The

Grail
St. Joseph of Arimathea From the Priest-in-Charge

May 2010

103 Countr y Club Dr. Hendersonville, TN 37075 | stjosephofarimathea.org | T: 625-824-2910 | info@stjosephofarimathea.org

The Goal of the Christian Life
What is the goal of the Christian Life? It’s an interesting question that I’m not sure we think enough about. Certainly we should answer “salvation,” but that is question begging. Salvation from what? What sort of salvation? What does salvation look like? Some Christians deploy their faith in a way that would make the casual observer believe that the goal of the Christian life is to be correct or right. Specifically, for some the goal seems to be getting Biblical interpretation or their theology right. But in some significant ways our tradition informs us that we can never truly be certain we are right when we speak about God—especially when we do so in the abstract apart from Christ as the pinnacle of God’s interaction and self-revelation to his people. There are many things we can be reasonably certain of regarding scripture and its interpretation—but such certainty is not the point. Other Christians might say that the goal of the Christian life is to help others, to be more Christ-like, to live the way Jesus did when he walked among us. Once again, there’s nothing particularly wrong about this idea. And yet, just as we go off track when we define salvation as being dependent upon or consisting of right interpretation we also go off track when we believe—or act as though we believe—that salvation consists in acting a certain way, or in doing certain things. Our Reformation era predecessors would’ve called that idea works-righteousness. Interpreting scripture rightly and living in a way consistent with the teachings of Christ are good and they should be some of our foremost goals as we strive to finish the race. But they are not, in the end, the point. Rather than looking at scriptural interpretation, right doctrine or righteous living as the goal of the Christian life, our perspective needs to shift in such a way that we see these more as tools than as an end in themselves. During our recent clergy colloquium down at St. Mary’s Retreat Center at Sewanee, Dr. Stephen Fowl, an Episcopalian New Testament scholar, reminded us of another way of looking at the purpose and goal of the Christian life: Friendship with God. Some might argue that friendship is not the best category to apply to our relationship with God. I would agree to the extent that this is not a “Buddy Jesus” idea. Instead, the sort of friendship envisioned here
 Continued on p. 2

“To encourage and equip one another as the baptized people of God, to witness to the transforming and reconciling power of Jesus Christ.”

Our Mission:



Want to see the Grail in Color? Interested in extended content, such as devotionals? If you’re receiving the Grail in printed form and would like to see it in color with more content, you can visit http://stjosephofarimathea.org/congregational-resources/grail to download a PDF version.

Continued from p. 1

hearkens back to a classical model, with an important distinction. The great philosopher Aristotle taught that the pinnacle of all human relationships was that of friendship with an equal. Because of this, one could not achieve the ideal friendship with someone who was considered somehow lesser or with someone who was greater. This would seem to preclude the use of the category of friendship to discuss our relationship to God. However, this is not the end of it because the great scholastic theologian Thomas Aquinas readily concedes Aristotle’s point, and says that friendship between us and God should be impossible. Except for the fact that God became one of us in Jesus Christ, in taking our nature upon himself and being born in the flesh, and then, in receiving Jesus’ perfected humanity into his God-

head, God allows for the possibility of true friendship with those created in his image. As Jesus puts: “No longer do I call you servants [...] but I have called you friends...” (John 15:15). And now, as friends who also remember who is Lord, and that we are called to study the Holy Scripture and act in ways that bring us ever more into conformity with Jesus as the Pioneer and Perfecter of our faith, let us learn together what it means to keep the main thing the main thing, rejoicing in our salvation and growing daily in friendship with God. In Christ,

News From
When: Where: What:

our

CompaNioN ChurCh (iglesia Compañera) gardeN party

iN

litoral

For eCuador Sunday, May 16, 2010 from 3:00 to 6:00 PM Home and gardens of Bill and Mary Heeks 306 Cherokee Road, Hendersonville, Tennessee (phone: 615.824.7139) Annual garden party and tea Finger foods, teas, lemonade and wine Games: croquet, bocci ball, volley ball, and badmitton Putting contest — for children and adults Theme basket sales including: children’s interests, gardening, golf, health & beauty, Christmas, pets and much more Bar-b-que chicken sales Drawing for the beautiful handmade queen/king-size quilt (tickets available at both services—see Lucy Pulley at 8:00 and Sharon Petty at 10:30—or at the door) Prizes and Silent Auction Theme Baskets: Golf lessons 4 rounds of Golf at Country Hills 4 rounds of Golf Through the Green 4 rounds golf and lunch at Bluegrass Yacht and Country Club Bed and Bath, Gardening, Art, Pets, Ecuador, Christmas, Yard Art, Stationery, Jewelry, and more

