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1

st

1 Grade
Word Study
Resource Packet

Clinton Community School District

2009-2010

Table of Contents
Sample Family Letter

Page 3

Sample Word Study Lesson Sequence

Page 4

Suggested Activities

Page 5

1st Grade Patterns

Page 10

Dictation Sentences

Page 12

High Frequency/Non-Pattern Words

Page 22

Introduction/Homework Sheet

Page 23

First Grade Sorts

Page 24

Resources

Page 44

3
Dear First Grade Families,
The first grade word study program begins this week. The biggest
difference you will notice from a traditional spelling program is that children
will NOT be bringing home a spelling list to study and memorize each week.
Instead we will be working with a different spelling pattern each week at
school. We will send home information each Monday letting you know the
pattern for the week and several examples of words that fit that pattern.
At school we will work with that pattern each day through different learning
activities. It would be very helpful if you would keep the pattern that comes
home on Monday in a prominent place so you can work with your child for a
bit each evening with that pattern also. On Fridays we will check the
understanding of that weeks pattern with each student through a writing
activity instead of the traditional list type of test.
There will be an emphasis on retaining and using each pattern after the
introductory week. So we will continue to spiral back and work with each
pattern as the weeks progress. The weekly writing assignments are designed
to not only assess understanding of that weeks pattern but also check for
retention of former patterns.
Our goal is to teach children patterns that they can rely upon when spelling
words in their daily writing. Traditionally we have asked children to
memorize a list of words and for many children it is difficult for them to
transfer that learning to words that are not on the list. Our hope is that
we will increase each childs spelling vocabulary as well as their ability to use
those patterns to spell many more words.
Your patience is appreciated as we get this new program off and running. If
you have any questions, please feel free to stop in or give us a call.
Sincerely,

Suggested Word Study Sequence


Day 1

Suggested
activities for
days 2-?
(Descriptions
follow)

Teacher will introduce the unit:


Provide several words that demonstrate the given pattern
In some cases teacher may need to include words that dont follow the
pattern and/or follow previous patterns for students to be able to discover
the new pattern
Students will:
Sort words to determine rule, pattern
Determine and clarify the rule or meaning (with teacher help)
Add words to the list that follow pattern or contain the word part
Students will be assigned homework to find additional words to fit the
pattern
Sorts
Word hunt: print, book, resources, room searches
Guess the covered word
Apply in writing
Concretely make words that fit the pattern
Dictating sentences: practicing words in context
Songs and poems
Making words
Teachers message that includes words that fit the rule, pattern, or word part
Dry erase boards
Practice spelling pattern only
Other activities youve previously used for these skills can be used anytime after
the introductory lessons.

Last day

Assessment (Dictation Sentences Provided)

Suggested Activities
SORTS
Letters, words, word parts, meanings, and types of words could be sorted
and classified into different groups based on similarities and differences.
You could sort words which fit the pattern and do not fit the pattern
(for example short a/other vowels- you may want to include some long
vowel words).
You could sort words within the pattern. For example, sort words
ending with at,- am, -an, -ap. (The pattern was short a.)
You could have children use a chart to record words you have
dictated. The objective is to record the words under the correct
pattern. The students will be auditorily differentiating and then
applying the sounds/patterns when recording the words.
Ex.
-at
-am
-an
-ap
sat

Sam

tan

lap

We use t-charts frequently. Whenever there are two categories that


make the same or similar sounds and they need to be sorted a t-chart
is perfect. Scratch paper from the recycle bin or a whiteboard is
great to use to create t-charts. This type of sorting is a great
assessment tool as well.
ai

