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Reading Readiness

Storytime Guide

Reading Readiness
Storytime Guide
Developed by
Mary Jan Bancroft
Liz Benham
Marie Graninger
Cherl Ridgley
Marsha Schull
Revised (2010) by
Julie Friberg
Jenny Volpe
Copyright Notice:
All art and written material in this guide is copyrighted. You have permission to use these
materials in your own classroom or library. You may not copy, reproduce or distribute, for sale
or commercial use, any portion of the art or written material.
3955 East Fort Lowell Rd, Suite 114 Tucson, AZ 85712 (520) 721-2334 Fax (520) 881-0669
www.makewayforbooks.org
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Table of Contents
MAKE WAY FOR BOOKS Reading Readiness Titles1
How to Use This Guide.3
What is Reading Readiness...5
Lesson Plans
Book Handling
Five Little Ducks, Penny Ives...6
Tickle the Duck!, Ethan Long ...9
Very Hungry Caterpillar, The, Eric Carle...14
Whats Wrong with My Hair?, Satoshi Kitamura...17
Wheels on the Bus, Annie Kubler...19
Print Awareness
Bunny Cakes, Rosemary Wells...21
Dont Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late, Mo Willems...26
Hurry! Hurry!, Eve Bunting29
Mouse Mess, Linnea Riley..31
Reading Makes You Feel Good, Todd Parr33
Phonological Awareness
Llama Llama Red Pajama, Anna Dewdney35
Please, Puppy, Please, Spike Lee37
Rhyming Dust Bunnies, Jan Thomas..40
Sing-Along Songs43
There Was a Coyote Who Swallowed a Flea, Jennifer Ward .45
Letter Knowledge
ABC T-Rex, Bernard Most..47
Alphabet Under Construction, Denise Fleming...49
Maxs ABC, Rosemary Wells..51
Shiver Me Letters: A Pirate ABC, June Sobel.53
Sleepy Little Alphabet, The, Judy Sierra.58
Vocabulary Development
Chickens Arent the Only Ones, Ruth Heller...60
Goldilocks and the Three Bears, James Marshall....64
Mama, Jeanette Winter.68
Snip, Snap! What is That?, Mara Bergman..76
Thesaurus Rex, Laya Steinberg....78
Comprehension
Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity, Mo Willems.80
Not a Box, Antoinette Portis....87
Officer Buckle and Gloria, Peggy Rathman....89
Olivia, Ian Falconer.94
Wheres My Teddy?, Jez Alborough...96
Resources.....98

Table of Contents

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HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE


We encourage teachers to read to their children every day. Research has shown that
reading aloud to young children is the single most important factor in learning how to
read.
The main purpose of this guide is to help teachers foster the development of six reading
readiness skills identified in the Arizona Department of Education Standard of PreReading through quality childrens picture books. These skills are as follows:
Book-Handling
Print Awareness
Phonological Awareness
Letter Knowledge
Vocabulary Development
Comprehension
MAKE WAY FOR BOOKS staff and Early Literacy Consultants selected thirty titles
based on their relevance to each of the skill-areas. For each book in the guide, the main
skill area for which it was chosen is identified. Almost any book, however, can be used
to develop reading readiness skills in all areas.
The books are organized alphabetically by title. They are intentionally not categorized by
reading readiness skill-areas so that teachers will not be tempted to focus on only one
skill before moving on to the next. The six skill areas should be reinforced throughout
the day as opportunities present themselves.
Please use this as a resource but feel free to add to or modify any of the activities to meet
the needs of your children. For each title you will find the following storytime elements:
Things to get ready
Read through each storytime before you begin so that you can decide which activities you
would like to do or if you need to modify anything. Be sure to read each book ahead of
time so you can do a great job reading it aloud.
Related Books
Teachers are encouraged to read related books to their children to reinforce a particular
topic. All suggested books are available at the public library.
Getting the children ready to listen
This section includes fingerplays, poems, and songs. These types of activities will help
to focus the children and introduce the topic of the story. Fingerplays help children to
develop their fine motor skills, to increase their vocabulary, and to learn new concepts.
Songs and poems are great for language development and give children a sense of
empowerment when they learn them. You can encourage children to teach songs and
poems to their families. Singing can be especially effective in getting children to come
over to the storyime area and in settling them down.

How To Use This Guide

Read-Aloud Guide
A step-by-step guide is offered in this section to help you get the most out of reading
each book aloud. Suggestions of what to do before you read will prepare the children for
a certain topic and will increase their interests. What you do during the reading will
encourage childrens active participation. Questions and comments you make after
reading will help children make connections to their own lives and experiences.
Extension Activity
Extension activities are suggested for each book. Most are designed to reinforce the main
reading readiness skill-area identified beneath the title of each book. Please encourage
children to take their projects home and retell the stories to their parents. This is an
excellent way to enhance language development and comprehension. Certain activities in
this section ask teachers to write down what the children dictate or tell about their
pictures. This helps children see that what they say can be written down and then read by
others.

How To Use This Guide

What is Reading Readiness?


The Arizona Department of Education has identified six areas of early literacy that a child should
master before entering kindergarten. These are listed for you, as well as simple things you can
do throughout the day to help foster skill development in each area.
Print Awareness - The child knows that print carries meaning. Run your finger under words as
you read storybooks aloud. Point out other print in the classroom such as signs, labels, etc.
Book Handling Skills - The child knows how books work and how to care for them. Always
point out the title and author of the book. Ask children how to hold a book, where to begin, how
to turn pages, etc.
Phonological Awareness - The child hears and understands the different sounds of spoken
language. When reading books that rhyme, leave off the rhyming word and see if children can
guess what it is. Teach nursery rhymes and repeat them often.
Letter Knowledge - The child demonstrates knowledge of the alphabet. Choose alphabet books
that actually tell a story. These will be more meaningful and enjoyable to three and four-yearolds than alphabet books that have the letter and an object starting with that letter on each page.
Vocabulary Development - The child understands and increasingly uses complex vocabulary.
Explain new words to children when you come across ones you think they may not know. Give
them opportunities to talk and listen to what they say.
Comprehension The child shows an interest in books and comprehends stories read aloud.
Ask children questions about details in stories. Help them relate stories to their own life
experiences.

What is Reading Readiness

Five Little Ducks


By Anonymous
Illustrated by Penny Ives
Reading Readiness Skills Area(s):

Book Handling Skills


Print Awareness
Phonological Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Five Little Ducks


Five little ducks and the mother cut out and attached to popsicle sticks.
Examples of torn, scribbled on, etc., books
A selection of other versions of Five Little Ducks and other stories about ducks:
o Click, Clack, Quackity, Quack, by Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin
o Duck and Goose, by Tad Hills
o Duck on a Bike by David Shannon
o Quack, Daisy, Quack by Jane Simmons
o One Duck Stuck, by Phyllis Root

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Who has seen ducks at the zoo? Anywhere else?


Why do ducks leave their mother after a while?
Do children sometimes leave their parents?

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Five Little Ducks. The
author is anonymous. That means we dont know who first made up this story. The
illustrator is Penny Ives. That means she drew all the pictures.
2. Show the front cover and ask the children what they see.
3. Ask if the five little ducks look exactly the same. Count them.
DURING reading:
1. Read slowly and ask questions about the illustrations on each page. Also, ask what
the children see in the hole.
2. Encourage the children to quack with you and to say the rhyming words.
3. Ask if the children think the fox will eat the little ducks.

Five Little Ducks

4. Ask how the mother duck felt when none of the little ducks returned.
AFTER reading:
1. Talk about what makes a book happy or sad. Show examples of sad books.
2. Teach the poem about what makes a book happy:
Take care of the book you choose to get.
Dont write in it, tear it, or let it get wet.
Read it, enjoy it, and use it for fun.
Return it tomorrow for another one.
Extension Activities:

Read another version, such as Raffis, Five Little Ducks and teach the song with
motions.
Sing the song Five Little Ducks and use the duck finger puppets to act out the song.
Do the HAPPY BOOK LESSON PLAN
Happy Book
1. Give each child a book from the class library. Ask them to check if their hands
are clean, then open it carefully and turn the pages while looking at the pictures.
If they find any books with problems (torn, scribbled on, etc,), ask them to raise
their hands. Model how to turn the pages before they begin.
2. Ask children to return their books to their homes (bookshelf).
3. Ask children to list things that make books happy. Write the childrens answers
on chart paper.

Five Little Ducks

Five Little Ducks

Tickle the Duck!


by Ethan Long
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):

Book handling
Print Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Tickle the Duck


A teddy bear or other stuffed animal
Cut out and glue the parts of the cover found at the end of the lesson onto felt backing
A felt board
A selection of related books:
o Five Little Ducks
o A Splendid Friend, Indeed by Susan Bloom
o Ducks Not Afraid of the Dark, by Ethan Long

Getting the children ready to listen:

Use a teddy bear to act out one of the following poems.


I Bounce You Here
I bounce you here, I bounce you there, (bounce child on knees)
I bounce you, bounce you, everywhere.
I tickle you here, I tickle you there, (gently tickle child)
I tickle you, tickle you, everywhere.
I hug you here, I hug you there, (hug child)
I hug you, hug you, everywhere!

Rhyme and Actions


Round and round the garden
Went the Teddy Bear,
One step, two steps,
Tickle under there.
Round and round the haystack,
Went the little mouse,
One step, two steps,
In his little house.

Tickle the Duck!

(Run your index finger around baby's palm.)


(Jump your finger up his arm.)
(Tickle him under his arm.)
Run your index finger around baby's palm.)
(Jump your finger up his arm.)
(Tickle him under his arm.)

Say Eeney, Meeney, Miney Moe while pointing to each child to randomly choose a
child. Ask this child if he or she would like to come up on your lap to do the rhyme and
be the teddy bear.

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Usually all the children will want to be next on your lap after they see you act out the
rhyme with the child. Pull out the book Tickle the Duck!, and tell the kids that duck is
next to be tickled. Show the cover picture and ask, Do you think duck wants to be
tickled? Why or why not? Say, Look, the duck is saying something. Here is the
talking bubble. Lets read what he says.
2. Say, Lets read the book to find out if duck gets tickled. Point to the words of the title
as you say, The title of this book is Tickle the Duck!. Ethan wrote the words and drew
the pictures. Ethan Long is the author and the illustrator.
DURING reading:
1. Read the story slowly with expression. Each time he mentions, Dont tickle me here
point that spot out. Ask the children whether they think he wants to be tickled. Then
have the teddy bear tickle him cautiously since the children are probably not sure whether
the duck wants to be tickled or not. If a child doesnt think he wants to be tickled ask if
teddy bear could try to tickle him softly, just a little.
2. Since there is not much text on each page, be sure to read each page slowly and give the
children time to enjoy the details of the illustrations.
3. On the first page with no words where ducks wings are crossed, ask the children how
duck feels. Did he really not want to be tickled? Let the children discuss their
thoughts and accept the different opinions. Then turn the page to see the ducks changed
expression. Ask the children again if the duck really wants to be tickled. Accept the
childrens opinions and predictions.
4. At the very end, ask the children if they have ever played a similar game with their family
or friends.
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children if their Dad or Mom has ever turned them upside down for fun. This
time instead of having duck state he doesnt want to be tickled, have the duck say that he
doesnt want to be turned upside down. Turn the book upside down then turn the page
holding the book upside down and have the duck laugh. You dont need to go through
the whole book like this but just introduce the concept of right side up and upside down.
2. Notice the orientation of books on the bookshelf. If there are any sideways or upside
down, have the children fix them by putting them right side up.

Tickle the Duck!

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Extension Activities:

The pages following this lesson have these parts of the cover: the illustration of the duck,
the talking bubble, the title, and letters from the title. These parts should be cut out and
glued on a felt backing. Have a felt board ready. Place all the pieces on the felt board
right side up.
Tell the children to watch the teddy bear plan the game. Pretend to tell teddy bear he has
to close his eyes. Cover the teddy bears eyes. Turn over the title so that it is upside
down. Uncover the teddy bears eyes. Ask teddy bear to find what is upside down.
Have the teddy bear point out the part of the cover that is now upside down.
Let the children know they are going to play the same game and try to guess what is
upside down. Have the children close their eyes. Turn over the illustration of the duck.
Have the kids open their eyes and guess what is now upside down. If the children are
ready for a challenge you can repeat with the talking bubble and then get progressively
more difficult with the title and then individual letters. How difficult you make it
depends on the age and development of your children.
When the children are ready, have them be the teacher and turn something over.

