, says Ohio State, come play for the Buckeyes and you can travel in style. Ohio State spent the most on football team travel in ’04-’05, according to a review of athletic expenses at public universities conducted by the Indianapolis Star. And each of these schools can cite another compelling reason to play for them: a Bowl Championship Series title within the last five years. Between these perks and others, it is becoming increasingly difficult for schools with smaller athletic budgets to compete for a championship. Based on the 2006
Photo by Associated Press

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list of top college spenders, only two teams ranked lower than 15th—traditional football powerhouses Florida State and Miami—have won the Division I football championship since 1991. That’s an inevitable result of what John Fizel, co-editor of “Economics of College Sports,” calls the “arms war” of athletic spending. “Every time someone adds a new facility—whether it be a weight room, training facility, stadium or dorm—the other teams feel obligated to meet that,” says Fizel, who directs Penn State’s online MBA program. “If one gets ahead, they will have the advantage in recruiting, retaining athletes and winning.” This arms race may result in part from the fact that, at some of the biggest spenders, the athletic departments are almost completely autonomous, often functioning with little oversight from university officials, and, more importantly, with separate operating budgets. Almost all of those athletic programs are self-sustaining, and tend not to share their profits with the general university. Instead, they funnel excess cash into reserve funds to be spent later on more expensive coaches, state-of-the-art facilities or perks for athletes. Given the huge divide between the top spenders and the next tier, it seems naive not to take spending into account before we are wowed by some programs’ continued success. We already do that with pro sports: when the Yankees win the World Series, we love to denounce their bloated payroll as the decisive advantage. But when teams with lesser funding win championships, as the Marlins did when they beat the Yankees in 2003, they are hailed as David slaying Goliath. While payrolls and salaries for the big leagues are routinely discussed, budgets barely earn a mention in the rah-rah coverage of big-time collegiate athletics. Yet we may be heading toward—or perhaps are already in—an era when the top spenders like Ohio State and Florida become a Yankeesesque super-elite, perpetually dominant across new seasons and changing line-ups. Why should this concern anybody besides fans of those poorer schools forced to battle with giants? Perhaps because 18 of the 20 schools that spend the most on

whopping $23.9 million—it used the sports are public universities. So while their money to buy new scoreboards for the footathletic programs bloat with enormous ball field and a plane for team travel, even television deals, donations from alums and as University Regents slashed $6 million ticket and merchandise sales, many of the from the university budget as part of statesame universities are also struggling to wide cuts. At Texas last year, just $1.2 milcope with drastic spending cuts, a result of lion of a $14.2-million athletic profit was nationwide budget-trimming at the state transferred back to university academics. level. At Florida, for example, enormous Meanwhile, tuition costs for students are up debt in the College of Letters, Arts and Sciagain—on average 5 percent over the past ences cost the dean his job and led to major two years—due to state scrimping. And at cuts in the English and math departments schools whose athletic departments are not in the fall of 2006. The previous academic self-sustaining—most schools, because athyear, Florida’s athletic department had letics are so expensive to maintain—money turned a tidy profit of $4.2 million. But the can pour directly from the university into profits generally end up in one of those athsports even during tight times. Rutgers letic department “reserve funds,” instead of University, for instance, faces massive enticing scholars of Shakespeare or number layoffs in an effort to close a $66-million theory to Gainesville. Schools like Florida spending deficit in the general university’s have a way to bail out ailing academics, but budget, but its athletic department received the opportunity is being wasted. $14.5 million from those same general Rather than allowing athletic programs university funds in the ’04-’05 year. That’s to hoard the profits, universities should be more than any other athletic department in held accountable for how they prioritize the country, according to the Star’s review. spending. If athletic departments were As the arms race spirals ever upward, required to give a sizeable portion of their it risks compromising the competitive profits back to the university, cash flow integrity that, among other charms, distininto starving academic programs would reguishes the college game from pro sports. open and teams with smaller budgets could There is little hope for recompete more successfully with their versing the trend in the near wealthy opponents. Of course, if ath- Schools like future. The NCAA’s October letic departments knew they had to Florida have report warned universisurrender profits at the season’s end, a way to bail out ailing ties to rein in the disparity they might find other ways to spend academics, between the rate of athletic the money first. But that highlights but the opportunity is and general spending, inthe present system’s essential flaw: permitting those departments to op- being wasted. sisting that “the rate of such growth simply cannot be erate as autonomous fiefdoms within maintained.” But the NCAA tends to move the university. toward reform at a glacial pace, so don’t The NCAA does recognize this probcount on any imminent policy changes to lem. An October 2006 report on athletic level the playing field. spending released by the association urged In the meantime, nobody should be schools to make their revenue and expense shocked to see another Florida and Ohio sheets more transparent and accessible. State “coincidence” in the BCS championAnd it found that athletic spending at Diviship game this season. After all, the schools sion I schools is increasing at a worrisome have 180 million reasons between them rate—three times that of the spending of why it just might happen again. ■ the general university. So where does the money wind up now, if Dan Loeterman is a sophomore majoring not with the university? It feeds right back in journalism and poli-sci at the Universiinto the arms race and the competition to ty of Southern California. He has to admit recruit the best players, says Fizel. In ’04that a huge athletic budget doesn’t seem so ’05, when Georgia’s athletics department bad when your school is ranked No. 1. turned the largest profit of any school—a

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When Your Body is Grandpa’s Age

Sarah Kliff sizes up the risks of a sedentary lifestyle. Don’t know your cholesterol, do you? Didn’t think so.

ebecca Corman thinks about her health, maybe even more than most. She played volleyball at her high school in California and, now a senior at the University of Washington in Seattle, strives to fit four workouts into her weekly schedule. She tries to make healthy decisions at the grocery store and to remember her multivitamins. But when asked about her cholesterol and bone density, Corman draws a blank. “I have no idea,” she admits. “When I go to the doctor and they say I’m okay, I don’t really think about it.” Certain numbers are key on campus, like a high grade point average, low weight, cheap happy hour and the digits for the

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health these studies paint. “I honestly don’t pay attention to what I eat,” says Greg Moskoff, a junior at the University of Missouri at Columbia, who has not had a check-up in three years. “I don’t overindulge or gorge myself, but I also don’t keep track of what I am eating.” That’s not good enough, according to a recent study of 800 University of New Hampshire undergrads, which found that 60 percent of male students had high blood pressure and more than two thirds of women were not getting enough calcium, iron or folate. The researchers also looked for risk factors like elevated blood pressure, high cholesterol and insulin resistance—all signs that point to an increased chance of coronary heart disease and type II diabetes. More than half the students in the study showed signs of at least one of those risk factors. “Many of the students were astounded that they could be at risk for what they viewed as elderly-related diseases,” said Joanne Burke, a researcher who led the UNH study. Jordan Caley is among those students. A nutrition major at UNH, Caley says she has usually paid attention to health issues and watched what she ate. But until this study, she never thought about checking her blood pressure or cholesterol. “You never hear of a 20-year-old having a heart at“Many of the tack,” she says. “Nutritional constudents were cerns in college are much more astounded Jimmy John’s that delivers that they being thin for girls, and building could be at straight to the library all night muscle for guys.” risk for what long. Low cholesterol or high While the UNH study is one they viewed bone density don’t quite make of the first to track college stuas elderlyrelated the list. “People think in terms dents’ blood pressures and chodiseases.” of appearance instead of what lesterol levels, previous research they’re doing for their body,” says Corman. on weight gain has also indicated unhealthy “And I think that changes how people are habits running rampant on campus—not going to take care of themselves.” exactly groundbreaking. And though we’d New studies are testing how that attitude all prefer not to hear scientific proof of the plays out for college students, and our colfeared freshman fifteen, a 2005 study of lective grade is not good. Risk for obesity, undergrads at Washington University in coronary heart disease and type II diabeSt. Louis revealed just that. WashU Medites—all of which sound like old people’s cal School’s Susan S. Deusinger reported ailments—is just as high among undergrads that 70 percent of her subjects experienced as it is for our parents or grandparents. But significant weight gain between their freshconvincing students to care is no easy task, man and sophomore years. It was not quite no matter how dire a picture of our future the monstrous 15 pounds students dread—
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participants averaged a 9-pound gain—but it’s still troubling. “It’s very scary to see these things because people are dying from the effects of obesity and sedentary behavior,” says Deusinger. “It is now that they need to be concerned about this. They may say, ‘I can wait until I’m old to do anything.’ That’s too late.” The forces pushing toward unhealthy lifestyles on campus come from all angles, starting with an increasingly unfit American population—national levels of obesity rose from 15 percent to 33 percent over the past 30 years. Long days studying and snacking in the library followed by late nights drinking only make matters worse. Finding the hours to squeeze in preventative measures for health problems that won’t hit for another 40 years—almost double the time most of us have been alive—is, for most, simply not a priority. “These are the least of the worries of college students,” says Lona Sandon, spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. “They’re just trying to get their homework in on time and pass the next final. They’re not worrying about if their cholesterol is 170 or if it will be over 200 down the road.” In fact, they probably don’t even know whether a cholesterol of 170 is good or bad—let alone the distinction between “good” and “bad” cholesterol that adults agonize over. Researchers and nutritionists make a clear point: the risks are real and the diseases are serious. But when the food is cheap and time is crunched, who are college students to turn down a free slice of pizza or $3 draft? Take Jackson Boyer, a junior at Westminster College in Fulton, Mo. He knows that his frat house cuisine is far from healthy—“almost always fried or soaked in something,” as he describes it—but Boyer is okay with that. “I’m fine with the way I live,” he says. Ask him again in 40 years. ■ —with Brittany Farb and Rebecca Katz Sarah Kliff is a recent grad of Washington University in St. Louis who, even after writing this story, does not know her cholesterol level. She was the editor-in-chief of her campus newspaper, Student Life, and now writes about health for Newsweek.

Too Much of a Good Thing
Maura Judkis takes a look at exercise bulimia
Hours spent on treadmills and rowarriving on campus spurred weight loss at ing machines may give you buns of steel and the beginning of her first year at Smith. That to-die-for legs, but some gym rats are taking quickly spiraled into binging, purging and their workouts too far. Colleges across the excessive exercise. She spent hours daily on U.S. are now dealing with a new type of eatan elliptical machine, in addition to several ing disorder: exercise bulimia. nights a week practicing for the diving, track Overexercisers purge themselves of and softball teams she had joined. calories by working out for hours each day, Working out so much took its toll, and and may also suffer from more traditional after suffering sports injuries and severe disordered eating such as weight loss, Scafati began to fear Exercise calorie restriction and selffor her life. She promised a friend bulimia is just she would enter a private in-painduced vomiting. Doug Bunas dangerous nell, a doctor at the Renfrew as other forms tient treatment program. College of eating Center for women’s health in support groups were helpful, Connecticut who specializes in disorders, and Scafati says, but more resources college can be eating disorders, says that he a particularly are needed. Rumors that girls had and his colleagues have seen been kicked out of school for simhigh-risk environment. ilar disorders made Scafati paran increased number of exercise bulimia cases in the past ticularly nervous about seeking decade, and there are probably far more help. (Kristen Cole, Smith’s media relations out there going untreated: only 6 percent of director, says no one has ever been asked to people with any type of bulimia ever receive leave because of an eating disorder.) treatment, according to the National Eating So what’s a school to do to help people Disorders Association. There are no official like Scafati? Earlier this year, reports surstatistics for exercise bulimia, but according faced that some universities were monitorto the National Institute of Mental Health, ing students’ gym use in order to identify 1 to 4 percent of all adolescents and young over-exercisers—a claim that turned out to adults suffer from bulimia, and 80 percent be untrue. But while the idea of Big Brother of patients are female. While the majority of watching you work out may seem extreme, them binge and purge in the better-known some degree of monitoring could be what’s fashion, some follow up their eating sprees necessary to keep the problem exercisers with exercise overload. from blending in with the healthy crowd. “I think there is a common perception “The ideal solution is that we educate trainthat exercise bulimia is ‘healthier’ than other ers and coaches and gym staff so they can types of bulimia,” said Bunnell. “Exercise is spot people overdoing it,” says Bunnell. culturally endorsed, so we don’t have the Scafati has since recovered from her eatsame reaction to it as to vomiting.” ing disorder and is working on a photograBut exercise bulimia is a disease just as phy project of people in recovery from eating dangerous as other forms of eating disordisorders. ders, and college can be a particularly high“When I was in the middle of my disorder, risk environment. “At the beginning of colI never thought I’d be able to sit down and lege there’s a social contagion effect, with a eat a piece of pizza and be okay with it,” she new environment and all kinds of anxieties,” says, “but I just had a fantastic weekend gosays Bunnell. As students leave the security ing out and eating with friends.” ■ of eating at home with less-judgmental famiMaura Judkis is a recent George Washlies and long-time friends, they may struggle ington University grad. Her pilates mat to maintain a healthy body image. is starting to collect dust in the closet. For Caitlin Scafati, now 25, the stress of fall 2007 |

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found her lurking in the corners of bars jumping (literally) when her cell vibrated. She couldn’t get enough of her text-lovin’ fling and his sexy—and sort of creepy—latenight messages. “Why don’t you just call him?” I finally asked. Looking horrified, she said, “We’d have nothing to say to one another.” Exactly. Maybe texting was always the doom of an AOL Instant Messenger generation: these are the same kids who spent middle-school years in front of computer screens during the wee hours, always just a click away from learning friends’ and crushes’ deepest secrets (or sexiest 13-year-old thoughts). Now they’ve turned to text messaging for a similar rush. Like AIM, texting feels pleasingly illicit, as if we know this isn’t what we’re supposed to do with our machines. But a dependence on texting can complicate early courtship. Let’s say my law boy had returned my message—what next? Maybe we’d keep texting back and forth in the pre-dawn hours, maybe the texts would turn salacious, maybe I’d decide I kind of like him. But even if I did, it wouldn’t mean much. In the nebulous realm of texting, there is always the possibility that he’s consulting his funnier friends for a good line, or that his auto spelling function is masking his poor grasp of the English language. And I’m not the only one doing it. I see For now, my friends and I appreciate the other students en route to class, even in comfort and thrill of the mobile romance, class, ignoring blackboards and traffic lights but it’s a bit harder to imagine us cackling to focus on the one-inch square of screen in over mispunctuated pick-up lines—and their palms. But while texting a lab partner sexting fiendishly right back—at age 28, to say you’re running late is simple and con- 35, 40. I’d like to think I’ll have landed in a venient, pursuing a hot and heavy real relationship by then, the romance in the language of T9 is a We’re not just kind where we do our pillow texting. We’re whole other story. We’re no longer sexting. And it talk face-to-face rather than just texting; we’re sexting. And screen-to-screen. But hell, if comes with its own set sometimes it’s dirtier—and more a few more decades of texting of symbols, complicated—than the real thing. means I’ll never have to make thrills and Take my friend Jess, a bona fide complications. awkward small talk on my cell sext goddess. After a one-week again, I’ll hold off on intimacy spring fling with an older guy, she parted until I’m 50. ways with him, only to launch into a fullYesterday, my phone rang. It was the law fledged sext relationship upon her return. student. I stared at the screen in disbelief. I We’re talking XXX. The seemingly playful stared for so long I missed the call. Call me “What are you wearing?” turned into “Tell back, the voicemail said. So I texted him. ■ me what you want me to do to you,” which Andrea Zimmerman is a senior journalism turned into things I will not write lest my major at Drake University. She is grateful father ever read this. Jess could get any her parents still pay her cell phone bill. guy she wants, yet the post-vacation weeks
Illustration by Shih-Mu Pai

Sexting Up Ur Nite

Andrea L. Zimmerman knows that starting a romance should be hard...but texting is so temptingly easy.

