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THE TAIJI MANUAL OF LI XIANWU

TAIJI BOXING

by Li Xianwu
[published June, 1933]
[translation by Paul Brennan, Oct, 2015]

Taiji Boxing

calligraphy by Zhang Renjie


The path to health

[calligraphy by] Yang Chongwei


To ceaselessly improve oneself

calligraphy by Lin Sen


The path to health

[calligraphy by] Yu Youren

The strengths of both north and south

[calligraphy by] Chen Jichang


The basis of strengthening the nation

calligraphy by Chen Ce (in the style of Zhang Qianbeis engravings)


The basis of strengthening the nation

respectfully calligraphed by Lin Zhenxiong


To ceaselessly improve oneself

[calligraphy by] Luo Wenzhuang


Liu Caichen


Portrait of the author

PREFACE BY ZHANG NAIYAN

They are without fists, without courage. Thus runs the slanderous comment in the Book of
Poetry [Poem 198]. Boxing and bravery bolster each other. The mention of fists preceding that of
courage can show the significance of boxing. Once boxing emerges, bravery follows. (The boxing
art called Taiji [grand polarity] particularly displays a pervading sense of wuji [nonpolarity
= limitlessness] by embodying all things. It is truly different from other boxing arts.)
The appearance of the term fists [or boxing] indicates that our martial arts originated at
least twenty-five hundred years ago. Looking back over the millennia, practitioners of boxing arts
are beyond counting, but it can be said that boxing theories are rather sparse. This causes people to
look upon boxing arts as very minor and not worthy to be placed alongside other forms of learning
a very depressing attitude.
Li Xianwu has made a solid study of martial arts and has made great achievements in them. But
in the art of Taiji Boxing, he has achieved an especially high level. Therefore this book he has
written is able to present the arts deeper meaning and secret tricks, explaining all and leaving
nothing out. Its genuine essence, unshared with the public for thousands of years, is suddenly
revealed. As this work truly manages to explain martial arts by way of principles, I am overflowing
with admiration, and thus I have written these words.
written by Zhang Naiyan of the National Construction Committee, Apr, 1933

AUTHORS PREFACE

When I was young, I was addicted to martial arts. At the age of seven, I was learning external styles
of boxing from a teacher, but I grew into an angry person because of this. I decided to change into a
kinder person and so I also learned Taiji Boxing from Liu Caichen. I have practiced it to this day,
never daring to cease the training. As for the health aspect, its benefits are vast, and as for

transforming ones temperament, it has caused myself in particular to develop a strong faith in this
boxing art.
As I have personally received its benefits and as I am unwilling to keep the art a secret, I decided
to take what I have learned from my teacher and from my experience and write it down into a book
to share with all who are interested. But then life interrupted with various wearying tasks. There
was unfortunately no opportunity to do any writing and I had to urge the thing into being.
In the spring of 1929, I was setting up the Two Guangs [Guangdong & Guangxi] Martial Arts
Institute in Guangzhou. In my spare time from this work, I applied my hand to writing the
material. After just a few months, I had completed about three quarters of the manuscript, but life
got in the way again, sending me rushing all over the place. By the winter of 1930, it was finished at
last, and I then wanted to publish it, but traveling around took over my time for the next few years.
Though my wish was unfulfilled, my mind remained dedicated to the idea.
In the summer of 1931, I traveled to Nanjing three times, staying longer each time. My comrades
noticed the days were piling up, and having seen my manuscript, they were pushing me to get it
published. At the same time, comrades in Guangzhou and Honk Kong were also frequently sending
me letters similarly pressing me. By February, 1933, they sent me my earlier draft so I could set
about putting the whole thing in order. A month was required for this, and then it was ready to be
published.
Our powerful neighbors are at this moment at our borders. Our national crisis becomes more
urgent by the day. For building up our physique and bringing down their ferocity, now is the time. I
hope my countrymen will encourage each other.
written by Li Xianwu in the Capital [Nanjing], Mar 30, 1933

CONTENTS

One: Origins

Two: The Meaning of the Name

Three: Advantages

Four: Fundamentals
1
Postural Principles
2
Essential Principles

Five: The Thirty-Seven Postures Their Names Explained, Their Effects, Their Applications
1
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL
2
SINGLE WHIP
3
RAISE THE HAND
4
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS
5

BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE


6
PLAY THE LUTE
7
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH
8
SEALING SHUT
9
CROSSED HANDS
10
CAPTURE THE TIGER AND SEND IT BACK TO ITS MOUNTAIN
11
DIAGONAL SINGLE WHIP
12
GUARDING PUNCH UNDER THE ELBOW
13
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY
14
DIAGONAL FLYING POSTURE
15
NEEDLING UNDER THE SEA
16
FAN THROUGH THE BACK
17
TORSO-FLUNG PUNCH
18
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS
19
RISING UP AND REACHING OUT TO THE HORSE
20
KICK TO THE LEFT & RIGHT SIDES
21
TURN AROUND, PRESSING KICK
22
PLANTING PUNCH
23
DOUBLE KICK
24
FIGHTING TIGER POSTURE
25
DOUBLE WINDS THROUGH THE EARS
26
DRAPING THE BODY, KICK
27
WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE
28
MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE
29

LOW POSTURE
30
GOLDEN ROOSTER STANDS ON ONE LEG
31
CHOPPING PALM TO THE FACE
32
CROSSED-BODY SWINGING LOTUS KICK
33
PUNCH TO THE CROTCH
34
BIG DIPPER POSTURE
35
SITTING TIGER POSTURE
36
DOUBLE-SLAP SWINGING LOTUS KICK
37
BEND THE BOW, SHOOT THE TIGER

Six: The Boxing Set Illustrated (including the sequence of postures)

Seven: Pushing Hands


1
The Eight Techniques Their Names Explained & Their Applications
2
Level-Circle Pushing Hands
3
Vertical-Circle Pushing Hands
4
Ward-Off & Push
5
Pushing Hands Method for the Four Primary Techniques (including two sequence charts)
6
Pushing Hands Method for the Four Secondary Techniques (including a sequence chart)

Eight: Commentary to the Boxing Theory


1
Taiji Boxing Treatise With Commentary
2
Taiji Boxing Classic With Commentary
3
Thirteen Dynamics Song
4
Understanding How to Practice With Commentary
5
Playing Hands Song With Commentary (note: playing hands means pushing hands)

TAIJI BOXING

ONE: ORIGINS

The genesis of Chinese martial arts cannot be examined. When the Yellow Emperor fought Chiyou,
weaponry had already been developed. Within the classical six arts, there was archery and
charioteering [the other four being rituals, music, calligraphy, and math]. Within the Book of
Poetry, there was the mention of boxing bravery. Within the Book of Rites [chapter 6], there was
mention of wrestling [to be engaged in as further training alongside archery and charioteering].
Chinese martial arts seem to have begun quite early. Later on there was Hua Tuos Five Animal
Frolics, which became the basis of postures and movements.
During the Tianjian era [502519 AD] of the reign of Emperor Wu of the Liang Dynasty, the
Buddhist monk Damo traveled south [east] to the Shaolin Temple at Mt. Song, where he faced a
wall [in meditation] for nine years until realizing the art of strengthening the body as a means to
quieting the spirit. He wrote the two classics ofSinew Changing and Marrow Washing, as well as
creating the eighteen hand techniques. [Centuries] later, the head monk Jueyuan adjusted the
postures of the eighteen techniques and added to them until there were seventy-two techniques.
He found this to be insufficient and so invited the martial artist Bai Yufeng to the temple to mix his
art into the traditional Shaolin system. Combining with the ancient boxing art and the Five Animal
Frolics of Hua Tuo, the result was more than a hundred and seventy techniques, which were
divided into the five styles of boxing of dragon, tiger, leopard, snake, and crane, and contained
within the system were the weapons of saber, sword, spear, and staff. It was called Shaolin Boxing,
sometimes referred to as external boxing.
During the Song Dynasty (Some say it was in the era of the Yuan ending and the Ming
beginning, and as this issue has yet to be verified, it will be left as an unanswered question for the
time being.), there was Zhang Sanfeng, a hermit of Mt. Wudang, who gathered the strong points of
various styles of boxing arts and fused them together to create Long Boxing. [As can mean both
long and strong points, Long Boxing in this case can also be rendered as Best-of
Boxing.] It was called Wudang Boxing, sometimes referred to as internal boxing. Examining
into the origins of Taiji Boxing, there are five major versions, described below:
1
Transmitted by Xu Xuanping

Xu Xuanping was from Xi County, Anhui. He lived as a hermit at Mt. Chengyang, where he retired
on the south-facing slope and avoided eating grains. He was seven and a half feet tall. His beard
reached his navel and his hair reached his feet. He walked like a galloping horse. He often carried
firewood to sell in the marketplace. Li Bai went to visit Xu but did not meet him, then carved a

poem [about not meeting him] onto Gazing Immortals Bridge and went home.
The Taiji Boxing that Xu taught was called Thirty-Seven, because it had thirty-seven posture
names. In this boxing art, each posture was to be trained to perfection and only then could the next
posture be practiced, and the student was not allowed to be impatient. There was no prescribed
pattern as to how the thirty-seven postures were to precede or follow each other, but once they had
all been learned, they would then naturally be linked up together in an unbroken continuity. Thus
the art was also called Long Boxing. The secret to it lies in eight terms: warding off, rolling back,
pressing, and pushing corresponding the eight cardinal directions and plucking, rending,
elbowing, and bumping corresponding the eight corner directions.

SONG OF THE EIGHT TECHNIQUES

The techniques of warding off, rolling back, pressing, and pushing are so unique
that out of ten skillful people there are ten who do not understand them.
But if you can perform them with both agility and solidity,
the qualities of sticking, connecting, adhering, and following will then be sure to manifest.
The techniques of plucking, rending, elbowing, and bumping are yet more unusual,
and if you execute them unsuccessfully, they will be but a waste of time.
But if you have obtained the qualities of sticking, adhering, connecting, and following,
you will be centered on the target and loathe to veer away.

ON MENTALLY UNDERSTANDING IN THE THIRTY-SEVEN POSTURES ART

The lower back is first to command, the throat second to command, solar plexus third to
command.
The elixir field is first to obey, fingers second to obey, palms third to obey.

ON FULLY USING THE BODY IN THE THIRTY-SEVEN POSTURES ART

First, when your emotions are stable and your mind is calm,
you will naturally be nimble and alert at every point.
Second, when energy flows through your whole body,
there is a continuousness that cannot be interrupted.
Third, when you are never affected by opponents going for your throat,
everyone will think of you in heroic terms.

THE SIXTEEN KEY POINTS

[1] Liveliness lies with your waist.


[2] Inspiration penetrates to your headtop.
[3] Spirit courses through your spine.
[4] Energy sinks to your elixir field.
[5] Movement lies with your legs.
[6] Pressing is felt at the foot.
[7] Wielding lies with your palms.
[8] Coiling extends to the fingers.
[9] Gathering is a matter of your marrow.
[10] Arriving is a matter of your spirit.
[11] Concentration depends on your ears.
[12] Breathing occurs through your nose.
[13] Breath is expressed at your mouth.
[14] Springiness lies with your knees.
[15] Simplify things by using your whole body.
[16] The issuing of your whole body reaches to every hair.

SONG OF FUNCTION

Be nimble and lively, seeking to identify the opponents energies.


Passive and active are meant to exchange with each other, so do not make the error of getting
stuck in either.
Once you have got the skill of four ounces moves a thousand pounds,
it will be determined by your expanding and contracting, and the rousing of your energy.
2
Transmitted by Mr. Yu


Yu was from Jingyang in Anhui. He learned his Taiji Boxing from Li Daozi of the Tang Dynasty,
who called it Innate Nature Boxing. Li, who was from Anhui, lived in the Wudang Mountains at the
Southern Cliffs Temple. He did not cook his food, instead snacking on wheat bran several times a
day, and people called him master. Yu taught the art to Yu Qinghui and Yu Yicheng, who in turn
taught it to Yu Lianzhou and Yu Daiyan. His boxing postures were the same as in the Thirty-Seven
art. He also passed down a piece of verse, presented below:

Be formless and shapeless.


Let your whole body be full of emptiness.
Respond to things naturally.
Be like chimes hung in the westerns mountains [whose sound resonates far].
Have the roar of a tiger and the cry of an ape.
The water is still, but the stream is clear.
Divert the river and turn back the sea.
Fulfill your nature and accept your destiny.
3
Transmitted by Cheng Lingxi

Cheng Lingxi, called Yuandi, was from Xi County, Anhui. During the Houjing Rebellion [548552],
Xi County was protected entirely due to him. He taught his boxing art to Han Gongyue. It was later
passed down to Cheng Bi, was an expert in the theory of the Book of Changes. He took Taiji Boxing
and changed it into the Small Highest Heaven hand techniques, which had fourteen postures in
total. His art includes a list of Five Study Reminders and the Song of Four Natures Returning to
One.

FIVE STUDY REMINDERS [These five terms are originally from the Zhong Yong chapter 31 of
the Book of Rites.]

[1] Learn abundantly.


[2] Inquire meticulously.
[3] Ponder wholeheartedly.
[4] Discriminate clearly.
[5] Practice sincerely.

SONG OF THE FOUR NATURES RETURNING TO ONE

No one understands his own nature,


so who understands human nature?
The nature of things is similar to human nature,
and the nature of the universe is similar in turn to that nature.
I am a part of the whole though I live in but a part,
for a universe with nothing in it would never take shape.
If I can first seek to understand my own nature,
the universe will teach me when I am alone and I will be nudged toward enlightenment.
4
Transmitted by Yin Liheng

The Taiji Boxing art taught by Yin was called the Acquired Nature Method, and he taught it to Hu
Jingzi of Yangzhou. Hu Jingzi taught it to Song Zhongshu of Anzhou. His posture count amounted
to seventeen. Although its posture names were different, its method of use was the same as before.
5
Transmitted by Zhang Sanfeng

Zhang Sanfeng [three abundances], also called Sanfeng [three peaks] was an elixirist of Mt.
Wudang. Making a great achievement in Taiji Boxing, he was the founder of the Wudang School.
He observed the natural principles of the universe and adopted the strong points of various styles
of boxing arts, explaining actions through analogies of passive and active, hardness and softness,
movement and stillness, advance and retreat. It was called Wudang Boxing, sometimes referred to
as internal boxing.
It was later passed down to Wang Zong of Shaanxi, who was then the most famous exponent of
the art. It was then passed down to Chen Zhoutong of Wen County. During the reign of the Ming
emperor Jiajing [15211566], there was Zhang Songxi, who obtained the authentic transmission
and called the art the Taiji Thirteen Dynamics. Afterward the art split into two branches [northern
and southern], Zhangs transmission being the southern branch. He taught Ye Jinquan of Siming.
Ye Jinquan then taught Zhou Yunshan, Chen Zhenshi, Sun Jicha, Wu Kunshan, Dan Sinan, and
others. Zhou Yunshan taught Lu Shaoqi. Chen Zhenshi taught Dong Fuyu and Xia Zhixi. Sun Jicha
taught Chai Yuanming, Yao Shimen, the monk Er, and the monk Wei. Wu Kunshan taught Xu
Daiyue and Li Tianmu. Li Tianmu taught Yu Zhongbo, Chen Maohong, and others.
Dan Sinan taught Wang Zhengnan. Wang Zhengnan alone obtained the authentic transmission
and was an expert in the art of striking acupoints. The secret to his skill lied in five terms: focused,
sticky, potent, precise, efficient. Several decades after Wang, the most famous exponents became
those such as Gan Fengchi.
As for the northern branch, there have been a great many famous exponents, the most
noteworthy of which is Wang Zongyue of Shanxi during the early Qing Dynasty, who wrote the
Taiji Boxing Classic, the Thirteen Dynamics Song, Understanding How to Practice, and the Playing
Hands Song. He taught Jiang Fa of Henan. Jiang Fa taught Chen Changxing of Chen Family Village
in Biyang County. Chens two sons, the elder son named Gengxin, the younger named Jixin, were
both able to follow in their fathers footsteps and taught a great many people.
Once upon a time, Yang Fukui, called Luchan, of Yongnian County, Hebei, heard of Chens fame,
and so he, together with a friend from his hometown, Li Bokui, went to learn from the master.
Yang studied diligently and fully obtained the secret. He passed the art to two of his sons. The
eldest son, named Qi, died young and so was not taught. The second son, named Yu, called
Banhou, and the third named Jian, called Jianhou, were both taught by their father. Yang Banhou
taught Wan Chun, Wu Quanyou, Ling Shan, and others. Yang Jianhou taught his sons Zhaoxiang
and Zhaoqing. Zhaoxiang, called Mengxiang [and Shaohou], taught Tian Zhaolin, You Zhixue, and
others. Zhaoqing, called Chengfu, taught Wu Huichuan, Chen Weiming, and others.
Wu Quanyou taught his son Jianquan as well as Wang Maozhai, Liu Fengshan, Guo Songting, Qi
Gechen, and others. Liu Fengshan, called Caichen, taught his son Wenhai, as well as Bai Yongfu, Li
Yuanbi, Jun Ruchuan, Liang Hanxun, Du Yibin, Wang Shaoceng, the author, and others. (Listed
here are only students that Liu has instructed personally. There are many more than I know of,
thus inevitably there are names that have been left out.)

LINEAGE CHART


Zhang Sanfeng > Wang Zong (This transmission cannot be verified.) > Chen Zhoutong

Chen Zhoutong (southern branch) (This transmission cannot be verified.) > Zhang Songxi, Ye
Jinquan

Ye Jinquan > Zhou Yunshan, Chen Zhenshi, Sun Jicha, Wu Kushan, Dan Sinan

Zhou Yunshan > Lu Shaoqi

Chen Zhenshi > Dong Fuyu, Xia Zhixi

Sun Jicha > Chai Yuanming, Yao Shimen, the monk Er, the monk Wei

Wu Kunshan > Li Tianmu, Xu Daiyue

Li Tianmu > Yu Zhongbo, Chen Maohong

Dan Sinan > Wang Zhengnan > Gan Fengchi (This transmission cannot be verified.)

Chen Zhoutong (northern branch) (This transmission cannot be verified.) > Wang Zongyue >
Jiang Fa > Chen Changxing

Chen Changxing > Chen Gengxin, Chen Jixin, Yang Luchan

Yang Luchan > Yang Banhou, Yang Jianhou

Yang Banhou > Wan Chun, Wu Quanyou, Ling Shan

Wu Quanyou > Wu Jianquan, Wang Maozhai, Liu Fengshan, Guo Songting, Qi Gechen

Liu Fengshan > Liu Wenhai, Bai Yongfu, Li Yuanbi, Yin Ruchuan, Liang Hanxun, Du Yibin, Wang
Shaoceng, and the author

Yang Jianhou > Yang Mengxiang, Yang Chengfu

Yang Mengxiang > Tian Zhaolin, You Zhixue

Yang Chengfu > Wu Huichuan, Chen Weiming

TWO: THE MEANING OF THE NAME

The movements in Taiji Boxing seem at first glance to have no strength, and its postures appear
inferior to the manner of vim and vigor [angry dragon and lively tiger] seen in other kinds of

boxing arts. But this is actually not the case. It has to be understood that Taiji Boxings use of
power is internal and that its postures move in accordance with the paths of that power. It
conforms to natural principles. Its movements are rounded and lively, like a limitless circle. That is
why every posture contains a quality of roundness, its shape like a taiji circle, it moments of
transformation like the taiji itself [i.e. the grand polarity harmoniously alternating the polarities
of passive and active], hence the name Taiji Boxing. As for its function, it can be found in the
analogies of passive and active, hardness and softness, movement and stillness, advance and
retreat. It is profound and unique. Words are inadequate to describe it.

