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VOL. 44 NO.

www.discoverpass.wa.gov

MAY 2016

PRIZE INSIDE on pages 3-6:


Mission Critical & Public Service Matters posters

State Employee
The official newspaper of the
WASHINGTON FEDERATION OF STATE
EMPLOYEES/AFSCME Council 28AFL-CIO

WASHINGTON

Now good on either


of two vehicles!

Howard Jorgenson 1939-2016

In Jorgies footsteps
The best tribute to Howard
Jorgenson is the work of our
elected bargaining teams today.
They and the members doing actions in support of strong
contracts make real Jorgensons
long-sought dream of full-scope
collective bargaining.

As bargaining 2016 begins, we all


remember the man who started it all

hen bargaining
starts this month on
our new contracts,
we can thank Howard Jorgensons vision.
Jorgenson, the longest
serving WFSE/AFSCME
president who later became
president of the Retired Public
Employees Council of Washington/AFSCME, died May 2.
Jorgenson in 1987 spearheaded a WFSE/AFSCME
blue-ribbon task force and
ensuing study that put us on
the road to full-scope collective bargaining. Our first collective bargaining bill hit the
Legislature in 1989. Hurdles
remained that blocked passage until 2002.
Without his passion to
right old wrongs on our pay
and benefits, we likely would

South Puget Sound Community College members


gather April 28 to show support for their coalition
bargaining team -- and a strong contract.

still be going
hat in hand to
INSIDE:
the Legislature every two
More
years, said
about the
current WFSE/ life and
AFSCME Presi- impact of
dent Sue HenHoward
ricksen.
JorgenHis vison.
sion for WFSE
See 8.
members and
our Labor
Movement always stretched
beyond the
horizon, said
Duwane Huffaker, who succeeded Jorgenson as union
president in 1997.
He knew what we needed before we knew.

Our Western Washington University Bargaining Team.

Our Corrections Supplemental Bargaining Team.

ABOVE: Our University of Washington Bargaining Team.


ABOVE RIGHT: Our bargaining team for The Evergreen State College
Classified Staff.
BELOW RIGHT: Our Interpreters Bargaining Team.

WFSE/AFSCME wages court battle over release of your private information


Sign online
petition, urge
change in privacy laws
Its up to the courts
whether state employees privacy rights are upheld in the
face of the so-called Freedom
Foundations request to get
your personal information.
The release of that information was blocked at least
until May 27.
The Washington Federation of State Employees/
AFSCME Council 28 filed
for an injunction asking the
court to stop the release of the

birthdates
of state
employees
in several
agencies,
colleges
and uniUpdates: wfse.org
versities
represented by the union.
Thurston County Superior Court Judge Gary Tabor
and two other judges said before scheduled hearings May
13 that it makes sense (and
good use of judicial time) to
consider consolidating the
motions from WFSE/AFSCME and other unions.
The motion by WFSE/
AFSCME to block release of

your birthdate was continued


(or postponed) until May 27.
The two-week delay was
to allow the court to consider consolidation of all the
unions motions.
With the postponement,
WFSE/AFSCME and the other parties agreed the state will
delay release of any personal
information until at least May
27. Judge Tabor signed an
order making that agreement
official.
Take action!:
Sign the online petition! Tell the
Freedom Foundation to respect
our privacy!
The Freedom Foundation

in its briefs to the court says


that if contacted by them, you
can request that they stop.
So lets save them the
trouble. Sign our new online
petition demanding the Freedom Foundation stop this violation of your privacy.
Sign the online petition at:
https://actionnetwork.org/petitions/do-not-call-registry
We must change the law.
Tell legislators now they
need to change the law when
lawmakers return in January
so this never happens again.
Go to: https://actionnetwork.org/
letters/protect-my-privacy

MEMBERS IN ACTION
Get involved in our contract campaigns:
http://wfse.org/neverquit/

Use the poster signs on pages 3-6


for actions at your worksite
in support of strong contracts.

King County Council, state Salary Survey give unexpected moral boost as bargaining starts
The King County Council
and the states own Salary
Survey have given WFSE/
AFSCME members a moral
boost as bargaining starts this
month for General Government and Higher Education
members.
King County Council
members on May 3 signed a
letter to Gov. Jay Inslee and
eight legislative leaders to
address the inequities faced
by state employees living in
high-cost areas. We also ask
that you update the relevant
state laws and regulations to
create an equal standard of
living for state employees.
This is the latest develop-

ment in the effort endorsed by


delegates to the 2015 WFSE/
AFSCME Convention when
they passed Resolution 15
Equal Standard of Living for
State Employees.
Meanwhile, the states
latest Salary Survey shows
that the gap between state
employee pay and market
rates has grown dramatically
in just two years.
And that state employees
really are the 99%.
The survey shows that 99
percent of state employee job
classes are paid below market
rates counterparts in the
private and public sectors, in-

King County Council members at signing of letter to state leaders on pay


inequality in high-cost areas of state. From left: Councilmember Dave Upthegrove, Councilmember Jeanne Kohl-Welles, Brooks Salazar (Local 304), supporter Chris Cicierski, Council Chair Joe McDermott (sitting), Dave Madden
(Local 304) and Councilmember Larry Gossett.

state and out-of-state.


In 2014, the pay gap was
81 percent.
The Office of Financial
Management released the
2016 Salary Survey to the
public, state employees and
the media on April 21. It was
conducted by Segal Waters
Consulting.
Neither of these developments guarantees anything.
But they validate what weve
said that state employees are
struggling in high-cost areas
of the state, theyre not overpaid and unless something
is done, the recruitment-andretention crisis will continue.

Check out these other stories, photos and video


on WFSE/AFSCMEs communications network
Go to: http://wfse.org/quick-links-516/
MaryBe McMillan Hope is
contagious
keynote address at WFSE/
Mobilize Now!
Conference

Rally at
So. Seattle
College

Licensing members march on boss


Skamania-Klickitat DOT members prove Public Service Matters
Department of Transportation members of Skamania-Klickitat Local 716
met April 19 to discuss workplace issues and contract bargaining support
actions. The event was organized by Shop Steward Jim Beierle to address
inappropriate management actions toward crews and office staff.

Workers Memorial Day at Western


State Hospital

Special Commitment Center


members
demand a safe
workplace
Public Service Recognition Week
around the state

IN
MEMORIAM

State Employee
WASHINGTON

Washington State Employee (USPS 981200) is published monthly, except February


and July, for $5.08 per year by the Washington Federation of State Employees/AFSCME
Council 28 AFL-CIO, 1212 Jefferson St. S.E.
Suite 300, Olympia, WA 98501. Affiliated with
the American Federation of State, County
and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) and the
Washington State Labor Council, AFL-CIO.
Periodicals postage paid at Olympia, WA
and at additional offices. Circulation:
42,000.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Washington State Employee, 1212 Jefferson
St SE Suite 300 Olympia WA 98501-7501
Sue Henricksen, President
Greg Devereux, Executive Director
Editor Tim Welch
e-mail: tim@wfse.org Internet: www.wfse.org
Member, ILCA

Page 2

IN MEMORIAM: Charyn Niemeyer, the Olympia Local 443


Health Care Authority activist
whose touching story moved
convention delegates in 2009,
died April 13. Niemeyer, a
medical assistance specialist
3 at HCA, was 65.
The beloved Niemeyer
was a Local 443 shop steward, secretary of the WFSE/
AFSCME Miscellaneous Policy Committee from 2011-2015
and a delegate to the WFSE/
AFSCME Convention in 2011
and 2013.
It was at WFSE/AFSCMEs 2009 state convention

...And more of these photos will appear in the June Washington State
Employee newspaper.

Local 843 members join labor/immigration rightsmarch


At 10/2/09 Medal
of Valor presentation: recipient Jon
Brogger, Local 443;
Charyn Niemeyer,
whose life the recipients saved; and
Margaret Kemrer,
nominator who accepted the award
for Sunny Hawkins.

that Niemeyer touched hundreds by her touching and


surprising tribute to two coworkers who had saved her
life by performing CPR.

As the unions Medal


of Valor Award was being
presented to Jon Brogger
and Sonja Sunny Hawkins,
Niemeyer appeared from the

Comparable Worth: 30 years


wings to present the award in
person to Brogger and nominator Margaret Kemrer (accepting for Hawkins).
Sunny and Jon are more
than deserving in my book,
Niemeyer told the WFSE/AFSCME delegates at the Oct.
2, 2009 event.
IN MEMORIAM: Merry
Webb, a retired financial services specialist 3 and Local
1253 member at the DSHS
Pasco Community Service
Office, died April 30. Survivors
include her husband of 60
years, Ed.

ELECTRONIC DELIVERY OPTION. If youd like to save paper and postage, you can receive this newspaper electronically. Go to www.wfse.org and hover
over NEWS & INFO, located in the top menu bar. Select from the drop-down list: WASHINGTON STATE EMPLOYEE - Newspaper. Use the form
on this page to register for the electronic version. Or e-mail us at info@wfse.org, or write: WFSE/AFSCME, 1212 Jefferson St. S.E., Suite 300,
Olympia, WA 98501. If youre a represented non-member fee payer and you dont wish to receive this publication in any format, e-mail us at contactus@wfse.org, or write: WFSE/AFSCME, 1212 Jefferson St. S.E., Suite 300, Olympia, WA 98501.

WFSE/AFSCME Washington State Employee

May 2016

UNION NEWS
SHARED LEAVE
REQUESTS
Reidun MacGregor, a support enforcement officer 2 with DSHS in Tacoma and a
member of Local 53, has been approved
for and is in need of shared leave to care
for a family member. If you would like to
donate shared leave to Reidun, please
complete a Donor Shared Leave form and
send it to your human resources representative for processing, or contact your own
human resource office.
Yajaira Martinez, a financial services
specialist 3 at the Bellingham CSO and a
WFSE member, is in need of shared leave
for her daughter, Alexis, who was born
prematurely at about 24 weeks. Yajaira will
need to help care for Alexis. Alexis will be
in the NICU until about Aug. 15. Contact:
Vicki Rothenbuhler, (360) 714-4006.
Twila Knudtson, a financial services specialist 3 with DSHS in Vancouver and a
member of Local 313, is in need of shared
leave because of terminal cancer, according to the shared leave request email sent
by DSHS to staff. Contact: your human
resource office.
Jeri (Reid) Davis, a Community Corrections officer 3 with the Department of
Corrections in Bellingham and a member
of Local 1060, is in need of shared leave to
care for her seriously ill husband. Contact:
Diane White in DOC Human Resources, or
your own human resource office.
Heidi Blindauer, a WorkFirst program
specialist with DSHS in Oak Harbor and a
member of Local 1060, has been approved
for shared leave. Contact: your human
resource office.
Beverly VanPatten-Shadley, a financial
services specialist 3 with DSHS in Auburn
and a member of Local 843, has been
approved for shared leave. Contact: your
human resource office.
Antionette Hamilton, a financial services
specialist 3 with DSHS in Everett and a
member of Local 948, has been approved
for and is in need of shared leave. Contact:
Vickie Rothenbuhler, (360) 714-4006, or
your own human resource office.
Jose Martinez, a social service specialist
3 with DSHS Office of Indian Child Welfare
in Seattle and a member of Local 843, has
been approved for shared leave. He has
severe kidney renal disease and will be off
the job for a while. Contact: Marilyn Nichol,
(425) 590-3048, or your own human resource office.
Yasen Angelov, a financial examiner 3
with the Office of the Insurance Commissioner in Tumwater and a member of Local
443, is in need of shared leave to cover the
time he will be out while caring for his wife
during her surgical recovery. He will be
away from work until July. Contact: Lindsey
Henderson, (360) 725-7004, or your own
human resource office.
Beate Caron, a financial services specialist 3 with DSHS in Tumwater and a member of Local 443, has been approved for
shared leave to help care for her mother.
Contact: Vickie Rothenbuhler, (360) 7144006, or your own human resource office.
Stephanie Respicio, an institution counselor 2 at Western State Hospital in Lakewood and a member of Local 793, is in
need of shared leave to cover the time she
is missing work for a medical need. Contact: Robin Calhoun, (253) 761-7566, or
your own human resource office.
Patricia Pettit, an administrative hearing
coordinator with DSHS in Tacoma and a
member of Local 53, has been approved
for and is in need of shared leave. Contact:
your human resource office.

May 2016

Application

SUMMER SCHOOL FOR TRADE UNION WOMEN SCHOLARSHIPS 2016


Offered by the WFSE/AFSCME Womens/Equal Partners Committee

Cover costs for registration (which includes housing and most meals) and travel.
Recipients will attend the summer school Aug. 9-13, at the UCLA campus in Los Angeles, Calif.
Please complete the following questions:
1. Are you a member in good standing of WFSE/AFSCME?

Yes
Length of membership
Local No.

No
How long have you been a state employee?
2. Have you previously attended a Womens Summer School?
3. Do you hold a leadership position in your local?

Yes

Yes

No

No

4. Ethnic heritage (optional)


5. Reason for wanting to attend

Name
Address
City State Zip
Telephone: (Daytime) (Evening)
Home e-mail address:
Signature of Applicant
Signature of Local Union Officer (optional)
Application deadline: June 24, 2016.
For more information, call 1-800-562-6002 or (360) 352-7603. Online: http://wfse.org/scholarship-info/. Return this application to: WFSE/AFSCME Womens/Equal Partners Committee, 1212 Jefferson St. S.E., Suite 300, Olympia, WA
98501. Or FAX to (360) 352-7079.
Scholarship information
Application deadline: June 24, 2016.
The Summer Institute for Union
Women celebrates the solidarity of
union women across boundaries of
age, race, and nation. Rank-and-file
members, staff members, and officers from across the West including
Canada will gather to share strategies,
information, experience, and skills.
Highlights of the week include in-depth
classes to hone skills and deepen
knowledge as well as workshops and

plenary sessions
to examine current issues, ranging from politics,
to health care,
to international
solidarity. This
summer the Institute will be held
at UCLA in Los
Angeles, Calif. from Aug. 9 through
Aug. 13, 2016.
The scholarships cover the costs

for registration (which includes housing and most meals) and travel. To apply, please fill out the application form
in full and return to WFSE/AFSCME
Womens/Equal Partners Committee, 1212 Jefferson St. S.E., Suite
300, Olympia, WA 98501 or FAX to
(360) 352-7608 by 5:00 p.m. June 24,
2016. The application form is above
or can be found online at http://wfse.
org/summer-institute-union-womenscholarship/ For questions on the
scholarship, call 1-800-562-6002.

Heather Kok, a financial services specialist 3 with DSHS in Spokane and member
of Local 1221, is in need of shared leave.
Contact: Teresa Baumbach, (509) 2257923.

member of Local 1326, has been approved


for shared leave. Contact: your human resource office.

Judith McMahon, a WorkFirst program


specialist with DSHS in Bremerton and a
member of Local 1181, has been approved
for shared leave because of a serious
medical condition. Contact: your human
resource office.

Natasha Pacis, a financial services specialist 3 with DSHS in Bremerton and a


member of Local 1181, has been approved
for and is in need of shared leave. Contact:
your human resource office.
Susan Lash, a financial services specialist
4 with DSHS in Pierce County and a member of Local 53, has been approved for and
is in need of shared leave. Contact: your
human resource office.
Sharon Frampton, a WorkFirst program
specialist with DSHS in Kelso and a member of Local 1400, has been approved for
and is in need of shared leave because of
a serious condition. Contact: your human
resource office.
Jennie D. Winkle, a WorkFirst program
specialist with DSHS in Aberdeen and a
member of Local 970, has been approved
for and is in need of shared leave because
of a serious condition. Contact: your human resource office.
Brenda Quiroz, a WorkFirst program
specialist with DSHS in Toppenish and a

Frances Brown, a financial services specialist 2 with DSHS in Yakima and a member of Local 1326, has had to take time off
work because of a serious health condition.
Contact: your human resource office.
Nerissa Serezo, a financial services
specialist 3 with DSHS in Bellevue and a
member of Local 843, has been approved
for shared leave. Contact: your human resource office.
Thea Villar, a financial services specialist
3 with DSHS in Kent and a member of Local 843m has been approved for shared
leave. Contact: your human resource office.
Thais Marbles, a financial services
specialist 3 with DSHS in Seattle and a
member of Local 843, has been approved
for shared leave. Contact: your human resource office.
Charlie Johnson, a financial services
specialist 4 with DSHS in Lakewood and a
member of Local 53, has been approved
for shared leave because of a family members serious medical condition. Contact:
your human resource office.

WFSE/AFSCME Washington State Employee

Erika Torres, a financial services specialist


3 with DSHS in Moses Lake and a member
of Local 1299, is in need of shared leave
because of a serious medical condition.
Contact: your human resource office.
Mary Lou Torres, a financial services specialist 3 with DSHS in Olympia and a member of Local 443, has been approved for
shared leave because of a serious condition. Contact: your human resource office.
Emilie Clayton, a financial services specialist 3 with DSHS in Yakima, is in need
of shared leave. Contact: your human resource office.
Jo-En Huang, a financial services specialist 3 with DSHS in Bellevue, has been
approved for shared leave. Contact: your
human resource office.
Kirsten Moylan, a financial services specialist 3 with DSHS in King County, has
been approved for shared leave. Contact:
your human resource office.

Page 7

IN MEMORIAM: Howard Jorgenson 1939-2016

His word
was his bond

In memoriam: Howard Jorgenson, former


WFSE/AFSCME president; architect of
our collective bargaining rights

e was known
as Jorgie
to all who
knew, loved and respected him.

The Federation family is


mourning the death of Howard Jorgenson, former president of the Washington Federation of State Employees/
AFSCME Council 28.
Jorgenson served longer
than any other Federation
president, from 1972 to 1997.
Jorgenson died May 2
in Spokane of complications
from diabetes. He was 76.
During his tenure, we
won the $482 million comparable worth pay equity victory. And he sparked the movement that won full-scope collective bargaining rights over
our pay, health benefits and
other issues.
He continued mentoring a
new generation of leaders and
activists long after he retired
in his frequent appearances at
WFSE/AFSCME conventions
and as president of the Retired Public Employees Council of Washington/AFSCME.
Whats best for the membership, is best for me, Jorgenson said in 1997.
He was a truly inspirational
figure -- he made you want to
do more to advance the interests of our members and their
families, said former WFSE/
AFSCME Deputy Director
Mark Brown. Brown later
served with Jorgenson on the
RPEC board.
Howard Jorgenson de-

Services June 11

A celebration of life
service will be 1 p.m.,
Saturday, June 11,
at Medical Lake High
School, 200 E. Barker
St., Medical Lake,
WA 99022. A reception will follow. In lieu
of flowers, the family
suggests contributions to: Medical Lake
Dollars for Scholars,
Medical Lake Friends
for Children, or Medical Lake High School
Booster Club. Donations can be sent
to his wife, Marye
Jorgenson, P.O. Box
1024, Medical Lake,
WA 99022.

fined leadership, said Gary


Moore, executive director
from 1985 to 1994. A bold
and strategic trade unionist
grounded by good judgment,
integrity and an uncanny
sense of timing.
Jorgie combined strong
and powerful leadership with
an unswerving commitment
to democratic principles of
union governance. He fought
for what he believed was
right for the union and the
members, regardless of the
popularity of his stance.
He was respected and
trusted by all -- his word was
his bond.

Lets make this dream a reality.


Full collective bargaining rights
with dignity, decency, respect.

-- Jorgensons plea to WFSE/AFSCME members in his 1997 farewell


speech. Five years later, what he started did become reality with passage
of the Personnel System Reform Act.
PICTURED: Jorgie inspires hundreds of members who came to the Capitol in Olympia in
March 1993 furious that then-Gov. Mike Lowry and legislative leaders had effectively derailed our collective bargaining efforts with an uncivil alternative that stripped rights away.

He always had great integrity, said George Masten,


executive director from 1974
to 1985.

Jorgie came up
through ranks
Jorgenson came up through the
ranks at Eastern State Hospital and
Consolidated Support Services as a
member and eventually president of
Local 782.
Winning election as statewide
WFSE/AFSCME president in 1972
proved that a person from a small
town in Eastern Washington could
run an organization whose headquarters were in Olympia, he said in
1997.

Tributes continue to pour


in. Here are a few:
Carol Dotlich, one of
Jorgensons successors as
WFSE/AFSCME president,
called him a force to be reck-

Page 8

He was always concerned about the members.


He forged a path we all
have followed thats brought

Jorgies last convention.


Jorgenson was a familiar face
at WFSE/AFSCME conventions long after he retired. He
proudly presented the Organizing Award named in his honor.
His last appearance at our
convention came in October
2013 when he presented the
Howard Jorgenson Organizing
Award to Local 1020 members
Max Phipps and Laura Little.
During his 25 years as president,
Jorgenson oversaw the transformation of the Federation into a political,

oned with.
He never stopped fighting for hardworking public
sector folks whether active or
retired.
A kinder man cant be
found.

lobbying and
organizing
powerhouse.
We are
known throughout AFSCME
as a council
that when
other people
are thinking of
ideas, were
already implementing them,
Jorgenson said in a 1997 interview
when he retired.
He never took a vacation in his

He was a friend, a mentor and a true leader, said


Mike Watson, WFSE/AFSCME vice president under
Jorgenson from 1976 to 1988.
He devoted his life to
improving the lives of public

25 years as president, instead taking


leave time to do union business for
the benefit of our members.
After he retired, Jorgenson accepted an appointment from thenGov. Gary Locke to the old Personnel
Appeals Board.
He became active in the Retired
Public Employees Council of Washington and later became RPEC president.
In 2003, he won election to the
Medical Lake City Council (it was
his second stint on the council). He
served until declining health forced
his resignation this past January.

sector workers and retirees.


His presence will be sorely
missed.
Watson is the current
RPEC president.
A fine guy who supported
me time and time again. May

WFSE/AFSCME Washington State Employee

us greater respect, dignity and


hope, said WFSE/AFSCME
Executive Director Greg Devereux.

he rest in peace, said former


Washington Secretary of State
Ralph Munro.
What a great friend, said
former Washington Auditor
Brian Sonntag.

May 2016