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t’s 2:30 a.m. My phone rests in my hand as I wait for the familiar notes of Justin Timberlake’s “My Love” to signal that I have a text message. Last weekend, I met a law student at a local bar. We exchanged phone numbers, and I texted him the next day with a casual “What’s up?” It’s now two days later, and still no return text. Oh well, I think, it could be worse: at least he doesn’t have a lame, rambling voicemail of mine saved on his phone to laugh about. It was just one of many times I’ve leaned on the crutch of text messaging to get me through the otherwise awkward early weeks of a budding relationship—a time normally marred by stilted small talk and fumbling phone conversations. Believe me, I know that texting is the furthest thing from deep, unbridled romance. But it’s just so easy, so safe; I can concoct a winning message in no time and shake off a losing response just as fast.

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Hokies Seek to Heal
In the days leading up to the start of a new semester, Robert Bowman looks back at April’s tragic shootings and forward to his school’s future.

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leep-deprived and with eyes still raw from crying, I walked up the stairs of Burruss Hall after an interview with CNN. Burruss is normally a bustling scene; it houses the president’s office, administrative offices and the office of undergraduate admissions. But two days after the shooting that scrawled our university’s name across televisions and computer screens worldwide, the stairwell felt empty and somber. As a tour guide, I work closely with admissions ofThe class of ‘11 ficers, and I hadn’t heard from many can make a fresh start, but upperof them since before April 16. classmen must On my way up the stairs, I passed return to places two high school students, clearly lost and people that serve as constant and overwhelmed. I led them upstairs to the admissions office, where reminders of last spring. they learned that all official tours had been canceled. The two had traveled all the way to Blacksburg from Cooperstown, N.Y., and though their timing couldn’t have been worse, it was their only chance to see the school. I looked at my watch. “I have a free hour. Do you guys want to go for a walk?” For the first time since Monday, I was at ease doing what I love: selling Virginia Tech. The visitors told me they originally had been drawn to Tech’s academic standards and football scene. Once they were accepted, they only needed to visit campus to be sure. Yet over the past 24 hours, their vision of the university had changed. The smiling pictures from promotional pamphlets received in the mail were now joined with images from the news the night before: thousands of Hokies gathered at a candlelight vigil to pay tribute to the 33 we lost. But the tragedy, these visitors told me, could have happened anywhere. They wanted to be a part of this community. I’ve given many tours since then, and nearly all prospective students and families echo that sentiment. Some students needed to be dragged to visit Tech, resisting merely the association with the tragedy. But many more hadn’t even considered attending until they too saw photos from the vigil or the convocation—the images of our students coming together during a time of struggle. My university cannot rid itself of the tragedy, but we should not

be measured by it either. Going forward, each member of the community must show the watching world what makes this school amazing: our unbreakable spirit. Tech’s newest class has quickly learned the sense of pride each Hokie carries. More than 5,000 students accepted Tech’s offer of admission, making the Class of 2011 the largest (and most academically impressive) class in our history. Admissions did not pull any from its waiting list of 1,441. But though the class of 2011 can make a fresh start on campus, upperclassmen must return to places and people that serve as constant reminders of last spring. Many will look down at the ground in silence as they pass Norris Hall, forcing themselves not to picture the long fall from the second floor windows. As they sit in class, some will continue to scan the room for the fastest exit, just in case. But they will still have to do their best not to doze off during Electric Theory, and they will still laugh with friends while playing soccer on the Drillfield. Everyone anticipates as eagerly as ever the first snowfall of the year, when the Corps of Cadets faces off against the civilians in our traditional snowball fight. It will take some time, but things can return to normal. Getting ready for the new school year this fall means something different for our community: looking forward and looking back in tandem. Our annual blowout opening-day football game will be a little different this time around when the Hokies open their season. We will join together—faculty, staff, students, alumni and even the greater Blacksburg community—to celebrate our team, but also to honor the 32 victims. On October 28, another group of Hokies will do their part to help the community heal, when 100 of them will join the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C.. They are running to raise $100,000 that will endow a scholarship honoring those who lost their lives that day in April. The tribute of many students will be as small as placing a ribbon on their car or wearing a memorial T-shirt, but not a single student will forget. Instead, we remember those we lost and we move forward in their memory. ■ Robert Bowman is a senior industrial systems engineering major at Virginia Tech. He was managing editor of the Collegiate Times when the shootings broke out on campus in the spring.
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special issue:

smells like

Green spirit
Green isn’t just the new black this fall. From now on, it’s a perennial staple. But think only big-talking celebs can deck out their lives in earth-friendly hues? Turns out we can, too. That’s what our cover story is all about: making just a few of the million little choices that add up to change. We’ve come up with 33 to get you going—and for an extra boost, we handpicked six of our favorite campus green initiatives, from recycling with earthworms to showering with friends. Maybe the sustainable—but still sleek & sexy—dorm we’ve designed will inspire you to spruce up your living, or maybe mouth-watering descriptions of one school’s locally grown dinners will do the trick. As we’ve learned editing this issue, you’re never too late to the green party.
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Green for a Week | Could you handle the heat (or the freezing showers)?

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Your Money Where Your Mouth Is | Back-to-school in sustainable style

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Greenest of Them All | Some of our favorite activists charge up to make change

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Making the Grade | Does your school measure up? Sixteen conscious campuses

Photo: Veer

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green for a week (or)

How my Life went to trash
by Robert Padnick
Harvard University
When Current asked me to live green for

a week, I said yes—yes, I will be a hero. My assignment: Forfeit air conditioning in the middle of July, eat organically and locally, carry all my trash in a bag and generally be at one with Mother Nature for seven days. The following is my diary. It should tide you over until Lifetime airs my made-fortelevision movie, “Mother Nature’s Gentleman Caller: The Robert Padnick Story.” Thursday: I head to the school cafeteria groggy from last night’s cookout—my environmental bachelor party before marrying my green wife. (I suspect that our smoke-spewing grill runs off of ozone and dolphin souls.) But today it’s goodbye sausages, and hellooo tofu and sprouts. After my first meal of greens and beans, I stash my leftovers in the trash bag I’m storing in my backpack. A lady seated next to me looks over with pity. I explain to her that I’m keeping my trash to show how much I accumulate, but she pretends not to hear me. She’s only an arm’s length away. Friday: I’m lying on my dorm room floor spread-eagled and motionless, preserving my energy like a desert lizard. As

Eat This Magazine
10 ways to get green now
1. Unplug your cell

phone charger when it’s not powering anything. Same goes for the iPod. 2. Let your computer

sleep when you do. 3. Cold? Wear a sweater. Hot? Wear a tank top. 4. Support businesses that share and prac-

ally a heinous torture. Not because it’s so cold, but because of the demonic, Gak-like sound of liquid soap on my body, echoing against the bathroom tiles. I hear someone in another shower shudder. Monday: It’s time I explain a little something called the Sheryl Crow One Square Method: one toilet paper square per number two. Apparently having soaked up the sun qualifies Sheryl as an environmental scientist. But what Ms. Crow fails to realize is that while rock stars may have the luxury of 30-ply potty silks, we college students are stuck using jumbo rolls of tracing paper that disintegrate upon skin contact. She can enjoy her butt-wiping soirees with the sheikh of Dubai Throwing in the Towel: Robert Padnick can’t and Kid Rock, but I’m handle the heat of a week without A/C. going to do the globe a favor by using as many I gaze up at my inactive air conditioner, I squares as it takes to avoid smelling like a realize that global warming isn’t happentoxic dump. Tuesday: I visit the local farmers’ maring, it happened, and A/C is all that’s keepket to peruse its green wares. I approach ing us out of the frying pan. If only I could a honeycomb candles vendor and proudly shrink like in Blues Clues and jump into tell her that I’m living green for a week. my air conditioner’s winter wonderland to “Just a week?” she asks. play tic-tac-toe with penguins. I manage “Yeah, a whole week! That’s seven to type an e-mail query: Dear editors, why days!” I say, beaming. have you sentenced me to burn to death? I wait for my pat on the head, but she Waiting for a reply, I pass out till Saturday. Saturday: I feel refreshed from my fulllooks at me like I haven’t said anything. I day blackout, until I get a whiff of myself. tell her it’s been hard, that I had to pass up Yikes! I possibly smell worse than my bag nacho day at the cafeteria. Nacho day! I of rotting beans. I take a military shower in buy a candle and slink away, pouting. Wednesday: It’s my final day, and I’m which I rinse myself in cold water, turn off a lean mean green machine. A paper towel the tap, soap and shampoo and then rinse after washing my hands? No thanks, I preoff the suds with more cold water. Sounds fer my reusable hand cloth. Join my friends like a practical measure, but it is actufor pizza? No thanks, I don’t have friends 8. Write to Contice green values. anymore due to my awful stink. One 5. Bring your own mug gress—nay, e-mail. Square Method? Get real, Sheryl. 9. Bank online to to get coffee. I wonder how green I’ll remain after 6. Eat at restaurants avoid accumulating midnight. The hand towel is no problem. that have “bring your piles of unread, unThe A/C’s going back on, but I’ll turn it off own bowl” programs… shredded bank statewhen I leave the room. And I’m definitely and actually bring ments. keeping my bag of trash. I just don’t have 10. Do readings for your bowl. the heart to toss the little guy after all we’ve 7. Fill your dishwasher class on the screen been through. ■ Thanks to eco-consultants Frog Design for before you run it. instead of printing.
the trash bag idea and to Sheryl Crow’s blog.

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Stay Green, Save on the cheap Green going eco
by Katherine Evans
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
If you’re scrimping this year and still want to save the world, take heart. The best way to spend sustainably isn’t on pricey organic sheets and a solar-powered iPod charger—it’s on less of everything. “Look at what you don’t need,” says Emily Main, senior editor of National Geographic’s webzine The Green Guide. “It’s cutting out all those unnecessary expenses you use for convenience’s sake.” Age-old rule No. 2 still holds true: reuse, even if the thrift-store mothball scent with the Organic Consumers Association, makes you gag. Search craigslist.com for because the local fruit burns fewer fossil used furniture. Remind yourself that you fuels on its way to the shelf. Some crops are don’t need a new “Periodic Table of Beer” exceptions, like strawberries, often grown poster; just tear out some magazine photo with a particularly harmful pesticide. For spreads and you’ve got yourself (marginthose, it’s better to spring for organic. ally classier) wall art. When thirsty, head Check the wrapper for the tap (it’s free!). If your Another culprit that’s all cell phone ain’t broke, don’t too easily ignored is excess upgrade it, and resist seapackaging, says Minowa. sonal wardrobe overhaul: Look for items packed new products mean more 1.42 billion the number of dollars college students energy consumed, period. in glass jars or tin cans, spend on bottled water each year materials that are more Try to support compaeasily and frequently renies making green efforts, 70 million the number of water bottles Americans like Nokia, Dell and Sony cycled, and always reach consume each year for the 24-pack of toilet Ericsson. And before drop27,000 paper. Buying in bulk and ping $50 on your college’s sharing with roommates is the number of barrels of oil required to hoodie, double-check for package and transport that water a great way to cut down on workers rights violations 90 packaging. (see workersrights.org). the percent of bottles that end up in Last, you can forget all Besides not paying a fair landfills rather than recycled or reused about “paper vs. plastic”— living wage, companies that 1,000 bring along a cloth bag to run sweatshops typically the approximate number of years pack up instead. have lax environmental water bottles take to biodegrade No green eggs & ham standards, too. And hit up INFO FROM THE CONTAINER RECYCLING INST., If you’re serious about big-name lines like Levi’s, THE EARTH POLICY INST. AND THE HARRIS INTERACTIVE POLL 2002. —BY JANIE LORBER going green, be ready to American Apparel and Ureat like it. Cutting down ban Outfitters for recycled on meat and animal products is best, says or organic clothes that don’t resemble Sarah Bratnober of the Organic Valley items from a booth at a Phish concert. Family of Farms, since much more land Still, says Main, “one pair of conventional and energy are consumed generating a jeans is better than five pairs of organic pound of meat than one of grain. ■ cotton jeans.” ■
Veg Out: Eating green just requires a little extra grocerystore savvy.

beyond organic
how to eat like a hippie
by Ruth Olson
Brigham Young University
If you’ve set foot in a supermarket in the

past five years, you already know shopping is getting tricky. Is organic or free-range meat better? Is your canned tuna dolphinfriendly? How many pesticides lurk inside your tomato? Can’t you just eat in peace? It turns out dining green is easier than you’d think. We asked some experts to help you re-write your grocery list so you can chow down with the environment in mind.
Vocab lesson

excess by the numbers

“Organic” isn’t just a philosophical choice—for a food to earn the label, it must obey specific U.S. Department of Agriculture rules: no synthetic pesticides or herbicides for crops, of course, and no antibiotics or hormones for livestock. Plus animals must have space to move freely. This all sounds great, you say, but is that bag of organic arugula really better for the environment? The long-term benefits go beyond the pesticide problem, says Barbara Haumann of the Organic Trade Association—organic farming methods help native flora and fauna by supporting soil health.
No place like home

Buying an organic watermelon from Chile can leave the globe worse off than buying an inorganic melon grown down the street, says Craig Minowa, a scientist
Photo: Veer

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The Green Room

Cool Green Stuff
b. b. a. c.

e.

d.

f.
At this point in the year, you’ve probably loaded up with all the backto-school basics—pens, highlighters, overpriced textbooks—but what about a solar powered calculator? Or notebooks with covers created from recycled records? Current rounded up a few of the eco-friendly dorm goodies that you won’t find at your campus bookstore. And with items like silk and hemp undies, shopping green has never been sexier. a. Water Powered Desk Set, thinkgeek.com, $9.99 b. Album Cover Notebook, eco-artware.com, $18 c. MaxLite Spiramax Flourescent Lamp, amazon.com, $4.99 d. Stapleless Stapler, revdesign.biz, 6.29 e. Hannah Swivel Tilt Chair, izzydesign.com, $260 f. Reware T-Shirt, reware.com, $26 g. Low-rise Bootcut Hemp Jeans, rawganique.com, $88 h. Silk and Hemp Knickers, greenknickers.org, $50 i. Mobile Wallpaper, mioculture. com, $28 j. Fong Chopstick Lamp, chopstickart.com, $42 k. EcoBasics Pillow, ecobasics.com, $24 l. Canpactor, conservastore.com, $69.95 m. Grocery Bag Trash Can, containerstore.com, $4.99, n. Bestrite Tack Board, stales.com, $79.99 o. Seventh Generation Ultra Liquid, lowimpactliving.com, $12.50.

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The Green Room

Cool Green Stuff
b. b. a. c.

e.

d.

f.
At this point in the year, you’ve probably loaded up with all the backto-school basics—pens, highlighters, overpriced textbooks—but what about a solar powered calculator? Or notebooks with covers created from recycled records? Current rounded up a few of the eco-friendly dorm goodies that you won’t find at your campus bookstore. And with items like silk and hemp undies, shopping green has never been sexier. a. Water Powered Desk Set, thinkgeek.com, $9.99 b. Album Cover Notebook, eco-artware.com, $18 c. MaxLite Spiramax Flourescent Lamp, amazon.com, $4.99 d. Stapleless Stapler, revdesign.biz, 6.29 e. Hannah Swivel Tilt Chair, izzydesign.com, $260 f. Reware T-Shirt, reware.com, $26 g. Low-rise Bootcut Hemp Jeans, rawganique.com, $88 h. Silk and Hemp Knickers, greenknickers.org, $50 i. Mobile Wallpaper, mioculture. com, $28 j. Fong Chopstick Lamp, chopstickart.com, $42 k. EcoBasics Pillow, ecobasics.com, $24 l. Canpactor, conservastore.com, $69.95 m. Grocery Bag Trash Can, containerstore.com, $4.99, n. Bestrite Tack Board, stales.com, $79.99 o. Seventh Generation Ultra Liquid, lowimpactliving.com, $12.50.

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Mean v. Green you buy you are what
i.
Looking to green up your spending as you get back into the swing of things this year? Check out these eco-friendly alternatives to basic college necessities:

Mean:
SUVs. A 2004 Lincoln Navigator gets, on average, 13 miles to the gallon—that’s about $3,461 in gas costs a year.