THREE: ADVANTAGES

Taiji Boxing has a great many advantages. Here I describe the major ones:
1
Turning Weakness into Strength [text copied from Chen Weimings 1929 Q&A book, question 118]

For those who have weak bodies or are suffering from chronic illness, after training in Taiji Boxing,
chronic complaints will leave the body, ones spirit will be invigorated, and color will be returned to
ones face. Whether the problem is pulmonary tuberculosis with spitting up of blood, gastric
disease with inability to eat or drink, or nocturnal emissions, hemorrhoids, headaches, dizziness,
numbness of the extremities, or just plain old gas pain, all sorts of lingering illnesses, all will
quickly recover from them after practicing Taiji Boxing.
2
Economical in Terms of Time

Beginning practitioners of Taiji Boxing perform the postures relatively quickly, taking about ten
minutes to go through the set once. Later on, with more practice comes more refinement and the
performance gradually slows down until going through the set can take thirty or forty minutes.
Beginners will go through the set two or three times each day, then once they have become skillful,
they will go through it once or twice. The small amount of time that is required allows most
working people to find the time to practice.
3
Economical in Terms of Money

To practice Taiji Boxing, it is not necessary to purchase special equipment or special clothing,
unlike in money-draining European or American forms of exercise.
4
Economical in Terms of Space

It is not necessary to have specially prepared grounds, or a special hall or courtyard. It can be
practiced anywhere.
5
Uniform Development

In modern sports circles, the latest maxim is: body and mind united into one. This means
striving for equal development of both body and mind. Our nations ancient description of
[Mengzi, chapter 7a:] maintaining ones mind and nurturing ones nature, or Mengzis mention
of [chapter 2a] nurturing my noble energy, as well as modern meditation methods, all can be
considered methods of mental cultivation. Ordinary forms of exercise, outdoor games, and our own
nations other methods of physical fitness can all be considered merely ways of building up the
body. Nothing is able to cultivate inside and out so equally as Taiji Boxing.
The moving of energy and making of postures in Taiji Boxing are both enacted by mental
intention. Intention commands the movement of muscles. Wherever intention goes, both energy
and power naturally follow along, from inside to out. It is like a good writer his hands takes down
what his mind dictates. Or a good calligrapher his intention precedes his brush. Not only does it
exercise the voluntary muscles externally, but also the involuntary muscles internally, such as
those involved in the function of the kidneys or other organs, which will also be affected by such
exercise, and additionally the circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, nervous
system, everything.
6
Cultivating the Mind

This boxing art uses the actions of the mind to exercise the muscles, developing a persons intuition
and innate abilities. Furthermore, when two people are pushing hands, they are training the
muscles, but are also enhancing perception and sensitivity. Thus beyond tempering the muscles,
the art can also train the mind. It can be considered an exercise for the consciousness, which no
mechanical actions can compare to.
7
Boosting Intelligence

Physical education certainly strengthens the body, but it is necessary to also train ones ethics and
intellect. Otherwise you will only cultivate a rough and rude personality and be of no benefit to
society. The way Taiji Boxing uses energy and gets into postures conforms to the studies of
geometry, mechanics, psychology, and hygiene, it is of scientific value. Through these kinds of
scientific study, all aspects of reasoning will be enhanced. Intelligence will naturally increase and
understanding will daily sharpen.
8
Molding the Temperament

Taiji Boxing uses the softness of stillness as the foundation, involving hardness of movement only
in the function. Practitioners have a harmonious state of mind rather than a counterproductive
habit of impetuousness. Softness will allow you to stretch out your body. Hardness will enable you

to defend yourself. By strengthening your spirit, you will naturally commit no evil or immoral acts.
There is no higher form of cultivation. Your character will be enhanced and your moral sense will
be heightened. There is hardly anything better than this boxing art.
9
Suitable for All Ages

This boxing art is a mild form of exercise. Its movements are simple, and so it is an appropriate
practice for children. And yet its concepts are profound, conforming to scientific principles, and so
the other side of the practice is that it is fitting for very patient people who seeking into mysteries.
You can practice it your whole life, but you will never feel you have reached the end.
10
Appropriate for Practical Application

As for Taiji Boxings thirty-seven postures, although each posture has its own function, it does not
rely on the techniques to defeat an opponent, the priority is to control the opponents energy. Use
softness to overcome hardness, stillness to overcome movement, a small force to overcome a large
force, slowness to overcome swiftness. These concepts all conform to scientific principles.
I control the opponents leverage so he is unable to extend. I manipulate his balance so his
center of gravity is outside his body and he is rendered unable to maintain his position. This is
called responding to the opponents power and is the act of using softness to overcome hardness.
Even if his power is huge, according to the principles of components of force and resultant of
forces in the science of mechanics, I can transform the situation so that he is under my control.
Examining geometry and kinetics, every part of a wheel, however large or small, turns in unison
and moves with the same amount of power, thus its speed is in proportion to the time it takes to
make a circuit around the axle. Taiji Boxings use of stillness to overcome movement is exactly this
principle.

FOUR: FUNDAMENTALS

In practicing the Taiji boxing art, if you do not obtain the correct method, then results will not
materialize and you will have been wasting your time. If one has practiced hard for ten years but is
unable to identify energies, he has not studied the boxing principles, not sought guidance from
teachers or colleagues, or taken the wrong path. The result is a betrayal of the authentic principles
of this boxing art. Briefly described are the main points to pay attention to while practicing. If you
can abide by these principles, and work at them diligently and consistently, effects will quickly
manifest.
1
POSTURAL PRINCIPLES

i. Head

Your head is the most important part. It should be upright, neither leaning nor inclining. But do
not use effort to make it so, let it be natural, leading to an intention of emptiness and nimbleness.
(When your whole body is nimble, spirit courses through to your headtop.) Your eyes should not
stare in anger. Your brow should not furrow. Your mouth should be closed (using your nose to
breathe), but avoid grinding your teeth. Your tongue should be touching your upper palate, thus
generating saliva and thereby keeping you from being thirsty for a longer period.

ii. Shoulders

Your shoulder must loosen, causing them to sink downward. Thus energy will not rise up and will
return to your elixir field. If your shoulders lift, energy will rise up, causing to become tense. You
will furthermore be incapable of being nimble in such a state.

iii. Elbows

The shoulders and elbows are truly interrelated. If your shoulders loosen, your elbows will hang
down. If your elbows rise, your shoulders will lift up. Therefore your elbows should hang down to
keep from leading your shoulders astray. Furthermore, while you are applying techniques, it will
then not be easy for an opponent to make a surprise attack to your ribs.

iv. Hands

When practicing the Taiji boxing art, you will use your palms often, seldom making fists (as it
contains only five punching techniques). When you extend your hands, by all means avoid being
stiff or tense. Your fingers should have an intention of extending. Your palms should have an
intention of protruding. When you make a fist, you must use effort to do so, you should instead
have an intention of looseness and softness. You will thereby wield energy naturally and you will
have a manner entirely free of stress.

v. Chest

The chest is slightly hollowed inward, or contained, causing energy sink to your elixir field. You
will consequently feel your chest is unusually relaxed, your heels will not easily float up, and your
whole body will be nimble, and you will be able to display a natural bearing. If your chest is
sticking out, energy will fill up within it, and thus you will counterproductively become top-heavy,
your whole body will be disadvantaged by the inability to generate power, and you will be
abnormally rigid, greatly violating the key Taiji concept of softness.

vi. Back

The back slightly sticks outward, plucked up, corresponding to the contained chest. With your
chest hollowed, your back will of course by sticking out. With your back sticking out, your chest
will naturally not be sticking out. With an intention of plucking up your back, your vertebrae will
be piled one on top of another, energy will naturally stick to your back, and thus you will be able to
issue power from your spine.

vii. Waist

In Taiji Boxing, the waist and the head are the most important parts, the waist being more central.
With every action, every movement, it is all that is required to control your whole body, like a
general commanding an army, as it says in the Treatise: Directing from your waist. Therefore if
you want your whole body to be nimble and your postures to be correct, you must loosen your
waist. If you are able to loosen your waist, energy will naturally sink down, your legs will have
power, your lower body will be stable, your limbs will move nimbly, and you will clearly distinguish
between emptiness and fullness. It says in the Thirteen Dynamics Song: The command comes
from your lower back. If your waist uses effort, then your whole body will become stiff and your
movement will be slowed. It says in the Treatise: The problem must be in your waist and legs, so
look for it there. You should give attention to this point.

viii. Abdomen

The abdomen and chest are interrelated. From a physiological perspective, while the chest is
slightly hollowed inward, the chest wall is press inward, causing the diaphragm to be pressed
downward. Breathing abdominally at the same time (being the basis for the expanding and
contracting of the postures) enables energy to slowly sink down. Your abdomen becomes sturdy
and springy, and your center of balance stabilizes. It says in the Classic: Energy sinks to your elixir
field. This saying points to this idea.

ix. Hips

Sticking out your buttocks is a mistake. But it is the easiest mistake for students to make. When
you stick your buttocks out, your dorsolumbar region gets affected, causing it to become stiff,
violating the concept of nimbleness. Therefore you must tuck in your buttocks. Your dorsolumbar
region will then be relaxed, your bearing will be natural, and the postures will be correct. You have
to give particular attention to this point.

x. Legs

The movements of your legs and feet must go along with the bending and extending of the boxing
postures through actions of advancing and retreating, having a manner of lifting and lowering, up
and down. While alternating between empty and full, your movements should have nimbleness
and clarity, causing your legs and feet to obtain an equalized harmony from which they are
strengthened. It says in the Treatise: Starting from your foot, issue through your leg. The
problem must be in your waist and legs, so look for it there. From these sayings can be understood
the importance of the legs.

The ten points above are the most important postural principles for the various parts of the body
while practicing Taiji Boxing. The waist is in the middle. Upward from the waist are the head,
shoulders, elbows, chest, and back six parts. Downward from the waist are the abdomen,
buttocks, and legs three parts. Each part has its proper posture, and they have all been explained
one by one. Within these ten, the errors of hanging the head, sticking out the chest, stiffening the
waist, and the sticking out the buttocks are the easiest errors for beginners to make, and so they
should be given extra attention.
2
ESSENTIAL PRINCIPLES

i. The mind is calm and focused.

Taiji is a boxing art that seeks stillness within movement. It is different from external boxing arts,
which focus only on movement. Therefore when performing the postures, although the whole body
and every part is moving without pause, ones mentality is instead receiving the effect of becoming
tranquil. When beginners who do not ingrain this principle practice, the mind is not concentrated
and thoughts are disorderly. Consequently, the postures are in error, the movements are stagnant,
and they are entirely unable to get results, the equivalent of not practicing at all. Thus when
practicing this boxing art, you must focus only on the exercise and not be distracted. You will then
automatically come to feel that your body is nimble and the movement is natural, and that your
mind is tranquil and your spirit is cheerful. Very skillful practitioners truly have an aloof air about
them.

ii. The movements are soft and slow.

External boxing arts give priority to being hard and fast. As a result, hardness meets with
hardness and speed encounters speed, resistant forces cancel each other out, and the one with the

greatest strength wins. Or they will both lose, coming away with injuries. But for one who practices
this boxing art, even if he has hard muscles, great strength, and a fearsome posture, his size
becomes irrelevant next to his high level of sensitivity. Taiji Boxing focuses on neutralizing
opponents. It does not value strength or seek to have speed. (As it says in the Classic: Examine the
phrase (from the Playing Hands Song) four ounces moves a thousand pounds, which is clearly not
a victory obtained through strength. Or consider the sight of an old man repelling a group, which
could not come from an aggressive speed. From this, we can know that this boxing art does not
value hardness and hurrying.)
One acts based on the opponents movements rather than forcing ones own agenda. I find out
the direction and extent of an opponents power, then correspondingly turn in that direction,
causing his power to lose all effect. (As it says in the Classic: He is hard while I am soft this is
yielding.) I then adhere to his energy. He is thus drawn in by my absorption and loses his balance.
However, you must be aware and sensitive, moving nimbly. Then you will be able to know the
direction of an opponents power and deal with it expertly. If you wish to be aware, sensitive, and
nimble, you must practice the set with softness and mildness in your movements. (It says in How
to Practice: Extreme softness begets extreme hardness. And: Move energy as if drawing silk.
These sayings describe the two terms soft and slow.) Moreover, with movements that are soft
and slow, your breathing will be deep and long, your energy will not float up, and your pulse will
not become agitated. By gently moving your whole body, the benefits toward your health will be
enormous.

iii. The postures are performed evenly.

When performing the postures, once the mind is concentrated rather than distracted, and the
movements are soft and slow rather than urgent, then the evenness of the postures becomes the
priority. In Taiji Boxing, every posture contains a quality of roundness, and thus you will turn
nimbly and move with a continuous energy. The most important thing to avoid is to seem to be
stopping and starting, to be suddenly speeding up or suddenly slowing down. Therefore the
postures must be performed evenly, with the same speed and power in each posture. Each posture
is to continue right into the following posture, and so they must be linked into a single flow. Do not
allow any stagnancy between them.
This is not only the case for the external postures, but also the internal intention has to be
continuous through the whole thing. Thus your breath also has to be even, and this will keep you
panting after doing the exercise. Furthermore, once performing the postures evenly becomes your
ordinary habit, it will have an effect on practical application. You will automatically be giving an
opponent no gaps to work with. This quality of evenness in Taiji Boxing needs to be given repeated
attention. It is a point that students should thoughtfully contemplate and clearly discern.

iv. Do not use awkward effort.

Before we train in this boxing art, our bodies express a kind of strength which is but awkward
effort. Those at the beginning of the training stop and start in their movement, and are very rigid.

This is because awkward effort has not been dispelled. Therefore when practicing, you must loosen
your whole body, and not use the slightest bit of effort, only use intention. Wherever your intention
goes, energy goes there too, and so energy and blood are unimpeded, your whole body is nimble,
and your movement is natural.

v. Clearly distinguish between emptiness and fullness.

When either practicing the set or dealing with an opponent, you must in both cases clearly
distinguish between emptiness and fullness. It says in the Treatise: Empty and full must be
distinguished clearly. In each part there is a part that is empty and a part that is full. Everywhere it
is always like this, an emptiness and a fullness. If you can understand that in Taiji Boxing there is
everywhere an emptiness/fullness, your footwork will be clean and clear. When the weight of your
body sits on your right leg, your right leg is full and your left leg is empty. Conversely, when the
weight is on your left leg, your left leg is full and your right leg is empty.
If I am able to distinguish clearly between emptiness and fullness, then my movements will be
nimble and I will be able to respond to the opponents changes by changing in order to deal with
them. When he is full, I become empty. When he is empty, I become full. Emptiness can change to
fullness, and fullness can suddenly switch back to emptiness. This causes the opponent to be
unable to figure out what is going on and his attempts constantly land on nothing. If it is not done
in this way, he and I would be clashing with each other, the condition of double pressure. If I
were to lose my balance, my advancing or retreating would be heavy and sluggish. Unable to steady
myself, I would thus be under the opponents control.

vi. The upper body and lower coordinate with each other.

When practicing this boxing art, the most important thing to avoid is moving the hands without
moving your waist and legs. If your waist and legs are not moving, the movement of your hands
movement will be stiff. Your whole body will not be able to be nimble, and your actions will result
in disorder. Therefore with each movement of your hands, there is to be corresponding movement
in your waist, legs, and feet at the same time. There is connection through each section of the body,
your gaze following along with the turning motions, and thereby the movements can be a complete
continuity. It says in the Treatise: Starting from your foot, issue through your leg, directing it at
your waist, and expressing it at your fingers. From foot through leg through waist, it must be a fully
continuous process. It says in How to Practice: If one part moves, every part moves, and if one
part is still, every part is still. These sayings point to this idea.

vii. Inside and outside are joined with each other.

The external postures in Taiji Boxing should indeed be performed correctly, but the function of the

intention is especially important. Therefore inside (intention) and outside (posture) should operate
in unison. With the opening and closing of each posture, the intention must at the same time be
opening and closing. In other words, inhaling and exhaling must be in unison with the rhythm of
the movement. Once you get inside and outside to combine into one, then it will be perfect.

viii. Stick, connect, adhere, and follow.

The four terms sticking, connecting, adhering, and following are key principles in pushing hands.
Sticking means to lift upward. Connecting means to be connected and not disconnect. Adhering
means to adhere to and not separate from. Following means to pursue without giving up. If you
learn these four things well, then no matter how great an opponents strength, he will not be able to
make use of any of it. His balance will be off, no control over where his chest goes. When he looks
upward at me, he will feel I am even higher than he thought. When he looks downward at me, he
will feel I am even lower than he thought. When he advances with an attack, he will feel I am even
farther away, unable to reach me. When he retreats to evade me, he will feel I am even closer to
him, unable to escape. (But in the beginning, you will not be able to discuss these things. Your
practice will have to be based in the eight techniques warding off, rolling back, pressing, pushing,
plucking, rending, elbowing, and bumping practicing them more and more, until you are able to
perceive and know an opponents energies.)
If he uses hardness, I use softness. I suddenly empty and suddenly fill. I move according to his
movement. If he moves quickly, I move quickly. If he moves slowly, I move slowly. If he forcefully
resists me, I then lift upward. If he crowds close to me, I then connect to him and do no disconnect.
If he wants to disconnect, I then adhere to him and will not separate. If he wants to escape, I then
pursue him relentlessly. I render him incapable of using any power, everything he tries landing on
nothing. Without using the slightest bit of awkwardness, I slightly tug, and he naturally stumbles
away. As it says in the Playing Hands Song: I will tug with four ounces of force to move his of a
thousand pounds.

ix. Neither come away nor crash in.

To not come away means to not separate. To not crash in means to not resist. These are also keys
principles in pushing hands. Whenever an opponent attacks, regardless of whatever posture he
uses or the size of his power, I will be sure not to resist. Instead I should use methods of yielding to
neutralize it. Furthermore, I will make him unable to separate from me, and to do this I must
adhere to his energy. Thus he will lose all of his efficiency and my victory can be assured. Pushing
hands is the art of training perception. If there is any resistance or disconnection, perception will
not be getting trained, for it will be difficult to attain a high level of sensitivity, and thus is a serious
error in pushing hands. (It says in the Classic: A feather cannot be added and a fly cannot land.
This describes a very high degree of awareness.)


x. Let go of yourself and follow along with the opponent.

Taiji Boxings method of dealing with opponents is to use stillness to overcome use movement, to
use leisure to overcome his labor. It is not about taking the initiative, instead always following
along with what he is doing. This is the opposite of external styles of boxing arts. Observe which
direction the opponents attack is going and simply following along in that direction, using the
principle of neither coming away nor crashing in. Dealing with him in this way causes his attack
to land on nothing and he stumbles away. If you instead decide to act on your own, moving without
understanding how to follow along with the opponents movement, you will only build up
resistance. Thus it is said that if you are unable to let go of yourself and follow along with the
opponent, you will be discarding what you have at hand to work with in favor of what you do
not.

Of these ten essential principles, the first three must not be lacked while practicing the solo set, the
second four should be abided by both while practicing the solo set and practicing pushing hands,
and the last three are specifically for use during pushing hands.

FIVE: THE THIRTY-SEVEN POSTURES THEIR NAMES EXPLAINED, THEIR EFFECTS,


THEIR APPLICATIONS
1
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL

Explanation of the name:


This posture contains the techniques of ward-off, rollback, press, and push. The idea is that your
hand is holding a sparrow by the tail and following its movement. Imagining the opponents arm is
a sparrows tail, catch it to keep its power from advancing, then take advantage of the opportunity
to go forward with a cutting energy to throw him away.

Effects:
This is the most important posture in Taiji Boxing. It exercises the head, neck, shoulders, elbows,
chest, waist, abdomen, and legs. It harmonizes and increases blood circulation. It can heal
dizziness, back pain, stomachache, constipation, stiff joints, and reduce lung disease.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack, so I use both hands to go forward with a ward-off,
neutralizing his force. If he wishes to escape, I then perform a rollback, driven by my waist,
bringing his hand downward. If he wants to pull back his hand, I then go along with his energy by
pressing outward or pushing forward. However, the opponents attacks will not have a definite
pattern, so I have to respond according to the situation. I observe his actions and am thus able to
deal with them.

2
SINGLE WHIP

Explanation of the name:


Single means using a one hand to strike an opponent. Whip means it is like you are hitting him
with a whip.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders, back, and limbs. It can cure stiffness in the shoulders and
back, as well as numbness in the hands and feet.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack me, so I use my right hand to stick to his arm, going along
with his advancing force to lead it farther forward, causing him to shift his weight, then take
advantage of the opportunity to use my left hand to strike directly to his chest, using either a
cutting energy or a pushing energy.
3
RAISE THE HAND

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, a hand is going upward in the manner of lifting a heavy object, hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders, back, wrists, elbows, waist, and knees, and increases
flexibility of the joints.

Application:
When an opponent uses his right fist to attack directly to my face, I use my left hand to push down
on his wrist and lift my right hand up from below to strike to his chin or nose.
4
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, your arms extend diagonally in the manner of a birds wings. Your feet stand
together like a crane standing one-legged. Your hands are like a crane swatting its wings, hence the
name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the chest, back, shoulders, arms, and waist, and develops ability in
expanding and contracting.

Application:
An opponent to my left side uses a fist to attack me, so I twist my body and use both palms to stick
to his arm, then guide the force of his attack to the right, causing him to lean forward, and then
push toward his body with both palms, causing him to stumble away.

5
BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE

Explanation of the name:


Brushing the knee means your hand is brushing downward past your knee. A crossed stance is
the name of stepping method in boxing arts. When a boxing arts practitioner extends his right
hand while advancing with his right foot, or extends his left hand while advancing with left foot,
that is called a straight stance. But when it is the reverse, and the right hand is extending while
the left foot is advanced, or the left hand is extended while the right foot is advanced, that is called
a crossed stance.

Effects:
This posture exercises the waist, spine, shoulders, arms, knees, and legs, and can cure weak
kidneys.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack my waist, so I use my left hand to brush it aside and use
my right palm to strike to his chest. If he uses his left fist to attack me, I use my right hand to brush
it aside and use my left palm to strike to his chest. The strike has a pushing energy.
6
PLAY THE LUTE

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, your hands, one forward and one back, are in a shape of holding a lute, the fingers
of both hands as though pressing the strings, hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the arms and the waist.

Application:
1. An opponent uses his right fist to attack, so I use my right palm to stick to his wrist and use my
left palm to prop up his elbow, performing a criss-crossing action with both palms, thereby
breaking his arm.
2. If an opponent grabs my right wrist, I withdraw my right palm toward my chest, neutralizing his
force and causing him to shift his weight, then use my left fingers to poke into his armpit, thereby
cutting off the power in his arm.
7
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH

Explanation of the name:


PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH means that you parry an opponents hand, then block to obstruct the
power of his forward attack, and then use a fist to strike him. This is one of the five punching
techniques in Taiji Boxing.


Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders, back, waist, abdomen, hips, arms, and legs. Its movement of
seemingly rotating a ball develop muscle. It can also treat kidney issues, stomach issues, and
constipation.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to strike to my chest, so I use my right palm to push down on his
wrist. If he again attacks, using his left fist, I then use my left palm to parry it aside. If he wishes to
escape, I then obstruct him and take advantage of the opportunity by using my right fist to strike to
his chest or belly.
8
SEALING SHUT

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, seal yourself off by blocking the opponents hands. If an opponent advances with
an attack, use both hands to draw it in and spread it away, then push toward his body, thereby
sealing shut.

Effects:
This posture works the chest, elbows, waist, and legs. It can heal illnesses of the lungs and kidneys,
as well as numbness of the hands and feet.

Application:
If when I use my right fist to strike the opponent, he uses his left hand to push my fist or elbow
aside, I then withdraw my right fist toward my chest, changing it to a palm, while sending my left
hand from below to block his wrist, and once I have cleared a space for my right palm, I push on
his elbow, then add my left palm so both palms are pushing together toward his chest.
9
CROSSED HANDS

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, your wrists cross each other in front of your chest to make an X shape, hence the
name.

Effects:
This posture works the arms, knees, and legs, causing the legs to become both more solid and more
springy.

Application:
Both of my hands are sticking to both of the opponents hands. If he wishes to escape, I take
advantage of the situation by leading him forward, causing him to lean forward, then I spread my
hands apart to the sides, causing him to lose his balance. I then place my hands in front of my
chest, crossing to make an X shape, to prevent him from making a countering strike.

10
CAPTURE THE TIGER AND SEND IT BACK TO ITS MOUNTAIN

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, the opponent is in the role of the tiger. Once you wrap around him, he will wish
to escape, so take advantage of that moment to go forward and throw him.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders, back, waist, and legs.

Application:
An opponent uses his left fist to attack from behind and to the right, so I turn around using my
right hand to brush aside his arm, then use my left hand to strike to his face. If he wishes to escape,
I advance with my body, extending my right arm to wrap around him, then take advantage of the
opportunity to strike him.
11
DIAGONAL SINGLE WHIP

Explanation of the name:


This posture is the same as SINGLE WHIP, except the direction should be to a diagonal, hence the
name.

Effects:
Same as in SINGLE WHIP.

Application:
Same as in SINGLE WHIP.
12
GUARDING PUNCH UNDER THE ELBOW

Explanation of the name:


Your right hand is placed below your left elbow, making the punch, while guarding means
defending against an opponents attack, hence the name. This is one of the five punching
techniques in Taiji Boxing.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, and waist, and increases flexibility of the
joints.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to strike to my left shoulder, so I use my left hand so block aside his
fist and use my right fist to strike to his chest. If he sends his left hand to block this, I withdraw my
right fist below my elbow, then use my left fist to strike to his chin. If he uses his right hand to
block again, I then take advantage of my right fists position to strike straight to his chest, and he
will have no means of escaping it.

13
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, employ a monkeys nimble liveliness and it personality of delighting in slapping
someone. Use a hand to draw the opponent in, then once he attacks forward, step back, leading
him in with your hand, and use your other palm to press down on his headtop.

Effects:
This posture exercises the waist, spine, shoulders, arms, knees, and legs, and can cure weak
kidneys.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to strike to my chest, so I use my left hand to brush it aside and use
my right palm to strike to his face. Or if he uses his left fist to strike to my chest, I use my right
hand to brush it aside, and use my left palm to strike to his face.
14
DIAGONAL FLYING POSTURE

Explanation of the name:


This posture is like a bird diagonally opening its wings to fly, hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the waist, legs, and arms, and can cure kidney disease.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to suddenly strike to my left side, so I use my right hand to pluck his
right wrist and take advantage of the opportunity to send my left hand forward to attack his ribs or
face.
15
NEEDLING UNDER THE SEA

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, your hand has an intent of poking toward Under the Sea, the name of an
acupoint on the human body.

Effects:
This posture trains the strength of the spine.

Application:
An opponent used his right fist to strike me, so I sent my left outward to brush it aside and used my
right palm to strike to his chest. If at that moment he uses his left hand to grab my right wrist, I
slightly withdraw my right palm to the rear, then extend straight downward, causing his strength
to be dispelled.

16
FAN THROUGH THE BACK

Explanation of the name:


Imagine that your spine is like the hinge of a fan and your arms are like the cloth of the fan.
Making a posture of the fan opening, send power from your spine through your arms, hence the
name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the spine, causing power from the spine to reach to the arms and legs.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack me, so I use my right hand to slyly lift his right wrist,
dispelling his force, then use my left palm to strike to his ribs or chest.
17
TORSO-FLUNG PUNCH

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, send your body to the rear, turning at the waist, your right palm becoming a fist
and flinging out, hence the name. This is one of the five punching techniques in Taiji Boxing.

Effects:
This posture exercises the waist, legs, elbows, and wrists, developing wrist strength.

Application:
An opponent attacks me from behind, so I turn around using my right first to fling out a strike to
his forearm and use my left palm to strike to his face. If he wishes to escape, then I use my right fist
to strike to his chest.
18
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, your hands move to the left and right, coming and going ceaselessly, like the
swirling of clouds, hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the waist, back, arms, and legs. It can cure numbness in the hands and feet,
as well as lower back pain.

Application:
An opponent on my right side uses a fist to strike me, so I use my right hand to roll him back,
dispelling his force, then take advantage of the situation by issuing energy to attack him. Or if he
attacks me straight ahead, I use my right hand to dispel his force and use my left hand to strike to
his belly. If an opponent on my left side uses a fist to strike me, I use my left hand to roll him back,

dispelling his force, then take advantage of the situation by issuing energy to attack him. Or if he
attacks me straight ahead, I use my left hand to dispel his force and use my right hand to strike to
his belly. In this technique, the hands move back and forth like the swirling of clouds, entirely
without any stagnant pausing. Therefore when the opponent attacks, he gets thrown out.
19
RISING UP AND REACHING OUT TO THE HORSE

Explanation of the name:


Withdrawing a step, your body rises up as you reach out forward in the manner of extending your
body forward to mount a horse, hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the waist, hips, knees, and legs, and can treat kidney issues.

Application:
An opponent uses a fist to strike me, so I use my left hand to connect to his wrist, then use my right
palm to strike to his neck or face.
20
KICK TO THE LEFT & RIGHT SIDES

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, kick with each foot to its respective side.

Effects:
This posture exercises the legs and develops muscles.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack, I use both hands to coil around his wrist, then use my left
hand to do a carrying strike to his arm. Catching him off-guard, I then lift my left foot to kick to his
ribs. Or if he uses his left fist to attack, I use both hands to coil around his wrist, then use my right
hand to do a carrying strike to his arm, Catching him off-guard, I then lift my right foot to kick to
his ribs.
21
TURN AROUND, PRESSING KICK

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, turn around to the rear, then with the toes lifted, press forward using your heel,
hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the legs and heels.

Application:
An opponent behind me attacks my back, so I turn around to prevent it, taking advantage of the
opportunity to lift my foot and do a pressing kick to his chest or belly, my hands spreading apart to
keep him from brushing my leg away.

22
PLANTING PUNCH

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, with your right hand a fist and your left hand a palm, strike down from above as if
to plant something, hence the name. This is one of the five punching techniques in Taiji Boxing.

Effects:
This posture trains the strength of the spine.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to strike to my chest, so I send my left hand outward to brush it
aside while using my right fist to strike to his belly.
23
DOUBLE KICK

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, your feet kick in succession, left then right.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders, arms, hips, and legs, and can cure numbness in the hands
and feet.

Application:
An opponent uses his left fist to attack, so I use both hands to coil around his wrist, then use my
right to do a carrying strike to his arm and take advantage of the opportunity to lift my right foot
and kick to his ribs. If he uses his hand to brush aside my right leg, I withdraw my right leg and
then left my left leg to kick him.
24
FIGHTING TIGER POSTURE

Explanation of the name:


This posture resembles the fighting tiger pose of a classical warrior, hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the waist, spine, knees, and legs. It trains the strength of the spine and
causes the leg muscles to develop.

Application:
An opponent uses both hands to grab my left arm, so I withdraw to the left to dispel his strength,
using my right hand to grab his left arm while sending my left hand upward from below to do an
arcing strike to his face.
25
DOUBLE WINDS THROUGH THE EARS

Explanation of the name:

In this posture, both fists come from the sides to strike the opponents ears as swift as the wind,
hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders, arms, elbows, and wrists.

Application:
An opponent uses his left fist to attack, so I use my left hand to coil around his wrist and use my
right palm to strike to his face. If he uses his right hand to prop up my right palm, I then lift my
right foot to do a pressing kick to his ribs or chest. If he then brings his left hand downward to
brush my leg aside and uses his right fist to attack directly to my chest, I then withdraw my right
leg while using a hand to block aside his fist, then take advantage of the situation by using both
fists to arc upward from the sides and strike to his ears.
26
DRAPING THE BODY, KICK

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, your body makes an action of diagonally covering and then your left foot kicks
forward.

Effects:
This posture exercises the arms, waist, and legs.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack me, so I cover my body, using my right hand to grab his
wrist, and my left hand to prop up his arm, then take advantage of the opportunity to lift my left
foot and kick to his ribs or chest.
27
WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, the movement is like a wild horse running swiftly, your hands spreading away like
the horses mane draping side to side.

Effects:
This posture exercises the neck, arms, chest, waist, hips, and legs. It can cure kidney disease,
numbness in the hands and feet, and reduce lung disease.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack directly to my chest, so I use my right hand to push down
on his wrist, then advance my left leg to be behind his right knee while sending my left hand
forward to attack his ribs or chest. If he uses his left fist to attack, I use my left hand to push down
on his wrist, then advance my right leg to be behind his left knee while sending my right hand
forward to attack his ribs or chest.

28
MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE

Explanation of the name:


This movement is named because it turns around to the four corners continuously in the manner
of the shuttle slipping in and out when weaving.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders, elbows, wrists, waist, and legs, and trains ability in expanding
and contracting.

Application:
1. An opponent uses a fist to strike to my head, so I use my left hand to ward off and neutralize his
arm, then use my right palm to strike to his chest or ribs.
2. An opponent from behind strikes to my back, so I turn around and use my left hand to pluck his
wrist, advance with my right foot, and use my right hand to ward off and neutralize his arm, then
use my left palm to strike to his chest or ribs.
29
LOW POSTURE

Explanation of the name:


That idea in this posture is that your body descends from above to below.

Effects:
This posture exercises the back, knees, legs, and feet. It trains strength in the spine and legs.

Application:
An opponent makes an aggressive forward attack to my body, so I use both hands to do a
downward rollback to his arm while sitting my body down, causing him to lose his balance and
lean forward, then take advantage of the opportunity to strike him.
30
GOLDEN ROOSTER STANDS ON ONE LEG

Explanation of the name:


This posture resembles the look of a rooster or crane standing on one leg. One foot stands on the
ground while the other is lifted, your hands in a pose of spread wings.

Effects:
This posture exercises the waist, spine, and legs, causing the legs to become solid and strong.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to strike to my chest, so I use my left hand to push down on his
wrist and use my right hand to strike to his chin, and taking advantage of his unpreparedness, I lift
my right leg and use my knee to strike to his lower abdomen. If he wants to escape, I bring down

my right foot and use my left palm to strike to his face. If he sends a hand to block my palm, I then
quickly lift my left foot to kick to his belly.
31
CHOPPING PALM TO THE FACE

Explanation of the name:


This posture is the name of a boxing technique in which the palm does a chopping strike to an
opponents face or chest.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders and arms.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack me, so I use my right hand to push down his wrist, then
advance with my left foot while using the back of my left palm to do a chopping strike to his face.
32
CROSSED-BODY SWINGING LOTUS KICK

Explanation of the name:


Your right leg swings across (a sideways kick being a swinging lotus kick) to kick your left palm,
making a crossed shape, hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the legs.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack me from behind, so I turn around and use my left hand to
block it, then take advantage of the opportunity to lift my right foot and do a sideways kick to his
ribs.
33
PUNCH TO THE CROTCH

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, you advance and strike an opponents lower body, hence the name. This is one of
the five punching techniques in Taiji Boxing.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders and back, and trains strength in the spine.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to strike to me belly, so I use my left hand to block it aside and take
advantage of the opportunity to use my right fist to strike to his lower body.
34
BIG DIPPER POSTURE

Explanation of the name:


This is a boxing arts term. When a practitioner crosses his fists in front of his face, it is called a big
dipper posture [i.e. making a bucket shape resembling the saucepan of the Dipper].


Effects:
This posture exercises the wrists and legs.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to strike to my chest, so I use both hands to prop it upward while
lifting my right foot to kick him.
35
SITTING TIGER POSTURE

Explanation of the name:


This too is a boxing arts term. When a practitioner spreads his arms to the front and back, right
hand a palm, left hand a hook, standing in an empty stance, it is called a sitting tiger posture.

Effects:
This posture exercises the wrists, elbows, neck, shoulders, waist, and legs, and it trains ability in
expanding and contracting.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to attack from the right side, so I use my left hand to hook his wrist
and use my right palm to strike to his chest. If then uses his left hand to block, I then take
advantage of the opportunity to lift my left foot and kick him.
36
DOUBLE-SLAP SWINGING LOTUS KICK

Explanation of the name:


In this posture, your right foot lifts and swings across to kick both palms, hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the legs.

Application:
An opponent uses his right fist to strike me from behind and to the side, so I turn around using my
right hand to connect to his fist and use my left hand to push on his arm, then take advantage of
the situation by lifting my right foot to do a sideways kick to his ribs or back.
37
BEND THE BOW, SHOOT THE TIGER

Explanation of the name:


This posture resembles an ancient person during a hunt, one who is on horseback drawing a bow to
shoot, hence the name.

Effects:
This posture exercises the shoulders, elbows, waist, and hips, and develops the muscles.

Application:
When an opponent uses his right arm to chop down at me from above, so I use both hands to
connect to his arm and lead him to the right, causing him to lose his balance, then take advantage
of the situation by using both fists to strike him, causing him to stumble away.

SIX: THE BOXING SET ILLUSTRATED


1
BEGINNING POSTURE See photo 1:

Torso: upright, facing squarely to the south.

Hands: Your hands, palms facing downward, lift up until beside your chest, then slowly push down
until at hip level.

Footwork: Your feet stand parallel, spread apart, legs straight. The space between them is shoulder
width.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: This is the opening preparation posture in the Taiji Boxing set. When
practicing, your whole body is to be relaxed, moving naturally. Do not use any awkward effort or
glare angrily with your eyes. Your mouth should be closed, your tongue touching your upper palate.
Sink your shoulder and drop your elbows, contain your chest and pluck up your back, loosen your

waist and tuck in your buttocks. Energy sinks to your elixir field, spirit courses through to your
headtop, your whole body should feel emptied. This is the most important posture in Taiji Boxing.
2
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 1) See photo 2:

Torso: facing to the south.

Hands: Your palms turn to be sideways, lifting from your hips in an arc until in front of your chest,
your left palm swinging across to be facing inward, your right palm swinging into place vertically,
fingers pointing forward [upward], your left thumb at nose level.

Footwork: Your right leg sits down, knee bending, as your left foot extends forward, heel touching
down, toes lifted. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: In this posture, as your hands lift up, energy may easily float as a
consequence. When practicing, you should get energy to sink to your elixir field, then you will be
able to avoid the errors of leaning forward or back.
3
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 2) See photo 3:


Torso: turns to be facing to the west.

Hands: Your hands make a half circle, carrying outward to the right, left palm facing upward, right
palm facing downward, your left fingers about an inch away from your right wrist.

Footwork: Your left foot pivots to the right, the leg straightening as your right foot advances a step,
its knee bending, making a three-line stance [meaning a line for each foot and the line running
between them]. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: As your hands prop up forward, this is the ward-off. When practicing, your
waist acts in unison with your limbs. Do not be biased toward using one or the other.
4
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 3) See photo 4:


Torso: facing to the west.

Hands: Your hands go along with your waist by arcing to the right, making a half circle.

Footwork: Your left leg sits, the knee bending, your right foot staying where it is, toes lifted. Your
left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: In this posture, as your hands go along with your waist by pulling downward,
this is the rollback. When practicing, you should get your arms to hang down. The weight is
entirely on your left leg.
5
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 4) See photo 5:


Torso: facing to the west.

Hands: From the previous posture, your hands arc until in front of your chest, right palm turning
to face upward, left palm turning to face downward, then make an arc to the left and forward, and
pushing out.

Footwork: Your right toes come down, the knee bending, your left leg straightening, making a
three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands.


Points for attention: This posture is called press because your hands press outward. When
practicing, it is like you are pushing an object away from your chest. You should sink your
shoulders and drop your elbows. Your right thumb is at nose level, your left fingers about an inch
away from your right pulse.
6
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 5) See photo 6:


Torso: facing to the west.

Hands: From the previous posture, your hands make a half circle, arcing to the right and rear until
by your right shoulder, becoming upright palms (left hand slightly lower, fingertips close to your
right wrist), the palms facing outward, then do a level push forward at about chest level.

Footwork: As your hands circle, your left leg sits, the knee bending, your right leg straightening,
heel touching down, toes lifted. Your left foot is full, right foot empty. Your hands push out, your
right foot lightly advancing, the knee bending, your left leg straightening, making a three-line
stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: This posture is called push because you use power to push against the
opponents body. While practicing the five postures above, energy is to be continuous and must not
be interrupted, and the movements should be rounded. Your waist, spine, and limbs must all
function in unison, and the movements should be lively.
7
SINGLE WHIP See photo 7:


Torso: turns to be facing to the east.

Hands: From the previous posture, your right arm stays where it is, the fingers hanging down and
bending to make a hook shape, as your left elbow hangs and the palm turns from facing outward to
face inward, turning in accordance with the movement, passing in front of your chest and slowly
extending to the left, turning again to face outward.

Footwork: Your right heel pivots to the left to be slightly diagonal, the leg straightening as your foot
lifts and advances a step, the knee bending, making a three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right
foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: This posture exercises the shoulders, back, and limbs. When practicing, your
[left] hand and foot must go forward in unison. Your shoulders are to be relaxed and should not be
rising up.
8
RAISE THE HAND (Part 1) See photo 8:


Torso: turns to be facing to the south.

Hands: From the previous posture, your right hand becomes a palm, hanging down and going
forward, as your left hand lifts until by your forehead, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your right foot advances a half step, toes touching down, your left heel slightly pivoting
so the toes are pointing forward slightly diagonally. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: In this posture, your head should have an energy of pressing up, your
shoulders should be sinking down, and your body should not be leaning at angle.
9
RAISE THE HAND (Part 2) See photo 9:


Torso: facing to the south.

Hands: Your left hand descends from above until in front of your chest, palm facing downward, as
your right lifts from below until at chest level, palm facing inward.

Footwork: Your right foot advances a half step, the knee bending, your left foot shifting forward
two or three inches. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: In this posture your spine should be straight and should not be inclining
forward.
10
RAISE THE HAND (Part 3) See photo 10:


Torso: facing to the south.

Hands: Your right hand lifts up from below until by your forehead as your left lowers from above
until in front of your belly, both palms facing downward.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step to stand next to your right foot, knees bent.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: When practicing this posture, your lower back should be supple, you should
contain your chest and pluck up your back, loosen your waist and buttocks. Energy should sink to
your elixir field, then flow everywhere above and below without the slightest interruption.
11
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS (Part 1) See photo 11:


Torso: twists to the left.

Hands: Your hands are rotated toward the lower left, palms diagonally facing each other, to make a
posture of reaching wings, in the manner of a crane swatting with its wings.

Footwork: Your legs twist slightly to the left, standing together, knees bent.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: In this posture, your lower back makes a pivot, your arms spreading
diagonally at the same speed.
12
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS (Part 2) See photo 12:


Torso: turned to the left.

Hands: From the previous posture, your hands lift up [your left hand lifts and your right hand
lowers], palms diagonally facing each other.

Footwork: Your legs slightly turn to the right, standing together, knees bent.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: This posture is like a crane with its wings spread [away to one side], the
energy issuing from your spine.
13
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS (Part 3) See photo 13:


Torso: turns to be facing squarely to the south.

Hands: Your hands are shifted toward the south, next to each other, palms turning to face outward,
fingers pointing upward.

Footwork: Your legs turn to the right to be angled squarely, standing together, knees bent.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: The three postures above develop flexibility in the chest and back, but the
actions of opening and closing must be natural.
14
LEFT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 1) See photo 14:


Torso: slightly turns to the east.

Hands: Your left hand pushes downward to be placed sideways in front of your chest, palm facing
downward, your right hand lifting until by your ear, the palm sideways.

Footwork: Your left foot does not move, your right foot turning to be sideways, the toes about two
inches away from your left toes.

Eyes: looking to the east.

Points for attention: This posture is preparation to advance in the following posture.
15
LEFT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 2) See photo 15:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: From the previous posture, your left hand pushes downward to the right from in front of
your chest, brushing past your left knee to be placed beside your left knee, palm facing outward,
fingers pointing forward, as your right hand lowers to the rear, arcs upward, passes beside your
right ear, and slowly pushes out forward, elbow slightly bent, fingers pointing upward, palm facing
outward.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step, the knee bending, your right leg straightening, making a
three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: In this posture, your hands forward path of movement is the roundness of an
oval throughout. The movement should be driven by your waist, not the strength of your arms.
16
PLAY THE LUTE See photo 16:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your right hand withdraws toward your chest as your left hand lifts from below, your
hands making a shape of holding a lute, elbows hanging, palms upright, your left thumb at nose
level, your right palm facing to roughly your left elbow.

