SEEKING FUNDS

‘MONEY MONSTER’ A
SOLID ’90S THRILLER

GATORS WIN
PAL TOURNEY

DONALD TRUMP PREPARING TO SEEK BIG-DONOR
MONEY
NATION PAGE 7

WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016 • XVI, Edition 233

Brown warns of deficits
By the numbers: Details of governor’s budget plan
EDUCATION:

would also see an increase to $30 billion.

Under voter-approved Proposition 98, public
schools are guaranteed $71.9 billion, the biggest
slice of state revenue. It’s an increase of $2.8 billion
over the current year and more than $24 billion
higher than state spending at the depth of the
recession. The proposed budget also adds $100
million to repair unsafe school facilities, $135
million for schools’ discretionary needs and $10
million for teacher credential programs.
Brown wants to direct additional money to public
schools, bringing per-pupil spending to nearly
$14,700 in 2016-17, an increase of nearly $500 per
student over the current year. Higher education

HEALTH CARE:
Spending on Medi-Cal would hold fairly steady at
about $17.7 billion as the state anticipates 13.5
million enrollees.That’s nearly a third of California’s
population, and it includes about 185,000 children
in the country illegally who can begin enrolling
in full coverage starting Monday.

TRANSPORTATION:
Brown proposed spending $3.6 billion-a-year over
the next decade to address an estimated $59

billion backlog in road repairs. He wants to raise $2
billion from a new $65 fee on vehicles and increase
gasoline and diesel taxes to generate $1 billion
annually.

RAINY DAY:
Brown wants to squirrel away $2 billion more than
constitutionally required to prepare for the next
economic downturn. If the Legislature agrees, the
rainy-day fund would total $8 billion by the end of
the upcoming fiscal year.

See PLAN, Page 24

California tax campaign begins
By Jonathan J. Cooper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — California
Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday raised
the specter of steep budget deficits
if his voter-approved, temporary
tax increases on the wealthy are
allowed to expire — a warning
that added political overtones to
his proposed $122.2 billion state
budget.

County lawmakers want focus
on transportation and housing
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Plan does not include Assembly
proposal to earmark $1.3 billion
to go toward affordable housing

line Wednesday, June 15.
Alisa MacAvoy, president of the
Redwood City Elementary School
District Board of Trustees, said in
an email she supported Brown’s
commitment to funding state
schools, but felt more work needed
to be done to bring California
closer to levels enjoyed in other
states.
“I appreciate the additional education funds getting us closer to

As California’s financial landscape for the coming fiscal year
reached a significant milestone
with Gov. Jerry
Brown’s May
budget revision
an n o un ced
Friday,
local
legislators
urged continued
negotiations as
little was set
Rich Gordon aside to support
transportation
or housing needs across the state
and in the Bay Area.
“I think what’s important to
remember when we talk about
budgets, is we talk about a
process,” said Assemblyman Rich
Gordon, D-Menlo Park. “The leadership in the state Assembly is certainly going to be looking at
some tweaks to this May revision,
trying to figure out how do we
make sure we’re focusing on the
income gap in poverty, investing
in education and child care, and
making some progress on affordable housing.”
San Mateo County’s state legislators praised Brown’s fiscal prudence in the nearly $122.2 billion
general fund budget and acknowledged tax revenue projections are
nearly $2 billion lower than
January projections. However,
they questioned whether there was
room to do more to address the
state’s overwhelming needs related

See SCHOOLS, Page 23

See REVISE, Page 18

By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

See HOUSING, Page 23

REUTERS FILE PHOTO

Gov. Jerry Brown proposed a $122.2 billion general fund spending plan Friday that sets the stage for a monthslong
debate with the Legislature over budget priorities.

School spending plan draws critiques
Education advocates call on governor for more financial support
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Despite a proposed bump in
school spending, room for
improvement remains in Gov.
Jerry Brown’s most recent budget
revision, according to local and
state education officials.
The proposed $122 billion
budget offers a pay hike to state
schools, an expected increase of
roughly $2.8 billion from the fiscal year prior, to $71.9 billion.

We Smog ALL CARS
0JM$IBOHFt4BGFUZ$IFDL

See BUDGET, Page 24

Legislators
urge further
negotiations

Budget
short on
housing
State Assemblyman Kevin
Mullin, D-South San Francisco,
praised
Gov.
Jerry Brown’s
fiscally prudent
budget Friday
but said it falls
short when it
comes to affordable housing.
B r o w n
his
Kevin Mullin released
May
budget
revision Friday that does not
include an Assembly proposal to
earmark $1. 3 billion toward
affordable housing.
Mullin hopes that by the time
the budget is adopted in mid-June,
Brown will embrace the Assembly
proposal.
“I’m disappointed but there is a
lot more negotiating to take
place,” Mullin said Friday after
speaking at a Housing Leadership
Council forum in Redwood City.
Brown’s May revise does
endorse a $2 billion bond financed
by proceeds from Proposition 63
for chronic homeless and other
affordable housing programs.
Affordable Housing Week in San
Mateo County ends Saturday, May
14.

Brown used the release of his
spending plan to warn of a $4 billion budget shortfall by 2019,
when the tax increases fully
expire.
The Democratic governor
refused to take a position on
extending the tax hikes, but he
warned that without the added revenue, “we will have cuts, no ques-

But
greater
investment in
early education,
lifting reserve
caps and bringing
spending
levels back to
heights enjoyed
prior to the
Alisa MacAvoy Great Recession
are among the
opportunities identified by education advocates to improve the
budget before its approval dead-

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“Silence cannot hide anything — which
is more than you can say for words.”
— From the play “The Ghost Sonata”
by Swedish author-playwright August Strindberg

This Day in History

1948

According to the current-era calendar,
the independent state of Israel was
proclaimed in Tel Aviv.

In 1 6 4 3 , Louis XIV became King of France at age four upon
the death of his father, Louis XIII.
In 1 7 9 6 , English physician Edward Jenner inoculated 8year-old James Phipps against smallpox by using cowpox
matter.
In 1 8 0 4 , the Lewis and Clark expedition to explore the
Louisiana Territory as well as the Pacific Northwest left
camp near present-day Hartford, Illinois.
In 1 9 0 0 , the Olympic games opened in Paris as part of the
1900 World’s Fair.
In 1 9 2 5 , the Virginia Woolf novel “Mrs Dalloway” was
first published in England and the United States.
In 1 9 3 6 , British Field Marshal Edmund Allenby, 1st
Viscount Allenby, died in London at age 75.
In 1 9 4 0 , the Netherlands surrendered to invading German
REUTERS
forces during World War II.
A
student
of
the
General
Yermolov
Cadet
School
is
pictured
after
jumping
with
parachute
from
an
airplane,
as
the
moon is
In 1 9 5 5 , representatives from eight Communist bloc
seen
in
the
sky,
in
the
village
of
Novomaryevskaya
outside
the
southern
city
of
Stavropol,
Russia.
countries, including the Soviet Union, signed the Warsaw
Pact in Poland. (The Pact was dissolved in 1991.)
***
***
In 1 9 6 1 , Freedom Riders were attacked by violent mobs in
11. Percent of the population that 53. Percent of beer is consumed by 21
Anniston and Birmingham, Alabama.
believes in ghosts and other supernatu- to 34 year olds.
In 1 9 7 3 , the United States launched Skylab 1, its first
ral entities.
***
***
58. Percent of major professional footmanned space station. (Skylab 1 remained in orbit for six
13. The age of Bill Gates when he wrote ball injuries that involve a player’s
years before burning up during re-entry in 1979.) The
knee.
his first computer program.
National Right to Life Committee was incorporated.
***
***
15. Number of shots fired in the first 60 60. The time in seconds it took for
episodes of “Dragnet.” The original Polaroid’s pictures to develop when the
camera was first introduced in 1948.
series ran from 1951 to 1959.
The first Polaroid Land camera, Model
***
95, sold in Boston that year for
18.
The
inside
diameter
(in
inches)
of
a
Arithmophobia is a fear of numbers.
$89.75.
regulation basketball hoop.
***
***
***
2. The number of senators from each
62. The amount of money in dollars
state. Each senator serves a six-year 23. Consecutive years the “The Ed
Sullivan Show” ran. It is the longest Ralph Kramden earned per week as a bus
term.
running variety show in television his- driver. “The Honeymooners” aired in
***
tory. The show premiered June 20, 1955-56 and ran for a total of 39
3. Minutes the United States was with- 1948, with its original title “Toast of episodes.
out a president. It was the time between the Town.”
***
Movie writer,
Movie producer
Actor Tim Roth is
Richard Nixon’s resignation and the
82. The age of Mao Tse-tung when he
***
director Sofia
George Lucas is
55.
swearing in of Gerald Ford in 1973.
31. Number of films starring Elvis died in 1976.
Coppola is 45.
72.
***
***
Opera singer Patrice Munsel is 91. Photo-realist artist 4. Strings on a cello. The violin also Presley. Can you name his first film and
the year, and his last film and the year? 96. The number of Hershey’s kisses
Richard Estes is 84. Actress Sian Phillips is 83. Former Sen. has four strings.
See answer at end.
that weigh 1 pound.
Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., is 74. Actress Meg Foster is 68. Rock
***
***
***
singer David Byrne is 64. Rock singer Ian Astbury (The Cult) 5. Layers in the Earth’s atmosphere. 44. A coat hanger is 44 inches long
Ans wer: Elv is Presley ’s first starring
is 54. Rock musician C.C. (aka Cecil) DeVille is 54. Actor They are the troposphere, stratosphere, when straightened.
role was in the 1956 mov ie “Lov e Me
Danny Huston is 54. Rock musician Mike Inez (Alice In mesosphere, thermosphere and atmos***
Tender.” His last mov ie was “Change of
Chains) is 50. Fabrice Morvan (ex-Milli Vanilli) is 50. phere.
46. Number of children’s books written Habit” in 1969. In the film, Elv is play s
Rhythm-and-blues singer Raphael Saadiq is 50. Actress Cate
***
by Theodor Seuss Geisel, AKA Dr. Dr. John Carpenter. Mary Ty ler Moore
Blanchett is 47. Singer Danny Wood (New Kids on the Block) 7. The opposite sides of a dice cube Seuss. His first book “And to Think I play s an undercov er nun with a mission
always add up to seven.
is 47. Actor Gabriel Mann is 44.
Saw It on Mulberry Street” was rejected to help the doctor clean up the New
***
29 times before being published in York City ghetto where he liv es.
8. Legs on all spiders. Most spiders 1937.
also have eight eyes, but some only
***
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
have six eyes.
48. Freckles on Howdy Doody’s face.
the weekend edition of the Daily Journal.
***
***
Questions?
Comments?
Email
9. Rungs on the ladder Neil Armstrong 50. The average number of licks to fin- knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or call 344climbed down to step foot on the moon. ish a single scoop ice cream cone.
5200 ext.128.

Birthdays

Lotto
May 11 Powerball
20

32

52

66

69

23
Powerball

May 13 Mega Millions
20

21

38

54

66

7
Mega number

May 11 Super Lotto Plus
8

24

31

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five

32

43

2

3

9

36

7

9

Daily Four
7

3

Daily three midday
2

17

20

0

5

Daily three evening

Mega number

6

5

3

The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No. 1, in first place; Lucky Charms, No. 12, in
second place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:43.24.
The San Mateo Daily Journal
1900 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 112, San Mateo, CA 94403
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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Saturday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. Lows in
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mph.
Sunday : Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s. Northwest
winds 10 to 15 mph.
Sunday ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s. Northwest winds 15 to
20 mph.
Mo nday : Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Highs in the mid 60s.
Mo nday ni g ht thro ug h Thurs day : Partly cloudy.
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

Hillbarn stages treat
with ‘Sweet Charity’

Police reports

By Judy Richter

HALF MOON BAY

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Her name, Charity Hope Valentine, perfectly describes the title character in “Sweet
Charity.”
Played by Monique Hafen at Hillbarn
Theatre, Charity is generous, optimistic and
romantic — mostly to her detriment.
In the story by Neil Simon, she works at
the seedy Fan-Dango Ballroom in New York
as a dance hall hostess, or taxi dancer.
She has had no luck in love until she
meets Oscar (David Blackburn), and they
become trapped in an elevator at the YMCA.
Though neurotic, he’s sweet and deeply
cares for her. Still, disappointment ensues
once more.
Charity’s best friends are her cynical and
more worldly coworkers Helene (Caitlin
O’Leary) and Nickie (Alicia Gangi). They
team up with her in “There’s Gotta Be
Something Better Than This,” one of the
highlights in the tuneful score by Cy
Coleman with lyrics by Dorothy Fields.
Inspired
by
Bob
Fosse,
choreographer/director of the original 1966
Broadway production, choreography by
Alex Hsu enhances enjoyment of the songs.
Perhaps it’s best displayed in “Rich Man’s
Frug,” featuring the ensemble.
Also ranking high are “Big Spender,”
sung and danced by the jaded Fan-Dango
women; “The Rhythm of Life,” featuring
Lawrence-Michael C. Arias as a hippie
preacher; and “I’m a Brass Band,” with
Charity and the men.
Complete with go-go boots, the ’60s costumes by Valerie Emmi capture the era.
It’s too bad that music director Rick

3

Not very fun
Someone bought more than $800 worth
of games online with someone else’s
credit card on Lido Lane in Redwood
City before 3:24 p.m. Thursday, May
12.

Petty theft. A leaf blower, valued at $300,
was stolen from a truck on the 100 block of
Poplar Street before 8 a.m. Wednesday, May
11.
Burg l ary . Items valued at approximately
$840 were taken from a vehicle through a
smashed window on the 4200 block of
Highway 1 before 2:42 p.m. Tuesday, May
10.
Vandal i s m. A vehicle sustained approximately $700 in damage during an attempted
break-in on the 4200 block of Highway 1
before 2:55 p.m. Tuesday, May 10.
Hi t-and-run. A driver ran a red light,
caused a collision and then fled the scene on
foot near Highway 1 and San Mateo Road
before 11:44 a.m. Monday, May 9.

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
MARK AND TRACY PHOTOGRAPHY

Monique Hafen leads an ensemble cast in Hillbarn Theatre’s production of ‘Sweet Charity.’
Reynolds’ orchestra sometimes drowns out
the singers, and the brass hit too many sour
notes on opening night, especially in the
overture.
Directed by Erica Wyman-Abrahamson
with vocal direction by Tracy Chiappone,
the acting and singing are generally good.
With her expressive face and limber
limbs, Hafen excels in acting, dancing and
singing. She’s ably supported by O’Leary,
Gangi and the other women. Some of the
men are good dancers, but overall the male
corps isn’t equal to the women.
Blackburn overacts as Oscar, especially
in the elevator scene, and puts too much
emphasis on Oscar’s neuroticism.

Running about three hours with one intermission, the production overall is quite
enjoyable thanks to the great score and terrific dancing.
“Sweet Charity” will run through May 29
at Hillbarn Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. For tickets and information call (650) 349-6411 or visit www.theatre.org.

Vandal i s m. Unknown powder was found in
front of a residence and its door was spray
painted with red paint on Grand Avenue
before 9:13 a.m. Friday, May 6.
Theft. A vehicle was stolen from a parking
lot at La Quinta Motor Inn on Airport
Boulevard before 8:24 a.m. Friday, May 6.
Traffic hazard. A garbage can was seen in
the road near Westborough and Junipero
Serra boulevards before 10:34 p. m.
Wednesday, May 4.

4

LOCAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

Former principal seeks jury
trial in embezzlement case
Linda McDaniel, former interim principal of El Camino High
School in South San Francisco,
will be held to answer for felony
charges she embezzled the
school out of nearly $10, 000 to
fund a gambling addiction,
according to the San Mateo
County District Attorney’s
Office.
A judge ruled Friday that evidence is sufficient enough to try
McDaniel during a preliminary
hearing.
She previously pleaded not
guilty to the charges.
McDaniel, 61, resigned abruptly from her post at the high
school last year, following a
police investigation into what
was described as alleged fiscal
malfeasance.
The San Mateo resident claimed
she needed the $8,030 taken from
a safe in the front office and
$1,930 in cash from the principal’s office to cover debts from a
gambling addiction, according to
prosecutors.
The money was found missing
after McDaniel had left a note in

Local briefs
the bank box saying she took the
cash, with intention to pay it
back.
After having not returned the
money over an extended period of
time, the library technician
responsible for accounting the
smaller cash box reported
McDaniel to an assistant principal, who took the issue to district
administration, according to
prosecutors.
McDaniel did repay the school
the full amount, prior to her
appearance in court.

San Bruno
police investigating
residential burglary
Police say they’re investigating a residential burglary that
occurred Wednesday in San
Bruno.
Officers responded to a residence in the 3900 block of Colby
Way at 10:09 p.m. Wednesday.
As part of their investigation,
they found that a suspect broke a
window near the front door to
enter the home sometime
between 2:30 p.m. and 10 p.m.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Police do not know whether
anything was stolen, and a
description of the suspect was
not immediately available.
Investigators asked anyone
with information about the burglary to call the San Bruno Police
Department at (650) 616-7100.

Cellphone store
robbed with screwdriver
Police in Daly City are investigating a robbery that occurred
Sunday at a Sprint store.
Officers with the Daly City
Police Department responded at
1:45 p.m. to the Sprint store at
the Westlake Shopping Center on
a report of a robbery.
Police said an unknown suspect
entered the store, brandished a
screwdriver and stole two
Samsung Galaxy S7 cellphones.
The suspect brandished the
screwdriver to an employee who
attempted to detain him, police
said.
The suspect was described as a
black man, 20 to 25 years old, 6
feet tall, about 200 pounds and
wearing ripped white coveralls, a
black crew neck T-shirt, blue
jeans and a black beanie.

William Edward (Bill) Moffett
William Edward (Bill) Moffett,
age 70, died May 8, 2016, surrounded by his family.
Bill was born Dec. 20, 1945, in
San Francisco and was raised there
with his family. Son of the late Leo
C. Moffett and Bridget M. (O’Shea)
Moffett. Survived by Timothy
Moffett (late Denise), Carol Anne
(Bob) Ellingson, Frances (Mike)
Casazza and the late Leo Moffett.
Survived by many nieces, nephews,
and great-nieces and nephews and
many relatives in Ireland. Bill was a
gardener for The City, a longtime
employee of the Serra High School
community for 22 years. He was
always available to help one and
all. Our family historian, Bill was
the storyteller and reminder of the
past events. Bill will forever be
remembered for his open heart and
embracing smile. Friends are invited to visit after 6 p.m. Tuesday, May
17. A 7 p.m. memorial vigil will be
at St. Gregory Church, 2715
Hacienda St., San Mateo. A memorial mass will be celebrated 10 a.m.
Wednesday, May 18, at St. Gregory
Church.
In lieu of flowers, donations
Mission Hospice & Home Care,
113 16th Ave., San Mateo, 94402

Burlingame-Pacifica Medical Group, Inc.
1828 El Camino Real, Suite 507
Serving the Peninsula Area Since 1981

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Obituaries
or Ursuline Sisters Retirement, 639
Angela Drive, Santa Rosa, 95403.

Raeanne Frances Mesquite
Raeanne Frances Mesquite, born
Dec 21, 1944, died May 7, 2016.
Born in San Francisco, much of
her life was
spent living in
San
Mateo
C o u n t y .
Raeanne
was
loved most for
her large personality and dedication to family
and friends. She
died in peace and comfort holding
her first granddaughter’s hand.
Survived by her son Matt Cole and
his wife Kim, along with granddaughters Brittney and Hillary Cole,
Raeanne lived a vibrant life and is
now reunited with her beloved parents and twin brother Joe. In loving
memory of Raeanne, “Go Niners.”
Friends are invited to join our
family for a barbecue in memory
and celebration of her life.
Celebration hosted at 20539
Marshall St., Castro Valley, CA
starting at noon May 22, 2016.

Accepting New Clients

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

5

U.S. gives directive to schools on
transgender bathroom access
By Eric Tucker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

Barack Obama, left, escorts Nordic leaders to the Oval Office of the White House. From second left, Danish Prime
Minister Lars Lokke Rasmussen, Finland President Sauli Niinisto, Sweden Prime Minister Stefan Lofven and
Iceland’s Prime Minister Sigurour Ingi Johannsson.

Barack Obama hosts summit of
Nordic leaders at White House
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — His fellow
Democrats may be arguing about
whether to hold up places like
Denmark and Norway as liberal
utopias, but President Barack
Obama isn’t hesitating.
Apparently well past concerns
about being branded a socialist,
Obama on Friday celebrated five
Nordic nations as models of reliability, equality, generosity,
responsibility, even personal
happiness.
As he welcomed a group of
Nordic leaders to the White House,
he owned up to thinking perhaps

the small, havens of social liberalism should take the reins every
now and then.
He joked: “Why don’t we just
put all these small countries in
charge for a while.”
The remarks opened a White
House summit with the leaders of
Norway,
Sweden,
Finland,
Iceland and Denmark. Obama and
the leaders are due to discuss a
slate of issues weighing heavily
on the region — including concerns about Russian aggression,
long-term plans for managing
the flow of refugees in Europe
and contributions to the campaign against the Islamic State

group in Iraq and Syria.
The White House is casting the
rare multilateral summit as something of a diplomatic walk in the
park compared to recent, more
contentious sit-downs in the
Middle East, or even Europe.
Where Obama often is tasked with
nudging reluctant partners to contribute more to international partnerships, the Nordic leaders, he
said, are willing partners and
ready to “punch above their
weight.”
Norway, Sweden, Finland and
Denmark are part of the U.S.-led
campaign against the Islamic
State group.