ay

paint
rain
Stain

play
stay
ray
may

6
Included are word sorts created specifically for the first grade
spelling patterns. At the beginning of the year these sorts are
teacher directed and as the year progresses students gradually gain
more independence. Words are cut apart then sorted. Students also
should be able to explain their reasoning for their groups and read the
words aloud. You may also wish to have students record their sort.
WORD HUNTS
Students use familiar reading material to search for words that contain the
current pattern. They record their words individually or with partners and
after a given amount of time, come together as a class and make a class list.
This is a good time to point out similarities and differences between words.
GUESS THE COVERED WORD
Guess the Covered Word is an activity which helps students learn to use
meaning, word length, and onsets to figure out words. As students engage in
this activity, they learn that none of the clues meaning, beginning letters,
or word length is helpful by itself but together they become a valuable
decoding strategy.
1. Write some sentences or a paragraph related to something students
are studying or some topic of general interest, on a piece of chart
paper.
2. Select one word per sentence which fits the current spelling pattern
and cover that word.
3. Read each sentence aloud and have students make three or four
guesses without any letters revealed. Write down these guesses.
4. Remove the note that covers all the beginning letters. Erase any
guesses which are no longer possible. Have students make additional
guesses that make sense and have all the right beginning letters.
5. When the students cannot think of any more words that meet both
criteria, reveal the rest of the word and see if the correct word was
guessed.
* This activity helps students to see the connection between reading and
writing the pattern.

Cunningham, Patricia M., and Hall, Dorothy P., Month by Month Phonics
For First Grade: Systematic, Multilevel Instruction. Greensboro, N.C. 1997
Kohfeldt, Joyce, King, Annie, and Collier, Helen, Guess the Covered Word for First Grade
Greensboro, N.C. 2000

APPLY IN WRITING
Observe students in daily writing, make them aware of past word patterns,
and reteach any patterns theyre not applying. This is a useful informal
assessment tool.
MAKING WORDS (CONCRETLEY)
Students use a set of plastic letters to spell words that fit the pattern.
Depending on the pattern and the students level of independence, this can
be done several ways. The teacher can give words that fit the pattern orally
for the students to spell with the letters and then check together. You
then should take it to the linking level by having students practice writing
words that fit the pattern and then eventually practice writing them within
the context of a sentence. This can be done over several word study
practice sessions. Another option that works well is to discuss the current
pattern and then have children make words that fit the pattern with their
plastic letters and keep a written list as they make each word. You can then
share to create a large classroom list. Again, students can use the pattern
words that they find in written sentences. If plastic letters are not
available, letter cards used from Four Blocks making words activities can
also be used.
DICTATION SENTENCES
Practice using pattern words in the context of dictated sentences.
Students can also use pattern words and create their own sentences.
SONGS/POEMS
Many songs and poems are available that fit spelling patterns. They can be
found in language arts resource books, web sites, etc. A couple of good web
sites to get you started are www.carlscorner.us.com, and
www.canteach.ca/elementary. Be sure to share them with your grade level
peers when you find a good one! Weve included a few to get you started.

MAKING WORDS
In this activity students learn that there are patterns in words, that little
changes in the letters of a word can change it in a predictable way, and that
words can be sorted into patterns and then used to read and spell other
words.
1. Begin with a secret word a word which can be made from all the
letters you will use.
2. Using the letters in the secret word, choose 12-15 words which will
give some easy and some harder words and several sets of rhymes. A
good portion of these words should fit the current and/or past
patterns.
3. Decide on the order in which words will be made, beginning with short
words and building to longer words. Write these words on index card
to use in the sorting and transferring parts of the lesson.
4. Write the letters on a strip vowels first, then consonants, so as not
to give away the secret word.
5. To begin the lesson, give students the strips, have them write the
matching capital letters on the back, and let them cut or tear the
strips into individual letters or use pre-made letters.
6. Place large letter cards with the same letters in a pocket chart.
7. As student make each word, choose one student to come and make the
word with the big letters.
8. After all the words have been made, have students sort by patterns
such as beginning sounds, rhyming words, prefixes, plurals, etc.
9. After all the words have been sorted, remind students that rhyming
words can help them read and spell other words. Show two new
rhyming words to students and have them use the rhymes to decode
the new words. Then, say two new rhyming words and have students
use the rhymes to spell the new words.
Cunningham, Patricia M., and Hall, Dorothy P., Month by Month Phonics
For First Grade: Systematic, Multilevel Instruction. Greensboro, N.C. 1997

