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VARYING OVERHEAD AODV ROUTING IN

DYNAMIC MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS TO


CONTROL OVERHEADS

ABSTRACT
of the Thesis

Submitted by

BALAJI V
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

of

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

FACULTY OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION


ENGINEERING
ANNA UNIVERSITY
CHENNAI 600 025
FEBRURAY 2014

ABSTRACT

A Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANET) is a group of wireless mobile nodes


dynamically forming a network for data transfer without any pre-existing
infrastructure or centralized administration. A wireless network with a high density of
nodes and within a single collision domain has a high probability of congestion,
decreasing the performance significantly. Typically, congestion includes drastic drops
in network throughput, unacceptable packet delays and session disruptions.
Routing in ad hoc wireless networks has been an active area of research for
many years. Much of the original work in the area was motivated by mobile
application environments, with the primary focus is to provide scalable routing in the
presence of mobile nodes. Most current ad hoc routing protocols select paths that
minimize hop count. In static ad hoc wireless networks, minimal hop count paths can
have poor performance because they tend to include wireless links between distant
nodes. These long wireless links can be slow or lossy, leading to poor throughput. A
routing algorithm can select better paths by explicitly taking into account the quality
of wireless links.
The main objective is to decrease the network overheads without affecting
the QoS of the network in highly dynamic ad hoc networks. Highly dynamic and
dense network have to maintain acceptable level of service to data packets and limit
the network control overheads. This capability is closely related, as how quickly the

network protocol control overhead is managed as a function of increased link changes.


Dynamically limiting the routing control overheads based on the network topology
improves the throughput of the network.

This work is based on dynamically

modifying the active route time based on the network topology. The following are
some of the contributions of this thesis:

Propose an improved AODV based on Link quality. Investigate the


performance of the proposed protocol and compare it with AODV.

Propose a novel routing algorithm, Varying Overhead Ad hoc On


Demand Distance Vector (VO-AODV), which is an extension of
AODV routing protocol to decrease network overheads.

Propose

an

optimization

techniques

based

on Ant

Colony

Optimization (ACO) to improve the packet delivery ratio of the


proposed routing protocol.

Propose a hybrid optimization technique based on ACO and Tabu


search.

In this study, it was proposed to improve the link quality by incorporating a


Link Quality metric with AODV (LQ-AODV) routing protocol. The performance for
PDR of LQ-AODV improves by 2.22% and 0.36% when compared to AODV and
VO-AODV when node pause time is 100 sec. The end to end delay of LQ-AODV is
less by 8.01% when compared to AODV and by 2.07% when compared to VO-AODV
when node pause time is 100 sec.
It was proposed to improve the VO-AODV using ACO for link optimization.
The proposed Ant Colony Optimization with AODV (ACO-AODV) routing protocol
is compared with AODV and LQ-AODV. The performance for PDR of ACO-AODV

improves by 5.63% and 3.34% when compared to AODV and LQ-AODV when node
pause time is 100 sec. The end to end delay of ACO-AODV is less by 11.89% when
compared to AODV and by 4.22% when compared to LQ-AODV when node pause
time is 100 sec.
The proposed Hybrid ACO-AODV is compared with AODV and LQAODV. The performance for PDR of Hybrid ACO-AODV is similar to ACO-AODV
but end to end delay decreases for Hybrid ACO-AODV by 24.16% and 17.56% when
compared to AODV and LQ-AODV when node pause time is 100 sec.