WASHINGTON

Public
schools must permit transgender
students to use bathrooms and
locker rooms consistent with their
chosen gender identity, according
to an Obama administration directive issued amid a court fight
between the federal government
and North Carolina.
The guidance from leaders at the
Justice and Education departments
says public schools are obligated
to treat transgender students in a
way that matches their gender
identity, even if their education
records or identity documents indicate a different sex.

“There is no
room in our
schools for discrimination of
any
kind,
including discri mi n at i o n
against transgender students
the basis of
Loretta Lynch on
their
sex, ”
Attorney General Loretta Lynch
said in a statement accompanying
the directive, which is being sent
to school districts on Friday.
In issuing the guidance, the
Obama administration is wading
anew into a socially divisive
debate it has bluntly cast in terms
of civil rights.

Register for draft: It’s what a
man’s got to do, and women?
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Congress is
on the verge of ordering young
women to register for a military
draft for the first time in history,
touching off outrage among social
conservatives who fear the move
is another step toward blurring
gender lines.
The female draft requirement,
approved late Thursday by the
Senate
Armed
Services
Committee, could be as heated as
the divisive debate over what pub-

lic lavatories and locker rooms
transgender people should use.
Opponents of expanding the
draft may be unable to halt the
momentum in favor of lifting the
exclusion, which was triggered by
the Pentagon’s decision late last
year to open all front-line combat
jobs to women. After gender
restrictions to military service
were erased, the top uniformed officers in each of the military branches expressed support during congressional testimony for including
women in a potential draft.

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6

LOCAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo Ci ty Co unci l
will hold a study session to discuss
its recreation facilities strategic
plan and Central Park master
plan recommendations Monday,
May 16.
The discussion comes after a 12member community advisory committee came up with
some consensus on the community’s needs and interests.
Some key considerations have been to maintain and
improve Fi tzg eral d Fi el d, maintain the tennis courts
but reduce their number and consider relocating them to
the south end of the park in the picnic area, include a plaza
adjacent to Fifth Avenue and identify future needs for the
overall system of recreational facilities (centers and
pools) and determine the most appropriate community
building at Central Park.
The study session begins at 5:30 p.m. The Ci ty
Co unci l holds its regular meeting at 7 p.m. and will
include a resolution to extend the city’s agreement with
Redflex Traffic Sy s tems Inc. for an additional twoyear terms for red light traffic camera services. The city
will also provide direction to staff on the priorities and
potential development options for the two former redevelopment agency sites at Fourth and Fifth avenues and
Claremont Street and Railroad Avenue.
The council meets at City Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave., San
Mateo.

Around the Bay
Bees are buzzing on rooftops
at seven San Francisco hotels
SAN FRANCISCO — At the Clift Hotel in San Francisco,
there are more than 370 rooms inside and 100,000 bees
buzzing above in rooftop hives outside.
Yes, honeybees.
Aware of the well-publicized environmental threats to
honeybees that have reduced numbers worldwide, seven San
Francisco hotels have built hives on their rooftops. The sustainability effort also benefits the hotels as the bees produce
honey for cocktails, food and spa treatments. It’s the latest
in a series of environmental programs at hotels that includes
low-flow toilets and aggressive recycling programs.
“This is not about making money, it’s really about raising
awareness about sustainability,” said Melissa Farrar,
spokeswoman at the Fairmont in San Francisco.

T

he Ro o s ev el t El ementary
Scho o l
community
in
Burlingame hosted a celebration last week to hoist the flags the
school received for winning the gold
ribbon and academic excellence awards
from the Cal i fo rni a Department o f
Educati o n.
***
Students at Ev eres t Publ i c Hi g h
Scho o l in Redwood City showcased
various works and projects to the community at the school’s annual
Cel ebrati o n o f Learni ng event
Thursday, May 12.
***
No tre Dame Hi g h Scho o l in
Belmont is hosting a competitive art
showcase in the campus art gallery,
1540 Ralston Ave.
The show, which began Friday, May
13 and spans through Wednesday, June
1, will display paintings, drawing,
sculptures, photography and video.
Winners will be awarded up to $250.
***
Registration at Sky l i ne Co l l eg e
in San Bruno is open for the summer
and fall semester. Tuition is $46 per
unit and financial aid is available to
those who qualify.
Visit skylinecollege.edu/index.php
for more information on class schedules and enrollment guidance.

The San Mateo Rotary community college scholarship committee just completed
interviewing applicants from Aragon, Hillsdale, San Mateo and Serra high schools
and awarded a total of $17,700 in scholarship funds to 12 students who will be
attending the College of San Mateo.The funds are to help pay for tuition and books.
***
Jackl y n Ferrari , of Burlingame,
Sarah Sho bi ng er, of Redwood City,
Cl ai r Carruthers , of Atherton, and
James Cal bert, of Woodside, were
named to the dean’s list at Bel mo nt
Uni v ers i ty for the spring semester.
***
Pame l a Dus z y n s k i has been
named the new principal of Mi l l s
Hi g h Scho o l in Millbrae.
Duszynski, who previously served
as the school’s assistant principal,
will replace Paul B e l z e r. Belzer
replaced former Burl i ng ame Hi g h
S c h o o l principal Di Yi m, who
resigned in the wake of a clash with
popular teacher Kev i n Nel s o n.
Prior to joining the San Mateo
Uni o n Hi g h Scho o l Di s tri ct in
2014, Duszynski worked as an administrator and educator in San Francisco.
***

Al l en El ementary Scho o l in the
S an B run o Park El e me n t ary
Scho o l Di s tri ct hosted its first Eat
the Rai nbo w event, focused on promoting healthy eating and nutrition
for local students.
Students learned about the value of
eating fruit and vegetables, and how
natural colors reflect the nutritional
value of the foods.
The event held Saturday, April 20,
was an initiative generated by Fran
De b o s t , the district’s director of
Student Nutri ti o n Serv i ces who
plans to expand the program to other
district campuses next year.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Austin Walsh. You can contact him at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at austin@smdailyjournal.com.

Tuesday, June 14
San Mateo County Fair
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo
Senior Expo open 11am - 3pm
Seniors age 62+ admitted FREE
into Fair and Senior Expo
Senior Expo hours: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
Expo Hall
Fair hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Free parking for one hour
11 a.m. to Noon

Senior Expo features seniorrelated businesses and
non-profit booths
t Goody bags for first 500 guests
t Meet and greet exhibitors
t Giveaways
t Blood pressure check

After visiting the Senior Expo enjoy the Fair all day!

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

Donald Trump preparing
to seek big-donor money
By Julie Bykowicz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS — The billionaire
presidential candidate who prides
himself on paying his own way
and bashed his competition for
relying on political donors now
wants their money — and lots of
it.
Donald Trump, the presumptive
Republican presidential nominee,
recently hired a national finance
chairman, scheduled his first
fundraiser and is on the cusp of
signing a deal with the Republican
Party that would enable him to
solicit donations of more than
$300,000 apiece from supporters.
His money-raising begins right
away.
The still-forming finance team
is planning a dialing-for-dollars
event on the fifth floor of Trump
Tower in New York, and the campaign is at work on a fundraising
website focused on small donations. In addition to a May 25
fundraiser at the Los Angeles
home of real estate developer Tom
Barrack, he’ll hold another soon
thereafter in New York.
The political newcomer faces a
gargantuan task: A general election campaign can easily run up a

REUTERS

Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump arrives at a campaign rally in Eugene, Ore.
$1 billion tab. For the primary
race, Trump spent a tiny fraction
of that amount — he’s estimated
$50 million of his own money,
plus about $12 million from
donors who sought his campaign
out on their own.
Trump told the Associated Press
in an interview this week that he
will spend minimally on a data

operation that can help identify
and turn out voters. And he’s betting that the media’s coverage of
his rallies and celebrity personality will reduce his need for pricey
television advertising.
Yet he acknowledged that the
general-election campaign may
cost “a lot.” To help raise the
needed money, he tapped Steven

Mnuchin, a New York investor
with ties in Hollywood and Las
Vegas but no political fundraising
experience.
“To me this is no different than
building a business, and this is a
business with a fabulous product:
Donald Trump,” Mnuchin said in
an interview at a financial industry
conference in Las Vegas.

Democrats fear Sanders is undermining efforts to beat Trump
By Lisa Lerer and Ken Thomas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Democratic
Party leaders are upping the pressure on Bernie Sanders to drop his
presidential campaign, alarmed
that his continued presence is
undermining efforts to beat the
presumptive Republican nominee, Donald Trump, and again win
the White House.
“I don’t think they think of the
downside of this, ” said Sen.
Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., a supporter of front-runner Hillary
Clinton and broker of the postprimary peace between Clinton

and
thenIllinois Sen.
Barack Obama
in 2008.
“It’s actually
h a r m f u l
because
she
can’t make that
g en eral -el ecBernie Sanders tion pivot the
way
she
should,” Feinstein said. “Trump
has made that pivot.”
The new concerns come after
Sanders’ recent wins over Clinton
in Indiana and West Virginia.
While those victories have provided his supporters a fresh sense
of momentum heading into next

week’s primaries in Kentucky
and
Oregon,
they did almost
nothing to help
Sanders cut into
Clinton’s nearly insurmountable lead in the
Hillary Clinton delegates who
will
decide
their party’s nomination.
Still Sanders soldiers on, frequently telling the thousands of
supporters who attend his rallies
that he still has a narrow path to
the nomination.
“Please do not moan to me
about Hillary Clinton’s prob-

lems,” Sanders said in a recent
interview with MSNBC. “It is a
steep hill to climb, but we’re
going to fight for every last
vote.”
Clinton, her aides and supporters have largely resisted calling
on Sanders to drop out, noting
that she fought her 2008 primary
bid against Obama well into June.
But now that Trump has locked up
the Republican nomination, they
fear the billionaire businessman
is capitalizing on Sanders’ decision to remain in the race by
echoing his attacks and trying to
appeal to the same independent,
economically frustrated voters
that back the Vermont senator.

Around the nation
Trump says his tax
rate is no one’s business
WASHINGTON — Republican
presidential candidate Donald
Trump is refusing to disclose even
what tax rate he pays until an IRS
audit of his tax returns is complete.
“It’s none of your business,” he
told ABC’s “Good Morning
America” when asked what tax rate
he pays in a phone interview
Friday. “You’ll see it when I
release. But I fight very hard to pay
as little tax as possible.”
Trump has refused to release his
tax returns until, he says, an IRS
audit is done. He says he will “gladly” release them when that happens, but makes no guarantees it
will happen before Election Day.
In an interview with the
Associated Press this week, Trump
said he hoped the audit would be
done in time but feels no obligation to the public to get the returns
out before people vote.
“I really don’t, and I’ll tell you
why,” he said. “You don’t learn
anything from a tax return. I think
nobody knows more about taxes
than I do, maybe in the history of
the world. Nobody knows more
about taxes. You can learn very little from a tax return.”

Trump denies he
posed as his spokesman
during tabloid days
WASHINGTON — Back when
Donald Trump’s love life was
tabloid
heaven,
a
Trump
spokesman with intimate knowledge of the businessman’s personal
relationships offered juicy stories
about a failing marriage, a new
live-in paramour and three other
girlfriends he was juggling at once.
The spokesman identified himself as John Miller. But The
Washington Post says it was actually Trump, posing as his own publicist on the phone with a reporter
who wondered why Miller’s voice
sounded so familiar.
The Post has unearthed a recording of that 1991 phone call. The
voice on the phone describes
Trump as irresistible to women.
“He gets called by everybody in
the book, in terms of women,”
says the voice. “He’s got a whole
open field, really.”

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8

NATION/WORLD

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Baghdad cafe attack
kills 13; Islamic State
claims responsibility
By Qassim Abdul-Zahra
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD — A group of gunmen, including two suicide
bombers, stormed a coffee shop in
a town north of Baghdad early on
Friday, killing at least 13 people
and wounding 15 there, Iraqi officials said.
Within hours, the Islamic State
group posted a statement online
claiming responsibility for the
attack, which took place shortly
after midnight Thursday in Balad,
80 kilometers (50 miles) north of
the Iraqi capital.
The attack came on the heels of
a two-day wave of bombings in
Baghdad that killed nearly 100
people — attacks that have also
been claimed by the Islamic State
group. The deadliest struck the
sprawling Shiite neighborhood of
Sadr City in northeast Baghdad on
Wednesday, killing 63 people.
According to Iraqi officials,
three gunmen armed with machine
guns opened fire into the crowded
Balad cafe and once police arrived
at the scene, two of the attackers
detonated their suicide vests. The
officials spoke on condition of
anonymity because they were not
authorized to talk to the media.
Later Friday, Iraq’s top Shiite
cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali alSistani, condemned the wave of
attacks and said the government is

ultimately responsible for such
security breaches, accusing the
country’s politicians of “closing
their ears to their advisers.”
Al-Sistani’s words were relayed
by his aide Ahmed al-Safi in a televised speech from the holy city
of Karbala following Friday
prayers. Over three months ago,
al-Sistani suspended his weekly
political sermons after his repeated demands that the country’s
politicians tackle corruption went
unheeded.
The IS bombings this week
exposed lingering gaps in
Baghdad’s defenses, which are
manned by an array of security
agencies and militias that don’t
always cooperate. They also point
to the resilience of the extremist
IS group, which has increasingly
resorted to bombings in civilian
areas far from the front lines as it
has lost some territory to Iraqi
forces backed by U. S. -led
airstrikes.
On Thursday evening, hundreds
took to the streets in Baghdad’s
Sadr City to demand government
accountability for the security
breaches. Protesters carried signs
calling for the interior minister to
resign while others called for the
minister of defense and Prime
Minister Haider al-Abadi to also
step down.
Anti-government protests first
erupted last summer as tempera-

REUTERS

People gather at the scene of an attack in Baghdad, Iraq.
tures soared and millions were left
without electricity. While alAbadi proposed a series of government reforms in August 2015 that
he claimed would combat corruption, very little has been implemented. Repeated delays in Iraq’s
parliament sparked another wave
of protests this year, led by influential Shiite cleric Muqtada alSadr. In late April the cleric’s supAdvertisement

porters stormed Baghdad’s heavily
fortified Green Zone and the parliament building.
Since the unprecedented breach
of the compound, which is home
to many of Baghdad’s ministries
and foreign embassies, the country’s government has been largely
gridlocked as many lawmakers are
boycotting parliament.
Iraqi officials and analysts warn

that the deepening political crisis
may be distracting Iraq’s security
forces from the fight against IS.
The Iraqi government claims IS
only occupies 14 percent of the
country’s territory after a string of
battlefield losses, but the extremist group still controls key border
areas between Iraq and Syria as
well as Iraq’s second largest city of
Mosul.

General is first woman to lead
top-tier U.S. combat command
By Dan Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. —
Air Force Gen. Lori J. Robinson on Friday
became the first woman to lead a top-tier
U.S. warfighting command when she took
charge of the North American Aerospace
Defense Command and U. S. Northern
Command in Colorado.
Robinson — one of just two female fourstar generals in the Air Force — was “the
clear and obvious choice,” said Defense
Secretary Ash Carter, who attended the
change of command ceremony in a vast
hangar at Peterson Air Force Base. Outside,
a row of cannons fired a 19-gun salute.
Carter praised Robinson’s extensive
experience and her skill as a strategic
thinker capable of making split-second,
life-and-death decisions. Her promotion
shows the U.S. has female officers qualified
for the most senior positions, he said.
“I do hope — well, I know — there are
more in her wake, more female officers in
her wake,” Carter said.
Robinson is an inspiration to female
cadets at the nearby Air Force Academy, said
Academy
Superintendent
Michelle
Johnson, a three-star general and the first
woman to head the school. “They appreciate seeing somebody that they can aspire
to,” Johnson said after the ceremony.
Robinson’s family has deep roots in the
Air Force. Her husband, David Robinson, is
a retired two-star general and was a pilot in
the Thunderbirds demonstration team. A
daughter, 2nd Lt. Taryn Ashley Robinson,
was fatally injured in a pilot training crash
months after graduating from the Air Force
Academy. She died in January 2006, four
weeks before her 23rd birthday.
“I knew she was peeking over the clouds,
and I knew that she was saying, ‘You go,
Mom,’ “ Robinson said after the ceremony.

People who know
Robinson describe her as
the personification of a
new generation of leaders, someone who understands that the Air Force
has a broad role in space,
cybersecurity
and
drones, not just flying
and fighting.
Lori Robinson
That’s
what
sets
Robinson apart, not her gender, said Maria
Carl, a retired Air Force colonel who worked
with her when the general headed the Pacific
Air Forces at Joint Base Pearl HarborHickam, Hawaii.
“Gen. Robinson reflects that change as
much as anything else,” said Carl, who
serves on the Military Affairs Council of
the Hawaii Chamber of Commerce. “She has
an ability to take all the different pieces of
the picture and pull it together strategically.”
One of her new commands, the North
American Aerospace Defense Command or
NORAD, is a joint U.S.-Canada operation
that defends the skies over both nations and
monitors sea approaches. It’s best known
for its Cold War-era control room deep
inside Cheyenne Mountain — now used
only as a backup — and for its wildly popular NORAD Tracks Santa operation on
Christmas Eve, fielding calls from children
asking for Santa’s whereabouts.
Her other command, Northern Command,
is responsible for defending U.S. territory
from attack and helping civilian authorities
in emergencies. It was created after the
Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
Robinson has an extensive background
in command and control, the science of
orchestrating military operations across a
broad area. In her previous job, commander
of Pacific Air Forces, her area of responsibility spanned more than half the globe.

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

9

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

Anti-Counterfeiting
Coalition suspends
Alibaba membership
By Erika Kinetz and Desmond Butler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SHANGHAI — An anti-counterfeiting group said Friday it
was suspending Alibaba’s membership following an uproar
by some companies that view the Chinese e-commerce giant
as the world’s largest marketplace for fakes.
The International Anti-Counterfeiting Coalition told
members that it had failed to inform the board of directors
about conflicts of interest involving the group’s president,
Robert Barchiesi.
Earlier Friday, the Associated Press reported that Barchiesi
had stock in Alibaba, had close ties to an Alibaba executive
and had used family members to help run the coalition.
The coalition, in a letter to members sent after the AP
report came out, said conflicts weren’t disclosed to the board
“because of a weakness in our corporate governance procedures.” It said the failure was not because of “inaction on
Bob’s part,” referring to Barchiesi.
The coalition said that is hiring an independent firm to
review its corporate government policies.
In its letter, the board said that as a result of members’ concerns, it was suspending a new class of membership under
which Alibaba had recently joined. The move would affect
two other companies that signed up under the new rules.
Jennifer Kuperman, Alibaba’s head of international corporate affairs, said companies like Alibaba were important for
solving the problem of counterfeiting.
“Whether or not we are a member of the IACC, we will continue our productive and results-oriented relationships with
brands, governments and all industry partners,” she said.
At issue is the independence of a small but influential
coalition that lobbies U.S. officials and testifies before
Congress.
Alibaba’s membership could help shape the global fight
against counterfeits. Fakes damage companies’ bottom
lines, can harm consumers who unknowingly buy such products, and feed a vast underground money-laundering industry
that supports criminal syndicates.
In recent weeks Gucci America, Michael Kors and Tiffany
have quit the Washington D.C.-based coalition, which has
more than 250 members.
The AP found several ties between the group’s president
and Alibaba:
• Barchiesi has owned Alibaba stock since its 2014 listing
in New York. The IACC said in a statement that the holdings
represent “a small percentage of his investment portfolio.”
• Matthew Bassiur, who took over as vice president of
global intellectual property enforcement at Alibaba in
January, hired Barchiesi’s son, Robert Barchiesi II, to work
at Apple back in 2011. Alibaba said that hire was made on
merit. Apple declined to comment.
• Bassiur is a founding board member of the ICE
Foundation, which supports U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement employees. Since 2013, the foundation has
been run by Barchiesi’s other son, James Barchiesi. That
same year, the foundation’s board voted to award a contract
for “fiscal and operational management” to a private company, also run by James Barchiesi. The foundation has
received grants of $10,000 from the anti-counterfeiting
coalition every year since 2012, tax filings show.

Apple investing $1 billion in
Chinese ride-hailing company
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIJING — Apple Inc. has invested $1 billion in Chinese
ride-hailing service Didi Chuxing, the main competitor in
China for Uber Technologies Ltd.
Apple will become a strategic investor alongside Chinese
e-commerce giant Alibaba Group and Tencent Holdings
Ltd., an online games and entertainment service, Didi
Chuxing announced Friday.
China’s ride-hailing industry has grown rapidly, with
competitors spending heavily to subsidize rides to capture
market share.
The latest deal reflects Apple’s increased emphasis on
services as growth in its iPhone business slows, said Jack
Kent of IHS Technology in a report.
“The investment in Didi highlights the strategic importance of China and the services segment for Apple’s future
strategy,” Kent said. “It could help Apple gain greater
insight into the behavior of users beyond its own ecosystem.”
Didi Chuxing, previously Didi Kuaidi, operates in 400
Chinese cities.
In September, the company and Lyft of the United States
agreed to link their services to allow travelers to use them
in each other’s markets. In December, their alliance added
India’s Ola and Southeast Asia’s GrabTaxi.

REUTERS

Hezbollah members carry the coffin of top Hezbollah commander Mustafa Badreddine, who was killed in an attack in Syria,
as his brother mourns his death during his funeral in Beirut’s southern suburbs, Lebanon.