9
TEACHERS MESSAGE
Teacher writes a message to the class. This message might include an
agenda or miscellaneous information that students need to know for the day.
A teachers message is a great opportunity to include words that fit your
particular word study pattern. You may then ask students to circle or
underline those specific words and talk about their similarities or
differences.
Example: Spelling Pattern ch
Dear_____________,
Today is Thursday, March 23rd. We will have L.R.C. today and you will
have a chance to choose books that are a good fit and check them out. I
hope you have such a great day!
Your Teacher,
DRY ERASE BOARDS
We use dry erase boards for assessments and practice. I give the students
words with patterns they are familiar with a day before the assessment. I
have the students write the words. Then I have the students show me their
work. They all hold their whiteboards up so I can see them. I do a quick
assessment of their understanding of particular patterns. I may have other
students record the correct spelling of a word on the large class whiteboard
as we are going. Having the students show their work also informs me of
who needs reteaching or extra time.
PRACTICE SPELLING PATTERN ONLY
These are great ways to spiral back and review past patterns.
Teacher gives sound and student spells just that sound. For example
teacher says /a/ and student writes the letter a. This is best used to
help you review and spiral back.
Give students a word either written or orally and have them write or
explain the spelling pattern/patterns that the word includes. For
example teacher says or writes that. Students write th and/or short
a.

10
1st Grade Patterns
Word Working Rule List
Short Vowels (a,e,i,o,u)
Rule: In a cvc word the vowel is short
Clusters/Blends (l,r,s)
Rule: Two or three consonants blended together but each consonant keeps
its own sound.
Consonant Digraphs (th, sh, ch)
Rule: A combination of two letters making a single sound.
Long vowel silent/magic e (a, i, o, u)
Rule: Silent e at the end of a word makes the preceding vowel long. (The
exceptions are most words ending in: -le, -ce, -se, -re, -ve.)
Vowel Digraph ee
Rule: Two vowels that make one speech sound. They usually occur in the
middle of words.
Vowel Digraph ai/ay
Rule: Two vowels that make one speech sound.
*ai usually appears in the middle of words like in pain
*ay usually appears at the end of a syllable or words like in may.
Vowel Digraph oa/ow
Rule: Two vowels that make one speech sound.
*oa is found at the beginning or middle of a word
*ow can appear in the beginning, middle, or end of a word, however, it is most
commonly found at the end of a word or syllable
Plural s
Rule: The plural form of most nouns is made by adding s to the end of the
word. It changes meaning to more than one.

11
Suffix -ing
Rule: Adding suffix ing to base words makes the verb a continuous action.
*at the first grade level there is no base word changing
Suffix -ed
Rule: Adding suffix ed to verbs can be pronounced three ways: /d/, /ed/,
/t/. It makes the verb past tense.
* At the first grade level there is no base word changing
Plural es
Rule: Nouns ending in s, ch, sh, x, z add es to make them plural. It changes
the meaning to more than one.
R-Controlled Vowels (ar,or)
Rule: When a vowel is followed by an r in the same syllable it is r
controlled. It is neither long nor short.

12

Dictation Sentences
1st Grade
Trimester 1
Short a
Rule: In a cvc word the vowel is short
1. The cat is fat.
2. The man is tan.
3. Dan has a fan.
4. The bat is on the mat.
5. Sam likes ham.
Short i
Rule: In a cvc word the vowel is short
1. We hid the big ball.
2. It did not fit.
3. I hit the lid.
4. Jim can sit.
5. Dig out your pin.

Short o
Rule: In a cvc word the vowel is short
1. That is not a fox.
2. The pot is on top.
3. There is a lot in the box.
4. I will hop with the mop.
5. The ox is hot.

13

Short e
Rule: In a cvc word the vowel is short
1. The men like to pet the cat.
2. Ned and Ben are friends.
3. Ted can pull the net up.
4. Jen has a hen.
5. I have a red bed.

Short u
Rule: In a cvc word the vowel is short
1. I will jump up.
2. Tell us to have fun.
3. He cut the gum.
4. The bug can run.
5. We put the rug in the sun.

