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INTEGRITY
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INNOVATION

ACCOUNTABILITY

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

Editor's note
Let me begin with a quote by Dr APJ Abdul Kalam,You have to dream before
your dreams can come true. Easy to dream, but its realization requires inspiration.
Our dream has finally come true through IIQS Magazine & Annual Event. Now the
proud moment has come to unveil IIQS Magazine, IIQS Annual Insight 2013 in
the glorious function IIQS Annual Regale 2013
As you all know, the seeds of IIQS were sown in 1998 and now this great movement is celebrating its 15th anniversary. It is hard to believe that IIQS has achieved
so much within this short time. It is time to take stock of the goals we have set for
IIQS and the progress we have made towards them. I am a great believer in the
importance of setting goals that are high but realistic. Success is a journey, not a
destination.
IIQS Annual Insight 2013 has attempted to chronicle the IIQS path to glory, by
glimpse of the CPD events, matrixes, workshops, articles, achievements, programmes and cultural events .IIQS Magazine is just like opening the window when
it rains. Enjoy the rains of IIQS through this magazine. Read the articles, events and
enjoy the photographs. Hope IIQS Annual Insight 2013 takes a nostalgic look at the
event of the IIQS in the recent years.
IIQS Annual Regale 2013 is going to be a great event, I wish all the best to the event
team members also, I want to say thank you for their untiring efforts to the success
of sponsorship journey. We have been greatly supported by advertising and sponsorship partners, who were the glue that held the pages, and I am sure our dream
may not have come true without their support.
IIQS Magazine and Annual Event is the outcome of a glorious teamwork and
combined inspiration. I would like to thank from the bottom of my heart to all the
members and friends for their valuable contribution to bring out this publication.
And special thanks to the Editorial Team who have worked creatively with dedication throughout this journey. This Editorial note will not be complete if I do not
thank the Board of Directors for entrusting me with this work and all their encouragement.
We truly hope that our readers enjoy our humble effort.
Sinimol Noushad,BTech, MBA, MRICS, MIS
IIQS Magazine Chief Editor & UAE Publications Lead

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Email : info@dutcotennant.com
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
Contents

MESSAGES..........................................................................................................................................................(07-13)
VISION / MISSION /MOTTO.................................................................................................................................(15)
HISTORY....................................................................................................................................................................(17)
IIQS GLOBAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS..............................................................................................................(19)
IIQS UAE MEMBER COUNCILS...........................................................................................................................(20)
IIQS MEMBER COUNCILS INDIA AND QATAR.......................................................................................(21-23)
OUR VISION FOR NEXT 5 YEARS.......................................................................................................................(25)
CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (CPD)........................................................................(27-31)
IIQS MATRIX EVENTS.....................................................................................................................................(33-37)
NETWORKING JOB OPPORTUNITIES........................................................................................................(38-39)
OUTDOOR FAMILY EVENT 2012..................................................................................................................(40-41)
FAMILY DINNER 2012......................................................................................................................................(42-43)
IIQS INDOOR CRICKET 2012.....................................................................................................................(44-45)
CO, OPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH AIQS ...................................................................................................(47)
ARTICLES............................................................................................................................................................(49-83)
MEMBER'S DIRECTORY..................................................................................................................................(85-89)
GLOBAL RECOGNITION......................................................................................................................................(92)
MEMBERS ACHIEVEMENTS ...............................................................................................................................(93)
TESTIMONIALS FROM IIQS GLOBAL MEMBERS....................................................................................(96-97)
MAGAZINE AND EVENT COMMITTEE...........................................................................................................(98)

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

Neil Armstrong
upon reaching the
moon had said
One small step by
a man, one giant
leap for mankind

Greetings to one and all,


I feel humbled and at the same time take great pride in addressing you through the Indian
Institute of Quantity Surveyors (IIQS) yearly magazine in Year 2013.
Neil Armstrong upon reaching the moon had said One small step by a man, one giant leap
for mankind.
This comes true in the case of IIQS, which was started in 1998 by a small group of 8 members to help each other through knowledge sharing. From 1998 to 2006, the association
(IQSA) continued their mission within Dubai and helped many professionals to upgrade
themselves professionally. Years 2007 to 2011 were truly remarkable when the effort of this
group started yielding fantastic results. Many of members got the corporate membership
of prestigious global bodies and also many of our members got into the senior positions
in their profession. Also, many of our members completed their master degree in Quantity
Surveying, Construction management and Construction Law etc.
In the milestone year of 2011, IQSA was renamed as Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors
(IIQS) and successfully incorporated under section 25 of the Companies Act, 1956 on 14
October 2011 in Mumbai, India. Since 2011 onwards, after successful incorporation under
Companies Act in India, we initiated our CPD activities and formation of Member Councils
in India in various cities, namely, Delhi, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Chennai, and Bangalore etc.
Also, within the Gulf region, CPD and formation of Member Council has been initiated in
Doha.
By engaging in the activities of IIQS, the Indian Quantity Surveyors, slowly but surely, are
becoming world class leaders in the field of Contracts & Commercial Management of major
projects around the world. This became possible due to motivation and guidance provided
by IIQS to these members to enhance their knowledge in Quantity Surveying by acquiring
higher academic qualification in the field of quantity surveying, construction management
and construction law.
Also, one of the major contributions of IIQS toward members professional growth is the
regular CPDs (Continuing Professional Development) that IIQS has been organizing on a
regular basis in UAE as well as in many cities in India, such as Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai,
Hyderabad, Bangalore etc. These CPDs allowed our members to enhance their knowledge
in the various disciplines as well as gave them the opportunity to be part of a large network
and get benefitted thereby.
Dear fellow members, let us march forward together with strong courage and moral
principles for greater success in the years to come.

Good luck!
MR. VARUGHESE MATHEW
FRICS, FCIOB, MCIArb,
IIQS Director & Global President

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

Indian engineers and


Quantity Surveyors
have played an
important role in
UAEs
development. All
major and Iconic projects in this Country
have some imprints
of their minds and
hands

IIQS / 8
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

Indian Institute of
Quantity surveyors
has been an
important body
providing a platform
for engineers and
quantity
surveyors to share
their
professional
experiences.

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

We are proud to
have a shared
purpose with the
IIQS, given our
objectives for
providing
professional
support and
welfare to our
respective
memberships

IIQS / 10
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

It gives me great pleasure to deliver this message to the Indian Institute of Quantity
Surveyors (IIQS) on the occasion of their Annual Celebrations in the UAE.

It was impressive to
see the IIQS efforts
and continuing
success in
organizing
regular CPD events in
order to keep its
membership professionally developed
continuously.

It was impressive to see the IIQS efforts and continuing success in organizing regular
CPD events in order to keep its membership professionally developed continuously.
The Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (AIQS) which promotes best practice
and advancement of the Quantity Surveying profession, around the globe, encourages such efforts and therefore would applaud the success of IIQS in this area.
Many members of the IIQS are also members of the Australian Institute of Quantity
Surveyors. As the Middle East Representative of the Institute, I have close contacts
with such members and am aware about their keen interest to continue their education further and enhance their knowledge in order to provide a professional and
value added service to the construction industry in the UAE, which too needs to be
applauded. IIQS has once again had a very successful year.
With significant success rates at achieving corporate memberships of other professional institutions such as RICS and AIQS by IIQS members, you have more than
sufficient reasons to celebrate another years success and it is a privilege to convey
in this instance, the Institutes best wishes to the Committee of the IIQS, and also to
IIQS members, their families and friends who would be joining in these celebrations.
Have a wonderful occasion!
Prof. Indrawansa Samaratunga
AIQS Middle East Representative

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

IIQS achieved
record success
in Contributing in
massive number of
IIQS members who
has gained professional membership
with world-recognized institutions.

Message from the Chartered Institution of Civil Engineering Surveyors - UAE Region
It is a source of tremendous satisfaction and pleasure that, on behalf of the CICES
UAE Region, I am able to congratulate the members of the Indian Institute of Quantity
surveyors (IIQS) on the occasion of launching their inaugural IIQS publication, IIQS Insight 2013,. The IIQS has enough reasons to publish such a journal duly documenting
the years achievements, due to the sustainability of the membership, the effective and
efficient continuing professional development programme and the record success of
the massive number of IIQS members who gained professional membership with worldrecognized institutions.
We look forward to a continued professional association with the IIQS as one of the leaders among construction professional Institutions in the Arabian Gulf region and once
again we wish you every success on the IIQS journey towards professional excellence.

Dhammika T. Gamage
NDT(Civil Eng.), I Eng., ICIOB, ACIArb, AIQSSL, MRICS, FIIESL, FACostE, FAIQS, FCInstCES
Chairman - Chartered Institution of Civil Engineering Surveyors - UAE Region

IIQS / 12
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

It was impressive to
see the IIQS efforts
and continuing
success in
organizing
regular CPD events in
order to keep its
membership professionally developed
continuously.

I am happy to know that the Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors is celebrating their
15th Anniversary.
IBPC Sharjah is glad to have IIQS under our umbrella and pleased to support IIQS
in all their activities.
I am very impressed with the activities of the IIQS especially the zeal and enthusiasm for expanding your wings for the cause of your fraternity, with a vision to share
and develop knowledge among fellow Indian Engineers, Quantity Surveyors, Estimators and Cost Engineers.
On behalf of The Chairman and Board members of IBPC Sharjah, I congratulate
IIQS for their excellent work and on the occasion of the release of their first Annual
Magazine.
I take this opportunity to wish the Management and the esteemed members of IIQS
all the very best and great years ahead.

Sripriyaa
Director General

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

N
Vision
To establish and maintain a high standard of professional competence and integrity
by limiting membership to persons who have prescribed by, or acceptable to, the
Institute and who have satisfied the requirements of training, practical knowledge,
experience and integrity prescribed by the Institute.

Mission
The Mission of the Institute is to ensure professional advancement of Engineering
and Quantity Surveying Professionals in the Property Development and Construction
Industry, so that they can contribute more effectively in the ongoing development
in the construction sector worldwide and particularly in India, as well as to share
their knowledge and experience with the fellow professionals.

Motto
Lighted to Learn & Live

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The name synonymous to quality engineering in:

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Irrigation Main Lines
Storm Water & Drainage Lines
Tel : 04 2579912, Fax : 04 2579913
Etisalat/DIC Duct Lines
E-mail : hfcon@eim.ae website: hillsandfort.com
Irrigation Main Lines
Street Lighting Ducts
Etisalat/DIC Duct Lines
Asphalt and Other Road Works
Street Lighting Ducts
Hard & Soft Landscaping
Asphalt and Other Road Works
Book.indd 16
Hard & Soft Landscaping

nymous to quality engineering in:

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
History

History
Initiated in December 1998, Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (IIQS) formerly known as Indian Quantity
Surveyors (IQSA) is a non-profitable professional body registered in India with a vision to share and develop
knowledge among the fellow Indian Engineers, Quantity Surveyors, Estimators, Cost Engineers, Contract Administrators and other similar professionals.
IIQS was initially started by a few members, however after organizing CPD (Continuing Professional Development) events on a monthly basis, the strength started to increase with every meet. IIQS realized that Indian
Engineering degree does not adequately cover the subjects such as Contract Procedure, Finance and Development, Project Cost Control, Dispute Resolution, Construction Law, Risk Management etc., which are essentially
required for effective commercial management of the construction contracts at a global level.
Accordingly, a smaller study group was formed with an aim of upgrading skills by enhancing their qualification
by pursuing further studies from internationally accredited universities, as well as arranging regular technical
seminars, wherein industry experts share their knowledge with the members. As a result, over the years, IIQS
has grown and many of its members have been successful in upgrading to post graduate qualification and have
attained professional membership from some of the most respected professional Institutions in India, UK, US,
Australia, etc. Subsequently many members have risen to key positions in their respective fields.
In 2007, IIQS took a giant step by implementing high ethical principles, bylaws and logo. IIQS logo has a burning candle, which signifies giving light to the world. Our Motto is Lighted to Learn and Live. It is the collective aim and desire of IIQS that its members become self-motivated and take pride in doing things rightly and
taking decisions based on strong ethical values.
IIQS has monthly seminars, Matrix workshops for young engineers to attain chartered membership with professional bodies, Annual cricket events with other QS team and RICS teams. In addition, various study groups, CPD
events, mentoring sessions, sports events are actively organized for the benefit of its members. IIQS is closely
associated with number of International professional bodies such as Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors,
Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors, Chartered Institute of Buildings, Chartered Institute of Arbitrators,
AACE International, Institution of Surveyors India etc.
IIQS foresee attaining Chartered status for Quantity Surveyors in India in near future.

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

IIQS GLOBAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Front Row Left to Right

MR. E.V. JOHNSON NEIL


Director & Global
Vice President

MR. BASVARAJ BETH


Director & Global
Event Chair

MR. VARUGHESE
MATHEW
Director & Global
President

MR SAJEETH SIDHARTHAN
Director & Global
Awarding Committee
Chair

MR.RAMESH PALIKILA
Director & Global
Professional Development
Chair

MR.PAWAN KUMAR
MAMIDI
Board Member

MR KASI
VISWANATHAN
Director & Global
Governance Committee
Chair

MR. JACOB JOBY


Director & Global Executive Director

MR.DHARMENDAR
PARDASANI
Director & Global
Vice President

MR. PAUL BANKALA


Director & Global
Professional
Development Vice Chair

MR SYED ASLAM
Director & Global Audit
Committee Chair

MR NAVEEN KUMAR
Director &Global
Membership Committee
Chair

MR.GANESHAN G
Director &Global
Governance Committee
Vice Chair

MR FRANKLIN JOSEPH
Director & Global
General Secretary
Back Row Left to Right

No-Nonsense
Task Master
The Man with
Wise and
Cautioned Approach

MR. RAMARAO KILARI


Board Member

The Man
of Rules
The
Seasoned
Man

Not in Picture

MR. HIREKER
Director & Global Audit
Committee Vice Chair

.Mr
Loves Smart
Cocktail
of
Serious
Work and
Fun

Tough at
Work Soft
at Heart

Mr
Simple

THE
CAPTAN

Mr
Perfect

The
Adorable
Professor

The
Great
Advisor

The
Bindaas
Man

The
Charmer
of IIQS

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

UAE Member Council 2012

Front Row Left to Right

MAHESH BUTANI
Abudhabi Representative

RITU SUBODH DAS


News Letter

SINIMOL NOUSHAD
Publication Head

PARTHARAJAN PILLE
Matrix Support

Back Row Left to Right

SAJEETH SIDHARTHAN
Chairman

MATHEW VARGHESE
Past Chairman

JOHNSON NEIL
Vice Chairman

DHARMENDAR PARDASANI
Vice Chairman

BINU C NINAN
Web
Co-ordinator

PAUL BANKALA
General Seceratary

PAVAN MAMIDI
Treasurer

UAE Member Council 2013

Front Row Left to Right

MR.GANESHAN G
Mr. MAHESH BUTANI
Abu Dhabi CPD Event Lead Director &Global
Governance Committee Vice Chair
GOVINDARAJU RATHOD
MR.PAWAN KUMAR MIMIDI
UAE Events Support
UAE Treasurer
Back Row Left to Right

MR. PAUL BANKALA


UAE General Seceratry
REKHA RAMESH
Membership
Development
Maneger

MR SAJEETH SIDHARTHAN
MR KASI VISWANATHAN
UAE ME Chairman
Director & Global
Governance Committee Chair
SINIMOL NOUSHAD
UAE Publication Lead

AJITH
MR SYED ASLAM
MR. E.V. JOHNSON NEIL MR FRANKLIN JOSEPH MR. BASVARAJ BETH
News Letter UAE Finance & Audit Controller UAE Vice Chair
UAE Sports/Events
Abu Dhabi Head of Professional
& Membership Development
MR. RAMARAO KILARI
MR.RAMESH PALIKILA
Web & IT Manager
UAE & ME Head of Training/Membership Development

IIQS / 20
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

Member Councils
India and Qatar

IIQS India Member Councils were launched in May

in India. However,with passage of time, the industry

2012 and it received a warm welcome from the

has realized the importance of Quantity Surveyors in

professionals in india. First IIQS Member Council was

construction projects. The construction industry experts

formed in New Delhi and followed with several Mem-

along with some of QS related Professional Institutes

bers Councils in various metro cities including Mumbai,

are working together to develop the QS profession in

Hyderabad, Chennai and Bangalore etc. These

India.

Member Councils are organizing CPD workshops,

Member Councils in India are committed to develop

seminars etc. periodically in their respective cities.

the QS profession and to ensure that members attain


the professional standard of the global standards with

Quantity surveying profession is still not very well known

Delhi Member Council

support of IIQS activities.

Mumbai Member Council

IIQS Delhi Member Council Launched In May 2010

Franklin is heading the Mumbai MC with a great sup-

under the leadership of Mr. Naveen & successfully

port from the leadership of Mr. Govind Rathod and

conducted two CPD Events.

Mr .Saleem Merchant and his team from Mumbai.


Mr. Ajith Philips from Dubai presented a CPD topic
on Bonds, insurance and securities and their importance in Construction Contracts in the first CPD. Later, Mumbai MC conducted two professional CPDs in
2012 and will formalize the MC in 2013.

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Tel : 04 298 3206, Fax: 04 298 3207. E-mail: ararutly@eim.ae, Website: www.araruty.com

Mr. Ramesh
Managing Director
Mob : +971 50 6318961
:+971 55 5971176

DEWA/ADWEA/FEWA APPROVED
CONTRACTOR FOR ALL ELECTRICAL INFRASTRUCTURE AND MEP
WORKS.

