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Positive Partnerships Planning Matrix

1.1 Physical, social and intellectual


development and characteristics of students is
represented by text highlighted in grey.
Knowledge and understanding of physical,
social and intellectual development and
characteristics of the student and the
implications on her learning is demonstrated.

Students Name: Zainab Abdulah


Age: 7
Grade: 1
Difficulty: Poor attention; memory; language; social cognition;
and health
Need: English as a second language (ESL)
1.2 And example of understanding how students learn is
Special Need/s: Low SES; refugee; PTSD
represented by the underlined text. Knowledge and
Current level of achievement: Interrupted history of
understanding of research into how students learn and the
schooling (Iraq)
implications for teaching has been demonstrated with this
Interests: Mathematics; art; animals; cultural activities
particular case study.
Communication
Characteristics

ESL
Lacks basic
communication
skills
Poor attention span
Prefers to
communicate with
women (cultural
preference)

Social interactions

Socially isolated
(isolationist) due to
language barrier and
mistrust of others
Bullied due to cultural
differences (different
food, clothing and
interests)

Emotional & physical


behaviours

Learning difficulties,
strengths & styles

Low self-esteem and


poor emotional
wellbeing (e.g. prone
to
withdrawing/crying)

Functions at/below
foundation level of
learning (poor literacy
and auditory skills)

PTSD related anxiety

Strong mathematical
understanding
Visual & kinaesthetic
learner
Requires constant
reassurance from
teacher and
classmate modelling
to complete tasks

Implications

Uses visual cues and


hand gestures for
basic
communication
Unable to follow
instructions and
participate fully in
learning
Loses concentration
easily. Unable to
focus on tasks for
sustained periods
Reluctant to engage
and avoids making
eye contact with
male teachers and
peers

Does not initiate


interaction with peers
and rather relies on
them to approach her
in group work and
playground situations
Resists participating
in group work
Frequently excluded
from group activities
Unable to form,
develop and maintain
friendships

Rarely participates
in small group or
class discussions

Strategies

Encouraging
communication:
Keep to routine
whenever possible
Visual timetables
Introduce new
adults sensitively
(NSW Department of
Education and
Communities, n.d.)
Limited English:

Foster inclusiveness
through lessons,
organised groups and
classroom seating
rotations
Implement weekly
circle time to
promote sharing of
feelings and concerns
Eradicate

Fears attending
school and is
regularly absent.
Lacks continuity in
learning and
foundations. She
does not ask
teacher / peers for
clarification

Unable to write
cohesive sentences.
Can only read basic
level picture books
with minimal text

Lacks classroom set


behaviours eg.
staying in
classroom/seat

Rarely participates in
standard curriculum
activities. Frequently
zones out

Copies students work


without processing
information

Reacts negatively to
physical contact.
Suffers panic attacks
Fears load noises/fast
movements. Is
reluctant to
participate in outdoor
activities. At times,
needs an enclosed
area to feel protected

Arrange meeting with


wellbeing
coordinator, teacher
and parent to discuss
Zainabs needs
(include interpreter
for her father).
Organise counselling
for anxiety/PTSD, if
required

Arrange weekly

Provide pictures,
symbols, diagrams
and concrete
materials when
instructing class tasks
Practice Literacy
Instructional
Strategies (AusVELS,
2015 a), including:
guided reading
sessions (Flint,

Bodily/kinaesthetic
experiences

Gestural language
Buddy support
(NSW Department of
Education and

Communities, n.d.).

Concentration:
Consider
appropriateness of
learning activities
Include topics of
interest
(NSW Department of
Education and
Communities, n.d.).
MEAs:
Assist in the
classroom (one-toone basis)
(Department of
Education and
Training, 2014 c)
Picture Exchange
Communication
System:
Persevere in
communication,
differentiate
symbols, join
symbols into simple
sentences and
answer questions
(Mark Carter. MUSEC
Briefings Issue 20,
July 2009 p.1)

discrimination:
Increase empathy by
building classroom
understanding of
different cultures
Identify positive views
of different groups
Include cultural
activities
(VicHealth, 2009)

check-ins with
Zainab to discuss her
recent emotional

wellbeing. If needed,
liaise with wellbeing
coordinator
Provide regular
affirmation.
Focus on strengths.
Be sensitive when
providing feedback
Withdrawing
behaviour:
Grant space until
the crisis has
passed, then
reassure using
simple sentences
e.g. you are safe
Create a classroom
safe zone tent
Do not overreact to
exaggerated
behaviours
Sit close but do not

touch (respect
personal space)
Conference after

crisis
NSW Department of
Education and
Communities. (n.d.)