Lebanon’s Hezbollah senior
commander killed in Syria
directed Hezbollah’s operations in
Syria since its fighters joined Assad’s
forces in 2012, the group’s biggest
ever military intervention outside of
Lebanon. Thousands of guerrillas
fighting alongside Syria’s military
were crucial to tipping the battlefield
in the government’s favor on multiple
fronts, from the suburbs of Damascus
to the northern province of Aleppo.
But it has come at a heavy price,
with more than 1,000 Hezbollah fighters killed. Sounding a tone of defiance
Friday, the group’s deputy leader said
they were undeterred.
“By killing you, they gave a new
push to our drive that produces one
martyr after another, as well as one
commander after another, ” Naim
Kassem said as the slain military chief

By Bassem Mroue
and Sarah El Deeb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — The top military commander of Lebanon’s Hezbollah was
killed in an explosion near the Syrian
capital of Damascus, the Shiite guerrilla group said Friday, the highest-level
casualty yet in its intervention in the
raging civil war next door.
The death of Mustafa Badreddine
strikes a heavy blow to the militant
group and underscores how its deployment in Syria backing President
Bashar Assad has widened its circle of
enemies beyond traditional foe Israel
to include Sunni extremists and conservative Gulf monarchies.
The 55-year-old Badreddine had

Baptist

Church of Christ

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor

CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

(650) 343-5415

217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm

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was buried in a cemetery in southern
Beirut.
Still, the slaying was unlikely to
lead Hezbollah to reduce its role in
Syria.
Hezbollah leader Sheikh Hassan
Nasrallah has touted the war as necessary to protect Shiites — including in
Lebanon — from Sunni extremists
who have been at the forefront of the
opposition, and Hezbollah’s patron
Iran has shown itself determined to
keep its ally, Assad, in power.
“I do think it will affect their morale.
This is not just their commander in
Syria. This is one of the most elite and
uniquely pedigreed Hezbollah personalities,” said Matthew Levitt, director
of the Stein Counterterrorism Program
at the Washington Institute.

Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
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2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
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San Mateo
Sunday English Service &
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Call (650) 349-0100

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(650)873-4095

Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 5:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am, 5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School:
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
www.churchofthehighlands.org

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks take tumble as retail suffering continues
By Marley Jay

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — A late slump
Friday pulled U.S. stocks to their
third straight weekly loss.
Companies that make clothing,
food and household goods dropped
on more bad news from retailers,
and energy companies fell with
the price of oil.
Stocks started falling just before
noon and continued to slump the
rest of the day. Machinery and
equipment companies took some
of the biggest losses. Retailers
fell again after Nordstrom and J.C.
Penney became the latest department store operators to report
plunging first-quarter sales. Bond
prices jumped and yields fell,
which hurt bank stocks.
“The rebound and recovery rally
has largely run its course,” said
Mike Ryan, chief investment
strategist for UBS Wealth
Management Americas. With
investors worrying about weak
corporate profits, the health of the
global economy and the Federal
Reserve’s plans, Ryan said “It’s
going to be more of a grind” in the
coming months.
The Dow Jones industrial average gave up 185.18 points, or 1.1

High: 17,734.74
Low: 17,512.48
Close: 17,535.32
Change: -185.18

OTHER INDEXES

percent, to 17, 535. 32. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell
17.50 points, or 0.8 percent, to
2,046.61. The Nasdaq composite
index lost 19.65 points, or 0.4
percent, to 4,717.68.
The S&P 500 has fallen 2.2 percent over the last three weeks,
bringing the index back almost to
breakeven for the year.
Wrapping up a brutal week,
Nordstrom gave retailers yet
another gut punch when it slashed
its annual projections and said a
key measure of sales fell for the
first time in almost seven years.

S&P 500:
NYSE Index:
Nasdaq:
NYSE MKT:
Russell 2000:
Wilshire 5000:

2046.61
10,228.05
4717.68
2299.64
1102.44
21117.21

-17.50
-106.33
-19.65
-15.93
-6.16
-192.04

10-Yr Bond:
Oil (per barrel):
Gold :

1.71
46.33
1,274.80

-0.05

Nordstrom stock tumbled $6.07,
or 13.4 percent, to $39.16 and hit
a four-year low. J.C. Penney’s and
Dillard’s also reported results that
came up short of analysts’ estimates.
A
Commerce
Department
released Friday confirmed that
consumers are spending more, just
not at department stores. Sales at
those stores have fallen 2 percent
over the last year while online and
catalog sales have jumped 10 percent. Nordstrom tumbled 19 percent this week, while Macy’s and
Kohl’s, which reported first-quar-

As online shopping intensifies,
outlook dims for mall stores
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Online shopping is reaching such a critical
mass with American households
that many of the icons of the traditional mall —from Macy’s to The
Gap and J.C. Penney — face an
increasingly uncertain future.
A government report Friday suggested a modestly healthy consumer, with retail sales up 1.3 percent in April. Americans are eating
out more at restaurants. They’re
buying more cars. But the main
beneficiaries of spending in the
past year have been Amazon, eBay
and other internet behemoths.
Spending at these non-store
retailers shot up 10.7 percent from

a year ago, the government said in
a week when earnings reports
showed disturbing drop-offs at
Macy’s, Kohl’s, Nordstrom and
J.C. Penney.
Shoppers who once crowded
malls are now ordering on phones,
computers and tablets, siphoning
sales from physical stores, which
face growing pressure to reinvent
their businesses.
“Online is cannibalizing the
store business,” said Marshal
Cohen, chief industry analyst at
the NPD Group.
The magnitude of the change
may be just beginning to intensify. Online shopping has attuned
customers to focusing on price and
hunting for the best bargains,

thereby shrinking profit margins
at many stores.
Retailers have responded by
shuttering stores to cut costs, leaving more shopping malls and
plazas empty. The result has been a
painful upheaval in an industry
that employs 15.9 million people.
Online, in the meantime, has
been catching up to the general
merchandise stores that range from
Wal-Mart to Nieman Marcus.
Back in 2000, for every dollar
spent at physical stores, just 30
cents were spent online and at
mail-order houses, according to
government figures. Now, the
online category makes up nearly
70 cents for every dollar spent at
general merchandise stores.

ter results earlier in the week, fell
17 percent and 14 percent, respectively.
“It’s been a very challenging
week for retailers, ” said Rob
Samuels,
a
UBS
Wealth
Management strategist. He said
consumers are spending money on
home improvement goods and
trips and other items, but they’re
not spending as much on clothes.
And competition to department
stores just keeps growing, as
shoppers turn to smaller webbased brands.
“It’s not just Amazon anymore,”
he said.

GM stops sale of SUVs;
mileage on stickers wrong
DETROIT — General Motors Co.
is telling dealers not to sell about
60,000 SUVs in the U.S. because
the gas mileage listed on the window stickers was inadvertently
overstated.
The company told dealers that
the Environmental Protection
Agency-estimated mileage on the
stickers is one-to-two miles per
gallon too high. GM says it
reported the mistake to the EPA as
soon as it was discovered.
The problem affects all 2016
Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia
and Buick Enclave models, including ones that have already been
sold. The Detroit company says it
will contact owners to address the
problem, but it would not say if
they will be compensated for the
lower-than-advertised
gas
mileage.

Consumer stocks slumped after
advancing on Thursday. Wal-Mart
gave up $1.91, or 2.8 percent, to
$64.94 and Costco sank $2.22, or
1.5 percent, to $144.50. PepsiCo
fell after investment firm Trian
disclosed that it had sold its stake
in the company. The beverage
maker lost $1.92, or 1.8 percent,
to $104.18.
U.S. government bond prices
jumped in the afternoon, and the
yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury
note dipped to 1.70 percent from
1.76 percent. When bond yields
fall it tends to hurt banks, since
rates on many kinds of long-term
loans such as mortgages are tied to
bond yields.
Wells Fargo slid 96 cents, or 2
percent, to $48. 24. Bank of
America declined 2 cents, or 1.8
percent, to $13.88 and Citigroup
fell 89 cents, or 2 percent, to
$43.11.
Benchmark U. S. oil fell 49
cents, or 1 percent, to $46.21 a
barrel in New York, while Brent
crude, the benchmark for international oil prices, lost 2 cents to
$47.83 a barrel in London. That
pulled energy stocks down.
Exxon Mobil lost $1.01, or 1.1
percent, to $88.66 and Murphy
Oil fell $1.21, or 4 percent, to
$29.14.

Business briefs
YouTube tests
messaging feature
to keep people in app
SAN FRANCISCO — YouTube
is testing a messaging feature in
its smartphone app so people can
share and discuss videos without
resorting to other ways to connect with their friends and family.
The
messaging
option
announced Friday initially is only
being offered to a small group of
people with YouTube’s app
installed on an iPhone or device
running on Google’s Android software.
If all goes well, messaging will
be included in a future app update
available to everyone with an
iPhone or an Android phone.

CSM ON A ROLL: THE BULLDOGS’ BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL TEAMS OPENED SUPER REGIONAL PLAY WITH WINS >> PAGE 16

<<< Page 12, Raiders rookie
still working back from injury
Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

Warriors begin prep for Thunder
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Stephen Curry surprised
coach Steve Kerr with how quickly he found
his groove the past two games after returning from a right knee injury, even with a few
more misses than usual for the MVP.
Now, Curry and the Golden State Warriors
push into the Western Conference finals
against Oklahoma City counting on their
superstar to be fully healthy for an entire
round for the first time this postseason.

Steph Curry

There’s no way he
won’t be making as big
an impact as he possibly
can as the defending
champions move closer
to their goal of a repeat
title.
“Hopefully, it will be
close to 100 percent by
Monday night, ” Curry
said after Friday’s prac-

tice.
Fellow Splash Brother Klay Thompson,

who carried the load on
both ends of the floor
during Curry’s absence
for much of the first two
rounds, is counting on it.
So far, Curry’s return
has been seamless —
even more so than Kerr
had foreseen. The Coach
Klay Thompson of the Year figured there
might be a transition
period as everybody got comfortable again.
“It has (been smooth),” Thompson said.

“Anyone can see that. He hasn’t missed a
beat.”
Draymond Green practiced after injuring
his left ankle during Wednesday’s series
clincher against Portland, while 7-foot center Andrew Bogut sat out Friday’s workout
with a strained muscle in his right leg.
The hope is that Bogut will return to practice Saturday and be ready for Monday
night’s Game 1 of the best-of-seven series
against the Thunder at Oracle Arena. An MRI

See WARRIORS, Page 17

A’s 6, Rays 3

SHP wins PAL tourney A’s finally end
slide in Tampa

By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

If nothing else, the Peninsula Athletic
League baseball tournament will test a
team’s pitching depth.
Playing for the third time in three days,
both the Capuchino and Sacred Heart Prep
teams had to go to seldom-used arms for the
third-annual PAL championship game at
Half Moon Bay Friday afternoon.
Turns out the Gators have the depth. Sean
Clark got the starting nod from manager
Anthony Granato and, along with a aggressive batting lineup, pitched the Gators to a
6-1 victory.
“[Clark’s] had only a couple innings
(pitched) this year,” Granato said. “But I
have confidence in his ability.”
After getting off to a shaky start that saw
him give up a run on four hits in the first two
innings, Clark settled into a groove and
shut down the Mustangs the rest of the way.
He needed just 78 pitches to throw a complete game, holding Capuchino to just five
hits.
“We were popping things up. We couldn’t
square balls up. We rolled over a lot of
balls, ” said Capuchino manager Matt
Wilson. “If you’re going to beat a good
team, you can’t do that.”
Wilson knew he team was going to be in
for a tough test and the Mustangs could not
match the Gators.
“I know [Granato] really well,” Wilson
said. “I know his teams are going to be spot
on and disciplined. He’s going to get everything out of his team.”
With Clark locking things down on the
mound, the SHP offense went out and banged
the ball around the park, finishing with 10
hits.
Leadoff hitter Andrew Daschbach, who
was the designated hitter instead of playing
his normal shortstop position, jump-started
the Gators’ offense. He led off the bottom of
the first with a booming double to the rightcenter field gap, the first of two doubles and
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
three hits altogether for the Stanford-bound
Daschbach. He also scored two runs, drove Stanford-bound Andrew Daschbach crushes the second of his two doubles during SHP’s

See GATORS, Page 14

6-1 win over Capuchino in the PAL tournament championship game. Daschbach was 3 for 3
with two doubles, an RBI and two run scored.

By Dick Scanlon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.— Danny Valencia
hit his first two home runs in more than seven
months, and that was just the start of his contribution to the Oakland Athletics’ 6-3 win
over the Tampa Bay Rays on Friday night.
The third baseman made a diving catch in
the ninth inning to take a bases-loaded hit
away from Evan Longoria.
“You make a play like that, it’s like knocking in two runs. It’s just as important,” manager Bob Melvin said after
the A’s broke a five-game
losing streak.
Valencia sat for two
games this week after reinjuring the left hamstring
that had landed him on the
disabled list. He had two of
Oakland’s four homers in
this one.
Danny Valencia “I’ve had a zero in that
column and it’s the middle
of May so it’s definitely nice to get in that column finally,” he said.
Rich Hill (5-3) pitched six innings to win
for the fourth time in his last five starts.
Valencia’s diving catch helped Ryan Madson
work out of a jam to earn his ninth save.
“We were guarding the line because if the
ball’s hit down the line they have a chance to
score (three) and tie the game,” Valencia said.
“Longoria is notorious for pulling the ball and
it seemed like every at bat he was going to hit
the ball to me. Luckily he hit it in the small
vicinity where I cover, and I was able to make
a good play.”
Khris Davis and Valencia homered off Rays
starter Jake Odorizzi (0-2) in the first inning,
driving in all four runs. Davis’ three-run homer
was his eighth of the season.
Marcus Semien put the A’s up 5-2 in the
fourth with his ninth home run before Valencia
added his second homer off reliever Dana
Eveland in the sixth.

See ATHLETICS, Page 14

Teevens: Tackle-free practice reduces injuries
By Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Dartmouth football
coach Buddy Teevens makes a promise to
recruited players before they take the field:
“In four years, you will never tackle another
Dartmouth football player.”
Teevens, a former Dartmouth player who
has coached at the Ivy League school for 15
years, has eliminated all live tackling from
practices, including spring and preseason.

He told Congress Friday
the result has been far
fewer concussions, less
practice time missed due
to injury — and wins.
Since cutting back on
tackling
in
2010,
Dartmouth has not had a
losing record. Last year,
Buddy Teevens Big Green tied Harvard
for the Ivy League championship. Just as important to Teevens: No

defensive player suffered a concussion in
2015.
Instead of practicing on each other,
Teevens’ players practice on pads and dummies, including a robotic tackling dummy.
“I love football,” Teevens said, “but I
love my players more.”
In February, Ivy League coaches voted to
eliminate all full-contact hitting from practices during the regular season, the most
aggressive measure yet to combat growing
concerns about brain trauma and other

injuries in the sport. The decision still
needs approval by the league’s athletic
directors, but passage is expected.
Teevens and other experts said Friday that
the tackle-free practices need to spread to
youth teams and high schools.
“Unless we change the way we coach, we
won’t have a game to coach,” Teevens told a
House Energy and Commerce subcommittee.

See FOOTBALL, Page 14

12

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Raiders first-round pick Panik’s blast lifts
is not ready for practice Giants to victory
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALAMEDA — First-round pick Karl
Joseph will have to wait a little bit longer
until he can show the Oakland Raiders what
he’s capable of doing on the field.
As the Raiders held their first rookie minicamp practice on Friday, Joseph was merely
a spectator as he continues to rehabilitate the
torn ACL in his right
knee that cut his final
season at West Virginia
short and raised questions about how high
he’d be drafted.
The Raiders had no
concerns as they believe
Karl Joseph
Joseph will be completely healthy for his rookie
season. Joseph said his rehab is on schedule
and he plans to be ready to get back on the
field when training camp starts in late July.
“It’s tough, just not being able to go out
there and practice and learn the stuff, but I
am still learning in meeting rooms,” Joseph
said. “Right now, I am just focusing on
rehabbing and getting healthy.”
The Raiders have big plans for Joseph,
who is being counted on to replace the
retired Charles Woodson. Joseph had five
interceptions in four games before getting
hurt last season and is known as a hard hitter despite his small size of 5-foot-10, 207
pounds.
Coach Jack Del Rio said it is important
that Joseph make the most of this time even
if he is unable to practice.
“We’re still able to walk it and talk it so
we’re doing some of that,” he said. “It’s definitely valuable time to have. We don’t get
enough time with these guys and we’ve got
to maximize the time we do get and be real-

ly efficient with it.”
Del Rio even picked out Joseph’s number,
assigning him the No. 42 that Hall of Famer
Ronnie Lott wore in a career that included
two seasons with the Raiders.
“There have been a few good ones in that
number,” Del Rio said.
Joseph wore No. 8 in college and needed a
new number as a pro. He said No. 42 was
under consideration and he was happy when
Del Rio picked it out. Joseph called it an
honor and said he would represent it as best
he can.
Joseph wasn’t the only Oakland draft pick
with questions about his knee. Some teams
reportedly believed that second-round pick
Jihad Ward would need arthroscopic surgery
on his knee before he could play. The
Raiders were confident that wasn’t necessary and Ward was on the field and looked
active in his first practice as a pro.
“He looked pretty good, right?” Del Rio
said. “Don’t trust all those reports out there.
We felt pretty good about our reports. He
looks terrific. He’s very athletic.”
The Raiders had six draft picks, six other
non-rookie roster players and 17 undrafted
free agents on the field, along with several
others there on a tryout basis.
This is the one chance for the rookies to
get on the field and start learning the systems without the veterans. In just over a
week, the Raiders will start organized team
activities and then they will hold a three-day
mandatory minicamp in June so there is little time for the new players to get acclimated.
“It was fast, ” third-round linebacker
Shilique Calhoun said. “That’s the biggest
thing for me. The transition is a little different because of how fast the game is and how
fast the game is played. Then also, retaining
knowledge. You have to be able to retain it
pretty fast as well.”

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOENIX — Joe Panik homered for the second straight night, Jeff Samardzija had another
strong outing and the San Francisco Giants
made it two in a row in Arizona with a 3-1 victory over the Diamondbacks on Friday night.
Samardzija (5-2) pitched out of trouble early
and went eight innings for
the third time this season,
giving up a run and scattering eight hits to improve to
4-1 in his last five starts.
Shelby Miller (1-4)
blanked the Giants on four
hits through five innings
but faltered in the sixth,
allowing two singles and
Joe Panik
Panik’s three-run homer.
Miller’s first career
triple, and Jean Segura’s RBI single, had given
Arizona a 1-0 lead in the fifth.
Miller went 5 2/3 innings, giving up three
runs on seven hits.
Left-hander Josh Osich retired left-handed hitting Jake Lamb for the first out in the ninth and
Santiago Casilla came on to strike out the final
two for his eighth save in 11 tries.
The visitor won for the 22nd time in the last
27 meetings between the teams. Arizona fell to
5-14 at home.
Miller led off the fifth with a shot over the

Baseball briefs

Giants 3, D’backs 1
head of center fielder Denard Span. The
Diamondbacks pitcher made it to third, despite
staggering and almost falling after rounding
second. Segura’s RBI single extended his hitting streak to 11 games. He has reached safely in
20 straight games.
Angel Pagan and Span singled to start the
sixth, then Panik sent Miller’s 3-0 pitch high
down the right field line and into the seats for
his fifth home run of the season. Panik’s two
home runs have accounted for five of San
Francisco’s seven runs in the first two games of
the four-game series.
The Diamondbacks turned five double plays,
in the second, third, fourth, eighth and ninth
innings.
Arizona stranded four runners, three in scoring position, in the first two innings.

Up next
Gi ants : RH Jake Peavy (1-4, 8.47 ERA)
takes the mound in the third game of the series
Saturday night after losing his last three starts,
most recently a 3-1 defeat against Toronto on
Monday.
Di amo ndbacks : LH Patrick Corbin ( 1-3,
4.12) goes for Arizona after pitching seven
scoreless innings in his last outing, the
Diamondbacks’ 11-inning, 5-3 win at Atlanta
on Sunday.
joined the team this week after serving a 29game penalty.

Reyes banned thru May 31 under
MLB domestic violence policy

Texas Rangers call up RHP
Matt Bush for first MLB action

NEW YORK — Colorado Rockies shortstop Jose Reyes has accepted a suspension
without pay through May 31 under Major
League Baseball’s domestic violence policy.
MLB announced the ban Friday, and Reyes
has agreed not to appeal. The penalty without pay was retroactive to Feb. 23, when he
was put on leave following an alleged altercation with his wife in Hawaii last October.
A person familiar with the decision told
The Associated Press that Reyes will lose
$6,251,366 of his $22 million salary. The
person spoke on condition of anonymity
because that aspect of the penalty wasn’t
made public.
Reyes is the second player to be penalized
under MLB’s domestic violence policy. New
York Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman

ARLINGTON, Texas — The Texas Rangers
were expected to call up former No. 1 overall
draft pick Matt Bush on Friday, making the
right-hander available for his first regularseason game since spending 3 1/2 years in
prison for a drunken-driving accident in
Florida that left a man seriously injured.
Bush was the top pick in the 2004 draft
and signed with the Rangers on a minor
league deal in December after being released
from prison in October. He made two
appearances in spring training and
impressed his coaches with his array of
pitches, including a fastball of nearly 100
mph.
The Rangers said they were buying his
contract from Double-A Frisco and would
make a corresponding roster move later.

HELP WANTED

SALES

The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:

EVENT MARKETING SALES

TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES

Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.

We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.

To apply for either position,
please send info to

jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call

650-344-5200.