Green:
Used Bicycle, waterloocycles.com, from $100 to $900. Bikes rank second only to walking in terms of environmental-friendliness, and a used bike is even better.

h.

j.

Mean:
The average American cheeseburger. One environmental journalist estimated that the yearly greenhouse gas emissions from the production and consumption of cheeseburgers equals the emissions of about 6 million SUVs.

Green:
k.
Amy’s California Veggie Burger, www.amys.com, $3.99 for a pack of four from FreshDirect. It’s flavorful, low-cal, and made from completely organic ingredients. Plus you can just pop it in the microwave.

Mean:
n.
Rubber flip-flops, like those by J.Crew or Havaianas that are made in part with PVC, a plastic that has been shown to release toxins.

Green:
Ethletic Sneakers, www.ethletic.com, about $68. They’re durable, so you won’t have to replace them every year, and look a lot like Chuck Taylors. The latex for the sole is responsibly harvested.

Mean:
l. o.
Beauty supplies, like lip balm and shampoo, containing petroleum products. Fossil fuels are insanely un-green.

Green:
Burt’s Bees Rosemary Mint Shampoo Bar, www.burtsbees.com. $6. Because it’s a bar of soap for your hair, it doesn’t come in a plastic bottle, and its ingredients are “99.9 percent” natural. It smells super good, too. fall 2007 |

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new haven : gothicRomanoff
Alexandra aretto and Emily Cas om fr see their food at rout to spoon sp . the Yale Farm

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when our powers combine:

planting a new crop of planeteers
by Jody Pollock and Veronique Greenwood
University of Pennsylvania and Yale University
Today’s college students are the first generation to grow up with green. In kindergarten, we anointed

Captain Planet our hero; in grade school, the three R’s—reduce, reuse and recycle—became a classroom mantra. The cumulative community service hours we put in picking up trash beside local roads or cleaning wetlands behind our high schools may total somewhere in the millions. It’s only fitting that, now in college, the same kids that spent our playground days yelling “Earth! Wind! Water! Fire!” are beginning to throw real weight behind those words. Environmental issues today are more pressing than sorting paper and plastic: the threat of global warming, waning of oil supply and destruction of natural resources are complex, international problems. But on campuses across the country, we are taking them on with real energy—solar and otherwise. Current has unearthed students, faculty and staff at six campuses who are making some of the most impressive moves toward a greener future. While the stakes may be overwhelming, these innovators prove that solving Earth’s problems can actually be fun. And when students are committed and campuses are enthusiastic, the payoff is big. Take a look.

dirtiest dinner
Kidding Around: Alexandra Haar balances being an undergrad and a single mom.

growing closer Yale university

>>There’s no mystery meat on the menu at Yale University’s Berkeley College dining hall. Instead, a dinner menu this fall might include asparagus soup, roasted squash, maple-syrup-and-sage pizza and grass-fed beef hamburgers, finished off with cranberry oatmeal cookies. Definitely a step up from ramen. Not only that, but it’s all seasonal fare supplied by producers in the New Haven area.
Photo by Miranda Popkey

Since its founding in 2001, the Yale Sustainable Food Project (YSFP) has been at the forefront of the movement to put local food on campus dining hall tables. YSFP has grown from a student group advocating for organic foods in dining halls into a full-fledged university-funded operation serving 40 percent of all food on campus. The average American meal travels between 1,500 and 2,500 miles from starting point to your plate, according to the Worldwatch Institute, accruing a steep carbon price tag. But YSFP’s food comes entirely from regional producers. The project’s centerpiece is the Yale Farm, a oneacre plot a few miles from campus. One acre isn’t enough to supply much of the food served at Yale, but
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the farm is a teaching ground designed to include students in every aspect of the growing process. Volunteers and six summer interns plant, tend and harvest the produce, then sell it at the farmer’s market in downtown New Haven. Students working the farm also learn about sustainable agriculture methods, like putting plants where they can make the best use of resources and spreading mulch instead of nitrogen-boosting fertilizers. So far, the results of the food project have been delicious, and student appetites are picking up on the difference. In a 2005 survey, 79 percent of students said they would eat in dining halls more if the food were sustainable and 83 percent find the project’s offerings to be of higher quality than other food served on campus. (Makes you wonder what you’re missing.) YSFP is now hard at work to make the flavors of topnotch, locally grown meals complement a college budget. When the project began, sustainable food cost an exorbitant 70 percent more than conventional food, but as the program expanded its directors have become savvier about spending. By making large food purchasing agreements with farmers and streamlining their operations, YSFP brought down the price of a sustainable menu to just 37 percent more than conventional food. That’s good news for the majority of students, who value food quality over price, portion or overall dining experience, according to the same 2005 survey. The Food Project isn’t meant to stop growing at Yale’s gates; it was created as a model for other schools seeking to incorporate sustainability into campus dining. The project’s purchasing guidelines are available online, and soon Yale will release a compilation of the project’s complete parameters for nurturing a sustainable, healthy food culture on campus. It’s a recipe book for a tastier, more wholesome planet.

most bang per buck

pay it forward Macalester College
>>Some would have seen the leaky freezer in the vegetarian co-op dorm at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minn. as a nuisance. But to three enterprising undergraduates, it represented an opportunity

Passing on Gas
earth-friendly ways to fill up your tank
Every decade thinks that it’s the most al-

ternative. The ’60s brought us alternative love, the ’80s claimed alternative rock and now the ’00s are making way for their own alternative— alternative fuels, which are cleaner and greener than traditional fuels like gasoline and diesel. Northwestern’s Laura Schocker breaks down some of the cutting-edge technologies fueling big-time changes.
Plug it In: Electric Cars

green) choice is a hybrid plug-in, which uses both battery and fuel power.
It’s the Bomb: Hydrogen

Some of the earliest cars on the road were electric, but the trend gave way to steam and the internal combustion engine. Now electric cars are making a comeback, says John Humphrey, an eco-consultant for Sustainable Energy Partners. This fall the $98,000 Tesla hits the streets. It’s a 100-percent electric car—meaning that it gives off no harmful emissions—that can travel an impressive 200-plus miles per charge. If you’re in the market for a slightly more affordable set of wheels, another good (but less

Hydrogen-powered vehicles may become a hugely successful alternative over the next few decades, but some scientists worry that we don’t have enough time to wait for results. Hydrogen-powering also brings up a chickenand-egg dilemma, says MIT researcher Jeroen Struben. No one will buy the car without a widespread re-fueling infrastructure in place— like gas stations with hydrogen pumps—but fuel providers are reluctant to make the investment without high demand for hydrogen cars.
A Use for Eucalyptus: Biofuels

biochemist Chris Somerville. Eucalyptus and switchgrass are ideal sources of biomass because they consume less water (and thus fewer resources) as they grow.
Pretty Corny: Ethanol

Biofuels come from biomass, which is a fancy name for plant matter and waste. Devoting a small percent of the arable land in the world now farmed for food to the cultivation of biomass would “go a long way toward meeting our needs for renewable energy,” says Stanford

Produced by fermenting sugary plants like sugar beets, sugercane and corn, ethanol can safely be combined with gas in most car engines in 5-percent doses. Almost all gas stations in California already provide 5-percentethanol mixtures at the pump, says Humphrey, and in Brazil—which invested in ethanol during the ’70s oil crisis to become more self-sufficient—about half of all cars run off ethanol.
Flower Power: Diesel Alternatives

Biofuels and ethanol only work with special car engines, but biodiesel is a simpler alternative, since diesel engines are already on the

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for investment. By replacing this outdated, 241-kilowatt-hour freezer with a cheaper, energy-efficient, 42-kilowatt-hour freezer, Macalester will save about $150 a year and the co-op’s supply of frozen Boca Burgers. All of that is thanks to Macalester’s Clean Energy Revolving Fund (CERF), founded in the spring of 2006. A revolving loan fund is “a wonderful mechanism for capturing cost savings from wise [sustainable] investments and funneling them back into more investments,” says Chris Wells, assistant professor of environmental studies and chair of the CERF Board, which oversees project selection and allocation. A green fund like CERF operates by taking the money saved from successful energy-efficiency projects—like replacing a freezer, installing low-flow showerheads or building a wind turbine— and cycling it back into other sustainability initiatives.

roads. This fuel is typically made from the oil of natural products like olives, peanuts, grape seeds, sunflowers and soybeans. Humphrey cautions that those products must be planted in a sustainable way—organically or locally grown—to make this a truly green alternative.
Here Comes the Sun: Solar Power

Capturing just one percent of all solar energy that reaches one percent of the earth’s surface would be enough to provide transportation worldwide for an entire year, says Stanford’s Somerville. But solar energy certainly isn’t going to make cars any sexier: there simply isn’t space on most automobiles for enough solar panels to power the entire vehicle, says Humphrey, although plugging an electric car into a solar-powered home would work nicely. Ready to fuel up a greener life right now? Hit up the pantry and fill your diesel engine with straight vegetable oil—in warm weather (and with a heater when it’s cold), a bottle of Wesson gets almost the same miles to the gallon as gasoline. It may cost about three times as much, but saving the planet is priceless, so suck it up, tightwad.

Before it was so eloquently defined, CERF was just an idea bouncing among a green-conscious trio: Timothy Den HerderThomas and Asa Diebolt, both freshmen at the time, and senior Richard Graves who has worked as the New Media Fellow at the Energy Action Coalition, a youth-led cleanenergy advocacy organization, since graduating in 2006. The three spent their spare time researching notable loan funds, and what they found was startling. Harvard’s Green Campus Loan Fund was averaging a return on investment of 27 percent in 2007—a number that is unheard-of compared to the stock market’s average return of 7 percent. It was doing even better than Harvard’s own endowment. “A 27 percent return on investment really opens the eyes of the treasurer of a college,” says Diebolt, proving that it’s not always “the environment versus the economy.” The compact fluorescent lightbulb, or CFL, is a classic example. CFLs are significantly more expensive than regular bulbs upfront but can prove worthwhile as long-term investments in reduced electricity costs. The real magic of CERF is that it captures, accumulates and reinvests those gains rather than losing them to unrelated ends, says Julian Dautremont-Smith, Associate Director of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). That’s exactly how the students presented CERF when they came before the administration with their ideas—as a smart investment. They won approval and a $20,000 donation from Macalester’s student government, the largest contribution to any single project in student memory. CERF is closing in on a target goal of $100,000 in combined initial investments and project savings, recording $70,000 as of this spring. The Board is currently reviewing several proposals, including the installation of low-flow showerheads, dual-flush toilets and low-flow faucets in one dorm—expected to chop 39 percent off the water bill and save
Photo: Veer

100,000 gallons of water per year in that building alone. An industrial-size wind turbine is also in the works, an investment that will produce the equivalent of 40 percent of Macalester’s total energy needs and, within a decade, a projected $150,000 per year for the fund. Last spring, Diebolt and Den HerderThomas teamed up with AASHE to publish a how-to guide for students looking to start revolving loan funds on their own campuses. The guide is careful to emphasize that, at the beginning, bigger green loan funds aren’t necessarily better. In fact, students at California State University in Monterey Bay began their fund with $250 from a private donation. When CSU’s Office of the Chancellor matched that $250, the fund had just enough to replace four high-pressure sodium light fixtures on the indoor basketball court. Slam dunk.

most creepy crawly

remixing the earth worm u. Southern Illinois
>>Feeding earthworms wasn’t a skill Andilee Warner listed on her resume. But for Warner, the recycling and solid waste coordinator at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), feeding two million of them everyday has become vital to her work. The feeding is actually just one part of a process called “vermicomposting” (literally, “worm composting”), an earthworm-fueled recycling method. In an average work week, these red wrigglers compost between 500 and 1,000 pounds of food waste from three of SIUC’s cafeterias as well as paper waste from a commercial-size shredder, transKidding Around: Alexandra Haar balances forming the leftovers into supplemental ferbeing an undergrad and tilizer for the campus grounds. “We’re taking a single mom. what has traditionally been waste going into the landfill and turning it into a very precious and powerful commodity,” explains Warner. For every pound of food fed to the red wrigglers, only one-fourth of a pound fall 2007 |

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remains after digestion and excretion to emerge in the form of worm “castings,” or poop. Warner, who was named “Recycler of the Year” by the Illinois Recycling Association in June, can’t take credit for inventing vermicomposting. The first recorded use of the practice dates back more than 2,000 years, and more than 100 years ago Charles Darwin noted in the results of an extensive study that red wrigglers can eat their own weight in organic matter in a single day. Vermicomposting has long since been a favorite of eco-conscious homeowners with big bins (and lots of worms) to spare. But Warner believes no one has attempted this kind of project on such a large scale before, and John Russin, associate dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences at SIUC, is certain that it’s the first example of vermicomposting in Illinois, if not the whole Midwest. On a campus where food waste once made up a quarter of all dumpster weight, according to trash audits—making for one “very nasty” pile, says Russin—vermicomposting is expected to save SIUC $93,000 over 10 years in garbage removal costs. But just as important are the tons of natural fertilizer the program will generate and the creative research it stimulates—explaining why Warner received an initial $150,000 grant from the Recycling Expansion and Modernization (REM) program of Illinois’ Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity when SIUC approved the plan two years ago. With $55,000 more from the university and $15,000 from Jackson County Health Department, she was well on her way. Warner has learned that worms have an important edge over traditional methods of composting: intestines. “A banana in a pile of leaves take a long time to decompose but if you eat the banana, it’s a much more efficient process,” she says. SIUC is still working out kinks in the vermicomposting procedure. There was, for example, the unforeseen problem of summer starvation. The worms mainly are fed what Warner calls a “tuna casserole” of cafeteria waste, which includes everything from spaghetti to milk cartons. “If it comes into the kitchen on a food tray and it’s biodegradable, it gets composted,” Warner says. But when students left SIUC for summer break, Warner discovered a hitch in the plans: the cafeterias shut down, and the worms were left without a constant flow of food waste. The solution was paper waste. The earthworms seemed to cope with the diet change, even if it meant a downgrade in food quality. “It’s like the difference between eating a sausage from the griddle and a rice cake,” she says. “Of course they like food waste better, but if they’re going to starve, they’ll eat paper.” Now, after a year of eating and excreting, the worms have produced enough for the harvesting to begin. The castings that have been accumulating in the worm beds since last fall will be collected and used to create what Warner calls “worm tea”—and what most people would call watery worm dung. Storing the vermicompost material in a container that’s seeped in water, much like tea in a tea bag, creates a nutrient-rich compost-water mix ready to be sprayed onto campus grounds. This phase of the process has yet to be tested on such a large scale, but Warner is hopeful about the results and about the potential for a recycling breakthrough. Let’s just hope she doesn’t decide to celebrate success with crumpets and worm tea. Group showers—or at least staged photographs of them—are par for the course during George Goes Green, an annual, campus-wide initiative at WC to raise awareness about sustainability and conservation. Though it began two years ago as a three-week-long exercise, the program has flourished, now running for a full semester and featuring a building efficiency competition, a sustainable ideas contest, a Green Pledge and a No Energy Day. Inspired by similar programs at other schools around the country, in particular Dickinson College, Middlebury College and Warren Wilson College, George Goes Green is just a part of the movement to make going green a good time. “Colleges have always been at the forefront of progress and what’s coming next. They have to set an example,” explains ’07 alum Shannon Holste, the student behind George Goes Green and a representative to the Sustainability Committee of WC’s Center for Environment and Society. To get George Goes Green off the ground, Holste created a coalition of dedicated students, faculty and staff. “You can’t turn the campus green on your own,” she says. The administration was quick to join the cause, especially since the college is located in the heart of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, a region continually threatened by chemical, air and landscape pollution. Nine teams of dorms and academic buildings competed to claim the biggest cutback in energy consumption over the course of the semester. In case bettering the world wasn’t enticing enough, the competition offered an extra incentive: the winner got a free breakfast served by Holste and other students during finals week—with biodegradable plates and cups, of course. Holste also encouraged her classmates to sign a Green Pledge, committing them to green practices like washing clothes on the cold cycle and avoiding any products involving Styrofoam. Four hundred green flags were planted on the college lawn to represent those who signed. April brought “No Energy Day”—a day of eco-festivities celebrated by classes held outside or in the dark, a special candlelit dinner and a bonfire party. To
Photo by Jim Graham

sexiest sustainability

pumped up to suds College up Washington
>> Last year, several students at Washington College in Chestertown, Md. piled into a shower together and snapped a picture. A little while later the photograph surfaced online—on the official Washington College website. But there was nothing inappropriate or objectionable about the shower scene. It was, after all, for a good cause: they were saving water.