Review Test
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

The hat did not fit.


My fox had a cut.
The rug is wet.
We put a lid on the pan.
I fed the dog.

14

Trimester 2
r Clusters
Rule: Two or three consonants blended together but each
consonant keeps its own sound.
1. Do not grab the crib.
2. Brad will fix the drum.
3. The frog is on a trip.
4. Fran will grin.
5. Fred has a good grip.
l Clusters
Rule: Two or three consonants blended together but each
consonant keeps its own sound.
1. The flag is flat.
2. Im glad you did not slip.
3. Did you plan to clap?
4. The fish can flip flop.
5. The plum is slim.

s Clusters
Rule: Two or three consonants blended together but each
consonant keeps its own sound.
1. It is the best sled.
2. You swim fast.
3. Do not slip on the spot.
4. Step on the stem.
5. Stop and spin.

15

Consonant Digraph th
Rule: A combination of two letters making a single sound.
1. That man is thin.
2. The dog needs a bath with soap.
3. This is for them.
4. Beth is taller than this.

Consonant Digraph ch
Rule: A combination of two letters making one speech sound.
1. . That is such a big chin!
2. . I like to chit chat.
3. I can chop that chip.
4. I have such a rich friend.
5. The bench is an inch long.

Consonant Digraph sh
Rule: A combination of two letters making one speech sound.
1. The fish is by my shin.
2. She can shop with me.
3. Does the ship have a shed?
4. I wish I had the dish!
5. The shell can shut!

16

Long a
Rule: Silent e at the end of a word makes the preceding
long.
1. I was late for the game.
2. She came to make a gift.
3. I gave him a name.
4. Dave made a cake.
5. Did I wave at you?

Long i
Rule: Silent e at the end of a word makes the preceding
long.
1. The time is nine.
2. The dime can shine.
3. I like to ride one mile.
4. Five of the books are mine.
5. Get in line!

Long o
Rule: Silent e at the end of a word makes the preceding
long.
1. He woke up at home.
2. My dog has a rope and a bone.
3. The note has a rose with it.
4. I hope you rode your bike.
5. We drove by the hole.

17

Vowel Digraph ee
Rule: Two vowels that make one speech sound. They usually
occur in the middle of words.
1. The sheep have feet.
2. That beep will not let me sleep.
3. The street is green.
4. Do you need something sweet?
5. My teeth seem fine.
Vowel Digraph ai/ay
Rule: Two vowels that make one speech sound.
*ai usually appears in the middle of words like in pain
*ay usually appears at the end of a syllable or words like in
may.
1. Can I play in the rain?
2. May I wait for you?
3. He will stay one more day.
4. Did you pay for the pail?
5. The train is on the way.

Vowel Digraph oa/ow


Rule: Two vowels that make one speech sound.
*oa is found at the beginning or middle of a word
*ow can appear in the beginning, middle, or end of a word,
however, it is most commonly found at the end of a word or
syllable
1. The boat is on the coast.
2. The toad is slow.
3. Did the snow blow?
4. Do not throw your coat.
5. Show me the road.

18

Long u
Rule: Silent e at the end of a word makes the preceding
long.
1. The mule is big.
2. You are cute.
3. Put your t.v. on mute.
4. June is a good month.
5. Can you play your flute?

Review Test
1. That is the best prize. (th, short a/ short e, st/ pr, long i)
6pts.
2. The ship will sail on the wave. ( sh, short i/ ai or cvce / cvce
or ai). 4pts.
3. I hope you feel fine. (cvce or oa / ee / cvce) 3pts.
4. Can you wait for the note? (short a / ai or cvce / oa or cvce)
3pts.
5. Did you see the cute fish by the boat. (cvce / short i, sh /
oa or cvce) 4pts.
Total of 20 pts.

19

Trimester 3
Plural s
Rule: The plural form of most nouns is made by adding s to
the end of the word.
1. The traps are very big.
2. The crabs have pinchers.
3. My lips are dry.
4. She needs two cups.
5. Are the plants growing?

