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COURSE: English 11

UNIT: Lord of the Flies

Thematic Statement or Essential Questions:

Why do things go wrong?

English 11 Learning Targets:

B4 independently select and read, for sustained periods of time, texts for enjoyment and to increase fluency
B2 read, both to comprehend a wide variety of information and
B12 recognize and explain how structures and features of text shape readers and viewers construction
of meaning and appreciation of authors craft, including form and genre, functions of text, literary elements, literary devices,
use of language, non-fiction elements.

Unit Learning Targets:

A1: interact and collaborate in pairs and groups to respond to and critique a variety of texts
A3 listen to comprehend, interpret, and evaluate ideas and information from a variety of texts
A9: speak and listen to interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas and information from texts.
B1: read to comprehend a wide variety of literary texts
B5 before reading and viewing, select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to anticipate content and construct meaning
B6: During reading and viewing, select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to construct, monitor, and confirm meaning.
B8 explain and support personal responses to texts, by making comparisons to other ideas and concepts C14 Use conventions in
writing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry, including grammar and usage, punctuation,
capitalization, and Canadian spelling, copyright and citation of references, presentation/layout.
C4 create thoughtful representations that record & describe
C9 write and represent to interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas and information from texts
C10 write and represent to synthesize and extend thinking
C11 use metacognitive strategies to reflect on and assess their writing and representing.
C12 use and experiment with elements of style in writing and representing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance
meaning and artistry
C13 use and experiment with elements of form in writing and representing

# of
lessons
all

LEARNING TARGET

PLANNING FOR ACHIEVEMENT

20 minutes of independent reading

Read article Attention Students: Put


Your Laptops Away 1

Read Goodnight iPad 2


Discuss background of William
Golding, WWII, & Coral Island
Define parody, infer, imply, allusion,
imagery, symbolism, utopia,
dystopia, situational irony, dramatic
irony, ambiguity, hyperbole,
understatement, dynamic character,
static character

B4 independently select and read, for


sustained periods of time, texts for
enjoyment and to increase
fluency
Identify a variety of strategies for notetaking
B2 read, both to comprehend a wide
variety of information and
persuasive texts
B12 literary devices
A3 listen to comprehend, interpret,
and evaluate ideas and information
from a variety of texts
B5 before reading and viewing, select,
adapt, and apply a range of strategies
to anticipate content and construct
meaning
B12 literary devices

B5 make logical predictions

Share story of Golding in WWII

1
1

B6 make inferences
C4 create thoughtful representations
that record & describe

Read Lord of the Flies 3


Identify significant setting details in
LOTF

ACHIEVEMENT
INDICATORS
Students share content, mark
progress, and create reviews
of books on their personal
accounts at Goodreads.com
Exit ticket

Exit ticket
Informal class discussion
Quizzes: students interpret
events, narrative, symbols,
etc. in LOTF
Exit tickets: identify
elements of devices from
LOTF
Identify a line of imagery
from book and explore in
written piece
Class discussion on
predictions for LOTF
Quiz, infer plot details
Create accurate map of
the island

"Attention Students: Put Your Laptops Away." NPR. NPR, n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2016. <http://www.npr.org/2016/04/17/474525392/attention-students-put-yourlaptops-away>.
2

Droyd, Ann. Goodnight IPad: A Parody for the next Generation. New York: Blue Rider, 2011. Print.

Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Penguin, 1999. Print.

B8 explain and support personal


responses to texts, by making
comparisons to other ideas and
concepts
B6 during reading select, adapt, and
apply a range of strategies to
construct, monitor, and confirm
meaningmake inferences, draw
conclusions.
C9 write to analyse
C12 write using style, purpose,
audience
C13 write with organization
C14 use conventions, references
C11 use metacognitive strategies to
reflect on and assess writing

Discuss LOTF and watch clips from


culture of fear segment of Bowling
for Columbine 4

Personal reflection on
culture of fear

Students record interpretations


individually and work in small groups
to share/revise interpretations.

Students record
interpretations in LOTF
packets

Students develop original thesis that


interprets the content and purpose of
Lord of the Flies.
Students will develop a formal outline
to organize their ideas.
Students will defend their thesis in a
multiple paragraph essay
Students will include parenthetical
references and a works cited
Students will revise their essay in
response to peer and teacher
feedback.

Literary essay is evaluated


using a rubric

Bowling for Columbine. Dir. Michael Moore. MGM Home Entertainment, 2003. Film.

COURSE: English 11

UNIT: THE KITE RUNNER

Thematic Statement or Essential Questions:

There is a way to be good again


Kids arent colouring books

English 11 Learning Targets:

B1 read to comprehend literary texts


B4 independently select and read, for sustained periods of time, texts for enjoyment
C14 Use conventions in writing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry, including grammar and
usage, punctuation, capitalization, and Canadian spelling, copyright and citation of references.

Unit Learning Targets:

B2 read to comprehend a wide variety of information


B7 After reading apply a range of strategies to extend and confirm meaning,
B9 Interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas and information from texts by identifying diverse voices, critiquing perspectives,
changing bias.
B10 synthesize and extend thinking about texts by transforming existing ideas and information
B12 literary devices: irony
B13 demonstrate increasing word skills and vocabulary knowledge by analyzing the origins and roots of words, determining
meanings and uses of words based on context, discerning nuances in meaning of words considering social, political, historical,
and literary contexts.
C1 write meaningful personal texts that elaborate on ideas and information to make connections, reflect, and respond
C8 Write to explain and support personal responses to texts by relating reactions and emotions to understanding of the text.
C9 Write to interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas and information from texts, by identifying the importance and impact of social,
political, and historical contexts
C10: write and represent to synthesize and extend thinking, by explaining relationships among ideas and information.

TIME

LEARNING TARGET

PLANNING FOR ACHIEVEMENT

1 class

B2 Read articles and reports


A3 listen to comprehend, interpret, and
evaluate ideas and information from a
variety of texts, considering messages
C1 write meaningful personal texts to
reflect and respond
A3 listen to comprehend, interpret, and
evaluate ideas and information,
considering context, including historical,
social, and political influences
B2 read print and electronic reference
material
B13 I can interpret the meaning of foreign
words using context and resources.
B6 During reading select, adapt, and apply
a range of strategies to construct, monitor,
and confirm meaning
B12 literary devices, figurative language,
satire
B1 read to comprehend a wide variety of
literary texts, including traditional forms
from other cultures.

Listen to DNTO podcast Heroism: 5


Read article: Why we read fiction6

ACHIEVEMENT
INDICATORS
Class discussion
Six-word poem

Watch Afghanistan Revealed 7

Film notes

Use The Kite Runner Vocabulary 8


website as a resource for Farsi words
throughout the novel.

Test: students interpret Farsi


vocabulary in context.

Read The Kite Runner,9 chapters 1-3

Venn diagram of Hassan and


Amir

Read story Calling a woman a dog,


relate to The Kite Runners protagonists,
relate to literary terms.

Class discussion

2
classes

2 weeks

1 class

1 class

"How a Quick-thinking Teenager Saved a Kidnapping Victim - Home | DNTO with Sook-Yin Lee | CBC Radio." CBCnews. Ed. Sook-Yin Lee.
CBC/Radio Canada, 1 Oct. 2015. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.
6 Person, and Gabe Bergado. "Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Still Read Fiction." Mic. N.p., 2014. Web. 22 Apr. 2016.
<http://mic.com/articles/104702/science-shows-something-surprising-about-people-who-love-reading-fiction#.YidvgVwxa>.
7

Richard000Kabul. "Afghanistan Revealed." YouTube. YouTube, 2012. Web. 22 Apr. 2016. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZlkhX03dpk>.

"KiteRunnerVocabulary." Kite Runner Study Guide /. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2016.
<http://litkite.pbworks.com/w/page/18050110/KiteRunnerVocabulary>.
9

Hosseini, Khaled. The Kite Runner. New York: Riverhead, 2003. Print.

1 class

1 class

1 class

1 class

1 class

B10 synthesize and extend thinking about


texts by transforming existing ideas and
information
B12 literary devices: irony
B7 After reading apply a range of
strategies to extend and confirm meaning,
and to consider authors craft, including
making inferences & drawing conclusions
Extend and connect understanding of a
text to current events
B9 Interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas
and information from texts by identifying
diverse voices, critiquing perspectives,
changing bias.
C8 Write to explain and support personal
responses to texts by relating reactions
and emotions to understanding of the text.
C9 Write to interpret, analyse, and
evaluate ideas and information from texts,
by identifying the importance and impact of
social, political, and historical contexts
B12 literary devices: irony
B7 After reading apply a range of
strategies to extend and confirm meaning,
and to consider authors craft, including
making inferences & drawing conclusions
C14 grammar and conventions
B1 read to comprehend a wide variety of
literary texts, including traditional forms
from other cultures.
B9 Interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas
and information from texts by identifying

Read The Kite Runner, chapters 4-6

Quiz, chapters 4-6

Read The Kite Runner, chapters 7-8


Watch video of Omar Kadr 10 on day
of release. OR
Discuss Stephen Harpers failed
campaign to shame women wearing
the nicab
Guest speaker Darryl DeBoer on
topic of class difference in the region
Read The Kite Runner, chapters 910

Class discussion

Class discussion and


questions
Exit ticket: personal
reflection on topics from
the day

Read The Kite Runner chapters 1112


Together insert introductory commas
in example essay sentences

Quiz
Revised LOTF essay

Read The Kite Runner, chapters 1314


Read story The Cultural Double
Standard
Read article Women Who Show
Anger are Taken Less Seriously 11

Discussion thread on Moodle:


The double standard. Does
our culture (school, church,
home, society) engage a
double standard for men

10

Scott Gilmore Omar Khadr Bail. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 7 May 2015. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.

11

Dahl, Melissa. "Women Who Show Anger Are Taken Less Seriously." Science of Us. 13 Oct. 2015. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.

1 class

diverse voices, critiquing perspectives,


changing bias.

B12 literary devices: epiphany, allusion,


theme
C10: I can synthesize the ideas between
two stories.

12

1 class

1 class

B12 literary devices: epiphany, allusion,


theme
C9 Write to interpret, analyse, and
evaluate ideas from texts by identifying the
importance and impact of social, political,
and historical contexts
C9 Write to interpret, analyse, and
evaluate ideas from texts
B12 literary devices: parody

Watch Portraits of Afghan Women

versus women? In what ways


do you see it?

Read The Kite Runner, chapters 1517


Read quote by Rainer Maria Rilke 13
Read quote by Maureen Corrigan
from Memoir of a Book Lover 14
Storytelling: Biblical story of
Abraham, Isaac, and Ishmael
Introduce themes: redemption, free
will
Read The Kite Runner, chapters 1820
Show video of the Taliban bombing
the sacred Buddha statues 15
Read excerpt from Habibi,16 43-46

Chalk talk: students draw


parallels between the Biblical
story of Abraham, Isaac, and
Ishmael and characters in The
Kite Runner

Watch 9/11 Back to the Future


conspiracy video 17
Read The Kite Runner, chapters 2122

Write a thesis statement that


relates the biblical allusion in
The Kite Runner to the
authors larger purpose.

Class discussion on
making valid connections
to a text.
Revise thesis statement
that relates the biblical
allusion in The Kite Runner

12

Bieber, Jodie. "Portraits of the Women of Afghanistan - Video - TIME.com." Time. Time Inc. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.

13

Rilke, Rainer Maria. "Letters To A Young Poet - #4." Letters To A Young Poet - #4. 16 July 1903. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.

14

Corrigan, Maureen. "Memoir of a Book Lover." NPR. NPR, 12 Sept. 2005. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.

15

Sinhalese Buddhist. "Afghanistan Taliban Muslims Destroying Bamiyan Buddha Statues." YouTube. YouTube, 2011. Web. 22 Apr. 2016.
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYYBlPWYb7Y>.
16

Thompson, Craig. Habibi. New York: Pantheon, 2011. 43-46. Print.

17 BarelyHuman11. "BACK TO THE FUTURE Predicts 9/11." YouTube. YouTube, 2015. Web. 22 Apr. 2016.
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1ULjJ3EqyY>.

1 class

1 class

A10 speak and listen to synthesize and


extend thinking by applying new ideas and
information
C9 Write to interpret, analyse, and
evaluate ideas from texts
C6 use strategies for composing to
analyse writing samples.

Read letter from Canadian soldier


who served in Afghanistan and view
his photographs
Read The Kite Runner, chapter 23.

1 class

B12 literary devices: epiphany, allusion,


theme

Read The Kite Runner, chapter 24

1 class

C1 write meaningful personal texts that


elaborate on ideas and information to
make connections, reflect, and respond
B12 literary devices

Finish reading the book


Teach anecdote, personification,
metacognitive, review epiphany

3
classes

Most PLOs for unit

Watch film as review 18 & review


handout

18

The Kite Runner. Dir. Marc Forster. Perf. Khalid Abdalla and Atossa Leoni. DreamWorks SKG, 2008. DVD.

to the authors larger


purpose.
Class discussion

Thesis statements a theme:


1. Parallel w/ Biblical story
2. A theme of your choice
Review thesis statements in
small groups to revise and
extend understandings.
Quiz: interpretations,
inferences, figurative
language.
300-word reflective piece
reflecting on a theme, motif, or
anecdote from the novel,
creating an epiphany moment.
Kite Runner test

COURSE: English 11

UNIT: Grammar

Thematic Statement or Essential Questions:

How can I ensure that my quality ideas are well respected?

English 11 Learning Targets:

C7: I can use a variety of strategies to revise, edit, and publish writing and representing.
C11: I can use metacognitive strategies to reflect on and assess my writing and representing.
C12: I can experiment with elements of style in writing, appropriate to audience and purpose, the enhance meaning and artistry,
including syntax and sentence fluency.
C14 Use conventions in writing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry, including grammar and
usage, punctuation, capitalization, and Canadian spelling.

Unit Learning Targets:

I can use a common vocabulary for English grammar to efficiently think and speak about my own writing
I can use punctuation correctly, including the comma, semicolon, colon, and dash.
I can identify common errors in my own writing and correct them.

TIME
1-2
days

LEARNING TARGET
1. I can identify 9 parts of
speech.
2. I can recognize that 1 word
may function as multiple
POS.
3. I can identify the subject and
predicate of a sentence.

ACTIVITIES
We collectively review 9
parts of speech with a
sentence that we label on
the white board: noun,
pronoun, verb, adverb,
adjective, helping verb,
preposition, article,
conjunction.

ACHIEVEMENT INDICATORS
After selecting a unique theme to use for personal
sentences in this unit, students complete grammar
assignment #1 in a Moodle wiki. Students practice
breaking these sentence in half b/t the subject and
the predicate using a line.

Write a sentence that uses every part of speech


and identify them.
Write 2 sentences that have a compound subject.

4. I can recognize, compose,


and punctuate various
compounds: subjects,
predicates, & sentences.

We review notes on POS,


subjects, predicates, and
compounds.

Write 2 sentences that have a compound


predicate
Write 2 sentences that have a compound subject
and predicate
Write 4 compound sentences, punctuated two
ways.
Student complete wiki #2: Write sentences that
contain lists, separated by commas. List nouns,
noun phrases & verb phrases.
contain prepositional phrases at the end.
contain prepositional phrases at the beginning.
contain subordinate clauses at the end.
contain subordinate clauses at the beginning.

1
class

1. I can identify a phrase and


a clause.
2. I can identify and punctuate
a subordinate clause and
an introductory
prepositional phrase.

We review notes on
phrases, clauses,
subordinate vs.
independent clauses, and
introductory prepositional
phrases.

1
class

1. I can compose and punctuate


an essential and
nonessential appositive
phrase.
2. I can compose and punctuate
an essential and
nonessential participial
phrase.
3. I can compose & punctuate
sentences using THAT,
WHICH, and WHO.

We review notes on
participial phrases,
appositive phrases, the
difference between an
essential and nonessential
phrase, and correct usage
of THAT, WHICH, & WHO.

Students complete wiki #3:


Write 2 sentences with nonessential appositive
phrases.
Write 1 sentences with an essential appositive
phrase.
Write 2 sentences with nonessential participial
phrases.
Write 1 sentence with an essential participial
phrase.
Write 3 sentences that demonstrate usage of
THAT, WHICH, WHO

1
class

1. I can punctuate sentences


with a semicolon.
2. I can punctuate sentences
with a colon.

We review notes on
semicolon and colon
usage.

Complete wiki #4: Write sentences that...


1. use a semicolon between two closely related,
complete sentences.
2. each use a semicolon for joining two complete
sentences with words like however, nevertheless,
also, consequently, and hence.
3. use semicolons to clarify a dizzying stack of
commas.
4. use a colon to introduce a list.
5. use a colon with oppositional statements.
6. use a colon to introduce a quote.

1
class

1
class

1
class

1.

2.

1. I can punctuate
sentences with a dash.
2. I can use a dash to fix a
sentence fragment.

We review notes on dash


usage.

I can use an apostrophe


For contractions
To show possession
I can recognize plural words
and possessive pronouns
that do not require
apostrophes

We review notes on
apostrophe usage.

C14: I can use conventions in writing


appropriate to purpose and
audience, to enhance meaning and
artistry, including grammar and
usage, punctuation, capitalization,
and Canadian spelling.

Students review the


material from the unit.

Complete wiki #5. Write sentences that...


1. Use a dash for an abrupt change in a sentence.
2. Use a dash for a long appositive phrase
3. Use a dash for a parenthetical thought
4. Use a dash in dialogue for a sudden break in
thought.
Students locate missing or misused apostrophes in
the wild, photograph them, and post to Instagram with
the hashtag SCSgrammar
Students complete a quiz where they
edit sentences to insert commas for contractions
and possession.
Create singular and plural possessives from
existing prepositional phrases
Students complete a grammar test where they
edit sentences to demonstrate correct usage of
commas and apostrophes.
supply the reason why a comma is needed:
introductory, compound sentence, nonessential, or
a list.
create possessive singular and plural nouns from
existing phrases.
write original sentences that demonstrate correct
usage of the semicolon, colon, and dash.

COURSE: English 11

UNIT: Kims Convenience

Thematic Statement or Essential Questions:

Look same, not same thing


What is good work?

English 11 Learning Targets:


1. A3 listen to comprehend, interpret, and evaluate ideas and information from a variety of texts, considering devotional
anecdote, and KCs purpose as satire.
2. A9 speak and listen to interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas and information from texts, by describing and critiquing
perspectives
3. B5 before reading and viewing, use strategies to anticipate content and construct meaning, including accessing prior
knowledge, including knowledge of genre, form, and context
4. B6 during reading and viewing, select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to construct, monitor, and confirm meaning,
including comparing and refining predictions, questions, images, and connections making inferences and drawing
conclusions summarizing and paraphrasing using text features determining the meaning of unknown words and
phrases clarifying meaning
5. B7 After reading and viewing, select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to extend and confirm meaning and to
consider authors craft, including purpose.
6. B9 Interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas and information from texts, by identifying the importance and impact of social,
political, and historical contexts.
7. B10 synthesize and extend thinking about texts by contextualizing ideas and information
8. B12 Recognize and explain how structure and features of text shape readers and viewers construction of meaning and
appreciation of authors craft, including form and genre, literary elements, literary devices.
9. C2 write purposeful information texts that express ideas and information to speculate and consider
Unit Learning Targets:

B1 read, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of literary texts, including literature reflecting a
variety of times, places, and perspectives & literature reflecting a variety of prose forms, significant works of Canadian
literature

TIME
1 class

LEARNING TARGET
B5 I can anticipate what may
happen based on my previous
experience.
B9 I can infer a playwrights
purpose in role choices based
on cultural context.

1 class

B6, B7

1 class

I can identify a characters


central motivation.
I can locate text that
provides strong evidence of
characterization.

A3 listen to comprehend,
interpret, and evaluate ideas
and information, considering
devotional anecdote, and KCs
purpose as satire.

ACTIVITIES
ACHIEVEMENT INDICATORS
Discussion: what do you expect to Exit ticket: identify a possible reason why Ins
see happen in a Canadian play? Choi chose to have four black men played
by one actor.
Discuss cultural factors of the
play, including the Japanese
occupation of Korea, the Korean
civil war, and subsequent
refugees/immigration to Canada.
Read Kims Convenience19,
authors note, forward, and
introduction
Read Kims Convenience, scenes
1-12, with students reading parts.
Select ONE student to read all
four parts that are to be played by
a black actor.

Activity to share interpretations


from wiki, reach consensus,
analyze and evaluate strength of
ideas.

19 Choi, Ins. Kim's Convenience. Toronto: Anansi, 2012. Print.

Wiki at Moodle to interpret characterization


and purpose: Kims Convenience #1:
1. What does each character want? Name
one of their central motivations or desires. 2.
Identify one quote that helps summarize the
character. 3. Write three adjectives that
capture the character's personality.4. Identify
a possible reason why Ins Choi chose to
have all four black men be played by a
single actor. What might be his purpose for
doing this? Imagine you are an audience
member, what is the possible effect of this
technique?
Wiki at Moodle to interpret theme: Kims
Convenience #2
In scene 2, Appa is pushing an energy drink
beverage on a customer, Rich. He insists

1 class

A9 speak and listen to interpret,


analyse, and evaluate ideas and
information from texts, by
describing and critiquing
perspectives (last question on
homework)
B12 recognize and explain how
structures and features of text
shape readers and viewers
construction of meaning,
including form and genre,
literary devices (i.e. satire &
caricature)
C2 write purposeful information
texts that express ideas and
information to speculate and
consider (homework to explore
theme)

B3. View to comprehend broadcast


media
B7 After reading, construct
meaning
B10 synthesize and extend thinking
about texts by contextualizing ideas
and information
B12: literary devices

20

Activity: in groups of 3-4. First


Abba, then Janet, then final
question.
1. Independently, read through
the words we chose to
describe Appa. Choose
(circle) three words that you
feel are the most accurate.
2. Share your with your group
members and reach

that the product contains insam, NOT


ginsing. He ends up saying "looks same, not
same thing." Rich is confused because the
picture clearly looks like ginsing. We learn
that "insam" and "ginsing" are both words for
the same thing, but one is the Korean word,
the other is Japanese. Knowing the
difference is very important to Appa.
In a brief paragraph, explore how "look
same, not same thing" works as a larger
theme in this play.

consensus on items you feel


are the most accurate.
3. Discuss, disagree, and defend
with evidence as a class.
Teach literary terms: satire,
caricature, stereotypes
Give background on LA riots.
Watch video of Rodney King.20
View photographs of LA riots
Read 2nd half of the play, scenes
13-17.
Identify abbas conflict based on
what he wants and what Janet
wants. Teach the narrative arc,
subplot with Janet. Subtext.

Students respond to reflective question in


Moodle journal:
In scene 16, Appa is trying to name his
store. This is juxtaposed against Umma
naming her son. Explore the effect of this
juxtaposition.

20 Multishowtvweb. "RODNEY KING BEATING VIDEO Full Length Footage SCREENER." YouTube. YouTube, 2015. Web. 22 Apr. 2016.
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sb1WywIpUtY>.

Identify allusion to the prodigal


son story discuss factual truth
vs. narrative truth.
2
classes

B9 Interpret and analyse ideas in a


text.

Read Kims Convenience scenes


18-20

B10 synthesize thinking about texts


by explaining relationships among
ideas.

Tell Jacob & Esau (OT) and


prodigal son (NT) stories, discuss
development of myths.
Powerpoint on mythology. Teach
literary terms: myth & archetype

B12: literary devices

1 class

Unit learning targets

Review material on
characterization, theme, genre for
test.
Watch Tig 21 Notes on oratory
comedic style.

21

21 Tig. Dir. Kristina Goolsby and Ashley York. Perf. Tig Notaro. Beachside Films, 2015. DVD.

Exit ticket: Ins Choi picks it an old story


(from OT & NT) and makes it his own. What
did he add?
Students respond in Wiki journal:
1. Find evidence in the 2nd half of the
play to argue that Appa is not
actually racist.
2. Consider the final scene. Do you
hear a familiar archetypal story
peeking through? Does it sound like
a story you know?
Unit test:
Short answer essay
Characterization: according to each
character, what makes for meaningful
lifes work?
Theme & genre: comedy, myth, racism,
immigrant experience, parent/child
relationships

COURSE: ENGLISH 11

UNIT: PODCASTING

Thematic Statement or Essential Questions:

How can I tell a good story?

Unit Learning Targets:

22

23

A12 recognize and apply the structures and features of oral language to convey and derive meaning.
A5 select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to prepare oral communications, including interpreting a task and setting a
purpose, generating ideas, planning and rehearsing.
C3 Write effective imaginative texts to develop ideas and information to strengthen connections and insight, engage and
entertain
C5 select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to generate, develop, and organize ideas for writing and representing,
including setting a purpose and considering audience, gathering and summarizing ideas of personal interest, analyzing writing
samples or models.
A11: use metacognitive structures to reflect on and assess their speaking by referring to criteria, setting goals for
improvement, and evaluating progress.

TIME
1

LEARNING TARGET
A12 I can recognize
effective strategies for
oral speaking.

ACTIVITIES
Watch Tig.22 Discuss oratory style: pace,
pauses, volume

ACHIEVEMENT INDICATORS
Exit ticket on effective elements of Tig
Notaros style.

C5 I can find a good


story to write and find
a purpose.

Devotions Read Experiencing Storytelling,


page 30. 23The process of storytelling Then
read the story about brotherly love, 13.

Exit ticket: Students respond to questions


related to film.
Complete Pitch sheet: what will your
podcast be about?

Tig. Dir. Kristina Goolsby and Ashley York. Perf. Tig Notaro. Beachside Films, 2015. DVD.
Kurtz, Ernest. Experiencing Spirituality: Finding Meaning through Storytelling. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.

Watch How to Tell a Story 24

1-2

I can use a Zoom


audio recorder to
capture, monitor,
adjust gain, delete
files, and transfer files
to my netbook.

Brainstorm possible podcast stories


In small groups, students will peer share their
pitch sheets, make suggestions and revisions,
then upload pitches to Moodle for teacher
feedback

Students will have free play time with


Zoom recorders, and have them available
for checkout from the library.
Students will sign up for recording times.

Demonstrate features of the Zoom recorders.

C5: I can brainstorm a


story
1

A5: I can compose for


audio.
C6: I can generate
text.

C6 I can analyse
writing samples as I
edit my draft.

Share powerpoint Writing for Radio


Give students a recording schedule with times
and locations, & devices.

Share powerpoint Pixar rules for Storytelling.

Students will complete their 1st draft, with


attention to writing for audio, in a Moodle
wiki so we can track revisions.

Students will revise their drafts at Moodle.

Share podcasts from previous students.

C7 I can revise my
draft for better
storytelling
1

24

I can compose openended questions and


follow-up questions for
interviews.

Class discussion on interviewing strategies.


Guest speaker from Pacific Content podcast
company

"How to Tell a Story." TED: Ideas worth Spreading. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2016.
<https://www.ted.com/playlists/62/how_to_tell_a_story>.

After teacher feedback, students will


complete their final drafts.

I can annotate my
script for oral
interpretation.

Review annotation strategies for oral


interpretation.

Students will annotate their scripts for oral


reading: pacing, pauses, clarity, tone,
emphasis

I can perform my
podcast with attention
to public speaking
criteria.

Guest speaker on oral performance.

Students will rehearse their podcasts and


gives peer feedback that is useful, specific,
and kind.

I can store ALL the


pieces of my podcast
in a source folder on
my desktop.

Instruction on websites for free music and


sound effects: Incompetech, Soundbible, etc.

Students will locate key sound effects and


possible musical choices and report their
downloads in a wiki.

Instruction on editing with Audacity.

Students will install Audacity and create


their project with layered pieces.

I can identify, source


and capture sound
effects and music that
enhance my podcast.
2-3

I can install, learn, and


use the digital editing
program, Audacity.
I can create a
Soundcloud account,
upload my podcast, and
post the URL.
A11: I can reflect on and
assess my classmates
and my own public
speaking public
speaking

Instruction on creating an account & uploading


audio to Soundcloud.

Students will create a Soundcloud


account, upload their podcasts, and post a
public URL to the class wiki.
Students will share their finished podcasts
with the class and give feedback that is
useful, specific, criteria based, and kind.

Additional resources: Abel, Jessica. Out on the Wire: The Storytelling Secrets of the New Masters of Radio. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.

COURSE:

ENGLISH 11

UNIT: POETRY

Thematic Statement or Essential Questions:

How can poetry help me understand myself and others?


How can poetry empower me?

English 11 Learning Targets:

B5 before reading and viewing select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to anticipate content and construct meaning.
B6 During reading and viewing, select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to construct, monitor, and confirm meaning.
B7 After reading and viewing, select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to extend and confirm meaning, and to consider
authors craft.
B8 Explain and support personal responses to texts
B9 Interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas from texts
B12 Recognize and explain how structure and features of text shape readers and views construction of meaning and
appreciation of authors craft, including literary devices.
B13 demonstrate increasing word skills and vocabulary knowledge by analyzing the origins and roots of words, determining
meanings and uses of words based on context, discerning nuances in meaning of words considering social, political, historical,
and literary contexts.

Unit Learning Targets:

A4 select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to interact and aollaborate with others in pairs and groups
A8 Speak and listen to make personal responses to texts
A9 Speak and listen to interpret, analyze, and evaluate ideas and information from texts.
A10 speak and listen to synthesize and extend thinking.
C3 Write effective imaginative texts to develop ideas and information to explore and adapt literary forms and techniques
C4 create thoughtful representations that communicate ideas and information to exp0lore and respond, record and describe.
C12: use and experiment with elements of style in writing and representing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance
meaning and artistry, including syntax, diction, POV, literary devices.

C14 Use conventions in writing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry, including grammar and
usage, punctuation, capitalization, and Canadian spelling, copyright and citation of references, presentation/layout.

TIME
1

LEARNING TARGET
B5 I can imagine and understand
vivid, relevant, and compelling
purposes and effects of poetry.
I can identify the difference
between poetry and prose.
C9: I can read and, analyze, and
interpret poetry.

C8: I can support personal


responses to texts.
C9: I can read and, analyze, and
interpret poetry.
B12: literary devices
C4: I can visualize a poem as a
literal picture.

25

ACTIVITIES
Introduction to poetry: what is the difference
b/t poetry and prose?
Read NYT article: Bringing a Daughter
Back From the Brink25
Read Introduction to Poetry & Catch

ACHIEVEMENT INDICATORS
Students will read and respond at
Moodle to the following Mountain
Graveyard, A Leaf Falls, In a
station of the metro, and A
Narrow Fellow in the grass and
respond to questions at Moodle.

Instruction & notes: metered poetry


(syllables), end-rhyme, assonance, free
verse, end-stopped lines, metaphor,
extended metaphor, paraphrase

Discuss interpretations of Mountain


Graveyard, A Leaf Falls, In a station of
the metro, and A Narrow Fellow in the
grass
Literary devices:
end-stopped
enjambed
free verse
imagery
metaphor
simile
line breaks
lyric poem
slant rhyme
alliteration
assonance

Students will read and respond at


Moodle to the following The
Secretarys Chant, We Real
Cool, and Next god of course
America I and respond to
questions at Moodle.
Students will create a visual picture
of The Secretarys Chant to
explore the possible mood of the
poem.

Macwhinney, Betsy. "Bringing a Daughter Back From the Brink With Poems." The New York Times. The New York Times, 2015.
Web. 22 Apr. 2016. <http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/01/style/bringing-a-daughter-back-from-the-brink-with-poems.html?_r=1>.

C8: I can support personal


responses to texts.
C9: I can read and, analyze, and
interpret poetry.

consonance
speaker
syntax
Share visuals
Discuss interpretations of The Secretarys
Chant, We Real Cool, and Next god of
course America I and respond to questions
at Moodle.

Students will read and respond at


Moodle to the following love poetry:
The Magic of Love, Sonnet, and
Those Winter Sundays

B12: literary devices

C9: I can read and, analyze, and


interpret poetry.
B12: literary devices
I can apply the idea of clich
images in film to clich images in
poetry.

Literary devices:
internal rhyme
end-rhyme
tone
diction
dialect
jargon
eye rhyme
situational irony
sonnet
ambiguity
satire
Onomatopoeia
mood
Watch the opening scene from the film
Commando to explore the idea of clichs.
Discuss interpretations of The Magic of
Love, Sonnet, and Those Winter
Sundays
Literary terms:
cliches
sentimentality
satire
rhyme scheme
meter
iambic pentameter
sonnet

Students will read and respond at


Moodle to the following Dogs
Death, Midterm Break, and
Death of a Ball-Turret Gunner.

C9: I can read and, analyze, and


interpret poetry.
B12: literary devices

A9: I can share my responses to


poetry in a small group
A4: I can create a group
presentation

quatrain
rhyming couplet
sestet
octave
blank verse
dissonance/caucophony
Discuss interpretations of Dogs Death and
Midterm Break
Literary terms:
elegy
blank verse
pun
satire
tragic irony
ambiguity
connotation
denotation
Students will join small groups according to
one poem they wish to explore. Each group
will prepare a presentation for the class
where they explore the poems interpretation
and devices.

Students will read and respond at


Moodle to the following Onion, I
Know That He Exists, and Death
of the Ball Turret Gunner

Student groups will present a poem


and interpret it for the class.

A10: I can learn from my group


members thoughts on poetry
C9: I can read and, analyze, and
interpret poetry.
B12: literary devices

C12: I can use elements of style


and literary devices in the
creation of poetry.

Students will complete a poetry portfolio


where they choose among options for
composing two poems. They will write
explications of their poems that identify

Students will submit their portfolio


and select one piece to read at a
class poetry reading.

C11: I can analyze and describe


the features and devices in my
own writing.

strategies and devices. They will also select


one professional poem to explicate in a
multiple paragraph essay.

A8: I can listen to student poetry


and make personal responses
relating reactions and emotions
1

All targets

Students will take a test.

Poetry test: the test will be


formatted after the English 12
poetry section of the provincial
exam and include a sight poem, a
300-word essay, and multiple
choice questions which potentially
cover any/all literary terms for the
unit.

COURSE: EN11

UNIT: GRAPHIC NOVELS

Thematic Statement or Essential Questions:

What is the secret of this icon we call the cartoon? Scott McCloud

English 11 Learning Targets:

B1: read, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a wide variety of literary texts, including literature reflecting
a variety of prose forms.
B3 View, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of visual texts, with increasing complexity of ideas
and form, such as graphic novels.

Unit Learning Targets:

A1: interact and collaborate in pairs and group to respond to and critique a variety of texts.
B5 Before reading and viewing, select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to anticipate content and construct meaning,
including interpreting a task, generating guiding or speculative questions.
B12: recognize and explain how structures and features of text shape readers and views construction of meaning and
appreciation of authors craft.
A3: Listen to comprehend, interpret, and evaluate ideas and information from a variety of texts, considering structure,
message, effect and impact.
C4 Create thoughtful representations that communicate ideas and information to explore and respond, record and describe,
engage.
C9 write to interpret texts by identifying the importance and impact of social, political, and historical contexts.
C10 Write to synthesize and extend thinking by contextualizing ideas and information.

TIME
1

LEARNING TARGET
B1: read, both collaboratively and
independently, to comprehend a
wide variety of literary texts,
including literature reflecting a
variety of prose forms.

ACTIVITIES
Read Understanding Comics,
pages 24-41 and discuss.
First reading in book groups:
Persepolis: pages 1-40; Maus:

ACHIEVEMENT INDICATORS
Exit ticket response to Understanding
Comics passage: Describe Scott McClouds
theory of how comics help us better access
the world of ideas. What is this secret

B12: Literary terms: realistic vs.


abstract, physical world vs.
conceptual, iconic, universality

chapters 1-2; Stitches: pages 1280; American Born Chinese:


pages 7-60; Pyongyang: pages 144; March 1-40

B3 View, both collaboratively and


independently, to comprehend a
variety of visual texts, with
increasing complexity of ideas and
form, such as graphic novels.

power of the cartoon, according to him?


How does it work?
First post to Moodle discussion thread with
book groups: It should include a) things you
noticed, found interesting and b) any of your
general reading questions and/or possible
questions for verification. Your second post
should be in response to one group
members post.
Handout: As students read, they will identify
panels that demonstrate these ideas, record
the examples, and give interpretations.

B5 Before reading, strategies to


contruct meaning, interpreting a
task, generating guiding or
speculative questions
A1: interact and collaborate in
pairs and group to respond to
and critique a texts.
A3: Listen to interpret, and
evaluate ideas from a variety of
texts
1

C4 Create thoughtful
representations that
communicate ideas and
information to explore and
respond, record and describe,
engage.
C9 write to interpret texts by
identifying the importance and

Second readings: Persepolis:


pages 40-80; Maus: chapters 3-4
Stitches: pages 81-160
ABC: pages 61-120
Pyongyang: pages 45-88; March
42-80

Character portraits: Keeping yesterdays


McCloud reading in mind on the iconic
stripped-down nature of the characters,
students create portraits of the main
characters that respond to these questions:
What is the text/art trying to emphasize
about them so far? Is there anything
iconic/symbolic about their clothing, speech,
environment that helps to characterize
them? Label character details.

Historical verification. On the back of the


sheet, students reflect on discussion threads
from previous night. Identify any potential
pieces for historical verification.

impact of social, political, and


historical contexts.

2
classes

B12: literary devices

Teach plot types:

A9 speak and listen to interpret,


analyse, and evaluate ideas and
information from texts.

Linear

C4 create thoughtful
representations that
communicate ideas and
information to record and
describe.

Multiple alternating threads of


stories

Flashback/forward

Students create a timeline and map their


plots in small groups.
Short answer test where students interpret
each of their books in relation to the literary
terms and strategies we have learned in this
unit.

Finish reading books.

C10 Write to synthesize and


extend thinking by
contextualizing ideas and
information.

Resources:
Delisle, Guy. Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea. Montreal: Drawn & Quarterly, 2007. Print.
Lewis, John, and Nate Powell. March. Marietta: Top Shelf Productions, 2013. Print.
McCloud, Scott. Understanding Comics:. New York: HarperPerennial, 1994. Print.
Satrapi, Marjane. Persepolis. New York: Pantheon, 2003. Print.
Small, David. Stitches: A Memoir. New York: W.W. Norton, 2009. Print.
Spiegelman, Art. Maus I: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds History. New York: Pantheon, 1986. Print.
Yang, Gene Luen., and Lark Pien. American Born Chinese. New York: First Second, 2006. Print.

COURSE: ENGLISH 11

UNIT: INDEPENDENT READING

Thematic Statement or Essential Questions:

How do real readers engage with books?

Unit Learning Targets:

A4: select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to interact and collaborate with others in pairs and groups including
contributing ideas and supporting ideas of others.
B4: independently select and read, for sustained periods of time, texts for enjoyment and to increase fluency.
B2: read to comprehend a wide variety of information and persuasive texts with increasing complexity and subtlety of ideas
and form, such as professional book reviews and student generated book reviews.
B3: view, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of visual texts such as film and video, studentgenerated material.
C2: write purposeful information texts that express ideas and information to analyse and critique, engage.
C4: Create thoughtful representations that communicate ideas and information to explain and persuade, engage.
C5: select, adapt, and apply a range of strategies to generate, develop, and organize ideas for writing and representing,
including analyzing writing samples or models
C8: write and represent to explain and support personal responses to texts by making comparisons to other ideas and
concepts, relating reactions and emotions to understanding of the text, developing opinions using reasons and evidence.
C12 & C13: use and experiment with elements of style and form in writing and representing appropriate to purpose and
audience, to enhance meaning and artistry, including, visual / artistic devices.

TIME
daily

LEARNING TARGET
B4: independently select and
read, for sustained periods of
time, texts for enjoyment and to
increase fluency.

B2: read to comprehend a wide


3-4
classes variety of information and

ACTIVITIES
Students spend 20 minutes of each
class reading books they have freely
chosen, appropriate to ability.

ACHIEVEMENT INDICATORS
Social networking. Students create
Goodreads.com accounts where they post
regular updates about their reading
progress.

As students read, they will select


meaningful quotes, note their

Online book review. Students post a review


(with defined criteria and an assessment

persuasive texts with increasing


complexity and subtlety of ideas
and form, such as professional
book reviews and student
generated book reviews.

responses, and collect meaningful


reviews of their book. Students write
a review of one book they have read
during term 1.

rubric) using basic HTML and social media


at Goodreads.com

Students prepare a 30 second


persuasive pitch of their book and
engage in a speed dating event
where they mingle to promote their
book with peers.

Social networking. Students login to their


goodreads accounts and add books to their
to read lists following our speed-dating
event.

Students will work on storyboards


and practice using Animoto to
produce book trailers and advice
each other when they have
questionsto advance their skills
and use collective troubleshooting.

Indie film. Students work toward production


of a book trailer film. The first step is to
produce a storyboard or outline of the
trailer. Students will decide which
characters, themes, plot details they will
work with, and in what sequence. Students

C2: write purposeful information


texts that express ideas and
information to analyse and
critique, engage.

Reviews contain of the following


categories:
Book synopsis
Personal response
Selcected & interpreted quotes
Response to a professional review

C8: write and represent to


explain and support personal
responses to texts by making
comparisons to other ideas and
concepts, relating reactions and
emotions to understanding of the
text, developing opinions using
reasons and evidence.
Students use social media and
basic HTML in a book review.

weekly

A4: select, adapt, and apply a


range of strategies to interact
and collaborate with others in
pairs and groups including
contributing ideas and
supporting ideas of others.

C4: Create thoughtful


4-5
classes representations that
communicate ideas and
information to explain and
persuade, engage
.

C5: select, adapt, and apply a


range of strategies to generate,
develop, and organize ideas for
writing and representing,
including analyzing writing
samples or models

1 class

C14: use conventions in writing


and representing to enhance
meaning and artistry, including
copyright and citation of
references.
B3: view, both collaboratively
and independently, to
comprehend a variety of visual
texts such as film and video,
student-generated material.

Instruction on advanced Google


search and copyright. How to
search online for images that are
free to use, how to cite properly in a
film.

We will learn about QR codes and


how to produce them.
We will review the rubric for the
book trailers and discuss what
success looks like.

will select still/film images. Consider the


iconic nature of images when choosing.
Gather the necessary data: awards won,
review quotes, book quotes. This is todays
exit ticket. Students will complete their
project and post to a Youtube account,
pasting their URL in a Moodle wiki.

Students will generate QR codes for their


books that link to their book trailers. After
affixing them to our school library books, we
will have a book trailer fair, where students
wander, view, and respond to each others
book trailers.