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Christina e got Shannon Holst ion nt students’ atte that by telling them e owers ar group sh nserve. one way to co

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Andilee W illion more than 2 m s ees: worm employ comhard at work ty iversi posting un trash.

top it off, George Goes Green sponsored a student contest to brainstorm other kinds of sustainability on campus. The winning student’s idea, which earned a $250 cash prize, was two-fold: replace inefficient water fixtures in school bathrooms and create a campus wetland. While the wetland awaits funding, Holste believes the bathroom project will kick off soon. The photographs on georgegoesgreen. com tell a story of real impact—images of students studying by candlelight, professors turning off unused computers and a self-proclaimed Energy Conservation Patrol confiscating inefficient appliances and issuing citations to brazen energy users. The photo-documentation also kept the process light-hearted, which is a huge part of keeping students engaged. Sustainability “can come off sounding like it’s a big chore, but if you can make it enticing and show it’s easy to make a part of your life,” says Holste, “your movement will be that much more successful.”

friendliest fight

think big, playof calif. nice university
>> The California Student Sustainability Coalition, or CSSC, was born at a time of statewide energy turmoil. The blackouts and budget crises that led to the recall of Governor Gray Davis were at high boil. So, in the fall of 2002, student sustainability groups from University of California schools teamed up with the environmental group Greenpeace to turn the UC system— a community of more than 200,000 students—into a sustainable force of nature. The initial campaign, called UC Go Solar, brought together student activists, administrators and faculty to tackle the lack of formal environmental awareness among the UCs. The proposed system-wide sustain-

ability policy brought before the university Regents in December 2002 had big goals: calling for new and renovated buildings to meet LEED green building standards and to take 50 percent of power from renewable energy. The real innovation of Go Solar, however, wasn’t its green ideas but its golden touch. The 30 or so students who lobbied the Regents worked deliberately to cooperate with administrators rather than butt heads. It’s an approach that isn’t always embraced by college activists, who often confuse assertion with aggression, but one that helped make CSSC a success. The UC Regents agreed to a revised version of the Go Solar policy in July 2003. All new and renovated buildings would now be required to generate 25 percent of their power on campus and to meet the equivalent of LEED certification standards, and the entire system would take 10 percent of its overall power from renewable sources by 2014. “The policy was a dramatic shift,”
Photo by Joseph Midkiff

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says Mike Cox, co-chair of the CSSC’s advisory board. “There was no thought of green building or purchasing renewable energy prior to the policy. Now the UCs are one of the largest institutional purchasers of clean energy in the country,” and have put $8 billion of funding into green construction, he says. With the campaign completed and a giant first step made, Greenpeace left. But the student coalition persisted, and the CSSC—now spanning nine campuses and sponsored by the Earth Island Institute, an environmental-group incubator—continues to research and implement expansions of the policy they pushed through five years ago. The CSSC is a sterling example of how student activists can work together with administrators to institute change. Student activists are at their most effective when “they’re not just going off and shaking their fingers at people,” says Merrillie Herrigan, director of education for the Alliance to Save Energy. So what’s next on the agenda? Pushing for local and sustainable food purchases on campus, a project spearheaded by Tim Galerneau, a Food Systems employee at UC-Santa Cruz. And although this year the CSSC replaced its traditional grassroots structure with a more formal hierarchy, the group’s core values remain intact. Says Montgomery Norton, co-chair of the Irvine Student Sustainability chapter, “When we go to the administration, we thank them for what they’ve done, and ask them to take the next step.” Does saying please and thank you mean they’re catering to the man? Well, with the environment at stake, it’s worth minding your ps and qs. campus green living. What the Ecovillage is not, says Richard Olson, the director of Sustainability and Environmental Studies (SENS) at Berea, is a solution. It’s just the beginning. The Ecovillage was built more than two years ago at the college, located in Berea, Ky., to provide additional housing for the sizable “nontraditional” student population—mostly married couples and students with children. Conceived as the centerpiece of Berea’s campaign for campus-wide efficiency, the Ecovillage is made up of a complex of 50 townhouse-style apartments, a childcare and educational laboratory, a community center and a demonstration house. But the moniker “village” certainly understates the development’s complexity. It aims to achieve a 75 percent reduction in energy use (against the baseline of average regional household use) and a 75 percent reduction in per capita water use (against average Berea household use), plus the recycling, reusing or composting of at least 50 percent of all waste. That’s a tall order, but the Ecovillage certainly seems up to the challenge—it already features an impressively full array of green designs, including passive solar heating, wind-powered electrical generators, a ground-source heat pump and a natural wastewater treatment system. Indoors, residents find recycled-fabric carpets, energyefficient appliances and reclaimed wood— originally destined for landfills—making up siding and ceilings. Still, as Olson says, installing the right infrastructure and technology only makes two-thirds of the difference; the rest is up to individuals. Residents must apply to live in the village and sign a contract when they move in, pledging to recycle and to take on a few chores from a “menu” of green options, like carpooling and composting. “You depend on your neighbors,” says house director Phil Hawn. To meet performance goals and create a community of sustainability, he continues, “everyone is responsible.” Hawn is one of six house directors, all Berea undergrads and budding experts in specific environmental fields. Pooling their knowledge, the directors conduct ongoing educational programs like parent lunches to teach residents how to live sustainably. For his part, Hawn looks to create a responsible community for the future. In addition to his roles as house director and a fulltime student of Sustainable Community Development, Hawn, 41, is a husband and father of two. His daughters, ages two and seven, have plenty of eco-friendly places to romp around the village with other kids, like all-natural playgrounds outfitted with slides built into hillsides. Plus, all children living in the Ecovillage help recycle and compost, making it a perfect place to raise another generation of eco-conscious families. The green playground is certainly unique, but Berea’s campus-wide effort to reduce energy use 45 percent by 2015 is not. In 2002 Cornell University’s Energy Conservation Initiative declared its plan to reduce campus energy use to 20 percent below 2000 levels by 2012, and in 2000 the University at Buffalo pledged a onefifth reduction within a decade. Plenty more schools have pledged big carbon emissions cuts for the next twenty years. Still, even “the forefront is not far enough,” says SENS director Olson. No campus in the U.S. can justifiably claim that it is sustainable, at least not yet, according to Olson. He warns that, unless the nation takes major steps now, simply being more conscientious about turning off lights or saving water will no longer cut it. In just a few decades, Americans may need to abandon the ideal of owning a house in the suburbs with two cars and seriously begin to relocalize economies, food sources and energy systems. “If we just change the lightbulbs and buy a Prius, we’re dead,” Olson says. But we have to start somewhere, and not everyone can live in an entirely self-sustaining Ecovillage. So where to begin? “Go grow your own tomato,” says residential director and senior Kate Maginel. “That’s a start.” ■ Jody Pollock is a sophomore Spanish and urban studies major at the University of Pennsylvania. She will never underestimate the power of earthworms again. Veronique Greenwood, a senior biology major at Yale, is sad that moving off-campus means no more YSFP burgers for her.
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it takes a village
Berea College
>>Berea College’s Ecovillage is a state-of-the-art exercise in sustainable design. It is a beacon of eco-friendly architecture. It is a family-friendly example of on-

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16 schools That Care
Luckily for the planet, there aren’t enough pages in this magazine to do justice to the vital sustainabilty efforts taking place on college campuses around the country. We surveyed 75 top schools to see what they are doing right—and where they’re falling short. With the help of Mindy Pennybacker, former editor of The Green Guide and creator of GreenerPenny.com, we tallied up those with the best scores across the board, looking at basics like energy-saving buildings and pesticide-free grasses along with even greater—and more unusual—endeavors, from wind turbines to fish sanctuaries. Here is our green honor roll:

Carnegie Mellon
Green spaces built on roofs at Carnegie

Mellon stabilize temperatures in the rooms directly underneath. Alternative transportation methods on campus include public bus passes, shuttle buses, carpool parking incentives and electric vehicles for facility workers. Carnegie Mellon plans to up its green building even further and makes sure students stay involved as part of a task force to stamp out the campus’ carbon footprint.

Transportation

water monitoring

Arizona State U.
Arizona State University’s dining halls have a growing appetite for sustainability. Besides eliminating Styrofoam use and starting a composting system, dining services are supporting a new, entirely organic buffet to be supplied largely by local farmers; eventually, the university hopes to grow some of its own organic food. The Office of Sustainability would like to see more student involvement in its projects, though.

Bowdoin
Bowdoin College’s small student body—

Colby College
Driven by a dedication to reducing water

only 2,500 students—packs a big punch when it comes to being green. This year, students organized a rally on campus as part of Step It Up, a national grassroots campaign asking Congress to help America cut carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050. More than 400 people showed up to sign petitions and march in support of the goal. Students were also the driving force behind the college purchasing Renewable Energy Credits, which kicked off in the spring of 2006.

consumption and waste excess, Colby’s environmental studies department developed a program called RESCUE (Recycle Everything Save Colby’s Usable Excess). And so far it’s working: dining services compost all food waste, and each week Colby recycles an average of 42 pounds of waste per person. Every building and dorm is equipped with low-flow shower heads and low-flush toilets, and recycling is readily accessible for everything from paper products to electronics.

food

student involvement

Brown
Wrought-iron recycling stations have a strong visual presence on Brown’s campus, and 35 percent of all waste on campus is recycled—not a bad number, but a little low for a stereotypically tree-hugging school. Dining halls serve 30 percent locally and regionally grown food, and students started a campus garden. Brown is now shifting to a cleaner natural gas supply and looking into bio-based fuel sources for the future.

water conservation student initiative pesticides

transportation

Tufts
Tufts University takes 70 percent of its

U. of Virginia
Not content to recycle merely plastic

energy from wind power. Even more thrilling, a green campaign asks students to “Do it in the Dark”—and the dorm that saves the most energy in a month earns a free party complete with pizza and entertainment. What better way to conserve electricity than giving out glow-in-the dark condoms?

and aluminum, the university’s recycling department collaborated with UVA students to organize “Chuck it for Charity,” a program that collects furniture and other household items from students moving out of apartments and donates the goods to the underprivileged.

food

living up to image wind power buildings

generous reusing

alternative energy

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LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, and refers to widely-used national building standards developed by the U.S. Green Building Council, a non-profit organization.

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Cornell
Cornell’s Department of Sustainability

Reed College
One of Reed’s campus landmarks, the Canyon, covers 26 acres and splits the campus in half, serving as a sanctuary for fish and a research gold mine for students. Realizing that fish—specifically endangered salmon— were struggling to swim upstream, Reed constructed a fish ladder in 2000 that permits easier passage from the rapidly moving water to calmer breeding areas on the other side of the plot. Preserving and improving a natural environment inside its campus, Reed has pushed sustainability to another level.

Vanderbilt
Vanderbilt students enrolled in Wil-

is helping to create a consortium of local schools and businesses to buy biodiesel fuel. Meanwhile, on the other side of campus, students representing the university’s seven colleges build a sustainable house for the national Solar Decathlon competition each year—earning second prize for The Big Red in 2006. A green roof adorns the first LEED*-certified dormitory in New York, and another is in progress atop an underconstruction parking garage.

Skills, a class dedicated to exploring nature (complete with camping trips!), and members of the student group SPEAR (Students Promoting Environmental Awareness and Recycling) are using vegetable oil from campus dining halls to create biodiesel.

transportation

buildings

WashU
To lead the community of St. Louis into
buildings transportation fish Preservation Buildings

Emory
Emory has more square footage of

U. of Florida
Besides its athletic fields, all UF’s green

LEED-certified buildings than any other campus in the country. And its green energy isn’t just spent indoors; the university has designated three “food gardens” throughout campus to stress the importance of eating locally. (The gardens are largely educational in design and will produce little actual food.) A new policy requires future construction to meet at least silver LEED-certification.

spaces, including the first Audubon-certified sanctuary at any university, are maintained with reclaimed water, and natural predators are used to keep pest ecology balanced. UF has also been making large strides in green architecture, with more than 50 new and renovated buildings either LEED-certified or submitted for certification.

a more sustainable future, Washington University is willing to try anything and everything. So far, it’s installed solar panels on top of the main campus library, made plans to construct exclusively LEED-certified buildings in the future and invested $55 million in a renewable energy initiative.

renewable energy

recycling

Syracuse
With 247 buildings and 8.57 million

buildings buildings alternative energy

athletic fields

Kenyon College
Neighboring communities are key for Kenyon, where the use of locally grown food has spiked 150 percent in the past two years. The complete inventory of campus food cultivated within 75 miles of campus is extensive and varied: it includes all beef products, hormone-free chickens, Amish eggs, dairy products, apples and other seasonal produce and even local jams.

U. of Washington
The Seattle campus is completely pow-

ered by renewable energy—a fact that’s pretty impressive on its own, but astounding when you consider that the university supports an undergrad population of 36,000. Dormitories have replaced all their lights with long-lasting halogen bulbs, campus cafeterias serve locally harvested foods and bicycle trails offer students the option of traveling carbon-free.

square feet of space, staying green can be tricky (especially for a school that bleeds orange). Proving that sometimes commonsense ideas are just as good as out-of-thebox ones, eco-designers focus mainly on simple concepts—like insulation and day lighting—that create maximum efficiency with minimal output. New buildings, including an upcoming engineering research lab, a residence hall and a new basketball practice facility, are all planned to satisfy LEED requirements of various levels. Things would be near-perfect, if they could just figure out how to get citrus to upstate NY more sustainably during the winter.

food

athletic fields

transportation

fish preservation

buildings

citrus acquisition

.

Reporting credit: Lyndsie Bourgon, Hillary Brody, Sabina Ellahi, Candice Jones, Sarah Kliff, Danielle McNally and Chip Sheridan

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ANSWERING

THE CALL
Finding the faith on secular campuses Students struggle to earn their G.O.D.

by Taylor Barnes and Daniel Stone
Brown University and University of California at Davis
When Justin Cannon moved into the

dorms at Earlham College in Richmond, Ind., his new friends started calling him Jesus. It wasn’t just because of his resemblance to iconic images of the Messiah. “I had a full beard and told them I wanted to be a priest,” says Cannon. And at Earlham, a liberal arts college—even one rooted in the Quaker faith—his life plans stood out from those of his teasing dormmates. It’s not that theism is absent on college campuses—a startling 80 percent of college students believe in God, according to a 2004 survey by UCLA’s Higher Education Research Institute. Having religion is one thing. Devoting your life to it is, well, quite the leap of faith. Along with a growing number of undergraduates at secular universities across the nation, Cannon is picking out the vaguely marked path to becoming a religious leader in a culture that prizes monstrous earnings and instant reward. Many universities, like Syracuse and George Washington, were originally founded to prepare students for ministerial service in a time when priesthood, not banking or medicine, guaranteed professional prestige. Since then, most schools have academically

diversified, offering students a nearly limitspiritual rewards to come. less array of fields to study. Pursuing an age-old profession in the But even as schools drift from their 21st century is in some ways just as comtheological roots, religion maintains its plicated as ever, but given a growing list of strong, if quiet, pull and now attracts more lucrative opportunities, it requires more students than ever. The Association a sense of purpose—and guts—like never of Theological Schools reports 74,600 before. DEUS EX MACHINA students studying Protestantism and RoActs of self-denial may seem a tad out man Catholicism in 2006—a 7.3 percent of place in college, more widely understood increase from four years prior. Hebrew to be a prime opportunity for personal Union College has seen a 9 percent inindulgences and social excesses. What can crease in rabbinical and cantorial ordimake the desire to forgo worldly temptanations since 2005. Even Islam, which tion strong enough? Many students credit requires no formal training or ordainment a calling, usually a specific experience that process of its religious leaders, has seen provokes interest in a spiritual life followed new highs in the number of young people by small signs guiding them down what becoming Islamic scholars in the past five can seem like a lonely road. years, says Daisy Kahn of the College years That’s exactly how it hapAmerican Society for Muslim aren’t usually pened to Aaron Graham, an Advancement. a time for great acts of ’02 University of Richmond What distinguishes these self-denial. graduate, after a week-long pious few from many of their What can make missionary trip to Belize durpeers are the sacrifices they the desire to ing high school. “I thought, must make. Their paths reforgo wordly temptation ‘why only do this for a week?’” quire years more study and strong enough he says. “Why not do it for promise far less earning poten- for aspiring life?” But when he arrived at tial than other graduate-track spiritual leaders? college, he felt isolated, certain occupations like business and that he was set utterly apart law. That can make following by his call to the ministry. He turned out God’s will a tough choice to explain—to to be wrong. In the first weeks of school, friends, to family members and even to Graham met five dormmates with similar oneself. Many who pursue the ministry aspirations. “I started not to feel alone,” he point to an otherworldly calling as the says. “These guys were really committed. reason behind their choice, justifying what Their calling was genuine.” they give up now with the expectation of
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Spirituality 101: Justin Cannon’s clerical aspirations surprised some of his dormmates.