Suffix -ing
Rule: Adding suffix ing to base words
*at the first grade level there is no base word changing
1. We were jumping.
2. Are you going?
3. I was looking.
4. My mom is showing it to me.
5. They are planting seeds.
Suffix -ed
Rule: Adding suffix ed to verbs can be pronounced three
ways: /d/, /ed/, /t/.
* At the first grade level there is no base word changing
1. He needed a dog.
2. She jumped over the pole.
3. He played at home.
4. They looked at books.
5. She showed me the dog.

20

Plural -es

Rule: Nouns ending in s, ch, sh, x, z add es to make them


plural
1. Did you see those boxes?
2. My dishes are all done.
3. The tree branches are budding.
4. My ruler is 12 inches long.
5. We had to pay our taxes.

R- Controlled or
Rule: When a vowel is followed by an r in the same syllable
it is r controlled. It is neither long nor short.
1. The torch will point north.
2. She made a fort on the porch.
3. Is this horn for you?
4. That is a short form.
5. The kitten was born in that storm.

R-Controlled ar
Rule: When a vowel is followed by an r in the same syllable
it is r controlled. It is neither long nor short.
1. The star is far away.
2. The jar is sharp.
3. The car is by the arch.
4. The tarp is in the yard.
5. Can I have part of that bar?

21

Review Test
1. The frogs are jumping in the boxes. (fr, short o, s / short u,
ing / short o, es) 7pts
2. A star landed on the porch. (st, ar / ed / or, ch) 5 pts.
3. Show him the green toad. (sh, ow / short i, / gr, ee / oa or
cvce) 6pts.
4. Can you wait to get your teeth fixed? (short a / ai or cvce, /
short e / ee, th / short i, ed) 7 pts.
Total 25 pts.

22

First Grade
High Frequency Words for Mastery in Spelling

Most words in the English Language fit a pattern and are being taught
through our Word Study program explained in the attached letter. There
are approximately 150 words in our language that do not fit any patterns and
must be memorized. The following is a list of words that all first grade
students will be expected to spell correctly in all of their writing by the end
of the year. We will work with them in the classroom often. Please keep
this list in a prominent place and help your first grader practice them
frequently as well as spell them correctly when writing at home. Thank you
for your partnership in this portion of your childs education.

1. a
2. are
3. come
4. could
5. do
6. friend
7. from
8. give
9. have
10. love
11. of

12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.

off
one
people
pretty
said
should
talk
the
there
they
to

23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.

two
very
walk
want
was
what
where
who
would
you
your

23

Dear Parents,
This week in spelling, I am learning the pattern
________________________________________________________.
These words use this pattern:

1.

6.

2.

7.

3.

8.

4.

9.

5.

10.

* This will be returned on Tuesday. Please keep it and continue


practicing the strategy. Thank you!