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

13

UFC shifts attention to stacked Brazilian card
By Dan Gelston
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

UFC 198’s roughly $50 pay-per-view
price tag is a steal compared to the numbers
floated for the cost of buying the promotion.
UFC President Dana White has denied
rumors the undisputed champion of MMA
companies is on the market, though a $4
billion offer could make him and the Fertitta
brothers at least consider a sale.
Until that sweet mega offer comes — if it
comes — for all the company or even a
small stake, White will remain out in front
talking bouts not deals as UFC closes in on
its milestone UFC 200 event in July.
But even card promotion has seemingly
faded into the foreground of late for UFC.
UFC has dealt with sale rumors, MMA legalization in New York and Conor McGregor’s
psuedo-retirement controversy more than
highlighting a stout card Saturday in
Curitiba, Brazil.
Brazil’s Fabricio Werdum (20-5-1) defends
the UFC heavyweight championship in his
home country in the main event against
Stipe Miocic (14-2).

Werdum has won five
straight fights, highlighted by a win against
Mark Hunt for the interim title and then a submission victory against
Cain Velasquez in a unification bout.
They’ll fight in front
of a sold-out crowd of
Fabricio
about 45, 000 fans at
Werdum
Arena da Baixada in what
was expected to become the second-biggest
sporting event of the year in the country
behind only the Rio Olympics.
“This is my country. It is a special
moment in the history of MMA and UFC,”
Werdum said. “It’s the first time in the stadium and first time having a heavyweight title
fight in Brazil. My mom is here too, it’s the
first time she has come to watch me fight.”
Miocic, an Ohio firefighter, also defeated
Hunt in his current stretch of five wins in
his last six fights. The bout was scheduled
for February until Werdum pulled out with
injuries and forced a postponement.
“It’s not going to be fun having 44,985
people against me,” Miocic said. “I also
have people supporting me, which is all I

need. It’s for the heavyweight title and we
always know there is going to be nerves,
but you got to have nerves. If you’re not
nervous then you aren’t ready. I’m going to
be ready, no worries.”
And watch out LeBron. As an added bonus
for the Ohio native, Miocic could be the
athlete that wins a championship for
Cleveland.
While LeBron James and the Cavaliers are
still in the hunt for an NBA crown, the city’s
long-suffering fans haven’t celebrated a
major professional championship since
1964.
“It would be amazing, hometown boy,
bringing it back to Cleveland,” he said.
“Start to win championships in Cleveland,
it’s going to be amazing. Cleveland against
the world, that’s how we say it.”
Miocic, who made his UFC debut in 2011,
believed that even with Cleveland’s sorry
sports history and a decided disadvantage
with the crowd against him that he could
win the belt in his first major title bout.
“It’s what I signed up for, winning the
heavyweight title, which I’m going to do,”
he said. “When I get there it’s going to be a
great moment. Me and the team, the guys
that helped me here, we are all going to

cherish it together.”
Werdum-Miocic tops a card that includes
Ronaldo Souza vs. Vitor Belfort in a middleweight bout, Maurmcio “Jacare” Rua vs.
Corey Anderson in a light heavyweight
fight and Cris “Cyborg” Justino vs. Leslie
Smith in a women’s bout.
Justino (15-1) has long been considered
one of the top fighters in the women’s
sport. The Brazilian veteran has a 15-fight
winning streak since her debut in 2005,
stopping nine consecutive opponents and
winning titles in the Strikeforce and Invicta
promotions.
Fans have long clamored for Justino to
face former UFC bantamweight champion
Ronda Rousey, but Justino had expressed
concerns about making the 135-pound
limit. Rousey’s loss to Holly Holm last year
derailed the discussion.
Justino served a one-year suspension in
2012 for testing positive for steroid use.
The card suffered a blow when former middleweight champion Anderson Silva was
forced to withdraw from his fight against
Uriah Hall because of gall bladder surgery
on Wednesday. He could be sidelined up to
six weeks.

Day has 3-shot lead in suspended Players
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. — The sky
was getting so dark that Jason Day could barely see the flag on the 14th hole, much less the
small crowd that waited out a two-hour storm
delay Friday at The Players Championship.
The way he was playing, he sure could hear
them.
His 5-iron from 190
yards into a strengthening
wind rolled to the back of
the green and settled 2 feet
away.
“A great shot,” said Day,
who can be stingy with
self-praise.
His second big birdie to
Jason Day
end his long day stretched
his lead to three shots
before it was too dark to continue, and Day
stepped into a van for a short drive to the clubhouse. His first task was to check the wind for
the morning when he had to finish four holes.
He already was 14-under par. He was on a
record-setting pace at the TPC Sawgrass. And
he could only think about pushing.

“I’m at 14-under par, I’ve got a good lead
going on, I just can’t sit back,” Day said. “I
need to keep pushing forward. And the
moment that I lose a little bit of focus and
make a few mental errors and mistakes, that’s
when I let the field back in. And I just can’t
afford to do that.”
Shane Lowry had a 68 and was at 11-under
133, a solid round that only got going when
he hit a wedge so badly that it didn’t each
reach the island green at the par-3 17th. He
managed to escape with bogey, and then holed
a wedge from about 180 yards on the 18th
hole for eagle.
Two tough pars at the end of his round meant
he was likely to be in the final group with
Day. Not bad for a guy who was hitting it so
badly Wednesday that he was dreading the
thought of even playing.
“I thought I’d be booking a plane ticket
now, how I was feeling on Wednesday,” Lowry
said. “Yeah, golf is a funny game. Sometimes
low expectations brings good results and
high expectations brings no results.”
Jordan Spieth was just hopeful of a Saturday
tee time, as was Phil Mickelson.
Spieth, looking frustrated as ever, got to
the projected cut of 2 under with back-to-back

birdies to start the back nine, only to catch a
bad break when a rake kept his ball from
rolling into the bunker and stayed on the
steep slope leading to the sand. The best he
could do was chip over the green and he made
bogey, and his tee shot was wild to the right
on the 15th when they stopped because of
darkness. Spieth was at 1 under.
Mickelson had to make an 8-foot par putt
on the par-5 16th to stay at 1 under. He was to
return at 9:15 a.m. to play the 17th and 18th,
likely needing a birdie on one of them to
make the cut.
Defending champion Rickie Fowler shot 71
and was at 1-under 143. He needed help to
make the cut.
Greg Norman set the 36-hole record of 14under 130 at The Players in 1994, the year the
Shark made only one bogey the entire week.
Day looks just as good and has yet to drop a
shot over the 32 holes he has played. He
ended his day with a 40-foot birdie putt down
the slope at No. 13 and the 5-iron for his tapin birdie at the 14th.
“Hopefully, I can hit some good, solid
shots coming in and at least try to get a couple more birdies,” Day said.
Alex Cejka and Jonas Blixt each shot 67

and were at 10-under 134, along with
Cameron Tringale (69).
Another day of calm and soft greens in the
morning led to more record-tying performances, and a few irritated golfers who could
have gone even lower. Colt Knost made a 15foot birdie putt on the 17th to reach 10 under,
only to three-putt the 18th and have to settle
for a course record-tying 63.
“I was a little nervous over the second one,”
Knost said about his 5-footer for par and a 62.
“I knew what it was for. But I didn’t hit a bad
putt. I hit it on the left lip and it just stayed
there. So a little disappointing, but still, I
would have taken 9 under before I started
today.”
Then came Rory McIlroy, 7 under through
seven holes when he made a 50-foot eagle
putt from just off the 16th green. His momentum slowed, but he still came to the par-5
ninth needing a birdie to become the first
player to shoot 62 on the Stadium Course at
Sawgrass.
McIlroy opted to lay up from 271 yards
because going for the green historically has
not worked out well for him on No. 9. Laying
up wasn’t much better. He chunked a wedge,
chunked a chip and made bogey for a 64.

14

SPORTS

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

GATORS
Continued from page 11
in third and also added an intentional walk
that loaded the bases in the second inning.
Schafer Kraemer, the No. 2 hitter, was the
only other starter to have two hits and he
also had an RBI. Clark helped his own cause
by driving in a pair of runs.
Jakob Uriarte led the Capuchino offense
with a pair of hits. Armando Vanegas drove
in the only run for the Mustangs.
The Gators came into the game ready to hit
and wasted little time in jumping on
Capuchino starter Damian Hernandez, who
worked three innings, allowing five runs
(four earned) on six hits.
“We struggled with location,” Wilson
said. “I don’t think Damian was wild at all.
Half inch off the plate or up and they know
when to swing.”
After taking the first pitch for a ball,
Daschbach launched Hernandez’s second
offering to the wall in right-center field.
Kraemer came up with a single and Clark
drove in Daschbach with a sacrifice fly to
center.

FOOTBALL
Continued from page 11
Terry O’Neil, a former network TV producer who founded “Practice Like Pros,” an
advocacy group that pushes for increased
safety measures in youth football, said studies show that in high school football, 60 to
75 percent of head-trauma incidents occur in
practice, not in games.
In the NFL, that number is 3 percent.
O’Neil called the high rate of head trauma
during high-school practices “the worst,

THE DAILY JOURNAL

After the Mustangs tied the score in the
top of the second, SHP took the lead for
good in the bottom of the inning. Mike York
blooped a single into shallow right field and
Nick O’Donnell reached on a fielder’s
choice. Following a groundout for the second out of the inning, the Mustangs took the
bat out of Daschbach’s hands by issuing an
intentional walk to load the bases.
That must have gotten into Hernandez’s
head because he went on to throw eight
straight balls, walking Kraemer and Clark to
drive in two more runs for a 3-1 SHP lead.
The Gators tacked on three more in the
fourth. Jack Molumphy led off the inning
with an infield hit and scored when
Daschbach followed with his second double
of the game to nearly the same spot as his
first. Kraemer followed with a bloop single
that moved Daschbach to third — who would
score on a wild pitch.
Kraemer, meanwhile, had moved to second
on a groundout and took third on the same
wild pitch. He would score on Brendan
Semien’s groundout to put the Gators up 6-1.
Granato said his hitting philosophy is to
have his players concentrate on swinging at
good pitches. He tries to keep a simple and
direct approach.
“We’ve been preaching a lot of being

aggressive in the zone. Early in the season,
we were a little too passive,” Granato said.
“At this level, when you start giving them
too much (instruction), they start thinking
too much.”
Capuchino’s second-inning run came
about when Max Stines hit a dying fly ball
to left field that the left fielder couldn’t catch
with a slide and the ball got by him.
Following a groundout, Vanegas skewed a
single between first and second base, with
Stines chugging home with what was the
tying run at the time.
Now that the regular season is finished,
the Gators will await their Central Coast
Section fate. They’ve already assured themselves an automatic bid — as has Capuchino
— and are just waiting on a seed and a destination.
So the PAL tournament also gave the teams
involved some critical experience in a playoff atmosphere and Granato believes his
team can learn from it.
“We played really well. We made a couple
mental mistakes, but we’ve been minimizing those lately,” Granato said. “The big
thing I’ve been talking about is having a
championship mindset. A champion has to
be in tip top shape every single game.”

ATHLETICS

most shameful statistic in football, because
coaches and administrators control the rules
of engagement in practice.”
While he saluted Ivy League coaches for
the proposed rule change, O’Neil said youth
leagues need to go further and convert to
flag football until ninth grade.
He also called for a ban on full-contact
practice in spring and summer, with contact
limited to 30 minutes per week during football season, and said schools should have a
full-time athletic trainer or comparable
medical professional on every team, with
emergency medical workers on site at every
game.
Kelli Jantz, whose 14-year-old son died

after suffering a concussion while playing
football, said more research is needed on the
causes and consequences of concussions in
youth sports. Jantz was a leading force
behind the Jake Snakenburg Youth
Concussion Act, a 2011 Colorado law
named for her son. The law requires middle
and high and high school coaches to receive
training on how to recognize a concussion,
remove players if a concussion is suspected,
and ensure that players are cleared by a medical professional before returning to play.
All 50 states and the District of Columbia
have passed similar legislation.
Even so, many youth coaches need more
training on the risks of concussion, and

equipment used by young athletes needs to
be made safer, Jantz said. She called on
Congress to approve a $5 million request
by President Barack Obama to allow the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
to collect data on concussions in youth
sports.

Continued from page 11
Hill retired 12 straight after giving up two
runs on three walks and RBI singles by Steve
Pearce and Steven Souza Jr. in the first inning.
The left-hander gave up three runs on four hits
while striking out seven.
“After that first ... the biggest thing was to go
deep in the game,” Hill said. “I didn’t get deep in
the game but deep enough to where I thought I
could give the team a chance to win the ballgame.”
“(Hill) was kind of off in the zone, wasn’t
throwing many strikes,” Rays manager Kevin
Cash said. “Then he locked it in with the curveball and when he needed to pick up strikes, he
was able to get them.”
Longoria drove in Tampa Bay’s final run with
a double in the fifth. Desmond Jennings walked
three times and scored twice for the Rays, who
have lost four straight.
Odorizzi became the first Rays pitcher in nine
years to go winless in his first eight starts. He
gave up five runs on seven hits, including three
homers, in four innings.
Yonder Alonso had three of Oakland’s 11 hits.

“These children are our future. It is our
responsibility as parents, coaches, teachers, medical professionals, policy makers
and the community as a whole to make sure
we do all we can to support the necessary
culture change to make youth sports as safe
as possible and protect our children,” Jantz
said.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

15

Bullfight tensions rise in Spain with new political landscape
MADRID — As matadors face
half-ton bulls this month during
Madrid’s most important annual
series of bullfights and Pamplona
gears up for its chaotic July bull
runs down cobblestoned streets,
tensions are building between
anti-bullfighting forces and the
traditions’ defenders, who have
launched Spain’s first pro-bullfight lobbying group.
At least 17 Spanish cities and
towns have slashed municipal
funding for bullfights and bull runs
or passed measures condemning or
banning them since the new leftist
Podemos party won its first seats
in local and regional elections a
year ago.
The Podemos party finished
third in an inconclusive December
national election that splintered
the country’s traditional two-party
system into four. It will be repeated June 26, when Podemos could
overtake the No. 2 center-left
Socialists.
Bull spectacles are expected to
be banned this summer on the
Mediterranean island of Mallorca
by the regional Balearic Islands
parliament ruled by a coalition
including Podemos — six years

NBA brief
Miami forces Game 7
against Toronto
MIAMI — The Miami Heat went
small, and came up big.
With that, another Game 7
awaits.
Goran Dragic scored a postseason career-high 30 points, Dwyane
Wade added 22 and the Heat rode
their small lineup to a 103-91 vic-

after northeastern Catalonia prohibited bullfights but enshrined as
cultural heritage bull runs and
events featuring bulls running
around with flaming balls of wax
or fireworks affixed to their horns.
Animal rights activists say the
gory fights are among the planet’s
most blatant forms of animal cruelty, with bulls lanced and finally
stabbed through the heart.
Matadors are praised for killing
with a single stab, though some
don’t succeed in finishing off the
animal with repeated thrusts.
Foreign tourists attending fights
for the first time often leave
stunned.
“Now that the political scenery
has changed, there is a window of
opportunity at the local level to
promote the anti-bullfighting
agenda,” said Antonio Barroso, an
analyst
with
the
Teneo
Intelligence political risk consulting firm. “The far left has gained
political power and this tends to
be an issue leftist voters care
about.”
But the new Fighting Bull
Foundation of breeders, matadors,
ring workers, groups of aficionados with thousands of members
and event organizers is pushing
back with a prominent Madrid law
firm that has filed five challenges
tory over the Toronto Raptors on
Friday night, tying their Eastern
Conference semifinal series 3-3.
Joe Johnson had 13 points,
Justise Winslow added 12, and Josh
McRoberts scored 10 for the Heat.
Kyle Lowry scored 36 points for
Toronto, on 12-for-27 shooting.
DeMar DeRozan added 23 for the
Raptors, but their teammates combined to shoot 14 of 34 from the
floor and manage 32 points.
Game 7 is Sunday in Toronto.
The winner will head to Cleveland

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so far this year to decisions
against bullfighting by four
Spanish municipal governments
and one provincial administration.
It’s also pressing for criminal
charges in five municipalities
against animal rights protesters
who disrupted bullfights, mostly
by jumping into the rings.
An appeal is planned for the
Mallorca ban after its anticipated
approval in June or July. The foundation also has requested that

Spain’s Constitutional Court act
quickly on an appeal against the
Catalonia ban filed in 2010.
Fighting Bull Foundation cofounder Juan Pedro Domecq, a
famed breeder from a family
renowned for producing wine,
sherry and top-grade Spanish ham,
said the bullfighting community
had felt under attack with no one to
defend it. Besides the legal effort,
the foundation is promoting bullfighting as an essential part of

for Game 1 of the Eastern
Conference finals on Tuesday
night. Both the Heat and the
Raptors won a Game 7 in the first
round.
Dragic shot 12 of 21, Wade
blocked a game-high three shots
and the Heat — despite some serious size deficiencies with injured
starting center Hassan Whiteside
still out — only lost the rebounding battle 43-41.
Neither team divulged its starting lineup until warmups were

under way. The Heat had reason for
subterfuge, after choosing a supersmall starting five of Dragic,
Wade, Johnson, Luol Deng and
Winslow.
Desperation? Maybe.
The results? Splendid for Miami.
The Heat used eight players —
the tallest being McRoberts, at 6foot-10. The average height of the
others was just under 6-6.
Deng jumped center and Winslow
got his first playoff start, three
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Mediterranean culture plus the economic benefits it generates in a
country with 20 percent unemployment.
“Now you are not going to be
able to attack bullfighting for
free,” Domecq said. “It will have
consequences. Before the foundation existed, there were no consequences.”
Shouting matches often erupt
between bullfight supporters and
protesters at bull events. A May 2
confrontation captured on video at
a small Catalonian town turned
ugly when two animal rights
activists taking video were beaten
up by three men and a woman. The
crowd cheered and applauded after
one attacker grabbed an activist’s
camera and hurled it into the bullring, shattering it.
The assailants were arrested, and
the AnimaNaturalis animal rights
group called this week for Catalan
regional police to boost security
to protect activists planning to
video a weeklong bull event starting Saturday.
“We think a minority of the probull sector uses violence to defend
their ideas,” said AnimaNaturalis
director Aida Gascon. “But it’s
very common for the hardcore fans
to try to prevent us from recording.”
entirely. The Heat like using the
term “positionless basketball” and
Winslow epitomized it early — in a
60-second span, the rookie guarded
Raptors center Bismack Biyombo,
brought the ball up like a point
guard and made a corner 3.
Both teams sputtered early,
shooting a combined 37 percent in
the opening quarter. The Heat got
going in the second, Dragic shooting 6 for 7 to spark a 14-point
quarter and sending Miami into the
locker room with a 53-44 edge.

16

SPORTS

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

CSM baseball, softball
continue their winning
ways in the postseason
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The CSM baseball team, after
sweeping through Fresno in the first
round of the Northern California
playoffs, opened super regional
play with a 6-4 win over No. 2
Cosumnes River in Sacramento
Friday afternoon.
A win Saturday or Sunday would
send the 11th-seeded Bulldogs to the
third round of the Nor Cal playoffs.
CSM (26-13) put the pressure on
Cosumnes River early with a run in
the top of the first inning. The
Bulldogs extended their lead to 3-0
with a two-run fifth, but Cosumnes
River (30-10), the No. 2 seed, tied
the game with two runs in the bottom of the sixth.
The Bulldogs added three runs in
the top of the eighth, with the
Hawks getting two runs back in the
bottom of the frame, but they would
get no closer.
Daniel Page paced the CSM
offense with three RBIs on just one
hit. Brad Degnan drove in a pair of
runs on his one hit as well. Dominic
Smith had three hits for the
Bulldogs, while Brandon Hernandez
and Anders Green had two hits
apiece.
Cameron Greenough picked up the
win, working five innings of threehit ball. Drew Reveno and Roger
Kruse each worked an inning, while
Mark Quinby got the final four outs
to record the save.
The Bulldogs will be back at it at 1
p.m. Saturday. If Cosumnes wins,
there would a deciding Game 3 at
noon in Sacramento.

SOFTBALL
CSM 21, Cabrillo 0, 5 innings
The Lady Bulldogs opened their
super regional tournament with an

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emphatic victory over the
Seahawks in a game that was called
after five innings because of the
mercy rule.
Morgan Jones and Christy
Peterson combined in the pitcher’s
circle to limit Cabrillo to just two
hits.
The offense, meanwhile, started
early and just kept hitting. CSM
scored three runs in the bottom of
the first and all but put the game
away with a nine-run second. The
Bulldogs added four more in third
and five in the fourth as they
banged out 19 hits.
Peterson also carried a big stick
at the plate, driving in five runs as
she went 2 for 2 with double. She
also scored three times.
Riley Wells also had a big day at
the plate, going 4 for 4 with a pair
of doubles and four RBIs. Kristen
Kowaki added three RBIs for the
Bulldogs as well.
Harlee Donovan, CSM catcher
and Coast Conference Player of the
Year, was held hitless —  but she
was walked four times, drove in a
run and scored twice.
Top-seeded CSM will now face
No. 4 Cosumnes River at noon
Saturday. The Hawks beat No. 5
Sierra 5-1 in the other first-round
game Friday.
Friday’s two losers —  Cabrillo
and Sierra — will play an elimination game at 2 p.m., while the
winner of that game and the loser
of CSM-Cosumnes River would
play an elimination game at 4
p.m. The championship round is
scheduled for a noon start Sunday,
with an if-necessary game following at 2 p.m.
All games are at CSM.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

AMERICAN LEAGUE

MLS GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L
Montreal
4 3
Philadelphia
4 3
Toronto FC
4 3
New York City FC 3 3
Orlando City
2 2
New York
3 6
D.C. United
2 4
New England
1 3
Columbus
2 4
Chicago
1 3

T
3
2
2
4
5
1
4
7
3
4

Pts
15
14
14
13
11
10
10
10
9
7

GF
17
13
10
15
16
13
11
13
11
8

GA
15
10
7
15
14
18
13
20
14
10

WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T
Colorado
7 2 2
FC Dallas
6 4 2
Los Angeles
5 1 4
Earthquakes
5 3 3
Real Salt Lake
5 2 2
Vancouver
5 5 2
Sporting KC
4 6 2
Seattle
4 4 1
Portland
3 5 3
Houston
2 6 2

Pts
23
20
19
18
17
17
14
13
12
8

GF
14
17
24
15
14
16
11
10
16
17

GA
8
19
12
14
13
17
13
10
20
19

NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Friday’s Games
New York at D.C. United, 4 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Philadelphia at Montreal, 2 p.m.
Colorado at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.
Chicago at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Toronto FC, 4:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
Seattle at FC Dallas, 6 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Orlando City at Sporting KC, 12:30 p.m.
New York at Portland, 4:30 p.m.