Take Home Activity:

Have the children look for books or items at home that are upside down. They could also
play the game with their mom, dad, or sibling.

Tickle the Duck!

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The Very Hungry Caterpillar


Written and Illustrated by Eric Carle
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Book Handling skills


Comprehension

Things to get ready

A copy of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, by Eric Carle


Gather a selection of the fruits that are mentioned in the story. Having real things helps
teach children because they are able to see, feel, smell, and touch them. They also help to
build vocabulary because there is something real to connect with the name.
o One red apple
o Two green pears
o Three blue plums
o Four red strawberries
o Five orange oranges
Snack idea: Have one or two of the fruits in the story for snack.
Gather the necessary materials for the Egg Carton Caterpillarso Egg cartons (cut into sections of 3)
o Markers or paint
o Feathers
o Glitter
o Glue
o Pipe cleaners
o Googley eyes
o Tissue paper
Gather a selection of related books to read during storytime or to place in the reading
corner for the children to explore during free time.
o Waiting For Wings, by Lois Ehlert
o Growing Like Me, by Anne Rockwell
o Bugs for Lunch, by Margery Facklam
o Butterflies Fly, by Yvonne Winer

Getting the children ready to listen


1. Ask the children what they know about caterpillars. Have the picture enclosed ready, or
another caterpillar book or picture to show them.
2. Tell them you will be reading a story about a caterpillar and you have a poem to get them
in the mood. Say the poem two or three times to allow the children time to participate
and say it with you. (See poem on following page).

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

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Caterpillar by Beverly Qualheim


(Do actions as rhyme indicates.)
Caterpillar creeping
Caterpillar spinning
Caterpillar crawl.
Caterpillar snug.
Caterpillar climbing
Caterpillar changing,
All along the wall.
What have you become?
A butterfly! (Pretend to fly around room.)
Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Show the front cover of the book and read the title and author.
2. Ask the children what they already know about the caterpillar from the title (that hes
very hungry).
3. Show them the back cover. Ask them what the caterpillar is eating (a green leaf).
4. Tell them to listen carefully to the story to hear about all the different things that
caterpillar eats. Tell them that something very special will happen to the caterpillar at the
end of the story.
DURING reading:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Use lots of expression in your voice.


Be sure to allow plenty of time for the children to examine and enjoy the illustrations.
As the caterpillar eats through the fruit, ask the children to count the fruit with you.
On the pages where the caterpillar eats the cake, etc., let your voice show exaggeration
and surprise.
5. Do the same thing with your voice when the butterfly emerges
6. Use the toy caterpillar and push him the holes in the book. Have the children make
munching sounds.
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children what was special that happened to the caterpillar. Show those pages
again.
2. Have a few share their favorite parts or pages and tell why they like them.
3. See if the children can remember some of the good things he ate.
4. Recall some of the things he ate that made him sick. Ask them to share some of their
own stories about what has given them a stomachache.
5. Model holding the book and turning the pages. Encourage the children to take turns
during free time to explore the board book and handle it properly.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

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Extension Activities
Fruit
Have your fruits that you have brought spread out on a table. Ask the children to count the
different types of fruit with you as you retell the story. This would also be a good time to discuss
healthy and unhealthy food. You can talk about how all the foods that the caterpillar ate on
Saturday made him sick.
Egg Carton Caterpillars
1. Cut the egg carton into smaller pieces, (three cells in each piece makes a good size
caterpillar).
2. Turn the pieces over so that the humps face up.
3. Have the kids use markers or paints to color the caterpillars crazy colors.
4. Decorate with feathers, glitter, scraps of paper, etc.
5. Glue on pipe cleaners for the antennae, and googley eyes for the eyes.
6. Overnight hang the caterpillars in a brown paper bag (the cocoon). While the kids are at
home, stick tissue paper onto each caterpillar like wings. When the kids arrive the next
day, their caterpillars will have transformed into butterflies!

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

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Whats Wrong with My Hair?


by Satoshi Kitamura
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):

Book handling

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Whats wrong with My Hair?


11 x 17 drawing paper
Colored Construction Paper scraps
Crayons or markers
Scissors
A selection of related books:
o Hairs=Pelitos, Sandra Cisneros
o Falling for Rapunzel, Leah Wilcox
o The Okay Book, Todd Parr

Getting the children ready to listen:

Tell the children that you are going to read a book about a lion that is going to a party.
Ask the children if they have ever gone to a party. The children will usually talk about the
parties that they have attended. If not, encourage them to talk about the details of their
party by asking open ended questions. What kind of party did you go to? How did you
feel about going to the party? How did you dress for the party? Who was at the party?
What did you do at the party?

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Whats wrong with My
Hair? The author and illustrator is Satoshi Kitamura. Show the children the picture of
Satoshi working on his illustrations

Whats Wrong with My Hair?

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2. Show the cover picture and ask, How does lion look like he feels about going to the
party? Let the children respond and make predictions about why he might feel a certain
way about going to the party.
3. Say, Lets read the book to find out what happens
DURING reading:
1. On the first reading you may want to focus on the giraffes role in the book. On the first
page with the giraffe say, Giraffe is a barber. He has scissors in his hand here (point to
the scissors) and a hair dryer in is hand here (point to the hair dryer). What do you think
giraffe, the barber, is going to do?
2. Throughout the book, encourage the children to talk about their experiences with getting
their hair cut. Encourage them as well to predict whether they think the lion likes his
hair-do. Be silly and ask the children if they have ever received a hair-do like lions.
3. Since the illustrations are very busy, you may want to focus on other details in the
illustrations in subsequent readings. For example, during the second reading you could
have the children talk about what they think lions hair is and use the details in the
drawing as clues. During the third, example you could focus on the dog in each
illustration.
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children if lion was happy with his hair in the end.
2. Invite the children to come up one by one and put their face in the hole so that they have
a star hairdo. Ask them to show with their facial expression how the star makes them
feel.
3. Let the other children guess how the child feels. Have them confirm their predictions
with the child.
Extension Activities:
Activity : Make Your Own Lion Hair!

The back of the book has directions for an activity Make your Own Lion Hair! Ask the
children to share their lion hair. Practice gentle handling of books and the lion hair
pages.
Be silly and change the Happy Book Poem to Take care of the lion hair you choose to
get.

Whats Wrong with My Hair?

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The Wheels on the Bus


By Anonymous
Illustrated by Annie Kubler
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):

Book Handling
Phonological Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of The Wheels on the Bus


Primary sentence strips
Markers, tape, and scissors
A selection of related books to share during storytime and in the reading corner:
o The Wheels on the School Bus, by Mary Alice Moore
o Bears on Wheels, by Stan and Jan Berenstain
o Wheels on the Race Car, by Alex Zane

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Select one of the following to share with the children


o Sing WHEELS ON THE BUS or
o Recite poems.

ROLLER SKATES

FERRIS WHEEL

MERRY-GO-ROUND

Lively boots
Like how it feels
To whoosh around
On little wheels.

Rolls around
But doesnt roll away.
Stays on the ground
while her riders rise and
sway.

Spins lions, zebras,


Many a horse,
A jeweled giraffe
And kids, of course!

o After singing the song or saying the poems, have the children extend their arms
overhead, making a circle. Ask them what shape they have created. Ask them if
they can name other round objects.
Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is The Wheels on the
Bus. The author is anonymous. That means we are not sure who wrote the story.
Annie Kubler is theillustrator. That means she drew all the pictures.

Wheels on the Bus

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2. Look at the front cover of the book-ask children if they can identify any round objects
(i.e. wheels, steering wheels, clown nose, etc). Talk about the objects.
DURING reading:
1. Encourage the children to read the book along with you.
2. Pause after reading each page, and see if the children can spot any round objects on
the page.
AFTER reading:
1. Sing WHEELS ON THE BUS again using hand motions.
2. Tell the children to think about all the round objects they saw in the book. Ask them
to name some of these objects.
Extension Activity

Ask the children to make a circle again with their arms.


Using hand motions, say the following with the children:
GOING ON A CIRCLE HUNT
Im going on a circle hunt (arms in circle over head) and Im not afraid
(thumbs point to self)
I look high (place hand to forehead as if shading eyes and look up)
I look low (hand in same position-look down)
I look to and fro (hand in same position looking left and right)
Im going on a circle hunt and Im not afraid (repeat motions)

Tell the children that them that they are going on a CIRCLE HUNT in their
classroom. Ask children to look round the room and locate round objects. As a
circular object is found, use the sentence strips to label it, then tape the label beside
the object. When the activity is completed, and all of the round objects have been
located, call children back together. Together, count how many objects they found.
Tell the children what good CIRCLE DETECTIVES they are!
Class Management - Depending on size of class and childrens behavior this activity
can be done with the whole group or with partners. If using partners, have children
first locate the object then raise their hand for someone to come over and label it.

Wheels on the Bus

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Bunny Cakes
Written and Illustrated by Rosemary Wells
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):

Print Awareness
Comprehension
Vocabulary Development

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Bunny Cakes, by Rosemary Wells


Cut out pictures of ingredients
Cut out pictures of utensils and tools
Ruby's Bunny Cake Recipe (Write on chart paper if you plan to bake it in class, or
make enough copies to send home with children, so they can make it at home.)
Cake ingredients if you plan to bake a cake
Gather a selection of related titles to share during storytime or in the reading corner:
o Bunny Money, by Rosemary Wells
o Max Cleans Up, by Rosemary Wells
o Pancakes for Breakfast, by Tomie dePaola
o Any childrens cookbook

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

When do you usually bake a cake? For what occasions?


Sing Happy Birthday

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Bunny Cakes. The
author is Rosemary Wells. She made up the story and wrote it down. The illustrator
is Rosemary Wells. She drew all the pictures.
2. Show the front cover and ask children what they see.
3. Show the inside front cover and ask What are some of the ingredients you need to
bake a cake from scratch? Explain what scratch means. Display the cut out
pictures of the ingredients.
4. Ask What utensils or tools do you need? Display the cut out pictures of the
utensils.
5. Explain that Max and Ruby both want to make a cake for their grandmothers
birthday. Ruby has a recipe. Ask, Who knows what a recipe is? Show children
Rubys Bunny Cake recipe. Go over the ingredients with the children and match

Bunny Cakes

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them up with the displayed pictures. Say, Lets read the story to find out how both
of their cakes turned out.
DURING reading:
1. Ask questions such as: Who is older, Max or his sister Ruby? How do you know?
2. When Ruby sends Max to the store, ask children to help you find the picture of the
ingredient and start a new row of all the things she needs Max to get.
3. Ask questions such as, Is Max able to add what he wants to the grocery list? Do
you think Max makes a mess on purpose or by accident? How does Max make the
grocer understand that he wants red-hot marshmallow squirters? Which cake does
Grandma like best?
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children if they think Ruby is a mean big sister. Why or why not?
2. Ask them to try to remember all the messes Max made.
3. Ask if Ruby used upper or lower case letters on the grocery list.
Extension Activities:

Put all the pictures of the ingredients in a paper grocery bag. Let the children take
turns reaching in and taking out an ingredient. Point out the words printed on the
ingredients and read aloud what they say. As a group, decide whether or not each one
goes in the cake recipe.
Play the same game with the utensils.
If possible bake the cake!

Bunny Cakes

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Bunny Cake
By Ruby

1/4 cup of butter


4 eggs
1 cup milk
2 cup of sugar
2 cups of flour
1 tsp. vanilla
tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
Beat eggs until light and thick, slowly add sugar
and beat with a spoon 5 minutes or with electric
mixer for 2 minutes. Fold dry ingredients into
eggs and sugar mixture Melt butter in hot milk and
add all at once. Pour into a floured and greased
cake pan. Bake at 350 degrees for about 20 or 25
minutes.

Bunny Cakes

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Baking Powder

Measuring Cup

Milk
Bunny Cakes

Sugar

Mixing Bowl

Butter

Vanilla

Measuring Spoons

Eggs
24

Flour

Hamburger

Mixer

Broccoli

Hammer

Saw

Saw

Banana
Bunny Cakes

Salt

Bread
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Dont Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late!


Written and illustrated by Mo Willems
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):
Print Awareness
Things to Get Ready

A copy of Dont Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late!, by Mo Willems


Comic pages
Speech bubbles This sheet is found in the back of the notebook in the section
marked activities.
Paper
Crayons and markers
A selection of related titles to share during storytime or in the reading corner:
o How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night?, by Jane Yolen
o Dont Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo Willems
o Good Night Moon by Margaret Wise Brown

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Tell the children they are going to hear a story about a pigeon going to bed. Sing one
or both of the following songs.
Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed
Five little monkeys jumping on the bed.
One fell off and bumped his head.
Mama called the doctor
And the doctor said,
No more monkeys jumping on the bed.
Four little monkeys
There were Ten in the Bed
There were ten in the bed and the little one said, roll over, roll over, So they all
rolled over and one fell out. There were nine in
the bed.

Dont Let The Pigeon Stay Up Late!

26

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Dont Let the Pigeon
Stay Up Late! The author and illustrator is Mo Willems That means he made up the
story and drew all the pictures.
2. Tell the children that this is a book about a pigeon who does not want to go to bed.
Have the children talk about what happens at their bedtime.

DURING reading:
1. Explain to the students when the pigeon speaks his words are in a speech bubble.
2. Ask questions during the story: What are some of the ways the pigeon tries to get to
stay up later? Ask the students if any of them try to stay up later. When the pigeon
yawns, do you think he is ready to go to bed?
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children what was the pigeon dreaming about? Tell the children that
pigeons dream is called a thought bubble. Ask the children to tell you about a good
dream they had.
2. Show the children cartoons and explain to them about the speech bubbles. Knuffle
Bunny also by Mo Willems uses speech bubbles. Olivia by Ian Falconer has a
thought bubble at the end of it.
Extension Activity

Make enough thought bubbles for each child. Have the students draw a picture of a
happy dream in the thought bubble. Have the child dictate to you his/her dream.
Write this on the childs paper, and then have the student glue the speech bubble to
his/her paper.

Dont Let The Pigeon Stay Up Late!

27

Dont Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late

28

Hurry, Hurry!
by Eve Bunting
Illustrated by Jeff Mack
Reading Readiness Skill Area

Print Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Hurry, Hurry!, by Eve Bunting


Bring in pictures, stuffed animals or puppets of farm animals, especially chickens and
roosters.
A plastic egg with a chick inside
A selection of related titles to share at storytime or in the reading corner:
o Daisy and the Egg, by Jane Simmons
o Big Red Barn, by Margaret Wise Brown
o Chickens Arent the Only Ones, by Ruth Heller

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Show the pictures or puppets and talk about various farm animals. The mommy
chicken is called a hen and the daddy chicken is called a rooster. What is a baby
chicken called? (A chick and it hatches from an egg.)
Sing Old McDonald Had A Farm.

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Hurry, Hurry! The
author is Eve Bunting. She made up the story and wrote it down. The illustrator is
Jeff Mack. That means he drew all the pictures.
2. Ask who they see on the cover of the book.
3. Point to the letters that say Hurry, Hurry. Ask the children why you yell hurry?
(i.e. when you want someone to come fast or when you was them to see something
right now!)
4. Who is yelling hurry, hurry? How can you tell? Show the title page. Why does
the hen have her wings out? What is she yelling? (Point out words that say hurry,
hurry.) Show picture of the farm and have children identify what they see. I wonder
what the hen is so excited about. Lets read and find out.

Hurry, Hurry!

29

DURING reading:
1. Show the first page. Have the children help you read Hurry, Hurry as you point to
the words. Turn the page. Identify the goat. He is saying Coming, coming. Point
and have children help you read Coming, coming. Turn the page. Identify duck
talking to her ducklings. She is saying Ready, ready. Read with the children as
you point to the words. Turn the page. Now the ducks are saying Yes, yes. Read
together. Turn the page.
2. Continue to identify the animals and point to the words on each page as the children
read with you.
3. On the page where the hen says Shhhhh put your fingers to your lips and ask why
you say Shhhh Point out that the egg is making a sound. Point out tap, tap,
tappity-tap and ask what is happening. Have a little chick in a plastic egg and when
you say, Tap, tap, tap on the egg and open it up. Turn page to see if they guessed
correctly. What says cheep, cheep? Turn the page. Point out the chick saying
Im here! Im here! Turn the page. Now who is talking? It is all the animals.
Point and read Welcome! Welcome! On the last page the hen and the rooster are
saying Hello, little one. Point and read with the children.
AFTER reading:
1. Why did the hen want everyone on the farm to hurry?
2. What did the new chick say? What did the farm animals say?
3. What did the mom and dad say at the end?
Extension Activity:

Hurry, Hurry!

Do a dramatic retell of the story, using puppets, or just have various children be the
ducks or lambs, etc. Use the book to point and read with the children the words on
each page of the story.

30

Mouse Mess
Written and Illustrated by Linnea Riley
Reading Readiness Skill Area:

Print awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Mouse Mess, by Linnea Riley


Materials to make mouse puppet
o #4 cone coffee filters folded into thirds
o 2 pink construction circles
o Googley eyes
o tiny pompom for nose
o 6 piece of yarn for tail
o hole punch
Paper plates
Pictures of food from magazines or newspapers (Newspaper food ads work well)
Scissors and glue sticks
A selection of related titles to share during storytime or in the reading corner:
o Reading Makes You Feel Good, by Todd Parr
o Bunny Cakes, by Rosemary Wells
o Hurry! Hurry!, by Eve Bunting

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Tell the children that they are going to hear a story about a mouse. Ask the children to
share what they already know about mice (How big are they? Where could they live?
What do they eat? What do they look like? How do they sound?)
Select one of the following poems to share with them:

Poem #1:
What in the world
Goes gnawing and pawing
Scratching and latching

Sniffing and squiffing


Nibbling for tidbits of left-over cheese?
Please?

Poem #2:
I think mice
Are rather nice.
Their tails are long,
Their faces small.
They havent any
Chins at all.
Their ears are pink,
Their teeth are white.

They run about


The house at night.
They nibble things
They shouldnt touch
And no one seems
To like them much.
But I think mice
Are nice.

Mouse Mess

31

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Mouse Mess. The
author and illustrator is Linnea Riley She made up the story and wrote it down. She
also drew all the pictures.
2. Have children name all the foods on the books front cover.
3. Ask them why they think the book is called Mouse Mess.
4. Say, Lets read the book and find out.
DURING reading:
1. Briefly talk about the pictures on each page, making sure that all labels are pointed
out and read to the children.
2. Emphasize the last word in each sentence. Explain to the children that the last word in
each sentence rhymes.
3. Challenge the children to think of other words that rhyme with the. last word in each
sentence.
4. On the last two pages of the book, pause before completing the last sentence. Ask the
children to supply the missing words, he leaves the mess and goes.
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children how their family would feel if they found the mouses mess.
2. Repeat the poem with the children. Ask them if they think that mice are nice. Have
them give reasons for their answers.
Extension Activity
Mouse Puppet

Mouse Mess

Fold a flattened coffee filter in thirds. Glue along the bottom seam, so that there will
be a space for a finger to control the puppet. Glue on ears (two pink circles), eyes
and nose, punch hole for tail, insert yarn and knot at one end.
Have children select pictures of food from the newspaper ads. Cut out the pictures
and glue onto a paper plate. Now, they will have a mouse puppet, and a plateful of
food for the mouse to enjoy.

32

Reading Makes You Feel Good


Written and Illustrated by Todd Parr
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):
Print Awareness
Things to Get Ready

A copy of Reading Makes You Feel Good, by Todd Parr


Clipboard for recording environmental print
Chart paper and markers
A selection of related books to share during storytime or in the reading corner:
o Wild About Books, by Judy Sierra
o I Like Books, by Anthony Browne
o My Book Box, by Will Hillenbrand
o Just Open a Book, by P.K. Hallinan

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Ask the children to raise their hands if they like books. (Hopefully everyone will!)
Ask them to share why they like books and reading.
Teach them one of the following poems:

BOOKS TO THE CEILING


by Arnold Lobel
Books to the ceiling, books to the sky.
My piles of books are a mile high.
How I love them!
How I need them!
Ill have a long beard by the time I read
them.

Big Book, Little Book Poem


by Sarah Barchas
Big books, little books- narrow and wide,
Open the book and look inside.
Tall books, short books- old and new.
Waiting on a shelf is a book for you,
For me, for you, for me, for youetc.
Lets read!

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Reading Makes You
Feel Good. The author is Todd Parr. He thought up the story and wrote it down. He
also illustrated the book. That means that he drew all the pictures.
2. Talk about what is happening on the cover picture.

Reading Makes You Feel Good

33

3. Tell the children that you are going to read about many different ways that reading
makes you feel good. Ask them to listen to see if they like reading for any of the
same reasons.
DURING reading:
1. On the second picture of the classroom, after reading the text, ask the children if they
can guess what the word says on the teachers desk. Point out and read all the other
print on the signs.
2. Point out the sign on the trash can that says, Do not litter.
3. On some of the pages, point out other print that may be in the illustrations. Only
choose a few pages for this purpose the first time through so you will not loose the
flow of the text.
4. On the library page, ask if any of the children have been to the public library. If
necessary, explain what a library is.
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children if they can remember any of the reasons why reading makes you feel
good. Turn back to the page(s) that they mention and discuss them briefly.
2. On the last page, the author invites the reader to See if you can read all the words I
put in the pictures! Tell the children that the next time they read the book, either
later that day or the next day, they can look for all the words in the pictures.
Extension Activity
Word Hunt

Look around the classroom to point out environmental print such as childrens names
on their cubbies or labels on shelves. Tell the children that you are going to all go on
a walk around the center to hunt for words. As the children point out words on signs,
write them down on your clipboard. (Make the walk short enough for short attention
spans.)
Later in the day, choose some of the words and write them on chart paper. As a
group, read the words by first giving the children clues, such as: We saw this word
on the front of the building. It is the name of our school. What does it say?

Reading Makes You Feel Good

34

Llama, Llama, Red Pajama


Written and Illustrated by Anna Dewdney
Reading Readiness Skills Area(s)

Phonological Awareness
Vocabulary Development

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Llama, Llama, Red Pajama, by Anna Dewdney


Bring in a picture of a llama, or a llama puppet.
Gather a selection of related books to share in storytime and in the reading corner:
o Is Your Mama a Llama?, by Deborah Guarina
o Froggy Goes to Bed, by Jonathan London
o Good Night Gorilla, by Peggy Rathman

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Explain that a llama is like a camel, only smaller and without humps.
Tell them we will be reading a story about a llama who is having trouble going to
bed. Ask what excuses do they use when Momma says its time for bed and they
dont want to go to sleep? (i.e. thirsty, hungry, not sleepy, bathroom, need another
story, kiss, hug, etc.)
Explain the following words from the story and have the children dramatize them:
fret, (wring hands, look worried), moan, weep, wail, (over-dramatize the crying),
tizzy (like a temper tantrum), and llama drama.

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Llama, Llama, Red
Pajama. The author is Anna Dewdney. She made up the story and wrote it down.
The illustrator is also Anna Dewdney. That means she drew all the pictures.
2. On the cover point out the llama and his red pajamas.
3. How does he look?
4. Lets find out what happens when its bedtime for llama.
DURING reading
1. Read to the page where he frets. Have the children dramatize fret.
2. Read to the page where llama moans and have kids moan.

Llama, Llama, Red Pajama

35

3. On the page where llama is wailing, ask why the letters are printed so big. Have
them wail. Turn page. Did Mama come running? Why does she have her hands on
her hips? Finish the story.
AFTER reading:
1. Did llama finally get to sleep? What is llama drama? Did llama use some of the
same excuses you use when you dont want to go to sleep?
2. Lets go back and read the story again. This time I want us to look for words that
rhyme (or sound the same) like llama Mama and pajama.
3. Re-read and allow the students to find rhyming words. If possible, write the rhyming
words on chart paper or the chalkboard.
Extension Activity
Play Llama, Llama, Pajama

This game is played like Duck, Duck, Goose but instead of saying Duck, Duck,
Goose have the children say llama, llama, pajama. You could also use other rhyming
words from the story to play this game. (drink-sink, phone-moan, doing-boo hooing)

Rhyme, Rhyme, Rhyme With Me

As you are reading the story, the kids may notice that many of the words sound the
same or rhyme. At certain points, stop and ask if the kids can guess what word comes
next, based on the rhyming pattern. Once the story is over, show them some of the
rhyming pairs, and sing a song or play a game with the group using the pairs.

Rhyme with Me (to the tune of Skip to My Lou)


As you sing the song, when you get to the blanks, hold up the rhyming pictures, so that
the children can insert the rhyming words. After singing a couple of the times, ask the
group if they can think of any other rhyming pairs.
Rhyme, Rhyme, Rhyme with me
Rhyme, Rhyme, Rhyme with me
Rhyme, Rhyme, Rhyme with me
Rhyme along with me.
__________ and ___________are rhymes you see.
__________ and ___________are rhymes you see.
__________ and ___________are rhymes you see.
Rhyme along with me.

Llama, Llama, Red Pajama

36

Please, Puppy, Please


by Spike Lee & Tonya Lewis Lee
Illustrated by Kadir Nelson
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)
Phonological Awareness
Letter Knowledge
Comprehension
Things to get ready

A copy of Please Puppy Please, by Spike Lee & Tonya Lewis Lee
Small stuffed animal puppy
Markers
Chart Paper
Have a CD player or cassette player ready with a pre- selected song
Gather a selection of related titles to be shared during storytime or to place in the
reading corner for the children to explore on their own:
o The Great Gracie Chase by Cynthia Rylant
o Spike in Trouble by Paulette Bogan
o A Dog Needs a Bone! By Audrey Wood
o Buster by Denise Fleming

Getting the children ready to listen


Tell the children that you are going to read them a story about a puppy who runs away. Teach
them the following song and/or poem:
Playing Together
by B. Bardige and M. Segal
I am so very lucky.
I have a little pup
Who licks my face and plays
with me
As soon as I get up.

Where Has My Little Dog Gone?


Oh where, oh where has my little dog gone?
Oh where, oh where can he be?
With his ears so short and his tail so long,
Oh where, oh where can he be?

Whenever I throw a ball to her,


She brings it back to me.
One day I threw it much too
high.
Its catcher was a tree!

Please Puppy Please

37

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Please, Puppy, Please. The
authors are Spike Lee and his wife Tonya Lewis Lee. They thought up the story and
wrote it down. The illustrator is Kadir Nelson. That means he drew all the pictures.
2. Show the cover picture and ask, What do you think the children and the puppy are
thinking about?
3. Ask, Why do you think the title says please? What do you think the children want
their puppy to do? Lets read the book to find out.
DURING reading:
1.
2.
3.

On the page where the puppy has something in his mouth, ask, What is the puppy
doing? How do you think the girl feels about it?
Why do the children want the puppy away from the gate? What could happen?
Briefly talk about what the puppy is doing that the children dont want it to do. Ask,
How do you think the cat feels about the puppy? Why?

AFTER reading:
1.
2.

3.
4.

Ask, What did the puppy finally do that made the children happy? Do you think the cat
was happy at the end of the story, also?
Go back and look at several pages. Point out the words puppy and please. When
the word please appears in larger letters, read it with more emphasis. Invite the
children to read along.
Ask, Did the children ever scold or hurt the puppy?
Ask the children if any of them have had a puppy and to tell about training it.

Extension Activities
Please Pass the Puppy Game
1.
2.
3.

4.

Have the children stand or sit in a circle.


Introduce the stuffed animal puppy you brought in.
Hand it to one of the children. The child next to him or her says, Please pass the
puppy. When the puppy is passed to that child, he or she says, Thank you. The next
child says, Please pass the puppy. When its passed, he or she says, Thank you.
Continue until the puppy is passed around the whole circle.

Please Puppy Please

38

Musical P Game
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

On a different day, read Please, Puppy, Please again. Emphasize the relationship
between the letter p and the sound it makes.
Ask children to think of as many words as they can that start with the letter p. Write
them on chart paper.
Have children stand or sit in a circle. Hand one of the children the stuffed animal
puppy. Start playing music. The children pass the puppy around the circle.
Stop the music and ask the child holding the puppy to name something that starts with
the letter p. Continue the music.
Children start passing the puppy again. Stop the music and ask the child holding the
puppy to say a p word. Continue with the game. Try to give each child a turn.
If a child has difficulty thinking of a word, give him or her a hint by pointing to
something, such as a pencil.

Please Puppy Please

39

Rhyming Dust Bunnies


by Jan Thomas
Reading Readiness Skill Area

Phonological Awareness
Print Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Rhyming Dust Bunnies, by Jan Thomas


The song, Willaby, Wallaby Woo sung by Raffi or Nancy Cassidy (optional)
A poster with the lyrics Willaby, Wallaby Woo written on it (optional)
Pompoms, glue, popsicles sticks for extension activity
A selection of rhyming books to share during storytime and to place in the reading
corner:
o Here Comes the Big, Mean Dust Bunny, by Jan Thomas
o Llama, llama mad at mama, by Anna Dewdney
o Llama, llama misses mama by Anna Dewdney
o Llama, llama Red Pajama by Anna Dewdney

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Tell the children that you are gong to play with the sound of their names and make the
name rhyme with a silly word.
Sing or chant the following song. The green highlighted area will have the childs name
with the first letter changed to a W.
This is a good opportunity to use a pocket chart and sentence strips so you can easily
change the name and the silly rhyming word as you go from child to child while you are
singing the song.
Afterwards use the childrens names to review. Say for example, Wustin rhymes with
Justin, Wavier rhymes with Javier, Woo rhymes with you.
Willoughby, wallaby woo,
An elephant sat on you!
Willoughby, wallaby wee,
An elephant sat on me!
Willoughby, wallaby Wustin,
An elephant sat on Justin!
Willoughby, wallaby woo,
An elephant sat on you!

Rhyming Dust Bunnies

40

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Rhyming Dust Bunnies.
The author and illustrator is Jan Thomas. She made up the story and illustrated it.
2. Ask, Do any of you have a cat or a dog? Tell them that sometimes cat and dog hair or
fur can collect under furniture and when we try to sweep it up the air makes it move
around so that its hard to sweep up. Tell them that these are called dust bunnies.
3. Show the front cover and ask the children how many dust bunnies they see. Count with
them, One, Two, Three, Four...Four Dust Bunnies.
4. Let them know that the dust bunnies in the stories rhyme. Say, The words mat, hat, rat
and ______ rhyme. Log, hog, bog and ________ rhyme. Bee, tea, see and _______
rhyme. Wait to let them think about what might rhyme, then fill in a rhyming word as
needed.
DURING the first reading:
1. Plan to read the story multiple times. This will allow the children to begin to see the
rhyming patterns. By the second or third reading, they will be able to help tell the story!
(See notes below for suggestions for the second and third readings.)
2. During your first reading, read through slowly and point to each character as it says a
word. Our goal during the first reading is to let the children get the flow of the story.
AFTER the first reading:
1. Ask them what they think happened after they were vacuumed up. Accept childrens
responses.
2. Point out the talking bubbles. Let the children know that we know what each character
says because the words are written in the talking bubble. Point to a character and ask the
children to find a talking bubble to match the character.
DURING the second reading:
1. During your second reading, point to the words as you read them. When you get to the
green word which doesnt rhyme, ask the children, Does LOOK OUT rhyme with rug,
hug, and mug? Why does Bob say LOOK OUT? Listen to and accept the childrens
responses.
DURING the third reading:
1. The third reading might be on the same day or on a different day or week depending on
the age and interest of your children. During your reading, pause and see if the children
fill in any rhyming words. For example, We rhyme all the ____!, and rug, hug, ___.

Rhyming Dust Bunnies

41

Extension Activity

Make dust bunny puppets with pompoms, popsicle sticks and if the pompoms are big
enough, googley eyes. Model having the dust bunnies retell the story or say rhyming
words.

Take Home Activity

Eventually, let the children take home their dust bunny puppets in a zip lock with the
Willaby Wallaby poem. Ask the parent to make silly rhymes with the members of the
familys names. Let them know that our dust bunny puppets have been practicing
saying rhyming words. They rhyme all the time.

Rhyming Dust Bunnies

42

Sing-along Songs
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Phonological Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Sing-along Songs


CD Player
Any props to go along with the song you choose to teach children that day such as
spider stuffed animal for Itsy Bitsy Spider or a drum and a bone for This Old
Man, stuffed animals or animal puppets for Old MacDonald, etc.
Craft materials to make an art craft that relates to the song you are learning, for
example, a school bus for Wheels on the Bus, or some animal puppets for Old
MacDonald, etc.
A selection of related titles to share at storytime or place in the reading corner:
o Wheels on the Bus by Annie Kubler
o Itsy-Bitsy Spider by Annie Kubler
o If Youre Happy and You Know It by Annie Kubler
o Singable songs for the very young: Great with a Peanut Butter Sandwich CD
by Raffi
NOTE: For each song, having books that connect to the content or that are
related in some way will also help make the song more meaningful for
children. For example, when you focus on Wheels on the Bus, having other
transportation books would work well or other books with farm animal
characters for when you sing, Old MacDonald had a Farm.

Getting the children ready to listen:

Ask: Do you have a favorite song you like to sing?


Explain that children are going to learn a song that you will sing together today.

Read-Aloud Guide:
This book is a collection of popular sing along songs. Choose one song to focus on and
repeat reading and singing the song often before learning another song. Below is a general
guide about how you can go about working with the song so children really get an
opportunity to develop phonological awareness.
BEFORE you read the song:
1. Point to the title of the song and say, The title of this song is ______.

Sing-along Songs

43

2. Ask the children what they see in the picture and what they think this song could be
about.

DURING reading:
1. The first time you go over the song, point to the words as you sing them. Read a
whole verse this way. Then, go back over the verse as you say each line and have
children repeat the line with you. Next, sing the whole verse together. Move on to the
other verses in the same way.
2. Then play the song on the CD and have children practice singing the song a second
time as you hold up the book and point to the words. Repeat until most children are
comfortable with the song. If there are actions that can go along with the song, teach
them to the children.
3. Then, if you have props, use them as you sing, asking children to pick out and use the
appropriate props at the appropriate time in the song.
4. Finally, a fun way to have children sing the song once they are familiar with it, is to
leave out a few of the ending words so children can fill them in as you sing together.
AFTER reading:
1. Once children are really familiar with the song, ask them to tell you what happens in
this song.
2. If you used props, have them retell the song using the props.
Extension Activities

Make an art craft that children can use to remember the song. For example, you might
make a school bus for Wheels on the Bus, or animal puppets for Old MacDonald,
a paper plate happy face for If Youre Happy and You Know It, or bunny ears for
Do Your Ears Hang Low? etc. As children make the art craft, play the song in the
background and encourage them to sing along.
Read a book that relates to the song.

Take Home Activity

Encourage students to bring home their art craft and sing the song at home for their
parents.

Sing-along Songs

44

There Was a Coyote Who Swallowed A Flea


By Jennifer Ward
Illustrated by Steve Gray
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):

Phonological Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of There Was A Coyote Who Swallowed A Flea, by Jennifer Ward


Non-fiction book about coyotes,
Large piece of paper for writing,
Markers
Tape
A selection of related titles to share during storytime or in the reading corner:
o There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed A Fly by Simms Taback
o I Know A Shy Fellow Who Swallowed A Cello by Barbara Garriel
o There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Trout, by Teri Sloat
o Welcome to the World of Coyotes by Diane Swanson

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Ask the children what they like to eat.


Ask them what might happen if they eat too much of something.
Tell the children that they will hear a story about someone who eats unusual things.
Explain the meaning of unusual if the children are unfamiliar with the word.

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is There Was A Coyote
Who Swallowed A Flea. The author is Jennifer Ward. She made up the story and
wrote it down. Stephen Gray is the illustrator. That means he drew all the pictures.
2. Show cover of the book; ask them where they think the story takes place.
3. Ask the children what they think the coyote will eat first.
DURING reading:
1. Start reading the story. Stop as you read and show the pictures. See if children can
predict which animal will be eaten next.
2. Have the children repeat the refrain Yippee-o-ki-yee with you.

There Was A Coyote Who Swallowed A Flea

45

3. Since there is a pattern to the story, pause and encourage the children to join you in
repeating the names of the animals eaten. For example, He swallowed the (pause) to
catch the (pause).
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children if they think the story could really happen. Have them explain their
answers.
2. Ask them to tell you what they liked best about the story. Encourage them to explain
their reasons to you.
Extension Activity

Show a picture of a real coyote and ask the children to tell you what they think a
coyote would eat. Use a true book about coyotes to provide information and to show
additional pictures of coyotes. Make a chart with the children comparing and
contrasting a real coyote and with the one from the story.
When finished-have the children count how many things are the same, and how many
things are different about the coyotes.

There Was A Coyote Who Swallowed A Flea

46

ABC T-Rex
Written and illustrated by Bernard Most
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Letter Knowledge
Vocabulary Development

Things to Get Ready

A copy of ABC T-Rex, by Bernard Most


Write childrens names on a name tag.
Make alphabet cards starting with the first letter of each child in the class. Be sure to
make the letters uppercase. If you have students whose names start with the same
letter, make them each a card.
A selection of related titles to share during storytime or to place in the reading corner:
o Animal Alphabet, by David Wojtowycz
o Maxs ABC, by Rosemary Wells
o The Dinosaur Alphabet Book, by Jerry Pallota

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Sing the ABC song or say the following poem.


Five Dinosaurs
Five dinosaurs went out to play
Out in the land of the lost one day.
Tyrannosaurus Rex ate one for a snack
Only four dinosaurs came back.
-continue the rhyme until (3-2-1)
No dinosaurs went out to play
Out in the land of the lost one day.
Tyrannosaurus Rex looked for something to munch
But he couldnt find a dinosaur to eat for his lunch.

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is ABC T- Rex. The
author and illustrator is Bernard Most. He made up the story and wrote it down. The
illustrator is Bernard Most that means he drew all the pictures.
2. Show the children their name tags but dont hand them out.

ABC T-Rex

47

DURING reading:
1. Read the book through once. Stop on any words that the children may be unfamiliar
with and explain the words to them. (appetizing, delicious, gobbled, irresistible,
luscious, nutritious, quenching are good examples that students might not know).
2. Hand out the name cards to the kids. Read the book a second time. When it comes to
the letter that starts with that childs name have the student stand up.
AFTER reading:
1. After reading the book a second time have the children sit down on the floor. Turn
the alphabet cards face down. Let each child pick a card.
2. On the childs turn the child says the letter and then gives the letter to the child whose
name that letter starts with.
3. After each child has gone have him/her tell the class what letter his/her name begins
with.
Extension Activity

Hand out the alphabet cards. Stop and look at the letter pictures that students first
names start with. For example, on the P page there are pictures of pickles, potato
chip, peanuts, and pies. The back of the book lists things to look for on each of the
pages.

Play I am going on a picnic. Give each of the students his/her alphabet card. Have
each student think of something that he/shecould bring on a picnic that starts with
his/her name. For example, Isaac would bring ice cream.

ABC T-Rex

48

Alphabet Under Construction


Written and Illustrated by Denise Fleming
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):

Letter Knowledge
Vocabulary Development

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Alphabet Under Construction, by Denise Fleming


Create a movement cube for the Movement Cube Game.
o Small, cube-shaped cardboard box
o Six new vocabulary words from the story that relate to movement
o Markers
o Colored Paper
o Write a new vocabulary word from the story on each side of the cube. To
make it more interesting for your kids, decorate with colored paper and
markers.
Gather a selection of related books to read during storytime or to place in the library
corner.
o Animal Action, by Karen Pandell
o ABC T-Rex, by Bernard Most
o Shiver Me Letters: A Pirate ABC, by June Sobel

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Read the following poem


MOUSE
In the woods
I saw a mouse
I built her a little mouses house
She pushed the leaves,
She pulled the hay,
She built her mouses house her way.
-Sharon Bailly

Alphabet Under Construction

49

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Alphabet Under
Construction. The author and illustrator is Denise Fleming. She made up the story and
she drew all the pictures.
2. Hold up the book, point to the picture on the cover and ask the children to describe
the contents of mouses toolbox. Have them predict what mouse might do with the
various objects.
3. Ask the children how the picture on the cover goes with the title. Talk about the word
construction. Ask them why they think the book is called Alphabet Under
Construction.
DURING reading:
1. As you read, stop and talk with the children about any unfamiliar vocabulary words.
2. Point out how the first letter of the action and the alphabet letter are the same.
3. Show how the illustrations match the action of each letter.
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children to describe the illustration they liked best, and tell why they liked it.
Extension Activity
Movement Cube Game
1. Explain to the children the difference between moving a little and moving a lot. Practice
big and little movements. Practice each of the movements on the movement cube for just
a little bit. As you do each action, point to its beginning letter on the alphabet chart.
2. Now the children are ready to play the game. Have them stand in a circle. Explain that
each child will get a chance to roll the cube. After rolling the cube, all children will
perform the top movement.
3. Pass the cube, and continue the game around the circle. To make the game more
interesting, ask the children to perform either big or little movements.
4. Note: If you dont have a cube shaped box, you could use index cards as an alternative.
Shuffle the cards and let the children take turns choosing a card. The children will then
do the movement on the card.

Alphabet Under Construction

50

Maxs ABC
Written and illustrated by Rosemary Wells
Reading Readiness Skill Area:
Letter Knowledge
Things to Get Ready

A copy of Maxs ABC, by Rosemary Wells


If possible bring in a small childs size ant farm for the children to observe
Half sheet of paper with the initial letter of each childs name, for example, M for
Mike and B for Barbara.
Ant Stickers
A selection of related books to share at storytime or in the reading corner:
o Hey, Little Ant, by Phillip and Hannah Hoose
o Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin and John Archambault
o Eating the Alphabet, by Lois Ehlert

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Ask the children if they know who Max and Ruby are.
Tell them that Max and Ruby are going to have some problems with ants.
Each page shows a different letter of the alphabet. Sing the Alphabet Song or The
Ants Go Marching.

The Ants Go Marching


The ants go marching one by one,
The ants go marching two by two.
Hoorah, hoorah,
The little one stops to tie his shoe..
The ants go marching one by one,
Hoorah, hoorah,
The ants go marching three by three
The ants go marching one by one,
The little one stops to scratch his knee
The little one stops to suck his thumb,
And they all go marching down, to the
The ants go marching four by four
ground, to get out of the rain,
The little one stops to shut the door
Boom, boom, boom
The ants go marching five by five
The little one stops to take a drive
The ants go marching six by six
The little one stops to pick up sticks
Seven by seven.
The little one stops to point to heaven

Maxs ABC

51

Eight by eight.
The little one stops to close the gate.
Nine by nine.
The little one stops to draw a line
Ten by ten..
The little one stops to sing it again .

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Maxs ABC. The
author is Rosemary Wells. She made up the story and wrote it down. The illustrator
is also Rosemary Wells. That means she drew all the pictures.
2. Show the cover of the book. Point out Max. What is he wearing on his shirt?
3. Show the inside cover and point out the alphabet letters and the ants. Point out the
ants on Maxs popsicle. Do you like it when ants get on your food? Lets find out
what Max does to get rid of the ants.
4. Show title page. Point out the ants getting out of the ant farm. What do you think the
ants will do? Lets read.
DURING reading
1. Read. After the C page, ask why Max poured the cranberry juice on the ants. After
the E page, point out Maxs sister Ruby.
2. After the F page, ask why Max took off his pants fast. On the I page, ask why Max
says itch, itch, itch.
3. After the J page, ask why Max jumped in the bath? R pagewhy did Ruby make a
trail of crumbs?
AFTER reading
1. Did Max get rid of the ants at the end of the story? Name some of the places the ants
went in the story.
2. Where did the ants go at the end?
Extension Activity

Maxs ABC

Have student place ant stickers onto the initial letter of their name. Use this
opportunity to say things like, or Youre putting ants on your letter L. Students may
also draw picnic items on their letter like they saw in the book.

52

Shiver Me Letters
by June Sobel
Illustrated by Henry Cole
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Letter Knowledge
Phonological Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Shiver Me Letters: A Pirate ABC, by June Sobel


Treasure Chest materials:
o Treasure chest sheets (make enough copies for 1 chest per child)
o Gold coins game sheet (Make enough copies for all letters in each childs first
name. Use gold-colored paper if possible.)
o Markers or crayons
o Scissors
o Envelopes
o Glue
A selection of related titles to share during storytime and in the reading corner:
o Alphabet Under Construction by Denise Fleming
o Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin, Jr.
o Tough Boris by Mem Fox
o How I Became A Pirate by Melinda Long

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Tell the children they will be hearing a story about pirates and letters of the alphabet.
Choose either of the following poems to teach them.
A Childrens Pirate Shanty
By Mark capn Slappy Summers
I'm a pirate! That I be!
I sail me ship upon the sea!
I stay up late - till half past three!
And that's a peg below me knee!
(You might want to add, Yo, ho, yo, ho a pirates life for me!)

Shiver Me Letters

53

Roger the Pirate


By "Coconut Bob" Karwin
My name is Roger the Pirate and my favorite letter is "R"
I sail the seas, Plundering ships
With cargo that starts with "R"
So if youre on a ship thats carrying....
Radishes and Raincoats
Right handed Rabbits
Rhinos and Race Cars
and Red Rocket ships
You know Ill be coming, across the ocean so far
Because my name is Roger the Pirate and my favorite letter is "R"
Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Shiver Me Letters: A
Pirate ABC. The author is June Sobel. She thought up the story and wrote it down.
The illustrator is Henry Cole. That means he drew all the pictures.
2. Ask the children if they know what sound pirates like to make. If someone says,
Aarr, ask, What letter of the alphabet does that sound like? If the children
learned the Roger the Pirate poem you can refer back to it.
3. Ask the children what they think a pirate ABC is. Tell them to listen to the story
and see.
DURING reading:
1. As you are reading, explain any of the words you think the children may not know
such as: land ho, capture, quest, anchor, etc.
2. The first time you read the book, point out most of the hidden letters. The children
will soon want to help you. Tell them that you will read the book again and they can
help point out all of the letters.
3. After reading the Q and R page, ask the children what letter comes next before
turning the page. After their guesses, say Lets turn the page and find out.
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children if the crew found all the letters. Where did they find a Z?
2. If children are interested, read the story again and let them point out the hidden letters
on each page.

Shiver Me Letters

54

Extension Activity
Treasure Chest Activity
1. Neatly write the first name of each child on a treasure chest using upper and
lowercase letters.
2. Children can glue their treasure chests onto an envelope.
3. Write all the letters needed for childrens names on the coins.
4. Help children cut out the coins they will need for each of their names.
5. Children can store the letters of their names in their treasure chest envelopes.
6. Quiz children on the letters in their names by asking them to identify letters when
they are taken out of the envelope.
7. Using the treasure chest as a model, children can place their letters in the correct
order to spell their names.
8. As children work with this activity, you can ask them questions such as, What sound
does this letter make? or What other words start with the same letter as your
name?

Shiver Me Letters

55

______________________________

Shiver Me Letters

56

Shiver Me Letters

57

The Sleepy Little Alphabet


by Judy Sierra
Illustrated by Melissa Sweet
Reading Readiness Skill Areas

Letter Knowledge
Phonemic Awareness

Things to get ready

A copy of The Sleepy Little Alphabet by Judy Sierra


Cut out letters from the attached Alphabet Sheet and glue onto tag board or thick
paper.
Gather a selection of related books to share during storytime or to place in the reading
corner for the children to explore on their own.
o Chicka Chick Boom Boom by Bill Martin Jr.
o Maxs ABC by Rosemary Wells
o How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight? By Jane Yolen
o Shiver Me Letters: A Pirate ABC by June Sobel
o If You Were My Bunny by Kate McMullen

Getting the children ready to listen

Show the children the book and tell them that they are going to take a trip to alphabet
town and try to get all the sleepy letters to bed.
Show the children one alphabet card at time while its completely covered with a
blank card. Tell them that one letter is already asleep in his bed. Let them know that
you are going to uncover only a part of the letter so that you dont wake him or her
up. Uncover only a very small part of the letter by pulling the covers down, up and
then to the right and left. After uncovering each part have them try to guess which
letter is asleep in bed. You can give them support beforehand if needed by writing
several letters on the board, naming them and then having the children guess which
letter is asleep based on the clues.

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is The Sleepy Little
Alphabet. The author is Judy Sierra. She made up the story and wrote it down. The
illustrator is Melissa Sweet. She did all the pictures.
2. Tell the children that before the alphabet letters go to bed they like to have the ABC
Song sung to them. Ask them how they think the class should sing the song if its a

The Sleepy Little Alphabet

58

before bedtime song (soft or loud, high or low, fast or slow)? Ask them why they would
sing it the way they mention. Allow children to discuss their opinions. Open the cover
of the book and point to the ABCs as you sing the song.
DURING reading:
1. Children love to read their favorite books repeatedly. This book lends itself to multiple
reads. Since it has predictable rhyme you can leave out a rhyming word and have the
children join in, for example, the little letters skitter-skatter, helter-skelter, whats the
_________? Read the last part with great concern to give them a clue. Many places in
the story lend themselves to inviting the children to fill in the rhyming words based on
context and visual cues.
2. Make the book interactive by pausing before you read one of the letters. See if they are
able to fill in the letter by using audio and visual cues, for example, with chubby C
and rub-a-dub D. Make room for me! says eensy ____.
AFTER reading:
1. On the last page sing the ABC Song in a whisper to not wake up the letters. Point to
each letter in bed as you name them.
2. After closing the book, say Now they cant hear us, we dont have to whisper. Sing the
song again using a normal to loud indoor voice.
3. Name a letter while showing its illustration and ask what the letter was doing when it was
time for bed. For example, What was t doing at bed time? (tucking in her teddy
bear) Then announce with enthusiasm that tuck and teddy start with the t sound.
Extension Activity
Repeat the alphabet game played at the beginning but using various letters. This is a game they
will enjoy playing on a regular basis.

The Sleepy Little Alphabet

59

Chickens Arent the Only Ones


Written and Illustrated by Ruth Heller
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):

Vocabulary Development
Phonological Awareness
Comprehension

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Chickens Arent the Only Ones, by Ruth Heller


Three boxes labeled YES NO and MAYBE cards
Picture cards of animals
Drawing paper (one sheet per child)
Crayons, paints, markers, colored pencils
A selection of related titles to share during storytime or in the reading corner:
o Daisy and the Egg, by Jane Simmons
o Hurry! Hurry!, by Eve Bunting
o Are You My Mother?, by P.D. Eastman
o Mrs. Gooses Baby, by Charlotte Voake

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Tell the children they will be hearing a story about eggs.


Choose either of the following poems to teach the children.
Baby Chick
Peck, peck, peck
On the warm, brown egg.
Out comes a neck.
Out comes a leg.
How does a chick
Whos not been about
Discover the trick
Of how to get out?

Chickens Arent the Only Ones

60

Eggs
Lots of animals come from eggs
Some with fins
And some with legs.
Some that chatter
And some that cheep
Some that fly
And some that creep.
Some that slither
And some that run
Some with feathers
And some with none.
Animal eggs can be quite small
Or just as big as a tennis ball.
The animals here
They're quite a few
Hatch from eggs
And lay them, too.
Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Chickens Arent
the Only Ones. The author is Ruth Heller. She wrote the words in the book.
Ruth Heller is also the illustrator. That means she drew all the pictures.
2. Show the cover picture and ask what kind of animal it is. Ask what is beside the
chicken.
3. Ask students which animals come from eggs. After children have brainstormed
animals that they know hatch from eggs, show them the yes, no, and maybe
boxes and pictures of a variety of animals. Let children take turns choosing an
animal picture card and saying the animal's name. Let students decide if each
animal definitely comes from an egg or definitely does not hatch form eggs. Put
pictures in the yes or no boxes. If children are not sure about an animal, place
it in the maybe box. Tell the children that reading Chickens Arent the Only
Ones will help them learn the answers.
DURING reading:
1. Point to the picture on the title page and talk about it briefly.
2. Begin reading the book.
3. On the page with the dyed eggs, point to the picture of the chick and ask if
children knew that baby chicks come from eggs.
4. On the peacock page ask, Who knows what kind of bird this is? Say, We are
going to be learning a lot of new animals in this book. So lets read it through
once and then we can go back and look at the pictures again.

Chickens Arent the Only Ones

61

5. As you read the book, explain any words that you think the children may not
know.
6. When you finish the book, go back to the Oviparous page. Ask the children to
say the word with you. Remind them that the word means any animal that lays an
egg.
AFTER reading:
1. Say, Think for a minute about which animals lay eggs. Raise your hand if you
want to say the name of one of the animals.
2. Repeat this until everyone gets a turn who wants one.
3. Look in the boxes for the animals the children named and see if their cards are in
the correct column.
4. If not, have the children correct them. Put the maybes in the correct boxes.
Look back in the book to find any of the animals that the children arent sure
about.
Extension Activity

Later in the day or on a different day, invite the children to draw a picture of their
favorite oviparous animal.
Ask them to dictate a sentence to you about the picture. Be sure their names are
on their pictures.
Put the pictures together to create a class book.
Make a cover for the book. Ask the class what they would like the title to be.
Write it on the cover.
During storytime, read the class book. Put it in the library area for children to
look at later.

Chickens Arent the Only Ones

62

Chickens Arent the Only Ones

63

Goldilocks and the Three Bears


By James Marshall
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Vocabulary Development

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, by James Marshall


Enlarge and post a copy of the Pease Porridge rhyme if possible, see attached page at
end of lesson
Small, medium and large items, such as stuffed bears, bowls, spoons, and chairs,
A paper bag with the message on the outside that says, The Bear Family Bowls
Various versions of Goldilocks and the Three Bears to place in the reading corner:
o Goldilocks and the Three Bears, by Heidi Petach
o Goldilocks and the Three Bears by Jan Brett
o Goldilocks and the Three Bears retold by Candice Ransom
o Goldilocks and the Three Bears retold by Jim Aylesworth
o Goldilocks and the Three Bears, by Paul Galdone

Getting the children ready to listen:

First chant the rhyme Pease Porridge.


Repeat the rhyme while including gestures for hot and cold when saying the words. The
gesture for hot might be wiping your brow as if sweating. The gesture for cold might
be shaking and shivering with teeth chattering.
Then ask the children to act out the hot and cold part with you when you chant the words.
Chant the rhyme again while pointing to the words or picture. Leave out the word cold
and see if they remember the word.
Finally chant the poem leaving out both the words hot and cold.
Let the children know that the words hot and cold are opposites. Tell them that you
will be reading a story that has many opposites. Have them act out some opposites with
you. Here are some examples of other concepts they could act out with you:
o Open and closed (while opening and closing hands)
o Big and little (while stretching your arms out big and then bringing them
together as if indicating the size of something little)
o High and low (while stretching up high and crouching down low).

Goldilocks and Three Bears

64

Read-Aloud Guide:
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the cover of the book Goldilocks and the Three Bears. See if they can guess the
title. Point out the three bears to help them if needed. Let the children know the title and
author of the book.
2. Point to the bowl of porridge on the poem and let the children know that the bear family
loves to eat porridge for breakfast. Porridge is like oatmeal. Ask the children if they
have ever eaten oatmeal. Ask them if they eat it hot or cold.
DURING reading:
1. On the page where the bears taste their porridge, ask the children if they can guess what
scalding means. Help them use the picture of papa bear as a clue since he has steam
coming out of his mouth. They can read on as a clue as well. The next sentence says,
Ive burned my tongue. Tell them that sometimes when we continue reading, we get a
clue that helps the book make sense.
2. On the following page where Goldilocks has her arm around Papa Bears bowl. The
children can talk about the sizes of the bowl. The red bowl is Papa Bears bowl. What
size is it? Is it small, medium or large? What about Baby Bears yellow bowl? What
size is it? Act out the sizes big and little. Then let them know that the words big and
little are opposites.
3. On the next two pages where Goldilocks is tasting and eating the porridge, leave out the
opposite word cold on both pages and see if one of the children says the word. Give
wait time as needed.
4. On subsequent readings you may want to emphasize the high and low or soft and
hard concepts. Since this is a very repetitive book the children can help reading large
parts of it as well after many repetitions. They will gain new vocabulary and language
structure while doing so. This is a great way for children who are learning English as a
Second Language to learn vocabulary and language.
AFTER reading:
1. Have the grocery bag ready with 3 different-sized bowls inside. The bag should have the
words The Bear Family Bowls written on the outside. Pretend to just then notice the
bag and say, Look I found a bag! Did anyone see who dropped it off? There are some
words on the bag! I wonder what they say. Pretend to sound out the words slowly and
read them.
2. Reach in the bag and pull out the large bowl. Say This bowl is very big. Its huge! Its
humongous, enormous! Its large! Who would eat out of such a big bowl. Accept any
answers the children give. Pull out the tiny bowl. Say, This bowl is very small! Its
little! Its tiny! Its miniscule! Who would eat out of such a small bowl? Accept any
responses the children give. Pull out the middle-sized bowl. Say, this bowl is not as big
as the large bowl and not as small as the little bowl. Its a medium size bowl. Who
would eat out of a medium-bowl? Accept any responses the children give.

Goldilocks and Three Bears

65

3. Each time you re-read the story you could start with a bag of items that relate to the story,
such as hot, cold and medium temperature items; soft, hard and in between.
Extension Activities

Place materials such as the bowls in your dramatic play kitchen area and invite the
children to act out the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears by saying lines from the
story while doing an activity related to the story such as pretending to eat from the bowls.
For example, My porridge is too hot.

Take Home Activity

Invite the parents to help the children bring items or picture from home in a bag that are
opposites. You can give suggestions if you would like (happy/sad, long/short, white/
black, narrow/wide, big/little, young/old). When the child brings in a bag, let the child
pull out one item and the children can guess how the other might be the opposite.

Goldilocks and Three Bears

66

Pease Porridge

Pease Porridge

hot,

Pease Porridge

cold.

Pease Porridge
Nine

Goldilocks and Three Bears

in the pot,
days old.

67

Mama: A True Story


Written and Illustrated by Jeanette Winter
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Vocabulary Development

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Mama: A True Story, by Jeanette Winter


Bring in pictures, stuffed animals or puppets of a hippopotamus and a tortoise. (See
pictures at end of lesson.)
Material to make a book- pictures from the book and construction paper for the cover.
A selection of related title to share during storytime and in the reading corner:
o George and Martha by James Marshall
o Owl Babies by Martin Waddell
o The Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Talk about the hippos physical attributes and compare them to the tortoises
attributes.
Explain that we will be reading a true story about a hippo that was separated from his
mother by a tsunami.
Explain that a tsunami is a really, really big wave that comes on the land after an
earthquake under the ocean. (You may have to also explain what an earthquake is).
Have the children say the word tsunami a few times, and tell them the word is
Japanese.

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Mama: A True Story.
The author is Jeanette Winter. She made up the story and wrote it down. Illustrator is
also Jeanette Winter. That means she drew all the pictures.
2. Show the cover of the book. Tell the children we will read a story without many
words, but they will be able to help tell the story by reading the pictures. Point out
the baby hippo and the speech balloon where he is calling Mama. Where is he? It
is day or night? (point out the stars in the sky).
3. Ask what the children think could happen if a lot of water came up on the land. What
might happen to the hippo?

Mama

68

DURING reading:
1. Show the first picture and point out the Mama and the baby hippo. Ask what they are
doing? Turn the page. Now what are the hippos doing? Point out the speech
balloons and tell what they say. Turn the page. Now what? It is the next morning
and where are the hippos going? Turn the page. Point out the beginning of the
tsunami. Turn the page. What happened to the hippos? What is the tsunami doing?
What will happen? Turn the page.
2. Can the baby see the Mama? Can the Mama see the baby? What happened? Turn
the page. Now its night. Who do you see? Wheres Mama? Turn the page. Point
out that the baby washed up on the shore all alone. How do you think he feels? Turn
the page. Who are the people? Where will they take the hippo? Point out the tear on
the hippos cheek. Turn the page. Now hes in the jeep. Where will they take him?
What place has a lot of wild animals inside fences? (zoo or animal shelter). Turn the
page.
3. Who is hippo looking for? Who does he meet? Turn the page. What does he say?
Did the hippo make friends with the tortoise? What are they doing together? Turn
the page. Now what are they doing together? Turn the page. Now its nighttime
again. What are they doing? What is the hippo dreaming about? Even though the
tortoise is not his real Mama, the tortoise adopted the baby hippo.
AFTER reading:
1. What was happening at the beginning of the story? How was the hippo feeling?
2. What happened when the tsunami came? How was the hippo feeling?
3. What happened after the tsunami? Who helped the hippo? How did he feel at the
end of the story?
4. Could you tell what was happening in the story even without a lot of words? How?
Read at the end of the book what it tells about this true story.
Extension Activity

Mama

Make a blank book and include a few pictures from the book. Have the students
dictate the captions and then you will write the dictation under the pictures to re-tell
the story. Make a title page and a THE END page for the book. Share the story with
the students. Leave the book where the students can re-read the story.

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Snip Snap! Whats That?


By Mara Bergman
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Phonological Awareness
Vocabulary Development

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Snip Snap! by Mara Bergman


Word cards with the following words written on them: creep, slither, snip-snap,
swoosh/swish, stumble
A selection of related titles to share at storytime or place in the reading corner:
o Yum Yum: What Fun by Mara Bergman
o Counting Crocodiles by Judy Sierra
o What Time is it, Mr. Crocodile? by Judy Sierra
o Tumble Bumble by Felicia Bond

Getting the children ready to listen:

Tell the children that today they are going to hear a story about an alligator. Ask them
to tell you what an alligator looks like and to share anything they know about
alligators.
Then teach them the following fingerplay:
The Alligator
The alligator snaps his jaws (lay arms flat together)
Snap, snap, snap (hands open and shut)
The alligator smacks his tail (hand on thighs)
Smack, smack, smack (smack hands on thighs)
The alligator crawls away (slither hands away from body)

Read-Aloud Guide:
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Snip Snap! The author
is Mara Bergman. She made up the story and wrote it down. Nick Maland is the
illustrator. That means he drew all the pictures.
2. Show the front cover of the book. Ask the children what they see. Ask: How do the
children look? How do you think they feel?
3. Ask them to predict what is going to happen in this story. Lets read to find out what
happens between the children and the alligator.

Snip Snap!

76

DURING reading:
1. Turn to the wordless picture pages before the story begins. Ask children to look at the
picture and describe all the things they notice. If necessary, ask questions to help:
What are those prints on the floor? What do you think made those footprints? What
do you see on the stairs? What is that man doing behind the desk? Do you think the
doorman saw the alligator come into the apartment building?
2. Point to the words as you read them. Use voices and actions as you say some of the
more descriptive words in the story. For example, as you read creeping, creeping,
creeping, on the first page, you might use a whispering voice as your hands creep
up the stairs. Then ask children to creep with you. Continue to use motions and
invite children to do them with you as you read the many descriptive words in the
story: slither, swish/swoosh, stumble, etc.
3. Give children plenty of time to look at the illustrations. Talk about what is happening
and how the children are feeling in the story.
4. When you get to the page that describes the alligator (wide mouth, long teeth, strong
jaws) use your arms to show what these words meanfor example, stretch your arms
out long and wide and ask the children to move their own jaws back and forth. Also
when you read the words SNIP SNAP, have children use their arms straight out in
front as jaws as they clap their hands together to snip and snap their jaws shut.
5. This story has repetitive questions and soon children will catch on. Invite them to join
in after you ask, Were the children, scared? and respond, You bet they were!
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children to explain what happened to the alligator at the end of the story.
How did the alligator feel at then end? How did the children feel?
2. Take out your word cards and talk about how this book had so many wonderful words
to help us understand how the alligator was moving. Go over each word and invite
children to stand up and move how each word describes. (For creep, walk on tip toes
and sneak around, for snip-snap, walk with their arms as snip-snapping jaws, for
swish/swoosh move around wiggling tails back and forth, etc.)
3. Read the book again. Ask the group to act out the story by doing the motions and
reading together with you.
Extension Activities

Play a Snip, Snap game which is a version of the Red light, green light game.
Have children line up some ways away from you. Explain that they are going to play
a game where they are the alligators trying to move towards you. Stand with your
back to the children. Pull a word card and tell the children to do the action on the
card. Then say stop. Continue with the other words until one of the children has
moved forward enough and touches you. Repeat the game.

Take Home Activity


Encourage students to talk about the story with their parents and siblings at home.

Snip Snap!

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Thesaurus Rex
by Laya Steinberg
Illustrated by Debbie Harter
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s):

Vocabulary development
Phonological awareness

Things to get ready:

A copy of Thesaurus Rex, by Laya Steinberg


Create a movement cube for the Movement Cube Game.
o Small, cube-shaped cardboard box
o Six new vocabulary words from the story that relate to movement
o Markers
o Colored Paper
o Write a new vocabulary word from the story on each side of the cube. To
make it more interesting for your kids, decorate with colored paper and
markers.
Gather a selection of related books to read during storytime or to place in the library
corner.
o My Friend Lucky, by David Milgrim
o Baby High, Baby Low, by Stella Blackstone
o Dinosaur Roar!, by Paul Strickland

Getting the children ready to listen:


Tell the children that they are going to hear a story about a dinosaur. Ask them to share what
they already know about dinosaurs. Read the following poem to the children. On the second
read through let the kids act out the poem.
Dinosaur
Dinosaur, Dinosaur, stomp around
Dinosaur, Dinosaur shook the ground
Dinosaur, Dinosaur some gave fear
Dinosaur, Dinosaur we wish you were here.

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78

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Show the group the cover of the book. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of
this book is Thesaurus Rex. The author is Laya Steinberg. She made up the story and
wrote it down. The illustrator is Debbie Harter. That means she drew all the pictures.
2. Explain to the children that a thesaurus is a book that helps you learn about words. It
tells you synonyms (words that mean the same thing) for a word they already know. For
example, if you wanted another word for clean you might find the words wash and
bathe.
DURING reading:
1. Read each page and talk about the words on the page. For example, when you read the
page, Thesaurus Rex likes to play, explain that the words frolic, rollick, frisk,
and romp all mean the same as play. This will help with vocabulary development.
Remember some of the words from the story and use them at other opportunities
throughout the day.
2. You can also work on phonological awareness with this story by emphasizing the
rhyming words to the children on each page. Thesaurus Rex drinks his milk: sip, sup,
swallow, swill. Whoops! Hes had a messy spill.
AFTER reading:
1. Discuss the new words the children learned while reading Thesaurus Rex. Ask them to
share their favorites new words.
2. Read the book again and have the students act out the book.
Extension Activity
Movement Cube Game
1. Explain to the children the difference between moving a little and moving a lot. Practice
big and little movements. Practice each of the movements on the movement cube for just
a little bit. As you do each action, point to its beginning letter on the alphabet chart.
2. Now the children are ready to play the game. Have them stand in a circle. Explain that
each child will get a chance to roll the cube. After rolling the cube, all children will
perform the top movement.
3. Pass the cube, and continue the game around the circle. To make the game more
interesting, ask the children to perform either big or little movements.
4. Note: If you dont have a cube shaped box, you could use index cards as an alternative.
Shuffle the cards and let the children take turns choosing a card. The children will then
do the movement on the card.

Thesaurus Rex

79

Knuffle Bunny, Too


Written and illustrated by MoWillems
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Comprehension
Print Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Knuffle Bunny, Too by Mo Willems


Copy selected pages of Knuffle Bunny, Too for sequencing activity
Clothesline and Clothespins
Crayons or markers
Stuffed bunny
A selection of related titles to share at storytime or place in the reading corner:
o A Pocket for Corduroy by Don Freeman
o The Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown
o Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale by Mo Willems
o Knuffle Bunny Free: An Unexpected Diversion by Mo Willems

Getting the children ready to listen:

Ask: Do you have a favorite stuffed toy or blanket?


Ask: How do you feel if it gets lost? How do you feel when you find it?
Play hide and seek with the bunny or you could do this as an extension activity
Teach this song to the tune of Where is Thumbkin?:
Where is Bunny?
Where is bunny? Where is bunny?
He is lost. He is lost.
Look and we will find him. (repeat)
Where he was tossed. (repeat)

Read-Aloud Guide:
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Knuffle Bunny, Too.
The author is Mo Willems. He made up the story and wrote it down. He is also the
illustrator. That means he drew all the pictures.

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80

2. Show the front cover of the book. Ask the children what they see. Many children
may be familiar with the first Knuffle Bunny story, so ask them if they remember
Trixie and what they recall from the other story.
3. Show the illustrations opposite the title page. Ask the children what story they tell.
Explain to the children that Trixie is older in this story and goes to school just like
them.
4. Ask them to predict what is going to happen in this story.
DURING reading:
1. Read slowly, pointing to the words, giving children time to look at the illustrations.
Talk about what is happening and how Trixie is feeling.
2. Ask questions throughout the reading, such as Where are Trixie and her Dad going?
Why did Trixie bring Knuffle Bunny to school? Have you ever wanted to bring a
special toy to school? Why are Trixie and Sonja fighting?
3. When you get to the page where Trixie realizes she has Sonjas bunny, stop and ask
the children to make a prediction about what Trixie may have realized.
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children to explain what happened between Trixie and Sonja at the end of the
story. How did Trixie feel? How did Sonja feel?
2. Look through the book again with the children. Ask them about the illustrations.
Did Mr. Willems draw all the pictures? Do these photos look like our town or
school? What is the same? What is different?
Extension Activities

Hang the photocopied pages from the story on a clothesline with clothespins. Put the
pictures out of sequence. Have the children take turns to put the pictures in the right
order. Ask for volunteers to re-tell the story.
Play hide and seek with the bunny. The teacher hides the rabbit and, one child seeks
with clues of cold, cool, warm, hot. After the child finds the bunny it is his
or her turn to hide the bunny.

Take Home Activity

Encourage students to talk about the story with their parents and siblings at home.
Send home a copy of the sequencing activity for students to do with their parents.

Knuffle Bunny, Too

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Knuffle Bunny Too

86

Not A Box
Written and Illustrated By Antoinette Portis
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Vocabulary Development
Comprehension

Things to get ready

A copy of Not A Box by Antoinette Portis


Ask each child to bring a box from home (have extras on hand).
Glue
Paint
Collage Materials
Camera
A selection of related titles to be used during storytime or to place in the reading
corner:
o Surprise Box by Nicki Weiss
o When This Box Is Full by Patricia Lillie
o Not a Stick by Antoinette Portis
o How Many Bugs in a Box? By David A. Carter

Getting the children ready to listen

Tell the children you will be reading a book about a bunny and a box. Teach them
this poem. Talk about the word imagination and what it means to use your
imagination.
A Box Can Be Anything!
There are so many things I can do with a box.
I can pretend its a race car
Or fill it with rocks.
I can paint it to look like a ship on the sea
Or make it a robot to do things for me.
Do you have a box for a special creation?
Its easy just use your own imagination!

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Not A Box. The author
and illustrator is Antoinette Portis. She made up the words for the story and drew the
pictures.
Not A Box

87

2. Talk a little bit about how the book looks like a cardboard box. Point out where it says,
Net wt. 11.5 oz. Explain what that means. (During a second or third reading of the
book, show a box that you have brought in that indicates its weight such as a cereal
box.
3. Show the cover picture and ask, What do you think the rabbit is thinking? Ask, Why
do you think the title is Not a Box? Lets read the book to find out.
DURING reading:
This is a great book for asking prediction questions.
1. Read aloud several pages so the children get the idea that the rabbit is imagining the box
to be different things.
2. For each of the remaining pages, ask for one or two suggestions before you find out what
the rabbit is imagining.
AFTER reading:
1. Ask the children to remember some of the things that the rabbit imagined the box to be.
2. Ask, Why do you think the rabbit finally said, Its my Not-A-Box! You can discuss
the exclamation point.
Extension Activity
What Can We Build With Boxes?
1. Tell the children that just like in the book, with a little imagination, a box can be
anything. With the boxes that the children have brought in, they will have a chance to
transform it into something else using the materials available.
2. Brainstorm a list of box-decorating ideas before beginning. You can write these down on
chart paper.
3. Children may want to work together in pairs or small groups. Or you could bring in a
large appliance box for a whole-group activity.
4. When creations are completed, ask each child about his or her box. Encourage them to
say, Its not a box. Its a ____________.

Not A Box

88

Officer Buckle and Gloria


Written and Illustrated by Peggy Rathman
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Comprehension
Vocabulary

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Officer Buckle and Gloria, by Peggy Rathman


Photocopy the safety sign page and the shape page book (Poster classroom rules and
safety rules
Crayons or markers
Glue
A selection of related titles to share during storytime or in the reading corner:
o Fireman Small, by Herbert Wong Yee
o Fire! Fire! Said Mrs. McGuire, by Bill Martin Jr.
o I Swapped My Dog, by Harriet Ziefert

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Ask the children what safety means and then ask them if they know of any rules
that help keep us safe.
Select one of the following safety poems to share:
911 Song

I know a number that is really hot,


Its only for people in a hot, hot spot.
If you see a fire or if you see a crime,
The number is the same every single time.
This very special number is never for fun.
This very special number is 911.

Twinkle, Twinkle Traffic Light


Twinkle, twinkle traffic light
Standing in the corner bright
When its green its time to go
When its red its stop you know
Twinkle, twinkle traffic light
Standing in the corner bright.

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Officer Buckles and
Gloria. The author and illustrator is Peggy Rathman. She made up the story and
wrote it down. She also drew all the pictures.

Officer Buckle and Gloria

89

2. Explain to them what the gold Caldecott seal means. The book received first prize for
best pictures (illustrations).
3. Point to the title and picture on the books cover. Ask the children to predict what the
story will be about.
DURING reading:
1. As you read, stop and discuss the following questions with the children to help them
understand the story better.
2. Did Officer Buckle follow his own safety rules? How do you know?
3. Look at the pictures, what unsafe things do you see happening?
4. What did Gloria do to make the children listen better?
5. At first, do you think that Officer Buckle knew what Gloria was doing on stage?
How do you know?
6. How did the children show that they liked Officer Buckle and Gloria?
7. How did Officer Buckle feel after watching the 10 oclock news? How did Gloria
feel? Explain your reasons.
8. Why do you think Officer Buckle was angry with Gloria?
9. What happened to Gloria without Officer Buckle on stage with her?
10. What caused the schools biggest accident ever?
11. What important rule did both Gloria and Officer Buckle learn?
Explain to the children any unfamiliar vocabulary. See if they can figure out the words meaning
through pictures and context clues.
AFTER reading:
1. Show the children the inside front and back of the book. Talk about the safety rules,
and how Gloria acts them out.
2. Show the children the safety rules for their classroom. Talk about them. See if they
can act out any of the classroom rules.
3. Read the following safety poems and act them out with the children.
STOP, DROP, AND ROLL
What do you do when your clothes catch fire?
Three simple steps to put out the fire,
Stop! Where you are, dont run, no dont run
Drop! To the ground, and roll all around.
What do you do when your clothes catch fire?
Three simple steps to put out the fire.

Officer Buckle and Gloria

SEATBELT
I like my seatbelt nice and snug.
Around my hips like a big bear
hug.
I make it click so the driver will
know
Im buckled in and ready to go.

90

Extension Activity

Tell the children that everyone must follow safety rules.


Give each child a photocopy of the safety signs and the shapes.
Have the students color the stop sign red, the school crossing, railroad crossing, and
the bike yellow. The other signs leave white.
After coloring, the students cut out the signs and glue them onto the appropriate
shapes on the shape page.

Officer Buckle and Gloria

91

Olivia
Written and Illustrated by Ian Falconer
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Comprehension

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Olivia, by Ian Falconer


Paper
Paint
Paint brush
A selection of related titles to share during storytime or in the reading corner:
o I Like Me, by Nancy Carlson
o Julius, by Angela Johnson
o Piggies, by Don Wood

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Have the children recite the poem:


This Little Piggy
This little piggy went to market.
This little piggy stayed home.
This little piggy ate roast beef.
This little piggy had none.
And this little pig went wee, wee, wee all the way home.

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Olivia. The author
and illustrator is Ian Falcanor. He made up the story and he drew all the pictures.
This book is a Caldecott Honor book. Explain to the children that this book won a
special award for its pictures.
2. Explain that Olivia is a pig that has a lot of energy and imagination.
DURING reading:
Ask questions throughout the reading of the book:
1. How does Olivia wear herself out?
2. What is Olivas brothers name and what does he do that bugs Olivia?
3. Where are some of the places Olivia visits in the story?
Olivia

94

4. How do you think Olivia feels after she gets punished for painting her room?
5. What does Olivias mother do before Olivia goes to sleep?

AFTER reading:
1. Point out the thought bubble at the end. Explain that this is what Olivia sees when she
is dreaming. Have the students tell you their dreams.
2. Olivia got in trouble for painting her room. Have the students tell you some of the
things that they have gotten in trouble for. How did it make them feel?
Extension Activity

Olivia

Have students make a picture like Olivia does in the story.


You might want to do this outside. Give students a paintbrush, paper, and paint.
Watercolors work best. The student then dips his/her paintbrush in the paint and
splatters it on the paper.

95

Wheres My Teddy?
Written and illustrated by Jez Alborough
Reading Readiness Skill Area(s)

Comprehension
Phonological Awareness

Things to Get Ready

A copy of Wheres My Teddy?, by Jez Alborough


Bring in a few teddy bearsdifferent sizes and colors.
Gather a selection of related titles to share during storytime and in the reading corner:
o Its the Bear, by Jez Alborough
o Ten in the Bed, by David Ellwand
o Corduroy, by Don Freeman

Getting the Children Ready to Listen

Show the bear or bears that you brought in.


Ask the children to raise their hands if they have a teddy bear. Ask the children why
they like to have a teddy bear (i.e. Its a friend. I like to sleep with it. It makes me
feel safe, etc.)

Read-Aloud Guide
BEFORE you read the book:
1. Point to the title of the book and say, The title of this book is Wheres My Teddy.
The author is Jez Alborough. He made up the story and wrote it down. Illustrator is
also Jez Alborough. That means he drew all the pictures.
2. Show the cover of the book. Ask the children if they can tell where the story takes
place (in forest or woods). Ask who they see on the front of the book.
3. Now show the back of the book and ask who they see. Ask who they think the story
might be about.
4. Lets read and find out who was sobbing because his teddy bear got lost.
DURING reading:
1. First pagepoint to Eddie. Where is he? How does he look? Read. Why does he
want his teddy and his bed? Read.
2. When Eddie stopped, what do you think he saw? Lets find out. Read. Why cant
this bear fit in Eddies bed? Read on. Who did Eddie hear sobbing? Why was he
sobbing? Lets find out.

Wheres the Teddy?

96

3. Who is the bear holding? Why is Eddie hiding behind the big teddy? Finish story.
AFTER reading:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Did Eddie find his teddy? Where was it? How do you think it got lost?
How did Eddie feel at the beginning of the story? How did he feel at the end?
Who was sobbing? Why?
Play the rhyming game to help with the childrens phonological awareness. You
could also do this as you are reading the book. In the blank spaces put words from
Wheres My Teddy? that rhyme. (until- still, surprise-size, clear-near, bawl-small,
bed-teds) This activity would also work well with other rhyming books.
Rhyming game
(Tune of Skip to my Lou)
Rhyme, Rhyme, Rhyme with me
Rhyme, Rhyme, Rhyme with me
Rhyme, Rhyme, Rhyme with me
Rhyme along with me.
__________ and ___________are rhymes you see.
__________ and ___________are rhymes you see.
__________ and ___________are rhymes you see.
Rhyme along with me.

Extension Activity

Play Hide and seek or Teddy, Teddy who has the


bears you brought in.

Teddy? with one of the

Hide and Seek: Take turns hiding the bear and take turns finding the bear.
Teddy, Teddy who has the Teddy?
One child is it and he/she stand in the center of the circle. Have the children in the circle put their
hands behind their backs. The teacher places the teddy bear in a childs hand. The children then
say Teddy, Teddy who has the Teddy? while they are passing the teddy bear behind their
backs. When they are done saying the above phrase, three times the child that is it tries to guess
who has the teddy bear.

Wheres the Teddy?

97

RESOURCES/BIBLIOGRAPHY
Bertolino, J., et. al. Theme Centers for Dramatic Play. Edupress, 1996.

*Castellano, Marie. Simly Super Storytimes. Fort Atkinson: Upstart, 2003.

*Charner, Kathy, editor. The Giant Encyclopedia of Circle Time and Group Activities for
Children. Gryphon House, 1996.

Cullum, Carolyn. The Storytime Sourcebook. Neal-Schuman, 1999.

*de Regniers, Beatrice Schnenk. Sing a Song of Popcorn. Scholastic, 1988.

Dyer, Jane. Animal Crackers. Little, Brown & Company, 1996.

*Feldman, Jean. Transition Tips and Tricks for Teachers. Gryphon House, 2000.

Flora, Sherrill. The Preschool Calendar. Instructional Fair TS Denison, 2000.

Foster, John. First Verses. Oxford University Press, 1996.

*Ghoting, Saroj Nadkarni and Martin-Diaz, Pamela. Early LIterach Storytimes @ Your Library.
Chicago: American Library Association, 2006.

*Heroman, Cate, and Jones, Candy. Literacy: The Creative Curriculum Approach. Teaching
Strategies, Inc., 2004.

*http://www.everythingpreschool.com/

*Kimbo Educational Records, Long Beach, NJ. Language Activities. Carson-Dellosa Publishing.

Resources

98

Lamont, Priscilla. Playtime Rhymes. DK Publishing, Inc., 1998.

Lee, Carol K. & Langford, Janet. Storytime Companion. Alleyside Press, 1998.

Maibox Magazine. Literature: Preschool/Kindergarten. The Education Center, 1998.

Raines, Shirley C. and Canady, Robert. More Story S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-R-S. Gryphon


House, Inc., 1991.

Shiller, Pam and Phipps, Pat. The Complete Daily Curriculum For Early Childhood.
Gryphon
House, Inc., 2002.

Totline Staff. 1001 Rhymes & Fingerplays. Warren Publishing House, 1994.

Totten, Kathryn. Storytime Crafts. Alleyside Press, 1998.

*Whitehurst, Grover J. http://www.getreadytoread.org

Wilkes, Angela, Animal Nursery Rhymes. DK Publishing, Inc., 1992.

Wilmes, Liz & Dick. Felt Board Fingerplays. Building Blocks, 1997.

*Citations for materials used in this guide.

Resources

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Reading Readiness Selections


Book Handling
Tickle the Duck!

Ethan Long

Very Hungry Caterpillar

Carle, Eric

The Wheels on the Bus

Kubler, Annie (illu)

Five Little Ducks

Ives, Penny (illu)

Whats Wrong with My Hair?

Kitamura, Satoshi
Print Awareness

Reading Makes You Feel Good

Parr, Todd

Bunny Cakes

Wells, Rosemary

Mouse Mess

Riley, Linnea

Dont Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late

Willems, Mo

Hurry! Hurry!

Bunting, Eve
Phonological Awareness

Llama Llama Red Pajama

Dewdney, Anna

Rhyming Dust Bunnies

Thomas, Jan

Sing Along Songs


Please, Puppy Please

Lee, Spike

There Was a Coyote That Swallowed a Flea

Ward, Jennifer

Resources

100

Letter Knowledge
ABC T-Rex

Most, Bernard

Alphabet Under Construction

Fleming, Denise

Sleepy Little Alphabet

Sierra, Judy

Maxs ABC

Wells, Rosemary

Shiver Me Letters

Sobel, June
Vocabulary Development

Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Marshall, James

Mama

Winter, Jeanette

Chickens Arent the Only Ones

Heller, Ruth

Thesaurus Rex

Stienberg, Laya

Snip Snap! Whats That?

Bergman, Mara
Comprehension

Knuffle Bunny, Too

Willems, Mo

Officer Buckle and Gloria

Rathman, Peggy

Olivia

Falconer, Ian

Not a Box

Portis, Antoinette

Wheres My Teddy?

Jez Alborough

Resources

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