Children's baskets and prizes: Miniature Golf from Drakes Creek Activity Center, Certificates from McDonalds, Ice Cream cones from Baskin and Robins, Books from Ms. B’s Why: To support our sister church and school in Ecuador Who: The entire family Cost: Adults $10.00 (children 14 and under are free) Ticket sales at both services (Pat Edson @8:00 & Cora Janson @ 10:30) and at the door May God continue to bless us through our companion relationship, Sarena Pettit 2

Notes

From the

global ChurCh

martyrs
by

iN the

Family

philip JeNkiNs
suspect foreign influences. In consequence, the great age of imperial expansion was a dreadful time for Christian believers unlucky enough to live beyond the protection of British gunships or French armies. Although rarely remembered by Western Christians, Asian and African believers suffered massacres on a vast scale during the 19th century. To take just the most outrageous examples: Korea's Buddhist-Confucian regime killed 8,000 Catholic Christians. Perhaps 100,000 perished in Buddhist Vietnam, including several hundred priests and nuns. By some accounts, even these holocausts were dwarfed by the mass killings under Madagascar's Queen Ranavalona. Hundreds more were slaughtered in Uganda in the 1880s. The Japanese occupations of the 20th century added hideous new chapters to the stories of Asian believers. These experiences—which are widely commemorated locally—have become the foundation on which later churches were built. You cannot comprehend Vietnamese Catholicism except in light of the basilica of La Vang, which commemorates both a Marian apparition and the great martyrdoms. Such events are accessible to these believers in a way that stories of ancient martyrs are not for Americans. For a modern-day Vietnamese or Ugandan believer, the martyrs are people like them, living in a recognizable style and probably in a town close by. They might even be a direct ancestor, or that of a neighbor. The martyrs are familiar, if not actually family. This fact makes nonsense of any claim that Christianity is a foreign, Western religion imposed by colonialists. How could it be for them, when their great-grandfathers died for it? Stories of conflict have a political impact. Even societies in which religious leaders strive for good interfaith relations have recollections of injuries suffered in the not too distant past—by the Buddhists of this temple or the Muslims of that town. Stories of persecution always underlie views of contemporary governments in ways that recall early Christians' ambivalent attitudes to secular power. However benevolent and democratic a regime may seem today, citizens know what its predecessors were like and what might well happen again. Memories of martyrdom shape faith and conduct. To that extent at least, churches in Seoul do have something in common with those of Kampala.
Philip Jenkins teaches at Penn State University. Copyright © 2010 by the Christian Century. Reprinted by permission from the April 20, 2010 online issue of the Christian Century. Subscriptions: $49/yr. from P.O. Box 700, Mt. Morris, IL 61054. (800) 208-4097.

What has Seoul to do with Kampala? In the 1980s, the term "Global South" gained currency as a means of describing those parts of the planet outside the advanced regions of Europe, North America and Japan. Various writers, including myself, noted the dramatic rise of Christian numbers in that vast region. The problem, of course, is that the whole concept of the Global South is outrageously broad, including as it does some very heavily developed regions, like South Korea, and many countries characterized by cataclysmic poverty and underdevelopment, such as the Congo. We should not use a term as vague as "Global South Christianity" without careful qualification. I tend to use it with the plural and speak of "Christianities." Yet it is not ridiculous to compare churches in very dissimilar societies, provided they share significant features that distinguish them from the traditional Christian heartlands. In many African and Asian countries, for instance, churches are largely made up of Christians relatively new to the faith, either first- or second-generation converts, and that characteristic affects styles of worship and faith. Also, across the Global South Christians live alongside numerous members of other faiths, possibly as small minority populations, so that they always have to bear in mind the risk of hostility from these neighbors. Christians bear with them a substantial cultural baggage from these other religions. In these ways, Christians in the newer churches operate on assumptions very different from believers in the U.S. or Germany. Among these differences, I would stress another one that rarely receives the attention it deserves: African and Asian churches know the concept of martyrdom as a recent historical reality. In North America, congregations might commemorate martyrs through the dedications of their buildings or through liturgies. The martyrs' sacrifices are remembered in art (St. Andrew's cross, St. Catherine's wheel). Normally, though, the martyrs are associated with antiquity, with the world of headsmen and torturers, of the beasts of the Roman arena. Europe has produced plenty of Christian witnesses in modern times, especially under communist tyrannies, but speaking of martyrs normally evokes a world as distant from us as that of the church fathers. Not so in the Global South. During the 19th century, Chris tian missions were often associated with the aggressive power of colonial empires, which meant that they were believed to pose a threat to native regimes. Some of these regimes were highly developed states in their own right, with the will and the means to defend themselves against