WHAT’S ON TAP
SATURDAY
Track and field
PAL championships at Menlo-Atherton, 10 a.m.
Swimming
CCS championship finals at Santa Clara International
Swim Center, 2:30 p.m.
Badminton
CCS championships at Independence High School,
10 a.m.
College baseball
Nor Cal super regional
No. 11 CSM at No. 2 Cosumnes River, 1 p.m.
College softball
Nor Cal super regional at CSM
noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m.
SUNDAY
College baseball
Nor Cal super regional
No. 11 CSM at Cosumnes River (if necessary), noon
College softball
Nor Cal super regional at CSM
Championship round, noon and 2 p.m.(if necessary)

TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
American League
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Recalled C Matt McBride
from Nashville (PCL). Optioned RHP Zach Neal to
Nashville.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
EAST DIVISION

EAST DIVISION
W
22
22
19
15
14

L
12
14
18
18
20

Pct
.647
.611
.514
.455
.412

GB

1
4 1/2
6 1/2
8

Washington
New York
Philadelphia
Miami
Atlanta

W
22
21
21
18
8

L
13
14
15
16
26

Pct
.629
.600
.583
.529
.235

GB

1
1 1/2
3 1/2
13 1/2

CENTRAL DIVISION
Chicago
24
Cleveland
17
Kansas City
17
Detroit
15
Minnesota
8

12
15
18
20
26

.667
.531
.486
.429
.235


5
6 1/2
8 1/2
15

CENTRAL DIVISION
Chicago
26
St. Louis
19
Pittsburgh
18
Milwaukee
15
Cincinnati
14

8
16
16
21
21

.765
.543
.529
.417
.400


7 1/2
8
12
12 1/2

WEST DIVISION
Seattle
Texas
A’s
Houston
Los Angeles

13
16
21
22
21

.618
.556
.417
.405
.382


2
7
7 1/2
8

WEST DIVISION
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Colorado
Arizona
San Diego

18
17
18
21
21

.526
.514
.486
.447
.432


1/2
1
3
3

Baltimore
Boston
Toronto
Tampa Bay
New York

21
20
15
15
13

Friday’s Games
Baltimore 1, Detroit 0
Chicago White Sox 7, N.Y. Yankees 1
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 6
Houston 7, Boston 6
Oakland 6, Tampa Bay 3
Toronto 5, Texas 0
Kansas City 5, Atlanta 1
L.A. Angels at Seattle, late
Saturday’s Games
Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m.
Houston at Boston, 10:05 a.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 1:10 p.m.
Oakland at Tampa Bay, 3:10 p.m.
Detroit at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Kansas City, 4:15 p.m.
Toronto at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Seattle, 6:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 10:10 a.m.
Oakland at Tampa Bay, 10:10 a.m.
Detroit at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m.
Houston at Boston, 10:35 a.m.
Atlanta at Kansas City, 11:15 a.m.
Toronto at Texas, 12:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Seattle, 1:10 p.m.

NBA PLAYOFF GLANCE
CONFERENCE SEMIFINAL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Toronto 3, Miami 3
Tuesday, May 3: Miami 102, Toronto 96, OT
Thursday, May 5: Toronto 96, Miami 92, OT
Saturday, May 7: Toronto 95, Miami 91
Monday, May 9: Miami 94, Toronto 87, OT
Wednesday, May 11: Toronto 99, Miami 91
Friday, May 13: Miami 103, Toronto 91
x-Sunday, May 15: Miami at Toronto, 12:30 p.m.
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Cleveland vs. Toronto OR Miami
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Monday, May 16: OKC at Warriors, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, May 18: OKC at Warriors, 6 p.m.
Sunday, May 22: Warriors at OKC, 5 p.m.
Tuesday, May 24: Warriors at OKC, 6 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 26: OKC at Warriors, 6 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 28: Warriors at OKC, 6 p.m.
x-Monday, May 30: OKC at Warriors, 6 p.m.

20
18
17
17
16

Friday’s Games
Chicago Cubs 9, Pittsburgh 4
Philadelphia 3, Cincinnati 2
Washington 5, Miami 3
Milwaukee 1, San Diego 0
Kansas City 5, Atlanta 1
Colorado 5, N.Y. Mets 2
San Francisco 3, Arizona 1
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, late
Saturday’s Games
Miami at Washington, 10:05 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Kansas City, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 5:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 5:10 p.m.
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 6:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m.
Miami at Washington, 10:35 a.m.
San Diego at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m.
Atlanta at Kansas City, 11:15 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m.
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 1:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 5:05 p.m.

NHL PLAYOFF GLANCE
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Tampa Bay 1, Pittsburgh 0
Friday, May 13: Tampa Bay 3, Pittsburgh 1
Monday, May 16: Tampa Bay at Pitt, 5 p.m.
Wednesday, May 18: Pitt at Tampa Bay 5 p.m.
Friday, May 20: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay 5 p.m.
x-Sunday, May 22: Tampa Bay at Pitt, 5 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 24: Pitt at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 26: Tampa Bay at Pitt, 5 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
St. Louis vs. San Jose
Sunday, May 15: San Jose at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Tuesday, May 17: San Jose at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Thursday, May 19: St. Louis at San Jose, 6 p.m.
Saturday, May 21: St. Louis at San Jose, 4:15 p.m.
x-Monday, May 23: San Jose at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 25: St. Louis at San Jose, 6 p.m.
x-Friday, May 27: San Jose at St. Louis, 5 p.m.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WARRIORS
Continued from page 11
wasn’t in the plans for Bogut’s injury, Kerr
said.
After a whirlwind week that included
becoming the NBA’s first unanimous MVP
on Tuesday, Curry looked forward to taking
some much-needed downtime between now
and the next round to rest his body and
mind.
“You go from missing three weeks, two
and a half weeks to playing significant minutes in 48 hours, especially with what the

SPORTS
day in between was like, it kind of shocks
your body,” Curry said. “So you’ve got to
take advantage of these three days we have
off to get refreshed and rejuvenated mentally and physically, and get ready to play.”
Curry came off the bench and overcame a
slow start to score 40 points in a 132-125
Game 4 overtime win at Portland on
Monday night, including an NBA-record 17
in overtime. He then started and scored 29
in Wednesday’s clincher against the Trail
Blazers.
“It went really well, obviously. He was
much better than we could have ever hoped
or expected given the length of time that he
was out,” Kerr said. “He was phenomenal in
both games, showing why he was the MVP.

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

Now it’s great to get him a few days of practice, a few more days to treat the injury.
Hopefully we can put this injury behind him
by the time we start this next series.”
Golden State won all three meetings with
the Thunder, who eliminated San Antonio in
Game 6 on Thursday night after dropping
the series opener, during its remarkable regular season that ended with 73 wins to top
the 1995-96 Chicago Bulls for the best regular-season record ever. That included a 121118 overtime win Feb. 27 at Oklahoma City
in which Curry hit a 3-pointer a few feet in
from halfcourt to win it.
He knows it will be far tougher on the
pressure-packed playoff stage.
“After Game 1 it’s pretty impressive how

17

OKC turned it around and put that behind
them, which is a lesson for the playoffs as a
whole,” Curry said. “Each game takes its
own identity.”
The do-everything point guard still
expects more from himself, saying he can
improve his consistency over the course of
48 minutes — which will be needed against
Russell Westbrook, Kevin Durant and the
aggressive, hard-nosed rebounding Thunder.
“I’ve finished both games strong but over
the course of the entire game I haven’t been
as in sync as I want to,” he said. “It’s obviously good things to look forward to hopefully the next series.”

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Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

to infrastructure, transportation and housing.
“I appreciate the governor’s cautious
approach with his proposed revisions to
the budget given the current decrease in
and continued unpredictability of tax revenue,” Assemblyman Kevin Mullin wrote
in a statement. “However, we continue to
face a very real crisis in the area of affordable housing and we must find ways to
expand and leverage our funding sources
… for our deteriorating transportation
infrastructure.”
Mullin, D-South San Francisco, noted
Brown’s revised budget continues to suggest just $36 billion in transportation
funding over the next 10 years, far off
from the Assembly Democrats’ preference
of an $80 billion plan — which would
require bipartisan support as it would need

THE DAILY JOURNAL

still remains a concern. I don’t know that
we truly address the transportation issues
without a re-examination of income dedicated to transportation, ” Gordon said,
adding funding for Caltrain electrification
needs to be discussed.
“Our challenges here are really two sides
of the same coin — housing and transportation. And neither one is much
addressed in the May revision, but both
are very much of concern to members of
the Legislature,” Gordon said.
Even some Republicans noted the lack
of focus on transportation, but remained
pleased by Brown’s fiscal restraint and
rainy-day fund contributions.
“Brown was spot-on in recognizing
there is a finite pot of money and a healthy
reserve is needed to weather the next recession. Spending is about priorities. It doesn’t appear our roads and bridges are any
more of a priority than they have been for
40 years — which is a huge disappointment,” said state Sen. Tom Berryhill, RTwain Harte, according to a press release.
Others suggested Brown continued to err

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29

El Camino Real

California Dr
101

Broadway

Continued from page 1

Palm Dr

REVISE

a two-thirds vote threshold to pass the
Legislature.
The state projected a $59 billion backlog in road repairs and Brown suggests a
$3.6 billion a year spending plan. In addition, the state’s volatile gas tax revenue
took a nosedive this year with the
California Transportation Commission
projecting a $754 million deficit and
plans to slash funding to multiple highway projects across the state — including
vital congestion relief and safety projects
along Highway 101 and State Route 92.
Brown’s budget does suggest creating a
$65 road improvement charge for all cars,
including electric vehicles, that could
raise $2 billion; as well as generating
another $1 billion by stabilizing the gas
excise tax at 18 cents and amending the
diesel excise tax beginning in 2017-18.
Still, it’s significantly less than what
Mullin, Gordon and other Democrats have
proposed and they suggest more comprehensive transportation funding reform.
“There’s essentially no mention of
transportation in the May revise and that

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in his support for high-speed rail, with
state Sen. Ted Gaines, R-El Dorado, calling it a “money pit” and noting “constituents need tax relief, not more government spending, ” according to a press
release.
While Brown’s fiscal prudence led to
scant new programs being proposed, one
new item is a $10 million launch of a
statewide earthquake early warning system
— a proposal called for in state Sen. Jerry
Hill’s legislation.
Hill, D-San Mateo, said in a press release
he’s pleased “Brown recognizes there’s no
valid reason not to make this relatively
small investment in a statewide earthquake
warning system that has the potential to
save lives and prevent injuries.”
Hill added he “supports the inclusion of
record levels of funding for K-12 education
and mental health initiative funding to
deal with homelessness. The May revise is
very similar to January’s proposal, but
reflects greater concern that we may face
another recession in future years and overall keeps spending contained.”

‘Love &
Friendship’
Talky tale centered
on the self-serving
ways of an attractive
young widow.

SEE PAGE 20

Important
checkbox
By Kelly Song

I

‘Uncharted 4: A Thief’s
End’ finds brotherly love
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Everyone has a relative like
Sam Drake — that seedy
brother (or uncle, or in-law)
who shows up every now and
then with a bottle of bourbon,
a pack of cigarettes and a
fresh neck tattoo. You love

the guy, but you know his
appearance means there’s
trouble ahead.
Sam is the older brother of
Nathan Drake, the hero of
“Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End”
(Sony, for the PlayStation 4,
$59.99). The twist here is that
Nathan is kind of rakish himself, as we’ve seen in his three

earlier adventures. But as this
new chapter begins, Nathan
has settled into domestic bliss
with his lovely wife, Elena,
and sworn off his globe-trotting, treasure-hunting ways.
Nathan gave Sam up for
dead during a caper that went
See GAME, Page 22

n exactly 24 days, I will be standing in
front of a covered screen, staring at
maybe the most important checkbox
of my life. It will be perfectly square, black
lines shockingly linear, its solid frame an
architectural masterpiece. I will stand in
awe, hand wavering over the screen, gazing
at its presence. Yes, indeed it will be the
most important checkbox of my life.
Because in exactly 24
days, I will be voting in
the California primary
election for the first
time. And when one is
standing in front of the
most important checkbox of their life, they
may need to step back and pause for a
moment.
Because when I am standing in front of
that checkbox, I will be speaking for many
people; not just people of the present and
the future, but those of history and the past.
I will be speaking for the women who
fought their way to the ballots, for the
immigrants who gave a voice to racial
minorities, for the impoverished who made
democracy accessible to anyone of any
income. The history of the United States is
short compared to other countries, but the
checkbox on my ballot sure traveled a long
way to get to my hands.
So the story of this powerful checkbox is
one of history, complexity, importance.
Like any major life event — buying a home,
investing in a car, adopting a pet — voting
requires extensive knowledge and research,
not just a random guess of different proposition numbers and senator names that have a
good ring to them. It’s an educational
process, something that needs to be well
thought out, and it deserves research.
Because whether you’re blue or red, the elephant in the room or pin the tail on the donkey, your decision is just a checkbox away
from creating a permanent impact.
With the media prevalent in every aspect
of modern life, politics has become deceiv-

See STUDENT, Page 22

‘Money Monster’ stays
rather small, fictional
By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

George Clooney plays a Jim Cramer-like
television personality who’s forced to grow
a conscience when a disgruntled viewer
holds him hostage on live TV in “Money
Monster,” a serviceable, if slight, real time
thriller from director Jodie Foster.
Clooney’s character Lee Gates is one of
those cable news stars who probably hasn’t
spoken to a non-celebrity in decades. His
flashy show opens with him in dancing in
costume with two gyrating ladies at his side
like he’s in his own rap video, and the vulgarity just escalates from there with ridicu-

lous graphics and sound effects that even a
shock jock radio host would likely find
tasteless.
We see him being dismissive of the pleas
from his put-upon producer Patty Fenn
(Julia Roberts) to stick to the script, or at
least give her a heads up as to where he’s
planning to go, but Lee Gates is one of
those roguish improvisational types who is
somehow charismatic enough to get away
with it. This is not really a likable guy, and
it’s not even clear how smart a financial
mind he is, but Clooney has that perfect
combination of non-threatening smarm and

See MONEY, Page 22 ‘Money Monster’ might not be a great movie, but it is still fun to watch.

20

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

‘Love & Friendship’
delights in scheming
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

It was the comedy, not the
romance, in Jane Austen’s work
that drew writer-director Whit
Stillman to her unfinished novella
“Lady Susan.”
Stillman spent years adapting
the collection of letters into
“Love & Friendship,” a talky tale
centered on the manipulative,
self-serving ways of an attractive
young widow.
Romance is but a trifle for Lady
Susan Vernon, considered “the
most accomplished flirt in all
England, ” and her callousness
breeds comedy, briskly delivered
here in stylized language. The wit
comes so quickly, the film
demands a second viewing.
The heartlessness of the central
character, though, makes that
option unappealing. It’s a testament to the performance, writing
and direction, and she should be so
odious, but sometimes hanging
out with a sociopath can be a drag.
“Love & Friendship” (the title
borrowed from a different Austen
story) reunites the stars of
Stillman’s 1998 film, “The Last
Days of Disco.” Kate Beckinsale
and Chloe Sevigny again play
friends obsessed with relationships and reputation, except this
story takes place at least 100
years earlier (Austen’s novella was
set in 1790).
Sevigny is Alicia Johnson, the
only remaining friend of the ele-

gant, unscrupulous Lady Susan,
played by Beckinsale, commanding and effortless in every scene.
In opulent costumes by Eimer Ni
Mhaoldomhnaigh and a mountainous tumble of curls, Beckinsale’s
Lady Susan is immaculate in her
appearance and delivery of
Stillman’s well-crafted prose. She
leads an ensemble cast that
includes Jemma Redgrave, Tom
Bennett, Xavier Samuel, Morfydd
Clark and Stephen Fry.
After her flirtations stir up
drama at home, Lady Susan
escapes to the country for an
extended visit with some distant
relatives. She foists herself on
Charles (Justin Edwards) and
Catherine (Emma Greenwell), her
brother-in-law and his wife, and
immediately begins looking for a
husband — the richer the better,
naturally — for both herself and
her reluctant daughter, Frederica.
Susan chooses kooky Sir James
Martin (Bennett) for her daughter,
and sets her own sights on
Catherine’s handsome and significantly younger brother, Reginald
DeCourcy (Samuel). Both situations create upheaval for all
involved.
As Susan tries to manipulate circumstances in her favor, she huffs,
“Facts are such horrid things.”
Meanwhile, Alicia’s husband
has forbidden her from being
friends with the scandalous Susan.
That doesn’t stop them from meeting at intervals along the way,
when Lady Susan recaps for Alicia

‘Love & Friendship’ is a talky tale centered on the manipulative, self-serving ways of an attractive young widow.
(and the audience) the various
romantic goings-on. Her tone is
always serious, but the content of
her long speeches is irrepressibly
comic as she details the trouble
she’s caused.
Stillman embellished Austen’s
novella beyond its epistolary
form into both the screenplay and
his own novel (due this summer),
so it’s hard to know how much of
Lady Susan’s character was drawn
by each author, but she’s wholly

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modern in that she exploits the
social norms so many Austen
characters embrace. And while it’s
refreshing to see such an unsympathetic female character, it’s difficult to empathize with anyone so
divorced from their own humanity.
Lady Susan may be a progressive woman — especially in the
1700s — but she’s so steely and
cold, any feeling person would
have trouble connecting. Is she
completely invulnerable? Does

nothing warm her heart? The film
makes clear that neither lover nor
kin even come close to the pleasure she derives from her own selfsatisfaction, and that’s hard to
laugh at for long.
“Love & Friendship, ” an
Amazon Studios release, is rated
PG by the Motion Picture
Association of America for “thematic elements.” Running time:
93 minutes. Two and a half stars
out of four.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

21

By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

REPENTANCE S HALL S ET YOU
FREE: PHILADELPHIA’S EASTERN
STATE PENITENTIARY STANDS AS A
PROTOTYPE OF PRISON REFORM.
Before Pennsylvania’s fortress-like Eastern
State Penitentiary was built in the early
1820s
on
the then-outskirts
of
Philadelphia, jails had traditionally been
dirty, overcrowded rooms where prisoners
were subjected to brutal treatment by the
guards. Then, in 1787, The Philadelphia
Society for Alleviating the Miseries of
Public Prisons was formed. Among the
founding members were Benjamin Franklin
and Dr. Benjamin Rush, both signers of the
Declaration of Independence. The Quakerinspired group believed that imprisonment
should change an inmate by making him
regret his misdeeds and seek a better life.
Their goal was to build a prison designed to
create penitence in the criminal’s heart — a
true penitentiary. From their vision was
built Eastern State Penitentiary, opened in
1829. It was the largest and most expensive
public structure in the country to that date
and, soon, would be one of the most famous
prisons in the world.
ISOLATION AND HARD WORK. At
Eastern State, prisoners served their terms
in isolation. In a skylit cell, the prisoner
had only the word of God (the Bible) and
work (such as shoemaking or weaving) to
fill his thoughts. The prison was totally
silent and the guards even wore coverings
on their shoes to muffle the sound of footsteps. Inmates were hooded whenever they
were outside their cells so that they would
have no knowledge of the layout of the
building and would not be able to interact
with other prisoners or even with guards.
The entire function of Eastern State was to
impel the criminal to look inward, to reflect
and to change.
ARCHITECTURE REINFORCING
REFORMATION. The novel architecture
of Eastern State reinforced the experimental
prescription of isolation combined with
labor. British-born architect John Haviland
designed seven cellblocks that radiated
likes spokes from a central surveillance
rotunda. Each prisoner had a private cell,
centrally heated, with running water and a
flush toilet. (This was in an age when the
White House, with its new occupant Andrew
Jackson, had no running water and was heated with coal-burning stoves.) Adjacent to
each cell was a private outdoor exercise yard

surrounded by a 10-foot wall.
THE WORLD COPIES THE PENNSYLVANIA SYSTEM. Prison reformers
came to Philadelphia to study the
Pennsylvania System and its architecture.
During the century following Eastern
State’s construction, more than 300 prisons
in South America, Europe, Russia, China,
Japan and across the British Empire were
built based on its design. Eastern State’s
distinctive geometric form and its regimen
of isolation became a symbol of progressive, modern principles.
STEVE BUSCEMI AND THE HEEBIE-JEEBIES. Eastern State was closed as
a prison in 1971, but is now a popular visitor destination. Admission includes an
Audio Tour narrated by actor Steve Buscemi
(“Fargo,” “Boardwalk”) that features the real
voices of former officers and inmates. Matt
Murphy, Eastern State Penitentiary’s Tour
Programs Supervisor, said: “It’s always fun
to watch a person walk through Eastern State
Penitentiary’s massive, iron front gate for
the first time. Though everyone reacts a little bit differently, the visitor’s face usually
says it all. A wave of uncertainty, awe,
curiosity and/or excitement washes over.
Some ask questions. Some crack jokes.
Some are stricken with a visible case of the
heebie-jeebies. Everyone, however, seems
to appreciate that they are entering a place
of profound history and great significance.”
HALLOWEEN BEHIND THE WALLS
AT EASTERN STATE PENITENTIARY.
Every October the prison is home to Terror
Behind the Walls, one of the nation’s
largest haunted attractions. The long cellblocks are the stages on which 200 performers combine with special effects, lighting, digital sound, animatronic creatures
and custom props. Visitors can become
even more fully immersed in the action by
marking themselves to be grabbed and
taken into hidden passageways.
PENITENTIARY
PARTICULARS .
Eastern State Penitentiary is located at 2027
Fairmount
Ave.
in
Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, just five blocks from the

SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL

When it opened in 1829, Pennsylvania’s Eastern State Penitentiary was the largest and most
expensive public structure in the country. Emphasizing reform rather than punishment, Eastern
State closed as a prison in 1971, but is now a popular Philadelphia tourist destination.
Philadelphia Museum of Art. Hours are daily
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (last entry 4 p.m.). Closed
Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas
Day and New Year’s Day. Adults: $14.
Seniors: $12. Students and kids: $10. Not
recommended for children under the age of
7.
For
more
information
visit
www.EasternState.org.
AND REMEMBER: Two or three hours’
walking will carry me to as strange a coun-

try as I expect ever to see. Henry David
Thoreau.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American
Travel Journalists Association, Bay Area Travel
Writers, and the International Food, Wine & Travel
Writers Association. She can be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com. More of her stories
may be found at http://ifwtwa.org/author/susancohn.