Classroom set
behaviours:
Introduce new
materials slowly. Do

Kitson, Lowe & Shaw,


2014. p. 157)
learning high
frequency words
Picture Chats:
decoding, reading
and writing strategies
(Flint et al., 2014, p.
133)
Oral Language
tasks: speaking and
listening (Monique
Micallef, Teacher at
Collingwood English
Language School,
2015)
Model reading and
writing: hearing and
recording sounds in
words (Flint et al.,
2014, pp. 151-154).
Simplify
directions/tasks:
Underline/highlight
significant parts of
the directions
Rewrite directions
using simple
language
Use smaller/modified
tasks
International Dyslexia
Association, 2015.

Tape recorder:
Record directions,
stories, and lessons.
The student can
replay to clarify
directions and
concepts
(International
Dyslexia
Association, 2015)

not overwhelm
Discuss class values
and rules
Acknowledge
appropriate
behaviours
Celebrate small gains
NSW Department of
Education and
Communities. (n.d.).

Loud noises/fast
movements:
Ease into
loud/fast-paced
situations
Discuss the situation
prior to commencing
the activity
Identify familiar
aspects of the
situation(s)
Establish a safe place
Provide strategies to
deal with change (eg.
buddies)
NSW Department of
Education and
Communities. (n.d.).

INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLAN


I.L.P. 1 / 4
Review Date: End of term 1 2015
Date Devised: 28/2/2015
Student: Zainab Abdulah
Year Level: Year 1
D.O.B. 16/11/07
Age: 7 years
Program Support Group Members consulted in devising this plan:
Class Teacher: Jessica Ornsby/Melanie Renner
Parents: Akram Abdulah
Principal Rep: Stewart Robinson
Consultants to the Program Support Group: Interpreter (for father), Multicultural Education Aide (MEA), Wellbeing
Coordinator, Counsellor/Social worker
Entry Skills
Zainab is at PM Reader level Starters 1 (Learning A-Z, 2015 b) and manages to associate words with visual cues. She is
beginning to read and write, generally using two/three letter words. She can follow verbal instructions when slowly spoken
and repeated. Visual cues help her to retain focus, participate in classroom activities and communicate with her peers.
She understands that there are different types of texts and that these can have similar characteristics. She can identify
connections between texts and her personal experiences when prompted. She attempts to read short predictable texts with
familiar vocabulary and supportive images, drawing on her developing knowledge of concepts about print, sound and
letters. She can identify the letters of the alphabet and use the sounds represented by most letters. Her writing
demonstrates sound and letter knowledge (AusVELS, 2015 b).
She has instant recall of number facts in addition and subtraction and shows confidence in the Number area of Mathematics
in an algorithmic sense. She depicts feelings and experiences through visual art.
Challenges
Zainab has low level foundation skills in decoding and coding text (reading/writing), producing and receiving information
(speaking/listening) and phonological awareness (letter-sound knowledge) (Language & Learning) (Emmitt, Zbaracki,
Komesaroff & Polloc, 2012. pp. 7;150). Whilst she can recall one or two events from texts with familiar topics, she rarely
uses predicting/questioning strategies to make meaning from texts (AusVELS, 2015 b). She needs to begin to verbalise her
ideas when reading to deepen her comprehension and language skills. She also needs to expand her spelling skills to four
letter words by listening closely to sounds within those words.
She finds starting Literacy and mathematical problem solving tasks difficult, without frequent one-to-one assistance. Zainab
needs to persevere and stay on-task with activities that she finds difficult.

Zainab is reluctant to undertake group work. She needs to build confidence to participate in group situations and to ask for
clarification to more fully understand task requirements.
Learning Priorities
To increase her vocabulary and use correct grammar and pronunciation. To read aloud in reading conference groups and
one-on-one with the teacher. Develop fluency and begin to recall key ideas and recognise literal and implied meaning in
texts. To accurately spell four letter words and use capital letters and full stops.
To listen to others and take part and share ideas in conversations using appropriate language features in pair, group and
class discussions. To present a few connected sentences on familiar and learned topics (AusVELS, 2015 c).
To build perseverance and on-task activity. To reassure and support Zainab to build resilience and self esteem.

INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLAN


Semester & Short Term Goals
Interpersonal Development
Domain
a. To seek teacher assistance
when requiring emotional
support 30% of the time (by
term end)

Entry level of performance


a. Zainab is able to
share emotional
concerns with her
father but does not
currently share those
concerns with her
teacher

b. To control emotions and


remain focused 60% of the
time (by term end)

b. She is comfortable
in familiar settings
within her classroom

Personal Learning Domain


To collect required materials and
be ready to begin lesson without
additional reminders/support
90% of the time (within four
weeks)

Teacher uses multiple


reminders &
scaffolding at the
beginning of each
lesson for Zainab to
understand what

Strategies/ Methods
a. Teacher and social
worker will arrange
regular check-ins to
discuss feelings that
have arisen at school
and discuss feelings
expressed in
drawings (see
below).The teacher
will use a calm,
soothing voice and
validating language
to comfort and build
rapport (NSW
Department of
Education and
Communities, n.d.).
b. Provide a
classroom safe zone
tent to enable
Zainab to process her
emotions and regain
composure. Play
soothing music to
create a calm
environment.
Encourage Zainab to
express her
feelings through
drawing

Mode of Delivery
a.
Teacher/social
worker
(Thursdays weekly or more
often if Zainab
is distressed)

Assessment
Observational formative.
Zainab initiates
discussion with
teacher about
her feelings.
Zainab
processes her
emotions
through
drawings. Uses
the safe zone.

Evaluation
1
2
3

b.
Teacher/social
worker/aide
(when Zainab is
anxious/
distressed)

a. Teacher
(beginning of
each day)

Observational formative.
Zainab collects
correct
materials and is

materials she needs


for that lesson

Personal Learning Domain


To complete tasks independently
50% of the time (by term end)

Rarely completes
tasks independently.
Requires further
explanations in
addition to whole
class instructions.
Struggles to engage
in tasks and often
copies others work

English Domain
To reach PM Reader level 3-4 red
(by term end)
Currently at PM
Reader level Starters
1. Does not selfcorrect or ask for
assistance when
reading texts aloud

a. Present a visual
timetable (pictureword association) to
show the order of
daily activities, and
the materials
required for each
lesson
b. Use simple and
concise language to
transition between
lessons (International
Dyslexia Association,
2015).
Visual instructions
and clues on how to
undertake tasks
(Kathryn Williams,
Teacher at Berwick
Chase Primary School
2015). Record
instructions via
tape/ipad to increase
Zainabs
understanding of task
requirements
(International
Dyslexia Association,
2015).

b. Teacher
(during lesson
transition)

Teacher (before
each lesson)

ready to start
lessons at the
same time as
her peers
without
additional
instruction.

Observational formative.
Zainab
completes her
tasks without
requiring
assistance

a. Teacher
(twice per
week)

Running Record
- formative.
Progresses in
PM Reader
b. Teacher/aide/ levels (Flint et
MEA
al., 2014, p.
(Department of 341-342).
a. Whole-class shared Education and
Undertakes
reading (teacher
Training, 2014
every two
reads; students join
c). (twice per
weeks for low
in at key points) (Flint week)
performing
et al., 2014, p. 156).
students.

English Domain
To write two simple connecting
sentences with correct spelling
and grammar 80% of the time.
To read them to the teacher with
correct pronunciation 90% of the
time (within four weeks)

Able to use
graphophonics to
sound out words, but
is unable to make
meaning. Written
work requires
frequent correction

Communication Domain
To make meaning, predictions
and inferences about
appropriate levelled texts by
answering text-based questions
accurately 80% of the time (by
the term end)
Uses illustrations to
show meaning of
texts. Unable to
verbalise meaning in
group situations

b. Engage Zainab in
one-on-one modelled
reading. Teacher/aide
reads one sentence
aloud and Zainab
repeats. Use levelled
texts to ensure text
suitability (Learning
A-Z, 2015 b; Flint et
al., 2014, p. 151)

Language Experience
Approach: Teacher
provides photographs
or artefacts of an
experience. For
modelled writing,
Zainab will use
picture cues to
construct words and
sentences describing
and making
observations about
the experience (Flint
et al., 2014, p. 156157).
Individualised guided
reading sessions
used to ask literal,
inferential and
evaluative questions
about the levelled
text (Flint et al., p.

CAP (Concepts
about Print) test
- summative
(Flint et al., p.
189). (Test midterm)
Teacher/aide
(once per
week)
Test Summative.
Demonstrates
accurate writing
and becomes
increasingly
fluent in reading
sentences aloud
Teacher/aide
(twice per
week)
Observational
Speaking and
Listening
assessment
where teacher
asks questions
after reading
and notes
accuracy of
Zainabs
responses.
(Department of
Education and
Training, 2014
a; b)

157)

KEY: 1 = Little or No Progress

2 = Satisfactory Progress

3 = Excellent Progress/Goal Achieved

Below is a list of learning priorities that may be included in the Individual Learning Plan:
Daily Living Skills
Social Skills
Behaviour
Motor Skills
Communication
Literacy

Numeracy

Justification of chosen goals:


Zainabs emotional wellbeing and response to events in the classroom are a key enabler/barrier to her effective participation and
learning outcomes. It is fundamental to build her resilience to stay on-task and persevere through her language difficulties, as these
are key contributors to successful academic performance. The goals also focus on literacy and communication, as these are
foundational for all subjects (Woolfolks & Margetts, 2013, p. 159-162).
Evaluation:
Zainab has substantially progressed her reading and comprehension skills and is more confident with Standard Australian English.
She reads simple sentences fluently, with conviction. This has significantly reduced her off-task behaviours.
She is increasingly willing to communicate and share her views with her peers. Zainab is feeling more comfortable in different
settings, although she is still troubled by unexpected loud noises. She is better equipped to control her emotional state and willing
to trusting others. She is socialising effectively with female students, however remains reluctant to engage with male teachers and
male peers.
Number of days absent: 8

Parents Signature__________________________

Teachers Signature____________________________________________

Principal / Special Needs co-ordinator____________________________ Other __________________________________________


Date:

_____________________________________

1.2 Knowledge and understanding of research


into how students learn and the implications
for teaching
References
AusVELS. (2015) a. English Curriculum Overview. Retrieved from
http://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/English/Curriculum/F-10
AusVELS. (2015) b. Foundation Level. Retrieved from
http://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Foundationlevel
AusVELS. (2015) c. Level 1. Retrieved from
http://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Level1
Autism Spectrum Australia (Aspect). (2014). Positive Partnerships Planning
Matrix. Retrieved from
http://www.positivepartnerships.com.au/planning-matrix
Department of Education and Training. (2014) a. Assessment and
Reporting. Retrieved from
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/di
versity/eal/Pages/ealreport.aspx
Department of Education and Training. (2014) b. EAL Learners in
Mainstream Schools. Retrieved from
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/di
versity/eal/Pages/ealschools.aspx
Department of Education and Training. (2014) c. Multicultural Education
Aides (MEAs). Retrieved from
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/di
versity/eal/Pages/ealschools.aspx
Emmitt, M., Zbaracki, M., Komesaroff, L., & Polloc. J. (2012). Language &
Learning: An Introduction for Teaching (5th ed.). South Melbourne,
Australia: Oxford University Press.

Flint, A. S., Lowe, K., & Shaw, K. (2014). Literacy in Australia: Pedagogies
for Engagement. Milton, Qld: John Wiley & Sons Australia Ltd.
International Dyslexia Association (2015). Reading Rockets:
Accommodating Students with Dyslexia in All Classroom Settings.
Retrieved from http://www.readingrockets.org/article/accommodatingstudents-dyslexia-all-classroom-settings (FROM LEO)
Learning A-Z. (2015) a. Reading A-Z: Leveled Books. Retrieved from
https://www.readinga-z.com/books/leveled-books/?lbFilter[level-A]
Learning A-Z. (2015) b. Reading A-Z: Level Correlation Chart. Retrieved
from https://www.readinga-z.com/learninga-z-levels/level-correlationchart/
NSW Department of Education and Communities. (n.d.). Foundation House:
Resource 3: Strategies to help students with a refugee background
who are experiencing behavioural issues. Retrieved from
http://www.foundationhouse.org.au/wpcontent/uploads/2014/08/Schools_In_Resource_03_Strategies_to_supp
ort_students_with_behavioural_issues.pdf
Ontario Ministry of Education and TFO. (2015). Online Teaching Resource.
Retrieved from http://eworkshop.on.ca/edu/core.cfm
VicHealth. (2009). Building on Our Strengths, Victorian Health Promotion
Foundation. Retrieved from www.vichealth.vic.gov.au
Woolfolks, S., & Margetts, K. (2013). Educational Psychology (3rd ed.).
Frenchs Forest, Australia: Pearson.

General comments from PSTs:


The planning matrix succinctly outlines the characteristics and learning needs of the avatar. There is a
detailed and sophisticated depiction of the implications that arise from the avatars characteristics. The
planning matrix also demonstrates a comprehensive understanding of the avatars entry level of
performance and uses strength-based language to do this, drawing appropriate links to AusVELS. The
learning goals selected would substantially progress the avatars learning needs. This is particularly the case
given the comprehensive range of multi-faceted strategies, which demonstrate extensive research and
careful consideration. The goals were SMART and there was a very good understanding of assessment
techniques. There is also clear evidence of strong collaboration between Jessica and Melanie in the
formulation of the ILP and planning matrix.

EDFD221 Assessment Task 3

Catering for Individual Student Needs

Names: Melanie Renner Jessica Ornsby


Criteria
Documents
academic, social
and emotional
development of
the individual in
positive/
strengths based
language (LO3)

Characteristics
(LO4)

Mark: Distinction

Distinctions

Credit

Pass

Fail (NN)

Matrix/ILP and other


documentation and
discussion demonstrate
consistent very high
level, comprehensive
information on the childs
social and emotional
development in
extremely well considered
positive/ strengths based
language.

Matrix and other


documentation and
discussion
demonstrate good
evidence of
comprehensive
information on the
childs social and
emotional
development with good
positive/ strengths
based language.
Informed approach
with good knowledge
and understanding of
the characteristics of
the child within an
inclusive educational
setting. Wellconsidered
documentation within

Matrix and other


documentation and
discussion demonstrate
satisfactory information
on the childs social and
emotional development
with satisfactory
positive/ strengths
based language.

Matrix and other


documentation and
discussion demonstrate
little, poorly considered or
no information on the
childs social and
emotional development
with little, poorly
considered or no positive/
strengths based language.

Satisfactory knowledge
and understanding of
the characteristics of
the child within an
inclusive educational
setting. Satisfactory
documentation within
the planning matrix.

Limited, poor or no clear


knowledge and
understanding of the
characteristics of the child
within an inclusive
educational setting.
Limited, poor or no
documentation within the
planning matrix.

Excellent, highly informed


and knowledgeable
understanding of the
characteristics of the
child within an inclusive
educational setting.
Excellent documentation
within the planning
matrix.

the planning matrix.

Impacts on
individuals and
others (LO4)

Implications for
the setting (LO2,
LO5, LO8)

Set goals and


level of
specificity
relating to needs
through planned
task analysis
(LO5, LO8)
Strategies
demonstrate an
understanding of
principles of
student
wellbeing and
teaching for
resilience within
an inclusive
setting (LO3)

Highly insightful,
connected and
comprehensive
consideration of possible
impact of these
characteristics on childs
learning, peers, family
and school/centre teams.
Excellent documentation
within the planning
matrix.
Very high quality, creative
differentiation of
instruction and
curriculum to meet the
needs of the child in the
inclusive setting.

Good consideration of
and thoughtful detail of
possible impact of
these characteristics
on childs learning,
peers, family and
school/centre teams.
Good documentation
within the planning
matrix.

Satisfactory
consideration of possible
impact of these
characteristics on childs
learning, peers, family
and school/centre
teams. Satisfactory
documentation within
the planning matrix.

Limited, poor or no clear


consideration of possible
impact of these
characteristics on childs
learning, peers, family and
school/centre teams.
Limited, poor or no clear
documentation within the
planning matrix.

Good consideration to
differentiating
instruction and
curriculum to meet the
needs of the child in
the inclusive setting.

Limited, poor or no clear


consideration to
differentiating instruction
and curriculum to meet
the needs of the child in
the inclusive setting.

Excellent, high level


consideration of goals
and task analysis to
scaffold learning to meet
the needs of the child.

Good consideration of
goals and task analysis
to scaffold learning to
meet the needs of the
child.