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Plenty of steps still lay between Graham and his commitment to doing the Lord’s bidding—an endeavor that’s far from simple. He says he felt a disconnect between the church’s work and broader problems and “wanted to help it become a greater force for social change.” After college, he entered an evangelical seminary program in Boston, and then decided to enroll in Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government for a master’s in public policy. “I figured both pastorship and policy training would allow me to integrate my interest in the ministry with social concerns and poverty,” he says. His ministry work also introduced him to a woman equally summoned to religion and social service. As husband and wife, they founded the Quincy Street Missional Church to address poverty in a low-income Boston neighborhood. Not everyone receives as clear a call as Graham. David Sideman says, quite simply, that he has yet to hear the voice of God. So when he graduated from Boston University in 2006, he did what any confused and ambitious liberal arts major would: he entered law school. But during his first year in Rutgers University’s law program, he found himself disinterested and lost. And then it hit him: “I discovered that the passions and the things that I cared about pointed me toward becoming a rabbi.” He plans to begin a six-year rabbinical ordination program this fall at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York City. On this unforeseen path, he’s finally satisfied—but at $28,000 each

Road Less Traveled: Ryan Patrico celebrated Pentecost this year in Salzburg, Germany with two Dominican nuns.

year, satisfaction won’t come cheap.
THE COLLECTION PLATE

Money is a huge issue for any gradschool bound student. But those en route to the clergy encounter particularly acute fiscal hardships, like sparse financial aid opportunities and few specialized scholarships. On top of that, the path to ordination is long. Training to become a Catholic priest can last from five to six years and cost nearly $30,000 annually. Christian pastoral ordination costs around $14,000 a year, says the Dallas Theological Seminary, though the exact price tag varies with each church’s program and the certification sought.

On the other end, salaries aren’t exactly enviable, since priests and preachers aren’t meant to live extravagantly, and are generally supported by their congregations. A lifelong contract with the Lord, it seems, doesn’t quite account for hefty loan payments. The struggle of getting on God’s payroll isn’t limited to tuition and future interest payments, which is why some aspiring religious leaders have already made slightly more earthly back-up plans. Randy Schultz, a junior at the Georgia Institute of Technology, plans to become a missionary—but he knows his divine calling won’t pay the bills. Right now he’s a management major, reluctantly earning his undergraduate de-

How They Got Religion
How a few religious icons took their very first steps toward God.
Pope Benedict XVI

After a visit from the Archbishop of Munich, the young Joseph Ratzinger found himself in awe of church leaders’ ceremonial robes. At age 15, he announced his desire to become a bishop to his family. A foresighted cousin added, “And why not Pope?”
Reverend Billy Graham

missionaries, Graham first heard his calling through Mordecai Ham, an evangelist activist. In 1938, he committed to the Christian church on a Florida golf course—not quite your typical holy ground— and was ordained a year later.
The Dalai Lama

efforts for an autonomous Tibet, won a Nobel Peace Prize and serves as a distinguished professor at Emory University.
Mother Teresa

religion, studying the Torah during breaks from his job as a woodcutter—a far cry from his only brother, who was a well-paid merchant, according to historians.
Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

Raised by two Presbyterian

Two-year-old Tenzin Gyatso had little choice when proclaimed the 14th Dalai Lama in 1937. But he has never been limited by the spiritual life: he leads political

The youngest of three, Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu was pushed by her siblings to join her local parish’s youth group. A Jesuit priest sparked her interest in missionaries and amplified her calling to become a Catholic nun. She took her first vows as a 17-year-old.
Rabbi Hillel

Religious texts say a teenage Hillel had an innate interest in

His Southern Baptist parents fostered a love of faith and community service, but King came to a crucial turning point when he entered Morehouse College at the age of only 15. He was inspired to emulate the religious leadership of the school’s then-president, Benjamin Mays.
Photo by Christel Sonnenkalb

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gree while waiting to start his career. “Most small start-up churches can’t support a pastor, so I’ll need a full-time job,” he says. He currently works for a small tutoring company, hoping to earn enough money to support himself and his fiancée after their wedding in December. “It’s not really about what I’m interested in,” he says, “but the work I can do with the money I earn.” After graduation he and his wife plan to move to Bozeman, Mont. It may seem like a long way to go, but Schultz anticipates good opportunities there both for missionary work—he says the area is “heavily underchurched”—and a business career, since Bozeman is also home to a number of tech startups. But he’s not putting down roots just yet. “I’ll go anyplace else God wants me to go,” says Schultz. Even with hefty expenses, it’s still possible to make a livable wage, which is good news for Shoshana and Elisa Abrams. They graduated from the University of California in Santa Barbara in June with a clear—and identical—call to serve, and plan to become cantors, the musical leaders of prayers in Judaism. At the cantorial program they’ll begin later this year—also at the Jewish Theological Seminary, but with a focus on cantorial music and Hebrew studies—their combined annual tuition will amount to nearly $60,000. Any financial aid will be limited to paltry federal grant money and small independent scholarships. As a result, the twins’ parents will end up juggling their daughters’ interest-accruing undergraduate loans with new ones on the way. The Abrams take comfort knowing their starting salary could be well over $80,000 a year, the figure given by a survey conducted by Hebrew Union College. Professions within Judaism typically offer competitive salaries to attract the best clerics, according to the survey results. “The amount of money is really nice to think about,” says Elisa, “but that’s not why we’re doing it.”
MIND OVER MATTER

choosing a religious path, but he’s getting man divided. He is committed to the idea there. He says that his theology and sociolof Catholic priesthood but also feels pulled ogy studies at Boston College enhanced in an entirely irreconcilable direction: a his faith. But since first feeling the pull to relationship with his long-term girlfriend, a serve God in high school, he has wrestled romance that can have no future, of course, with the decision. His parents, devout in the life of a priest. For now, he’s trying to Asian-American Christians, fostered his keep an open mind and to put his eventual spirituality, but now they are skeptical of plans in God’s hands. “Choosing marriage him making a career of his devotion. “It’s a doesn’t mean priesthood is wrong,” he says. touchy issue,” says Park. “Deep down, they “I’ll just go where I’m called.” probably hoped that I would pursue somePatrico finds that being outside the colthing more lucrative.” lege mainstream—“an environment that Park makes an effort to control his daily says sex shouldn’t be reserved for marriage,” behavior, even if that restraint sets him he says—is difficult. Still, he’s not a saint just yet and admits to the odd college foible, apart from most people his age. “Getting drunk is unhealthy and I’ve never really like occasionally indulging in a drink. For Earlham’s Justin Cannon, skepticism had the opportunity to have sex,” he says, among classmates pales in comparison with conceding that maintaining his discipline might become more difficult as he gets a much bigger obstacle, one that extends far beyond campus boundaries: he is openly older. “But ultimately,” he says, “I just want to please God with my choices.” gay. He is a member of the first wave of Park, a junior, now feels more at ease openly gay aspirants pursuing ordainment with his future than he did just one seby the Episcopal Church, which elected its mester ago; his convictions are stronger first homosexual bishop just four years ago. than ever, he says. Park even began to feel Sexuality is still a divisive issue in the strongly this summer that he is meant for church. When Cannon sought approval to something really big in God’s plan. What become a priest, his home church in Lexexactly does he (or the big “He”) have in ington, Mich. voted not to recommend him mind? “Do you know Billy Graham?” he for the priesthood, a decision he thinks was asks. “I think I’m headed in that sort of ditainted by concerns that he would use the rection.” If he weren’t called to the Christian pulpit to practice gay activism rather than ministry, Park says he would be spirituality. The church would The salaries at a loss for what else he would not discuss why Cannon was aren’t exactly enviable, since do. “Maybe a career in music denied. priests and or writing?” he muses. “That’s He has since taken sanctupreachers ary in California, where he aren’t meant to never crossed my mind.” live extravaFickle liberal arts majors, found a bishop supportive of gantly. Enterprone to major-hopping, may ordaining gays and enrolled ing a contract in Berkeley’s Church Divinity with the Lord, it envy such certitude. What preSchool of the Pacific. On the seems, doesn’t med gone artist gone pre-med again wouldn’t appreciate a litWest Coast, he is transforming quite account for hefty loan tle guidance from above? Those his sexuality into an important payments. like Park know they don’t look personal and spiritual asset. forward to a lifetime of material riches or He started TruthSetsFree.net, a website luxury. But believing you have a place in a to offer support to gay Christians, and has higher plan, pulling your feet forward past received donations from users that help pay the commencement walk—that must feel for his steep seminary costs. divine. ■ —with Isia Jasiewicz
FINDING (AND KEEPING) FAITH

Some of the hugest challenges for students entering ministry have little to do with finances and everything to do with day-to-day issues of, well, the flesh. Ryan Patrico, a senior at Brown University, is a

Many more students are on the fence, praying their four years in college will give them the conviction to follow a calling—or to be sure it’s a calling in the first place. Moses Park isn’t completely comfortable with

Taylor Barnes is a junior Latin American studies major at Brown; she hears a divine calling to journalism. Daniel Stone, a recent grad of UC-Davis, is glad he’s no longer an aimless liberal arts student.
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THEREFORE I AM
Alter egos emerge as liberal arts grads go corporate Overworked, overpaid and oversexed in the city by Dan Haley
Columbia University
Nick had all the makings of your classic idealistic humanities major: a degree in history and dreams of becoming a musician. As an undergrad at Columbia University he hung out in the dorm listening to Bob Marley and drank cheap beer like everyone else—not exactly a power player. Flash forward three years. Nick has ditched the musical aspirations, added a fake internship to his resume and quit being politically correct. He has become an investment banker. Why? “I went into banking for the money. That’s the only reason anyone becomes a banker,” he says. “They talk about the ‘challenge’ of the job and how ‘interesting’ it is. It’s really just about the money.” And what’s he got to offer the field? Well, for one thing, he says, his Y-chromosome: “You want a hotshot male as the face of a firm, not some woman.” Spoken like the stereotypical i-banker. But don’t even think about calling him that—insiders take the investment banker title too seriously to reduce it to a cutesy abbreviation. “No one in the investment banking industry calls it i–banking,” says Joe, another Columbia grad turned banker. “I mean, it’s not a f***ing Apple accessory.” Nick and Joe, who both asked to go by pseudonyms to protect their jobs, are part of a growing breed of 20-somethings jumping straight from senior seminars into a nonstop whirlwind of dollar signs and mega-deals—and getting paid six figures a year to do it. With the exorbitant

I-BANK,

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salaries come long hours and high-pressure demands, as well as a lifestyle that can turn even bookish history majors into big-spending VIPs. “You order $800 bottles of liquor for your table and you feel pretty slick,” says Nick, who now bears little resemblance to the tolerant, laid-back guitarist he once was. “People ask you what you do and you say you’re an investment banker.” Every year the banking industry lures in hundreds just like Nick: liberal arts majors willing to compromise their passions for a shot at a different type of dream. At Columbia University’s Columbia College, an arts and sciences school that doesn’t even offer a business major (its strict core curriculum revolves around the study of the Western classics), post-grad jobs in finance are among the most popular. Of the class of 2006, 29 percent said they were accepting positions in finance right after graduation, according to a survey conducted by Columbia’s Center for Career Education. Of course, Columbia isn’t the only elite college sending its students to the Street. Twenty-nine percent of ’06 Cornell University grads with jobs lined up by graduation entered finance, and that’s not counting the students pursuing consulting or other business fields, which brings the figure up to 47 percent. The proportion is the same at Princeton University. And at the University of Pennsylvania, about a third of ’06 School of Arts and Sciences grads entering the workforce went into finance. The massive popularity can be attributed partly to banks’ vigorous recruitment tactics, which often include ritzy receptions with free drinks. And the allure continues to build upon itself. As prominent students head off to top banks, others follow. “I looked around and I felt like the best people, the brightest minds, the most ambitious people at Columbia were going into banking,” says Joe. “I’m a really competitive person, and that was a huge motivation.” But at the bottom of it all, many say, is the bottom line—the money that can be made and the relatively few years it takes to make it. Bankers speak of “exit opportunities,” the options they have after the initial two-year contract expires. With the money and skills accumulated over those arduous