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22

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

MONEY
Continued from page 19
swagger to make Lee not completely reprehensible.
It does, however, make it a little hard to
care when Jack O’Connell’s character Kyle
comes skulking in through the back of the
set with a gun and a vest full of explosives
made especially for Lee. Kyle, we find out,
trusted Lee’s advice on an investment that
went awry when a stable company’s stock
plummeted and he lost everything. The
company’s explanation and the narrative in
the press is that it was just a computer
glitch, but Kyle’s not buying it and wants

STUDENT
Continued from page 19
ing. It’s flashy, it’s loud. It’s black suits and
silver ties, shouted debates, firm handshakes, fashion over facts. But when the
camera flashes are stripped away, what’s left
is a stark, bare reality: Politics is raw. It’s
conversations with refugees, it’s headthrobbing nights contemplating which
papers to sign and which ones to toss, it’s
residents watching every decision. Even if
it seems simple, voting turns into real
choices that affect real people. It’s your life

GAME
Continued from page 19
bad 15 years ago. So when Sam reappears
with a price on his head and a tall tale of lost
pirate booty, his brother feels obliged to
help. And we’re off on another high-stakes,
life-or-death romp around the world.
The best parts of the “Uncharted” games

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL
separate rooms for a large portion of it,
communicating only through a speaker system as Patty attempts to “direct” the
hostage situation from the control room.
O’Connell, while committed, is playing
too much of a working class stereotype to
truly make an impact, and a third act turn
really doesn’t help.

some answers.
It’s an odd pairing, this somewhat daffy
television dope against an unhinged blue
collar fool with a hunch that $800 million
didn’t just disappear because of a glitch.
Although it doesn’t make for the most scintillating conversation, as Kyle wails about
the system being rigged tension builds and
it seems like perhaps “Money Monster” is
heading somewhere significant — an allout indictment of Wall Street corruption,
maybe, that movies as different as “Margin
Call” and “The Big Short” have done so
well.
Unfortunately, it doesn’t.
Instead, “Money Monster” stays rather
small and fictional in its aim. It’s partially
interested in the idea of systemic corruption

in the finance world, sure, but it seems to be
even more critical of the cable news media
types who have grown soft, complacent and
careless.

and the lives of the people around you
placed on one paper, clean-cut and laid out,
shaped by the choice you put in that perfect
checkbox.
So before you leave your footsteps to the
voting poll, and before you receive the
honor of beholding the checkbox that
shaped the lives of Americans, think thoroughly. Tread lightly. Read biographies on
politicians, research the effects of propositions, both good and bad. And look at the
other side too, whether you agree with its
opinions or not, because like the decisions
we make, there are always two sides to one
story. Two different, but equally impactful
sides.
And before you are swept away by the

rhetoric of politicians, as it is often so easy
to do, listen to the words they speak. Not
the phrases or elegant lies, not the empty
promises or hopeful reassurances. Not the
false smiles or the charming glances. Listen
to the words of politicians and realize the
consequences and glimmers of hope behind
each syllable, filter out the virtue and the
reality, and cast away the rest. What’s left is
real, startling politics, and what’s left is
what is contained in that perfect checkbox.
What’s left is what you’re voting for.
So in exactly 24 days, I will be walking
up to a voting booth for the first time, and I
will look at the most important checkbox
of my life. It will be just as powerful as it
always was, just as sturdy and stunning, its

lines straight and its frame solid. But this
time it will have a meaning, because I know
the scope of the decision I will be making.
This time, I know it will speak for society
and for myself, and it will serve as my voice
in the world around me. It will be a badge for
the people who fought long ago to stand in
my position at the polls, and it will be a
badge I pass on to others who will follow
me. In exactly 24 days, I will face the most
important checkbox of my life, and I won’t
want to mess it up.

have always been the sequences where
Nathan is exploring new vistas, whether
he’s climbing mountains or descending
deep underground. Your job is to guide the
impossibly athletic rogue to his destination, with the most exotic settings turning
into elaborate mazes. The puzzles never get
too difficult; even when Nathan seems
trapped, careful observation will help you
find a way out.
Unfortunately, the Drakes aren’t the only
ones on the trail of the treasure, and their

path is often blocked by heavily armed mercenaries. The resulting firefights are far less
rewarding, even if they are slickly executed.
And then there are the gonzo action
sequences that are a specialty of developer
Naughty Dog. “A Thief’s End” is filled with
enough explosions, chases and hairsbreadth escapes to fuel a summer’s worth of
Hollywood blockbusters, and one in particular — a frantic race through a seaside town
— left me giggling and breathless.
All of this is presented with the most gorgeous graphics that have ever been summoned for a video game. Whether you’re
lost in a jungle or perched on a lofty mountaintop, it’s worth taking a break to appreciate the gloriously detailed scenery.
Amid all the spectacle, Naughty Dog
takes the time to carefully build the rela-

tionships among its four main characters —
Nathan, Sam, Elena and Nathan’s old partner-in-crime, Sully. The banter between the
Drake brothers (played by video-game
voice all-stars Nolan North and Troy Baker)
is eerily lifelike, filled with the kind of
silly in-jokes, affectionate concern and
genial chops-busting I share with my own
brother.

Foster, in the director’s chair for the
fourth time, proves once again to be assured
and malleable in this role, ready to proficiently fulfill the needs of any genre with a
steady, straightforward style. “Money
Monster” feels like a solid ‘90s studio
thriller in some ways — a movie for adults
and made by adults with a crop of charismatic A-listers at the center.
Clooney and Roberts, by the way, are
very good together but hardly get any time
to just be charming in this tightly woven
pic. It also seems like a cruel trick to have
those two in a movie and to keep them in

“Money Monster” might not be a great
movie, but it is a comforting movie-movie
that’s still fun to watch even if it whiffed on
being something more.
“Money Monster, ” a Sony Pictures
release, is rated R by the Motion Picture
Association of America for “language
throughout, some sexuality and brief violence.” Running time: 90 minutes. Two and
a half stars out of four.

Kelly Song is a senior at Carlmont High School in
Belmont. Student News appears in the weekend
edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.

And in the end, the humble concerns of
these four people mesh nicely with the
globe-spanning fable of greed, ambition
and hubris that they uncover. “Uncharted 4”
is one of the most ambitious video games
ever created, and it succeeds on almost every
level. But its most impressive accomplishment may be its creation of four characters I
actually cared about. Four stars out of four.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

23

Future’s history: Shatner looks at 50 years of Star Trek
bridge of the starship
Enterprise in 1966.
Celebrating its 50th
anniversary this year,
the original television
series has spawned four
spin-off series and 13
feature films, including
this summer’s “Star Trek
Beyond.”
“A unique position for
a show that was tremu-

lously hanging on for three years,” Shatner
recalled Wednesday during an interview with
the Associated Press. “Each year, it looked
like we were going to be canceled. And 50
years later, we’re still talking about ‘Star
Trek.”’
The show was canceled in 1969, but a dedicated following of Trekkies and Trekkers
(depending on the preference of the fan)
kept the series alive in popular culture until
the first motion picture in 1979. Shatner
tended to distance himself from fans in

those days and even appeared in a 1986
“Saturday Night Live” sketch where he told
a room full of overly enthusiastic convention attendees to “get a life.” But his feelings about conventions have changed, and
Shatner has regularly appeared at events in
recent years.
“Some years ago, I made a documentary
on the actors who were the captains on ‘Star
Trek’ and the qualities that they had in common and what they didn’t have in common,”
Shatner said.

not approve a proposal to extend the portion of Proposition 30 which hiked income
taxes on the wealthy while allowing the
sales tax increase of one quarter percent to
expire.
But regardless of the outcome of the
potential tax extension vote, Brown said he
believed more money should be set aside in
reserves to save for a time of need.
As school funding is also closely tied to
tax revenue, which is subject to fluctuations
in the economy, many education officials
have called for Brown to loosen the cap he
imposed limiting the amount of money
school districts can store in reserves.
MacAvoy said she supported the reserve
cap being lifted or modified.
“I do think the reserve cap sets a bad
precedent by not allowing school districts
to manage funds for local needs and to save
for their own rainy-day fund,” she said.
Her sentiment was echoed by the
California School Boards Association, or
CSBA.
“While the state’s finances are strong, the
governor and the Legislature also must
make it a top priority right now to fix the

school district reserve cap, so that local districts have the same ability as the state to
exercise fiscal prudence, and to adequately
plan for and safeguard against another economic downturn, which is inevitable,” said
Chris Ungar, president of the CSBA, in a
prepared statement.
CSBA has been a supporter of a bill
authored by state Sen. Jerry Hill, D- San
Mateo, which aims to lift the reserve cap to
17 percent of the district’s general fund,
nearly three times the allowable level.
Assembly Bill 799 is currently in the
Assembly Rules Committee, but some have
expressed hope that the issue will be
resolved during the budget negotiation
process.
Ted Lempert, a member of the San Mateo
County Board of Education and president of
education advocacy group Children Now,
agreed he believed the reserve cap should be
lifted or repealed.
“It doesn’t make sense to have those
kinds of limitations on districts,” he said.
The larger issue to Lempert though is the
need for increased investment in early education programs, such as preschool and

transitional kindergarten.
“The piece that we are most concerned
about is the early childhood piece,” he said.
“That system is so underfunded.”
Early education advocates claim granting
access to young students, especially those
from underprivileged backgrounds, can be a
valuable asset in closing the state’s
achievement gap.
Despite the variety of issues some have
identified with the budget proposals, others
lauded Brown’s continued commitment to
state students.
San Mateo County Superintendent Anne
Campbell, in an email, identified Brown’s
willingness to invest in teacher recruitment
programs and establish a fund which would
pay toward emergency facility repairs as
notable efforts.
Ultimately, Campbell expressed appreciation for the education priorities established
in Brown’s budget proposal.
“We are thankful for the governor’s dedication to California’s public schools and
urge him to continue his investment in and
support of our students, teachers and families,” she said.

at the forum which this year focused on how
communities can leverage technology to
improve community engagement.
The Housing Authority is on an ambitious
mission to get landlords to accept the 400
or so Section 8 housing vouchers that go
unused in San Mateo County every month.
The Housing Authority has contracted
with a nonprofit on housing locator services and has a new goal to “Leave No Voucher
Behind.” The government agency is partnering with the San Mateo County
Association of Realtors and the local
branch of the California Apartment
Association to provide incentives to landlords to accept the vouchers.
The unused vouchers represent $500,000
a month in federal money that is essentially
lost, Cole told the Daily Journal.
Brown did declare that the state is in the
midst of a housing crisis.
“Welcome to the party,” Mullin said about
Brown’s declaration.

In San Mateo County, the average rent for
a one-bedroom apartment is now $2,562, a
53.2 percent increase in four years, according to a county housing indicators report
through December 2015.
Mullin was encouraged by some proposals in Brown’s budget.
“It also represents an opening that a deal
might come together on regulatory reform
and ministerial by-right zoning for multifamily, affordable in-fill units, something
that could be big for our county,” Mullin
said at the forum.
Mullin is also tackling the housing crisis
through legislation.

His Assembly Bill 2502 would restore
local governments’ ability to enact inclusionary housing policies, ordinances
requiring a certain percentage of below-market rate housing in new residential developments.
The legislation, however, is similar to a
bill Brown vetoed in 2013.
“We need the governor to step up and lead
on this housing challenge,” Mullin said at
the forum.
Approximately 1.5 million low-income
California households pay more than half
their income in rent, according to a summary of Brown’s May revision of the budget.

By David Fischer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI — “Star Trek” has always looked
to the future (aside from episodes where the
crew fought Nazis, Romans and other
things the producers could easily get costumes for), but Capt. James T. Kirk himself
can’t help but be impressed by the franchise’s half-century of history.
Sporting his gold captain’s uniform,
William Shatner first swaggered onto the

SCHOOLS
Continued from page 1
levels we saw before the Great Recession,
but we are still underfunded compared to the
national average in student spending,” she
said.
Under Brown’s budget, $24. 6 billion
more would be directed to state schools, a
drastic jump from the $47.3 billion available during the depths of the economic
downturn in 2011. The general spending
increase equates to an average of roughly
$3,600 more per student, according to a
state report.
During the introduction to his budget
revision, Brown hit heavily on the need for
fiscal conservatism, so as to protect the
state’s coffers from the threat posed by a
pending economic slowdown.
To bolster his argument, Brown noted revenue decreasing by roughly $1.9 billion
from a previous projection, and the opportunity for California to fall into deficit
spending should voters in the fall election

HOUSING
Continued from page 1
Mullin described to the audience of housing advocates, nonprofit officials and elected officials the difference between today’s
housing market and when his father Gene
Mullin, a former assemblyman, first bought
his home in South San Francisco in 1968
for $28,000.
Mullin’s parents bought the home on one
public school teacher’s salary.
The same home is valued at $800,000
today, which would require “two very highearning incomes to purchase,” Mullin told
the audience.
“San Mateo County needs 22,000 affordable rental homes to meet our current
needs,” he said.
Housing Authority Director Ken Cole was

William
Shatner

24

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

BUDGET
Continued from page 1
tion about that.”
Brown regularly cautions about the
perils of a looming recession, but his
warning about steep deficits tied to the
expiring taxes was unusual and came as
union groups ramp up a campaign to
retain the higher levies.
The budget packet provided to
reporters was nearly identical to one
distributed in January but contained a
new graph depicting growing deficits
in the years ahead.
“It seemed to be an implicit endorsement” of the tax extension, said Jon
Coupal, president of the Howard Jarvis
Taxpayers Association, which opposes continuing the Proposition 30
increases passed in 2012.
Brown’s “wink and nod” was ironic
in the face of his complaints about the
volatility in California’s revenue due
to reliance on wealthy taxpayers,
Coupal said.
Left-leaning interest groups quickly
pounced on Brown’s warning to make
their case for maintaining the higher
taxes.
“California students, schools and
colleges can’t afford to go back to the
days of teacher layoffs, larger class
sizes, and cuts to programs,” Jennifer
Wonnacott, a spokeswoman for the
campaign supporting the tax extension, said in a statement.
Proposition 30 raised tax rates for
incomes above $250,000 by one to
three percentage points through 2019.
Supporters announced Wednesday
that they’re turning in nearly 1 million signatures in support of asking
voters in November to retain the
income tax hikes for an additional 12

years.
A temporary quarter-cent sales tax
increase would expire as scheduled at
the end of this year.
Brown’s spending plan for the 201617 fiscal year was down slightly from
his January proposal after he projected
tax revenues falling $1. 9 billion
below earlier expectations because of
stock market fluctuations.
By law, about half the state’s spending goes to K-12 education and higher
education. Brown’s budget plan also
calls for adding $2 billion more than
required to the state’s rainy-day fund to
prepare for the next recession.
“The surging tide of revenue is
beginning to turn, as it always does,”
he said. “That’s why it’s prudent and
best that we prepare for a time of
necessity.”
In recent months, Brown has
approved raising the minimum wage to
$15 an hour and signaled he was open
to liberal priorities. But his budget
proposal left fellow Democrats mostly
disappointed as he continued to favor
savings, debt payments and deferred
maintenance over increases to social
service programs.
“Given the unacceptably high num-

PLAN

Democrats to spend $1.3 billion on
affordable housing. That could be part
of negotiations over the next month.

Continued from page 1

CORRECTIONS:

HOUSING:

Spending on corrections would rise
only slightly, to $10.6 billion from
$10.4 billion in the current fiscal year.
The governor’s revised budget adds
$24.5 million for rehabilitation programs and $35.9 million for an electronic health records system. It
includes about $39.4 million for community rehabilitation programs
through a voter-approved lowering of

The governor has endorsed a plan by
Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de
Leon to divert $2 billion earmarked for
mental health services to develop permanent housing for homeless people.
Brown’s budget did not include funding
for a proposal from Assembly

ber of Californians living in poverty,
we must make targeted reinvestments
in education, health and social service
programs that help lift up the most
vulnerable residents of our state,” said
Sen. Mark Leno, D-San Francisco,
chairman of the Senate budget committee.
The governor did embrace a demand
from Senate Democrats to divert $2
billion in voter-approved mental
health funding for housing for the
homeless, a growing problem in
California. Brown noted it had a dedicated funding source outside the general fund.
Republican leaders generally backed
the governor in his call for fiscal
restraint, asserting that new spending
should be reserved for one-time critical
needs such as water, school and transportation infrastructure.
“This is the largest budget, the
largest spending we’ve had ever, so
this is the time to make everything
work well that we have,” said Senate
Minority Leader Jean Fuller, RBakersfield.
Friday’s release opens up a monthlong debate with lawmakers, who will
have until June 15 to hash out their
own version of the spending plan and
send it to the governor. Brown said it
will be difficult to push back against
lawmakers clamoring for more money
but he intends to stand firm.
Democrats want $800 million to
increase rates paid to subsidized day
care providers and to provide care to
more children. They’re also looking to
eliminate a condition in CalWorks that
prevents families from getting additional welfare benefits if they have
another child while receiving state
assistance.
Brown has also called for tax and fee
increases to begin paying for a $59
billion backlog in road repairs.
penalties for some drug and property
crimes.