Satisfactory
consideration to
differentiating
instruction and
curriculum to meet the
needs of the child in the
inclusive setting.
Satisfactory
consideration of goals
and task analysis to
scaffold learning to
meet the needs of the
child.

Comprehensive detailed
knowledge of student
wellbeing and teaching
for resilience and high
quality relevant
strategies for catering for
the needs of the child in
an inclusive setting.
Substantial insight into
the impact of these
strategies connected to
the needs of the child.
Comprehensive detailed

Good knowledge of
child wellbeing and
teaching for resilience
and relevant strategies
for an inclusive setting.
Very good
understanding of the
impact of these
strategies connected to
the needs of the child.

Satisfactory factual
knowledge of child
wellbeing and teaching
for resilience and
generally relevant
strategies for an
inclusive setting.
Adequate understanding
of the impact of these
strategies connected to
the needs of the child.

Limited, poor or no clear


knowledge of child
wellbeing and teaching for
resilience. Limited, poor or
no relevant strategies for
an inclusive setting.
Inadequate understanding
of the impact of the
strategies connected to
the needs of the child.

Good knowledge of

Satisfactory knowledge

Limited, poor or no clear

Limited, poor or no clear


consideration of goals and
task analysis to scaffold
learning to meet the needs
of the child.

Strategies to
enhance
protective
factors
minimising risk
(LO2, LO4)

knowledge of high quality


relevant strategies to
enhance protective
factors minimising risk for
all in an inclusive setting.
Substantial insight into
the impact of these
strategies connected to
the needs of the child.
Excellent documentation
within the planning
matrix.

Specific
Strategies that
cater for the
individuals
additional needs
(LO5, LO8)

Comprehensive, very well


planned highly relevant
strategies to cater for the
childs needs. Excellent
documentation.

well selected relevant


strategies to enhance
protective factors
minimising risk for all
in an inclusive setting.
Thoughtful
consideration into the
impact of these
strategies connected to
the needs of the child.
Good documentation
within the planning
matrix.
Well-considered,
relevant strategies to
cater for the childs
needs. Good
documentation.

of relevant strategies to
enhance protective
factors minimising risk
for all in an inclusive
setting. Adequate
consideration into the
impact of these
strategies connected to
the needs of the child.
Satisfactory
documentation within
the planning matrix.

knowledge of relevant
strategies to enhance
protective factors
minimising risk for all in an
inclusive setting. Limited,
poor or no clear
consideration into the
impact of these strategies
connected to the needs of
the child. Limited, poor or
no clear documentation
within the planning matrix.

Satisfactory and
generally relevant
strategies to cater for
the childs needs.
Satisfactory
documentation.

Limited, poor or no clear


relevant strategies to
cater for the childs needs.
Limited, poor or no clear
documentation.

Communication of information and ideas & connecting to the literature in the field

Sources/literatur
e

Presentation/For
mat of Planning
Matrix

REFERENCING

Explicitly, accurately and


insightfully used in
significant ways.
Appropriate, relevant and
recent selection, very
thoughtful generalisation
to practical experience.
Very clear, accurately
proofed print throughout.
All information very
clearly planned,
comprehensive,
professionally presented
and thoroughly
organised, scaffolded,
complete and accessible.
Inclusive language always
carefully used
throughout.

Explicit factual use in


significant ways.
Appropriate relevant
and recent selection,
good generalisation to
practical experience.

Explicitly used.
Satisfactory selection
and generalisation to
practical experience.

Fails to use source


explicitly, poor selection
and generalisation to
practical experience. .

Clear, proofed print. All


information clearly
organised, complete
and accessible.
Inclusive language
used.

Generally proofed print.


Information adequately
organised and
accessible. Inclusive
language mostly used.

Poorly proofed print,


poorly spaced text.
Information not clearly
organised or accessible.
Very limited, poorly used
or no use of inclusive
language.

Very Good
Improvement

Needs

Professionally presented and appropriate accurate


use of APA referencing style throughout text and
accurate reference list

General Comments:
You addressed all the criteria. Your planning matrix was detailed and your ILP clearly showed how you planned to improve
Zainabs low level skills. An area that needed further work related to the strategies that you would invoke to ensure that Zainab
grew in confidence in interacting with others. Also, some discussion on the challenges of implementing this program would have
been insightful. Stewart.