Coufos of Columbia’s Center for Career years, possibilities can seem limitless. Education. “The appeal of this field is that after two Without that key credential, Nick figured years, I can do pretty much whatever I he was sunk. But he wasn’t about to let a want,” says Joe. “I can move to France and little thing like the truth stand between become a painter, or join a private equity him and the high life. “I had a friend who firm, or go surfing in Australia. It’s not just had an asset management company, and he the money. Well, it is the money. But it’s made it look like I had interned with him,” also the freedom the money affords.” he says. “It had to look like I had an interest But success in the first two years requires in the field, which I didn’t.” a round-the-clock, work-hard, “You need that With a falsified resume and party-harder lifestyle. Last ‘I’m a banker’ the know-how gleaned from the summer, when Joe interned feeling. If you Vault Guide to Top Internships, with the bank he now works don’t have it, Nick aced his interviews. By for, nights ending before 1 none of the November an elite bank offered a.m. were one of his greatsuffering will him an analyst job with a salary est luxuries. He’d hop in the be worth it. of $55,000, an annual bonus waiting town car—a standard The image is that would at least double corporate perk if you work what that—and a $12,500 signing late—and hit the town. fuels you.” bonus. The lesson learned? Ly“There were people who ing pays. And it pays big. didn’t drink at all and came out just to keep The rest of senior year was a breeze: “I up appearances,” he says. “And then there was just sitting around feeling great,” he rewere people who would be downing tons of calls. “I was going to be a f***ing banker.” Macallan and Glenlivet and sneaking off to After graduation, Nick joined the ranks the bathroom for a bump—or 12.” of those who boast a 100-hour workweek— How do liberal arts majors go from ranks that also include David, another strumming the guitar in a dorm hallway to pseudonymous Columbia alum. When dropping G’s on liquor and snorting coke in David interned with a top i-bank in Hong swanky bar bathrooms? For Nick, the idea Kong last summer, he came into his ofof making immediate money, and lots of it, fice one morning at 9 a.m. not knowing he without any extra education pulled him in. faced a 30-hour workday. “My boss says you (Medicine and law require years of schoolshould be able to operate on four hours of ing before offering the same kind of payout, sleep,” says David, nodding earnestly. “For and by the time a young lawyer or doctor is around three weeks, I only got three hours actually making $150,000, his banker peer of sleep during normal business days.” is already earning three or four times as That schedule is par for the course in much.) It’s a small investment with a poteninvestment banking. But guys like Nick get tially giant payoff. Though no econ major, through the pain by romanticizing it. “You Nick knew a good bet when he saw one. need that ‘I’m a banker’ feeling,” says Nick. The only real problem was getting the “If you don’t have it, none of the suffering job. Nick had a 3.6 GPA and strong quantiwill be worth it—you won’t push through. tative skills, but he was still a history major The image is what fuels you.” with no previous finance experience. And And though the schedule is tough to in this playing field, his Ivy League backmaintain, in many ways banking is actually ground wouldn’t give him much of an edge. an easy way out, Nick says. It’s an industry The majority of new hires in banking come full of “people who want to make money from elite “target” schools like Columbia, but won’t take risks,” he explains. As long Penn, Harvard, Yale and New York Univeras you’re “hard-working and reasonably sity, according to sources in the industry. smart,” he says, “you’ll be a millionaire.” ■ Nick knew his lack of a previous internship could be the deal-breaker. “Employers Dan Haley is a senior majoring in English favor students with internship experience at Columbia University. He’s disappointed as they have demonstrated an early foray that writers don’t get signing bonuses. into the professional world,” says Eleanor
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SMART COOKIES
New grads spice up their schooling But do they have the iron it takes to become a chef? by Rebecca Kaden
Harvard University
Harrison Keevil was supposed to be an investment banker. He studied foreign affairs at the University of Virginia, and after graduation set off for London to intern for Parliament. A year later he returned to New York City for the banking job he had lined up senior year, only to realize that his heart was somewhere else. The story could end there, with a disgruntled banker living out his years wondering what could have been. But Keevil is one of the lucky few who could decide on a dream that’s slightly off the beaten track and actually try to follow it. “I had one of those ‘what are you going to do with your life’ conversations with my parents,” he says, “and I decided to do cooking.” A few decades ago, Keevil’s career change might have seemed like a tumble down the professional ladder. But the enormous popularity of shows like Top Chef and Hell’s Kitchen, the household celebrity Emeril and a summer spat of food films have all but stamped chefing as the new “it” profession alongside standbys like acting and pro sports. Reality, of course, is never as glamorous as prime-time television. Topnotch culinary jobs are hard to come by, and

once secured, they rarely offer fame or as a profession.” She adds that she wouldn’t fortune. According to the U.S. Bureau of be surprised by the advent of culinary Labor, head chefs in full-service restaumaster’s degrees in the near future. rants made an average salary of $13.57 per Keevil is pleased with his decision to hour in 2006, nearly $6 per hour less than sidestep the Street to enroll in a yearlong the overall average for amusement and program at New York’s French Culinary recreation industries. But while the wages Institute, where he is working toward a might suggest otherwise, chefing is hardly degree in Classic Culinary Arts. He quickly a fallback for high school dropouts. In fact, found a passion in the kitchen that he was many would-be chefs are college grads— never quite able to muster in the classstudents like Keevil, who trade in suits and room. “At UVA, I did the work and did ties for the tall, white chef ’s hat. okay, but didn’t find it interesting,” Keevil “The role of the chef is changing,” says says on the walk between the two resChristopher Koetke, dean of the School of taurant jobs he now holds in Manhattan. Culinary Arts at Kendall Col“Now I’m enjoying absolutely Many grads are lege in Chicago. “It used to be trading in suits every minute of learning about that you just sort of cooked, cooking.” and ties for the tall, white but now you have to cook and But Keevil is happy he didn’t chef’s hat. But understand the business.” An spend his undergrad years betopnotch undergraduate degree is no hind a stove. He credits UVA culinary jobs substitute for smooth knife economics and business classes are hard to land and rarely with giving him insight into work and a sophisticated offer fame or understanding of spices, of “all the behind-the-scenes stuff fortune. course, but highly educated that doesn’t involve the actual cooks are finding their coursework to be an food.” That knowledge could help him asset in the kitchen. achieve his next big goal: opening his own Drusilla Blackman, vice president of restaurant within five years. “I’ve talked to Enrollment Management at the Culinary people who say it’s ballsy,” Keevil says, “but Institute of America (CIA), says about 20 it’s something I want to do.” percent of students enrolling in each class Keevil says he has no regrets about passhave B.A.s. “Whereas being a chef used to ing up on the more plentiful (and immedibe seen as a trade,” she says, “it’s now seen ate) earnings of banking. “I cook because it
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is what I love to do,” he says. “I get to follow the college degree pushes you further.” my passions and live a dream every time Stanton’s studies have helped him take that I step into a kitchen. Not many bankhis cooking to the next level. As the execuers can say that [about their jobs].” tive chef of New York’s brand-new SanctuKevin Stanton originally chose the more ary Tea Restaurant, a scientific knowledge straightforward route into chefing. After of happenings inside the oven enhances his graduating from high school, he spent dishes. “I consider the cooking side first,” a year working for celebrity chef David he says, “then I think about the scientific Bouley in New York City, then side of it”—like taking into ac“Back in the skipped out on a typical college count the effects of temperaday being a experience to enroll in École Su- chef wasn’t ture control and oxidation on as glorified. périeure de Cuisine Française, a taste. Scientific know-how is Your parents culinary school in Paris. a must, he adds, when cookwouldn’t be as But he has since learned the proud as if you ing with tea. were a laywer drawbacks of forgoing a bachJoint degree programs are or doctor. The elor’s degree. “There are things popping up that will make title of chef you need to know about law and denotes much Stanton’s combination of regulation that you don’t learn in more honor training easier to find. In May culinary school,” he says, such as now.” of 2006, Cornell’s School of how to deal with recent trans fat Hotel Administration teamed legislation in New York and Chicago. “With up with the CIA (no, not that one), allowan undergrad education, you know where ing students in their junior or senior year to and how to find information.” earn both degrees at once: a B.S. in Hotel So Stanton returned to the classroom as Administration and an associate’s degree a student at Cornell’s College of Agriculture from the culinary school. The program and Life Sciences, and last spring, at the puts students in first-rate kitchens for eight age of 27, he received his bachelor’s degree months, teaching real-world technical and in Food Science. “I knew how to cook, but culinary skills like front-of-the-house serI needed the undergraduate education to vice and advanced wine selection. break through the wall,” he says. “Where the The leg up costs about $15,000, but it limits of just a culinary education stop you, lends grads a “depth and breadth to their

Fork it Over: Cornell grad Kevin Stanton runs the kitchen at Sanctuary Tea Room in New York City.

Get Cookin’ Good Lookin’
Salmon Cooked in Red Moon Tea with Wax Beans, Cucumber Relish and Kafir Lime Sauce

Sanctuary Tea Restaurant chef Kevin Stanton shares one of his signature recipes. Ingredients Two 4 oz. Portions of Salmon 3 oz. Blanched Wax Beans 3 oz. Diced Cucumber 1 oz. Red Moon Tea Salt to Taste 2 oz. Kafir Lime Sauce (see the second recipe) Approximate cooking time: 1 hour

1. Cut cucumber lengthwise; scoop out seeds and discard. Dice remaining “flesh.” Add 2 tablespoons of salt to diced cucumber to remove the water and let sit for 1 hour (drain the resulting liquid). 2. Salt water and bring to a boil. Add wax beans and cook until soft (approx. 4 minutes). You can use a standard dorm-room “hot pot” for this step. 3. Sprinkle salmon with Red Moon tea (a specialty black tea with dried strawberry and pink peppercorn) across the surface of fish; place in a shallow bowl.

4. Salt 1 gallon of water until it tastes like seawater. Heat water to a boil, then begin to cool. Measure the temperature of the water until it reaches 145ºF. 5. When the water has reached 145ºF, pour it over the pan containing salmon and tea, adding just enough water to cover the fish. Allow the fish to cook in the tempered water for approximately 10 minutes. 6. For the sauce, follow supplemental recipe (see next). If you prefer something simpler, take a bit of Crème Fraiche and add an even smaller amount of Tom Yum Chili Paste (can be found in the

Thai food section of your grocery store). Whisk this mixture until it is completely homogenous.

Kafir Lime Sauce: Take 2 ounces of shallots and dice finely. Heat a tablespoon of butter in a saucepan, then add the shallots and cook until translucent. Add a large stalk of lemon grass and saute for 30 seconds. Add 6 Kafir lime leaves followed by one teaspoon of chili paste. Add 1/2 cup of crushed tomatoes to the saucepan and allow the mixture to simmer for 3 minutes. Add 1 cup of heavy cream and bring to a gentle simmer. Reduce the amount of liquid by half. Strain the sauce.

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is what I love to do,” he says. “I get to follow the college degree pushes you further.” my passions and live a dream every time Stanton’s studies have helped him take that I step into a kitchen. Not many bankhis cooking to the next level. As the execuers can say that [about their jobs].” tive chef of New York’s brand-new SanctuKevin Stanton originally chose the more ary Tea Restaurant, a scientific knowledge straightforward route into chefing. After of happenings inside the oven enhances his graduating from high school, he spent dishes. “I consider the cooking side first,” a year working for celebrity chef David he says, “then I think about the scientific Bouley in New York City, then side of it”—like taking into ac“Back in the skipped out on a typical college count the effects of temperaday being a experience to enroll in École Su- chef wasn’t ture control and oxidation on as glorified. périeure de Cuisine Française, a taste. Scientific know-how is Your parents culinary school in Paris. a must, he adds, when cookwouldn’t be as But he has since learned the proud as if you ing with tea. were a laywer drawbacks of forgoing a bachJoint degree programs are or doctor. The elor’s degree. “There are things popping up that will make title of chef you need to know about law and denotes much Stanton’s combination of regulation that you don’t learn in more honor training easier to find. In May culinary school,” he says, such as now.” of 2006, Cornell’s School of how to deal with recent trans fat Hotel Administration teamed legislation in New York and Chicago. “With up with the CIA (no, not that one), allowan undergrad education, you know where ing students in their junior or senior year to and how to find information.” earn both degrees at once: a B.S. in Hotel So Stanton returned to the classroom as Administration and an associate’s degree a student at Cornell’s College of Agriculture from the culinary school. The program and Life Sciences, and last spring, at the puts students in first-rate kitchens for eight age of 27, he received his bachelor’s degree months, teaching real-world technical and in Food Science. “I knew how to cook, but culinary skills like front-of-the-house serI needed the undergraduate education to vice and advanced wine selection. break through the wall,” he says. “Where the The leg up costs about $15,000, but it limits of just a culinary education stop you, lends grads a “depth and breadth to their

Fork it Over: Cornell grad Kevin Stanton runs the kitchen at Sanctuary Tea Room in New York City.

Get Cookin’ Good Lookin’
Salmon Cooked in Red Moon Tea with Wax Beans, Cucumber Relish and Kafir Lime Sauce

Sanctuary Tea Restaurant chef Kevin Stanton shares one of his signature recipes. Ingredients Two 4 oz. Portions of Salmon 3 oz. Blanched Wax Beans 3 oz. Diced Cucumber 1 oz. Red Moon Tea Salt to Taste 2 oz. Kafir Lime Sauce (see the second recipe) Approximate cooking time: 1 hour

1. Cut cucumber lengthwise; scoop out seeds and discard. Dice remaining “flesh.” Add 2 tablespoons of salt to diced cucumber to remove the water and let sit for 1 hour (drain the resulting liquid). 2. Salt water and bring to a boil. Add wax beans and cook until soft (approx. 4 minutes). You can use a standard dorm-room “hot pot” for this step. 3. Sprinkle salmon with Red Moon tea (a specialty black tea with dried strawberry and pink peppercorn) across the surface of fish; place in a shallow bowl.

4. Salt 1 gallon of water until it tastes like seawater. Heat water to a boil, then begin to cool. Measure the temperature of the water until it reaches 145ºF. 5. When the water has reached 145ºF, pour it over the pan containing salmon and tea, adding just enough water to cover the fish. Allow the fish to cook in the tempered water for approximately 10 minutes. 6. For the sauce, follow supplemental recipe (see next). If you prefer something simpler, take a bit of Crème Fraiche and add an even smaller amount of Tom Yum Chili Paste (can be found in the

Thai food section of your grocery store). Whisk this mixture until it is completely homogenous.

Kafir Lime Sauce: Take 2 ounces of shallots and dice finely. Heat a tablespoon of butter in a saucepan, then add the shallots and cook until translucent. Add a large stalk of lemon grass and saute for 30 seconds. Add 6 Kafir lime leaves followed by one teaspoon of chili paste. Add 1/2 cup of crushed tomatoes to the saucepan and allow the mixture to simmer for 3 minutes. Add 1 cup of heavy cream and bring to a gentle simmer. Reduce the amount of liquid by half. Strain the sauce.

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management and culinary skills that naturally leads to multi-unit or corporate level foodservice,” says Emily Franco, director of the hotel school/CIA alliance, in an e-mail. Cornell isn’t the only one taking a multidisciplinary approach to culinary education. The Art Institute in Philadelphia will begin offering a B.S. in Culinary Management this fall. With classes like Art History: Baroque to Contemporary, Intro to Pyschology and World Literature offered alongside Hors D’oeuvres and Appetizers and Desserts, Plating and Presentation, the program blends culinary training with the liberal arts. Even high schools are starting to foster budding gourmands. At the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School in Cambridge, Mass., students study cooking, baking, and restaurant management in classes accredited by the American Culinary Federation. Jamin Mandel, a sophomore at Ithaca College, enrolled in the program while in high

school, and now he hopes to open his own restaurant. Although he considered enrolling directly in culinary school, Mandel decided to take a liberal-arts path first to “gain a broader education before narrowing down,” he says. He plans to earn a degree from Johnson and Wales University’s College of Culinary Arts in Providence, R.I. after graduation. Lisa Pelosi, the college’s communications director, says interest from students like Mandel is at an all-time high. For those whose passion for food doesn’t quite extend to the kitchen, the industry’s expansion has created a menu of new, related job possibilities, like working in research and development or in the health food business. Plus, someone always needs to write the cookbooks. Sandra Di Capua is one student taking advantage of those alternatives. Growing up, she spent hours at her mother’s side in the kitchen and dreamed of becoming a famous chef. But after summer stints working for a catering company in Rome and an Italian restaurant in New York City, she realized the chef ’s life wasn’t for her. “The kitchens were just not female-friendly,” she says, describing workplaces that were full of “lots of talking smack and cursing.” After graduating from Harvard this June with a degree in romance languages, Di Capua took a job with Kosher cookbook writer Joan Nathan, helping to research and craft recipes. She’s also open to working in nutrition, after a positive experience interning at a foundation focused on childhood obesity. The most important thing is sticking with food, wherever it leads her. “If restaurants aren’t going to work out?” she says, thinking aloud. “Maybe hotels.” Hollywood might have helped pave food’s way to fame, but determined students are making cooking more respectable than ever. “The stigma associated with being a chef back in the day wasn’t glorified. Your parents wouldn’t be as proud as if you were a lawyer or a doctor,” Keevil says. “But the title of chef denotes much more honor now.” Not to mention good taste. ■ —with Ben Eisen and Tatiana Lau Rebecca Kaden is a senior at Harvard. Her kitchen skills are limited, but she has recently mastered scrambled eggs.
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STUDENT BODY

POSTER BOY

SHADY Today he sports trendier sungear, but Alex’s favorite shades are meant for old folks with cataracts.

Alex Smith, originally from Philly, graduated in May from NYC’s School of Visual Arts with a degree in photography. Now a freelance photographer—and full-time dreamer—he spent two weeks this summer miles from civilization in an Arkansas forest, taking pictures of 10,000 hippies brought together for the annual “Rainbow Gathering.” But he snaps up new belongings just as quickly as pics, so during his trip to the wilderness Smith filled three trashbags with secondhand purchases—bearing out his conviction that the best thrift stores are always outside New York. “You have to go Pennsylvania or the South,” he declares. Here he is, bringing the backwoods to the big city.