DROUGHT:
Despite a wet winter in Northern
California, the budget proposes
spending $334 million to address
drought in the coming fiscal year. It
would add $41 million for tree
removal in high-risk fire areas and
$10.4 million for new firefighting
helicopters. Brown also included $10
million for a Republican proposal for
emergency drinking water in small
communities.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
SATURDAY, MAY 14
Housing Resource Fair. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Hillsdale United Methodist
Church, 303 36th Ave., San Mateo.
Calling tenants, first time home buyers and existing homeowners. Learn
about nonprofit legal services,
renter protection, home-sharing,
first-time homebuyer loans and
home energy efficiency. Free parking. For more information call 8724444
ext.
3
or
email
info@hlcsmc.org.
Courteous Park Use Event. 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Shorebird Park, Beach Park
Blvd., Foster City. Learn about the
Foster City Parks system, see one of
the new parks and meet some of the
members of the Parks and
Recreation Committee. For more
information call 286-3380.
Free Shred and E-Scrap Recycling
Event. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Shoreway
Environmental Center Visitor’s
Parking Lot, 333 Shoreway Road, San
Carlos. Residents can bring paper
documents and confidential materials for safe and secure shredding.
Proof of residency required; maximum limit of three standard size
bankers boxes (10’x12’x15’) per
household. For a list of accepted
items visit www.rethinkwaste.org or
call 802-3509.
Design_Code_Build (Intermediate
level). 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Computer
History Museum, 1401 N. Shoreline
Blvd.,
Mountain
View.
The
Design_Code_Build program welcomes middle school students from
around the Bay Area to a series of
one-day events that provide challenges and inspiration in the engineering, science, technology and
math fields. For more information,
c
o
n
t
a
c
t
cevans@computerhistory.org.
What You Need to Know About
Divorce. 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Peninsula Jewish Community Center
(conference room B), 800 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City. A workshop is
designed to help people take the
first step of untying the knot. Trained
professionals will address the legal,
financial, family and personal issues
of divorce in a logical, yet compassionate way. For more information
call 344-3168.
Rent Stabilization. 10 a.m. 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Come to
the Burlingame Library to discuss
how rent stabilization will benefit
Burlingame. There will be doughnuts. For more information email
cindy@rentersrightnow.com.
AARP San Bruno Chapter 2895
Meeting. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road. Coffee and doughnuts
from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. For more information call 583-4499.
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Russian Ridge OSP, La Honda. Come
out and enjoy a stroll with physician
volunteers and chat about health
and wellness topics along the way.
All ages and fitness levels welcome.
Free. Walkers receive complimentary
bottled water and a healthy snack.
Visit smcma.org/walkwithadoc for
more info and to sign up.
Foster City Parks and Recreation
Department’s
13th
annual
Polynesian Festival. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Leo Ryan Park Amphitheatre,
Foster City. Bring the ‘ohana (family)
and celebrate the Polynesian
Culture with performances, arts and
craft, food and canoe rides. Free. For
more information call 286-3380.
Mingle with a Mission. 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. 31st Union, 5 S. Ellsworth Ave.,
San Mateo. Eat food and take part of
a conversation about transportation.
For more information contact
info@peninsulafamilyservice.org.
Used Book/CD/DVD Sale. 11 a.m. to
4 p.m. Cubberley Community Center,
4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. For
more
information
go
to
www.fopal.org.
Human Traffick ing Awareness
Day. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
Explore the effects of modern-day
slavery in the Bay Area and strategies on how to prevent it in San
Mateo County. For more information, contact mitch@historysmc.org.
Inspired by Nature. 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. 856 Partridge Ave., Menlo Park.
Two Menlo Park Artists, Alice Weil
and Krishna Mitra, exhibit new landscape and floral paintings in oil and
acrylic. For more information email
californiagallery@gmail.com.
Origami Time. 1 p.m. Reach and
Teach, 144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo.
Learn some new origami tricks with
Derrick. Free. For more information
email craig@reachandteach.com.
Capuchino
High
School
International Baccalaureate Art
Show Reception. 1 p.m to 2:30 p.m.
The Society of Western Artists will be
presenting awards and give visitors
a chance to meet artists. The gallery

will be open from May 6-14. For
more information call 737-6084.
‘Flight of Eagles’ Monument
Unveiling. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sheridan
and Birch streets, Palo Alto. Artist
Don Leek’s 20-foot-tall monument
will be unveiled. The public is invited
to join Don Leek to view the work,
talk with the artist and see other
works. For more information call
(562) 810-8418 or email lindsayljgroup@gmail.com.
‘Dreams’ Workshop. 2:30 p.m. to 4
p.m. 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San
Mateo. Learn spiritual tools to
remember and understand your
dreams, and share your own dream
experiences. For more information
call 391-5872.
All A Flutter Quilting Exhibit. 6:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 33 Arroyo Drive.,
South San Francisco. Enjoy artistic
quilts on display with a butterfly,
flowers and all things spring theme.
For more information call 829-3800.
Willy Wonka Sing Along Movie.
6:45 p.m. 828 Chestnut St., San
Carlos. San Carlos Children’s Theater
hosts an interactive sing along
screening of the original ‘Charlie and
the Chocolate Factory’ movie. For
more information call 594-2730.
Dr. Mojo Band. 7 p.m. Half Moon
Bay Brewing Company, 390
Capistrano Road, Half Moon Bay.
Enjoy some rockin’ soul, funk and
R&B from the Dr. Mojo Band with
great local brews. Free. For more
information call 728-2739.
‘Footloose: The Musical.’ 7 p.m. 900
Alameda de las Pulgas. A cast and
crew of more than 100 students at
Borel Middle School will be cutting
loose when they mount their annual
spring musical. For more information go to www.boreldrama.com.
When the Rain Stops Falling. 8
p.m. 2120 Broadway, Redwood City.
When the Rain Stops Falling
explores patterns of betrayal, abandonment, destruction, forgiveness
and love. This powerful drama
unfolds
with
humanity,
surprising humor and hope, as the
past plays out into the future.
General admission is $30. For more
information visit dragonproductions.net.
SUNDAY, MAY 15
Burlingame Mother’s Club —
Annual Flea. 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Burlingame High School Gym, 1
Mangini Way, Burlingame. Obtain
strollers, highchairs, wheel toys,
books, baby clothing and more. For
more
information
contact
bmcflea@burlingamemothers.org.
Silicon Valley Boys Choir, barbecue and Live Jazz for Pentecost.
10:30 a.m. 457 Kingsley Ave., Palo
Alto. Join First Presbyterian Church
Palo Alto for a family-friendly and
spirit-filled outdoor Pentecost service. For more information email
craig@reachandteach.com.
Used Book/CD/DVD Sale. 11 a.m. to
4 p.m. Cubberley Community Center,
4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. For
more
information
go
to
www.fopal.org.
Ballroom Dances. 1 p.m. to 3:30
p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno. $5.
For more information call 616-7150.
Friends Book Sale. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos. Third Sunday of every month.
Free. For more information call 5910341 ext. 237.
The Crestmont Conservatory of
Music Student Recitals. 1:30 p.m.
and 3 p.m. 2575 Flores St., San
Mateo. Presenting students in two
free piano recitals. For more information call 574-4633.
‘Footloose: The Musical.’ 2 p.m. 900
Alameda de las Pulgas. A cast and
crew of more than 100 students at
Borel Middle School will be cutting
loose when they mount their annual
spring musical. For more information go to boreldrama.com.
When the Rain Stops Falling. 2 p.m.
2120 Broadway, Redwood City. When
the Rain Stops Falling explores patterns of betrayal, abandonment,
destruction, forgiveness and love.
This powerful drama unfolds with
humanity, surprising humor and
hope, as the past plays out into the
future. General admission is $30. For
more information visit dragonproductions.net.
Man of La Mancha and Music of
the Spanish Court. 2 p.m. Carlmont
Performing Arts Center, 1400
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Also
at 6 p.m. Masterworks Chorale will
be honoring Miguel Cervantes on
his 400th birthday with Man of La
Mancha, from the Broadway musical.
For more information email
info@masterworks.org.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

25

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Pound sound
5 First claim
9 Just scrape by
12 Lotion additive
13 Soprano’s piece
14 Hush-hush org.
15 Fight event
16 Dawdlers
18 Mainstay
20 Piano composition
21 Ms. Fitzgerald
22 Web address
23 Orlando attraction
26 Polite cough
30 Wham!
33 Golf stroke
34 London district
35 Rara —
37 AAA suggestions
39 NASA counterpart
40 PC fodder
41 Water softener
43 — Vegas
45 Light-bulb unit

GET FUZZY®

48
51
53
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Eggs’ partner
Zinnia or marigold
Job slots
“Diana” singer
W-2 info
Lion’s pride
Venison
Camp bed
Baja water
Bear constellation

DOWN
1 Ties up the phone
2 Overjoy
3 Steadfast
4 Humans
5 Cartoon chipmunk
6 A Gershwin
7 Tom Hanks film
8 Wiser
9 Pantyhose color
10 Notorious pirate
11 Inch forward
17 Globe substitute
19 Reindeer herder

22
24
25
27
28
29
30
31
32
36
38
42
44
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
54
55

Make a remark
Reins in
Conductor — Klemperer
Weed
Codgers’ queries
Kiwi’s extinct cousin
Floating leaf
Future fish
Humor
Beauty shop
Cut
Coleridge locale
Inner self, to Jung
Radio dial
Seizes
Autumn pear
Lhasa —
Bronze coin
Riding the waves
Zhivago’s beloved
Nitpick
Wildebeest

5-14-16

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2016
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — You need to gather
information and make a well-thought-out decision
regarding your professional direction and personal
desires. Don’t worry what others do or say. Do
what’s best for you.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — It’s a good day to clean
house and get rid of the things you no longer need.
Have a garage sale and turn your unused items into
cash. Let go of the past and move into the future.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — If you share your
thoughts, you will be offered interesting suggestions.
Someone from your past will make a difference to how

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2016 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

you proceed. Don’t shy away from love and romance.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Mix business with pleasure,
but don’t take charge. Listen attentively in order to
gather the knowledge you need to make a strategic
move when the time is right.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Join in, voice your
opinion and head to where the action is. Don’t let
domestic problems stifle your plans or a demanding
individual make you feel guilty. Aim to have fun.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Money matters will take
top priority. Handle your affairs personally. Take note
of any information offered from a reliable source. It’s
time to make changes to ensure your financial security.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You’ve got everything
under control. Participate in events that allow you

5-14-16
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

to use your imagination to come up with workable
solutions. A little romance will brighten your day.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Take a moment to
think. You’ll be manipulated if you let someone speak
on your behalf. Anger isn’t the answer, but making
your own decisions will improve your future.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You stand to come
into a financial gain, a gift or a token of appreciation.
Share your good fortune with someone you love to
make your day complete.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Don’t let anyone lure
you down a path that doesn’t take you where you want
to go. Do your own thing and follow your dreams with
discipline and desire.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — It’s a good day to

share memories and conversation with old friends.
Good ideas will spring up from old plans. Love and
romance look promising if you share your thoughts and
plans for the future.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You’ll desire change,
but do your research before you jump into something
different. Find out exactly what’s expected of you and
negotiate on your own behalf. Don’t settle for less.
COPYRIGHT 2016 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

110 Employment
DUMP TRUCK DRIVER, SM, good pay,
benefits. (650)343-5946 M-F, 8-5.

We welcome applicants for

110 Employment

CAREGIVER F/T-

Looking for compassionate team
member for Assisted Living in Burlingame. Call Mary Ann (650)464-6922.

HIRING NOW
for Caregivers!
Newly opening RCFE in

San Mateo. Full time and part time
shifts and schedules available.

Send resume to:
kimochikai@kimochi-inc.org

Caregivers
Kitchen / Prep Cook &
Dishwasher
Call us at 650-995-7123

Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000

Do you have….Good communication skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.

PALO ALTO & MENLO PARK

The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.

Early mornings, six days per week, Monday through Saturday.
2 to 4 hour routes. Must have own vehicle, valid license and
insurance.

For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...

Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m.

Contact us for a free consultation

Call 650-344-5200
or email resume to info@smdailyjournal.com

2 years experience
required.

Are you…..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?

San Mateo Daily Journal

Pay dependent on route size.

IMMEDIATE
NEED
Weekend
Caregivers

• Customer Service

EOE, Division of Labor Standard Wage Order 5.
Lic. # 415600900

CURRENT CONTRACT OPENINGS FOR:

CAREGIVERS

CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA

completeseniorliving@yahoo.com

Newspaper Delivery Routes to businesses and newsracks,
and some apartment buildings. (No residential houses.)

110 Employment

CASHIER - PT, FT, Will Train.
Apply in person, AM/PM Mini Market,
470 Ralston, Belmont.

1230 Hopkins Ave, Redwood City (Hopkins & Birch)

DRIVERS
WANTED

110 Employment

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

Please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED
Up to $15 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.

HOUSEKEEPER/ FT -

Seeking ambitious person who likes
working with elderly in Burlingame assisted living.
Call MaryAnn 650-464-6922
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

Exciting Opportunities at

Guaranteed hours
Paid Training provided

Sign on
bonus $100
Driving
required

Call…ASAP!
Ask for Carol
650-458-2200
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 1900 Alameda de las Pulgas #112, San Mateo CA 94403

RETAIL -

JEWELERY SALES +
DIAMOND SALES +
STORE MANAGER

Entry up to $13.
Dia Exp up to 20
Mgr. $DOE$ (Please include
salary history)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights

650-367-6500
FX: 367-6400

jobs@jewelryexchange.com

Applicants who are committed to Quality and
Excellence welcome to apply.
Candy Maker Training Program

Wrap Machine Operator

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Requirements for all positions include:
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t1SFWJPVTFYQFSJFODFJONBOVGBDUVSJOHQSFGFSSFE
t&NQMPZFFTBSFNFNCFSTPG-PDBM

Both are Union positions. If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at
(650)827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE

Daytime Receptionist /Concierge
needed for busy, upscale Assisted Living/Memory Care
community. Currently Sunday-Thursday but flexibility is a
must. Mature, friendly, process driven, detail oriented
candidate will be able to exercise good judgment in stressful
situations with high accountability. Polished, professional
appearance, demeanor, presentation and communication
skills, with English fluency, is essential. Experience in healthcare such as EMT, CNA, or Medical/Dental Assistant is
helpful. Stable work history is crucial. Position is high touch
customer service, directing phone traffic and managing light
administrative work. Knowledge of etiquette, manners and
compassion toward elders and families is paramount.
Excellent compensation based on experience. Kensington
Place also offers an exceptional training program for new
team members as well as a full range of benefits such as
meals, generous paid time off, and for those working 32
hours+/week, medical, dental, vision, disability, life
insurance, and more. Email JobRC@KensingtonSL.com, fax
650-649-1726, or visit 2800 El Camino Real, Redwood City
for an application.

SALES - Telemarketing and Inside Sales
Representative needed to sell newspaper print and web advertising and event
marketing solutions. To apply, pleasecall
650-344-5200 and send resume to
info@smdailyjournal.com

SAN CARLOS
RESTAURANT - AM
Dishwasher Required,
Tuesdays,
Saturdays,
Sundays. Contact Chef
(650) 592-7258 or
(541) 848-0038.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

110 Employment

127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268966
The following person is doing business
as: Yunting Dai Instruction, 2618 Hastings Drive, BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered Owner(s): Yunting Dai, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Yunting Dai/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/25/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/23/16, 04/30/16, 05/07/16, 05/14/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269037
The following person is doing business
as: Market Barbarian, 3654 Oso Street,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered
Owner(s): Mrktstar, Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/John Vittii/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 04/21/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/23/16, 04/30/16, 05/07/16, 05/14/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269036
The following person is doing business
as: Maries’ Bridal, 229 Park Road, BURLINGAME, CA 94010. Registered Owner(s): Casa JarJoura LLC., CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/Marie Thereze Cole/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 04/21/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/23/16, 04/30/16, 05/07/16, 05/14/16)

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

HOTEL -

MULTIPLE POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
CitiGarden Hotel is now hiring in
all departments, starting between
$11 - $14 per hour.
Please apply in person, at the front desk:

Caregivers, come grow with us!
No Experience Required
Paid Training Provided
FT/PT – excellent FT benefits
Evenings/weekends/vehicle/driving required
($250.00 Sign-on Bonus)
Don’t wait – come in TODAY – Ask for Carol

(650) 458-2200

245 S. Airport Blvd,
South San Francisco

HELP WANTED

SALES

27

www.homebridgeca.org
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #115 in San Mateo

The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:

EVENT MARKETING SALES

TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES

Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.

We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.

To apply for either position,
please send info to

jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call

650-344-5200.

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269095
The following person is doing business
as: 3 Bees Cafe, 55 West 3nd Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner:
Rafat Haddad, 1820 Gum St, SAN MATEO, CA 94402. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A
/s/Rafat Haddad/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 04/28/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/30/16, 05/07/16, 05/14/16, 05/21/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269107
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Century Cleaning 2) Century Window Cleaning, 255 Portola Dr, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: SCL
Group Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on April 1, 2016
/s/Ken Callegari/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 04/29/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/07/16, 05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268785
The following person is doing business
as: TX: Success Brokerage, 526 Alexis
Circle, DALY CITY, CA 94014. Registered Owner: English Estates Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Anncy Ho-English/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/31/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/30/16, 05/07/16, 05/14/16, 05/21/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269139
The following person is doing business
as: SNAP Fitness San Mateo, 1232 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94403.
Registered Owner: TitaniumFit, LLC.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 5/3/16
/s/Ricardo Mauricio/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 05/03/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/07/16, 05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269155
The following person is doing business
as: Dom’s Jerky, 1110 Douglas Ave #1,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010. Registered
Owner: Dominic Casazza, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on 101-2015
/s/Dominic Casazza/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 05/04/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/07/16, 05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269172
The following person is doing business
as: HALDAR+CO, 777 Morrell Avenue,
Unit 203, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner: Neil Haldar, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
March 1, 2016
/s/Neil Haldar/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 05/06/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/07/16, 05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269105
The following person is doing business
as: European Wax Center, 518 Westlake
Center, DALY CITY, CA 94015. Registered Owner: Peninsula EWC, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Lynda Oliver/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 04/28/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16, 06/04/16 )

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269185
The following person is doing business
as: Lyna’s Beauty Salon, 515 El Camino
Real #160, MENLO PARK, CA 94025.
Registered Owner: Lyna’s Beauty Salon,
CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
3/10/2016
/s/ Ngoc Nguyen/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 05/09/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16, 06/04/16 )
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269210
The following person is doing business
as: Anchor Homes And Loans, 533 Airport Blvd., Suite 400, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. Registered Owner: Anchor Financial And Insurance Services, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 05/18/2011
/s/ Ruzanna Avagyan/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 05/11/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16, 06/04/16 )
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269074
The following person is doing business
as: Aegean Blue Dream Villas, 99 Gresham Lane, MENLO PARK, CA 94027.
Registered Owner: George Papadoyannis, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A
/s/ George Papadoyannis/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 04/26/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16, 06/04/16 )
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269192
The following person is doing business
as: Magnolia Ice Cream & Treats, 3573
Callan Blvd., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner: Ramar International Corporation, CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Susan Quesada/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 05/10/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16, 06/04/16

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016
203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269101
The following person is doing business
as: Octograde, 103 Deer Lane, SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered Owner:
David Skrenta, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ David Skrenta/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 04/28/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16, 06/04/16

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT M-246961
Name of the person abandoning the use
of the Fictitious Business Name: Cyril
James McDonald. Name of Business:
Araya Clean. Date of original filing: 9-292011. Address of Principal Place of Business: 3182 Campus Dr. #422, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registrant(s): CLR
Stream Inc., CA. The business was conducted by a Corporation.
/s/Cyril McDonald/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 04/27/16. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/07/2016,
05/14/2016, 05/21/2016, 05/28/2016).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269202
The following person is doing business
as: Reverse Entropy, 130 Arch St. apt 8,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner: Nicolas Chaumont, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Nicolas Chaumont/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 05/10/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/14/16, 05/21/16, 05/28/16, 06/04/16
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT 263171
Name of the person abandoning the use
of the Fictitious Business Name: Anncy
Ho / English Estates Inc.. Name of Business: Realty World - Global Network.
Date of original filing: 12/3/2014. Address
of Principal Place of Business: 951 Mariners Island Blvd #300, San Mateo CA
94403. Registrant(s): English Estates
Inc., 526 Alexis Circle, DALY CITY, CA
94014. The business was conducted by
a Corporation.
/s/Anncy Ho-English/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 03/31/16. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 04/30/2016,
05/07/2016, 05/14/2016, 05/21/2016).

296 Appliances

303 Electronics

304 Furniture

NICHOLAS SPARKS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

Books

SHARK FLOOR steamer,exc condition
$45 (650) 756-9516.

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762

QUALITY BOOKS used and rare. World
& US History and classic American novels. $5 each obo (650)345-5502

TOASTER OVEN, Black & Decker, 4Slice, 1200W, Toast, Bake, Broil;
TRO480BS - $12 (650) 952-3500

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

STEPHEN KING Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleaner, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

ORIGINAL AM/FM 1967/68 Honda Radio for $50. (650)593-4490

294 Baby Stuff

297 Bicycles

GRACO DOUBLE Stroll $90 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

2 BIKES for kids $60. Will email pictures
upon request (650) 537-1095

PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

SIT AND Stand Stroll $95 My Cell 650537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
FOUND: WEDDING BAND Tuesday
September 8th Near Whole Foods, Hillsdale. Pls call to identify. 415.860.1940
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.
LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.
Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
JACK REACHER adventure novels by
lee child great read entire collection. $40
obo (650)591-6842

295 Art
AWARD
WINNING
(415)867-6444

Painting

$99.

BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

296 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898
BLACK & Decker Car Vac, Gd. Condition $8 650-952-3500
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CIRRUS STEAM mop model SM212B 4
new extra cleaning pads,user manual.
$45. 650-5885487

62 Leftovers dish,
perhaps
63 Leftovers
64 Valuation
DOWN
Twists
Straight up
Crooked bread?
Boring piece
Lasting start
Knocked
Spouted
containers
8 Big name in
stationery
9 Lasting
10 Mosaic piece
11 __ Chiles,
portrayer of Dr.
Holly Goodhead
in “Moonraker”
12 At ten, say
13 Lesser
14 Homeowner’s
burden
23 Baudelaire, par
exemple
25 Times to come
out
28 Plinth course
layers
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

298 Collectibles

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-430-a
$60. (650)421-5469

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
CIGAR BANDS, 100 years old $99
(415)867-6444
FROM TV series Vegas, 57T-Bird model
kit, unopened, $10,650-591-9769 San
Carlos
GEOFFREY BEENE Jacket, unused, unworn, tags , pink, small, sleeveless, zippers, paid $88, $15, (650) 578-9208
LENNOX RED Rose, Unused, hand
painted, porcelain, authenticity papers,
$12.00. (650) 578 9208.

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c1470 $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model L516b
$75. (650)421-5469
VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model yrb-791 1948, $ 70. (650)421-5469

304 Furniture
2 TWIN MAPLE bed frames, Cannon
Ball construction, $300 for both. Call
(415)516-4964

ELEGANT ELECTRIC Fireplace on
wheels in white casing can see flames,
like new. $99 (650)771-6324

SANDY SCOTT Etching. Artists proof.
"Opening Day at Cattail Marsh". Retriever holding pheasant. $99. 650-654-9252.

ANTIQUE MOHAGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.

ICE MAKER brand new $90. (415)2653395

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

31 Short putt
32 Is set
33 Generally
gluten-free
snacks
35 Tea __
39 Play that
inspired Puccini
40 Fitting
41 Fit figure,
usually
42 Impersonated

48 “Sweet Smell of
Success”
co-screenwriter
50 Slip to tie a knot?
51 Masterless
samurai
52 Sound named
by George
Vancouver
54 Torn
56 Weakens
60 Rover’s kin?