Footwork: Your left withdraws slightly toward the rear, toes lifted, your right leg sitting, the knee
bending. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: As your right hand withdraws, your body goes to the rear. Using your waist as
the axle between them, neither your hands nor body get overemphasized.
17
LEFT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 1) Same as in photo 15
18
RIGHT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 2) See photo 17:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your right hand pushes downward to the left from in front of your chest, brushing past
your right knee to be placed beside your right knee, palm facing downward, fingers pointing
forward, as your left hand lowers to the rear, arcs upward, passes beside your left ear, and slowly
pushes out forward, elbow slightly bent, fingers pointing upward, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your right foot advances a step, the knee bending, your left leg straightening, making a
three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: This posture is the same BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE as in photo
15, except that your hands and feet are reversed left and right.
19
LEFT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 3) Same as in photo 15
20
RIGHT PLAY THE LUTE Same as in photo 16
21
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 1) See photo 18:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: With your left palm above, right palm below, your hands make an arc from right to left,
palms facing each other, placed in front of your chest.

Footwork: Your left foot goes forward, the knee bending, then your right foot advances to stand
next to your left foot, knees bent.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: In the couple of movements above, PLAY THE LUTE is a transitional posture
into PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH.
22
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 2) See photo 19:


Torso: facing squarely to the east.

Hands: From the previous posture, your left hand makes a half circle, arcing forward from the
right, as your right hand goes along with the movement [by arcing to the side from the left].

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step, the knee bending, your right leg straightening, making a
three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: When your go forward to parry, you must not reach with your body, instead
you should use power from your spine.
23
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 3) See photo 20:


Torso: facing squarely to the east.

Hands: From the previous posture, your left elbows hangs, fingers pointing upward, as your right
palm shifts to be about an inch in front of your left palm, becoming a fist, tigers mouth facing
upward, and withdraws to be by your ribs.

Footwork: Your right leg sits, the knee bending, your left foot withdrawing slightly to the rear, heel
touching down, toes lifted. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: As your right palm withdraws, your left palm moves slightly inward.
24
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 4) See photo 21:


Torso: facing squarely to the east.

Hands: Your right fist strikes out forward from your ribs, your left palm guarding at your right
pulse area.

Footwork: Your left foot slightly advances, the knee bending, your right leg straightening, making a
three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: The four postures all have to be performed in one continuous flow which must
not be interrupted. Your waist, back, shoulders, and hips especially have to function in unison.
25
SEALING SHUT (Part 1) See photo 22:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your right fist becomes a palm a both hands arc to the sides so that your right wrist is
above your left wrist, the palms facing upward, crossed to make an X shape.

Footwork: Your left leg is slightly straight and slightly bent, toes touching down, your right leg
sitting, the knee bending. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: As your hands draw arcs, your elbows slightly bend, your body sits back, and
the weight shifts to your right leg.
26
SEALING SHUT (Part 2) See photo 23:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Continuing from the previous posture, your hands go along with your waist by withdrawing
in front of your chest and spreading apart to the sides until by your hips, palms facing forward.

Footwork: Your left foot is withdrawn to the rear, toes touching down, right leg sitting, knee bent.
Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.


Points for attention: As your hands withdraw and spread apart, your elbows should hang down
close to your ribs and should not protrude to the sides.
27
SEALING SHUT (Part 3) See photo 24:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your hands go to the rear, arc in half circles upward from below, then go along with your
waist by pushing out forward, the wrists settling, palms facing outward.

Footwork: Your left foot slightly advances, the knee bending, your right leg straightening, making a
three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: The three postures above are to be performed as a continuous flow. When
practicing, your wrists cross, then immediately spread apart. After they have spread, you must
push forward without lingering, the power issuing from your palms.
28
CROSSED HANDS See photo 25:


Torso: turns to be facing squarely to the south.

Hands: From the previous posture, your hands push downward as you turn to the right, until they
are by your hips, then arc upward from below, spreading apart to the sides and making a large
circle which brings them to be crossing to make an X shape in front of your chest, right hand on the
outside, left hand on the inside.

Footwork: From the three-line stance, turn to the right to form an eight-character stance. [()
This means your feet are making roughly a ninety-degree angle to each other. See the stance in
photo 38 below.] Then your left foot withdraws to stand next to your right foot, knees bent.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: When your hands push down as you turn to the right, your lower back and
legs are to act in unison with your hands. Avoid moving your hands without moving your waist and
legs.
29
DIAGONAL BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE See photo 26:


Torso: turns to be facing to the southeast.

Hands: Your right hand sinks down, arcs to the rear and upward, passes beside your right ear, and
slowly pushes out forward, elbow slightly bent, fingers pointing upward, palm facing outward, as
your left hand pushes downward, brushing past your left knee until beside your left knee, palm
facing downward, fingers pointing forward.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step diagonally to the southeast, the knee bending, your right
leg straightening, making a three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the southeast.

Points for attention: This posture is the same as LEFT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE,
except the orientation in this case is to the southeast.
30
CAPTURE THE TIGER AND SEND IT BACK TO ITS MOUNTAIN See photo 27:


Torso: turns to be facing to the northwest.

Hands: Your left hand lifts toward the southeast, arcs until by your ear, then pushes out to the
northwest, as your right hand withdraws below your left armpit, then brushes past your right knee
until beside your right knee, palm facing downward.

Footwork: Pivoting on your left heel, your right foot advances a step to the northwest, the knee
bending, your left leg straightening, making a three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot
empty.

Eyes: looking to the northwest.

Points for attention: Before your left hand pushes out forward, the weight shifts to your left leg.
Upon pushing, your waist and legs move forward.
31
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 1) See photo 28:


Torso: facing to the northwest.

Hands: Your left hand becomes an upward-facing palm withdrawing toward your chest, fingers
pointing forward, as your right hand lifts until in front of your left hand, palm facing downward,
the wrist about an inch away from your left fingers.

Footwork: Your left leg sits to the rear, the knee bending, your right foot withdrawing to the rear,
toes lifted. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture flowing into the following posture. In these next
four postures, your torso is facing to the northwest.
32
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 2) Same as in photo 3
33
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 3) Same as in photo 4
34
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 4) Same as in photo 5
35
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 5) Same as in photo 6
36
DIAGONAL SINGLE WHIP See photo 29:


Torso: turns to be facing to the southeast.

Hands: From CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL Part 5, your right arm stays where it is, the
fingers hanging down and bending to make a hook shape, as your left elbow hangs and the palm
turns from facing outward to face inward, turning in accordance with the movement, passing in
front of your chest and slowly extending to the southeast, turning again to face outward.

Footwork: Your right heel pivots to the left to point the foot slightly diagonally, the leg
straightening as your left foot slightly lifts and advances a step to the southeast, the knee bending,
making a three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: This posture is the same as SINGLE WHIP, except the orientation is to the
southeast corner.
37
GUARDING PUNCH UNDER THE ELBOW See photo 30:


Torso: turns to be facing squarely to the east.

Hands: Your left palm twists so the thumb is facing downward, makes a half circle arcing to the left
until by your ribs, whereupon it becomes a fist, raises diagonally, extending from in front of your
chest, tigers mouth facing your nose, as your right hand becomes a palm,
loosens and straightens, arrives in front of your chest and becomes a fist, gathering in to be placed
below your left elbow.

Footwork: Your right foot steps forward diagonally to the east, then the leg sits, the knee bending,
as your left foot points to the east, toes lifted. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: In this posture, the steps form a triangle. Your hands do not move one before
the other, but at the same speed.
38
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 1) See photo 31:


Torso: slightly turns to the right to diagonally face to the east.

Hands: Your right fist becomes a palm, arcs to the rear from below your left elbow, then upward,
until behind your right ear, the palm turned sideways, as your left hand pushes downward from in
front of your chest until in front of your left knee, palm facing downward.

Footwork: Your left foot slightly shifts so the toes are touching down, heel lifted, your right leg
sitting, knee bent. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture, as are the following five postures. Your hands
move up and down, forward and back, in oval shapes. The number of retreating steps may be three,
five, seven as long as it is an odd number.
39
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 2) See photo 32:


Torso: turns to be facing squarely to the east.

Hands: Your right hand pushes forward from beside your ear, the wrist settling, palm facing
outward, as your left hand goes to the forward left until beside your hip, palm facing downward,
fingers pointing forward.

Footwork: Your left foot retreats a step, the leg straightening, your right knee bending, making a
three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: As your left foot retreats, your body should not reach forward. Your spine
should be straight, your headtop suspended.
40
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 3) See photo 33:


Torso: slightly turns to the left to diagonally face to the east.

Hands: Your left hand arcs to the rear at about a forty-five degree angle, palm facing outward, as
your right hand pushes downward until in front of your right knee, palm facing downward.

Footwork: Your left leg sits, the knee bending, your right foot withdrawing a half step to the rear,
heel slightly lifted, toes touching down. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


41
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 4) See photo 34:


Torso: turns to be facing squarely to the east.

Hands: Your right hand arcs until beside your left ear, then pushes forward, the wrist settling,
palm facing outward, as your right hand lowers to the right until beside your hip, palm facing
downward, fingers pointing forward.

Footwork: Your right foot retreats a step, the leg straightening, your left knee bending, making a
three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: Same as in RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 2).
42
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 5) Same as in photo 31

Torso: slightly turns to the right to be diagonally face to the east.

Hands: Your right hand arcs to the rear, then upward, until behind your right ear, the palm turned
sideways, as your left hand pushes downward in front of you until in front of your left knee, palm
facing downward.

Footwork: Your right leg sits, the knee bending, your left foot withdrawing a half step to the rear,
heel touching down, toes lifted.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


43
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 6) Same as in photo 32
44
DIAGONAL FLYING POSTURE (Part 1) See photo 35:


Torso: turns to be facing squarely to the south.

Hands: Your left hand arcs to the right, becoming an upward-facing palm, until beside your right
ribs, as your right hand goes along with your waist by shifting to be in front of your left shoulder,
arm bent, palm facing downward.

Footwork: Your right foot stays where it is but pivots to point to the south, your left foot slightly
shifting forward, heel lifted, toes touching down, then your knees bend until you are in a twisted
sitting stance.

Eyes: looking diagonally to the right.

Points for attention: In this posture, you should first turn your waist, then shift your hands and
feet. Your elbows are to be wrapped together. As your body squats down, your buttocks should not
stick out.
45
DIAGONAL FLYING POSTURE (Part 2) See photo 36:


Torso: turns to be facing to the southeast.

Hands: Your hands spread apart diagonally to make straight line, in the manner of a bird
diagonally spreading its wings to take flight, your left slightly higher, palm facing upward, right
slightly lower, palm facing downward.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step, the knee bending, your right foot slightly shifting along
with the movement, the leg straightening, making a diagonal three-line stance. Your left foot is full,
right foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the right.

Points for attention: This posture is driven by your lower back, which should not bend. Your left
shoulder and left knee make a vertical straight line. Your right shoulder hangs down and should
not rise up.
46
RAISE THE HAND (Part 1) Same as in photo 8

Points for attention: This posture is the same as in photo 8, except that it was in that case preceded
by SINGLE WHIP and is in this case preceded by DIAGONAL FLYING POSTURE.
47
RAISE THE HAND (Part 2) Same as in photo 9
48
RAISE THE HAND (Part 3) Same as in photo 10
49
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS (Part 1) Same as in photo 11
50
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS (Part 2) Same as in photo 12
51
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS (Part 3) Same as in photo 13
52
LEFT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 1) Same as in photo 14

53
LEFT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 2) Same as in photo 15
54
NEEDLING UNDER THE SEA See photo 37:

Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your hand becomes a sideways palm, goes along with your waist by lifting higher, then
extends straight downward, fingers pointing downward, as your left hand slightly lifts to guard at
your right pulse area.

Footwork: Your right leg sits, the knee bending, your left foot withdrawing to the rear, toes
touching down. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: In the beginning of practicing this posture, you may easily commit the errors
of leaning forward at your waist, bending your back, and sticking out your buttocks. Your must
keep your lower back straight, buttocks drop down. The weight is on your right leg.
55
FAN THROUGH THE BACK See photo 38:


Torso: turns to be facing to the south.

Hands: Your right palm rotates, your hands lifting to the right, your right hand lifting until by your
forehead, arm bent, palm facing outward, as your left hand pushes out to the southeast, arm
slightly bent.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step as you turn to form an eight-character stance.

Eyes: looking to the left.

Points for attention: Power issues from your spine, courses through your arms, and is emitted from
your palms.
56
TORSO-FLUNG PUNCH See photo 39:


Torso: turns to be facing to the southwest.

Hands: Your hands go along with your waist by spreading apart to the sides, each making a half
circle, then arcing outward from beside your ribs, your right hand becoming a fist with the center
of the hand facing upward, flinging out close to your ribs, as your left hand, palm upright, guards
beside your right wrist.

Footwork: Your left foot pivots to the right, the leg straightening, as your right foot advances a step
to the northwest, the knee bending, making a three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot
empty.

Eyes: looking to the northwest.

Points for attention: Your right hand arcs until beside your left ribs, then promptly becomes a fist
and flings out to the northwest, your left palm following by striking forward. When turning around,
your movement should have folding. In this posture, your lower back is the axis of movement, your
hands and feet moving along with it. Turn with naturalness and nimbleness.
57
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 1) Same as in photo 28

Points for attention: This posture is the same as in photo 28, except that it was in that case
preceded by CAPTURE THE TIGER AND SEND IT BACK TO ITS MOUNTAIN and is in this case

preceded by TORSO-FLUNG PUNCH. In the following three parts of CATCH THE SPARROW BY
THE TAIL, your torso is facing to the northwest.
58
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 2) Same as in photo 3
59
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 3) Same as in photo 4
60
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 4) Same as in photo 5
61
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 5) Same as in photo 6
62
SINGLE WHIP Same as in photo 7
63
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 1) See photo 40:

Torso: turns to be facing to the southwest.

Hands: From SINGLE WHIP, your right hanging hand loosens and straightens, becoming a palm,
the palm facing downward, as your left hand hangs down, brushes past your left knee, making a
half circle arcing to the right to be placed diagonally in front of your chest, palm facing upward,
unevenly parallel with your right hand.

Footwork: Both feet pivot to the southwest, your left foot advances a step to stand next to your
right foot, then retreats a step, the leg slightly bent, your right knee bending. Your right foot is full,
left foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands.


Points for attention: This is the initial posture of CLOUDING HANDS.
64
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 2) See photo 41:

Torso: turns to diagonally face to the southeast.


Hands: Your left hand arcs upward until by your right shoulder, then arcs to the left, passing in
front of your chest, until in front of your left shoulder, elbow hanging, fingers pointing upward,
palm facing inward, as your right hand hangs down, preparing to flow into the following posture,
arcing to the left.

Footwork: Both feet pivot to the southeast, your left knee bending, your right leg slightly bent. Your
left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: following your left hand.

Points for attention: This posture is LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.


65
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 3) See photo 42:


Torso: slightly turns to the left.

Hands: Your hand left arcs from inward to the left, toward the east, palm facing downward, as your
right hand brushes past your right knee, making a half circle arcing to the left to be placed
diagonally in front of your chest, palm facing upward, unevenly parallel with your left hand.

Footwork: Your left foot slightly shifts as your right foot advances a step to stand next to your left
foot, knees bent.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


66
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 4) See photo 43:


Torso: turns to diagonally face to the southwest.

Hands: Your right hand arcs upward until by your left shoulder, then arcs to the right, passing in
front of your chest, until in front of your right shoulder, elbow hanging, fingers pointing upward,
palm facing inward, as your left hand hangs down, preparing to flow into the following posture,
arcing to the right.

Footwork: Both feet pivot to the southwest, your right knee bending, your left foot retreating a
step, the leg slightly bent. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: following your right hand.

Points for attention: This posture is RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.


67
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 5) Same as in photo 40

Torso: slightly turns to the right.


Hands: Your right hand arcs from inward to the right, toward the west, palm facing downward, as
your left hand brushes past your left knee, making a half circle arcing to the right to be placed
diagonally in front of your chest, palm facing upward, unevenly parallel with your right hand.

Footwork: Your feet do not move.

Eyes: following your hands.


Points for attention: This posture is the same as in photo 40, except that it was in that case
preceded by SINGLE WHIP and is in this case preceded by the fourth part of CLOUDING HANDS.
68
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 6) Same as in photo 41
69
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 7) Same as in photo 42
70
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 8) Same as in photo 43
71
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 9) Same as in photo 40
72
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 10) Same as in photo 41
73
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 11) Same as in photo 42
74
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 12) Same as in photo 43
75
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 13) Same as in photo 40

Points for attention: When practicing each of the parts of CLOUDING HANDS above, use your
lower back as the axis of movement, your hand and feet moving according to its turnings. Your
body should not sway and your shoulder must not rise. The movement of your hands is like the
swirling of clouds and should not be stagnant.
76
SINGLE WHIP Same as in photo 7

Points for attention: This posture is the same as in photo 7, except that it was in that case preceded
by CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL and is in this case preceded by LEFT & RIGHT
CLOUDING HANDS.
77
RISING UP AND REACHING OUT TO THE HORSE (Left) See photo 44:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your left hand becomes an upright-facing palm, withdraws to the rear, elbow hanging close
to your ribs, as your right hand becomes a palm, elbow bent, and pushes out forward from your left
shoulder, arm slightly bent, palm facing downward, the wrist about an inch in front of your left
fingers.

Footwork: Your right leg sits, the knee bending, your left foot withdrawing a half step, toes
touching down. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: The movements of your hands and feet should be in unison. This is RISING
UP AND REACHING OUT TO THE HORSE on the left side [meaning the left foot forward].
78
KICK TO THE RIGHT SIDE (Part 1) See photo 45:


Torso: turns to be facing to the northeast [southeast].

Hands: Your left hand slightly extends forward and your right hand slightly withdraws inward, so
your wrists are facing each other, then they make a flourishing action, going along with your waist
by going to the right, downward, to the left, upward, rotating until beside your left ear, both elbows
bent, as your hands make a crossed shape, left hand on the inside, right hand on the outside, palms
facing outward.

Footwork: Your left foot diagonally withdraws a step to the left rear, the knee bending, your right
foot staying where it is and slightly pivoting, the leg straightening, making a three-line stance. Your
left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the southeast.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


79
KICK TO THE RIGHT SIDE (Part 2) See photo 46:


Torso: slightly shifts to be facing to the east.

Hands: staying as they are in the previous posture.

Footwork: Your left foot slightly pivots to the east, your right foot shifting a half step to be in front
of your left foot, toes touching down, making a T-shaped empty stance [meaning your feet are
forming a ninety-degree angle with the weight mostly on one foot]. Your left foot is full, right foot
empty.

Eyes: looking to the southeast.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


80
KICK TO THE RIGHT SIDE (Part 3) See photo 47:


Torso: turns to be facing to the southeast [northeast].

Hands: Your hands spread apart to the front and rear, left hand at headtop level, arm slightly bent,
fingers pointing slightly upward, right hand at shoulder level, the palm sideways, fingers pointing
slightly downward.

Footwork: Your left leg standing straight, your right foot lifts, toes hanging down, then kicks out to
the southeast with the top of the foot flattened.

Eyes: looking to the southeast.

Points for attention: As you kick, hand and foot go out in unison. The movement should be slow,
your waist upright, your shoulders level. The weight is entirely on your left leg.
81
KICK TO THE LEFT SIDE (Part 1) See photo 48:


Torso: facing to the southeast.

Hands: Your hands withdraw in front of your chest so your wrists are facing each other, then they
make a flourishing action, going along with your waist by going to the left, downward, to the right,
upward, rotating until beside your right ear, making a crossed shape, left hand on the inside, right
hand on the outside, palms facing outward.

Footwork: Your right foot comes down, the knee bending, your left leg straightening, making a
diagonal three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the northeast.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


82
KICK TO THE LEFT SIDE (Part 1) See photo 49:


Torso: slightly turns to be facing to the east.

Hands: staying as they are in the previous posture.

Footwork: Your right foot slightly pivots to the east, your left foot shifting a half step to be in front
of your right foot, toes touching down, making a T-shaped empty stance. Your right foot is full, left
foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the northeast.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


83
KICK TO THE LEFT SIDE (Part 3) See photo 50:


Torso: turns to be facing to the southeast [northeast].

Hands: Your hands spread apart to the front and rear, right hand at headtop level, arm slightly
bent, fingers pointing slightly upward, left hand at shoulder level, the palm sideways, fingers
pointing slightly downward.

Footwork: Your right leg standing straight, your left foot lifts, toes hanging down, then kicks out to
the northeast with the top of the foot flattened.

Eyes: looking to the northeast.

Points for attention: The weight is entirely on your right leg. As you kick, hand and foot go out in
unison. The movement should be slow.
84
TURN AROUND, PRESSING KICK (Part 1) See photo 51:


Torso: turns to the west to be almost facing to the north.

Hands: Your hands close inward, making a crossed shape near your right ear, left hand on the
inside, right hand on the outside, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your left foot withdraws, knee bending, foot hanging, toes pointing downward, your
right foot staying where it is and pivoting to the left so the toes are pointing to the northwest.

Eyes: looking to the west.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture. As you turn around, your body should be
upright and the weight is entirely on your right foot. As your left foot withdraws, it must not touch
down.
85
TURN AROUND, PRESSING KICK (Part 2) See photo 52:


Torso: facing to the west, slightly inclining to the north.

Hands: Your hands spread apart to the front and rear, right hand at headtop level, arm slightly
bent, fingers pointing slightly upward, left hand at shoulder level, the palm sideways, fingers
pointing slightly downward.

Footwork: Your right leg standing straight, your left foot presses out to the west, toes upright.

Eyes: looking to the west.

Points for attention: As your press out, power is emitted through the heel, and the hand and foot
are to move in unison. Your body is to be upright and must not sway.
86
BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 1 Left) Same as in photo 15

Torso: facing to the west.

Hands: From the previous posture, your left hand withdraws to be placed sideways in front of your
chest, then pushes downward to the right, brushing past your left knee to be placed beside then
knee, palm facing downward, as your right hand withdraws, lowers forward, makes a half circle
arcing to the rear and then by your ear, then slowly pushes out forward, elbow slightly bent, fingers
pointing upward, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your left foot withdraws, then steps down forward, the knee bending, your right leg
straightening, making a three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: This posture is the same LEFT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE as in
photo 15, except the orientation is to the west.
87
BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 2 Right) Same as in photo 17

Points for attention: This posture is the same as in photo 17, except the orientation is to the west.
88
PLANTING PUNCH See photo 53:

Torso: facing to the west.

Hands: Your left hand, having brushed past your knee, raises up to your right shoulder, as your
right hand goes to the rear, arcs to be beside your ear, becoming a fist, then strikes diagonally
downward, tigers mouth facing to the left, your left hand guarding at your right wrist and going
along with the downward strike.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step, the knee bending, your right leg straightening, making a
three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands during the planting punch, then looking forward.

Points for attention: When performing the planting punch, you should use power from your spine.
Your body should not reach forward.
89
TORSO-FLUNG PUNCH See photo 54:


Torso: turns to be facing to the southeast.

Hands: Your right hand becoming a palm, both palms facing downward, Your hands go along with
your waist by spreading apart to the sides, each making a half circle, then arcing outward from
beside your ribs, your right hand becoming a fist with the center of the hand facing upward,
flinging out close to your ribs, as your left hand, palm upright, guards beside your right wrist.

Footwork: Both feet pivot to the right, then your right foot diagonally advances a step to the
southeast, the knee bending, your left leg straightening, making a three-line stance. Your right foot
is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the southeast.

Points for attention: This posture is the same TORSO-FLUNG PUNCH as in photo 39, except the
orientation is reversed.
90
DOUBLE KICK (Part 1) Same as in photo 45

Torso: facing to the northeast.


Hands: Your right fist becomes a palm, and with your wrists facing each other, your hands make a
flourishing action, going along with your waist by going to the right, downward, to the left, upward,
rotating until beside your left ear, both elbows bent, as your hands make a crossed shape, left hand
on the inside, right hand on the outside, palm facing outward.


Footwork: Your left foot stays where it is and pivots slightly to the left, the knee bending, your right
leg straightening, making a diagonal three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the southeast.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


91
DOUBLE KICK (Part 2) Same as in photo 46

Points for attention: Same as in photo 46, except your torso is facing to the northeast, eyes looking
to the southeast, and so it is slightly different.
92
DOUBLE KICK (Part 3) See photo 55:

Torso: turns to be facing to the east.

Hands: Your hands spread apart to the front and rear, left hand at headtop level, arm slightly bent,
fingers pointing slightly upward, right hand at shoulder level, the palm sideways, fingers pointing
slightly downward.

Footwork: Your left leg standing straight, your right foot lifts, toes hanging down, then kicks out to
the east with the top of the foot flattened.

Eyes: looking to the east.

Points for attention: Your waist should be upright and your shoulders should be level. As you kick,
hand and foot go out together. The movement should be slow. The weight is on your left leg.

93
DOUBLE KICK (Part 4) See photo 56:

Torso: turns to be facing to the southeast.


Hands: Your right hand withdraws inward to the left to be placed beside your left ribs, elbow bent,
palm facing downward, fingers pointing to the rear, as your left hand slightly hangs down, arm
diagonally straight, not quite level with your right palm, the palm also facing downward, fingers
pointing to the rear.

Footwork: Your right foot retreats a step to the northwest, the leg straightening, your left knee
bending, making a diagonal three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


94
DOUBLE KICK (Part 5) See photo 57:


Torso: facing to the southeast.

Hands: Continuing from the previous posture, your hands in unison go upward, forward, and press
down, arms extended forward, slightly bent, right hand forward, left hand behind, palms facing
downward.

Footwork: Your left foot withdraws a half step, toes touching down, then kicks out forward, your
right leg standing straight.

Eyes: looking to the southeast.

Points for attention: The above postures are tightly connected without the slightest stagnation.
Your lower back should be straight, and the weight is on your right foot, thus your body will not
easily sway. The above five postures should be practiced as a continuous flow without any
interruption. The movements of your hands and feet must be in unison.
95
FIGHTING TIGER POSTURE (Part 1) See photo 58:


Torso: facing to the southeast.

Hands: Continuing from the previous posture, your hands again press down, right arm extended
straight at about shoulder level, left arm slightly bent, both palms facing downward, fingers
pointing upward (left fingertips close to your right elbow).

Footwork: Your left foot comes down retreating a step to the rear, the leg straightening, your right
foot staying where it is and slightly pivoting, the knee bending, making a diagonal three-line
stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the southeast.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


96
FIGHTING TIGER POSTURE (Part 2) See photo 59:


Torso: turns to be facing to the east.

Hands: From the previous posture, your left hand goes downward, arcs to the left, raises upward
until above your forehead, grasped into a fist, tigers mouth facing downward, as your right hand
withdraws downward, becoming a fist, and lifts from your belly to be in front of your chest, tigers
mouth facing inward, the center of the hand facing downward, the fists facing each other.

Footwork: Your left foot stays where it is and slightly pivots to the east, the leg sitting, knee
bending, as your right foot shifts sideways a half step, toes touching down, making a T-shaped
empty stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: The movements of your hands, the stepping, and the turning of your waist
should be in unison.
97
DOUBLE WINDS THROUGH THE EARS (Part 1) See photo 60:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your right hand raises up, your left hand withdrawing downward, both fists becoming
palms as they arrive beside your left ear, elbows bent, your hands making a crossed shape, left
hand on the inside, right hand on the outside, palms facing outward. Then they spread apart to the
front and rear, left hand at headtop level, arm slightly bent, fingers pointing slightly upward, right
hand at shoulder level, the palm sideways, fingers hanging down, pointing toward your right toes.

Footwork: Your left leg standing straight, your right foot lifts and presses out to the east, toes
upright.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture. As you press out, power is emitted through the
heel, and the hand and foot are to move in unison. The weight is on your left leg.
98
DOUBLE WINDS THROUGH THE EARS (Part 2) See photo 61:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your left hand comes forward, your right palm slightly withdrawing so that your arms are
parallel and level (both palms facing downward). Then your hands go downward and spread apart
to the sides until beside your hips, becoming fists, then upward and outward, each making a half
circle, arcing until in front of your face, fists facing each other (two or three inches apart), tigers
mouth facing downward, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your right foot withdraws, then comes down stepping forward, the knee bending, your
left leg straightening, making a three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: As your right foot withdraws from its pressing kick, your hands are to spread
apart close beside your right knee, your hands and foot moving in unison.
99
DRAPING THE BODY, KICK (Part 1) See photo 62:


Torso: turns to be facing to the south.

Hands: Your fists go along with your waist by going to the right, becoming palms, elbows bent,
arriving beside your right ear, your hands making a crossed shape, palms facing outward, left hand
on the inside, right hand on the outside.

Footwork: Your right foot stays where it is but pivots to be pointing the south, your left foot slightly
shifting forward, heel lifted, toes touching down, then your knees bend until you are in twisted
sitting stance.

Eyes: looking to the east.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


100
DRAPING THE BODY, KICK (Part 2) See photo 63:


Torso: facing to the south.

Hands: Your hands spread apart to the front and rear, right hand at headtop level, arm slightly
bent, fingers pointing slightly upward, left hand at shoulder level, the palm sideways, fingers
pointing slightly downward.

Footwork: Your right leg standing straight, your left foot lifts, toes hanging down, then kicks out to
the east with the top of the foot flattened.

Eyes: looking to the east.

Points for attention: In this posture, your waist is the engine, your arms the machinery. By using
your waist to drive your arms, you will then be able to be nimble. As you kick, hand and foot go out
in unison. The movement should be slow. The weight is entirely on your right leg.
101
TURN AROUND, PRESSING KICK (Part 1) See photo 64:


Torso: turns to the right to be facing to the north.

Hands: Your hands slowly close inward, going along with your waist as it turns to the right,
arriving behind your left ear, elbows bent, your hands making a crossed shape, left hand on the
inside, right hand on the outside, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your left foot draws a level half circle to the right until behind your right foot, then
comes down, the leg sitting, knee bending, your right foot staying where it is and pivoting along
with the movement, heel lifted, toes touching down, making a T-shaped empty stance. Your left
foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the east.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


102
TURN AROUND, PRESSING KICK (Part 2) Same as in photo 60

Torso: turns to be facing to the east.

Hands: Your hands spread apart to the front and rear, left hand at headtop level, arm slightly bent,
fingers pointing slightly upward, right hand at shoulder level, the palm sideways, fingers hanging
down, pointing toward your right toes.

Footwork: Your left leg standing straight, your right foot lifts and presses out to the east, toes

upright.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: As you turn around, you must be upright. You must not lean forward or back.
As you press out, power is emitted through the heel. The weight is entirely on your left leg.
103
PLAY THE LUTE (Right) Same as in photo 16

Torso: facing to the east.


Hands: From the previous posture, your left hand arcs forward and level until in front of your
chest, your right hand withdrawing toward your chest, your hands making a shape of holding a
lute, elbows hanging, your left thumb at nose level, your right palm facing to roughly your left
elbow.

Footwork: Your right foot comes down, the leg sitting, knee bending, and your left foot goes
forward a step, heel touching down, toes lifted. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: Same as in photo 16, except that it was in that case preceded by BRUSH KNEE
IN A CROSSED STANCE and is in this case preceded by TURN AROUND, PRESSING KICK.
104
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 1) Same as in photo 18
105
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 2) Same as in photo 19
106
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 3) Same as in photo 20
107
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 4) Same as in photo 21
108
SEALING SHUT (Part 1) Same as in photo 22
109
SEALING SHUT (Part 2) Same as in photo 23
110
SEALING SHUT (Part 3) Same as in photo 28
111
CROSSED HANDS Same as in photo 25
112
BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Diagonal) Same as in photo 26
113
CAPTURE THE TIGER AND SEND IT BACK TO ITS MOUNTAIN Same as in photo 27
114
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 1) Same as in photo 28
115
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 2) Same as in photo 3

116
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 3) Same as in photo 4
117
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 4) Same as in photo 5
118
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 5) Same as in photo 6
119
DIAGONAL SINGLE WHIP Same as in photo 29
120
PLAY THE LUTE (Left) See photo 65:

Torso: turns to be facing to the west.

Hands: Your hands withdraw in front of your chest, elbows hanging, palms upright, your hands
making a shape of holding a lute, your right thumb at nose level, your left palm facing to roughly
your right elbow.

Footwork: Your left foot stays where it is but pivots to the right, the leg sitting, knee bending, your
right foot shifting to be in front of your left foot, toes lifted. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: In this posture, your right hand first becomes a palm, then withdraws in front
of your chest.
121
WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE (Part 1) See photo 66:


Torso: turns to be facing to the southwest.

Hands: Your right hand shifts toward your left ribs, palm facing upward, your left hand shifting to
be in front of your right shoulder, palm facing downward. Then your hands spread apart, right
hand to the northwest, left hand to the southeast, making a diagonal straight line, right hand
higher, left hand lower.

Footwork: Your right foot advances a step to the northwest, the knee bending, your left foot slightly
pivoting, the leg straightening, making a diagonal three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot
empty.

Eyes: looking to the left.

Points for attention: This posture is WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE on the right side. Your
hands spread apart in accordance with your waist, extending to their limit.
122
WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE (Part 2) See photo 67:


Torso: turns to be facing to the northwest.

Hands: Your hands close inward toward your chest, right hand in front of your left shoulder, palm
facing downward, left hand near your right ribs, palm facing upward. Then your hands spread
apart, left hand to the southwest, right hand to the northeast, making a diagonal straight line, left
hand higher, right hand lower.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step to the southwest, the knee bending, your right foot slightly
pivoting, the leg straightening, making a diagonal three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot
empty.

Eyes: looking to the right.

Points for attention: This posture is WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE on the left side. Your hands
spreading apart must go along with your waist, extending to their limit.
123
WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE (Part 3) Same as in photo 66

Points for attention: When practicing the three postures above, they must be continuous, without
any pauses. Your waist and hips function as a single unit. The opening and closing of your hands
must be performed smoothly and nimbly.
124
MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE (Part 1) See photo 68:


Torso: facing to the southwest.

Hands: From the previous posture, your right hand shifts to the left to be in front of your left
shoulder, palm facing downward, your left hand shifting to the right to be below your right ribs,
palm facing upward. Then your left hand goes along your right arm from your right ribs, carrying
upward, until above your forehead, the palm correspondingly turning to face outward, your right
hand, palm upright, going along with your left hand by pushing out forward, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step to the southwest, the knee bending, your right foot slightly
pivoting, the leg straightening, making a three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the southwest.

Points for attention: When practicing, the movements of your hands and feet are to be in unison.
125
MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE (Part 2) See photo 69:


Torso: turns to be facing to the southeast.

Hands: Your left hand lowers, your hands closing toward each other to make a round shape, both
palms facing downward, they spread apart to the sides, then your left hand shifts to be in front of
your right shoulder, your right palm turning to face upward, shifting to be below your left armpit.
Then your right hand goes along your left arm from your left ribs, carrying upward, until above
your forehead, the palm correspondingly turning to face outward, your left hand, palm upright,
going along with your right hand by pushing out forward, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your left heel stays where it is but pivots to the right until the toes are pointing to the
southeast, the leg straightening as your right foot turns to the right and advances a step to the
southeast, the knee bending, making a three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the southeast.

Points for attention: When turning around, your waist and step must act in unison, and there must
be no stagnation.
126
MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE (Part 3) See photo 70:


Torso: turns to be facing to the northeast.

Hands: Your right hand shifts to the left to be in front of your left shoulder, palm facing downward,
your left hand shifting to the right to be below your right ribs, palm facing upward. Then your left
hand goes along your right arm from your rights ribs, carrying upward, until above your forehead,
the palm correspondingly turning to face outward, your right hand, palm upright, going along with
your left hand by pushing out forward, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step to the northeast, the knee bending, your right foot slightly
pivoting, the leg straightening, making a three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the northeast.

Points for attention: When practicing this posture, you should continue in a single flow from the
previous posture. There must be no pause.
127
MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE (Part 4) See photo 71:


Torso: turns to be facing to the northwest.

Hands: Your left hand lowers, your hands closing toward each other to make a round shape, both
palms facing downward, they spread apart to the sides, then your left hand shifts to be in front of
your right shoulder, your right palm turning to face upward, shifting to be below your left armpit.
Then your right hand goes along your left arm from your left ribs, carrying upward, until above
your forehead, the palm correspondingly turning to face outward, your left hand, palm upright,
going along with your right hand by pushing out forward, palm facing outward.

Footwork: Your left heel stays where it is but pivots to the right until the toes are pointing to the
northwest, the leg straightening as your right foot turns to the right and advances a step to the
northwest, the knee bending, making a three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the northwest.

Points for attention: The four postures above move to each of the four corners. Although the
orientations are along diagonals, your body must not lean toward them.
128
PLAY THE LUTE (Right) Same as in photo 65

Torso: turns to be facing to the west.

Hands: Your hands withdraw to the left to be in front of your chest, elbows hanging, palms upright,

your hands making a shape of holding a lute, your right thumb at nose level, your left palm facing
to roughly your right elbow.

Footwork: Your left foot stays where it is but pivots to the left, the leg sitting, knee bending, your
right foot shifting to be in front of your left foot, toes lifted. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: This posture is the same PLAY THE LUTE as in photo 65, except that it was in
that case preceded by DIAGONAL SINGLE WHIP and is in this case preceded by MAIDEN
WORKS THE SHUTTLE.
129
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 1) Same as in photo 28

Points for attention: This posture is the same as in photo 28, except that it was in that case
preceded by CAPTURE THE TIGER AND SEND IT BACK TO ITS MOUNTAIN and is in this case
preceded by PLAY THE LUTE, and also your torso is facing to the west.
130
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 2) Same as in photo 3
131
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 3) Same as in photo 4
132
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 4) Same as in photo 5
133
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 5) Same as in photo 6
134
SINGLE WHIP Same as in photo 7
135
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 1) Same as in photo 40
136
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 2) Same as in photo 41
137
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 3) Same as in photo 42
138
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 4) Same as in photo 43
139
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 5) Same as in photo 40
140
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 6) Same as in photo 41
141
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 7) Same as in photo 42
142
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 8) Same as in photo 43
143
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 9) Same as in photo 40
144
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 10) Same as in photo 41
145

LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 11) Same as in photo 42


146
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 12) Same as in photo 43
147
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 13) Same as in photo 40
148
SINGLE WHIP Same as in photo 7
149
LOW POSTURE See photo 72:

Torso: turns to be facing to the south, lowering as far as it can.


Hands: Your right hand becomes a palm, arcs upward, to the left, downward, to be almost level
with your left hand, the palm standing sideways, then your hands go along with your waist by going
downward and withdrawing to the rear until to the inside of your left leg.

Footwork: Your right leg bends and squats down as far as it can, your left leg straightened until
almost flat on the ground.

Eyes: looking to the east.

Points for attention: As your body squats down, your spine should be straight and must not tilt
away at an angle or lean forward. The movements of your knees, torso, hands, and feet must be in
unison. The weight is on your right leg.
150
GOLDEN ROOSTER STANDS ON ONE LEG (Part 1 Right) See photo 73:


Torso: turns forward, lifting, to be facing to the east.

Hands: From the previous posture, your right hand goes forward and lifts upward until in front of
your forehead, palm facing downward, as your left hand lifts until in front of your chest, then
pushes downward until in front of your belly, palm facing downward.

Footwork: Your right foot lifts forward, knee at belly level, toes hanging down, your left leg
standing straight.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: The weight is entirely on your left leg.


151
GOLDEN ROOSTER STANDS ON ONE LEG (Part 2 Left) See photo 74:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your left hand in front of your belly becomes an upward-facing palm and threads out over
your right wrist, extending straight forward, as your right hand becomes an upward-facing palm
and goes along your left arm, pushing downward, the palm correspondingly turning to again face
downward, diagonally extending beside your left leg.

Footwork: Your right foot comes down, the leg stands straight, and your left foot then kicks out.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: In this posture, the weight is on your right leg. In both of the postures above,
stand tall like a mountain, stable and unmoving.
152
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 1) See photo 75:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your left hand goes to the rear and arcs until beside your ear, then pushes forward, the
wrist settling, palm facing outward, as your right hand pushes downward until beside your right
knee, palm facing downward.

Footwork: Your left foot rotates to the left and comes down to the rear, the leg straightening, your
right knee bending, making a three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: As you retreat your left foot, your body should be straight, should not sway,
nor reach forward.
153
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 2) See photo 76:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your right hand arcs to the rear at about a forty-five degree angle, palm facing outward, as
your left hand pushes downward until in front of your lower abdomen, palm facing downward,
fingers pointing to the right.

Footwork: Your left leg sits, the knee bending, your right foot withdrawing a half step to the rear,
heel slightly lifted, toes touching down. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


154
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 3) See photo 77:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your right hand arcs until beside your ear, then pushes forward, the wrist settling, palm
facing outward, as your left hand lowers to the left until beside your knee, palm facing downward,
fingers pointing forward.

Footwork: Your right foot retreats a step to the rear, the leg straightening, your left knee bending,
making a three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: As you retreat, your hands and feet are to move in unison. Your spine should
be straight and should not lean forward.
155
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 4) See photo 78:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your left hand arcs to the rear at about a forty-five degree angle, palm facing outward, as
your right hand pushes downward until in front of your lower abdomen, palm facing downward,
fingers pointing to the left.

Footwork: Your right leg sits, the knee bending, your left foot withdrawing a half step to the rear,
heel slightly lifted, toes touching down. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


156
RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY (Part 5) Same as in photo 76 [75]

Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your left hand arcs until beside your ear, then pushes forward, the wrist settling, palm
facing outward, as your right hand pushes downward until beside your right knee, palm facing
downward.

Footwork: Your left foot retreats a step to the rear, the leg straightening, your right knee bending,
making a three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: When practicing the five postures above, it should be performed as a
continuous flow and must not have any pauses. The movements of your hands must make oval
shapes.
157
DIAGONAL FLYING POSTURE (Part 1) Same as in photo 35
158
DIAGONAL FLYING POSTURE (Part 2) Same as in photo 36
159
RAISE THE HAND (Part 1) Same as in photo 8

Points for attention: This posture is the same as in photo 8, except that it was in that case preceded
by SINGLE WHIP and is in this case preceded by DIAGONAL FLYING POSTURE.
160
RAISE THE HAND (Part 2) Same as in photo 9
161
RAISE THE HAND (Part 3) Same as in photo 10
162
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS (Part 1) Same as in photo 11
163
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS (Part 2) Same as in photo 12
164
WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS (Part 3) Same as in photo 13
165
BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 1 Left) Same as in photo 14
166
BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Part 2 Left) Same as in photo 15
167
NEEDLING UNDER THE SEA Same as in photo 37
168
FAN THROUGH THE BACK Same as in photo 38
169
TORSO-FLUNG PUNCH Same as in photo 39
170
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 1) Same as in photo 19
171
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 2) Same as in photo 20
172
PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH (Part 3) Same as in photo 21

Points for attention: The explanations for the three postures above are the same as for photos 19
21, except that in that case you were facing to the east, whereas in this case you are facing to the
west.
173
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 1) Same as in photo 3
174
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 2) Same as in photo 4
175

CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 3) Same as in photo 5


176
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 4) Same as in photo 6
177
SINGLE WHIP Same as in photo 7
178
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 1) Same as in photo 40
179
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 2) Same as in photo 41
180
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 3) Same as in photo 42
181
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 4) Same as in photo 43
182
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 5) Same as in photo 40
183
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 6) Same as in photo 41
184
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 7) Same as in photo 42
185
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 8) Same as in photo 43
186
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 9) Same as in photo 40
187
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 10) Same as in photo 41
188
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 11) Same as in photo 42
189
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 12) Same as in photo 43
190
LEFT & RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS (Part 13) Same as in photo 40
191
SINGLE WHIP Same as in photo 7
192
RISING UP AND REACHING OUT TO THE HORSE (Left) Same as in photo 44
193
CHOPPING PALM TO THE FACE See photo 79:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your right hand becomes an upward-facing palm, your left hand threading out over your
right wrist as your right hand withdraws below your right armpit, palm still facing upward.

Footwork: Your left advances a half step, then knee bending, your right straightening, making a
three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the left.

Points for attention: Once your left palm has thread out, the arm is slightly bent and the fingertips
at forehead level.
194
CROSSED-BODY SWINGING LOTUS KICK (Part 1) See photo 80:


Torso: turns to be facing to the west.

Hands: Your left hand goes along with your waist as it turns by raising above your headtop, palm
facing outward, fingers pointing to the right, your right hand not moving.

Footwork: Your left foot pivots to the right so the toes are pointing to the southwest, the leg sitting,
knee bending, as your right foot turns to the right, slightly shifting so the toes are touching down,
making a T-shaped empty stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: As you turn around, your waist and legs must act in unison.
195
CROSSED-BODY SWINGING LOTUS KICK (Part 2) See photo 81:


Torso: facing to the west.

Hands: Your right palm turns to be facing downward as your left hand swings out from right to left.

Footwork: Your left foot staying where it is, your right foot lifts and swings across from left to right
to kick your left palm.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: As you perform the swinging kick, your body must not sway. The weight is
entirely on your left leg.
196
BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE (Right) Same as in photo 17

Torso: facing to the west.

Hands: Your left hand lowers, arcs to the rear and upward, passes beside your left ear, and slowly
pushes out forward, elbow slightly bent, fingers pointing upward, palm facing outward, as your
right hand pushes downward to the right from below your left armpit, brushes past and is placed
beside your right knee, fingers pointing forward, palm facing downward.

Footwork: Your right foot comes down forward, the knee bending, your left leg straightening,
making a three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.


Points for attention: This posture is the same RIGHT BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE as in
photo 17, except the orientation is different.
197
PUNCH TO THE CROTCH See photo 82:

Torso: facing to the west.

Hands: Your left hand brushes past your left knee, your right hand lifts until below your ribs,
becoming a fist, tigers mouth facing upward, then strikes out forward, your left hand guarding at
your left pulse area.

Footwork: Your left foot advances a step, the knee bending, your right leg straightening, making a
three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: As your fist strikes out, your body should be straight and must not lean
forward. The power must issue from your spine.
198
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 1) Same as in photo 28

Torso: facing to the west.

Hands: Your left hand becomes an upward-facing palm, withdraws to your chest, as your right
hand becomes a palm, lifting until about an inch in front of your left fingers, palm facing
downward.

Footwork: Your right leg sits to the rear, the knee bending, your left foot withdrawing to the rear,
toes lifted. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.


Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: This posture is the same as in photo 28, except your body is in this case facing
to the west. It flows into the following four postures.
199
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 2) Same as in photo 3
200
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 3) Same as in photo 4
201
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 4) Same as in photo 5
202
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 5) Same as in photo 6
203
SINGLE WHIP Same as in photo 7
204
LOW POSTURE Same as in photo 73
205
BIG DIPPER POSTURE See photo 83:

Torso: turns forward, lifting, to be facing to the east.

Hands: From the previous posture, your hands go along with your waist by going forward and
raising upward until in front of your chest, wrists crossing to make an X shape, left hand on the
inside, right hand on the outside.

Footwork: Your left knee bends forward as your right foot advances a step, toes touching down,

making a T-shaped empty stance. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: As your body goes forward and lifts up, you should use power from your spine
and should not lean too far forward. In this posture, the weight is on your left foot.
206
SITTING TIGER POSTURE See photo 84:

Torso: turns to be facing to the south.


Hands: Your hands withdraw toward your chest until in front of your left shoulder, then your right
hand becomes an upward-facing palm and pushes out forward, the palms correspondingly turning
to face outward, thumbs facing downward, as your left fingers form a hook, the hand extending to
the rear, fingers pointing upward.

Footwork: Your right foot retreat a step, toes pointing to the south, the leg sitting, knee bending,
your left foot withdrawing to be in front of your right foot, toes touching down, making a T-shaped
empty stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the east.

Points for attention: When practicing, your hands and feet must move in unison. The weight is on
your right leg.
207
CHOPPING PALM TO THE FACE Same as in photo 80


Points for attention: This posture is the same CHOPPING PALM TO THE FACE as in photo 80,
except in this case your torso is facing to the west.
208
DOUBLE-SLAP SWINGING LOTUS KICK (Part 1) See photo 85:

Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your right hand goes upward along your left arm from below your left armpit, the palm
correspondingly turning to face outward, until at the back of your left wrist, your hands crossing to
make an X shape, going along with your waist during its right turn by arriving in front of your right
shoulder, your left palm correspondingly turning to face outward.

Footwork: Your left foot stays where it is but pivots to the right until the toes are pointing to the
northeast, the leg sitting, knee bending, your right foot turning along with the movement and
shifting across to the right a half step, toes touching down, making a T-shaped empty stance. Your
left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture.


209
DOUBLE-SLAP SWINGING LOTUS KICK (Part 2) See photo 86:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your hands extend forward and swing from right to left.

Footwork: Your left leg standing straight, your right foot lifts and swings across from left to right to
kick both of your palms.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: The weight is entirely of your left foot. The path along which your left foot
swings makes a half circle.
210
BEND THE BOW, SHOOT THE TIGER See photo 87:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: From the previous posture, your hands arc to the left, downward, then upward, arriving
beside your right ribs, right hand above, left hand below, becoming fists, the tigers mouths facing
each other, then strike out diagonally to the northeast.

Footwork: Your right foot comes down to the forward right, the knee bending, your left leg
straightening, making a diagonal three-line stance. Your right foot is full, left foot empty.

Eyes: looking to the northeast.

Points for attention: As your fists strike out, your spine should be straight and should not be
reaching forward. Your shoulders must not lift. Your left arm is slightly straighter, your right fist at
about forehead level.
211
RISING UP AND REACHING OUT TO THE HORSE (Right) See photo 88:


Torso: facing to the east.

Hands: Your right fist becomes an upright-facing palm, withdraws to the rear, elbow hanging close
to your ribs, as your left hand becomes a palm, facing downward, withdrawing until in front of
your right shoulder, elbow bent, and pushes out forward, arm slightly bent, the wrist about an inch
in front of your right fingers.

Footwork: Your left leg sits, the knee bending, your right foot diagonally withdrawing a half step,
toes touching down. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: This is RISING UP AND REACHING OUT TO THE HORSE on the right side.
212
CHOPPING PALM TO THE FACE Same as in photo 80

Torso: facing to the east.


Hands: Your right hand withdraws to be placed horizontally in front of your chest, palm facing
downward, then goes outward along the top of your left arm and arcs around to arrive below your
left armpit, the palm correspondingly turning to face upward, as your left hand goes downward
and inward in front of your chest, becoming an upward-facing palm, and threads out over your
right wrist.

Footwork: Your right foot advances a half step, your left leg then advancing a step, the knee
bending, your right leg straightening, making a three-line stance. Your left foot is full, right foot
empty.

Eyes: looking level.

Points for attention: The paths that your hands make should be complete circles.
213
TORSO-FLUNG PUNCH Same as in photo 39

Points for attention: This posture is the same as in photo 39, except that it was in that case
preceded by FAN THROUGH THE BACK and is in this case preceded by CHOPPING PALM TO
THE FACE.
214
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 1) Same as in photo 28

Torso: turns to be facing to the west.

Hands: Your left hand becomes an upward-facing palm, withdraws in front of your chest, as your
right fist becomes a palm, lifts until about an inch in front of your left fingers, palm facing
downward.

Footwork: Your left leg sits, the knee bending, your right foot diagonally advancing a half step to
the west, heel touching down, toes lifted. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Eyes: following your hands.

Points for attention: This is a transitional posture. It flows into the following four postures.
215
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 2) Same as in photo 3
216
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 3) Same as in photo 4
217
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 4) Same as in photo 5
218
CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL (Part 5) Same as in photo 6
219
SINGLE WHIP Same as in photo 7
220
CLOSING POSTURE Same as in photo 1

Torso: turns to be facing squarely to the south, standing upright.

Hands: Your right hand becomes a palm, both hands hang down along your body, palms close to
your hips, then they lift up until beside your chest, palms facing downward, and slowly push down
until beside your hips.

Footwork: Your feet staying where they are, they pivot to point to the south, then your left foot
withdraws to stand next to your right foot shoulder width apart.

Eyes: looking forward.

Points for attention: At the conclusion of practicing the Taiji Boxing set, you return to the
BEGINNING POSTURE to make the CLOSING POSTURE. Each of the postures above are
complexly interwoven, but their transformations from one to another do not take them beyond the
Thirty-Seven Postures. In the beginning of the training, each posture is broken down into a few or
many sections. You should progress step by step and should not skip ahead in impatience.

SEQUENCE OF TAIJI BOXING POSTURES

Standing upright, facing squarely to the south, perform the BEGINNING POSTURE.
Squatting your body, advancing your left foot, pivoting your right foot, facing to the west,
perform CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL.
Pivoting your right foot, stepping out your left foot, facing to the west, perform SINGLE WHIP.
Turning your body to face to the south, advancing your right foot, perform RAISE THE HAND.
Staying where you are, twisting your body, perform WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS.
Pivoting your right foot, step out your left foot, facing to the east, perform BRUSH KNEE IN A
CROSSED STANCE on the left side.
Withdrawing your left foot, then your right, perform PLAY THE LUTE on the right side.
Stepping out your left foot, perform BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE on the left side.
Stepping out your right foot, perform BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE on the right side.
Stepping out your left foot, perform BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE on the left side.
Withdrawing your left foot, perform PLAY THE LUTE on the right side.
Advancing, perform PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH.
Staying where you are, perform SEALING SHUT.
Turning your body to face to the south, stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform
CROSSED HANDS.
Stepping out your left foot diagonally, facing to the southeast, perform DIAGONAL BRUSH
KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE.
Turning your body to face to the northwest, stepping out your right foot, perform CAPTURE
THE TIGER AND SEND IT BACK TO ITS MOUNTAIN.
Staying where you are, perform CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL.
Turning your body, stepping out your left foot, facing to the southeast, perform DIAGONAL
SINGLE WHIP.
Advancing your right foot, turning your body to face to the east, perform GUARDING PUNCH
UNDER THE ELBOW.
Retreating your left foot, perform RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY.
Retreating your right foot, perform RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY.
Retreating your left foot, perform RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY.
Turning your body to the south, advancing your left foot, perform DIAGONAL FLYING
POSTURE.
Advancing your right foot, perform RAISE THE HAND.
Staying where you are, perform WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS.
Pivoting your right foot, stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform BRUSH KNEE IN
A CROSSED STANCE on the left side.
Withdrawing your left foot, perform NEEDLING UNDER THE SEA.
Advancing your left foot, turning your body to face to the south, perform FAN THROUGH THE
BACK.
Turning your body to face to the northwest, stepping out your right foot, perform TORSOFLUNG PUNCH.
Staying where you are, perform CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL.
Pivoting your right foot, stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform SINGLE WHIP.
Turning your body to face to the southwest, stepping your left foot next to your right foot, then
retreating your left foot, perform the initial posture of CLOUDING HANDS.
Both feet pivoting to point to the southeast, perform LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.
Both feet pivoting to point to the southeast, perform LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.

Stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.
Both feet pivoting to point to the southeast, perform LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform SINGLE WHIP.
Bending your right leg, withdrawing your left foot, perform RISING UP AND REACHING OUT
TO THE HORSE on the left side.
Retreating your left foot to the northwest, perform KICK TO THE RIGHT SIDE, kicking to the
southeast with your right foot.
Lowering your right foot, perform KICK TO THE LEFT SIDE, kicking to the northeast with your
left foot.
Withdrawing your left foot, turning around to the left to face to the east, perform LEFT
PRESSING KICK.
Lowering your left foot, perform BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE on the left side.
Advancing your right foot, perform BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE on the right side.
Advancing your left foot, perform PLANTING PUNCH.
Turning around to face to the southeast, advancing your right foot, perform TORSO-FLUNG
PUNCH.
Kicking your right foot to the east, lowering your foot to the rear, then kicking your left foot out
to the southeast, perform DOUBLE KICK.
Your left foot coming down to the rear, withdrawing your right foot, facing to the east, perform
FIGHTING TIGER POSTURE.
Press your right foot to the east, then perform DOUBLE WINDS THROUGH THE EARS.
Perform DRAPING THE BODY, KICK, kicking to the east with your left foot.
Withdrawing your left foot toward the right, turning around to face to the west, lowering your
left foot, turning around to again face to the east, perform RIGHT PRESSING KICK.
Lowering your left [right] foot, advancing your left foot, perform PLAY THE LUTE on the right
side.
Advancing, perform PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH.
Staying where you are, perform SEALING SHUT.
Turning your body to face to the south, stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform
CROSSED HANDS.
Stepping out your left foot diagonally, facing to the southeast, perform DIAGONAL BRUSH
KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE.
Turning your body to face to the northwest, stepping out your right foot, perform CAPTURE
THE TIGER AND SEND IT BACK TO ITS MOUNTAIN.
Staying where you are, perform CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL.
Turning your body, stepping out your left foot, facing to the southeast, perform DIAGONAL
SINGLE WHIP.
Pivoting your left foot, stepping forward with your right foot, facing to the west, perform PLAY
THE LUTE on the left side.
Advancing your right foot, facing to the northwest, perform WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE.
Advancing your left foot, facing to the northwest, perform WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE.
Advancing your right foot, facing to the northwest, perform WILD HORSE VEERS ITS MANE.
Advancing your left foot, facing to the southwest, perform MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE.
Turning around to face to the southeast, advancing your right foot, perform MAIDEN WORKS
THE SHUTTLE.
Advancing your left foot, facing to the northeast, perform MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE.
Turning around to face to the northwest, advancing your right foot, perform MAIDEN WORKS

THE SHUTTLE.
Withdrawing your right foot, facing to the west, perform PLAY THE LUTE on the left side.
Your right foot advancing a half step, perform CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL.
Pivoting your right foot, stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform SINGLE WHIP.
Turning your body to face to the southwest, stepping your left foot next to your right foot, then
retreating your left foot, perform the initial posture of CLOUDING HANDS.
Both feet pivoting to point to the southeast, perform LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.
Both feet pivoting to point to the southeast, perform LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.
Both feet pivoting to point to the southeast, perform LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform SINGLE WHIP.
Staying where you are, bending your right leg, flattening your left leg to the ground, perform
LOW POSTURE.
Standing up, lifting your right foot, perform GOLDEN ROOSTER STANDS ON ONE LEG on the
right side.
Lowering your right foot, kicking with your left foot, perform GOLDEN ROOSTER STANDS ON
ONE LEG on the left side.
Your left foot turning to face to the left, coming down to the rear, perform RETREAT, DRIVING
AWAY THE MONKEY.
Retreating your right foot, perform RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY.
Retreating your left foot, perform RETREAT, DRIVING AWAY THE MONKEY.
Turning your body to the south, advancing your left foot, perform DIAGONAL FLYING
POSTURE.
Advancing your right foot, perform RAISE THE HAND.
Staying where you are, perform WHITE CRANE SWATS WITH ITS WINGS.
Pivoting your right foot, stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform BRUSH KNEE IN
A CROSSED STANCE on the left side.
Withdrawing your left foot, perform NEEDLING UNDER THE SEA.
Advancing your left foot, turning your body to face to the south, perform FAN THROUGH THE
BACK.
Turning your body to face to the northwest, stepping out your right foot, perform TORSOFLUNG PUNCH.
Advancing your left foot, facing to the west, perform PARRY, BLOCK, PUNCH.
Advancing your right foot, perform CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL.
Pivoting your right foot, stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform SINGLE WHIP.
Turning your body to face to the southwest, stepping your left foot next to your right foot, then
retreating your left foot, perform the initial posture of CLOUDING HANDS.
Both feet pivoting to point to the southeast, perform LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.
Both feet pivoting to point to the southeast, perform LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.
Both feet pivoting to point to the southeast, perform LEFT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping your right foot next to your left foot, perform RIGHT CLOUDING HANDS.
Stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform SINGLE WHIP.
Bending your right leg, withdrawing your left foot, perform RISING UP AND REACHING OUT
TO THE HORSE on the left side.

Advancing your left foot, threading your left palm, perform CHOPPING PALM TO THE FACE.
Staying where you are, turning your body to face to the west, perform CROSSED-BODY
SWINGING LOTUS KICK.
Lowering your right foot, perform BRUSH KNEE IN A CROSSED STANCE on the right side.
Advancing your left foot, perform PUNCH TO THE CROTCH.
Advancing your right foot, perform CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL.
Pivoting your right foot, stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform SINGLE WHIP.
Staying where you are, bending your right leg, flattening your left leg to the ground, perform
LOW POSTURE.
Standing up, advancing your right foot, perform BIG DIPPER POSTURE.
Retreating your right foot, shifting your left foot, facing to the south, perform SITTING TIGER
POSTURE.
Turning your body to face to the west, advancing your left foot, threading your left palm,
perform CHOPPING PALM TO THE FACE.
Staying where you are, turning around, facing to the east, perform DOUBLE-SLAP SWINGING
LOTUS KICK.
Lowering your right foot, facing to the northwest, perform BEND THE BOW, SHOOT THE
TIGER.
Bending your left leg, withdrawing your right foot, facing to the east, perform RISING UP AND
REACHING OUT TO THE HORSE on the right side.
Advancing your right foot a half step, threading your left palm, advancing your left foot, perform
CHOPPING PALM TO THE FACE.
Turning your body to face to the northwest, stepping out your right foot, perform TORSOFLUNG PUNCH.
Advancing your right foot, facing to the west, perform CATCH THE SPARROW BY THE TAIL.
Stepping out your left foot, facing to the east, perform SINGLE WHIP.
Withdrawing your left foot to stand in your original position, your hands hanging down,
perform CLOSING POSTURE.

SEVEN: PUSHING HANDS

Pushing hands is called playing hands, also touching hands or nearing hands. Two people use
their hands to push at each other in endless circles, round as a ball. The result of it is that they train
awareness and practical application.
The basics eight techniques are called: ward-off, rollback, press, push, pluck, rend, elbow, bump.
Throughout endless transformations, everything arises from these eight techniques.
In the beginning of the training, work only with choreographed movements proceeding in
sequence, thereby causing your sensitivity of touch to daily increase. Once you are skillful at this,
then you will at all times act nimbly, able to issue with but a single touch, no longer limited to
choreographed postures, transforming endlessly. Anticipating an opponents condition of
movement of stillness, emptiness and fullness, you will naturally have the abilities of neither

coming away nor crashing in and comply and bend then engage and extend. Able to both stick
and yield, a mere four ounces can move a thousand pounds.
1
THE EIGHT TECHNIQUES THEIR NAMES EXPLAINED & THEIR APPLICATIONS

1. WARD-OFF [peng]

Definition: to hold up, as in two hands carrying an object. It is a technical term in Taiji Boxings
pushing hands.

Application: When an opponent uses a hand to attack, I borrow his power by carrying his hand
diagonally upward with my hand in order to neutralize his force, and consequently he gets thrown
out.

2. ROLLBACK [l]

Definition: pronounced l, it means to extend, to distribute, to disseminate, a technical term.


Note: The actual character does not appear in any dictionary, and may be a mistake for another
character meaning to extend.

Application: When an opponent uses ward-off or press, I then rollback his force diagonally
downward to dispel his power, causing him to lose his balance and lean forward.

3. PRESS [ji]

Definition: to forcefully remove, to push away, to push to prevent someone from being able to
advance forward, a technical term.

Application: When an opponent uses rollback, I then bend my arm while using my other hand to
push forward toward his body and cast him out. He will naturally be unable to be stable and will
stumble away.

4. PUSH [an]

Definition: to press downward, to suppress, a technical term.

Application: When an opponent presses me, I use my hands to push downward and suppress his
action, causing his power to become ineffective, then I build upon this by throwing him away.

5. PLUCK [cai]

Definition: to pick, to take, a technical term.

Application: When an opponent uses ward-off or bump, I use a palm to take his hand and draw it
to the side to control his force and cause him to be unable to adjust his movement. I can then
attack him as I please.


6. REND [lie]

Definition: to twist, to turn, a technical term.

Application: When an opponent uses bump, I use a palm to turn away his force, causing his power
to be interrupted and putting his force under my control.

7. ELBOW [zhou]

Definition: the name of the outer point in the middle of your arm where it bends, a noun turned
into a verb as in the case of elbowing the opponent, a technical term.

Application: When an opponent wants to attack me, I take advantage of the situation by using my
elbow to strike to his chest or rib area.

8. BUMP [kao]

Definition: to lean against, to lean on, to lean upon someone else, a technical term.

Application: When an opponent uses rollback, I take advantage of the situation by advancing and
using my shoulder to bump him. If he does not adjust his posture, he will end up stumbling away.
2
LEVEL-CIRCLE PUSHING HANDS

A [marked as in the photos], stands straight, facing B [marked as ]. Your right foot advances a
step and the knee bends, your left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent, making a threeline stance, right foot full, left foot empty. Your right hand extends forward, the wrist settling, arm
slightly bent, to stick to the back of Bs right wrist, forming a posture of crossing. Your left hand
hangs down close to your hip.

B, stand straight. Your right foot advances a step and the knee bends, your left leg straightening,
though staying slightly bent, making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot empty. Your right
hand extends forward, the wrist settling, arm slightly bent, to stick to the back of As wrist, forming
a posture of crossing. Your left hand hangs down close to your hip. [See photo 1:]


Note: This photo shows the level-circle (single-hand) touching-hands posture on the right side.
Putting out the left hand and left foot forms the posture on the left side. It can be performed on
either side.

A, making a level-circle touching-hands posture on the right side, your right palm pushes
downward onto Bs right wrist, arcing a half circle, pushing forward toward the left side of Bs
chest, your right leg going along with your body by sitting slightly forward. [See photo 2:]

Note: This photo spotlights As movement. Bs movement is better depicted in the following photo.
However, both of these photos should be referred to together, the movement for both people
having been divided into the two photos.

B, also making a level-circle touching-hands posture on the right side, your right arm goes along
with As push, withdrawing toward your own chest, arm bending, then moving across your chest to
the right until in front of your right ribs, elbow hanging down, then strips aside As right hand,
pushing in turn onto As wrist. With your body sitting back, your left knee is bending, and with
your right heel touching the ground, the toes lift up. Your left foot is full, right foot empty. Your
right hand then arcs a half circle to the right and forward as you push forward toward the left side
of As chest, your right knee bending, your left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent,
making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot empty. [See photo 3:] (It is the same as A in
photo 2.)

Note: Then A performs as B did in photo 3. In this way, the movements go back and forth,
recycling over and over again. The exercise on the left side is performed the same, simply with the
hands and feet reversed.
3
VERTICAL-CIRCLE PUSHING HANDS

A, stand to Bs right side, facing B. Standing straight, your right foot advances a step to the outside
of Bs right foot, and the knee bends, your left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent,
making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot empty. Your right hand extends forward, the
wrist settling, arm slightly bent, to stick to the back of Bs wrist, forming a posture of crossing. Your
left hand hangs down close to your hip.

B, stand to As right side, facing A. Standing straight, your right foot advances a step to the outside
of Bs right foot, and the knee bends, your left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent,
making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot empty. Your right hand extends forward, the

wrist settling, arm slightly bent, to stick to the back of As wrist, forming a posture of crossing. Your
left hand hangs down close to your hip. [See photo 4:]

Note: This photo shows the vertical-circle (single-hand) touching-hands posture on the right side.
Putting out the left hand and left foot forms the posture on the left side. It can be performed on
either side.

A, making a vertical-circle touching-hands posture on the right side, your right hand draws toward
the rear, your body sitting back, your left knee bending, and with your right heel touching the
ground, the toes lift up. Your left foot is full, left foot empty. Your right hand then lifts up, passes in
front of your right shoulder, making a half circle, and send the back of the palm forward and
downward toward Bs right shoulder, cutting away Bs palm. With your right knee bending, your
left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent, make a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot
empty. [See photo 5:]

B, also making a vertical-circle touching-hands posture on the right side, go along with As cutting
action, your body sitting back, your left knee bending, and with your right heel touching the
ground, the toes lift up. Your left foot is full, right foot empty. Your right palm goes downward,
passing your right hip, making a half circle, and pushes forward toward As right hip. With your
right knee bending, your left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent, make a three-line
stance, right foot full, left foot empty. [See photo 6:]

A, go along with Bs movement. Your left knee bends, and with your right heel touching the
ground, the toes lift up. Your left foot is full, right foot empty. Your right hand then lifts up, passes
in front of your right shoulder, making a half circle, and again send the back of the palm forward
and downward toward Bs right shoulder, cutting away Bs palm. With your right knee bending,
your left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent, make a three-line stance, right foot full, left
foot empty. (It is the same as in photo 5.)

Note: Then B again performs as in photo 6, and the movement recycles in this way indefinitely.
The exercise on the left side is performed the same, simply with the hands and feet reversed.
Described above is vertical-circle pushing hands with A cutting B. If you wish to switch to B cutting
A, then when As hand is about to lift, B can draw back his hand in front of his right shoulder, make
a half circle, and send the back of his palm forward and downward toward As right shoulder,
cutting away As palm. (It is the same as A in photo 5.) A then performs according to Bs
movement. (It is the same as B in photo 6.) When A wants to switch again, it will be as before.
4
WARD-OFF & PUSH

A, stand facing B. Your right foot advances a step and the knee bends, your left leg straightening,
though staying slightly bent, making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot empty. Your right
hand extends forward, the wrist settling, arm slightly bent, to stick to the back of Bs wrist, forming
a posture of crossing. Your left hand then extends forward and the center of the palm touches Bs
right elbow.

B, stand straight. Your right foot advances a step and the knee bends, your left leg straightening,
though staying slightly bent, making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot empty. Your right
hand extends forward, the wrist settling, arm slightly bent, to stick to the back of As wrist, forming
a posture of crossing. Your left hand then extends forward and the center of the palm touches As
right elbow. [See photo 7:]

Note: This photo shows the double-hand touching-hands posture on the right side. When all four
arms are touching, they should be forming a circle, the right wrists touching at its center. The
posture on the left side is the same.

A, stand facing B, making the double-hand touching-hands posture on the right side, using your
right palm to touch the back of Bs right wrist, your left palm to touch Bs right elbow. Your hands
prop up Bs right arm, your left leg going along with your waist by slightly sitting downward, your
right toes lifting up. Your hands then push out forward toward Bs chest, your right knee bending
forward, your left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent, making a three-line stance, right
foot full, left foot empty.

B, go along with As movement. [See photo 8:]


Note: This photo spotlights As action of ward-off. When performing the exercise, pushing must
follow warding off without any gap between the two actions.

B, when you have been pushed by A, your body withdraws to the rear, your chest hollowing, your
left palm carrying As left palm, your right palm sticking to his left elbow, warding off and
neutralizing the force of As push, your left leg going along with your waist by sitting downward,
your right toes lifting up. Your left foot is full, right foot empty. Your hands then push out forward
toward As chest, your right knee bends forward, your left leg straightening, though staying slightly
bent, making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot empty.

A, go along with Bs movement. [See photo 9:]

Note: This photo spotlights Bs action of push. There should be a ward-off action before the push.
Because a single photo cannot depict the two actions, the movement has therefore been divided
into two photos which should be referred to together.

A, when you have been pushed by B, your body withdraws to the rear, your chest hollowing, your
left palm carrying Bs right [left] palm, your right palm sticking to his right [left] elbow, warding off
and neutralizing the force of Bs push, your left leg going along with your waist by sitting
downward, your right toes lifting up. Your left foot is full, right foot empty. Your hands then push
out forward toward Bs chest, your right knee bending forward, your left leg straightening, though
staying slightly bent, making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot empty.

B, go along with As movement.

Note: As movement of ward-off and push then recycles indefinitely, always using the actions of
ward-off and push to induce each other. If you want to switch sides, before the other person
pushes, instead of using your left palm to carry his left palm, you can bring up your right palm to
carry his right palm, your left palm still sticking to his right elbow, both hands propping up his
arm. Your hands then push forward toward his chest, your hands having already been switched.
5
PUSHING HANDS METHOD FOR THE FOUR PRIMARY TECHNIQUES (including two sequence
charts)

A, stand facing B making the double-hand touching-hands posture on the right side, using your
right palm to touch the back of Bs right wrist, your left palm to touch Bs right elbow. Your hands
in unison, arms bending, go diagonally downward to the right side with a rollback, your left leg
going along with your waist to sit downward, your right toes lifting up. Your left foot is full, right
foot empty.

B, when you are being rolled back by A, your body inclines forward to the left, your right hand
going along with As rollback by reaching out. [See photo 10:]


Note: This photo spotlights As action of rollback.

B, take advantage of the situation by bending your right arm across, the palm facing inward, your
left hand touching your right forearm, and press forward toward As chest. With your right knee
bending forward, your left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent, and make a three-line
stance, right foot full, left foot empty.

A, when you are being pressed by B, hollow your chest and go toward the left to neutralize the force
of Bs press, your left leg going along with your waist by sitting downward, your right toes lifting
up. Your left foot is full, right foot empty. [See photo 11:]

Note: This photo spotlights Bs action of press.

A, with your right palm pushing down on the back of Bs right wrist and your left palm pushing
down on his right elbow, push forward toward his chest, your right knee bending forward, your left
leg straightening, though staying slightly bent, making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot
empty.

B, go along with As movement. [See photo 12:]

Note: This photo spotlights As action of push.

B, when you are being pushed by A, withdraw your torso to the rear, hollowing your chest. Using
your left palm to carry As left palm, your right palm to stick to As left elbow, ward off upward to
neutralize the force of As push, your left leg going along with your waist by sitting downward, your
right toes lifting up. Your left foot is full, right leg empty.

A, go along with Bs movement. [See photo 13:]


Note: This photo spotlights Bs action of ward-off. In the four photos above, A rolls back, B
presses, A pushes, and B wards off.

B, after warding off A, your hands, arms bent, go diagonally downward to the left side with a
rollback, your left leg going along with your waist to sit downward, your right toes lifting up. Your
left foot is full, right foot empty.

A, when you are being rolled back by B, your body inclines forward to the right, your left hand
going along with Bs rollback by reaching out.

Note: B is now performing rollback.

A, take advantage of the situation by bending your left arm across, the palm facing inward, your
right hand touching your left forearm, and press forward toward Bs chest. With your right knee
bending forward, your left leg straightening, though staying slightly bent, make a three-line stance,
right foot full, left foot empty.

B, when you are being pressed by A, hollow your chest and go toward the left to neutralize the force
of As press, your left leg going along with your waist by sitting downward, your right toes lifting
up. Your left foot is full, right foot empty.

Note: A is now performing press.

B, with your left palm pushing down on the back of As left wrist and your right palm pushing down
on his left elbow, push forward toward his chest, your right knee bending forward, your left leg
straightening, though staying slightly bent, making a three-line stance, right foot full, left foot
empty.

A, go along with Bs movement.


Note: B is now performing push.

A, when you are being pushed by B, withdraw your torso to the rear, hollowing your chest. Using
your right palm to carry Bs right palm, your left palm to stick to Bs right elbow, ward off upward
to neutralize the force of Bs push, your left leg going along with your waist by sitting downward,
your right toes lifting up. Your left foot is full, right leg empty.

B, go along with As movement.

Note: A is now performing ward-off. In the movements above, B rolls back, A presses, B pushes,
and A wards off. The movement then returns to be as in photo 10, and the exercise recycles
indefinitely. It uses always the four primary techniques of ward-off, rollback, press, and push,
hence the name of the exercise. When practicing, there must be a single flow running through it
without interruption. To switch hands, then before B pushes, A can use his left palm to carry Bs
left palm instead of using his right palm to carry Bs right palm, and use his right palm to stick to
Bs left elbow, your hands, arms bent, go diagonally downward to the left side with a rollback.
(This describes A switching, but B would switch in the same way, for it is only a matter of switching
the techniques between left hand and right.)

Sequence chart 1:

A, roll back B.

B, press A.

A, push B.

B, ward off A.

B, roll back A.

A, press B.

B, push A.

A, ward off B.

Sequence chart 2 (moving-step):

A, ward off and roll back B while retreating.

B, push and press A while advancing.


B, ward off and roll back A while retreating.

A, push and press B while advancing.

A, ward off and roll back B while retreating.

B, push and press A while advancing.

B, ward off and roll back A while retreating.

A, push and press B while advancing.


6
PUSHING HANDS METHOD FOR THE FOUR SECONDARY TECHNIQUES (including a
sequence chart)

A, stand straight looking to the south, facing B, making the double-hand touching-hands posture
on the right side. Use your right palm to stick to the back of Bs right wrist, and using your left
forearm, arm bent, to roll back Bs right arm diagonally to the northwest, your right foot retreating
a step diagonally to the northwest, making an eight-character stance.

B, go along with As rollback by loosening your right arm forward and downward, and with your
left hand touching the inside of your right forearm, your right shoulder goes forward toward As
chest to bump him away, your left foot advancing a step diagonally toward the northwest and your
right foot promptly stepping between As legs. You are looking to the northeast, facing A. [See
photo 14:]

Note: This photo depicts As action of rollback and Bs action of bump.

A, going along with Bs bump, take advantage of the situation by using your left palm to push down
on the back of Bs left wrist, your right palm pushing down on Bs left elbow, and pluck downward,
your left foot shifting from the outside of Bs right foot to be between his legs. Your right leg is bent
and sitting downward, your left heel touching the ground, toes lifted up.

B, going along with As pluck, use your left palm to stick to the back of As left wrist, and using your
right forearm, arm bent, to roll back As left arm diagonally to the southwest, your left foot
retreating a step diagonally to the southwest, making an eight-character stance. [See photo 15:]

Note: This photo spotlights As action of pluck, but once A plucks, B rolls back. It is the same
thing as As rollback in photo 14, except the direction is different [and the hands and feet are
reversed], therefore no photo of Bs rollback has been included.

A, go along with Bs rollback by loosening your left arm forward and downward, then take
advantage of the situation by using your elbow to strike forward toward Bs chest, your right foot
advancing a step diagonally toward the southwest and your left foot promptly stepping between As
legs. You are looking to the southeast, facing B.

B, when you are getting elbowed by A, hollow your chest, using your right hand to push down on
As left upper arm, diagonally rending it away downward while at the same time using your left
palm to strike toward As face. [See photo 16:]


Note: This photo spotlights As action of elbow, but once A elbows, B rends. Because a single
photo cannot convey these two actions, the rending action will thus be shown in a further photo
below [when it is performed on the other side].

A, going along with Bs rending, use your left palm to stick to the back of Bs left wrist, and using
your right forearm, arm bent, to roll back Bs left arm diagonally to the northeast, your left foot
retreating a step diagonally to the northeast, making an eight-character stance.

B, go along with As rollback by loosening your left arm forward and downward, and with your
right hand touching the inside of your left forearm, your left shoulder goes forward toward As
chest to bump him away, your right foot advancing a step diagonally toward the northeast and your
left foot promptly stepping between As legs. You are looking to the northwest, facing A.

Note: Described here is As action of rollback and Bs action of bump. It is the same as the
scenario in photo 14, except the direction is different, and the hands and feet are reversed.

A, going along with Bs bump, take advantage of the situation by using your right palm to push
down on the back of Bs right wrist, your left palm pushing down on Bs right elbow, and pluck
downward, your right foot shifting from the outside of Bs left foot to be between his legs. Your left
leg is bent and sitting downward, your right heel touching the ground, toes lifted up.

B, going along with As pluck, use your right palm to stick to the back of As right wrist, and using
your left forearm, arm bent, to roll back As right arm diagonally to the southeast, your right foot
retreating a step diagonally to the southeast, making an eight-character stance.

Note: Described here is As action of pluck and Bs action of rollback. Refer to photo 15 for the
pluck and 14 for the rollback.

A, go along with Bs rollback by loosening your right arm forward and downward, then take
advantage of the situation by using your elbow to strike forward toward Bs chest, your left foot
advancing a step diagonally toward the southeast and your right foot promptly stepping between
As legs. You are looking to the southwest, facing B.

B, when you are getting elbowed by A, hollow your chest, using your left hand to push down on As
right upper arm, diagonally rending it away downward while at the same time using your right
palm to strike toward As face. [See photo 17:]

Note: This photo spotlights Bs action of rend. Each of the postures above are merge into a single
exercise. Upon returning to the initial technique, it can then recycle continuously. It uses always
the four secondary techniques of pluck, rend, elbow, and bump, hence the name of the exercise,
though it is also known as large rollback. When practicing, there must be a single flow running
through it without interruption.

Sequence chart:

A, roll back B to the northwest.

B, bump A.

A, pluck B.

B, roll back A to the southwest.

A, elbow B.


B, rend A.

A, roll back B to the northeast.

B, bump A.

A, pluck B.

B, roll back A to the southeast.

A, elbow B.

B, rend A.

In the various kinds of pushing hands exercises above, the footwork shown is always the samestep version, apart from in the four secondary exercise (which contains both the same-step
[opposite-step] version and moving steps). Once you are proficient with these exercises, you can be
switching feet and using the opposite-step version, as well as perform the four primary exercise
with moving steps.
If A bends his right leg and advances with his left foot, B sits onto his left leg and retreats with
his right foot. If B bends his left leg and advances with his right foot, A sits onto his right leg and
retreats with his left foot. This is the method of switching feet.
If A has right foot in front, left foot behind, while B has his left foot in front, right foot behind
this is opposite-step pushing hands.
For moving-step pushing hands: A retreats and B advances, then B retreats and A advances (and
vice versa). (This applies to the four primary exercise.) Continuously advancing and retreating in
this way, your stepping will become lively and unhesitating.

EIGHT: COMMENTARY TO THE BOXING THEORY

The Taiji Boxing Treatise is attributed to Zhang Sanfeng. As for the Taiji Boxing Classic, the
Thirteen Dynamics Song, Understanding How to Practice, and the Playing Hands Song, they were
written by Wang Zongyue. The ideas within them are difficult to understand, and so I have
included additional commentary to supply students with a means to study them.
1
TAIJI BOXING TREATISE WITH COMMENTARY

Once there is any movement, your entire body should be nimble and alert. There especially needs
to be connection from movement to movement.


Right from the beginning posture, you must not put forth effort. Your body will then naturally be
nimble, energy starting from within. To be connected means that when you are performing the
postures, they should be continuous without interruption. If your postures do not connect, there
is interruption between them, and thus your energy is interrupted. Once your energy has been
interrupted, an opponent can take advantage of the gap and get through. Therefore have a nimble
alertness and a continuity. You should give this extra attention.

Energy should be roused and spirit should be collected within. Do not allow there to be cracks or
gaps anywhere, pits or protrusions anywhere, breaks in the flow anywhere.

When energy is roused, there are no gaps between breaths. When spirit is collected within, there is
no disorder in your techniques. Therefore with a calm mind, a mild energy, and a natural posture,
you will be without the errors of having pits and protrusions, of stopping and starting. If your mind
is not concentrated and your posture is uneven, it will be easy for an opponent to control you. If
your movement is coming to a halt and starting over, it will be very easy for him to take advantage
of the moment. Both of these things will be a source of failure. They are the most important things
to avoid in Taiji Boxing.

Starting from your foot, issue through your leg, directing it at your waist, and expressing it at
your fingers. From foot through leg through waist, it must be a fully continuous process, and
whether advancing or retreating, you will then catch the opportunity and gain the upper hand.

Taiji Boxings breathing is deep and long, able to reach up to your head and down to your heels.
Therefore power goes from your heel, issuing through your leg, then to your waist, and to your
headtop and fingers, all in a continuous flow of natural breathing. Therefore when you encounter
an opponent, alternate between advancing and retreating, always driven by intention. When all
parts are coordinated with each other, you will naturally be able to catch the opportunity and gain
the upper hand.

If you miss and your body easily falls into disorder, the problem must be in your waist and legs,
so look for it there.

If you do not catch the opportunity or gain the upper hand, it must be that your hands are moving
but your waist and legs are not moving, the two sections not working in concert. Therefore when
performing a technique, if you have a moment of inefficiency, it may result in your bodys posture
falling into disorder, and so you must be mindful of what is going on at your waist and legs, for
there is where the error lies.

This is always so, regardless of the direction of the movement, be it up, down, forward, back, left,
right. And in all of these cases, the problem is a matter of your intent and does not lie outside of
you. With an upward comes a downward, with a forward comes a backward, and with a left
comes a right. If your intention wants to go upward, then harbor a downward intention, like

when you reach down to lift up an object. You thereby add a setback to the opponents own
intention, thus he cuts his own root and is defeated quickly and certainly.

With each movement, you must always move your waist and legs, and then you will be able to do as
you please. You must have an upward, a downward, a forward, a backward, a leftward, a rightward,
and then you can always adjust according to the situation. Otherwise even though you move your
waist and legs, it will be of no use. If your intention is to attack the opponent above, instead make a
posture of attacking him below. This will cause him to not know what you are doing and end up
defending one area to be defeated in another. In this way, you can cut the root to topple the trunk.

Empty and full must be distinguished clearly. In each part there is a part that is empty and a
part that is full. Everywhere it is always like this, an emptiness and a fullness. Throughout your
body, as the movement goes from one section to another there is connection. Do not allow the
slightest break in the connection.

Every time you practice a technique, you must distinguish clearly between emptiness and fullness.
If I am able in every posture know where is the emptiness and the fullness, then upon encountering
an opponent, when he is full, I am empty, and when he is empty, I am full. Once fullness and
emptiness is clear, the decision has been made between victory and defeat. When performing a
technique, the most important thing is that it be natural. Breathing especially needs to be
continuous. Your whole body in every part becomes insubstantial, power stored within. All sections
are linked with each other, and like a mechanical pivot, the levering of one part causes all parts to
move with no discontinuity anywhere, a pure efficiency. Taiji is exactly like this idea.

Long Boxing: it is like a long river flowing into the wide ocean, on and on ceaselessly

Taiji Boxing is also called Long Boxing. But over the years, as the art has sunk further into oblivion,
styles of it have become more numerous. Although their names are different, they all have the
same principles.

The thirteen dynamics are: warding off, rolling back, pressing, pushing, plucking, rending,
elbowing, bumping, advancing, retreating, stepping to the left, stepping to the right, and staying
in the center. Warding off, rolling back, pressing, and pushing are the four primary techniques.
Plucking, rending, elbowing, and bumping are the four secondary techniques.

An original note says: The material above was written by Zhang Sanfeng. He wanted all the heroes
in the world to live long and not merely gain skill. Each of the postures in Taiji Boxing, as well as
the techniques of warding off, rolling back, pressing, pushing, and so on, have been explained in
the sections covering the solo set and pushing hands.
2
TAIJI BOXING CLASSIC WITH COMMENTARY


Taiji is born of wuji. It is the manifestation of movement and stillness, and the mother of yin and
yang.

When everything was a vagueness, before yin and yang [the passive and active aspects] had
become distinct, that was the state of wuji [nonpolarity]. From nonpolarity was generated the taiji
[grand polarity]. The grand polarity is divided into the passive and active aspects, manifesting as
the qualities of emptiness and fullness. This boxing art is able to use passive and active, emptiness
and fullness, as its theme. That is why the art is called Taiji. Who would say it does not fit?

When there is movement, the passive and active aspects become distinct from each other. When
there is stillness, they return to being indistinguishable.

When your body moves, passive and active aspects become distinct and can be made use of. When
there is no movement, passive and active merge together and thus there is no distinguishing
between them.

Neither going too far nor not far enough, comply and bend then engage and extend.

Whenever you make contact with an opponent, you must examine for where his intention is going
and control him at the point of contact. By being mindful of my own movements of bending and
extending, I will keep to an appropriate degree in my actions of complying and engaging. Thus I
will naturally be without the errors of either going too far or not far enough.

He is hard while I am soft this is yielding. My energy is smooth while his energy is coarse this
is sticking.

When hardness is used to meet hardness, there will be mutual resistance. When softness is used to
control hardness, force will be neutralized. The opponent will thus lose his capacity, his energy
coarsening, and I will achieve the best position, my energy staying smooth. By sticking to his
coarse energy with my smooth energy, I will always win.

If he moves fast, I quickly respond, and if his movement is slow, I leisurely follow. Although there
is an endless variety of possible scenarios, there is only this single principle [of yielding and
sticking] throughout. Once you have ingrained these techniques, you will gradually come to
identify energies, and then from there you will work your way toward something miraculous.
But unless you practice a lot over a long time, you will never have a breakthrough.

An opponents attack will have a speed. If you can observe whether he is slow or fast and respond
accordingly, you will naturally stick to him without disconnecting. There is an endless variety of
possible scenarios. Although they are different, my sticking and following is a constant principle.
However, you have to be identifying energies in order to be able to discuss this. If you want to

identify energies, you must first practice diligently. The more you practice, the more refined your
skill will be, and thus with a lot of practice over a long time you will naturally be able to understand
the principles of applying power, to become ever more miraculous.

Forcelessly press up your headtop. Energy sinks to your elixir field.

Forcelessly is the opposite of forcefully. Headtop means the top of the head. The brain within
guides the whole body. Therefore while you move energy, you must course spirit through to your
headtop, and then you will be able to get your whole body to function as a single unit. The elixir
field lies below the navel. Deep breathing causes energy to sink there. Once energy is sufficient,
you will be able to be as immovable as a mountain, not easily affected or toppled by an opponent.
The intent of this sinking is to sink down gradually. Be careful not to try to force it to happen.

Neither lean nor slant. Suddenly hide and suddenly appear. When there is pressure on the left,
the left empties. When there is pressure on the right, the right disappears. [Due to the different
contexts of empty and disappear, this section is referring to facing an opponent with your right
side forward, left foot behind.]

To neither lean nor slant means that your body should be standing upright. To suddenly hide
and suddenly appear refers to the subtlety of your changes. If an opponent attacks me on the left
side, I shift the weight to the left, emptying and disappearing. If an opponent attacks me on the
right side, I shift the weight to the right, gently neutralizing. These things cause his force to lose its
focus. To become an unfindable target is the highest skill.

When looking up, it is still higher. When looking down, it is still lower. When advancing, it is even
farther. When retreating, it is even nearer.

If an opponent goes upward to attack me, he feels me to be too high to get to, as though he is trying
to reach the sky. Or if he goes downward to attack me, he likewise feels me to be too deep to find,
as though he will fall from a precipice into the ocean. If he wants to advance, he feels me to be so
far away that he cannot reach me with his hand. If he wants to retreat, he sees me crowding him so
much that he cannot escape even by stepping away. These words describe the effects of sticking,
connecting, adhering, and following and how to perform them. Only those who have practiced to
the point of skill will be able to understand these principles.

A feather cannot be added and a fly cannot land. The opponent does not understand me, only I
understand him. A hero is one who encounters no opposition, and it is through this kind of
method that such a condition is achieved.

A practitioner of this boxing art is able to concentrate his mind on the goal is sure to progress in

skill so much that he will achieve perfection before he expects to. It is said that once you are at a
high level with your awareness and sensitivity, you will respond to the slightest touch. Even the
lightest things, such as feathers and flies, cannot be put upon him. Therefore between myself and
the opponent, the situation of our emptiness and fullness can only be understood by me. I am able
to defend against him, but he is unable to respond to me. Thus I will be invincible.

There are many other schools of boxing arts besides this one. Although the postures are different
between them, they generally do not go beyond the strong bullying the weak and the slow
yielding to the fast. The strong beating the weak and the slow submitting to the fast are both a
matter of inherent natural ability and bear no relation to skill that is learned.

These words address external styles of boxing arts. Although there are many different branches of
them, they really do not go beyond using strength to bully those without strength and using fast
hands to defeat those with slow hands, nothing more than the notions that if my hands are fast, I
will win, and if his strength is weak, he will lose. These things have to do with natural ability and
are not purely the result of learning a skill. However, Taiji is the opposite, not needing to rely on
strength or speed to defeat opponents.

Examine the phrase four ounces moves a thousand pounds, which is clearly not a victory
obtained through strength. Or consider the sight of an old man repelling a group, which could
not come from an aggressive speed. Stand like a scale. Move like a wheel. If you drop one side,
you can move. If you have equal pressure on both sides, you will be stuck.

Taiji Boxing emphasizes lightness and insubstantiality rather than intentions of heaviness.
Therefore once you have practiced to a highly skillful level, you will truly be able to use four ounces
to move a thousand pounds. Even if the opponent has more strength than me, his energy is coarse.
Even if I have less strength than he, my energy is smooth. I use the smoothness to adhere to the
coarseness. The opponent loses his adaptability, and thus his speed is of no use. When standing,
you must be as balanced as a scale. Then you will be able to both sink energy down and course
energy up through to your headtop. Using your waist as an axle, your hands and feet will follow
along with its movements by making movements that are always rounded. Whenever you
encounter an opponent, if both of you contend against each other using force, then the one with
greater strength will win, the situation of double pressure. If one uses force and the other relaxes
his strength, the one relaxing is sinking is dropping to one side. No matter how powerful the
opponent may be, he will lose his firm stability and slip away into my neutralization.

We often see one who has practiced hard for many years yet is unable to perform any
neutralizations and is generally under the opponents control, and the issue here is that this error
of double pressure has not yet been understood. If you want to avoid this error, you must
understand passive and active. In sticking there is yielding and in yielding there is sticking. The

active does not depart from the passive and the passive does not depart from the active, for the
passive and active exchange roles. Once you have this understanding, you will be identifying
energies.

Practice the art with an emphasis on functionality. If you do not come to realize this point, then
you may practice for many years and still by controlled by the opponent no matter what you try.
This means you are committing the error of double pressure. If you want to avoid this error, you
must study the theory of passive and active, which have to do with emptiness and fullness. Upon
encountering an opponent, if I feel there is double pressure, I drop one side. If he empties, I will
fill, but if he increases pressure, I will lighten the pressure. When sticking, also be yielding, and
when yielding, also be able to stick. If you can both stick and yield, then you understand passive
and active, and thus you will be able to adapt according to the opponents actions and respond to
them with ease. You can pretty much say at this point that you are identifying energies.

Once you are identifying energies, then the more you practice, the more efficient your skill will
be, and by absorbing through experience and by constantly contemplating, gradually you will
reach the point that you can do whatever you want. The basic of basics is to forget about your
plans and simply respond to the opponent. We often neglectfully ignore what is right in front of
us in favor of something that has nothing to do with our immediate circumstances. For such
situations it is said: Miss by an inch, lose by a mile. You must understand all this clearly.

The most important thing in Taiji Boxing is identifying energies. However, once you are identifying
energies, you must still practice every day with increased attention and contemplation. With
understanding comes progress. What is smelted in the mind becomes cast in the body, hands,
stepping, and gaze. Thus when your mind moves, your body will follow along, your limbs
complying to your wishes. Achieving this boxing quality is entirely a matter of taking a passive
position rather than the initiative. Always move according to the opponents movements rather
than your own volition. Do not allow the error of double pressure, focus on seizing victory by
dropping one side. If there is the slightest force of resistance, you are unable to let go of yourself
and follow along with him. You have abandoned the root to seek the twigs. You are sure to be
under the opponents control and will lose. You have to pay attention to this concept, the difference
between miles and inches.
3
THIRTEEN DYNAMICS SONG

Do not neglect any of the thirteen dynamics,


their command coming from your lower back.
You must pay attention to the alternation of empty and full,
then energy will flow through your whole body without getting stuck anywhere.
In stillness, movement stirs, and then in moving, seem yet to be in stillness,
for the magic lies in making adjustments based on being receptive to the opponent.
In every movement, very deliberately control it by the use of intention,
for once you achieve that, it will all be effortless.
At every moment, pay attention to your waist,
for if there is complete relaxation within the belly, energy is primed.
Your tailbone is centered and spirit penetrates to your headtop,
thus your whole body will be nimble and your headtop will be pulled up as if suspended.
Pay careful attention in your practice
that you are letting bending and extending, contracting and expanding, happen as the situation
requires.
Beginning the training requires personal instruction,
but mastering the art depends on your own unceasing effort.
Whether we are discussing in terms of theory or function, what is the constant?
It is that mind is sovereign and body is subject.
If you think about it, what is emphasizing the use of intention going to lead you to?
To a longer life and a longer youth.
Repeatedly recite the words above,
all of which speak clearly and hence their ideas come through without confusion.
If you pay no heed to those ideas, you will go astray in your training,
and you will find you have wasted your time and be left with only sighs of regret.

The concepts within the Thirteen Dynamics Song have already been explained in the previous
sections, and therefore will not be repeated with further annotation here.
4
UNDERSTANDING HOW TO PRACTICE WITH COMMENTARY

Use mind to move energy. You must get the energy to sink. It is then able to collect in your bones.
Use energy to move your body. You must get the energy to be smooth. Your body can then easily
obey your mind.

The mind is the hinge of the body. Intention is the expression of the mind. Energy is the raw
material with which the mental intention issues power. Therefore with a movement of the hinge,
the whole thing is moved. Wherever your intention goes, energy will follow it there, thus if you can
get your intention to a place, you can move energy. Your intention should be calm, and then energy
can collect in your bones. If you work hard for a long time until you are skillful, naturally you will

be to use energy to move your body. But where energy arrives, it must not cause any obstruction.
Understanding this, then as your movements go back and forth, they will all come from your mind.

If you can raise your spirit, then you will be without worry of being slow or weighed down. Thus
it is said [in the Thirteen Dynamics Song]: Your whole body will be nimble and your headtop
will be pulled up as if suspended. Your mind must perform alternations nimbly, and then you
will have the qualities of roundness and liveliness. Thus it is said [in the Thirteen Dynamics
Song] that you are to pay attention to the alternation of empty and full.

Taiji Boxing most of all emphasizes spirit. Thus spirit is to be coursing through to your headtop as
energy is sinking down to your elixir field. With spirit expressing thus, movement will accord with
your mind, and you will naturally be without the error of sluggishness. While sticking to an
opponent, you particularly have to go along with the situation and adjust your intention
accordingly, rather than using awkward effort, and thus you will achieve efficiency. If you do it in
this way, your emptiness and fullness will be switching always as you intend, and then you will
have the qualities of being rounded and lively.

When issuing power, you must sink and relax, concentrating it in one direction. Your posture
must be straight and comfortable, bracing in all directions.

When issuing power, your mind, hands, and feet, must all be calm. The reason for this is that if you
are free of distracting thoughts, your intention will be focused, and you are without awkward effort,
your body will be loose. With your spirit thereby concentrated, regardless of what kind of attack the
opponent makes, you will always be able to deal with it easily. With your headtop suspended, your
body will be upright. With energy sinking down, your body will be at ease. With such stability, you
will naturally be able to brace in all eight directions the four cardinal directions and the four
corners directions.

Move energy as though through a winding-path pearl, penetrating even the smallest nook. Wield
power like tempered steel, so strong there is nothing tough enough to stand up against it.

Throughout your body, at no matter how small an area, if intention is focused there, energy will
always go to it. You will seem to have the roundness of a sphere, and thus any force coming your
way will be neutralized. The movements in Taiji Boxing appear to have no strength. But the power
that is issued from within is limitless, like steel folded hundreds of times, nothing tough enough to
stand up against it.

The shape is like a falcon capturing a rabbit. The spirit is like a cat pouncing on a mouse. In
stillness, be like a mountain, and in movement, be like a river.

The manner of the changing movements is like a falcon in the sky suddenly dropping to capture a

rabbit. This means to circle unpredictably. The concentrating of spirit and storing of power waiting
to be issued is like a cat crouching down about to pounce on a mouse when the right moment
comes. To be as still as a mountain is a metaphor for being fully stable and solid rather than
floating up. To move like a river is a metaphor for the energy flowing ceaselessly.

Store power like drawing a bow. Issue power like loosing an arrow. Within curving, seek to be
straightening. Store and then issue. Power comes from your spine. Step according to your bodys
changes.

Drawing a bow all the way into a half moon shape, right down to the fifteenth day of the month,
means storing up energy fully. Loosing an arrow is then like a shooting star, representing the speed
with which power is issued. To neutralize an opponents hardness is a matter of curving. Once it
has been neutralized, I have to take advantage of the opportunity to attack. For power to issue is a
matter of straightening. By sinking your shoulders, energy will course through. Power will go from
your spine to your fingertips. Footwork goes along with the movements and turnings of your body,
steps alternating without pattern.

To gather is to release. Disconnect but stay connected. In the back and forth [of your arms], there
must be folding. In the advance and retreat [of your feet], there must be variation.

Gathering means sticking and neutralizing. Releasing means attacking the opponent. Once you are
able to neutralize him, then you are able to attack him. When attacking, your power will seem to
finish, but your intention is able to adhere and reconnect. Folding means the act of transforming
inside and out. As folding comes and goes, emptiness and fullness are not fixed, and thus there is
transformation. Your footwork must have a quality of variation, and then your advancing and
retreating will happen as you wish.

Extreme softness begets extreme hardness. Your ability to be nimble lies in your ability to
breathe. By nurturing energy with integrity, it will not be corrupted. By storing power in
crooked parts, it will be in abundant supply.

Taiji Boxing uses softness as hardness. When practicing, one who moves very softly and slowly
builds that much more power until his energy becomes indomitable. Therefore the softest thing in
the world can achieve hardness. Breathing means the giving out and taking in of energy. One who
is good at nurturing energy is able to draw it right it and send it to his elixir field, then send it
throughout his whole body. Wherever his intention goes, energy arrives, and his limbs become
livened. He does not have the error of a stiff and sluggish manner, and thus for him a vastness
energy is a constant, functioning whenever he applies it. When encountering an opponent, your
crooked parts will store power and standby to issue. If there is no issuing, no power gets used, but
upon issuing, no one would be able to resist it.

Your mind makes the command, the energy is its flag, and your waist is its banner. First strive to
open up, then strive to close up, and from there you will be able to attain a refined subtlety.

Your mind is the commander issuing orders. The energy is then the flag which conveys the orders,
sending them to your limbs. Your waist is the middle of the army, where the large banner stands
and functions to control the troops to the left, right, forward, behind, in the attacking of the enemy.
When practicing either the solo set or the pushing hands, you should open up to grasp the method.
Then once the movement of every part can coordinate efficiently, strive to close up, big circles
turning into small circles turning into no circles, whereupon what you are doing will be hidden in
subtlety. Only one who has a refined skill can discuss this, for his intention is able to be reduced to
nothing more than: gather, release.

It is also said:
First in your mind, then in your body. Your abdomen relaxes completely and then energy collects
in your bones. Your spirit should be comfortable and your body should be calm at every
moment be mindful of this. Always remember: if one part moves, every part moves, and if one
part is still, every part is still.

In Taiji Boxing, the mental intention drives the machine, the body being the machinery. Therefore
intention comes first, then the body. When your belly feels natural, it is relaxed, and when you are
free of distracting thoughts, you are relaxed completely. Your energy will naturally be able to
gather into your bones, and thus your spirit will be comfortable and your body will be calm, and
you will respond leisurely to changing circumstances instead of getting flustered and confused.
When inside are connected and operating in unison, the effect is that movement involves the
movement of all parts and stillness involves the stillness of all parts.

As the movement leads back and forth, energy stays near your back and gathers in your spine.
Inwardly bolster spirit and outwardly show ease. Step like a cat and move energy as if drawing
silk.

When fighting with an opponent, it is easy in the midst of contending back and forth for control to
make the errors of your stance lightening or your energy floating up. Therefore you must sink
energy and get it to stick to your back to gather in your spine, then power will come from your
spine and be sent to every part. With your spirit firm and your body at ease, you will naturally be
able to show the opponent nothing but composure. Footwork that imitates the stepping of a cat
links the postures. Movement that is like the drawing of silk is continuous and uninterrupted.

Throughout your body, your mind should be on your spirit rather than on the energy, for if you
are fixated on the energy, your movement will become sluggish. Whenever your mind is on the
energy, there will be no power, whereas if you ignore the energy and let it take care of itself,
there will be pure strength. The energy is like a wheel and your waist is like an axle.

Taiji Boxing focuses on spirit and does not emphasize strength. Those who emphasize physical
strength are sure to have nothing more than the chaotic energy that comes with awkward effort.
Therefore those who are good at nurturing energy will use the waist as the center of expressing
movement. The energy is like a wheel that is rotated around this axle and is thereby transported to
the rest of the body. without the slightest obstruction.
5
PLAYING HANDS SONG WITH COMMENTARY (note: playing hands means pushing hands)

Ward-off, rollback, press, and push must be taken seriously.


With coordination between above and below, the opponent will hardly find a way in.
I will let him attack me with as much power as he likes,
for I will tug with four ounces of force to move his of a thousand pounds.
Guiding him in to land on nothing, I then close on him and send him away.
I stick to him and go along with his movement instead of pulling away or crashing in.

[line 1] The four techniques of ward-off, rollback, press, and push must all be in accordance with
the standards of the teaching as it has been passed down, and must not be even slightly violated.
[line 2] By working at it over a long period, skillfulness will deepen, and then there will be
coordination between the upper body and the lower. When one part moves, every part will move.
The opponent will be unable to attack.
[line 3] Even if he comes in to hit me with a lot of power,
[line 4] I slightly tug on his movement with a little extra, and so my four ounces naturally can
move his thousand pounds. When he applies such force, he will be incapable of altering his
direction once he has started along it.
[line 5] I follow his direction and tempt him farther along it. His attack thus lands on nothing.
[line 6] But it is essential that I stick to him and move along with him rather than pull away from
him or crash into him. Thus I will have attained this skill.

It is also said:
If he takes no action, I take no action, but once he takes even the slightest action, I have already
acted. The power seems relaxed but not relaxed, about to expand but not yet expanding. When
my power finishes, my intent of it continues.

During playing hands, I calmly await his action. If he takes no action, I take no action. If he takes
the slightest action, his action will assuredly be in some direction, so my intention will move ahead
of his action by going along the path he wants to take, and I will then take the initiative before he
does and he will consequently stumble away. Therefore the more effort the opponent uses, the
heavier he will fall. When he has not yet acted, I am in a posture of concentrating spirit and storing
power. My intention seems relaxed but not relaxed. My power is about to expand but not is yet
expanding. Once the opportunity comes, I release power. When I release, the power seems to finish
but the intent of it does not finish.

The texts above from past teachers present Taiji Boxings profound subtleties in full. Because I
wished to make the theory clear and simple for those of future generations who have aspirations in
the art, I have made these brief annotations in order to aid beginners.