BORROWED Alex’s beads were actually a gift to a friend from her father. He’ll return them one day.

HAIR APPARENT Since shampoo “destroys” his hair, Alex sticks to a weekly wash with Neutrogena hand soap. TOBACCO TUP Only hand-rolled cigs touch Alex’s lips, so he occasionally carries a SOMETHING Tupperware container for freshness.

t eir e up on oh to me” m irls to pin pump ir n yg to nt sororit “I wa at guys fr lls, and wa
THE XX JEAN Women’s jeans— worn “aggressively” — are Alex’s go-to pants. HOOP DREAMS These snazzy redand-black sneaks are all form, nofunction. “I don’t play basketball,” he says, “but I love that Nike swoosh.”

Photo by Michael Fodera

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FASHION

Leggings Bite the Dust, Again
by Allison Baker, Syracuse
This summer, for the second time in 25 years, we bid farewell to leggings. They’ll probably be back, once our childbearing days have left our thighs incapable of doing them justice. But for now— again—leggings are officially out. The spandex sensation first struck big clinging to Madonna’s legs in her “street chic” phase and hugging Jennifer Beals’ hips in Flashdance, but soon went the way of the scrunchie, relocating from the runway to the early morning run. Two decades later, they were back, this time gracing the gams of size-zero Hollywood royals Lindsay Lohan and Nicole Richie and seducing the everywoman with a comfortable—if at times grossly unflattering—alternative to pants, and a surefire way to transform shirts into dresses. But as tragic as it may be for Kelly Kapowski devotees, the second coming of leggings has already passed. Until, Thriller-style, they rise again. ■

Style Sans Serif
by Alex Benenson, Yale
Call it the shirt that launched a thousand slogans. U.K. label House of Holland’s stark neon “fashion groupie” tees—drawing on the famous Katharine Hamnett “Choose Life” and “Frankie Says Relax (Don’t Do It)” slogan shirts of the 1980s—have kicked off a frenzy for word-art tees. T-shirts overrun with giant sans serif text are cropping up everywhere from Urban Oufitters to high-end boutiques in New York and L.A. The printed word, at least when it comes to fashion, is in. At first glance the signature tees, featuring snarky rhyming couplets directed at British designers, such as “Get Yer Freak on, Giles Deacon, or “Treat Me Mean, Alexander McQueen,” seem like unlikely trendsetters. Not only do the simplistic designs look ridiculously crude against the baroque runway landscape, but the slogans smack of self-referential and selflimiting industry elitism. Just who is Giles Deacon, anyway? Nevertheless, these tees have single-handedly kicked off the word art revival—a return to a seductively simple, subversive aesthetic dating back long before the births of today’s trendsters. To understand the history of slogan tees, start with Annie Leibovitz’s iconic shot of Rolling

Say it Loud: Slogan tees evoke the revolutionary spirit of ’60s art by questioning the power of designers while simultaneously cashing in on them.

Long Live Leggings? We’ve had enough for our lifetimes.

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Stones guitarist Keith Richards on white canvasses, asking viewbackstage on their 1975 tour. He ers to re-evaluate who can make stands in a plain black T-shirt art and how we, as consumers, that reads “Who the F*** is Mick determine its value. Like their Jagger?” in huge, arched, white predecessors, slogan tees strike letters. The tee both registers the down the notion that interesting commercial marketability of a art must be technically difficult name like Mick Jagger and lamto produce. poons its own attempt to cash in. The trend also challenges the How lucratively postmodern. traditional economics of fashion. Now, House of Holland is just Forget about having enough cash one of several designers applying to blow on a designer word-art the word-art technique of simultee; a blank cotton T-shirt, some taneous praise and pillory. The ink and a stencil are all you need shirts are an ecstatic celebration to make the trend your own. If of each designer’s star power in you’re looking to recreate the meand beyond the fashion world— thodical anonymity of a Baldesand they also aggressively intersari masterpiece—or if you’re just rogate the role of haute couture. plain lazy—cheap custom shirt By taking the very names of high companies like Neighborhoodfashion’s wunderkinds to make ies (neighborhoodies.com) and ludicrously simple yet expressive Cafe Press (cafepress.com) will statements, House of Holland is print your personalized slogans essentially questioning what exfor you. actly designers do that any reguIn a beautiful inversion of lar person with a silk fashion’s usual relaWhat exactly screener and a com- do fashion tionship between price mand of the English designers do tag and exclusivity, the that some guy cheapest handmade language can’t. with ink and a word-art shirt is just as By probing the stencil can’t, purpose of the artist, anyway? recherché as a $5,000 today’s word art harcustom-made suit. kens back to a mid-century conOf course, some are shaking ceptual revolution. In the 1960s, their heads. Are we on the fast visual pioneer Dan Flavin exalted track to an anarchic, “everything the possibilities of the everyman is permitted” approach to fashartist with his simple but breathion, where the boundary between taking installations of commerwhat is and isn’t “real” fashion cially available fluorescent lights. evaporates? Maybe. But who says Around the same time, painter that would be such a bad thing? John Baldessari commissioned Admit it: “Everything Is Permitsign-painters to mechanically reted” would make a pretty great produce paragraphs of art theory slogan tee. ■

One Too Many: With great movies do not come great trequels.

Three’s (Bad) Company
The problem with the last installment of a trilogy, or “trequels,” as we at Current like to call them, is that our hopes are as big as their budgets. It’s like the problem with blind dates: we know we should keep expectations low to avoid disappointment, but the anticipation is just too great. We’re bound to reach the end of the night asking, “Really? That was it?” and wondering if maybe we should have simply stayed home. This summer’s grand finales—Spider-Man 3, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End, Ocean’s Thirteen, The Bourne Ultimatum—were stuffed with exhilarating special effects, complex (if convoluted) plot twists and devastatingly good-looking stars. But when the credits rolled, many of us complained that numero très was très long, très confusing and très self-important. As Richard Roeper wrote in his Chicago Sun-Times review of the muchanticipated Spider-Man 3, “I thought Spider-Man 2 was the best superhero sequel ever made—which is why I was so disappointed by the meandering storylines, sub-par performances and lackluster bad guys of Spider-Man 3.” And Spidey certainly wasn’t the only trequel to miss the hat trick—nor were its producers the only looking to make a buck, not a classic. About.com’s film critic Rebecca Murray put it bluntly in her review of Shrek the Third: “just because you can make a third film doesn’t mean you should.” Ouch. Despite our groaning, trequels will likely continue to grow bigger and badder. After all, the high-budget, low-ingenuity ratio has been working out like a charm: Shrek, Spider-Man and Pirates each earned over $300 million domestically by the end of July—the year’s top three grossers as of that date. So the next time you’re waiting at the box office, try to picture studio execs tugging on puppet strings connected to your wallet and chuckling, and you might just find yourself shelling out for La Vie en Rose. Never heard of it? Well, it’s French. And it could be just the thing to cure an American summer of overcooked thirds. Très bien.
■ —Danielle McNally

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Leggings photo by Kiersten Rowland; Spiderman image courtesy of Sony Pictures; All other photos by Damien Donck

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ONE-ON-ONE WITH JASON SCHWARTZMAN

Graduating from ‘Rushmore’
by Peter Fritch, Cornell
You might expect Jason Schwartzman

working dinners. “About 200 meals later,” to be the sort of over-ambitious go-getter Schwartzman says, “we had the movie.” that he plays in the 1998 film Rushmore. The outcome is the hilariously subdued After all, he’s made quite a name for himDarjeeling Limited, in theaters nationwide self by age 27, starring in cult hit films like this October. The movie stars SchwartzI Heart Huckabees, releasing three albums man, Adrien Brody and Owen Wilson as and starting his own record label. But to Jack, Peter and Francis Whitman, three hear Schwartzman tell it, the successes estranged brothers who decide to embark that have come his way weren’t seized so on a train ride—and, this being an Andermuch as received with open arms. With son film, spiritual journey—through India. his easy-going nature, Schwartzman manLike the film’s youngest two brothages to capitalize on his talent in a way that ers, steered into their Indian odyssey by Rushmore’s poor Max Fischer never could. the smooth-talking older sib (Wilson), His latest credit, co-writing and co-starSchwartzman is no stranger to being along ring in Wes Anderson’s next whimsical for the family ride. He’s one of the newest family drama, The Darjeeling Limited, was stars of an entrenched Hollywood clan— particularly serendipitous. When I ask him the son of actress Talia Shire (“Adrian” what it was like to pen his first screenplay in Rocky), nephew of Francis Ford Copwith indie-flick guru Anderson, Schwartzpola, cousin of Roman and Sofia Coppola man laughs and says, “It all happened so as well as Nicolas Cage and brother of quickly I wasn’t aware that we were writRobert, actor and frontman for the band ing anything.” Rooney. I thought he was just being modest. Silly Contrary to my speculations, working me. with his family did not involve the retellThe film, Schwartzman explains, ing of embarrassing childhood stories or emerged sort of “strangely” from conversaon-set arguments culminating with the tions with Anderson, the writer and direcline “God! You always do that!” Far from tor of Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums it, Schwartzman says. Acting in Darjeeland The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. ing with Roman Coppola and previously “Wes didn’t call me beforehand under Sofia’s direction in Marie “My idea of and say what he wanted,” he Antoinette, Schwartzman says a wild night is getting says. “He was living with me he benefited artistically from something and we would walk together at the family connection. “Because crazy at night and tell each other stories.” Whole they knew me as a little kid, they Unbeknownst to Schwartzman, Foods.” could say things like, ‘Remember those stories were being arwhen you were little and you ranged into a screenplay. It was Anderson’s used to do that weird thing with your fist? way of coaxing Schwartzman into writing Yeah, do something like that,’” he says. the script with him—the script for a movie But Schwartzman hasn’t translated his Anderson already had in the pipeline. star-studded family tree into glamour and With their ideas sketched out, the glitz. When I suggest the image of him close-knit trio of Schwartzman, Anderstrutting from one VIP room to another, son and Roman Coppola began nightly the paparazzi skidding behind, Schwartz-

A Wild Ride: Jason Schwartzman, Adrien Brody and Owen Wilson play three brothers on a trip through India in this fall’s The Darjeeling Limited.

man shudders. “It would be unnatural for me to be a part of that,” he says. “My idea of a wild night is getting something crazy at a Whole Foods in Westwood.” Schwartzman did develop an early appreciation for movies, but it was just like the rest of us: as an ordinary viewer mesmerized by the silver screen, and not a jaded studio brat barking orders at Mommy and Daddy’s assistants. “I know this sounds strange, but I didn’t really grow up around movie sets. My mom didn’t work much when I was a kid,” he says. And the young Schwartzman was happy to steer clear of the film industry. “I didn’t really have a thought in my head that was like, ‘I could do that too.’ I wouldn’t have even thought to try to do something that spectacular and otherworldly, really.”
Photo by James Hamilton

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But Schwartzman was a natural entertainer, and so he turned to music—a “more tangible” art form, he says. While movies seemed distant and unattainable, music was something he could do on his own. “With music, you can hold an instrument and play it and create something.” In 1994, Schwartzman and three highschool friends started the pop-rock band Phantom Planet, famous for its unavoidably catchy hit (and O.C. theme song) “California,” which features Schwartzman on drums. When the guys began to record their first album, Phantom Planet is Missing, in 1997, the then-17-year-old Schwartzman assumed he had found his big break. His family, however, had other plans in the making. Sofia Coppola tipped off the casting director of Rushmore that her little

cousin would be perfect as Max Fischer, the precocious high school sophomore who competes with a depressed steel tycoon— played by Bill Murray—for the affections of a widowed first-grade teacher. The casting director agreed. “Here I was, going into my senior year of high school thinking about applying to colleges, and I was making this record with my band, and literally a few months in, I found myself in Houston making a movie with Bill Murray,” he says. Ten years later, Schwartzman’s career hasn’t let up speed. In 2006, he started his own record label, Young Baby Records, and in March released his debut solo album “Nighttiming” under the performing name Coconut Records. Schwartzman also co-stars with Ben Stiller in the upcoming film The Marc Pease Experience, portray-

❏ Nuts in M ay (1917) ❏ The Misfit s (1961) ❏ Bedazzled (1967) ❏ The Hills (Season 1) ❏ The Five O bstructions (2 003) ❏ Wall Stree t (1987) ❏ The Makin g of ‘Rumors’ ❏ 9 to 5 (198 0)

WHAT’S ON JASONEXT N NetFlix Q’SEUE U :

ing a former high school a cappella star still living in his past. Schwartzman’s biggest hope now is to strike a healthy balance between singing and acting. “I’m going at a pace that feels comfortable,” he says. But given the guy’s history of unexpected breaks, there might be more up ahead than he sees coming. ■
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STUDENT TALENT

Sound Travels: Canadian Ben Caplan’s music has Latin flavor.

It changed the way I think about music.” If that isn’t worldly enough for you, he’s also recently started playing Bossa Nova, a Brazilian fusion of samba and jazz. Caplan’s career began at 13 in his hometown of Hamilton, a city close to Toronto with a bustling music scene, when his grandmother bought him an acoustic guitar. He still draws Ben Caplan already has one Behind the Music-worthy inspiration from local Hamilton acts produced by Put On Your scandal in the bag. This spring, Caplan, now a junior at UniDrinking Cap Records, along with classics like Phish and Pink versity of King’s College in Halifax, Nova Scotia, thought his Floyd. During the school year, Caplan headlines at the campus prayers had been answered: an actual producer was offering pub The Wardroom and venues around town. him the chance to record his new album, and promised him an For a guy who can play seven instruments and has a new solo “on the cheap” deal. It sounded too good to be true—and it was. The producer disappeared without a trace before Caplan looks album in the works, it’s hard to believe Halifax will be big enough for long. He also plays as one half of the project was over, leaving Caplan record-less and the part, but he doesn’t a band, Uvenburd (pronounced “oven bird”), which the studio stiffed. want to be a he formed with high school friend Joe Girard in Maybe that’s why Caplan, 21, doesn’t aim to berock star. 2004—a set-up he hopes could lead to touring. But come a rock star. He recently built a studio in the since Girard still lives in Hamilton, even practicing together basement of his parents’ house so that he can use school breaks is difficult. Still, with the release of their new album, “Floodto mix, master, record and edit new music by himself, without watching,” Caplan is more optimistic the two will hit the road. worrying about producers. Defining his style as experimental “It would be a dream come true to live off my music,” he folk rock with Latin influences, Caplan credits his travels in says. “But if not, there are other important things in the world.” South America and exposure to new rhythms and instruments Let’s hope that’s a line he can laugh about on VH1 someday. there with transforming his sound. “My eyes and ears were —Lyndsie Bourgon opened to a new musical paradigm,” he says. “It was great to Website: www.myspace.com/caplan; album on iTunes escape the monotony of the popular North American scene.
BEN CAPLAN | SINGER/SONG WRITER

Bad Breaks, Bossa Nova and an Album in the Uven

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ROB SPALDING | PRODUCT DESIGNER

It’s a Hat, It’s a Shoe, It’s a Plane!
Rob Spalding can turn a hat into sneakers. Last spring he constructed his favorite pair yet: fully wearable green high-tops, fitted together with about forty tabs of Velcro, that can double as a blue hat. Just pull, twist and flip the tabs, then Velcro them back into a different shape and voila! You have a hat—or at least a floppy head covering reminiscent of a military helmet. Spalding, now a sophomore product design major at the New School’s Parsons School of Design, grew up building CD racks and toy cars in his father’s workshop. Before long, he started to experiment with drawing, painting, photography and sculpture. He won a grade school costume contest with the Tin Man, a creation that took a month to construct out of household objects: cardboard, paint and even drier lint. Though Spalding loved math and science, he quickly became known for his artistic talent, much to the amusement—and discomfort—of his friends, who occasionally found themselves the subjects of his unorthodox art. “I did this really cool sculpture thing where I stretched a transparent tarp over my friends posed in different positions and took pictures of them inside,” he says. In high school, Spalding’s product-art leanings began to emerge: he one-upped the bulky duct-tape wallet trend of the time by crafting his own machine-washable wallets out of original drawings and packing tape. After beginning college at Penn State University as an engineering major, Spalding quickly realized that he couldn’t leave his art behind so easily, and he transferred to Parsons last fall. The move to Manhattan was intimidating—born in Arkansas, Spalding spent his high school years in small-town Maryville, Tenn.—but the payoff was worth it, he says. He taught himself to silk-screen, and is opening his own T-shirt line called Bobby Hayes—“a fun, Southern-sounding name,” he says, to match the shirts’ bold, colorful prints. “I love being immersed in it. I love getting my hands dirty.” —Carolyn Kylstra Website: www.robspalding.com

KEVIN MCMULLIN | UNIC YCLIST

The Never-Ending Wheelie
In one of his YouTube videos, Kevin McMullin hops up stairwells and glides down ramps. But unlike others sharing the camera, grinding on roller blades, bikes and skateboards, he is executing his tricks on just one wheel. “I never knew unicycling was so intense!” wrote one online commenter. Few do. More likely to evoke images of juggling circus bears than tough kids hopping railings, unicycling is gradually catching on as a street sport. “It’s hard sometimes to get people to understand what I do and “I never that street unicycling is actually fairly knew popular,” says McMullin. But through unicycling was so competitions and videos, he’s been makintense!” ing a name for himself—and the sport. First introduced to unicycling at 13 by a neighbor at home in Saint John, New Brunswick, Can., McMullin is credited with inventing many of the most common tricks, like the 360-degree sidespin and the “overblunt,” which involves grinding on one pedal, hopping over a rail and finishing the grind on the other pedal. In 2006, he received a Street Freestyle silver medal at the Unicycle World Championships in Switzerland, and one of his films, “If and Only If,” placed first at the 2007 British Unicycle Convention’s video competition. Don’t look for McMullin on UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus, where he’s a junior—he tries to practice in secluded areas, since unicycles attract so much attention. To catch a glimpse of McMullin’s tricks, check out his video on YouTube or order the DVDs he stars in, “Defect” and “Spaced Out,” at www.unicycle.com. —Ariel Davis

Shoe photo courtesy of Rob Spalding; Unicycle photo by Adam Biel

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BACKSTAGE

When Rocking Out Is a Family Affair
by Jennifer Pelly, Fordham
If you think the best things about Delaware are its lack of sales tax and shoutout in Wayne’s World, think again. An unexpected breeding ground for indie-rock groups, this state has been home to such musicians as Cab Calloway and Bob Marley, plus it’s pumped out some smaller bands whose names you might not know, but should. The latest set of up-and-coming crooners: The Spinto Band. Formed in 1996, this indie-pop sextet has drawn comparisons to popular artists like The Flaming Lips—and even The Beatles—and has toured with The Arctic Monkeys, Of Montreal, We Are Scientists and Art Brut across the U.S., Europe and Japan. This August, the guys headed to Los Angeles to record the follow-up to their hit first release, “Nice and Nicely Done.” For the as-yet-untitled album, slated for release in early 2008, the band teamed up with Dave Trumfio, producer of breakthrough records for Wilco and OK Go. Lots of small-town bands are friends first, musicians second, but the Spinto boys are

sake. “Nick had just started playing with us at the time,” explains Sam, “and he told us about his grandfather, and showed us some of the sheet music. We started playing some of Roy’s songs. Now we write our own songs, but the name stuck.” Although the guys have moved on to create their own sound, Roy’s music was a major influence as they develunusually close. Guitarist Joe Hobson and oped their style. drummer Jeff Hobson are brothers, as are The family act continued on “Nice and Sam Hughes, keyboard, and Thomas Hughes, Nicely Done,” their latest and most successbass guitar. The Hughes brothers met guitarful indie-label release, which was produced ist Nick Krill in middle school and guitarist by guitarist Jon Eaton’s uncle in Nashville. Jon Eaton through their parents, who were The guys call it “the most professional thing” all close friends in Wilmington, they have ever recorded. Touring can Dela. The web is more tightlyThe album’s hit single, “Oh, be tough, but woven still: five of the six guys had the boys pre- Mandy,” seems to be dedicated to a relatives in a group called Sin City fer the rocker dreamy love interest named Mandy, lifestyle to Band, making music a natural fit. “getting up but it’s actually about the mandolin In their early years, the boys at 7 a.m. and Krill is playing in the background. going to drew inspiration from a local unHe had no prior experience with the work every derground duo called The Pony instrument before composing the morning.” Brothers, whom Krill credits song on a friend’s mandolin, so “it with inspiring many local kids to start bands. was easy to come up with new songs and “There was this spirit of making your own different ways to play,” Krill says. music,” he says. After “Oh, Mandy” became a success, But when Krill found sheet music in his Sears ran a commercial featuring the song. attic written by his grandfather, Roy Spinto— Soon after, the band put out a “Mandy” musome of it scribbled on Cracker Jack wrapsic video under the direction of John Watts, pers—the band got a kickstart and its namewho has directed videos for Fatboy Slim and
Party Animals: Band members Joe Hobson, Jon Eaton, Nick Krill, Thomas Hughes, Sam Hughes and Jeff Hobson...and dogs.

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Death Cab for Cutie. The video juxtaposes real-life images with cartoon cutouts of the guys performing, complete with the mechanical mannerisms that characterize their stage shows. (Picture all six band members’ heads bobbing from side to side as if to the same metronome as their guitars). Chances are, though, that if you’ve heard

of The Spinto Band, it’s because they toured with U.K. rock phenomenon The Arctic Monkeys in 2006. That’s a hot gig, but the guys warn that touring can be a strain for young bands on the rise. Joe recalls one especially bad day at the South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Texas, when they had to carry around their own equipment and weren’t

even provided free water before their act. Still, they prefer the rocker lifestyle to “getting up at 7 a.m. and going to work every morning,” Joe says. With a new album in the works, the guys may not have to become working stiffs for a while. In the meantime, check them out at NYC’s CMJ Music Marathon this October. ■

Indie Girl’s Dance Party
Tired of the top 40s? Tune in

10. “Big Time Sensuality,” Björk
Her full name is Björk Guðmundsdóttir which, when directly translated, means “birch tree, Guðmund’s daughter.” In Iceland, first names are commonly used alone because last names indicate only the father’s moniker (Guðmunds, in Björk’s case).

Art history and photography major Emma Kitson spends her Sunday nights hosting “The Sunday Simmer,” a radio program at UNC-Asheville, so she knows a thing or two about alternative tunes for a college crowd. Emma suggests this mix for those who feel like dancing to an indie drummer’s beat.
1. “This Charming Man,” The Smiths
Frontman Morrissey was called devious and truculent by a judge who demanded that he pay outstanding royalties to a former member.

11. “Ride A White Swan,” T. Rex
Band frontman Marc Bolan refused to learn how to drive due to a lifelong fear of dying in a car accident. He was killed in a collision while his wife, who survived, was at the wheel.

to the soundtracks three of your classmates live by, and pump up your own playlist with some old-school, indie and techno songs that might not grace the airwaves anytime soon—but that instantly boost your music cred. —compiled by Carolyn Kylstra

4. “Age of Consent,” New Order 5. “Flipside,” The Breeders
In 2002, The Breeders performed a cover of Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s theme song as part of their regular concert set. A member of the show’s production staff approached them about performing on an episode, and sure enough, they appeared in the episode “Him,” first aired Nov. 5, 2002.

12. “Michael A Grammar,” Broadcast 13. “Used Goods,” Love Is All 14. “Twilight,” The Raveonettes
Vocalist Sharin Foo was listed as one of the “Hottest Women in Rock” by Blender in 2006, along with Liz Phair, Joan Jett and Juliette Lewis.

2. “Young Folks,” Peter Bjorn and John 3. “Blue Jeans,” Ladytron
Rolling Stone described their music as “what the future was going to sound like in 1980.”

6. “Disposable Parts,” Enon
Radio Flyer wagons, propane tanks and old hubcaps have all been used as percussion instruments by drummer Rick Lee.

15. “Your Kisses Are Wasted On Me,” The Pipettes
Singer Becki Pipette, also known as RiotBecki, received her degree in media studies from the U.K.’s Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College, where she wrote her dissertation on pornographic films.

7. “Cough Coughing,” Menomena 7. “I Think We’re Alone Now,”

Taste for the Classics
In high school, David Idol dreamed of becoming an opera singer. But after he was accepted to NYU’s classical voice program last year, he found a new passion: history. His list features foreign and classical tracks, plus a little pop for good measure.
1. “Revolution 1,” The Beatles 2. “L’accordeoniste,” Edith Piaf
Piaf (the subject of summer film La Vie en Rose) was born Édith Giovanna Gassion, but at only 4’8” tall, she earned the nickname “La Môme Piaf,” meaning “The Waif Sparrow.”

8. “The Beat,” Elvis Costello 9. “Transmission,” Joy Division

Tommy James 8. “La Camisa Negra,” Juanes
Juanes’s childhood in Medellín, Colombia wasn’t easy: his cousin was kidnapped, held for ransom and killed, and his father died of cancer. He has since risen to international stardom, selling more than 10 million albums and earning 12 Latin Grammys.

9. “Us,” Regina Spektor
You may know her only for the hit song Fidelity (“uh uh-uh uh uh-uh...”), but the Russian-born Spektor has released eight discs.

Road Trippin’
Lindsay Kosan, a psych and poli-sci WashU senior, loves a good road trip—requiring, of course, a great soundtrack. She swears by this one to get past any bumps in the road.
1. “City on Down,” O.A.R. 2. “Deliverance,” Bubba Sparxxx 3. “Magic Carpet Ride,” Steppenwolf
At age four, vocalist John Kay and his mother fled from Soviet-occupied East Germany.

10. “I Don’t Feel Like Dancing,” Scissor Sisters 11. “Der Holle Rache Kocht in Meinen Herzen (The Queen of the Night Aria),” Lucia Popp 12. “Both Sides Now,” Joni Mitchell
In 1965 Mitchell gave birth to a baby girl whom she put up for adoption. She wrote about her daughter in several songs, including “Little Green” and “Chinese Cafe,” and the pair reunited in 1997 when Mitchell’s daughter began a search for her birth mother.

10. “Nothing Better,” Postal Service
In 2004, the United States Postal Service sent the band a cease-and-desist letter. After negotiations, the USPS allowed the band to keep its name in exchange for a free performance and the right to use the band’s songs in promos.

4. “Straw Dog,” Something Corporate 5. “Take It Easy,” The Eagles
The Eagles broke up in 1980 after a historic show in Long Beach, Calif. Guitarists Glenn Frey and Don Felder verbally taunted each other between sets. Afterwards, Frey attacked Felder, who defended himself with his guitar.

11. “Lose Your Love Tonight,” The Outfield 12. “California Dreamin’,” The Beach Boys 13. “Once in a Lifetime,” Talking Heads
Born at the RI School of Design in 1974, one of the Heads’ first gigs was with The Ramones.

13. “Killing Me Softly,” Fugees 14. “Beyond Recourse,” Break of Reality
A cello rock band, Break of Reality was formed while its founding members were freshmen at the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music. Now graduated, they’re performing in NYC and are hard at work trying to break into the biz.

4. “Irreplaceable,” Beyoncé 5. “And I am Telling You I’m Not Going,” Jennifer Hudson
Just a finalist on season three of FOX’s American Idol, Hudson has since won an Oscar, a Golden Globe, a BAFTA and a SAG award for her role in Dreamgirls.

6. “Take Me Home Tonight,” Eddie Money 7. “Hey Driver,” Lucky Boys Confusion 8. “Shy Guy,” Diana King 9. “The Blood of Cu Chulainn,” Mychael Danna

14. “Crazy,” Alanis Morisette 15. “Fast Cars and Freedom,” Rascal Flatts 16. “Love and Memories,” OAR 17. “Jenny (867-5309),” Tommy Tutone

15. “Annie Waits,” Ben Folds 16. “S.O.S.,” ABBA

6. “Ojos Asi,” Shakira

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Pumping WIPING OUT THE ECO-THREAT Electric THE TERMINATOR TALKS ABOUT
BY DANIEL STONE
In his acting days, Arnold Schwarzenegger certainly wasn’t typecast as the guitarstrumming, long-haired hippie. But with his innovative ideas and global celebrity, California’s hotshot governor has become a face for the green movement. After signing a 2006 bill reducing the state’s greenhouse gas emissions across every sector of its economy and appearing in April on MTV’s Pimp My Ride to revamp a 1965 Chevy Impala, Schwarzenegger is converting his own image while he works to change others’ ideas. In the cigar tent outside his Sacramento office, the governor chatted with Current’s Daniel Stone about little cars, big planes and how to save the planet. What motivated you to embrace the environmental movement?
The position. When you’re governor, you have the ability to make great changes and improve people’s lives. Everything I’ve ever done in my life has been global. Body building, show business, those were global. Environmental issues have a global impact and, because California is so big, we can inspire other states to do the same thing. the engine. We can change the engine and find ways of reducing the greenhouse emissions by 50 percent or even completely with electric cars, like the Tesla. I ordered one for myself because it’s going to be really great to see a car that has zero emissions—and to make it that good-looking. Same thing with airplanes. Virgin Air is partnering with GE to create engines that will run on biofuel. So it’s not like saying, “Let’s shrink the planes and make people crouch.” No. Let’s make the planes bigger, but let’s create the engines with new technology.

Have you found that young people are engaging with environmental issues? Young people
are more and more responding to it, but they are always ahead of everyone. If they don’t like something, they’ll protest. Young people are very rarely up for the status quo. They’re always up for change. I want them to feel that they really have the power to make the changes. I think it makes them feel good—like they’re part of the action.

What kind of new opportunities do you think will be available to young people entering the workforce as a result of the industry Need new caption changes you foresee? In California, I think the technology sector
will explode. The Wall Street Journal called it the gold rush and that’s exactly what it’s going to be, because wherever you look, there are people and companies in technology coming up with new ways to be greener. I think that young people will be a big part of that and will get jobs in those areas.

When it comes to advocating environmental change, how much does celebrity help? I’m not out there as an environmentalist.
I’m out there as Arnold the guy you know from the movies, you know, all the hip things I’ve done in the past. Bodybuilding and movies are cool, and here’s another cool thing: go and take care of the environment. Be someone who really has the power to contribute. That’s what it basically is—inspiring people to be part of the change.

What kind of advice do you give your own kids about being efficient? Well, I teach them not just to talk about it but to do it.
Forget the 15- or 20-minute shower—it’s the-five minute shower. When you walk out of the room, turn out the lights. Everything you do all day long, think about the impact. My kids are very much into all this. For instance, my daughter currently drives a Volkswagen, and she wants to change it to a hybrid car. But I didn’t say anything. It was her idea.

But to some you’re still known as Arnold, the guy with the Hummers who commutes to work via private jet. We’ve now converted three out of five of the Hummers. One is a hydrogen Hummer and one is biofuel, and the other one uses new technology developed in California that actually reduces greenhouse emissions by over 80 percent. That’s huge. I don’t drive any of them, because I drive with the California Highway Patrol, but I wanted to try out the technology.

So what role should she and her friends take in this movement?
What young people have to do is just think about what they can do to contribute and invent new ideas. That’s really where the future is. They’re the next generation that’s going to take this thing through the roof; they’re responsible to get it started and to recognize that for 400 years we screwed up the environment. Now let’s try to fix it. ■

So whereas most people are talking about conservation, your main focus is technology. That’s what I always say: besides conservation, technology is going to save the day. I think everyone recognizes that the size of a car has nothing to do with it. It’s

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Photo courtesy of Duncan McIntosh, Office of Gov. Schwarzenegger