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

STAR WARS C-3PO mint pair, green tint
(Japan), gold (U.S.) 4” action figures.
$89 650-518-6614

BRASS-BALDWIN BRASS Door locks
Brand New $200 (650)360-8960
CHRISTMAS TREE China, Fairfield
Peace on Earth. Complete Set of 12 (48
pieces) $75. 650-493-5026
COMPLETE SET OF CHINA - Windsor
Garden, Noritake. Four place-settings,
20-pieces in original box, never used.
$250 per box
(3 boxes available).
(650)342-5630
DECORATIVE LAMP & 8"x8" mirror, exc
cond $30 (650)756-9516.Daly City.
PLASTIC DUAL-LID Underbed Storage
Container with wheels, 31"x15"x5-1/2",
$7 (650) 952-3500.
PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

BROWN WOODEN bookshelf H 3'4"X W
3'6"X D 10" with 3 shelves $25.00 call
650-592-2648

TULIP CHAMPAGNE glasses, perfect
condition, 11 for $15.00 (650)348-2306

STAR WARS Lando Calrissian 4” orange card action figure, autographed by
Billy Dee Williams. $50 Steve 650-5186614

CHAIR – Designer gray, beige, white.
Excellent condition. $59. 650-573-6895

THE
SAN
Francisco
newspaper,11/25/1924
full
$15,650-591-9769 San Carlos

Call
edition,

299 Computers
MONITOR FOR computer. Kogi - 15".
Model L5QX. $25. (650)592-5864.

CHAIRS - Two oversized saucer (moon)
chairs. Black. $30 each. (650)5925864.
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHILD’S TABLE (Fisher Price) and Two
Chairs. Like New. **SOLD**

308 Tools
ALUMINUM LADDERS 40ft, $99 for two,
Call (650)481-5296
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

300 Toys

COAT/HAT STAND, solid wood, for your
mountain cabin/house. $50. (650)5207045

3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142

COFFEE TABLE – Woven bamboo with
glass top. $99. 650-573-6895

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465

DEWALT DRILL/FLASHLIGHT Set $99
My Cell 650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

AMERICAN GIRL 18” doll, “Jessica”,
blond/blue. new in box, $65 (505)-2281480 local.
PUZZLES 300-1000 ps perf condition 26
for $2.00 ea. 650-583-4058
STAR WARS – one 4” orange card action figure, Luke Skywalker (Ceremonial) $10 Steve 650-518-6614

COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409
COUCH – Designer gray, beige, white.
Excellent condition. $99. 650-573-6895
CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222
DINETTE TABLE 35"x60" with 3 adjust
leafs $ 30 (650)756-9516.
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193

ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

END TABLES – Woven bamboo, offwhite. $89. 650-573-6895. (650)573-689

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
VANITY-ANTIQUE 100 years old
19"x36" Mahogany $200 (650)360-8960

303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUDIOVOX BOOMBOX Radio, cassette & CD player. AC/DC. Brand new in box. $20. 650-654-9252
BLAUPUNKT AM/FM/CD Radio and Receiver with Detachable Face asking
$100. (650)593-4490

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER in roller4'wx5'h glass door, shelf /drawers
ex/co $45. (650)992-4544
ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021
FOLDING TABLES (2), 500# capacity.
24"x48 Laminate top. $99. (650)5914141
GLASS TOP dining table w/ 6 chairs
$75. (415)265-3395
INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LIGHT OAK Cabinet, 6 ft tall, 3 ft wide, 2
ft deep, door at the bottom. $150.
(650) 871-5524.

CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

DYNAGLOPRO
HEATER.
Phone: 650-591-8062

$40.00

HEAVY DUTY Mattock/Pick, Less Handle $5. (650)368-0748
OXYGEN ACENTYLENE Heavy Duty
Complete
Welding
Set
$325.00
(650)873-6304
SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585
VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

309 Office Equipment
NEAT RECEIPTS Mobile Scanner new
in box $79, call 650-324-8416

310 Misc. For Sale
"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGUES" plants,
3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.
60 LP'S & 33/13 records from 50's -70's,
Sinatra, Diamond, Conniff, Mathis. $50.
650-349-3205
8 TRACKS, billy Joel, Zeppelin, Eagles
,Commodores, more.40 @ $4 each , call
650-393-9908
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021

HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

LOVESEAT – Designer gray, beige,
white. Excellent condition. $89. 650-5736895

INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133

DECK STEREO receiver with deck CD
player with 2 spkrs. Exc/co. $45.
(650)992-4544

NEW TWIN Mattress set plus frame
$30.00 (650) 347-2356

FIRST ALERT CO600 Carbon Monoxide
Plug-In Alarm. Simple to use, New in
pkg. $18 (650) 952-3500
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855
MULTITESTER KIT, 20.000 OHMS/volt
DC. never used in box $20.00
650-9924544

05/14/16

306 Housewares
BED SPREAD (queen size), flower design, never used. $22. Pls call
650-345-9036

STAR Wars Hong Kong exclusive, mint
Pote Snitkin 4” green card action figure.
$20 650-518-6614

302 Antiques

05/14/16

BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition
(650) 315-2319

WOODEN MINI bar with 2 bar stools
$75. (415)265-3395

TABLECLOTH. 84” round hand crocheted and embroidered tablecloth with 12
napkins. $65. San Bruno. 650-794-0839.

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

xwordeditor@aol.com

BEIGE CARPET. 12 1/2'x11 1/2'. Good
condition. Good for bedroom.$95.
(650)595-4617

WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184

BROWN RECLINER, $75 Excellent Condition. (650) 315-2319

STAR WARS – one 4” orange card action figure, Momaw Nadon (Hammerhead). $8 Steve 650-518-6614

By John Lampkin
©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-442c $60.
(650)421-5469

ANTIQUE MAHOGONY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

SONY DVD/CD PLAYER Model DVPNC665P. Precision drive 2/MP3 Playback. $20. 650-654-9252

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

RIVAL 11/2 quart ice cream maker
(New) $20.(650)756-9516.

VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280

MAGNA-GLACIERPOINT 26" 15 speed.
Hardly used . Bluish purple color .$ 59.00
San Mateo 650-255-3514.

ELECTRIC FIREPLACE on wheels in
walnut casing made by the Amish exl.
cond. $99. 650-592-2648

PASTA MAKER-BAND New From Italy
$40 (650)360-8960

TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344

ADULT BIKES 1 regular and 2 with balloon tires $30 Each (650) 347-2356

ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324

JACK LALANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855

MILLER LITE Neon sign , work good
$59 call 650-218-6528

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 What
separates the
gulls from the
buoys?
11 Red number
15 Come
fashionably?
16 20 fins
17 Hammers
home
18 Nail target
19 Chemical
formerly used in
carbonless copy
paper
manufacture
20 Challenges
21 “Go away!”
22 Mayan pyramid
feature
24 Threw on
26 Self-described
“non-musician”
27 Portent
29 It can be before
you
30 Checkup result
letters
31 Nut features
34 Experimental
habit?
36 They can be
frustrating
37 Enterprise
officer
38 Eponymous
Seminole
leader
41 Kiwi genus
43 Disgusted word
from Lady
Macbeth
44 Rest
45 Rest poorly
46 Kind of trading,
briefly
47 Pabst brand
49 Big Ten player
since 2014
53 Epps of “House”
55 Gobs
57 Good name for
a London
washroom
attendant
58 Net
59 Zip
61 Apple site

OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324

NEW AC/DC adapter, output DC 4.5v,
$5, 650-595-3933

LIONEL CHRISTMAS Boxcars 2005,
2006, 2007 New OB $90 lot 650-3687537

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429

LIONEL CHRISTMAS Holiday expansion Set. New OB $99 650-368-7537

OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280

LIONEL ENGINE #221 ‘Rio Grande diesel, runs good ex-condition
$90.
(650)867-7433

OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
QUEEN SIZE Sofa bed and love seat,
dark brown
and
beige.
$99
for
both obo 650-279-4948

LIONEL WESTERN Union Pass car and
dining car. New OB $99 650-368-7537
MISSION HIGH School (S.F. ) June
1928 year book. Good condition, no autographs. $20.00. 650-588-0842.

RECLINER CHAIR blue tweed clean
good $75 Call 650 583-3515

MISSION HIGH School (S.F.) leather
belt w/ metal buckle, late 1930's. $10.
650-588-0842.

RECLINING SWIVEL chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858

RMT CHRISTMAS Diesel train and Caboose. Rare. New OB $99 650-368-7537

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

310 Misc. For Sale

316 Clothes

318 Sports Equipment

SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709

PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393

PERRY ELLIS tan cotton pants 42X30,
$9 650-595-3933

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @ $5450., want $1800 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549
UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

PRADA DAYPACK / Purse, Sturdy black
nylon canvas, like new, made in Italy,
$35 (650)591-6596
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

317 Building Materials
32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
INTERIOR DOORS, 8, Free. Call 5737381.
PRE-HUNG EXTERIOR Door, Fiberglass Panelled with Windows, Left Hand
open $185.00 Call (650)595-3831
SHUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72
like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891
WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

318 Sports Equipment

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
WOMEN'S NORDICA ski boots, size 8
1/2. $50 650-592-2047

345 Medical Equipment
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.
NOVA WALKER with storage box &
seat; never used; already assembled;
$70.00 cash only. (650)755-8238
QUICKIE WHEELCHAIR - Removable
arms for transferring standard size.
$350.00. (650) 345-3017
RECLINER - Clinical care by Drive, like
new, $300. (650)952-3466
SEMIAUTOMATIC
hospital
bed. Head, foot sections powered by quiet smooth motor. $99 650.952.3466

Garage Sales

2 FAMILY
YARD SALE
Dory Lane

312 Pets & Animals

ADIDAS ENGLISH Olympics sports bag
(very good condition) - $25, (650)3418342

Redwood Shores

AIRLINE CARRIER for cats, pur. from
Southwest Airlines, $25, 2 available. Call
(505-228-1480) local.

CAMPING SHOVEL - or gardening.
Ames brand. 26.5" long/ blade 6" x 8.5".
$10 650-654-9252

SAT, MAY 14 ONLY
9am - 4pm

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

CAMPING/BACKPACKING
TENT
Dome style 4'x5'. Brand new-poles,
stakes & rain fly. $20. 650-654-9252

Credit Cards Accepted

ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066
OPEN HOUSE to see FRENCH BULLDOG puppies in San Mateo Every weekend $2,500 and up. Call or Text
(650)274-2241.
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

GOLF CLUBS (13) Dave Relz and
MacGregor - $65.(650)341-8342
GOLF CLUBS, 2 sets of $30 & $60.
(415)265-3395
LADIES MCGREGOR Golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104
MEN'S ROSSIGNOL Skis.
good condition, 650-341-0282.

$95.00,

PET CARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

MENS NORDICA ski boots for sale, size
10, $60.00, 650-341-0282.

316 Clothes

NEW 8" tactical knife, one hand open
$19 650-595-3933

100% WOOL brown dress pants, 42X30
$8 650-595-3933
DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $55 (650)357-7484
FAUX FUR Coat Woman's brown multi
color
in
excellent
condition
3/4
length $50 650-692-8012

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

SET OF Used Golf Clubs with Cart for
$50. (650)593-4490
SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347
TENNIS PRINCE Pro rackets (2) with
cover - $40. ea. (650)341-8342

LADIES BOOTS size 8 , 3 pairs different
styles , $20/ pair. call 650-592-2648

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708

TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893

MEN'S SKI boots size 10, $75.
(650)520-1338

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

MEN'S VINTAGE Pendleton,100% virgin
wool, red tartan plaid, large,like
new,$25,650-591-9769, San Carlos

VINTAGE GOLF Set for $75 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

Cabinetry

Contractors

Tools, luggage, backpacks, gear bags, sports
memorabilia, baseball
cards, beer mirrors, sales
rep samples of sunglasses and eyewear, athletic
body supports, a new
computer monitor, and
too much more to list!

Garage Sales

San Mateo
Bonsai Club

Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

Cleaning

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

31st Annual
Satsuki Azalea &
Bonsai Exhibit Show

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.

This Sunday
May 15
10am-4pm
FREE admission

Just $45
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!

Bonsai ClinicWe can check
your Bonsai tree!

Sale:

Satsuki Azalea Plants,
Bonsai Soil
& Pots
San Mateo Gardeners Hall

503 E. 5th Avenue &
Claremont St.
San Mateo

(650)548-9470

Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

CADILACC ‘99 DeVille Concours,
98,500 miles, $3,500 or best offer.
(650)270-6637
CHEVY ‘10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$5,500, child’s play three, call
(650)481-5296

GOT AN OLDER
CAR, BOAT, OR RV?
379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES

620 Automobiles

Do the humane thing.
Donate it to the
Humane Society.
Call 1- 800-943-8412

MERCURY ‘09 Marquis. 4 Door 11,000
miles. White. Like new. $16,000.
(650) 726-9610.

625 Classic Cars
1955 CHEVY BEL AIR 2 door, Standard
Transmission V8 Motor, non-op $22,000
obo. (650)952-4036.

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

FORD ‘63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$4,500 /OBO (650)364-1374

2007 BMW X-5, One Owner, Excel. Condition Sports package 3rd row seats
$21,995 obo Call (650)520-4650
FORD ‘98 Mustang. GT Convertible.
Summer fun car. Green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.

Concrete

MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888
NEW M/C tire Metzeler Z6 120/70ZR-18
$50 650-595-3933

670 Auto Service

AA SMOG

Complete Repair & Service
$29.75 plus certificate fee
(most cars)

869 California Drive .
Burlingame

(650) 340-0492
MENLO ATHERTON
AUTO REPAIR
WE SMOG ALL CARS
1279 El Camino Real

Menlo Park

650 -273-5120

www.MenloAthertonAutoRepair

670 Auto Parts
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222
NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

86 CHEVY CORVETTE. Automatic.
93,000 miles. Sports Package.$6,800
obo. (650) 952-4036.
CHEVY ‘65 Impala 2DR Coupe. 113K
miles. 4 BL Carb. $8,500.
(415) 412-1292.

1993 CHEVY Station Wagon, 1 owner
64,000 miles $3,900 (650)342-0852.

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

1969 CHEVY CORVETTE 350 V/8
4speed Flared Fenders-Retro Mod
$22,500 obo Call (650)369-8013

470 Rooms

620 Automobiles

29

FORD ‘64 Falcon. 4DR Sedan. 6 cyl.
auto/trans $3,500.00. (650) 570-5780.

630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVROLET 2014 express 2500 cargo
van 31,000 miles excellent cond.
$24,000 or trade class B or smaller
camper (650)591-8062
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $3,500/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
MAZDA ‘04 Tribute, Limited, 175K miles,
$4,400. (650)342-6342

Construction

Construction

LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955

Decks & Fences

Carpets
CARPET-9' X 11' Like New 30 year
Guarantee $50 (650)360-8960

Construction

CALEDONIAN
MASONRY INC
BBQ Season Coming!
Concrete
AAA CONCRETE DESIGN
Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

We can design your
outdoor living
experience.
*BBQ’s *Pizza Ovens
*Patios *Flagstone
*Concrete/Foundation
Call For Free Estimate:

(650) 525-9154

Dry-rot & Termite Repair

Deck Repair & New Construction
Staircase Repair & New Construction

Siding Installation
Bathroom Remodel & Painting
Free Estimates – Fully Insured
Lic. #913461

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

Electricians

Handy Help

Hauling

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

CHAINEY HAULING

for all your electrical needs

Free Estimates

650-322-9288

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

INSIDE OUT
ELECTRIC, INC

Residential/Commercial Service
Electrical Panel Upgrades
Remodels / New Construction
Trusted Owner Operated
since 2002.
Lic #808182

(650)515-1123
Gardening

J.B GARDENING

Maintenance • New Lawns
Clean Ups • Sprinklers
Fences • Tree Trim
Concrete & Brick Work
Driveway Pavers
Retaining Walls

(650)400-5604
LAWN MAINTENANCE
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)219-4066

SENIOR HANDYMAN

“Specializing in any size project”

• Painting • Electrical
• Carpentry • Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Retired Licensed Contractor

650-201-6854

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

1-800-344-7771

BELMONT PLUMBING
Complete Local Plumbing Svc
Water Heaters, Drain Clearing
Faucets, Sinks, Bathtubs
Showers, Toilets, Gas Repair
Bonded & Insured
Lic #836489 C-36

Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

650-766-1244

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming

Pruning

Removal
Grinding

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Washing

Landscaping

WINDOW

NATE LANDSCAPING
* Tree Service * Fence
* Deck * Pavers
* Pruning & Removal
* New Lawn * Irrigation
* All Concrete * Ret. Wall
* Sprinkler System
* Stamp Concrete
* Yard Clean-Up,
Haul & Maintenance

T&A
Hardwood
Floors

“WE BEAT ANY PRICE”

AAA RATED!

Service

• Stump

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Hardwood Floors

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

Hillside Tree

• Large

CHEAP
HAULING!

(650)701-6072

•Installed •Refinished
•Pergo
•Laminate
“OLD FLOORS MADE
LIKE NEW”
FREE ESTIMATES
Call John Ngo
415-350-2788

Tree Service

• Shaping

Licensed General and
Painting Contractor
• Int/Ext Painting • Carpentry
• Sheetrock, Tile, Stucco & Remodels
Lic#979435
CALL FOR GREAT RATES!

Hauling

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

Plumbing

THE VILLAGE
CONTRACTOR

Lic#1211534

PENINSULA
CLEANING

Hauling

Free Estimate

650.353.6554
Lic. #973081

JON’S HAULING
Serving the peninsula since 1976

FREE ESTIMATES

Junk and debris removal, yard/int
clearing, furniture, appliance hauling
www.jonshauling.com

(650)393-4233

$40 & UP
HAUL

SEASONAL LAWN

MAINTENANCE
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482

Painting

JON LA MOTTE

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

Invites You To Our

Open House!
8FEOFTEBZ .BZtBNQN
Marymount Greenhills is a lovely and quaint senior living
community that provides Independent Living, Assisted Living,
Memory Care, Short Term Stay and Hospice care.
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tBN)FBMUIZ&BUJOH
tQN&BSMZ4JHOTPG$POGVTJPO'PSHFUGVMOFTT 

#SPBEXBZ"WFOVFt.JMMCSBF $"t  

MICHAEL’S
PAINTING

Serving the Peninsula
since 1989

(650) 574-0203
lic#628633

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

VICTOR FENCES
& HOUSE PAINTING
-Interior
-Exterior
-Residential -Commercial
Power Washing - Driverways,
sidewalks, gutters
(650) 296-8088 | (209) 915-1570

WASHING

Roofing

REED
ROOFERS

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial
License #931457

Call for Free Estimate

(650) 591-8291

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

Cemetery

Dental Services

Food

Furniture

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY

COMPLETE IMPLANT
Dentistry Under One Roof

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing
FOOTWEAR ETC.
Offering 30 years of comfort
and exemplary service
Mephisto
Clarks
Vionic
Dansko
Naot
UGG
800-720-0572
www.footwearetc.com/locations

Computer

COMPUTER
PROBLEMS?

Viruses, lost data, hardware or
software issues? Contact Geeks
On Site! 24/7 Service. Friendly
Repair Experts. Macs and PCs
Call for FREE diagnosis.
1-800-715-9068

Same day treatment
Evening & Saturday appts available
Peninsula Dental Implant Center
1201 St Francisco Way, San Carlos
650.232.7650

I - SMILE

Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Inovative
650-282-5555

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
(650) 343-4123
www.smpanchovilla.com

CALIFORNIA
(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

THE CAKERY

Health & Medical

1308 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
Find us on Facebook

EYE EXAMINATIONS

A touch of Europe

579-7774

Fitness

1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

LEARN TO
BELLY DANCE!

SKIN TASTIC
MEDICAL LASER

Fun,fast way to get in shape

New classes starting in San Mateo

(650) 483- 4046

www.alisabellydance.com

Cosmetic Spa Cool Sculpting
Laser&Cosmetic Dermatology
1838 El Camino Rl#130
Burlingame. 650 542-7055
www.skintasticmedicalspa.com

Legal Services

Real Estate Loans

LEGAL

REAL ESTATE
LOANS

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

Insurance

In Just 10 Weeks !
with the ultimate body shaping course
contact us today.

AFFORDABLE

(650) 490-4414
www. SanBrunoMartialArts.com

LIFE INSURANCE

Eric L. Barrett,

Real Estate Broker
CA BRE#746683
NMLS #348288

Marketing

Real Estate Services

GROW

*SALES * LEASING
* PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Sales: 1.49% commission
Property Management: 4% fee

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

BEST ASIAN
BODY MASSAGE
$39.99/hr
Call (650) 787-9969
Free Parking Behind Building
Mon-Fri, 10am-9pm
Wknds-Holidays Call Ahead

TURNING 65 this year?

Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

650-701-9700
www.collinscoversyou.com

ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED
Since 1979

"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

legaldocumentsplus.com

1838 El Camino #103,
Burlingame

Collins Insurance

DIRECT PRIVATE LENDER

WACHTER INVESTMENTS, INC.

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Medicare Supplement Insurance
Low cost-guaranteed coverage

REFINANCE HARD MONEY
AT LOWER RATE

(650)574-2087

Massage Therapy

LOSE WEIGHT

31

Music

Bronstein Music

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

(650)588-2502

bronsteinmusic.com

650-348-7191

Personalized service

Peninsula Prime Realty
650-591-0119

info@peninsulaprimerealty.com

SALES • LEASING •
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Serving the Bay Area
since 1980
First 3 callers get special
1.5% sales commission
Real Estate Unlimted
Since 1980
(415)585-2233
luckyaltman@aol.com
CA BRE Lic# 00621471

Travel

FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

32

Weekend • May 14-15, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL