You are on page 1of 23

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Privacy Through Poetry: 
A poetic journey through  Privacy In A Digital Age 
 
 
 
 
Diana Kelly 
Honor 3374 
Prof. Randy Dryer 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Introduction 
 
 
Following this introduction is a compilation of poems written as partial fulfillment of the 
course requirements for Privacy In A Digital Age.  This University of Utah Honors course takes 
on the format of a flipped classroom.  We listened to video lectures, read pertinent information, 
and engaged in discussions through a class blog outside of class.  This engagement outside of 
class allowed for class time to be used for discussion and exercises.  Throughout the course we 
discussed several relevant privacy concerns and policies.   
These relevant privacy concerns and policies were addressed as blog posts written by 
each student.  I have written a poem for each blog post.  These poems display the multifaceted 
struggle to remain private and anonymous in the world we live in.  Each poem is written in a 
style I felt reflected the tone of the privacy concern or policy.  Following each poem is a brief 
explanation of the topic and analysis of the poem.  I hope this poetic journey through the course 
gives you a basic understanding of what was discussed and a greater appreciation for 
protecting your privacy. Enjoy! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A Private Life 
 
Some say Privacy is dead,  
A tribute to Nietzsche, perhaps 
Privacy is dead because we killed it. 
We yearn for what we have lost 
Tricking ourselves into believing 
We live a Private life  
 
We live a Private life 
Creating torts for the common law 
Protecting us from Orwell’s vision come true 
Concocted in 1949 for 1984 
Truth in 2016 
 
Truth in 2016  
Is government surveillance 
Privacy is sacrificed for Protection 
A public in terror of what can be planned in private. 
 
We live a Private life 
One of many lies we tell ourselves 
To ease our concerns  
About those who might wish us harm 
Those who might abuse the system. 
 
Some say Privacy is dead, 
A word never written into our constitution, 
But inherently valued by the free 
Through the Katz test we may tell ourselves  
There’s a chance for revival of a term so flexible that 
I can say I live a private life. 
 
I can say I live a private life 
Hoping there is a chance for revival of a term so flexible that 
The Katz test is a comfort 
A term inherently valued by the free 
A word never written into our constitution 
Allowing some to say Privacy is dead 
 
Those who might abuse the system 
Those who might wish us harm 
Bring concerns, eased by 

One of many lies we tell ourselves: 
We live a Private life. 
 
A public in terror of what can be planned in private 
Sacrifices privacy for protection 
Government surveillance is 
Truth in 2016 
 
Truth in 2016 
Concocted in 1949 for 1984 
To protect us from Orwell’s vision come true 
We create torts for common law 
So we live a Private life 
 
We live a Private life 
Tricking ourselves into believing 
We don’t yearn for what we have lost 
Privacy is dead because we killed it. 
A tribute to Nietzsche, perhaps 
Some say Privacy is dead. 
 
 
 
In  A Private Life , I attempt to evoke the sense that privacy is not tangible in today’s 
world.  With the flexibility of the the meaning of privacy, there is much debate about whether the 
expectation of privacy is reasonable.  In this poem, I cycle through some of my thoughts on the 
subject.  I start with the somewhat bold statement of privacy being dead, referencing 
Nietzsche’s statement “God is dead and we have killed him.”  I believe that in a way this is true 
today of privacy.  Many of the reasons why we don’t have easily accessible privacy is because 
of the willingness we have to give it up in the name of protection.  This is a byproduct of the acts 
of terror that our generation has witnessed.  Out of fear we have denied ourselves a right not 
specifically written out in the Constitution, but inferred from the First Amendment, Fourth 
Amendment, and Fifth Amendment. 
While privacy is not easily attainable, many people go through life assuming that most of 
their life is private.  This is the mindset that I had before taking this class.  This mindset was not 
one that came out of total ignorance, but a choice to believe that it was true.  I was aware that 
the government had access to vast amount of data about its citizens from the Edward Snowden 
scandal,  I had always treated my social media like the public could see it, and I knew that there 