3

Easter Egg Hunt, 2010

How did THAT get up THERE???

Happy hunters

4

birthdays & aNNiversaries
May 1 May 4 May 5 May 6 May 8 May 9 May 11 May 13 May 14 May 15 May 18 May 21 May 22 May 23 May 26 May 28 May 17 May 25 May 26 Miriam Foerster Isaac Broome Philip Layton Lauren Love Meghann Jordan Grace Lawson Julie Torr Janet Mason George Fossey Jessica Mason Stephanie Lowe Sally McCanner Dana Mason Patrick Dunigan Bill Disney Stephen Garrett, Jr. Arnie Theis Genevieve Melcher Beth Longmire Adam & Kim Waltenbaugh Bruce & Charlene Green Mike & Vikki Morris

hospital

admissioN, siCkNess, or FaCiNg

some other diFFiCulty?

If you or a loved one are admited to the hospital, please let us know. While admissions clerks may ask specific questions regarding religious affiliation, due to government regulations they cannot and will not notify St. Joseph of Arimathea to let us know that you are there. Please get in touch with the church office (615-824-2910) or with Fr. Jody (615-440-6492) as soon as possible. If you’re sick and in need of assistance please let us know that as well. You can call or fill out our new care calendar information sheet located at: http://www.stjosephofarimathea.org/ how-can-we-help-you/

vestry highlights

aNd

aCtioN poiNts

The vestry met Wednesday evening, April 21. The highlights from the meeting are: • The Church Operations Manual was approved by the vestry, with the understanding that changes will need to be made from time to time because this is a “living” document. One copy of the manual will be kept in the church office, and one copy will be kept in the church library. • The junior warden now has the authority to spend up to $500 annually without prior approval from the vestry. • The new insurance policy went into effect at midnight on April 21. The new policy gives us more coverage for less money than we were paying. • The vestry approved a motion that all contributions to the rector’s discretionary fund will be in addition to the set amount that is given to the discretionary fund from each month’s budget. For example, if a minimum of $200 is the budgeted amount going into the rector’s discretionary fund each month from the general account, and someone designates a $50 contribution to the rector’s discretionary fund, the amount of money coming from the general funds to the discretionary fund will not be reduced by that $50. • Vacation Bible School is quickly approaching. This year, it will be at the Church of Our Savior in Gallatin, at 5:30 each evening, June 6–10. We need volunteers from our parish. Even if you can only help for one evening, please consider being a part of this very special week for our kids. See Kim Waltenbaugh, JoAnne Kemp, or Jeanne Rose for more details.

5

adult diNNer group
Dinner will be at the Cherokee Steak House, Gallatin (turn left at first road past the bridge south of Gallatin). The date is MAY 2, 6:00 pm (change of weekend because of Mother's Day). Call Donna Holt for reservations, 452-7242 (will take last minute reservations). All adults are invited. Cherokee does allow BYOB, but charges a dollar for setups. There have been some coupons in the Gallatin paper and possibly Hendersonville, but they do offer other daily specials at reasonable prices.