Parent
Signature_____________________________________________

24
Pattern short u: word sort short u/ other vowels

sun

pig

cute

his

fat

slug

flat

run

runts

us

hug

but

hot

Tim

yes

jump

funny

pet

Jen

plug

up

can

bump

tug

25
Pattern clusters with r: word sort clusters with r/no clusters

grab

crop

can

pet

Brad

grass

mop

stop

fat

drop

grin

Fran

fresh

ship

chat

run

trip

fish

rib

trap

drat

dark

drip

tub

26
Pattern clusters with l: word sort clusters with l / no clusters

glad

pet

you

blast

plan

flip

one

plum

slim

will

men

are

flop

slip

clap

of

jump

look

plant

glass

here

class

black

flat

27
Pattern clusters with s: word sort clusters with s / other clusters

clap

stop

swam

grab

slim

flip

drop

snack

swim

crab

plan

slip

trip

swing

snip

black

plant

crib

scratch

plug

string

drop

bring

swell

28
Pattern digraph th: word sort digraph th / no digraph th

that

pet

you

brother

plan

then

teeth

sixth

thick

will

thing

the

two

bath

clap

thin

with

look

plant

top

father

tenth

black

flat

29
Pattern digraph ch: word sort ch/th

thin

checkers

that

chin

chat

check

them

this

much

chop

thank

math

the

chip

such

bath

bench

branch

then

chat

than

with

Beth

inch

30

Pattern digraph sh: word sort th/sh/ch

ship

checkers

this

fish

Beth

dish

than

shin

much

shell

chop

such

bench

branch

she

shed

chin

shop

thin

that

shut

math

chat

bath

31

Pattern cvce a: word sort long a/short a

glad

shade

make

cat

rake

sag

ran

drape

grape

fade

tack

smash

flap

cape

clap

came

grade

shape

same

glass

made

class

black

flat

32
Pattern cvce i: word sort long i/short i

like

time

lid

bike

tin

shine

mint

six

thick

will

wide

dime

Mike

rip

line

thin

with

prize

white

kite

fine

bike

pig

miss

33
Pattern cvce o: word study long o/short o

hope

bone

nose

froze

not

dot

cope

mop

note

box

woke

cop

nope

rope

pox

shop

cone

lot

top

Tom

joke

phone

Ron

sock

34
Pattern long e (ee): word sort ee/ short e

feet

pet

men

sheep

then

beep

sleep

street

net

den

feel

pest

peek

green

sweet

when

teeth

seem

bench

fret

wheel

mess

three

creep

35

Pattern ai/ay: word sort long a- ai/ay

clay

sail

play

nail

say

bay

tail

fail

may

day

pay

pail

rail

May

rain

way

stay

tray

bait

pain

drain

stain

brain

jail

36
Pattern oa/ow: word sort oa/ow

goat

pot

show

blow

plop

float

not

toad

boast

snow

grow

toast

flop

stop

road

throat

throw

boat

chop

glow

coat

stow

block

boat

37
Pattern cvce u: word sort long u/short u

mule

tub

shut

cube

sun

cute

rug

tune

mug

fun

clue

blue

use

mute

luck

June

rule

truck

huge

cub

flute

fuse

cut

hug

38
Pattern plural s: word sort s/no s (more than one/one)

plants

stem

stems

boats

coats

lips

plant

eggs

boat

bugs

books

magnets

hats

mugs

hips

bats

hens

cans

rats

ships

ship

baskets

pens

mug

39
Pattern ing: word sort ing/s

tires

sleeping

reading

roads

waiting

trees

being

chains

jumping

calling

poles

snowing

eating

bikes

streets

throwing

cans

flutes

rules

boating

pails

staying

notes

greeting

40
Pattern ed: word sort s/ed/ing

showed

jumped

cats

playing

jumps

plants

tracking

looking

looks

looked

thanking

played

saying

stems

rocking

stayed

locking

pens

sleeping

bugs

41
Pattern plural es: word sort s/es

traps

pets

beaches

cups

plans

dishes

branches

plums

boxes

buzzes

inches

plants

pigs

buses

taxes

crabs

bunches

wishes

dolls

glasses

lips

classes

cars

blocks

42
Pattern or: word sort short o/long o/or

hope

corn

nose

thorn

not

short

cope

mop

for

box

woke

pork

nope

fork

fox

shop

morning

lot

torn

tom

joke

born

pox

form

43
Pattern ar: word sort ar/or/er ir ur

fort

part

car

porch

her

perch

start

short

fur

dirt

Clark

cork

park

art

more

hurt

shark

smart

for

dart

perk

dark

shirt

fork

44

Resource List
1. Words Their Way by Donald R. Bear, Marcia Invernizzi ,
Shane Templeton, Francine Johnston
2. Reading Teachers Book of Lists by Edward Bernard Fry
Ph.D., Jacqueline E. Kress, Ed.D., Dona Lee Fountoukidis,
Ed.D.
3. Daily Word Ladders by Timothy Rasinski
4. Unlocking Literacy by Marcia Henry
5. Continuum of Literacy Learning by Gay Su Pinnell, Irene
C. Fountas
6. Words Their Way- Word Sorts for Within Word Pattern
Spellers by Donald R. Bear, Marcia Invernizzi , Shane
Templeton, Francine Johnston