were risks involved with sharing my credit card information and social security number online, 
but I chose to ignore what this meant for my long term privacy.   
In the poem, I try to show an inner dialogue of admitting that privacy is not within grasp. 
After the bold declaration that Privacy is dead, I move into how we (the collective American 
people) trick ourselves into believing that we live private lives.  Not only do we trick ourselves, 
but we justify giving up privacy out of fear from terrorists who are able to create and execute 
plans that are made in private.  I then go on to discuss the value of privacy and how through the 
Katz test there is still hope for a semblance of privacy.  The Katz test was developed in the U.S. 
v Katz case of 1967 and tests whether there is a “reasonable expectation of privacy”.  Even with 
this hope, the previously stated still stands.  For this reason, I chose to write in a cyclical 
fashion, bringing the poem back to where it started by reversing the poem. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Right To Be Forgotten  
 
The right to be forgotten 
A ray of sunlight to brighten 
The grieving parents of a child 
Her remains eternally filed 
The pictures leaked  
Of her body streaked 
Across a cement barrier  
Causing anger to stir 
In the hearts of her parents 
Holding onto fragments 
Of their daughter’s life 
This right could relieve much strife 
From the grieving and changing 
It perhaps could bring 
A return of dignity for the embarrassed  
Turning their indiscretions to dust 
Already established in Europe 
Saving politicians from gossip 
Of lives lived in the past 
And information that used to last 
Now disconnected from a name 
Protecting those who live in fame 
423,050 requests have graced 
Google’s team, now faced 
With decisions that define 
Where we draw the line 
Defining what deserves to be private 
Locked away and shut 
And what the public needs to know 
From what a search result may show 
Causing many to be smitten 
With the right to be forgotten  
 
 
 
As the use of the internet increases and more and more information is accessible 
through web searches, the struggle to remain anonymous is multiplying.  In a sense we have 
become immortal through our social media pages and other personal information uploaded to 
the internet.  While immortality may seem grand to some, for others it causes great grief or 

potential embarrassment.  For one American family, the Catsouras’s, the immortality of their late 
daughter is not a welcome condition.  Nikki Catsouras was killed in a car crash.  Following this 
incident, the photos from the scene were leaked onto the internet.  Now, every time her name is 
typed into Google, those pictures come up immediately1.  Currently there is no way to remove 
these pictures in America. 
A potential solution to these types of situations is the enactment of “the Right to be 
Forgotten.”  This is a privacy centered policy, enacted in Europe by the European Commission 
in 2014.  The policy does not require the deletion of information, rather it removes the 
association between a particular query, or name, and specific results from the search2.  This 
policy has put Google in the position of having to deny or grant requests.  In a transparency 
report, Google disclosed it has received 423,050 requests.  Of these requests, 57.2% have lead 
to removal of URLs3.  
This poem is written to begin examining the worth of such a policy.  I discuss the 
Catsouras story and mention how it could keep people’s embarrassing pasts hidden.  It could 
bring relief and dignity to people who might not otherwise have it because of content on the 
internet easily associated with their name.  While mostly discussing the allure of such a policy, I 
do mention that Google is now the decision maker about what information should and should 
not be easily accessible though certain searches on the internet.  This could lead to a 
dangerous precedent of censorship.  Regardless, many are still smitten with the “Right to be 
Forgotten.” 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1

 Jeffrey Toobin, “The Solace of Oblivion,”  The New Yorker.  October 31, 2014, 
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/09/29/solace­oblivion 
2
 “Myth­Busting: The Court of Justice of the EU and the ‘Right to be Forgotten’,”  European Commission. 
October 9, 2014, 
http://ec.europa.eu/justice/data­protection/files/factsheets/factsheet_rtbf_mythbusting_en.pdf 
3
 “European privacy requests for search removals,”  Google.  Last Updated April 28, 2016, 
https://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/europeprivacy/ (These numbers are constantly 
changing due to the nature of these statistics.  The number of requests on April 29th is 423,974.)  

Real Name Policy 
 
Real Name Policy 
Free speech or civility 
Anonymity 
 
 
 
As I mentioned in the blurb following  The Right To Be Forgotten , anonymity has become 
increasingly difficult to maintain as the use of the internet has increased.  For this reason, many 
people fiercely defend the ability for individuals to post anonymously on online forums.  This 
defense comes from the fact that anonymity protects whistleblowers, victims, and others who 
could be in danger if their identity was known.  Defenders of anonymous speech also feel that 
anonymity allows commenters to be more truthful and confident when engaging in discussion 
online4.  In contrast, many feel that anonymous usernames allow people to be meaner, knowing 
their comments won’t be traced back to them5. 
My haiku,  Real Name Policy , briefly touches on the debate between anonymous speech 
and the possibility of a real name policy.  While I am aware that the debate is complex and 
requires many considerations, I do feel it comes down to a black and white decision.  Do we 
want free speech or civility? There will always be trolls and those who hide behind the mask of 
anonymity to say cruel things as long as anonymous speech exists, however if it is taken away 
many more will lose protection they need to have a voice.  We live in a country founded on the 
ability of individuals to express their thoughts freely and anonymously.  This foundational ability 
should be protected through the continuation of anonymous speech. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

4

 Elizabeth Dwoskin, “Whisper and the Meaning of Anonymity,”  The Wall Street Journal.  October 28, 
2014, 
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2014/10/28/whisper­and­the­meaning­of­anonymity/tab/print/?mg=blogs­wsj&url=
http%253A%252F%252Fblogs.wsj.com%252Flaw%252F2014%252F10%252F28%252Fwhisper­and­the­
meaning­of­anonymity%252Ftab%252Fprint 
5
 Kashmir Hill, “Civilizing the Internet, One Lawsuit at a Time (For Now),”  Forbes.  October 20, 2010, 
http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2010/10/20/civilizing­the­internet­one­lawsuit­at­a­time­for­now/#4
8c2f27736d3 

John & Jane Doe Litigation 
 
Miss Norma McCorvey 
Rocked the nation with  
A case that would change history 
Roe v Wade 
 
Miss Sandra Cano 
Won on the same day 
A case that broke the status quo  
Doe v Bolton 
 
Both cases led to the 
Legalization of abortion 
To make a woman free 
To choose to carry or terminate 
 
A hot topic 
Yesterday and today 
Making some sick 
And others justified 
 
Miss Sandra Cano 
And Miss Norma McCorvey 
Chose to file under “Doe” and “Roe” 
Seeking protection in anonymity 
 
 
 
John and Jane Doe litigation has allows plaintiffs to go to court with relative anonymity. 
This anonymity has lead to some history changing results like in the famous Roe v Wade case 
that brought about the legalization of abortion.  My poem seeks to show that there is no doubt 
that this protection offered through pseudonyms has allowed for controversial questions to be 
taken to court.  I am a personal proponent of allowing John and Jane Doe litigation, but the 
court’s view on it is nothing short of vague.   
Federal law requires that both plaintiffs and defendants list their names in all complaints. 
Despite this clear requirement, the US Supreme Court has seen several waves of cases with 
anonymous plaintiffs since the early 1970’s6.  Since this approval, there have been more 
6

 Ryan Shiverdecker, “Ducking Duties: Pseudonymous Plaintiffs and the Supreme Court of Ohio,” 
University of Cincinnati Law Review.  November 8, 2013. 

plaintiffs seeking anonymity.  Because of this seemingly ambiguous stance of the courts, many 
have called on the US Supreme Court to make a decision about what warrants allowing a 
plaintiff to file anonymously.  This sentiment has lead some to go as far as calling out the courts 
for shirking their duty.7 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
https://uclawreview.org/2013/11/08/ducking­duties­pseudonymous­plaintiffs­and­the­supreme­court­of­ohi
o/ 
7
 Ibid. 

Biometrics 
 
B iometrics 
I dentify us by  
O ur physical or behavioral traits 
M icrosoft billboards recognize 
E yes, nose, and mouth 
T o generate targeted ads 
R ecognizing our faces with 
I ncredible accuracy  
C ausing concerns about consent and privacy 
S ending us off to find tinfoil hats 
 
 
 
Biometric technology uses physical and/or behavioral traits to identify people.  This 
includes retina scans, facial recognition, fingerprints, and many more uniquely identifiable traits. 
These technologies allow for identification and tracking over large geographical areas.  Because 
of the intensely personal nature of biometrics, it is important for companies that use these 
technologies to be transparent about this use.  Unfortunately there are no binding regulations on 
the use of many of these technologies.  For instance, the FTC has only provided guidelines 
“intended to provide guidance to commercial entities” in regards to facial recognition8.  While 
these guidelines are a step in the right direction, they are in no way legally binding. 
This lack of legal regulation of biometric technology is what influenced my acrostic 
poem.  There are many uses of this technology, one of which is to allow targeted ads based on 
facial recognition.  While this might seem great, there are some serious privacy concerns to 
think about.  Consent is one of these concerns.  The final line is a reference to the general 
paranoia triggered by the increased use of technology to identify and track individuals. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8

 Kashmir Hill, “The 7 Dos and Don’t of Facial Recognition,”  Forbes.  October 23, 2012, 
http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2012/10/23/the­7­dos­and­donts­of­facial­recognition/#585618a33
b28 

Electronic Communications and Cell Phone Surveillance 
 
Third party doctrine 
Some vocally criticize 
We live in a world 
Dominated by cell phones, 
Information surrendered. 
 
 
 
The third party doctrine was established in the 1970s as a result of US v Miller and Smith 
v Maryland.  This doctrine states that “a person has no legitimate expectations of privacy in 
information he voluntarily turns over to third parties”9. This doctrine has been used subsequently 
including cases surrounding location information extracted from cell phones in US v Graham. 
With the increase of electronic communication needed to function in this world, the third­party 
doctrine has been criticized.  This tonka poem explains the reasoning behind this criticism.  With 
a world dominated by cell phones, a lot of our information is unavoidably surrendered to 
third­parties.  With the practice of this doctrine, our privacy is seriously compromised.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9

 John Villasenor, “What You Need to Know about the Third­Party Doctrine”,  The Atlantic.  December 30, 
2013. 
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/12/what­you­need­to­know­about­the­third­party­doctr
ine/282721/ 

Video Surveillance 
 
Big brother is watching 
Has never been more haunting 
Than when you realize 
You are being watched by mechanical eyes 
 
Has never been more haunting 
A curse and a blessing 
You are being watched by mechanical eyes 
Allowing many to criticize 
 
A curse and a blessing 
Frantically to our privacy we cling 
Allowing many to criticize 
The use of mechanical eyes 
 
Frantically to our privacy we cling 
Not even private when driving 
Allowing many to criticize 
The government’s mechanical eyes 
 
Not even private when driving 
Could it bring accountability to enforcing? 
The government’s mechanical eyes 
Prevent a policeman’s lies? 
 
Could it bring accountability to enforcing? 
Keep a black boy from dying 
Prevent a policeman’s lies? 
How to use the wandering mechanical eyes? 
 
 
 
Video surveillance is something that our generation has become accustomed to.  My 
high school was outfitted with the newest and best security cameras they could get their hands 
on.  Stores have surveillance cameras inside and outside.  These cameras are usually 
accompanied by a sign informing the use of video surveillance.  While we may be familiar and 
complacent about video surveillance, it is important for us to understand the implications of this 
constant surveillance.   

In my poem, I reference the cliche of “Big Brother” from Orwell’s 1984.  In Orwell’s 
futuristic novel, “Big Brother” is the all seeing government.  I touched on this topic in the first 
poem of this cycle as well.  In a very real way, this vision of Orwell’s has become reality today. 
This is seen in the use of ALRP (Automatic License Plate Reading) technology to track vehicles. 
With this information, the government has the potential to follow the driving patterns of an 
individual.  This can be very telling about a person, exposing where they live, work, go to 
school, and what activities they indulge in. 
The last two stanzas of my poem move into the potential benefits of video surveillance. 
Recently, there has been increased attention to police violence toward people of color.  An 
attractive accountability feature is the use of body cameras on policemen. While this is not a 
perfect solution and may even have it’s own privacy concerns, it shows that tools like video 
surveillance are only threats when abused.  The way we use our technology can and will affect 
the quality of our privacy. 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Snowden Affair 
 
There once was a man named Snowden 
He exposed the truth through the pressmen 
Now he lives in Russia 
Defending his dogma 
His penance for fleeing the bullpen   
 
 
 
This limerick is written at the expense of Edward Snowden.  In 2013 Edward Snowden 
exposed large amounts of classified information collected by the NSA’s global surveillance 
programs.  He leaked the information through news organizations in the US.  In June of 2013, 
Snowden was charged with theft of US government property and of violating the Espionage Act 
of 1917.  In response, Snowden fled to Russia where he now lives and seeks asylum.  
Snowden’s revelations have led to many discussions surrounding government 
surveillance and secrecy as well as Snowden’s status as an American hero or a traitor.  The 
Pentagon claims that his revelations will have ‘staggering’ impacts on US intelligence 
capabilities10.  While this may be true, his revelations exposed government programs that 
intruded on millions of American citizen’s lives on a regular basis without their consent.  For this 
reason, Snowden has been regarded as an American hero by many.   
The greatest difference between Snowden and other American heroes who have broken 
laws in the name of activism is that Snowden did not stick around to deal with the 
consequences of his actions. He fled from confronting his own actions in American courts. 
Instead he is stuck in Russia and can never come back to America.  This is the influence for my 
final line “His penance for fleeing the bullpen.” 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10

 “Defense Intelligence Agency assessment of damage done by Edward Snowden leaks ­ read the 
report,”  The Guardian.  May 22, 2014, 
http://www.theguardian.com/world/interactive/2014/may/22/pentagon­report­snowden­leaks­damage­repo
rt 

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (Diamonte)  
 
FISC 
Secret, Sly 
Reviewing, Approving, Allowing 
Surveillance, Searches, Security, Certainty 
Comforting, Validating, Unsuspecting 
Privacy, Rights 
Trust 
 
 
 
The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) was created after the Foreign 
Intelligence Surveillance Act was passed in 1978.  According to their website, “the Court 
entertains applications submitted by the United States Government for approval of electronic 
surveillance, physical search, and other investigative actions for foreign intelligence purposes”11. 
The FISC is conducted ex parte, only considering the side of the government, due to its need to 
be top secret.  This lack of transparency in conjunction with the courts overwhelming tendency 
to approve applications and the fact that each judge is appointed by the Chief Justice have 
caused the FISC to receive criticism and distrust. 
My poem is written as a diamonte.  This type of poem examines opposites.  In this case, 
the opposites are the FISC and trust.  The first half of the poem describes the FISC, the second 
half describes trust.  The shift of description happens in the middle of the fourth line.  I chose 
trust as the opposite of the FISC because of the criticism the court has received and because 
surveillance inherently comes from a sense of mistrust. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

11

 “About the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court”,  United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance 
Court.  http://www.fisc.uscourts.gov/about­foreign­intelligence­surveillance­court 

The Internet of Things Regulation 
 
There once was a fridge who listened to me 
Its obedience came with a fee 
Potential for breeches 
Fearing the glitches 
Of the Internet of Things I flee. 
 