SubmiSSionS: Next deadline: Friday, May 21
Did something in The Grail pique your interest? Feel free to send your comments, prayers, reflections, essays, articles, jokes or other material you would like to share to grail@ stjosephofarimathea.org with “the Grail” in the subject line. If you would like to change delivery preferences (change your address, recieve the Grail electronically in addition to or in place of a physical copy) visit our web site at: http://www. stjosephofarimathea.org/congregational-resources/ newsletter-survey/

Upcoming EvEnts
May 2 May 9 May 16 May 16 May 19 May 21 May 23 May 30 Adult Dinner night out, 6:00 pm Mother's Day PB&J dedication Garden Party for Ecaudor, 3–6 pm Vestry meeting, 6:30 pm Deadline for May's Grail Last day of Sunday School for teens and children Trinity in the Trees at Rockland Recreation area

waNted: vbs helpers
Last year's VBS was a great success, and everyone (helpers and participants) enjoyed their "vacation to Rome." This year, we'll be joining Joseph in Egypt, June 6–10, 5:30 pm, at Church of Our Savior in Gallatin. Please mark these dates on your calendar to attend, and also prayerfully consider helping with VBS. Even if you can't help during that week, we have tasks that need to be done to prepare for VBS. Contact Joanne Kemp, Jeanne Rose, or Kim Waltenbaugh with any questions or to sign up to volunteer.

daughters oF the kiNg glastoNbury Chapter
May 9th will be our last meeting before taking our traditional summer break. It is time to think about officers for next year. Spring Assembly was held at Church of the Good Shepherd in April. Our state Chaplain, Rev. Monna Mayhall offered a wonder program on Soul Full Gardening. The Daughters of the King is an Order for women of the Episcopal Church. We welcome new members. This summer we will be holding a tea to introduce ourselves. Ladies, keep your eye on the mail! Anyone interested in the Daughters is welcome to call myself, Cora Janson at 822-7018, Sharon Petty (824-0327), Dee Stahr (855-2446) or Jane Garrett (264-1047). Cora Janson President 6

to pray For your Child 1. Pray NOTHING hinders your child from accepting Christ as his/her personal Savior early in life. (Matthew 19:14)
2. Pray your child learns to know God and will have a deep desire to do God's will for his/her life. (Psalms 119:27,30,34,35). 3. Pray child hears stories from the Bible that will be a basis for his/her decisions throughout life. (Ecclesiastes 12:1, Psalms 71:17). 4. Pray child will-develop a keen sense of right and wrong and that he/she will truly abhor evil and cling to that which is good. (Psalms 139:23–24). 5. Pray child will increase in wisdom (mentally) and in stature (physically) and in favor with God (spiritually) and man (socially). (Luke 2:52). This prayer covers his/her total development to his/her full potential. 6. Pray that child will develop a thankful heart and a positive mental attitude. (Psalm 126:2–3, Romans 8:31) 7. Pray that God protect child from Satan and his/her wiles in every area of his/her life. (John 17:55, Psalm 121) 8. Pray that God would destroy the enemies in his/her life whether they be weaknesses, lying, selfishness etc. (Psalms 120:2; 140). 9. Pray that God would make him/her successful in the work God has for him/her to do. (Psalm 118:25, 139:9-10) 10. Pray he/she have a strong sense of belonging to a family that is loving and dwells together in unity. (Psalms 133, Colossians 3:12-14). 11. Pray he/she will respect authority. (Romans 13:1, Ephesians 6:1–4). 12. Pray that his/her entire life will be a testimony of the greatness and love of Christ. (Phillippians 2:15–16, Thess 5:2–3) If you pray one of these a month, you will have your child covered for a year!

how

Author Unknown

a review

oF

The CenTurion’s Wife

by

davis buNN

aNd

JaNette oke

In this fictional account, I encountered one of my favorite Bible characters—the Centurion who asked Jesus to heal his servant (Lord, only say the word and my servant shall be healed). Not only is Alban serving in Palestine, but through politics and bribery, he has been pledged to the woman of his choice Leah, the niece of Pontius Pilate and servant to Pilate’s wife. As a condition of his betrothal, Alban must first complete a task for Pilate. He must come back with the answers to three questions: What happened at the tomb? Who stole Jesus’ body? Are these followers of Jesus planning an insurrection? In the meantime, Leah’s mistress is suffering from migraines and nightmares. She sends Leah into the midst of the Christ followers to learn more about the man crucified and his followers. After interviewing the Centurion at the crucifixion, the two guards at the tomb, and the respected Joseph of Arimathea, Alban finds there is only one explanation—the one offered by the Christ followers—the Lord is risen! Leah, taking a different path, comes to the same conclusion. I loved this book. It is the first in a series of Acts of Faith books and not normally my usual type of reading material. I don’t even remember who recommended it. I do know I was pleasantly surprised and couldn’t put it down. I know the answers to Pilate’s questions and I found it special to follow Alban and Leah along their path to discovery. This was a gentle book and deeply compelling at the same time. I am so glad I read this book, particularly so close to Easter.

Cora Janson

7

The

St. Joseph of Arimathea Episcopal Church 103 Country Club Drive Hendersonville, TN 37075 Church Phone: (615) 824-2910 http://stjosephofarimathea.org Service Schedule Sunday 8:00 am Holy Communion, traditional language (Rite I), no music 10:30 am Holy Communion, contemporary language (Rite II), with music 9:15 am Christian formation for all ages

Grail

Address Service Requested Non-Profit Organization

U.S. POSTAGE PAID
Hendersonville, TN Permit No. 12

Schedule of MiniStry: May 2010
Chalicists (chalice bearers) May 2 May 9 May 16 May 23 May 30 June 6 Lectors (readers) May 2 May 9 May 16 May 23 May 30 June 6 Acolytes May 2 May 9 May 16 May 23 May 30 June 6 Ushers May 2 May 9 May 16 May 23 May 30 June 6 Altar Guild Schedule May 2 May 9 May 16 May 23 May 30 June 6 8:00am Paul Love/PoP Julia Burton/PoP Cornelia Pullins/PoP Bill House/PoP Bill House/PoP, Milligene Shepherd Paul Love/PoP 8:00am Pat Edson, Julie Burton Mike Shepherd, Paul Love Mary Heeks, Bill House Opal Poe, Carl MacLeod Jack Hayes, Jeff Jordan Pat Edson, Julie Burton 10:30am Bill McMinn/PoP, Adam Waltenbaugh George Fossey/PoP, Beulah Murphy Shelley Sircy/PoP, Jeanne Rose George Fossey/PoP, Ed Arnold In Park Adam Waltenbaugh/PoP, Bill McMinn 10:30am Nell Nestor, Sally McCanner Dave Mason, Jessie Kemp Deborah Jordan, Claudia Douglass Nell Nestor, Sally McCanner In Park Anna Howard, Thom Chittom 10:30am Patricia Collins (S/C), Jack Mason (T), Joseph Broome (T/P) Christen Aldridge (S/C), Joshua Milliken (T), Emma Waltenbaugh (T/P) Andrew Mason (S/C), Michael Barber (T), Aaron Wildgoose (T/P) Jack Mason (S/C), Patricia Collins (T), Aaron Wildgoose (T/P) Christen Aldridge (S/C), Joshua Milliken (T), Emma Waltenbaugh (T/P) Christen Aldridge, (S/C), Joseph Broome (T), Michael Barber (T/P) 8:00am 10:30am Bill Reidy Bob Lindsey, Andrew Mason Jack & Bea Hayes Bill McMinn, Bobby Jones Bill & Mary Heeks Dave Mason, Chris Trenholme Jeff Jordan Jim Stahr, Andrew Mason Don & Donna Holt In Park Omer Fontaine Bob Lindsey, Jack Mason Stephanie Lowe, Donna Holt, Milligene Shepherd, Janet Mason, Jean Millhauser, Lynn-nore Chittom Stephanie Lowe, Donna Holt, Milligene Shepherd, Janet Mason, Jean Millhauser, Lynn-nore Chittom Cornelia Pullins, JoAnne Kemp, Lucy Pulley, Sharon Petty, Linda Palmer, Sue Donoho Cornelia Pullins, JoAnne Kemp, Lucy Pulley, Sharon Petty, Linda Palmer, Sue Donoho Mary Heeks, Boo Tidwell, Opal Poe, Jackie Lindsey, Jo Ann Forrest Mary Heeks, Boo Tidwell, Opal Poe, Jackie Lindsey, Jo Ann Forrest

Note to lectors/readers: Weekly lectionary readings are available in printed form in the plastic filing pocket on the wall in the office workroom, or online at: http://www.stjosephofarimathea.org/worship/lectionary-aid/

Church Calendar, Community use, Kalendar, US Holidays
Tuesday 26 11:30am - Community Use @ St. 7 p m - Choir Practice @ Joseph of St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Arimathea, 103 Francis Hall Country Club Dr. Hendersonville TN 4 11:30am - Community Use @ St. 7 p m - Choir Practice @ Joseph of St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Arimathea, 103 Francis Hall Country Club Dr. Hendersonville TN 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall 6:30pm of Daughters of Joseph the King @ St. Arimathea: St. Joseph of Francis Hall Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 11 11:30am - Community Use @ St. 7 p m - Choir Practice @ Joseph of St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Arimathea, 103 Francis Hall Country Club Dr. Hendersonville TN 18 11:30am - Community Use @ St. 6 p m - NAMI Joseph of Arimathea: St. 7 p m - Choir Practice @ Francis Hall St. Joseph of Arimathea, 103 Country Club Dr. Hendersonville TN 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - St. Arimathea: Community Use @ St. Francis Hall 6:30pm of Vestry Meeting Joseph @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Arimathea: St. Francis Hall Francis Hall 19 11:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 11:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 12 13 Cinco de Mayo 11:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - St. Arimathea: Community Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 5 6 7 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 11:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 27 28 29 30 St. Philip & St. James, Apostles Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 1

May 2010 (Central Time)

Sunday

Monday

25

St. Mark the Evangelist

7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - St. Arimathea: Community Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 3

8

7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - St. Arimathea: Community Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

10

14 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

15

7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 17

8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of 9:15am - Priest's Forum Arimathea, 103 Country Club Dr. 10:30am - Holy Eucharist Hendersonville TN @ St. Joseph of 37075 Arimathea, 103 Country Club Dr. 2 Hendersonvill e, TN Holy 8 a m - 37075Eucharist @ St. Joseph of 9 a m - First Sunday Arimathea, 103 Breakfast @ St. Country Club Dr. 9:30am of Priest's ForumJoseph Hendersonville TN Judaism & St. Arimathea: 37075 10:30am - Holy Eucharist Christianity Francis Hall @ St. Joseph of 11:45am - Garden Party Arimathea, Planning 103 Country Meeting @ St. Club Dr. Joseph of Hendersonvill Arimathea, 9 e, TN 37075 103 Country Club dr. Day Mother's Hendersonvill 8 aTn - Holy Eucharist @ e, m St. Joseph of 10:30am - 103 Arimathea, Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph Dr. Country Clubof Arimathea, Hendersonville TN 103 Country 37075 Club Dr. 16 Hendersonvill e, & Dedication PBTNJ37075 20 Grail Deadline 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 21

22 1 2 p m - Private Usage @ Downstairs

7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - St. Arimathea: Community Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of 9:15am - Priest's ForumArimathea, 103 Intro to no Country Club Dr. 10:30am - Holy Eucharist monotheistic/n TN Hendersonville @ St. Joseph on-western of 3 p 0 7 5 Garden Party @ Bill 7m Arimathea, faiths & Mary Heeks 103 Country House Club Dr. Hendersonvill 23 e, TN 37075 24 11:30am - Community Use @ St. 7 p m - Choir Practice @ Joseph of St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Arimathea, 103 Francis Hall Country Club Dr. Hendersonville TN 1 11:30am - Community Use @ St. 7 p m - Choir Practice @ Joseph of St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Arimathea, 103 Francis Hall Country Club Dr. Hendersonville TN 25 26 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 2

27 11:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 3 11:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

28 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 4 7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - St. Arimathea: Community Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall John F. Kennedy's Birthday

29

8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of 9:15am - Priest's ForumArimathea, 103 Buddihism, Dr. Country Club Taoism & Hendersonville TN Christianity 37075 30

7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 31

5

Memorial Day

"Trinity in the Trees" (was Pentecost in the Last @ for teen Park)dayRockland & children's Sunday School Recreation Area, No Sunday School Hendersonville TN 8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of 10:30am - Holy Eucharist Arimathea, 103 @ St. Joseph Dr. Country Clubof Arimathea, Hendersonville TN 103 Country 37075 Club Dr. Hendersonvill e, TN 37075

7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - Community Arimathea: St. Use @ St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

7:30am - Community Use @ St. Joseph of 11:30am - St. Arimathea: Community Use @ St. Francis Hall 6:30pm of Daughters of Joseph the King @ St. Arimathea: St. Joseph of Francis Hall Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

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