 
This limerick is written about the “Internet of Things” or IoT.  The IoT consists of all 
internet connected devices spanning from your washing machine and refridgerator to your car. 
Connected devices have many benefits such as allowing smart home systems and centralizing 
control points for all your IoT devices.  IoT devices can also be used to improve health in the 
form of exercise trackers and a new pacemaker known as the Accent.  Even with all these great 
benefits, the IoT poses a big privacy risk. 
IoT devices collect a lot of data. This type of data is usually collected only after implied or 
express consent, but because most  IoT devices lack screens it is much harder to seek consent. 
This data could then be used to “make credit, insurance, and employment decisions”12.  With the 
third­party doctrine in effect, handing over this information to insurance agencies would 
essentially be turning your information into the government.  In addition, the way the data is 
stored and how long it is stored could potentially lead to breaches in security.  These privacy 
concerns greatly influenced my limerick. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12

 Joseph J. Lazzarotti, “FTC Announces ‘Concrete Steps’ for IoT Privacy and Security”,  Jackson Lewis. 
January 28, 2015, 
http://www.workplaceprivacyreport.com/2015/01/articles/hipaa/ftc­announces­concrete­steps­for­iot­privac
y­and­security/ 

Data Boker Legislation 
 
Well, they dig dig dig 
Well, they dig through data the whole day through 
Dig dig dig, that is what they have to do 
To pull of that trick to get rich quick 
If they dig dig dig, with a formula and click 
Dig dig dig, the whole day through 
Got to dig dig dig, that is what they have to do in the mine, in the mine 
Where a million data shine 
They got to dig dig dig, from the morning till the night 
Dig dig dig up every data in sight 
They got to dig dig dig, in the mine, in the mine 
Dig up data by the score 
A thousand brokers, sometimes more 
And they know what they are digging for 
 
Heigh­ho, heigh­ho 
It’s off to work they go 
They keep on digging and selling 
Heigh­ho 
 
Heigh­ho, heigh­ho 
Got to make our troubles grow 
Well, they keep on digging and selling 
Heigh­ho 
 
Heigh­ho, Heigh­ho  
 
 
 
To Disney fans, this poem is an obvious homage to the seven dwarfs in Snow White.  In 
a way, Data brokers are miners of personal data.  They dig up the information then sell the data 
for a profit “to get rich quick”.  Data brokers obtain personal information through public records, 
self reported information, social media, cooperative arrangements, and through purchase.  This 
information is then used for various purposes.  These purposes include verifying identities, 
differentiating records, marketing, and preventing financial fraud.  None of these purposes seem 
very dangerous, but the whole system of brokering data brings up many privacy concerns. 
There is very little regulation surround data brokers.  The information collected and sold 
can be used to discriminate against consumers.  In addition to potential discrimination, data 

brokers try to circumvent the concept of notice/consent, keeping you in the dark13.  There have 
been recent steps to increase regulation, allowing the consumer to be informed of what data 
has been collected and correct any incorrect data.  With or without this added regulation, data 
brokers will still be data miners, selling raw materials, or personal data, for a profit. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13

 InfoLawGroup LLP, “The Privacy Legal Implications of Big Data: A Primer”,  Information Lawgroup. 
February 12, 2013, 
http://www.infolawgroup.com/2013/02/articles/big­data/the­privacy­legal­implications­of­big­data­a­primer/ 

Do­Not­Track (Tonka) 
 
Please do not track 
My online activity 
Don’t use your cookies 
Don’t try to tailor or boost 
Please respect this one request 
 
 
 
Adding to the struggle of staying anonymous is the inability to navigate the internet 
without having your every action tracked.  Tacking is the result of websites using software and 
cookies.  Once collected, this data can lead to improved, personalized internet experiences and 
targeted ads.  While this is beneficial for websites, the data being collected is often personal and 
if abused could lead to serious security concerns.  Examples of data that can be collected are 
location, number of visits, total pages viewed, and even the page you were on before.   
Do­Not­Track is an option for individuals to opt out of being tracked.  On the surface, this 
options seems great.  It works by internet browsers implementing a Do­Not­Track header, 
allowing the user to determine their tracking preferences in an HTTP request14.  This then 
creates something like the Do Not Call list.  Unfortunately, the proposal that was issued in 2015 
only asks networks and companies to honor this Do­Not­Track header, it does not mandate 
them to heed these requests.  This lack of respect for requests inspired my tonka poem on the 
Do­Not­Track policy, which clearly represents a disdain for the lack of respect from networks 
and companies towards consumers. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14

 “Tracking Preference Expression (DNT): W3C Candidate Recommendation 20 August 2015,”  W3C. 
August 20, 2015, https://www.w3.org/TR/tracking­dnt/ 

School Monitoring of Student’s Social Media 
 
To eliminate the hurt of an unkind word 
Social media must be monitored 
Keeping students sheltered from the cruel world 
On the surface the benefits seem obvious 
Action can be taken 
To eliminate the hurt of an unkind word 
The potential to prevent violence 
To respond immediately to threats 
Keeping students sheltered from the cruel world 
But does it justify 
The collection of student passwords 
To eliminate the hurt of an unkind word 
Hateful speech is not illegal 
Do we trade our free speech for 
Keeping students sheltered from the cruel world 
It is up to the school’s discretion 
To decide what to sacrifice 
To eliminate the hurt of an unkind word 
Keeping students sheltered from the cruel world 
 
 
Bullying has been a part of life since the dawn of humankind, but with the widespread 
use of the internet and social media, bullying has shifted from the playground to the computer 
screen.  With this shift to cyber bullying, the string of school shootings, and the increase in teen 
suicide, schools have sought new ways of monitoring student behavior.  This has turned to the 
monitoring public social media posts by school officials and even, in some cases, going so far 
as to request the social media passwords of students.  This has opened up a fierce debate 
about the morality of such monitoring. 
My poem seeks to demonstrate the two sided debate surrounding the issue.  The 
ultimate goal of any school system is to create a safe place for students to learn.  In an effort to 
create and maintain safe learning environments, school systems have chosen to decrease 
student privacy.  Utah recently passed a law prohibiting post­secondary schools from being able 
to ask students to disclose their personal social media information15.  The exact words of the law 

15

 Tanya Roscorla, “Student Social Media Monitoring Stirs Up Debate,”  Center for Digital Education. 
September 30, 2013. 
http://www.centerdigitaled.com/news/Student­Social­Media­Monitoring­Stirs­up­Debate.html 

are: “Employer may not request disclosure of information related to personal internet account”16. 
The law does not speak for primary, middle, or high schools.  This leaves monitoring up to the 
discretion of individual schools and districts in Utah.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

16

 “Internet Privacy Amendments,”  Utah State Legislature.  2013, 
http://le.utah.gov/~2013/bills/hbillenr/hb0100.pdf 

National DNA Databases 
 
A national database of 
Something so personal 
Unique to each individual 
Our DNA is the very essence 
Of our being 
 
A proposal that could bring 
Discrimination unlike 
What we have seen before 
Genetic markers 
Determining our place  
 
The worth defined 
By the use in solving crimes 
But are we willing to pay 
With the potential exploitation 
Of our unchangeable genetics? 
 
 
 
There aren’t many things more personal than DNA.  With the increase of biometric 
technology, DNA is a more accessible and an efficient way of identifying individuals.  DNA is 
used in solving crimes, in medical cases, to determine paternity, and even in family history work. 
Currently it is considered a reasonable search for law enforcement to collect DNA samples from 
all arrestees in America. These databases store massive collections of DNA which pose 
potential privacy and discrimination concerns.   
Without a definite term length for holding onto the DNA samples, opponents of DNA 
databases argue there is a risk of the samples being used “for new and unidentified purposes”17. 
In addition, there are serious risks of DNA samples being used to discriminate.  Opponents of 
DNA databases argue that DNA could be used “to the exclusion of material that might prove the 
innocence of the suspect”18.  Discrimination could also take the form of using genetic markers in 
a legal context.  My poem seeks to explain both sides of this debate. 

17

 Candice Roman­Santos, “Concerns Associated with Expanding DNA Databases”,  Hasting Science and 
Technology Law Journal.  Summer 2010. 
http://uchstlj.org/concerns­associated­with­expanding­dna­databases/  
18
 Ibid.