DubaiAbu Dhabi
Tel. : +971 4 2983206Tel. : +971 2 5509678
Fax : +971 4 2983207Fax : +971 2 5509677
E-mail :ararutly@eim.aeE-mail : ararab@eim.ae

Qatar
Tel. : +974-44689123
Fax : + 974-44689150
E-mail : ararutly@qatar.net.qa

Sage Global Engineering LLC is one of the leading companies engaged in


Civil Engineering activities and infrastructure development,registered in the
Emirates of Dubai,United Arab Emirates.
We Specialise in Sewerage and Drainage Pipeline, Water pipelines and
Pumping Stattion Contracting. Our Company has successfully completed
several projects in UAE since inception and are still engaged in several major projects.
Aspiring for continuous improvement and customer satisfaction the company acquired its present identity as Sage Global Engineering LLC established
in the year 2002, The organisazation is one of the pioneers in construction
of Sewerage and Drainage Systems for the city of Dubai and has continuous presence in U.A.E since then.

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

Hydrabad Member Council


2. Hyderabad Member Council Leads Data :

Chennai Member Council

Ramesh Palikila is heading the Hyderabad MC with a great

Mr. Kumaresh Murthy is leading the Chennai MC with a great

support from the leadership of Mr. Karthikeyan , Executive Di-

support from his team from Chennai under the leadership of

rector of Langdon and Seah Cost Consultants and his team

Mr. Kasi Viswanathan and Mr. Johnson Neil from Dubai.

from Hyderabad. IIQS has conducted a professional need

Mr. Sankar from Langdon and Seah presented a CPD topic

analysis in 2011 with NICMAR students and core QS profes-

on Role of a QS profession in India and value addition to

sionals. With the results of this analysis and feedback from

the industry in the first CPD.

NICMAR students and QS professionals, IIQS inaugurated first

Senior Advocate , Additional Adv. General of Tamilnadu at-

CPD event in August 2012 with a successful collaboration with

tended this event as a Chief Guest and his valuable guide-

CIOB( UK) and NICMAR. In March 2013 , Hyderabad MC con-

lines added a great value to this CPD event. Later, Chennai

ducted a professional workshop on Post Contract Adminis-

MC conducted two professional CPDs in 2012 and will for-

tration with support from Aparna Constructions Commercial

malize the MC in 2013.

Mr. P.H. Aravindh Pandian

team. IIQS Hyderabad MC will do some more developments


soon to help QS professionals with our vision with the help of
NICMAR and Hyderabad construction industry professionals.

Bangalore Member Council

Qatar Member Council


IIQS conducted a need analysis of CPD events in Doha in

Mr. Jacob Joby is leading the Bangalore MC with a great

November 2012 under the leadership of Mr. Dharmendar

support from his team. Mr. Darshan Tededesai from Gleeds

Pardasani and Mr. Ramesh Palikila from IIQS Global Board.

Hooloomann

presented a CPD topic on Procurement

Approximately 40 members attended this event. Mr. K.V.R.

Strategies in the first CPD. Mr.A.N.Prakash has attended this

Prasad, Mr.Sandeep , Mr. Avinsah and Dr. Binu Varghese are

event as a Chief Guest and his valuable guidelines added

currently leading this Doha MC. In February 2013, Doha MC

a great value to this CPD event. Currently Bangalore MC is

has conducted first CPD event to from IIQS Matrix forum in

planning to conduct future CPDs and will formalize the MC

Doha with the help of the above lead members and around

in 2013.

45 members got benefit from this professional event.

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
Our vision

Our vision for next 5 years is:


To increase our membership base substantially in India and other Gulf
countries
To create awareness of Quantity Surveying profession in India
To create awareness in Engineering colleges in India that they need to
start the degree courses in Quantity Surveying
To ensure that we continue to organize CPD activities for our members
To ensure that we organize regular social events for our members since
we consider that it is also a core part of our vision to serve our members.
To provide a fully developed website to our members wherein they can access the CPD notes of all previous seminars and other webinars etc, along
with the full directory of our members.
To certify our members with appropriate membership grades such as MIIQS, CIIQS, FIIQS etc.
To ensure that our members follow the ethics of highest standards. This
is being ensured by including ethics as one of the mandatory competencies
for achieving the membership grade.
Most importantly, to give back to the society by engaging in some charity
works

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Book.indd 26

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
CPD

Continuing Professional
Development (CPD)
What is
CPD?

CPD stands for


Continuing
Professional
Development
and is the term
that describes
how professionals maintain
their own competence in the
workplace. CPD
is about learning
and development
that enhances
effectiveness in
professional life.

IIQS CPD Programme


IIQS CPD events are scheduled on monthly basis and it includes a wide range of
activities such as talks and presentations on subjects of contract and commercial
management, construction law, cost planning and management, business management, contract practice, contracts administration, procurement and tendering, risk
management etc. IIQS encourages all members to maintain and develop their professional in the workplace and CPD is one of the recommended way of enhancing the
professional competence through sharing knowledge with other industry professionals
and networking.
Benifits of CPD

Helps Members to enhance their knowledge

Networking opportunities

Providing competitive environment for members

Helps members in their day-to-day work.

Enhances presentation skills by providing opportunities

for presenting seminars and workshop.

CPD Events 2010-2011


Subject

Month

Coping up with Recession

28 April 2010

How to make Target Cost Contracts Work

30 June 2010

Personal Development & Presentation

21 July 2010

Process of Arbitration between Dispute Establishment and Start of


Arbitration

9 August 2010

Forensic Delay Analysis of Construction Claims

20 September 2010

Important Legal Development in UAE in 2010

2 November 2010

Variations under FIDIC 1999

28 February 2011

Dispute Boards in Todays Construction Disputes

29 March 2011

Excellence is Construction Series

27 April 2011

Why and how to use standard forms of Construction Contracts

25 october 2011

Various Delay Analysis Approaches

30 November 2011

27 / IIQS
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
CPD

IIQS Annual General


Board Meeting AGM 2012

IIQS Annual General Board Meeting 2012 was held at the API Tower in Dubai on 25 January 2012, wherein the
IIQS Board of Directors were introduced. This well-attended event provided the opportunities for the attendees to
interact in a casual setting. Mr. Varughese Mathew, Director & President of IIQS Global provided a brief overview
of IIQS 2011 accomplishments and discussed IIQS Vision & Mission and some of IIQS new objectives set out for
2012. The event was followed by the Question & Answer Session lead by IIQS Board of Directors.

IIQS / 28
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
CPD

CPD EVENTS 2012 & 2013


No

CPD EVENT
2012 & 2013

TOPIC: Question & Answer on Mr.Varughese Mathew, FRICS, FCIOB, ACIArb


Tendering, Pre Contract,Post
Mr.Dharmendar Pardasani, M.Sc., FRICS, MCIOB.
Contract, Cost Control
: Mr. E. V. Johnson Neil, MRICS, MIS, MCIArb.
: Mr. Sajeeth Sidharthan, BE, MRICS

API World Tower


25th January 2012

Session 1: Risk Evaluation

Mr. Daniel Alcon, BSc, DipArb, FCIArb, MRICS, MACostE


MDRBF, MDBF
Mr. Gary Beamish Eng.C, C.Eng, C.Env, C.WEM, MICE,
MCIWEM, MQSI

API World Tower,


21st February 2012

Session 2: Creation of Risk

Speakers

Location & Date

The Paradox of Lean


Leadership

Prof: David Bamford, Bsc(Hons),Mphil,Phd,MCMI


Honorary senior Research Fellow at Manchester Business
School, University Of Manchester

API World Tower


20th March 2012

Impact of various Parameters


in Costing

Mr. Somnath Mukherjee, Chief Manager Projects- Simplex


Infrastructures Limited

API World Tower


18th April 2012

The Flipside - A Different Way


of Looking at Business
Environments and Strategy

Prof. Christopher Abraham, Head - Dubai Campus, Sr. Vice


President - Institutional Development, S P Jain School of
Global Management, Dubai Singapore Sydney

Al Futtaim Training Center,


22nd May 2012

An Overview of Arbitration
Process from Commencement to Enforcement

Mr. Dharmendar Pardasani, MSc, FRICS, MCIOB


Mr. Kalpesh Sangani, MSc, MRICS, MCIArb

Al Futtaim Training Center,


27th June 2012

Construction Claims in the


Gulf

Mr. Guy Elkington, Director Global Construction Practice,


Navigant

Al Futtaim Training Center,


19th September 2012

Areas of Concern in FIDIC


1999

Prof. Indrawansa Samaratunga PhD, DSc.


FRICS, FAIQS, FIQS(SL), FCIArb, FCIOB, FCMI, FIAS,
FBEng,

Wednesday 7th November


2012 at AlFaraa Corporate
office

UAE Constitution-Contract
Formation

Mr. Gary Beamish , Eng.C, C.Eng, C.Env, C.WEM, MICE,


MCIWEM, MQSI, Joint Managing Partner, M/s. Talos Consult FZC

Al Futtaim Training Center,


15thJanuary 2013

10

Liquidated Damages an UAE Mr. Shah Nawaz CA, Fellow Member of the Institute of
perspective
Chartered Accountants, Regional Director of Operations
Johnson Controls International

Al Futtaim Training Center,


26th February 2013

11

The secrets behind


construction contract pricing
options - understanding
whats on the menu

Mr. Sachin Kerur BEng (Hons) Construction Engineering API Tower Auditorium,
The University of Dundee, The College of Law, Guildford and 25th March 2013
Mr. William Marshall fromPinsent Masons: combining the
experience, resources and international reach of McGrigors
and Pinsent Masons

29 / IIQS
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4/21/13 9:09 PM

Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
CPD

CPD In Dubai & AbuDhabi

IIQS , has successfully organized 12 consecutive CPD events in UAE for year 2012-2013 .CPD Sessions provide
a great opportunity for our members to enhance their knowledge and skills. The 1st CPD event in Abu Dhabi was
launched on 07 Nov 2012.
IIQS Structured CPD events are lead by experts indusrty speakers. IIQS takes this opportunity to thank all the
speakers and guest for their valuable time and effort for IIQS CPD events..

IIQS / 30
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
CPD

CPD In India

The Dubai Region with many member and Members Council support from India provided a wonderful opportunity
to deliver successful CPD seesions in various metro cities in India. This was the important milestone for IIQS and it
is planned in 2013 also, all IIQS Member Councils will continue to organize the CPD events and Matrix workshops
for global members.

31 / IIQS
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TEL.
TEL.NO.:
NO.:04-3958771,
04-3958771,FAX
FAXNO.:
NO.:04-3958775,
04-3958775,P.O.
P.O.BOX
BOX119070,
119070,DUBAI,
DUBAI,UNITED
UNITEDARAB
ARABEMIRATES
EMIRATES
Email;
Email;alavoncontracting@gmail.com,
alavoncontracting@gmail.com,alavon@alavoncontractingsllc.com,
alavon@alavoncontractingsllc.com,Web:
Web:www.alavoncontractingsllc.
www.alavoncontractingsll

TEL.
TEL.NO.:
NO.:04-3958771,
04-3958771,FAX
FAXNO.:
NO.:04-3958775,
04-3958775,P.O.
P.O.BOX
BOX119070,
119070,DUBAI,
DUBAI,UNITED
UNITEDARAB
ARABEMIRATES
EMIRATES
Email;
Email;alavoncontracting@gmail.com,
alavoncontracting@gmail.com,alavon@alavoncontractingsllc.com,
alavon@alavoncontractingsllc.com,Web:
Web:www.alavoncontractingsllc.com
www.alavoncontractingsllc.com

TEL.
TEL.NO.:
NO.:04-3958771,
04-3958771,FAX
FAXNO.:
NO.:04-3958775,
04-3958775,P.O.
P.O.BOX
BOX119070,
119070,DUBAI,
DUBAI,UNITED
UNITEDARAB
ARABEMIRATES
EMIRATES
Email;
Email;alavoncontracting@gmail.com,
alavoncontracting@gmail.com,alavon@alavoncontractingsllc.com,
alavon@alavoncontractingsllc.com,Web:
Web:www.alavoncontractingsllc.com
www.alavoncontractingsllc.com

Book.indd 32

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
Matrix

IIQS Matrix Events

Structured Training Programme in Dubai

VISION OF IIQS MATRIX EVENTS:

To Create a professional environment among all QS community to share the knowledge and experience to enhance
the professional competence as well as to be part of a large professional net work.
IIQS Matrix Events were initiated in 2009 with support of IIQS Board of Directors and lead by IIQS Global Professional development Director Mr. Ramesh Palikila. B.Tech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS. with a basic idea of providing a
knowledge sharing workshops by eminent resource speakers from UAE industry.
Matrix is a one of the IIQS structured training programs to provide a professional platform for Contracts & Commercial Management professionals, Quantity Surveyors & Construction Professionals to plan their professional
development to become Chartered QS of RICS or attain any other professional membership. Since 2009 , through
this Matrix platform, more than 60 QS professionals have attained their Chartered status and have reached to
management positions in Contracts and Commercial fields and are presently working in UAE, Doha,India and other
Countries.

33 / IIQS
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Matrix Events in 2013


Matrix 2013 Events Conducted in UAE ( Dubai and Abu Dhabi)
MATRIX EVENT NO.01/2013
Date : Friday, 14th December 2012
Topic : Introduction of Matrix Training Workshops and Self planning to Strike perfectly APC
Speaker : Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
MATRIX EVENT NO.02/2013
Date : Friday, 24th December 2012
Topic 1 : Matrix Formation, APC Critical Analysis Guidelines and Written Skills
Speaker : Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
Topic 2 : Business Planning for QS professionals
Speaker : Mr .Franklin Joseph BE,MRICS, MIS - IIQS Director & Global General Secretary
Topic 3 : Contract Practice and Contract Administration
Speaker : Mr .Dharmendar Pardasani MSc, FRICS, MCIArb, MIS,FAIQS - IIQS Director & Global Vice President
MATRIX EVENT NO.03/2013
Date : Friday, 04th January 2013
Topic 1: Over view on QS Core Competencies, Commercial Management and Study Skills
Speaker : Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
Topic 2 : Design Economics and Cost Planning
Speaker : Mr. Dinesh Dabasia BSc ( Hons),MRICS Associate Davis Langdon an AECOM company, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
MATRIX EVENT NO.04/2013
Date : Friday, 18th January 2013
Topic 1 : Quantification and Costing of Construction Works
Speaker : Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
Topic 2 : Client Care for QS professionals
Speaker : Mr. Eswar S.B BSc, Dip, CIPM, MRICS, ACIArb CEO of 3EG Group Sharjah- UAE.
Topic 3 : Successful deliver of QS service in an International Projects
Speaker : Mr. Chris Webb MRICS , Associate Davis Langdon an AECOM company.
MATRIX EVENT NO.05/2013
Date : Friday, 08th February 2013
Topic 1 : Communication and Negotiation Skills
Speaker : Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
Topic 2 : Conflicts Avoidance and Dispute Resolution
Speaker : Mr. Kasi Viswanathan BE,MRICS, CCE , MCIArb, MIS IIQS-Director-Global Governance Committee Chair,
Topic 3 : Design Economics and Cost Planning
Speaker : Mr. Luay Azzam BSc (Hons), FRICS, FAIQS, ACIArb , Executive Director NEA Consultants ,RICS UAE National Board Member.
Topic 4 : Contract Practice and Contract Administration
Speaker : Mr. Colm OSuilleabhain BSc, MSc, MRICS, LLM , FCIArb Director FTI Consulting , Abu Dhabi, UAE.

IIQS / 34
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Matrix Events in 2013


MATRIX EVENT NO.06/2013
Date : Friday, 15th February 2013
Topic 1 : APC- Phase II Guidelines: Presentation Skills for professional Interviews
Speaker : Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
Topic 2 : Procurement and Tendering
Speaker : Mr. Sajeeth Sidharthan BE,MRICS, ACIArb, MOSE , IIQS-Director-Global Awarding Committee Chair
Topic 3 : Securities, Bonds, Indemnities and Insurances in Construction Contracts
Speaker : Mr. Ajith Philip BE, PGDCM - Contracts Manager Nakheel Properties Developers
MATRIX EVENT NO.07/2013
Date : Friday, 01st March 2013
Topic 1: Project Financial Control and Reporting
Speaker : Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
Topic 2 : Managing Variations in Construction Contracts
Speaker : Mr. E V JOHNSON NEIL, MRICS, MIS, MCIArb -IIQS Director and Global Vice President
MATRIX EVENT NO.08/2013
Date : Friday, 08th March 2013
Topic 1: Construction Technology and Environmental services
Topic 2: Health and Safety
Topic 3: Over view and need of Mandatory Competencies for a QS professional
Speaker: Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
MATRIX EVENT NO.09/2013
Date : Friday, 08th March 2013
Topic 1 : Risk Management An introductory session for QS professionals
Speaker: Dr. Tamil Selvan Mahalingam MBA,PMP,CCE, PhD, Professional Trainer on Project Management ,Cost Management and Quality Management 3Fold Institute , Dubai.
Topic 2 : Think Big about QS profession & How a QS can reach to Lead / Management Position? Speaker : Mr. Varughese Mathew FRICS, MCIArb,
FCIOB, CL , IIQS Director Global President
Topic 3 : Data Management Principles and Best practice Standards of Cost Management
Speaker : Ms. Julie Christie M. Dela Cruz MBA,FRICS, FAIQS - Founder and Chair of Philippine Institution of Certified Quantity Surveyors ( PICQS)
Topic 4: Ethics, Rules and Regulation of RICS - Mandatory Competency for a Chartered QS Speaker : Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb,
MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
MATRIX EVENT NO.10/2013
Date : Friday, 05th April 2013
Topic : APC 1 Hour Special Guidelines to APC candidates
Speaker : Mr .Ramesh Palikila BTech, MRICS, ACIArb, MIS, IIQS Director Global professional Development Chair
Mock interviews to APC candidates by IIQS team of Assessors
Lead: Mr.Paul Bankala MSc , BE, ICIOB and Mr. Kasi Viswanathan BE,MRICS, CCE , MCIArb, MIS

35 / IIQS
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
Matrix

Matrix 2009

Matrix 2012

Matrix members and mentors in the


Structured Training Programme in Dubai
Mock APC in Interview

Ramesh Palikila addressing


the matrix event

IIQS / 36
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
Matrix

NICMAR - QS PG Students

Professional Events Conducted for


NICMAR Students in Hyderabad

Successfull matrix members

Ramesh and Jacob Joby at


NICMAR Hyderabad

37 / IIQS
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4/21/13 9:16 PM

Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

NETWORKING AND
IIQS provides a great
platform for networking
opportunities during
the CPD events as well
as during the social
events. Any relevant
information required
for effectively carrying
out the day to day
works and also for
upgrading professional
qualifications is shared
among the members.
Any job opportunities
also shared which is
of immense help to
members who have lost
their jobs or are looking
for new opportunities

IIQS / 38
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

39 / IIQS
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OUTDOOR FA
It was an excellent
outdoor event in
Zabeel Park in
Dubai wherein
many of our
members joined
with their families
and had a great time
socializing and
playing fun games.

Book.indd 40

4/21/13 9:19 PM

MILY EVENT 2012

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FAMILY DINN
This event was attended
by more than 150
members. All the
members had a
memorable evening
wherein members danced
away to glory, enjoyed
fashion show, played
games, enjoyed lovely
food. A great evening!

Book.indd 42

4/21/13 9:21 PM

ER 2012

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IIQS-INDOOR
The IIQS Cricket
team participated in
the annual
RICS Cricket
event and brought
laurels for the
IIQS!

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4/21/13 9:22 PM

CRICKET 2012

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DUBAI - ABU DHABI - QATAR - OMAN


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Laying of
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Fax:+971 4 2582040
P.O.Box:93085

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Email: arcc@eim.ae

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Fax:+968 2 4499258
P.O.Box:4047, PC 112

Website: www. arabiancoastuae. com

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P.O. Box
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4 2894158
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F:
4 2894125
971 4 2894125
Email:Email:
mqmain@mostaqbl.ae
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The most important


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certification for the
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Abu Dhabi - U.A.E.


Tel: +971 2 5503654
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Book.indd 46

Weekend, Regular and


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Dubai: 04-3547997

Other courses offered: PGMP, CMQ/OE, SIX SIGMA,


RMP, PSP, CCCM, CFM, LEED, CMA

info@chicagomti.com

www.chicagomti.com

4/21/13 9:22 PM

Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
Affliation

Co-operative
Agreement with
Australian
Institute of Quntity
Surveyors (AIQS)
A co- operative agreement was signed with
Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors on
9th April 2013 in Dubai, whereby IIQS and AIQS
have agreed to collaborate for their respective
CPDs and other knowledge sharing activities in
the Middle East.

Instead of Memorandum of Understanding a co-operative agreement was singed

47 / IIQS
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HEAD OFFICE OVERHEADS


REVISITED

BY Prof. Indrawansa Samaratunga

ead Office Overheads is not an expression that


is found in FIDIC Forms of contract, resulting
in frequent debate as to why a prolongation
cost claim (especially under FIDIC Forms of
contracts) should include a Head Office Overheads element. Typical expressions such as off the Site overhead charges (FIDIC4th 1.1(g)(i), FIDIC1999 1.1.4.3)
and Contractors general overhead costs (FIDIC4th 52.3)
found in FIDIC Forms of contract are generally construed

to mean Head Office Overheads. Whilst in some parts of the


world they are referred to as Home Office Overheads, an
accountant would use the expression General and Administrative (G & A) expenses of the company in referring to
the Head Office Overheads.
In the books of accounts of a Contractors Head Office, the
Overheads (G&A expenses) are generally recorded under the
following heads (which vary from company to company):-

Executive and administrative salaries, allowances & recruitment costs etc.


Head Office rent and maintenance.

- Insurance.

Utilities, phone/data/fax, postal and bank charges

- Travel.

Depreciation of company assets.

- Bad debts.

Furniture and equipment.

- Entertainment.

Stationary and printing.

- Pantry expenses.

Professional fees.

- Contributions.

Auditing expenses.

- Sponsorship fees.

Advertising and marketing (including tendering costs).

- Idle resources.

Interest on company borrowings.

- Training.

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Though the total of all these expenses (taken as a percentage of


the company revenue) is usually considered as a suitable basis for
the pricing of tenders and building-up new rates / prices, some of
these expenses are inappropriate for inclusion in the prolongation
cost calculations of a delay claim. There is no reason, for example,
why the Employer of the delayed project should bear a part of a
bad debt related to another project of the Contractor. Similarly,
the Employer of the delayed project has no liability to bear any
part of a claims consultants fees paid for the preparation of a claim
for another project of the Contractor. Therefore, during an audit of
the books of accounts of the Contractors Head Office by the Engineer or the Employers other Contract Administrators (or by the
Contractors Contract Administrators in auditing a Subcontractors books of accounts) in order to verify whether the Contractor
(or the Subcontractor) has calculated the Head Office Overheads
element of a prolongation cost claim in a fair and reasonable manner, the following should be given due consideration:
(a) Capital expenditure (building extensions,

new furniture etc) should be appropriately depreciated.
(b) One-off annual/quarterly expenditure (advertising

costs, audit fees etc.) should be distributed over the

year/quarter and the cost of bulk printing etc.

should be distributed over the relevant period.
(c) Insurance costs and financing costs of projects should

not be included in the Head Office Overheads account.

(They should be in the project accounts).
(d) Claims consultancy fees should not be included in the

Professional Fees head.
(e) Any bad debts written-off under the Head Office Over
heads should be completely removed from the
calculations.
(f) Cost of idle resources should be in the project accounts

and not in the Head Office Overheads account. (It is
permissible to allow the cost of some idle resources

such as the asphalt plant of a road works contractor to

be in the Head Office Overheads account).
(g) Cost of an employee (such as a Commercial Manager)

whose time is totally dedicated to a project/projects,

should not be in the Head Office Overhead account, de

spite being stationed at the Head Office.
(h) Sponsorship fee/parent company fee paid as an annual/

monthly sum of money or as a percentage of the rev

enue could be a Head Office Overhead, but not if it is a

portion/percentage of the profit.
Once the Head Office Overheads account is rationalized in the
above manner (lets call it the Rationalized account), it would be
suitable for prolongation cost calculations.

Where a project completion had been delayed, it is not difficult for a Contractor to demonstrate (using daily records, photographs, correspondence etc.) that the cost of his Site Overheads
increased due to the necessity of:


supervision staff to stay longer on Site


site huts to be maintained for a longer period
tower crane to be retained on Site longer than
previously planned
performance security, insurance etc. to be extended
etc.

The prolongation of these Site Overheads are manifest and


therefore this part of the claim generally receives few challenges, but when it comes to the matter of Head Office Overheads,
the impact thereof on the site/project costs is not so obvious and
therefore Engineers and Employers often have the following questions, as to:

why should there be an increase in the Head Office


Overheads when the project completion is delayed?
why should any Head Office Overheads be an additional
cost under the contract?
why should a formula be used (whereas the Contractor
should demonstrate all costs using records)?

Moreover (unlike for Site Overheads), there are no site records


that can be produced (other than the Head Office books of accounts) to support this part of the claim.
The answers are found in the explanation of how the Contractor
sustains his Head Office. Since the Head Office does not have an
individual income/revenue, the cost of sustaining the Head Office
has to be borne by all the projects of the Contractor, by contributing a proportional sum every month from their project revenue, in
order to meet the Head Office Overheads. Therefore such contribution is a cost incurred in the execution of the Works (not different to paying authority fees, taxes, subcontract/supplier payments,
and any other project expense).
The resources deployed in the project were expected to generate
revenue and pay to the Contractors Head Office a sum of money
(to fund the Head Office Overheads) for the duration of the Time
for Completion, following which the same resources were expected to be deployed in other projects to generate revenue in order
to contribute further money to fund the continuing Head Office
Overheads beyond the aforesaid Time for Completion, which was
prevented by the Employer by delaying the project completion,
requiring the said resources to be retained on Site for a prolonged
period of time, resulting in the need to contribute more money
from the delayed project to sustain the Head Office, which is an
unforeseen additional cost, which is the answer to the second

IIQS / 50
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4/21/13 9:23 PM

question.
The answer to the first question is that, it is not an increase in
the Head Office Overheads but an increase in the contribution required from the delayed project to fund the continuing Head Office Overheads (though such Overheads may not have increased)
for the prolonged period, because the resources were not released
to generate such contribution from other projects.
Since there are adequate provisions in FIDIC Forms of contract
entitling the Contractor to additional payment in respect of costs
incurred as a result of a delay caused by the Employer or by those
for whom the Employer is responsible or by an event for which
the Employer assumed the monetary risk, and since Head Office
Overheads contribution is part of such cost, the Contractor would
be in a position to successfully argue his Head Office Overheads
claim, provided that it is quantified in an appropriate manner.
Where both parties are agreeable to use an existing formula
such as Hudson, Emden, Eichleay or Hank Laan (see the Schedule
at the end of this article), quantifying the Head Office Overheads
claim would be quite simple, but where there is disagreement,
such formulae cannot be used with FIDIC Forms of contract and
most bespoke forms of contract (or with claims for damages for
breach of contract) due to the necessity to deal with the actual (but
fair and reasonable) costs incurred or to be incurred, in addition
to other limitations/weaknesses found in such formulae.
It is ideal (but may not be convenient) to have a transparent
method to apportion the Rationalized Head Office Overheads of
a Contractor to all his projects and to recover monthly from each
project, its due contribution, neither based on the revenue (as is
being practised by some contractors) nor based on the overall expenditure (as practiced by the others), but based on the limited
cost of staff, workers and equipment deployed on the projects (or
in other words, based on the cost of those resources that a Contractor moves from one project to another and from which he generates revenue). If this is practised by Contractors, there would
be no need of formulae to establish the quantum of Head Office
Overheads element of the claim. The Contractor can simply produce proof of the contribution made by the delayed project towards the Head Office Overheads, during the delay period. But the
general practice among Contractors (mainly due to administrative
convenience) is to use either the revenue or the overall expenditure as the basis for the apportionment, thus necessitating the use
of a formula to later assess (for the purpose of a claim) what a fair
and reasonable Head Office Overheads contribution should have
been, because the actual contribution made was disproportionate
(and therefore not fair and reasonable). Moreover, a Contractor is
at liberty to collect from any of his projects whatever level of contribution that he prefers, in order to fund the Head Office Overheads (which is the contribution that would be recorded in the
project accounts), but an Employer is required to reimburse only
what the project should have contributed fairly and reasonably,

and not what was actually contributed. Such fair and reasonable
contribution could either be lower or higher than such actual (but
unfair and unreasonable) contribution, and can only be assessed
by using a formula, which is the answer to the third and final question, and therefore the use of an appropriate formula in the assessment of the Head Office Overheads element of a claim should
neither be questioned nor rejected.
Where a necessity arises for the use of a formula, which is free
of those shortcomings referred to in the Schedule given at the end
of this article, the following formula developed by the author is
available, which is currently being used successfully by Contractors and Consultants in the construction industry:where:

CP
SCP

Additional Payment due

H
=
Actual total overhead costs (G&A
expenses) of the Contractors Head Office during the period of EOT of the delayed project (Rationalized).
CP
=
Contract Price of the delayed project divided by its original Time for Completion, and
multiplied by the period of EOT
SCP
=
Sum total of Contract Price of each
concurrent project divided by its original Time for Completion, and multiplied by the whole or part period of
EOT (of the delayed project) through which it was in progress, taking into consideration all projects in progress at
the time, including the delayed project.
The application of the formula to a project and its claim, would
demonstrate that the Contractor is not attempting to recover
(from the Employer of the delayed project), all or most of its Head
Office Overheads incurred during the relevant period, but only a
fair and reasonable portion of it, which is the transparency that an
Employer would expect. (Such transparency does not exist when
using Hudson or Emden Formulae). It would also be transparent
to the Contractor that he is not under-recovering on the reimbursement of the contribution, fairly due from the delayed project.
Since the pace of the project (fast track, slow paced etc.) has been
factorized through the CP component, a fast-track project (where
it is very likely that the Contractors highest paid Project Director
and most of the brand new equipment are deployed) would need
to contribute proportionally higher than a slow-paced project,
which is a fair distribution of Head Office Overheads that cannot
be criticized. Also a weighting has been introduced (to multiply by
the full or part period of EOT through which a concurrent project was in progress) in order to avoid unfair apportionment to a
project which was not concurrent through the full period of EOT.
(Such factorization and/or weighting to ensure a fair apportion-

51/ IIQS
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ment cannot be found in Hudson, Emden, Eichleay or Hank Laan


Formulae). Since actual costs are taken into consideration, this
Formula can be used in claims under FIDIC Forms of contract
and since a transparent method of fair apportionment is used, this
Formula would be acceptable to both Contractors and Employers. For the same reasons, this formula should still be acceptable
as a means of assessment of Head Office Overheads element of a
prolongation cost claim at arbitrations and litigations even where
the Form of contract is not FIDIC, and also where a claim is for
damages for breach of contract.
One would wonder why the Authors Formula takes into consideration the period of Extension of Time (EOT) rather than
the period through which the delaying event continued. (It is not
all the monetary aspects of the delay claim that should be calculated for the period of actual delay! Cost of prolongation of the
Site Overheads for instance, should be calculated for the period
of actual delay whereas financing charges in respect of reduced
revenue should be for the period when the Contractor actually
suffers from such reduction (i.e. probably after 2 months of the
occurrence of the actual delay, given 28 days for certification and

28 days for payment. Likewise, financing charges for the late release of first moiety of Retention Money should be for the period
from original date for completion to the end of the EOT, whereas
in respect of the second moiety it should be a year later. Thus each
kind of prolongation cost is incurred during a different period of
the project time line). Head Office Overheads element should be
calculated for the period when the Contractor was unable to generate revenue from other projects using his resources which were
unforeseeably retained in the delayed project, which is the same
period for which EOT was determined.
A refined version of the formula could be developed by using an
S-Curve distribution instead of the linear distribution adopted for
the CP factor but the necessity to use calculus and probable nonavailability and/or unacceptability of the information required by
such a version may pose administrative difficulties/impossibilities
in its application for most projects. For this reason, parties to contracts consider the linear distribution to be adequate in order to
arrive at a fair assessment of the Contractors Head Office Overheads contribution that should be reimbursed as part of a prolongation cost claim .

Schedule.

HUDSON FORMULA:where :

HO/P
X
100

Contract
Sum
Period
of Delay
(weeks)

Period of Delay
(weeks)

HO/P =
the percentage of head office overhead cost
and profit allowed in the Tender
Authors Comments:(a) This formula does not comply with the actual cost requirement of FIDIC Forms of contract (or of claims for damages
for breach of contract) due to the following reasons:-

EMDEN FORMULA:-

h
100

c
cp


where :

X pd

The actual Head Office Overheads percentage could either


be more or less (at the time of delay/EOT) than that included
in the Tender.
The average-per-week interim assessment is a departure
from the actual.

(b) There is no transparency as to: whether the Contractor is attempting to recover all or mostof the Head Office Overheads from the Employer of the delayed project.
whether the other concurrent projects of the Contractor are also
sharing the Head Office Overheads in a fair and reasonable manner.
whether the Contractor is over-recovering/under-recovering
on the Head Office Overheads contribution of the delayed project.

h =


c =
cp =
pd =

head office percentage arrived at by dividing the total


overhead cost and profit of the Contractors organiza
tion as a whole, by the total turnover.
contract sum
contract period in weeks
period of delay in weeks

Authors Comments:-

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(a) This formula does not comply with the actual cost requirement of FIDIC Forms of contract (or of claims for damages
for breach of contract) due to the average-per-week interim
assessment.
(b) There is no transparency as to:-

whether the other concurrent projects of the Contractor are also


sharing the Head Office Overheads in a fair and reasonable
manner.
whether the Contractor is over-recovering/under-recovering
on the Head Office Overheads contribution of the delayed project.

EICHLEAY FORMULA:CONTRACT BILLINGS


STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

TOTAL CONTRACT BILLINGS


FOR CONTRACT PERIOD
ALLOCABLE OVERHEAD
DAYS OF PERFORMANCE
DAILY CONTRACT
HEAD OFFICE OVERHEAD

TOTAL HEAD OFFICE


OVERHEADS FOR CONTRACT
PERIOD

DAILY CONTRACT
HEAD OFFICE OVERHEAD

DAYS OF COMPENSABLE
DELAY

ALLOCABLE
OVERHEAD

ADDITIONAL PAYMENT
DUE

Authors Comments:(a) This formula does not comply with the actual cost requirement of FIDIC Forms of contract (or of claims for damages
for breach of contract) due to the average-per-day interim
assessment.

(b) Where the value of billings of other projects of the Contractor is low, the delayed project would attract most of the Head
Office Overheads, which would not be acceptable to an Employer.

HANK LAAN FORMULA:-

Contract Billings
Total Company Billings

Total Head Office Overheads


(during the period of delay)

Additional Payment due

Authors Comments:(a) The actual cost requirement of FIDIC Forms of contract (or
of claims for damages for breach of contract) are satisfied to
some extent by this Formula but the method of apportionment used in this formula would not be acceptable to an Employer for the reason stated in comment (b) under Eichleay
Formula above.

(b) Authors Formula is a development off this formula in search


of a fair apportionment acceptable to both the Contractor
and the Employer.

- Prof. Indrawansa Samaratunga


(Publishers Note : Samaratunga Formula was first
published in 2001, in his doctoral thesis Contract Administration in the Middle East under FIDIC-4th, and later
became a popular topic in his Sound Contract
Administration training trilogy.)

53/ IIQS
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UNREASONABLE
RISK TRANSFER
NOT ALWAYS BENEFICIAL
FOR THE EMPLOYER

BY N.M.Raj

THE THEORY
A lot of standard build only construction contracts (e.g. FIDIC
Red Book) are significantly amended to transfer an unreasonable
quantum of risk to the Contractor. During my professional tenure
in Europe, Middle-East, Africa & far-East Ive had extensive debates with several professionals about this issue. The general view
of the Employers representatives is that there is more financial
certainty in terms of the project budget. The view of the Contractors is that they have to price more risk into the tender and, at the
end of the process.
There are logical arguments from both sides; however, the reality is that a balance should be struck between what risks should
be transferred to the Contractor and what should be retained by
the Employer. The allocation of risk associated with unforeseeable
ground conditions is a case in point.
Example
Rock Excavation (Part of Unforeseeable Ground Conditions)
As a result of the various legal/contractual problems arising from
ground conditions claims, the Employers have, around the
world, amended the standard forms of Contract to transfer this
risk completely to the Contractor.

This is a sample clause from a build only public sector contract that I encountered which defines an unforeseeable event as
follows:
A condition, circumstance or occurrence is unforeseeable if an
experienced Contractor tendering for the Works could not have
reasonably foreseen it on the Designated Date, having inspected
the Site and its surroundings and having satisfied itself, insofar
as practicable and taking into account any information in connection with the Site provided by the Employer, as to all matters
concerning the Site, including its form and nature and its geotechnical, hydrological and climatic conditions.
In the D&B contract, the risk transfer for unforeseeable events
appears to be far more onerous for the Contractor. Having said
that, it remains to be seen how contractually effective the latter
will be taking into account the fact that, generally, the Contractor
receives a geotechnical report from the Employer for D&B projects as well. It is a generally accepted opinion that a similar clause
in the ICE 5th edition (FIDIC was originally based on the ICE
form of Contract) is not very effective, contractually/legally, due
to the following reasons:
Pre-Tender investigations that the Contractor may want to carry out are limited by the time available.
If the Employer has provided the Contractor with a reasonable

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geotechnical report, it will be impractical for the Contractor to


double check the information with his own site investigations.
It would also be unreasonable to expect the potential Contractors to dig boreholes all over the site.
Case Study - Disadvantages of Total Risk transfer to the Contractor
Let us consider a practical example to illustrate the disadvantages associated with total risk transfer with respect to ground
conditions.
Example:
The Employer has issued a tender for a D&B project which requires the Contractor to price for the risk associated with unforeseeable ground conditions. Let us assume that there are four Contractors bidding for the project; three local Contractors that are
highly reputed/financially secure (Contractors 1, 2 and 3) and one
Contractor (Contractor 4) that is new to the market (with limited
financial resources), desperate to tender/win a project. Let us also
assume that the geotechnical report is not very comprehensive
and contains errors which may not be picked up by contractors
that do not have local experience.
Contractors 1, 2 and 3 will study the geotechnical report
supplied by the Employer, utilise their in-house expertise, local knowledge of the ground conditions and make a considered
guesstimate of the risk associated with ground conditions such
as ingress of groundwater, excavation in rock etc. It is impossible
to make an accurate assessment, so, let us assume that the Contractors have priced the risk as follows (based on their interpretation of the geotechnical report and experience):
1) Contractor 1 - 60 million.
2) Contractor 2 - 55 million
3) Contractor 3 - 63 million
Now, let us assume that Contractor 4 has only included an
amount of 20m for the risk associated with ground conditions.
Now, it does not matter whether the said Contractor under-estimated the risk due to 1) calculations based on errors contained
within the geotechnical report (which could be disputed by the
Client) 2) on purpose or 3) by way of an error. Situations like this
do happen (quite often) in a competitive tendering environment,
especially during a recession.
The above scenario could have the following outcomes:
1) Scenario 1 - Contractor 1 or 2 or 3 wins the project (Assuming
that the overall price is still lower than Contractor 4s tender
price) or
2) Scenario 2 - Contractor 4 wins the project as a result of his

lower estimate for the risk item and/or his overall price when
compared to the other Contractors.
LET US ANALYSE THE TWO SCENARIOS:
Scenario 1
Based on this scenario, if the Contractor had to spend say
30m to overcome ground condition problems, the Employer has
lost circa 25m - 33m. In the unlikely event that the cost associated with this risk amounts to more than the winning Contractors
tender estimate, the Employer would have benefited from the risk
transfer obligation. However, it is not prudent to assume, beforehand, that the commercial outcome would definitely be better for
the Employer if the Contractor carried the entire risk. This is due
to the fact that the Employer could have, at pre-tendering stage,
hired additional experts to analyse/interpret the tender geotechnical report and make a guesstimate which could, in most cases,
be superior to the Contractors tender estimate due to relatively
higher availability of time.
Scenario 2
As mentioned earlier, Contractor 4s eagerness to win the project
and generate turnover may well be reason why he under priced the
risk item and/or the tender in general. Now, as soon as Contractor
4 realises that the cost associated with this particular risk item is
significantly exceeding or will significantly exceed his tender allowance, he is very likely to adopt an adversarial claims oriented
stance and walk away from the project when he realises that Employer will not pay up unless an award is given via arbitration/
litigation. This is because Contractor 4 simply does not have the
resources to finance the project by expending his own cash which,
in turn, would become the subject of a claim/dispute and remain
unresolved/unpaid for years.
The Employer stands to lose a lot in this scenario as well due to
issues related to an incomplete project, legal dispute with Contractor 4 and the necessity to procure another Contractor to finish
the job.
It is clear from the above that the Employer does not really benefit from the above scenarios.
So, what is the best way to manage this risk?
A suggested method to manage this risk whilst optimising the
Employers budget is as follows:
1) Carry out a detailed ground investigation study along with a detailed risk assessment review of the problems associated with
excavation in rock, ground water conditions et al.
2) Based on the same, establish a Medium and worst case scenario in terms of monetary risk associated with ground conditions. This ground investigation exercise should be more

55/ IIQS
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detailed than the normal tender geotechnical reports in that a


detailed technical and commercial assessment should also be
procured by the Employer.
3) Based on the Medium case scenario, insert various types of
Ground condition risk as items in the tender bill of quantity e.g. rock as remeasurable items in the bill of quantity for
the Contractor to price, rates for resources associated with
ground water risk etc. The Employers representative should
also be contractually obliged to provide adequate supervision/management of these items by using an independent
geotechnical expert (more information below).
4) The aforementioned items in the bill of quantity should form an
integral part of the overall tender sum; otherwise, the Contractor may load the rates and recover, at the Employers expense,
disproportionate sums if the quantity increases significantly.

The most important question the Employer should ask himself


is this: If the Contractor can price the unforeseeable risk, why
cant I do it with the help professional expertise? Why should I be
at the mercy of the Contractors guesstimate?
Case Study - Conclusion
The Employer could allow an internal budgetary contingency of
say 65 million and ensure that the costs associated with the rock
excavation (if required) is managed and recorded properly. The
additional costs associated with the same could be funded from
the aforementioned contingency. In all likelihood, the additional
costs associated with this risk would be lower than the internal
contingency. Therefore, the Employer would have saved money
and as the old saying goes a penny saved is a penny earned.

N.M.Raj Is The Managing Partner Of Prime Consulting And An Internationally Renowned Claims/Contracts Specialist (FIDIC & Other Contracts) With
More Than 20 Years Of Commercial/Claims Management Experience

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HOW TO AVOID RISK


ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF
BESPOKE CONTRACTS IN UAE

BY Mathew Varughese
RESPONDENTS PROFILES
Survey respondents were invited from various sectors of the construction industry, including clients, consultants, contractors,
suppliers, subcontractors and legal firm. Majority of the respondents werefrom contracting companies, they contributed to 38%
of the response. 29.0% of the respondents were from clients side
and another 29% werefrom consultants. 2% of the response was
fromeach legal and subcontractor firm.
In terms of total experience in UAE, majority of respondents
(40%) were well experienced and areworking in UAE for more
than 15 years. 24% of the respondents have experience of about
10 to 15 years. 26% of the respondents have experience of about
5 to 10 years.

KEY RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE APPLICATION OF THE


BESPOKE CONTRACT
Nearly 50% of the respondents are using FIDIC based bespoke
contracts showing the wide implementation of bespoke form of
contracts by clients in the UAE. 29 % of the respondents are using FIDIC 1987 Redbook and 17 % of the respondents are using
FIDIC 1999 Red book.
Article 246 of the UAE federal Law No. 5 of 1985 (the Civil
Code) states that the contract must be performed in accordance
with its contents and in a manner consistent with the requirements of good faith. But most of the bespoke forms of contract
incorporatestrict application of time bar clauses and condition

57/ IIQS
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precedent clauses,which is identified as one of the main cause of


disputes in construction contracts.
From the survey it wasfound that there are majorrisks associated
with the application of the bespoke contracts, some of them are
as follows.
75% of the respondents believed that client uses bespoke forms of
contract to transfer unrealistic risk to the contractors
59% of the respondents agreed that strict application of time bar
clauses and condition-precedent clausesisone of the major causes
of dispute in bespoke contracts
From the above, this fact is established that the substantial risks
are transferred to Contractors through bespoke forms in UAE and
therefore it is essential to assess such risks at the tender stage to
price /manage them efficiently by listing the risks and getting it
reviewed by qualified professionals, so that these can be managed
effectively throughout the contract duration.
CONTRACTUAL AND LEGAL KNOWLEDGE
OF PROFESSIONALS
The UAE legal system is based on the civil law system and as such
the primary source of law is a statutory code.
An attempt was made to know how much the respondents are
familiar withthe civil code pertaining toconstruction matters.
About 75% of the respondents were familiar with UAE civil code
It is reasonable to expect that industry practitioners have basic
legal knowledge. However,by increasing the use of bespoke form
of contract, wherein the client is transferring additionalrisks to
the Contractor, the contractors staff should have adequate legal
knowledge to foresee such situations and manage the risk properly. 55% of the respondents believed that court system in UAE
doesnt have sufficient capacity to manage major construction disputes. This was in line with the finding of Stephen (2010) who
stated that, the court system of Abu Dhabi has little real capacity
to manage major, complex, construction disputes. Presently the
only real alternative to litigation in the UAE is via commercial arbitration whether pre agreed or via an ad - hoc reference.
Majority of the professionals involved in projects in UAE are
mainly from common law background and not from civil law
background. Time is of the essence and Time at large adopted
by FIDIC is not a civil law concept and also Penalty clauses are
valid and subject to judicial control of the court. About 60% response shows that they are familiar with this concept.
A common law lawyer would first rely on the terms of the contract and then on the implied terms and will ask question to what
the parties did agree, whereas a civil law lawyer would rely on the
terms of the contract itself and then on the corresponding rules
provided by the civil code. About 84% response shows that they
are familiar with this concept as well.
However, about 65% of the participants of the survey stated that

lack of legally qualified staff is one of the main causes of dispute in


UAE construction industry and the staff needs to have more legal
knowledge to administer the contract properly.
CREATE A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE VARIOUS
BESPOKE FORMS OF CONTRACTS USED IN UAE.
A question was asked to the participant that why Contractors accept bespoke forms of contract instead of standard forms of contract? Majority of the respondents believed that the following are
the possible reason for the contractors to accept bespoke forms.
1. It is dictated by the Client, no choice but to accept

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2.

3.

4.
5.


Imposed on them otherwise excluded from the


tender process
Nothing wrong with the bespoke Contract as the
Contractor can price for his risks in any form of contract
There is also huge competition in the market for works
Most of the clients are either government
departments or organizations controlled
by government who have their own standard
bespoke contracts.

95% of the survey respondents were of the opinion that use of bespoke forms of contract is a common practice in UAE. About 65%
of the respondents of the survey believe that it is not fair for clients
to change the standard form of contracts to protect their own interest. About 51% of the professionals participated in the survey
do not believe that the clients legal team make sure that all of the
intended bespoke provisions are enforceable under UAE civil law.
About 67% of the professionals participated in the survey consider that the high competition in the market for works is the reason why contractors accept bespoke contract instead of standard
forms of contract.
GENERATE DISCUSSION AMONG PROFESSIONAL FOR A
BETTER LEGAL FRAMEWORK
The disputes in construction sector of UAE are increasing in terms
of number and amount. Even though there are number of ways to
settle the disputes such as negotiation, mediation, arbitration, litigation etc. most of the parties go for negotiation / amicable settlement, few of the companies only enter into arbitration or litigation
due to uncertainty of the outcome.
About 65% of the respondents believed that UAE civil code provision related to construction law is inadequate to settle all disputes in UAE and therefore about 84% think that there is a further
need to develop construction law in UAE to make clarity on various issues such as delayed or non-payment, set-off, settlement of
disputes etc.
About 50% of the respondents believe that some action has to
be taken to prevent the disputes recurring time and again in UAE
construction Industry. These actions are,
1. A specific body of construction related law has to be

developed, similar to construction Act in UK, which

would bevery effective
2. More clarity is required for the law position on

Condition Precedent / Prevention issues.
3. Appointment of legally qualified persons to ensure

that any amendments to FIDIC contracts are

enforceable in UAE jurisdiction.
4. Companies have to develop policies to review


contracts during tender stage to assess risk of the contract.
6. Conclusion It is found that, in UAE, majority of the clients
use bespoke contracts, generally based on the FIDIC 1987 or
FIDIC 1999 Red book either substantiallymodified version or
changes applied through particular conditions. Most of the
changes made to the standard forms are found to have severe implication to the Contractors as many additional risks
are transferred to the contractors by the clients. Changes includes but not limited to condition precedent, strict notice
provisions, , modified variation provisions and its determinations, modified payment provisions, delay penalties, additional insurance provisions, modified dispute resolution
provisions, etc.

Most of the situations when contractorsare faced with such
disputes; they are left with the onlychoice to proceed with
dispute resolution process. But the outcome of the dispute
resolution process is uncertain since the case precedents are
not applicable in civil law.

Keeping this in mind, in majority of the situations, the contractors opt to settle most of the dispute through settlements/
compromise.
7. Recommendations

Contractor to carry out detailed review of the tender conditions at the time of tender to assess risks and opportunities.
They need to appoint appropriate qualified professionals
to manage contracts. Employers should be encouraged to
reduce use of bespoke contract forms and increased use of
standard contract forms. Also, there is a need to develop construction law to minimize disputes between clients and the
contractors.

Varughese Mathew
FRICS, FICOB, MCIArb,
Commercial Head, Al Faraa Group

59/ IIQS
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PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY
INSURANCE WHAT DOES IT
COVER

BY Dharmendar Pardasani
WHAT IS PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY INSURANCE?
Professional Indemnity insurance (PII) covers professional from
claims made against them for financial losses flowing from the
services and advices, on the grounds of professional negligence,
error or omission.
PII also covers the legal liability towards third party property
damage and third party injury or death. The professionals, who
are generally required to obtain PII, by virtue of legal or contrac-

tual requirement, are Architects, Engineers, Lawyers, and Insurance Brokers etc.
WHY IS IT RECOMMENDED?
A single claim can ruin a business completely since defending a
claim for professional negligence can be very expensive. It can
cause extensive financial damage to a professional and also may
ruin his reputation. In some of the jurisdictions, PII is a manda-

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tory requirement for some professionals. Most of the contracts for


professional services also require the PII as a mandatory requirement.
EXAMPLE OF DAMAGES THAT THE PROFESSIONAL MAY
BE LIABLE DUE TO ERROR, OMISSION OR NEGLIGENCE
AND GENERAL COVERAGE BY PII



Damage to building constructed based on insureds design


Damage to others property
Compensation to injury to residents of other property
Legal costs of client to defend the claim from all parties

CLAIMS NOT COVERED BY PII


Consequential damages such as claim for loss of reputation or loss
of possibility of future contracts with the Client are not covered
by PII.
COVERAGE PERIOD
PII is generally based on claim-made basis. The policy covers
all the claims, made during policy period even if the claim was
based on an event of negligence, error or omission prior to policy
period. In some cases, the policy contains an agreed retroactive
date and the claims made during the policy period for the events
beyond that retroactive date only shall be covered by the policy.

RICS REQUIREMENT FOR PII FOR MEMBERS


RICS REQUIREMENT OF PII COVERAGE AS PER RULE 9
OF CONDUCT RULE IS AS FOLLOWS:
FIRMS TURNOVER IN THE PRECEDING YEAR

MINIMUM LIMIT OF INDEMNITY

GBP 100,000 OR LESS

GBP 25,000

GBP 100,000 TO 200,000

GBP 500,000

GBP 200,000

GBP 1,000,000

MAXIMUM LEVEL OF UNINSURED EXCESS:


LIMIT OF INDEMNITY

MINIMUM LIMIT OF INDEMNITY

UP TO GBP 500,000

GREATER OF 2.5% OF THE SUM INSURED OR GBP 10,000

OVER GBP 500,000

2.5% OF SUM INSURED

GBP 200,000

GBP 1,000,000

It also requires that indemnity is based on full civil liability


basis and is based on each and every claim.
Also, it requires firms to obtain the run off cover during the
period the firm ceases to operate. The minimum period of runoff cove is not mentioned. Accordingly, the firms may decide
the years of run-off cover period depending on the years of
liability under the legal framework of a particular country. In
UAE the liability period extends to 10 years from the completion of the project.
Also, the above guidelines for the PII refer to the minimum
coverage. The firms may decide on the coverage based on the
specific requirement of PII mentioned in the contract and the
extent of risk that they want to manage.
The RISC requires all the practicing members to be covered by
PII in case they practice as sole principals, partners, directors
or consultant to any firm offering surveying services.
OBLIGATION TO NOTIFY CLAIMS
OR CIRCUMSTANCES
A claim is generally an allegation of negligence and indication

of intention to recover the financial losses by the client or a third


party against the insured.
A circumstance basically arises where the insured become aware
of an occurrence or problem, which may give rise to a claim, but
no formal claim has been made.
The insured should notify the insurers under both scenarios, since
that is generally considered by the insurers a good risk management practice. A late notification may tempt the Insurer to avoid /
delay reimbursing a claim.
TIPS TO ENSURE THAT RISKS WITH RESPECT TO PII
COVERAGE ARE MINIMIZED
Ensure that there are no gaps in the PII coverage and that it
covers all the risks that the insured intends to cover based on
the terms of contract and the possible civil liability.
Immediate notification to the insurers of any claim or circumstance.
Ensuring that notification is made during the period of the
policy during which the insured become aware of the claim
or circumstance.

61/ IIQS
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Maintaining of client confidentiality and privilege when notifying circumstance to insurers. However, once the formal
claim is notified by the client, the confidentiality is deemed
to be waived off.
Not admitting any liability or giving any offer for settlement
to any third party without getting the consent from the insurers.
Once the claim has been notified to the insurers, then the
insured needs to ensure that he cooperates with the insurers
fully in providing all the related information.

WHAT DOES THE PREMIUM DEPENDS ON


The premium charged by the insurers depends on the following:
Claims history in the previous years
Type of services offered
Number of principles and employees
Annual Turnover
Risk management practices of organization
Other risk derived by the insurers
The premium may significantly increase (by 20-25%) in case
the there are substantial claims in the previous year.
EXAMPLE OF A PII CLAUSE IN A CONSULTANCY
CONTRACT BY A UAE BASED CLIENT
AED 6.00 Million for each and every loss resulting from any
one occurrence or series of occurrences resulting from the
same event.
Aggregate limit to be equal to project value (value of project
that the consultant shall design)
In case of projects less than AED 25.00 Million, the PII requirement is 25% of the project value for each and every loss,
subject to a minimum of AED 2.00 Million.
Deductible amount per loss shall not exceed 10% of the limit
of PII cover subject to a maximum of AED 100,000.00
Third Party Liability in the joint name of consultant and the
employer, to be AED 2.00 Million per occurrence or series
of occurrences resulting from the same event which shall
include for legal fee. The number of occurrences to be unlimited
Waiver of insurers right of subrogation against the client.
A run off cover of 10 years to be maintained.
The above is an example only and each contract may have
differing requirement for PII cover
JURISDICTION OF PII COVERAGE
PII policy mentions the jurisdiction within which it shall be valid
for all legal liabilities covered by the policy.

FINAL WORD
Any PII policy needs to be negotiated judiciously with the insurers to ensure that all the risks in the contract are passed on to the
insurers. Any gaps must be diligently negotiated and closed. Avoid
misrepresenting or non-disclosure of any key details in respect
of the type of services being undertaken and the risks involved,
which if discovered later can render the PII cover as void. Notify
the insurers at the earliest in case of any claim and cooperate with
insurers to defend the claim if you or they think that the claim is
not justified. Ensure that you have a risk management system in
place so as to avoid any claims as far as possible and consequently
mitigate the possibility of increase of premium next year.

References:

Professional Indemnity Insurance ,RICS Regulations, version


2, w.e.f. 1 July 2011
Professional Indemnity Insurance, The Law Society,
30 January 2013
Professional Indemnity Insurance, www.professio
nalindemnity-insuracne.org
Professional Indemnity Insurance Regulations and
Guidelines, www.aceew.com
Professional Indemnity Insurance, www.ausdance.org.au
Professional Indemnity Insurance Requirements,
The Chartered Certified Accountants Global Practicing
Regulations, www.accaglobal.com
Howard Land, Professional Indemnity Insurance, College of
Estate Management
Overview of Practical Aspects of Professional Indemnity
Insurance in UAE, Presentation by an Insurance company for
IIQS in September 2007

Dharmendar Pardasani

MSC(QS),FRICS,FAIQS,MCIOB,MCIArb

Director & Global Vice President


Contracts Manager, Parsons UAE

IIQS / 62
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4/21/13 9:23 PM

QUANTITY SURVEYOR
POSITION OR PROFESSION?

nadvertent misinterpretation of any profession down plays


the crux of the role either from a commoners perception
or from the professions deliverables. For instance many a
time people tend to mix up the identity of a Land Surveyor
(one who measures Land) with Quantity Surveyor. Besides,
even if one perceives Quantity Surveyor as professional calculating quantities for construction works, then also the role is not fully
understood.
Royal institution of Chartered surveyors christened Quantity
surveyors as Cost Managers, a name coined with their core responsibility in mind. A Quantity Surveyor is an efficient and effective cost consultant with the empowerment to assume advisory
responsibility to the project team on procurement as well as contractual matters.

BY E V Johnson Neil
The reader of this article can garner a fair knowledge on:
Heritage of Quantity Surveying profession
Roles and Responsibilities of Quantity Surveyors
Recognition concerns ahead of Quantity Surveyors
HERITAGE OF QUANTITY SURVEYING PROFESSION
Quantity surveying profession had become an integral part of construction industry since inception with limited visibility. Estimating costs prior to development was ever treated as a mandatory
exercise. Historians endorse the view that Egyptian architectural
domain had a sign of methodical quantity surveying generations
behind. As per the records, quantity surveying had registered its
professional inroads during 17th century. Nevertheless, this profession established its identity during the course of 19th century.
Records say that 1820 was the year which offered quantity survey-

63/ IIQS
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ing a profession status. Sir. Henry Arthur Hunt of 19th century


played Quantity Surveyor role in the construction of House of
Parliament in U.K.
This profession has now grown to an extent of having one of the
largest sections in the membership of the Royal Institution of the
Chartered Surveyors.
In India, prior to 1934, the profession of quantity surveying was
practiced by a few qualified Quantity Surveyors who were working either independently or in association with architects in presidency towns. In the same year, the Govt. of India also introduced
the Surveyor of Works cadre in the Military Engineering Services
by recruiting a team of British Quantity Surveyors. These pioneers
were Quantity Surveyors from UK who trained a few Indian Engineers, showed desire to opt for this profession.
However, the profession has not been significantly developed in
India. Although in the recent years the quantity surveying profession is recognized to some extent in various central Government
and private sectors, the development has been still slow primarily
due the lack of awareness of the effective utilization of the Quantity Surveyors.
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
OF QUANTITY SURVEYORS
As stated above, Quantity Surveyors are primarily cost managers
of construction Industry with footing in all sectors of the industry.
Quantity Surveyors effective involvement can be witnessed right
from the capital expenditure phase of a building or facility, which covers the feasibility study, design and construction phases. In addition
the Quantity Surveyors can be also involved with the jobs related to
extension, refurbishment, maintenance and demolition of a facility.

The Quantity Surveyors are engaged in diversified roles by employers representing different domains of operation namely clients,
developers, lead consultants and contractors. The Quantity Surveyor
can also offer services at the capacity of a consultant as a private practitioner for a developer or public sector.
The prime responsibilities of a Quantity surveyor
are enlisted below:



Preparing feasibility studies


Assessing capital and revenue expenditure over the whole life
of a facility
Advising on the budgets
Preparing cost plans and cost estimates

Monitoring design development against planned expend ture

Advising on procurement strategy


Conducting value management and engineering exercises
Managing and analyzing risk
Managing the tendering process
Preparing tender and contractual documentations
Controlling cost during the construction process
Managing the commercial success of a project
Valuing construction work for interim payments
Valuing variations and changes, assessing or compiling
claims for loss and expense and agreeing final accounts
Giving advice on the avoidance and settlement of disputes

The above explicitly encapsulates the significance of a Quantity


Surveyors contribution in cost management to ensure financial
feasibility of assigned projects.
In Middle East, the Quantity Surveyors are empowered with

IIQS / 64
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diversified assignments with value added responsibilities. Consistent demand in work culture across geographies to maintain
operational excellence facilitates Quantity Surveyors in Middle
East and India to explore their contributions at corresponding
roles more effectively.
Globally the quantity surveying profession is evolving multi
dimensionally with balanced diversification in to new areas of
practicing such as investment appraisal, analysis of financial risks,
contractual dispute resolution, project management, cash flow accounting forecasts etc.
RECOGNITION CONCERNS AHEAD
OF QUANTITY SURVEYORS
Despite the fact that Quantity Surveyors add value to their assignment by assuming responsibilities with key controls, in Asian
countries this role is yet to be offered due recognition.
Limited exposure and knowledge on leveraging the contribution of a Quantity Surveyor is the prime cause for role victimization. Industry evolution with operational maturity will certainly
nullify this during the course and Indian industry started experiencing this now. Current Academic stream doesnt have any
provision to charm young talents during under graduation curriculum as there is no specialization available to learn. The title
poses a challenge to beginners as the very word Surveying has a
low perceived value.
Moreover, Quantity Surveyors fail to make a significant impact
in the industry in terms of professional standard and work ethics
in comparison to other senior assignments.
It is imperative to ensure Quantity Surveyors identity
consistently aligns with the Five Ethics and Professional standard yard stick set out by Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors
(Regulations August -2012). The Ethics and Professional Standard
set out by the RICS are as enlisted below:
1. Act with integrity 2. Always provide a high standard of
service 3. Act in a way that promotes trust in the profession 4.
Treat others with respect 5. Take responsibility.
Every Quantity Surveyor must upkeep high level of ethical
standards and honour rules and regulations in addition to the
basic requirement of abiding by law throughout.
To obtain due recognition, every Quantity Surveyor is required
to address the stated factors with total commitment and failing
which may cause them dearly.
Meanwhile, IIQS has been effectively addressing these factors
both in India and UAE and hence the Quantity Surveyor fraternity can expect a positive shift during the course.
CONCLUSION
Quantity Surveyors are instrumental in cost control initiatives
and their effective contribution in the industry will offer them a
level playing field to climb corporate ladders and secure strategic

positions. Needless to say that higher the skill set of a Quantity


Surveyor greater the benefits to the employer and certainly this
will keep the professional engaged to the fullest extend with comprehensive responsibilities.
The Quantity Surveyor role demands consistent enhancement
of skill matrix and each professional must have a grip on analyzing and calibrating every measure of construction element for the
life cycle of building or facility. The core competency of Quantity Surveyor is to manage the costs by balancing value propositions with no compromise on preferred / opted quality standards
matching respective client needs.
Quantity Surveyors have a higher responsibility to shoulder
and it is ideal to exercise ethical practices across their career regardless of the office they hold. Demonstrating fairness in every
domain they operate will bolster the significance of Quantity Surveyors role.

REFERENCES
Indian Surveyor The Journal of the Institution of Surveyors,
India January 2012
Quantity Surveying P.L Bhasin, published by S.Chand and
Company Ltd, New Delhi, India
Pathway - Quantity Surveying and Construction - Assessment
of Professional Competence - Royal Institution of Chartered
Surveyors, London
Ethics and Professional Standards Regulations 22 August
2012 - Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, London

E V Johnson Neil
MRICS, MIS, MCIArb
Director and Global Vice President IIQS
Director - Eben Johnson Consultants

65/ IIQS
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NOVATION
AN OVER VIEW
BY Kasi Viswanathan

s per the New Oxford Dictionary of English,


Novation means Law the substitution of new
contract in place of an old one. Barrons Law dictionary explains that Novation means the substitution of a party for one of the original parties to
a contract with the consent of the remaining party. The result is
that old contract is extinguished, and a new contract, with the
same content but at least one different party, is created. It often
involves a transaction whereby the original debtor is discharged
from liability his creditor by the substitution of second debtor
Complex construction projects are conceived with a target cost
and time at the inception stage. Any adverse cost overrun or time
overrun could seriously jeopardize the viably or the purpose of
having ventured into such a project. Therefore, for completion
of the project without any overruns, it is essential that there is a
proper and timely engagement of the parties for the project.
The novation process is helpful in the following scenarios.
1. Engage a consultant to develop the initial concept and preliminary designs before inviting tenders for design and build
contracts and later novate the consultant to the contractor
for further design process.
2. Procure a specialised and proprietary type of subcontractor
prior to the appointment of main contractor to mitigate the
lead time of such specialised and proprietary type of works
and later novate the specialised contractor to the main contractor.
3. Change in ownership of the property during construction
of the property.
Although it may appear that the novation is executed through
a relatively simple agreement, there are number of pre-arrangements to be made.
It is interesting to note that most of the standard forms of contracts in this region do not directly address the novation provision. There are provisions for nomination and assignment in the
standard forms.

IIQS / 66
Book.indd 66

There is an essential difference between the Assignment and


Novation as explained below:
For an example consider a scenario of three parties, namely a
client, an EPC contractor and a novated or assigned specialised
contractor, involved in a typical novation or assignment agreement. In order to mitigate the schedule constraints, the client enters into a contract with the specialised contractor for supply of
proprietary items and in parallel enters into the selection process
of the EPC Contractor.
Once the EPC contractor is selected the specialised contractor
will be either novated or assigned to the EPC contractor by the
client.
If it is a novation, then after signing of the novation agreement,
all the rights and obligations of the client under the previous contract will be transferred entirely onto the EPC contractor from
the client as if the previous contract was entered into by the EPC
contractor directly
If it is an assignment, after signing of the assignment agreement, only the specific defined rights of the client will be transferred onto the EPC contractor while client will be keeping with
himself some of the obligations under the previous contract such
as payment obligations.
The appended diagram explains the contractual arrangement for
pre and post-novation scenarios
1st STAGE
EPC Contractor

Client

Contractor

Specialised
Contractor
Sub-contractor

2nd STAGE

Contractual Link Novation Agreement

4/21/13 9:23 PM

1 STAGE
EPC Contractor
1st STAGE

Contractor

Client

EPC Contractor
Contractor

Client

Specialised
Contractor

Specialised
Contractor
Sub-contractor

Sub-contractor

nd
2nd STAGE

2 STAGE

Contractual Link Novation Agreement

Contractual Link Novation Agreement

FINAL STAGE
EPC Contractor
Contractor

Client

FINAL STAGE
EPC Contractor

Specialised
Contractor

Client

Sub-contractor

Contractor

Novation offers distinct advantages to the project and it is a very


attractive procurement option for the client as it transfers all the
risks to the contractor. It also ensures greater consistency
Specialised in deContractor
sign which may improve the buildability of the project.
Novation
encourages a less adversarial relationship than the
traditional
Sub-contractor
procurement system. Clients have a greater degree of control over
design and quality in novation contracts. The major advantage of
the novation is project delivery time which can be saved in the
time leading up to the start of construction as well as during the
construction.
However, the novation is not without disadvantages. There are
number of issues that may cause difficulties for parties when novating. Some of the key issues include ownership of the intellectual property, lack of standardization in the form of novation
deeds, collection of outstanding fee prior to novation and warranties and indemnities.

Large contractors see a great opportunity with the increasing usage of novation as they believe that novation allows them to display their superior management skills and thereby gain a market
edge over many of their competitors.
On the other hand, small to medium sized contractors may have
greater concern over the imposition of additional risks and cost
and time management involved in accepting the novation from
the client.
It is important that contracting parties are aware of implications
associated with contractual rights, obligations and liabilities.
Contracting parties should ensure that the necessary consent and
notice requirements are met and that a clear and unequivocal language is used in the contract and in deeds of novation in order to
give effect to their intended commercial outcome.
In conclusion, it is obvious that novation is an innovative process
where the time is constrained in the complex construction projects but the succession of novation largely depends on the professionalism, maturity and competence of the three participating
parties, the client, the contractor, the designer or the specialised
contractor.
References:
International Journal of Project Management May 2006
News Letter May 2008 - Henry Davis York, Lawyers

Diagram appended below shows the major risks of contractor in


the novation.
.
Lack of Fees for
Novated Team

Novated Team's
Ability to Perform

Poor Relationship
with Novated
Team

Contractor's
Risks
Timing of Novation

Kasi Viswanathan,
B.E. (Civil), MIE, MRICS, MIS, MCIArb,
Director and Governing Committee Chair IIQS
Contracts Manager - Nakheel PJSC

67/ IIQS
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COST CONTROL
MEASURES UNDER A
CONSTRUCTION
PROJECT
A PENNY SAVED IS
PENNY EARNED
BY Syed Aslam

GENERAL:
The construction industry is subject to a stiff competition to win the jobs
and therefore a majority of the tender prices represent the most optimum
of all parameters such as construction outputs, material wastages, general
expenses and overheads. In order to achieve the anticipated contribution
and deliver construction projects within budget, a proper cost control
procedures must be established and monitored continually through the
lifecycle of a construction project at pre-defined reporting period.
PURPOSE:
Instances remain where members of the project team do not know
the cost of basic resources. The knowledge of allowances made in the
tender are essential to enable them to evaluate their observations of
the production rates, efficiencies and wastage of the operations that
they control. The project manager and project QS are responsible for
making project staff aware of the magnitude of the cost of resources
under their control. The objective of cost control measures can only
be met provided if the supervisory staff is properly made aware of the
key tender allowances.
It is commonly stated that on Civil Engineering and Building projects, 80% of the value is contained within 20% of the work items.
Cost Control procedures clearly need to be focused accordingly on
each specific project. Each project is unique and there is no single
procedure or approach, which will provide satisfactory and effective
cost control. The skills and experience of the project team are to be ap-

plied to determine cost control procedures appropriate to the project


drawing on the various disciplines of production management, waste
control and general attendance monitoring
COST CONTROL SYSTEMS
The project manager and the senior quantity surveyor of the
project are required to establish a formal statement of the
Cost Control Procedures adopted for the specific Project.
Costs control systems which are commonly implemented
are;
Productivity Report
The purpose of this system is to monitor the production rates that
are being achieved on site against the production rates considered
in the tender. In other words compare the man-hours spent with
man-hours earned. Under the infrastructure projects, expenditure
related to the construction plant represents a significant proportion of the tender price. Unlike reconciling the actual hours in the
case of the labour resources, the performance of the construction
plant is reconciled on a basis of cost incurred against the value recovered. It is suggested that, a reconciliation which extends to the
general expenses related resources has proven to provide effective
results. The sum total of the hours reported in the report should
be equal to the sum total labour hours clocked and paid , similarly
the plant resources

IIQS / 68
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Material Reconciliation and yield reports


The purpose of this report is to monitor the actual wastages
in construction materials against the provisions made in the
tender.
Monthly cost value reconciliation report
This is generally a management report produced to demonstrate the commercial position of the project on a monthly basis. The report encompasses a full reconciliation of the cost
incurred in the project and the allowances generated for the
quantity of work actually executed. This report also highlights
trends and exceptions with regards to the actual allowance/cost
against the forecasted allowance/cost
MONTHLY COST VALUE RECONCILIATION REPORT
This report is a spine of the commercial reporting. This report
provides full cost versus value reconciliation on a monthly basis.
In order to achieve a report with a reasonable quality, the following must be ensured

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE ALLOWANCE


GENERATION SYSTEM

Establish cost codes.


The objectives of setting project specific cost codes are: (i) to
sub-divide the total value of the project into smaller parts for
monitoring. In general, the number of cost codes should be kept
to the minimum necessary to effectively monitor the project.
A proliferation of costs codes leads to misallocation, additional
administration and a level of detail not conducive to over view
management of the project.
Collation of the tender price details:
Electronic copies of the tender allowance should be collected from
the estimating team. The eminence of the monthly cost value reconciliation is highly dependent on the quality of the tender price
details.
Careful review of Tender price
Ensure all allowances plus the contribution equal the Contract
Sum
Set-up allowance generation system
Ensure allowances are generated on following guidelines
Direct:
For projects where the Contract is on the basis of re-measurement, allowances are generated from the internal quantities
(actual quantities) of work executed to the relevant period end
multiplied by the resource allowances. The resource allowances
are those established at tendering. The allowances are not to be
adjusted. They may be reallocated (from one resource type to
another) or further sub-divided for monitoring purposes. Allowances for variations (other than purely quantitative variations)
are established with proper care. For lump-sum contracts, the

allowances are to be generated on the basis of quantities factored


by the ratio of completion.
Indirect:
Allowances are generated on a fixed, time-related or quantity basis
as appropriate. For time-related allowances, the draw-down of allowances should consider the programme period and any potential over-run.
Variations:
These may be purely of a quantitative nature or involve the requirement for agreement of new rates or prices. Principle: The principle
that payment will be made for the item of work to be executed
must not be in doubt. If there is any such doubt, the item is to be
considered to have the status of a claim for additional payment
and not a variation. No allowances are to be generated for claims
unless formal agreement has been obtained with the Employer
Quantity:
Quantities to be considered must be internal quantities arrived after due adjustments for any over or under-measure included in
the external monthly valuation
Materials unfixed:
allowance must be carefully drawn with considering the tender
allowance and the actual purchase costs
SUMMARY:
Often, controlling the cost is the most effective way of delivering the projects within budget. The best time to commence the
cost control is right at the commencement of the contract and not
when significant costs have already been expended. The old proverb A penny saved is penny earned is true and especially true in
the management of construction projects.

Syed Aslam
Director & Global Audit Committee Chair
Commercial Manager
Dutco Balfour Beatty LLC in UAE

69/ IIQS
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CONTRACT MANAGEMENT FOR


HIGHWAY PROJECTS IN INDIA
BY Dr. Rakesh Chaudhary* and Mr. Govindaraju Rathod
1. INTRODUCTION
Highway Projects are often the largest single commercial contract that
National Highway Authority of India (hereinafter referred to as the
Authority) enters. They involve substantial expenditure and complex
provisions that need to be closely monitored because they facilitate
the provision of an essential service to road users. This facility must be
provided in a fair, effective and efficient manner. This means that the
Authority have a duty to ensure that they not only provide this service,
but achieve best value for money in doing so. This requires Authority to monitor the delivery of Highway project to nation by applying
sound contract management practices. Effective contract management
practices will assist Authority to achieve better outcomes, ensuring
that best value for money is achieved and that the quality of facilities is
maintained.
2. IMPORTANCE OF CONTRACT MANAGEMENT
The aim of contract management is to ensure that facilities are provided to the required standard, within the agreed time frame whilst
achieving value for money. It is important that contracts are actively
managed throughout their life to help ensure contract performance is
satisfactory, stakeholders are well informed and all contract requirements
are met. This is particularly important with respect to Highway contracts
where inadequate monitoring of contractor performance can result in:
2.1 losses being sustained by the Authority due to substandard and/or
negligent performance;
2.2 loss of reputation and political attention as a consequence of poor
facilities delivery;
2.3 damage to the Authority commercial and community credibility
through inadequate monitoring; and
2.4 Damage to the environment from inappropriate dumping of
construction waste material
3. CORE TASKS
There are various core tasks that need to be undertaken in effectively
managing Highway contracts from their commencement. These tasks
form the subject of the following discussion.
3.1 Identifying and managing risks
It is important that all risks are identified and appropriately managed.
Examples of risks that arise in highway contracts scenarios include:

3.1.1 failure of the Authority to have sufficiently skilled and


experienced resources to effectively manage the contract;
3.1.2 failure of the contractor to provide facilities on time, to
agreed standards and in accordance with the contract;
3.1.3 failure by the Authority to act on contractor
under-performance; and
3.1.4 Inadequate handling of contract variations.

3.2 Identifying and assigning responsibilities


It is important that Authority internally identifies and clearly assigns
responsibilities for contract management at the outset. These tasks should
be assigned in light of the skills and experience required to perform such
functions. The successful management of Highway Projects will generally
require skills and experience in the areas outlined below:

Relationship
Assign supervision
Consultancy

Financial
management

Industry
knowledge

Responsibilities

Negotiation
Problem solving

Project
management

Performance
management

3.3 Managing relationships


Maintaining underpins overall successful
Successful relationship management
Contract details
contract management. It is important to establish and maintain a
Maintaining
Meetings
constructive
relationship and regular communications,
asandthe nature
Contract
Contract actions
Administration
of Highway contracts means that there is ongoing service delivery.
A structured approach to managing relationships should be adopted,
Maintainingday to day discussions
Making
comprising of informal,
and interactions and
Records
Payments
formal meetings at pre-determined intervals with nominated personnel
from both the Authority/Supervision consultant and the contractor.
Relationships should be managed in a professional manner and be based
on cooperation and mutual understanding taking into account the need
for probity and ethical behavior. Maintaining a good relationship does
not mean that the terms of the contract are not enforced where this is
warranted. It is about enforcing the terms of the contract in a professional

IIQS / 70
Book.indd 70

4/21/13 9:23 PM

manner based on evidence of contractual performance. This requires


the establishment and maintenance of an appropriate record trail. What
is necessary in the circumstances will vary but the importance of the
Relationship
maintenance of accurate, contemporaneous
records to successful
Assign supervision
Industry
contract management
cannot
be
under
emphasized.
Consultancy
knowledge
Financial
Project
3.4 Administering
the contractResponsibilities
management
management
Contract administration is an integral and important element of
Negotiation
Performance
contract management
and overlaps with monitoring
and performance
management
Problem solving
assessment. It encompasses various activities that need to be completed
on a daily basis:

3.6 Negotiate contract variations


The ability to vary the contract should be directed and controlled by the
Authority and should only occur in defined circumstances. It should
be noted that it is possible to inadvertently amend a contract by oral
agreement or conduct, even where there is a contractual provision
expressly requiring a formal process to be followed. Consider the
following contract variations checklist:
Contract variations checklist
Key issues to consider in managing contract variations include:
Following the procedures required by the contract;
Assessing the reasons for the proposed variation and whether these may
indicate an emerging or actual performance problem;

Maintaining
Contract details

Maintaining
Contract

Meetings and
Contract actions
Administration

Maintaining
Records

Assessing the impact of the proposed variation on the contract deliverables, particularly whether the variation or the work it represents is actually
required and whether it was part of the original contract deliverables;
Determining the effect the proposed amendment will have on contract price;
Considering the authority for making the variation;

Making
Payments

Properly documenting details of the variation and its impact; and


Meeting any reporting requirements.

3.5 Managing contractor performance


Performance management must be undertaken throughout the life of the
contract. Performance management involves:

Performance

Monitoring

Collecting data

Assessment

Maintaining records

Determining if
performance meets
needs

Action

Understanding effective
performance

Correcting underperformance

At the early stages of underperformance, agreeing upon informal


remedial action will often be the best and most economical approach.
Such action could include replacing or using additional personnel,
Formal action
reporting back more frequently on progress and modifying processes or
systems for clarifying the Authority requirements. But depending on the
Withholding payments
Involving senior
Developing and
Implementing formal
management
documenting
strategiestaken mechanisms
seriousness of the underperformance,
the action
may need to be
more formal and could include:
Performance

Monitoring

Collecting data

Assessment

Maintaining records

Determining if
performance meets
needs

4. CONCLUSION
A highway project is an essential facility for the road user in India.
Authority need to manage Highway Projects carefully as any problems
with the performance of contractors can create substantial difficulties
for authority. Authority must respond appropriately to evidence of such
behavior in order to ensure the appropriate and effective delivery of the
essential facility. In order to do this, Authority should develop formal
systems for monitoring and reviewing all contracts. Normally it will
be done by the Supervision Consultant firm which is selected by the
uthority after bidding. The level of complexity should depend on factors such
as the value of the contract and the nature of the services being performed. The
monitoringsystemshouldbedevelopedandclearlycommunicatedtopotential
contractors prior to Authority entering into contracts.

Action

Understanding effective
performance

Correcting underperformance

Formal action

Withholding payments

Involving senior
management

Developing and
documenting strategies

Implementing formal
mechanisms

Govindaraju Rathod
M.Tech (Civil), MBA(PM), MRICS, MIS

Head-Contract & QS Dept.


Archgroup Consultants Dubai

Dr. Rakesh Chaudhary


Team Leader
Bareilly-Sitapur (NH-24)
DBFOT project
ICT Consultants - India

71/ IIQS
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4/21/13 9:24 PM

IMPLICATIONS
OF THE LAWS OF THE UAE ON
CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS

BY M. Karuppa Samy
ABSTRACT: While executing construction projects using the
FIDIC form of contract in the UAE, the civil laws governing the
contracts play an important role; The UAE statutory codes were
enacted under the influence of Egyptian civil codes and Islamic
law [Sharia], the later constituting the guiding principle and
source of the UAE law. Therefore, that it is inevitable that some
conflict would occur between the statutory UAE codes and some
of the legal concepts used in FIDIC which are based upon the
common law principles. This article attempts to highlight some
of the provisions of law which are relevant to Parties entering into
construction contracts in the UAE
LAW APPLICABLE TO CONTRACTS IN THE UAE: The application of the UAE laws to the contracts performed in the country is difficult to avoid due to restrictions in applying foreign law.
Therefore, in order to avoid any potential disputes concerning
Parties rights and obligations, it is important to consider the following:
(a) Mandatory provisions of the UAE statutory laws including
those prescribed in Muqawala which are different to common

law doctrines, shall prevail over party agreed terms.


(b) FIDIC or its modified form is used by 94%of the construction
contracts performed in the Middle East although these forms are
based on legal concepts from the common law system
Therefore, parties to the construction contracts shall consider incorporating suitable provisions with in Part II and to ensure that
FIDIC conditions when used in contracts performed in the UAE
complies with local laws.
UAE: GENERAL STATUTORY PROVISIONS
Contract Performance: Performance of all obligations must be in
good faith and neither party should act in bad faith or shall take
undue advantage of the other; Express terms are extended by law
and custom and the nature of transaction. No variation of contract
terms is allowed without agreement. A party can refuse to perform
if the other party fails to perform.
Third Parties: Contracts cannot impose an obligation on a third
party but may confer a right in him.
Contract termination: Binding contracts can only be terminated
by mutual consent or under a court order. Parties may mutually

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revoke their contract by mutual consent. A contract may be automatically terminated for non-performance and without a court
order if so agreed. Notice must be given to a defaulting party to
perform it or that it is cancelled.
Force Majeure: Contracts are automatically terminated if force majeure makes it impossible to perform them.
Compensation: On automatic cancellation or by act of the parties
they must be restored to their pre-contract positions or compensation
will be ordered.
Non-Binding Contract: A contract that is otherwise valid is not
binding if one party has a right to terminate it without paying the
other compensation or allowing it to resort to the courts.
Abuse of Rights: Neither party may exercise its rights under the contract in a manner which is oppressive or abusive to the other. Exercise of a right shall be unlawful if, among other things, the interests
desired are disproportionate to the harm that will be suffered by the
other party.
Power to vary contractual obligation: If exceptional circumstances
of a public nature which could not have been foreseen occur it shall
be permissible for the judge, to reduce the oppressive obligation to a
reasonable level if justice so requires, and any agreement to the contrary shall be void.
No tortious claim on contracts: In a contractual relationship a party
may not rely on tortious provisions unless he is able to prove that the other party committed a crime, deceit, or gross negligence Tortious claims:
The court held that in a tortious claim attributable to several causes:

1. Judge has discretion to decide the extent


of contribution of each of the multiple causes
2. Direct damages are compensable
and not indirect damages or lost chance of making profits
3. Interest on damages shall apply from date of judgment be
comes final [and subject to no further appeal]
and not from the date of initiation of suit.
Implied warranties, Inherent Defects: It is well settled by UAE law
and jurisprudence that transactions involving sale of goods carry
a warranty that the goods are free from defects / damages and free
from any encumbrances, charges, liability.
Effects of Surety / Guarantee: A guarantee shall lapse if the creditor has not claimed his dues from the original debtor within 6
months from the date of default. In an action, the Court of Appeal upheld the lower courts ruling that the Defendant shall pay
the claimed sum plus interest. However, the Court of Cassation
reversed the judgment and held that the guarantee cannot be
deemed to exist if the creditor failed to assert his claim within 6
months from the date of default, to ensure that the guarantor does
not suddenly become liable to risk if the debtor suddenly becomes
insolvent or somehow the sum owed cannot be collected from
him.
Opinion or Certificate issued by the Consultant: An opinion or
certificate issued by the consultant is binding on the owner of the
building as the Consultant is considered to represent the interests

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and speak on behalf of the owner. The Appeal Courts verdict was
upheld rejecting both the owners request for appointing an independent expert and his counterclaim and ruled in favor of the
claimant.
Notice to fulfill contractual obligations prior to any action:
Proper notice must be given to fulfill contractual obligations prior to any action to claim damages in courts. It was held that the
Claimant must give proper notice to the other party before action
is taken for recovering damages in the courts. Filing an action in
the courts alone is not considered a proper notice.
UAE: STATUTORY PROVISIONS: MUQAWALA
CONTRACTS
The construction contracts performed in the UAE are subject to
basic principles laid down in the Muqawala section of UAE Civil
Code. A Muqawala is a contract whereby one of the parties thereto
undertakes to make a thing or perform work in accordance with
several specific provisions concerning construction contracts and
the key provisions are noted as below.
DEFECTS LIABILITY: The Contractor and the Consultant shall
be jointly liable for ten years for any defects and for any defect
which threatens the stability or safety of the building. The obligation to compensate remains even if the defect or collapse arises
from a defect in the land itself or the Employer has consented to
the construction of the defective structure. However, there is no
liability to an architect who just designed it, but not involved in
the supervision; these liability provisions cannot be contracted
out. Upon discovery of defects, the Employer has got three years
limitation period to make a claim.
VARIATIONS: Contractors right in re-measured contracts to
recover costs of increased quantities is lost unless contractor
immediately notifies the increase to the Employer. The Contractors cannot demand increase in lump sum fixed price contract on
basis of its execution, other than agreed variations.. In addition,
the Employer can suspend work or withdraw from the contract if
the quantities increase is substantial
Fair Remuneration: The Contractor shall be entitled to fair remuneration, if the consideration for the work is not specified [similar
to quantum meruit principles]. The Consultant shall be entitled to
fair remuneration, if the fee was not agreed
Loss or damage: Contractors are liable for any loss or damage
caused by their work irrespective of default unless caused by an
event that could not be prevented
Adjustment of Liquidated Damages: Although the contracting
parties are free to agree on a fixed amount of damages in advance,
the court retains the ultimate mandatory right, [upon the request
of one of the parties], to increase or decrease the amount of these

damages in order to reflect the actual loss suffered.


Termination of Muqawala: Muqawala contracts terminate on
completion of the agreed works. Either party can cancel or terminate a Muqawala contract for any cause preventing its performance or completion. The Contractor who is prevented from
completing a Muqawala contract for a cause in which he played
no part is entitled to the value of works and expenses. A party injured by the cancellation of a Muqawala contract may claim compensation against the other party to the extent allowed by custom
Termination for defects: Contractors must complete works as
per contract conditions; Employers have the right to terminate
the Contractor immediately for defective work, subject to notice
to rectify. Achievable repairs must be carried out in a reasonable
time. Employers have the right to cancel the Contract.
CONCLUSION: The Parties who intend to enter into construction contracts upon the basis of standard conditions such as
FIDIC or any similar must familiarize themself with the provisions of UAE law including those highlighted in this article. Accordingly, should any provisions of standard forms conflict with
mandatory provisions of UAE law, suitable additional provisions
may be considered within the particular conditions to avoid any
adverse consequences. Furthermore, after the contract is signed,
the Parties shall administer the contracts in accordance with
agreed contractual provisions and in harmony with legal provisions in order to secure and advance their respective rights and
remedies accordingly.

M. Karuppa Samy
FCIArb, MRICS, FAIQS
Contracts Manager, Morganti Group Inc., UAE

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CAUSES OF CONSTRUCTION
CLAIMS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING
PROJECTS IN THE UNITED ARAB
EMIRATES A CASE STUDY
BY Kalpesh Sangani
INTRODUCTION
Many construction projects in the UAE are of short duration and
high value. Planning for such projects for every eventuality may
be impossible. Majority of the high value projects executed in the
UAE are based on traditional procurement route. One of the most
common reasons for construction claims and disputes situation
today appears to bedue to delay and disruptions. Demand from
the various organisations from the construction industry includes
calls for limitation of the proliferation of avoidable claims that
have incapacitated the industry. This can be done more effectively
if the sources, causes of such claims could be identified and addressed in advance.
This research was conducted to identify the significant causes of
the claims in the traditional procurement route on civil engineering projects in UAE. Quantitative methods are being used to draw
on the magnitudes and frequencies. Average frequencies and magnitudes of the claims categories from 12 completed civil engineering projects with claims and disputes were thoroughly analyzed
to derive typical claim patterns. The projects used for research
belonged to a major Client having numerous infrastructure projects in UAE administered under bespoke Conditions of Contract,
prepared based on FIDIC 4th edition.
1. Delays
Delays are categorized into excusable and non-excusable delays. Excusable delays are the ones where the contractor is relieved from the liability
for delaying the projects and the latter are the ones for which the contractor is culpable for. A Contractor has to pay for liquidated damages /
penalties if the project gets delayed due to non-excusable delays.
1.1 Excusable delays
The projects surveyed contained provisions for events that may give
rise to claims for extension of time. Table 1 show the frequent causes
for delay under the surveyed project which have been used for the
purpose of investigation. Categories TC1, TC2 do not entitle contractor for additional cost and such causes are referred to excusable
and non-compensable delays while others are excusable and compensable delays

Table 1

Potential Excusable Causes of Delay

Time Claim Category

ClausE

TC1

Inclement weather

TC7

Disruption of regular progress

TC2

Delay in providing information

TC8

Suspension by the Engineer

TC3

Delay in issuing free-issue material

TC9

Delay caused by an utility service organization

TC4

Variation orders

TC10

Delay by other contractors

TC5

Obstruction due to existing services

TC11

Delay due to shortage on materials

TC6

Delayed possession of site

TC12

Changes in legislation

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2. Quantitative Survey of Completed Civil Engineering Project in UAE


The following section presents the quantitative analyses of the
claims. The data of all selected twelve projects were analyzed separately in depth, and the results of the analysis are presented.
2.1. Delayed Projects
The breakdown of all the twelve analysed projects is shown
in Fig. 1. It was found that, about 83.33% (10/12) of the projects which were delayed had excusable delays while 16.67%
(2/12) of the projects were due to non-excusable delays. Only
in 16.67% (2/12) of projects, the contractors were granted extension of time as claimed which indicates, the contractors
had over claimed extension of time in 83.37% (10/12) projects. Figure 4 shows the Extension of Time (EOT) - claimed
versus granted under different categories of claims. In total,
there were 100 claims over 12 projects, out of which 78 Nos
were rejected and 22 Nos had valid ground for entitlement.
Only 58.68 % of claimed extension of time was granted for
the claims with valid grounds. The total granted Nos of days
against total claimed including invalid claims amounts to only
22.65%.

OCV Original Contract Value

2.3. Time Claims


The main categories of claims for which the extension of time
was granted were found to be: variation order, delay in freeissue material by various Authorities and delayed possession.
In most of the cases (83.33%) the claim for extension of time
was due to additional works (variation) followed by claims due
to delay in providing information (66.67 %) and claims due to
delay possession of site (50%). Out of twelve categories, claims
under two categories were not granted. The average project
claim in respect of each category of claim has been compared
in Fig 2 & 3. Fig 4 shows the comparison between extensions
of time claims versus extension of time granted. The average
and the standard deviation of time claims and extensions of
time under each category are shown in Table 3.
Table 3 Magnitude of Time (EOT) Claims and Extension
Claim Category

EOT Extension of Time

Figure 1: Occurrence of Extension of Time Claims


2.2. Prolonged period
The prolonged period for each project has been calculated as a
percentage of extended periods (EOT) to the original contract
duration period (OCP). Table 2 shows occurrence of time
(EOT) claims along with the frequency of claims.

Table 2: Occurrence of Time (EOT) claims

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REFERENCES
Bloore, RD.S. (1991) The Ascertainment of Claims for Delay and Disruption,
Ph.D.Thesis, University of Surrey, The British Library, Boston Spa, Wetherby,
West Yorkshire, LS23 7BQ United Kingdom.
Chan, C. W. (1994) Case Studies in Civil Engineering Claims, M.Sc. (Eng.)
Dissertation, Dept. of Civil & Structural Engineering, the University of Hong
Kong
Charlton, M. (1995) Nature and Types of Claims, C.P.D. Short Course on Civil
Engineering Claims (October 26-28, 1995)

Figure 4: Claimed EOT and Granted EOT in Common Time


Claim Categories
2.4. Award of Extension of Time
Out of the surveyed 12 projects, it was found that the extension of
the time claims was granted in 83.33% (10/12) of the projects. Two
of ten projects for which the extension of time was granted were
delayed by non-compensable and excusable and concurrent
delays. In three projects, part of the delays was concurrent. Many
extensions of time claims submitted by the contractor were claim
by ambush. Such claims were submitted along with the other EOT
claims with a view of increasing the probability of award. No prior
notices for intension to claims were provided. The total award for
extension of time was around 30% on average and less than 50%
on most of the projects. Hence, it can be concluded that contractors on many occasions had exaggerated their claims.
3. Conclusion
100 claims were submitted for 12 projects out of which only 22%
were accepted leaving 78% rejected. Variation, delays in providing
information, delayed possession were found to be principal reason
for the legitimate claims. This research provides an overview on
the primary contribution for the EOT claims in civil Engineering
projects in UAE and also forms a useful foundation for further
development for minimizing / avoiding construction claims.

Cheng, K.S. (1994) Classifying Common Causes of Construction Claims in


Hong Kong, M. Sc. (Eng.) Dissertation, Dept. of Civil & Structural Engineering,
the University of Hong Kong.
Colin, S. (2000) Commercial and Contractual Problems Training Course,
James R. Knowles (Middle East) Limited, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Diekmann, E.J. and Nelson, C.M. (1985 Construction Claims: Frequency and
Severity, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Vol. 111, No
1,74-81.
FIDIC 1987 (Federation International Des ingenieurs Conseils) Conditions of
Contract for Works of Civil Engineering Construction, Fourth Edition.
Roads and Transport Authority (1993) General Conditions of Contract for Civil
Engineering Works, Government of Dubai.
Roads and Transport Authority (1993) General Specification for Civil
Engineering Works, 1993 Edition, Published by the RTA (Dubai Government
body).
Hughes, G. A. (1985) Building and Civil Engineering Claims in Perspective
(Second Edition), Longman, London,
Knowles, R. (1999) One Hundred Contractual Problems and their Solutions,
Blackwell Science, UK
Knowles, R. (1999) 50 Contractual Problems Relevant to the Middle East,
Seminar Dubai World Trade Centre, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Knowles, R. (2002) Delay, Extensions of Time, Penalties and Damages
Seminar, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Kumaraswamy, M. M. (1997) Conflicts, Claims and Disputes in Construction,
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 4, No 2,
95 - 111.
New Civil Engineer - Report (1997) New Civil Engineer; February 1997.
Rubin, R., Fairweather,V., Guy, S., and Maevis, A. (1992) Construction Claims
Prevention and Resolution- Second Edition, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New
York.
Semple C., Hartman, F.T. and Jergeas, G. (1994) Construction Claims Disputes: Causes and Cost/Time Overruns, Journal of Construction Engineering
and Management, Vol. 120, No 4, 785-795.
Sykes, K.J. (1996) Claims and Disputes in Construction: Suggestions for
their timely Resolution, Construction Law Journal, Volume 12, No.1, 3-15.

Kalpesh Sangani
MSc(QS), FCIArb, MRICS
Contracts Administrator
Parsons Overseas Limited

Trickey, G. and Hackett, M. (2005) The Presentation and Settlement of


Contractors Claims, Taylor and Francis, London, UK.
Yogeswaran, K. (1998) Sources, Causes and Minimisation of Contractual
Claims in Civil Engineering Projects in Hong Kong, Ph.D. Thesis, University of
Hong Kong, The Hong Kong University Library, Hong Kong, China.

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THE MAGNITUDE
OF BIM
(BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING)
BY Agish P George
BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING (BIM)
Construction projects are the most complex fields where various
people from different disciplines work together for common goals.
Complexity in this sector is comparatively large in the Middle East
due to the special pattern of imported work force from various
countries with different languages and many cultures. Proper
knowledge about the project and close collaboration between the
construction team are most important for the successful completion of any project. Sufficient information and early identification
of the problems help to manage and control the complexities effectively. It reduces the conflicts during construction and helps
to provide efficient safety measures as well as better facilities
management. Ability to identify the problems in an early phase
of a project leads to better understanding and delivers the greatest benefits of cost reduction through the effective management of
associated risks. Here comes the significance of Building Information Modeling (BIM) which is a new way of thinking and different
method of working.
Today, BIM is one of the most misunderstood terms in the construction sector on various levels. Many people have a perception
that BIM is new software. Even some of the senior level professionals think it as 3D modeling. Building Information Modeling
is not just new software and should not be confused whether 2D
or 3D as it extends far beyond that. It is both a new technology
and a new way of working. It involves much more than simply
implementing new software. BIM is a different way of thinking
and it combines technology with new working practices to improve the quality of the delivered product and also improve the reliability, timeliness and consistency of the process (Steve Pittard,
RICS). It promises to be the biggest development in architecture,
construction and asset management since the introduction of
CAD systems. (RICS, Building Value from knowledge [online]).
It is a significant move from the traditional approach, which was
mostly relied on CAD drawings. In the term BIM the letter I
which stands for Information has to be highlighted more. It

provides a common platform to combine all information defining


the building. BIM changes the traditional style of people working
on separate information pools and allows all parties to collaborate and work on a shared information pool. BIM represents the
designs as combination of objects parametrically that includes its
geometry, relations and characteristics. It also includes associated
non-graphical details to further explain its structure or function.
For example, a room partition shown in the BIM may contain related non-graphical properties like fire rating, estimating details
etc that may not be visible from outside. BIM allows to link with
many information such as rebar schedule, charts for construction,
specification etc. that are helpful for appropriate procurement or
tracking of materials as well as accurate cost estimation.
BENEFITS OF BIM IMPLEMENTATION
BIM may not be the universal remedy for all the problems in the
construction industry. But, the benefits it can deliver by a careful
implementation are tremendous. The productivity and economic
benefits of BIM to the global building industry are widely acknowledged and increasingly well understood (Randy Deutsch,
2011). It benefits not only the owner. BIM transforms the way designers, consultants and contractors work today. However, each
person may have a different description about the benefits, according to their role in the project.
During pre-construction stages, early implementation of BIM
delivers the appropriate understanding whether a building of
specified dimensions, qualities and program requirements could
be constructed in the bounds of available budget and time limits.
It helps the investor to prevent the troubles of a late finding that,
design is significantly over budget. A schematic BIM model helps
to evaluate the functional and sustainable requirements correctly.
Therefore any design changes, shall be finalized earlier by using
simulation tools. This enhances the total quality of building. It also
helps to determine the appropriate procurement route by providing sufficient information to the project team from the beginning

IIQS / 78
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and saves unnecessary delays for paper exchange.


A major benefit of using BIM in the design phase of a project
is an early and accurate visualization of design from 3D models.
Parametric objects used in the model ensure proper alignment
and reduce geometric or coordinate errors. It allows automatic
corrections of related objects when changes are made in the design. Extraction of reliable drawings is also possible for the required views. This reduces the time for preparing construction
drawings and reduces mistakes. It makes the involvement of all
parties earlier and enables better collaboration of multiple design
disciplines. Easy confirmation of the reliability to design objectives and accurate cost estimation helps the investor to proceed
with better confidence.
The BIM model contains the accurate details of objects for construction and fabrication. Automated fabrication using numerical
control machinery is possible for many objects. The correct information is helpful for the off-site fabrication of larger components
to save time, cost and storage space on site. BIM has a quick reaction to design changes and simultaneously updates other related
objects and allows early clash detection. Design modifications can
be easily resolved with BIM due to the facility for sharing, visualization and estimation by avoiding complicated paper transactions.
The BIM graphic simulation gives a better insight into how the
construction will progress each day and expose the sources of potential difficulties and opportunities for effective improvement. It
enables effective implementation of Lean construction techniques
by providing better synchronization between general contractor
and all subcontractors. Advanced builders combine excellence in
BIM with Lean Construction principles of reduced waste and rework, better process, making things happen, and a focus on value.
Calculations of the return on investment will convince you that
your projects can enjoy a lot of savings resulting from the transformation to model-based communications and a focus on digital
cooperation (Ken Stowe, 2008).
After the completion of project, all the information that contractors collected about the materials and maintenance shall be
linked to the building model and this can be provided to the
owner for their facility management. This enables an improved
commissioning and handover of facility information. It can also
be used to check the performance of the system before handover.
Details of all changes that have been updated with the building
model during construction stage become an accurate source of
useful as-built information to start the operation and management of the building.
In its most advanced form, BIM provides a single, coordinated
source of structured information to support all parties involved in
the delivery process, from design to operation. In other words, the
system supplies just one version of the truth. Because all the parties have access to the same data, the information loss associated
with handing a project over from the design team for the con-

struction team to the building owner/operator is kept to a minimum. (Building Value from knowledge [online])
Market and technology trends are good predictors of the nearterm future in any field and BIM is not exceptional. The trends
observed reveal the potential growth and influence that BIM will
have in the construction industry (Chuck Eastman, 2008). Angela Brady. President, RIBA states that, The transparency of data
that BIM brings will radically change the way architects work is
done, bringing additional effort and costs into the early stages but,
produce much greater cost and time savings to the constructors
and clients, making it worthwhile for everyone (NBS-National
BIM Report, 2012).

REFERENCES:
Building SMART (2010) The Reality and The Way forward.
BIM in the Middle East 2010
Chuck Eastman, Paul Teicholz, Rafael Sacks, Kathleen Liston
(2011) 2nd edn. BIM Handbook. New Jersey: John Wiley &
Sons Inc.
NBS and RIBA Enterprices (March 2011) Building Information
Modelling [online] available from <http://www.thenbs.com/
topics/BIM/articles/bimInConstruction.asp?&lang=en_us&
output=json> [18 Mar 2012]
Randy Deutsch (2011) BIM and Integrated Design. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
RICS (n. d.) Building Value from knowledge [online] aailable
from <http://www.isurv.com/site/scripts/documents_info.aspx
?categoryID=390&documentID=6183> [22 Mar 2012]
Steve Pittard (n. d.) What is BIM? [online] available
from <http://www.rics.org/site/scripts/download_info.
aspx?fileID=8344> [13 Mar 2012]
Ken Stowe, Autodesk Construction Solutions Executive,
BIMand Integrated Design

Agish P George
Sr Q.S, Jebel Ali Airport Projects
Al Naboodah Contracting Co. LLC.

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WHY PROJECT MANAGEMENT


CONSULTANTS (PMC)

The title of this article has been a topic of debate probably since Project Management
Consultant (PMC) service has been introduced in the industry. The primary idea to have a
PMC is to augment and work as extended hand of the investor/employer team to realize
project objectives. Despite such functional clarity, to hire a PMC or not is a common dilemma faced by the owner.

e see a lot of government and private clients


in the UAE, employing PMC to manage
their projects, but eventually ending up duplicating work that are done by other consultants or clients themselves. This is often
not noticed and employers end up getting less value for money.
In this context, it is prudent to discuss, what should have been
and what is in practice, the role of PMC.
MY EXPERIENCE:
My experience working in the project management teams in some
projects in UAE is what encouraged me to write this article. I am
sure many of the readers would have had similar experience and
thoughts.
It should also be noted that this is written with civil engineering
projects back ground in general. It might be different in other projects like IT, research, environmental etc etc.
ANALYSIS OF PROJECT 1:
The PMC supervises the work of the Site Supervision Consultant
(Consultant) and reports to the client. Design of this project was
complete when the PMC stepped in and there was only one Consultant who in turn supervises the one and only Contractor. The
PMC was additionally given the responsibility of quantity surveying (commercial management) of the project.
With the above scope, in addition to measurement and payments,
the PMC was monitoring the progress on site confirmed by Consultant; was occasionally handling design queries; monitoring and
helping when required in getting service authority approvals, inspections etc; reporting to and providing information as and when
required, in the formats provided by the client.

BY Rayees Harris
I believe that all of these activities, the Consultant could have
done alone, with some additional
staffing.
ANALYSIS OF PROJECT 2:
The client interviews and approves the proposed candidates
and the Consultant is integrated
within the client team. The PMC
staff, as any other employee of the
client, works within and implements the process and procedures
of the client. Although the service
is named PMC, effectively they were reporting to and taking directions from managers of the client.
It is difficult to understand what are the liability and or accountability of the PMC.
ANALYSIS OF PROJECT 3:
The project team consists of the Client, PMC, four Consultants
and four contractors. In this scenario PMC role is more justifiable since he coordinates the overall project, chairs meetings with
Consultants, client and service authorities. When required, liaises
with design consultants to resolve design issues.
Additionally the client has also mobilized its own technical staff to
monitor the PMC. So effectively, evaluation or recommendation
task of any issue is repeated by each layer of management, ending
up delay in decisions or resolution.
Any recommendation of the Consultant, say for example valuation of a variation, is being reviewed in detail by the PMC, and
after comments and revisions, goes to the clients QS manager.
This again gets discussed before going to the clients head office

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contracts department, who in several instances comments and


returns to the effect that it is scrapped or requires revision. Thus
necessity the whole process to repeat again.
QUESTIONS THAT NEED TO BE ANSWERED
Who is liable for the technical work/recommendation? Is it the
Engineer (or Consultant) or is it the PMC or is it the clients staff?
In project 3, the Consultant is the technical expert hired by the
client for these specific activities. Moreover the Consultant carries
a professional indemnity insurance to cover any eventualities due
to failure or mistakes. Then why do the PMC or client bother to
go through the Consultants recommendation and instruct revisions, when they are not the appointed technical expert and do not
shoulder any liability.
ANALOGY:
An analogy that often comes to my mind is project insurances.
Insurances are meticulously planned and implemented by industry experts that ensure avoidance of duplication in coverage and
in turn costs. In any construction project, normally, the works
and materials on site are covered under CAR insurance policy.
Similarly vehicles, contractors equipment, manpower etc are each
under separate insurance policies. Materials in transit under marine insurance. This displays the meticulous planning which does
indeed avoid overlaps in coverage and costs.
In the similar way, the developers or clients should take due care
while deciding and implementing procurement of any major project.
Each team member entity should be allocated clear roles suitable
for the expertise that is being hired and paid for. Corresponding
liability and accountability of each entity should be integrated in
their terms of agreement.
PMC ROLE:
In a typical construction project, PMC should be managing the different experts/specialists and be capable enough to plan, correctly
source, select and monitor the progress to achieve the objectives of
the client/investors or stake holders.
The project management consultant should be a professional team
with expertise to manage multiple discipline from feasibility study

to operational and handover stage. In construction industry the


PMC scope will extend to include sales and handover to the end
user, plan and establish long term maintenance strategies. The
PMC should not be just a group of Engineers hired to do the same
technical stuff that other consultants are hired for.
EXAMPLE:
Imagine a client want to invest in a hospital project.
He will broadly need the following:










Market and feasibility study.


Plan the overall budget and funding strategy
Stake holder management
Concept master plan including sourcing of equipments
Appoint Architect and contractors
Sourcing of doctors and hospital staff
Source equipment and furniture
Testing and commissioning
Marketing and public relations
Advertisements
Implement management systems and run the hospital.

The client inevitably will require the services of a PMC to handle


all the above. But should not make the mistake of appointing a
PMC to focus on what the architect and the contractors are doing,
overlooking the overall objective and scope..
CONCLUSION
While concluding the subject issue, the following quote come to
my mind
Project management is the art of directing and coordinating
material and human resource throughout the project life span
by utilizing various management methods and techniques to
achieve effectively predetermined goal of scope, quality, time, cost
and participation.
If above principle is implemented for appointment of Consultant /
PMC, it is possible that these appointments can be made with predefined matrix of responsibilities, thereby ensuring that they work
effectively without any overlap of duties and thereby justify costs.

Rayees Harris BE,MRICS.


Contracts Maneger,Parsons International Dubai

81/ IIQS
Book.indd 81

4/21/13 9:24 PM

THE CHANGING FACE OF


ARBITRATION IN UAE AFTER DIFC
One of most common dilemmas facing a party,
who has won an arbitration award is the next
course of action that they need to undertake.
They can either have the award recognized
and enforced or execute the arbitrators decision without the intervention of the court.
However,in these situations conflicts do arise
between the parties as one of the parties might
want the enforcement of the award while another might resist it. The losing party tries to resist every challenge to delay the enforcement
while the winning party would prefer early enforcement.
BY Ganesh Kumar

f the opposing party rejects the amiable award enforcement, then the arbitrator does not possess the power to
enforce the award.Such powers are exclusive to the courts
under the UAE law.If the arbitration was undertaken without the intervention of the court, the job of the arbitrator
comes to an end as and when the award is issued and a copy of
the same is provided to both the parties. The party should seek
the services of thecompetent UAE court to enforce an award and
subsequently compel thelosing party to meet his obligations. If the
arbitration was done with court intervention then the arbitrators
need to submit the award to the competent courts for their exequatur power (leave for enforcement). In both cases, ifthe courts
do possess this power, then it needs to confirm if the award satisfies the formal conditions of enforcement and the award is free
from any legal impediments which might prevent enforcement.
The court decides on either approving the award or on settingaside based on whether or not it is in compliance with the provisions of Federal Code of Civil Procedure (law No.11 of 1992).

However, the invalidity of arbitration awards referred to in Article


216(1)(c ) of the Federal Code of Civil Procedure provides vague
grounds for nullification of the award in the event that if the award
of the arbitrators or the arbitration proceedings become void and
such voidness affected the award. It is to be noted that this provision has disparaged the significance of arbitration in the UAE .
This provision has so far has been unsupportingtothe cause of
arbitration in the UAE as the courts were willing to repeatedly reopen arbitral awards and having to go through the same process all
over again. In many situations the opposing party could apply for
annulling the arbitral award on the basis of a nullity in the award
or a nullity in the procedures having an effect on the award. Federal Code of Civil Procedure also,permits the opposing party to
submit a requisition to the courts for the review of the merits of
the arbitrators ruling, thus paving the way to seriously delay the
arbitral awardratification.
Experts in the field of arbitration do feel that the present Federal Code of Civil Procedure allows challenge of arbitral awards

IIQS / 82
Book.indd 82

4/21/13 9:24 PM

REFERENCES:
by permitting the opposing parties to prevent enforcement of an
award on the basis of trivial and unpredictable grounds. Arbitral
awards rendered prior to September 2008 can still be analysed
based on the comparatively inadequate and unpredictable Federal
Code of Civil Procedure as they might not be able to select the
DIFC as the seat of arbitration.
HOWEVER, THE ARRIVAL OF DIFC HAS HERALDED A
NEW ERA IN THE ARBITRATION SCENE OF THE UAE.
The DIFC-LCIA Arbitration Centre was established as the new
regional international arbitration on 17th February, 2007 jointly
by both the Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC) and the
London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA). The DIFCLCIA functions on the basis of the DIFC Arbitration law 2008
(DIFC Law No.01 of 2008) which came into force on 01st September 2008 and which is modelled heavily on the UNCITRAL model
law (United Nations Commission on International Trade Law on
International Commercial Arbitration 1985). The centresrules are
closely based on the London Court of International Arbitration
(LCIA)rules with minor changes. The centres rules are compatible
with both civil and common law systems.
The DIFC Courts is an independent judicial authority which
follows stringent international legal procedures. Recourse to the
DIFC Court against arbitral awards awarded in the seat of the
DIFC can be done, only through a setting-aside application (in
accordance with Article 41 of the DIFC Law 2008). The concerned
parties can be rest assured as the basis of setting-aside is modelled
on the UNCITRAL Model Law.According to the DIFC Law, the
DIFC Courts should also comply with the New York Convention.
The DIFC law states that an arbitral award by the DIFC
needs to be further ratified by the DIFC Courts for the award
to be enforceable in the Dubai Courts though they have no jurisdiction to review the merits of the award(As per Article 7(3)
(c) of the law of the Judicial Authority Law, Dubai Law No.12
of 2004). There are a number of cases where DIFC Court orders, decisions and judgments have been enforced by the Dubai
Courts.
The new DIFC Law 2008 facilitates even non DIFC members
to resolve disputes through a reference to the centre which was
not the case with the DIFC Law 2004. Accordingly, the DIFC
law 2008 helps parties choose the DIFC as the seat of arbitrationespecially after September 2008. This has its own advantages as the parties can be sure that their award will not be
cancelled on trivial and unpredictable reasons.
In conclusion, it would not be surprising if in future all construction/commercial contracts entered into by business organizations for executing international contracts in the UAE
includes an arbitration clause thereby facilitating the concerned
parties to refer the relevant disputes for arbitration to DIFC.

1. DLA PIPER, A SUCCESSFUL INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATIONS


BEGINS WITH RIGHT VENUE (NOVEMBER 2011) AVAILABLE ONLINE
AT<HTTP://WWW.DLAPIPER.COM/FILES/UPLOAD/INTL-ARB-EVENTMATERIALS-NOV-2011.PDF>P.2-5
2. GCCARBITRATION, HURDLES FACED WHEN ENFORCING A
DOMESTIC ARBITRAL AWARD IN THE UAE, (23 AUGUST 2012)
AVAILABLE ONLINE AT <HTTP://GCCARBITRATION.WORDPRESS.
COM/2012/08/23/HURDLES-FACED-WHEN-ENFORCING-A-DOMESTIC-ARBITRAL-AWARD-IN-THE-UAE/>
3. GEORGE ANTHONY SMITH AND MATTHEW A. MARRONE, RECENT
DEVELOPMENTS IN ARBITRATION LAW IN THE UAE, AVAILABLE
ONLINE AT <HTTP://WWW.WWHGD.COM/ASSETS/ATTACHMENTS/
MIDDLE_EAST.PDF>P. 7-9, P.14-20
4. HABIB AL MULLA, ARBITRATION UNDER UAE LAW: TOWARDS A
MODERN LEGAL FRAMEWORK?,(09 SEPTEMBER 2010) AVAILABLE
ONLINE AT <HTTP://WWW.INHOUSELAWYER.CO.UK/INDEX.PHP/
UNITED-ARAB-EMIRATES/8140-ARBITRATION-UNDER-UAE-LAWTOWARDS-A-MODERN-LEGAL-FRAMEWORK>
5. RAID ABU -MANNEH, DUBAI: A REGIONAL ARBITRATION CENTRE?, (10 AUGUST 2009) AVAILABLE ONLINE AT <HTTP://WWW.
MAYERBROWN.COM/PUBLICATIONS/DUBAI-A-REGIONAL-ARBITRATION-CENTRE-08-10-2009/ >
6. SHAMLAN AL SAWALEHI AND NATASHA BAKIRCI, ENFORCING
DIFC COURT JUDGMENTS AND ORDERS OUTSIDE THE DIFC, (JUNE
2012) AVAILABLE ONLINE AT <HTTP://DIFCCOURTS.COMPLINET.
COM/EN/DISPLAY/DISPLAY_MAIN.HTML?RBID=2725&ELEMENT_
ID=9053&PRINT=1>
7. A HAMID, J EL-AHDAB, 2011. ARBITRATION WITH THE ARAB
COUNTRIES. THIRD REVISED AND EXPANDED EDITION. NETHERLAND : KLUWER LAW INTERNATIONAL
8. ACT NO.11, PUBLISHED IN THE OFFICIAL GAZETTE NO 235 OF
MAR 8,1992
9. THE DIFC ARBITRATION LAW NO. 8 OF 2004
10. DUBAI LAW NO. 12 OF 2004
11. THE DIFC ARBITRATION LAW NO.1 OF 2008

GANESH KUMAR GANGADHARAN


MSc(QS), MRICS, MCIArb
Contracts Administrator
Parsons International Dubai

83/ IIQS
Book.indd 83

4/21/13 9:24 PM

AL TAMIMI ENGINEERING SERVICES LLC


Al Tamimi Engineering Services LLC, established in 1996, is one of the fast expanding MEP Contractors in the U.A.E.
Our business interests and dealings are mainly concentrated in carrying out civil and electro-mechanical projects, in part
or turn-key.
Our success and strength lies in our dedicated team of qualified and experienced Engineers and Technical Personnel,
familiar with latest technology and managerial techniques; who are capable of interacting and coordinating with clients
and consultants from the conception stage to the final handing over of the project.
We have earned a reputation for excellent workmanship, superior quality of materials used and acute sense of time and
cost management from various internationally renowned Consultants, Architects and Clients. We offer superior quality
services that comply with specifications and requirements, at highly competitive prices. Our motto is Consistency, Punctuality & Superiority.
Being an ISO 9001:2008 Certified Company for Quality Management Systems, rest assured, your business is in the right
hands!
Services we offer are:
lectrical Installations
Plumbing & Sanitary Installations
Mechanical Installations
HVAC Installations
FacilitiesManagement & Maintenance

Our sister concern, Redcube Systems LLC, is an IT and ELV System Integrator based in Dubai, catering to various segments of the UAE Market in the supply and services of Information Technology for over 12 years! Redcube Systems LLC
is TRA Certified, Member of TPMA and a BICSI Corporate Member. We are an ISO 9001:2008 certified company and
Dubai Police Certified Security and Surveillance System Integrators.
Emptech Engineering Pvt. Ltd. is our sister concern in Bangalore, India, specializing in complex MEP, IT & ELV Installations. We possess excellent capabilities to support the customer through all stages of the project. As with all entities of
our group, Emptech also assures high-end expertise in the field, in order to meet & satisfy utmost quality concerns of our
clients.
We are committed to Environmental Conservation.

Book.indd 84

4/21/13 9:24 PM

Member's Directory
S.NO.

NAME OF THE CANDIDATE

QUALIFICATIONS

NAME OF THE COMPANY

DESIGNATION

ABDUL RASHEED

DIPLOMA OF CIVIL ENGINEERING

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

PROJECT QS

ABDUL WAHAB

B.E. (MECHANICAL)

KHATIB & ALAMI

MEP QS

ABDULLA

B.E. CIVIL

KHANSAHEB CIVIL ENG

QS

ADIT SHAH

B.E, M.SC.

HERALD

DIRECTOR

AHAMED ZUBAIR A.

B.E.

AL ASAB

TENDERING MGR.

AJIT PHILIP

B.E., PG DIP. M.C.M., CCE

NAKHEEL

CONTRACTS MANAGER

AJMEL ABOOBAKKER

DCE, B.E.CIVIL

KLING CONSULT

SENIOR Q S

ALAN K DAMAN

B. TECH

EMIRATES CODE CONT.

PROJECT COORDINATOR

ALEX PINCHIN

BSC REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT

ADCO

SR. CONCTRACTS ENGINEER

10

ANDICHAMY VEERANNAN

MA ECONOMICS / B SC. ENG. (CIVIL)

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

SENIOR QUATITY SURVEYOR

11

ANIL KUMAR N V

DIP. CIVIL

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

SR. PROJECT Q S

12

ANIL KUMAR SREENIVASAIAH

B.E. CIVIL

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY LLC

SR. QS

13

ANISH MOHAN

BTECH CIVIL

WADE ADAMS

QS

14

ANOOP GOPAL

B.TECH. MECH

SPECIALIST SERVICES

COST CONTROL ENGG

15

ANOOP VELLLARA ANISH

B.TECH, M.SC. QS

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

QS

16

ARUNA. G

M.SC QS

DAMAC

QS

17

ASHOK CHAKARAVARTHY

B.E. CIVIL

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

ESTIMATOR

18

ASWATHI ABIJITH

B. TECH CIVIL

ERC

QS

19

ATUL MARWAHA

B.E. CIVIL

ECC

COMMERCIAL MANAGER

20

B. PARIMELAZHAGAN

B.E. CIVIL, MRICS

DUBAI WORLD GROUP

QS

21

BAGAVADEESWAR

BS DIP, MRICS, FQSI, ACIARB, CIPM

3EG GROUP

CEO

22

BALBIR SINGH BHATTI

DIPLOMA IN CIVIL

REEM REAL ESTATE CONSULTANCIES

QS

23

BASAVARAJ K. BETH

BE(CIVIL),AIQS (AFFIL), CCE, ACIARB

BUNYA

MANAGER-COST CONTROL

24

BASIL ALEYAS

B.TECH. CIVIL, M.SC.

GULF DUNES LANDSCAPING &


AGRICULTURE SERVICES LLC

PROJECT MANAGER

25

BEJOY. S. NAIR

BTECH

AL FARAA

QS

26

BENCYLAL A S

DCE

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

SR.PROJECT Q S

27

BENNY JOHN NJONOIMACKAL

B.TECH. CIVIL, MRICS

VSH INTERNATIONAL

SR. Q S

28

BENNY. V. U.

M.SC

SHAPOORJI

DY. MANAGER MEP

29

BIJI CHANDY

BTECH

NMDC

CONTRACTS ENG

30

BINDU M. R

BTECH CIVIL

ALEC

QS

31

BUBUN GHOSH

B.E. (CIVIL), PGDACM

HABTOOR LEIGHTON GROUP

PROJECT Q S

32

C R KURUP

33

CHANDARANI AWCHAR

34

CHARLES JOHN

SAGE GLOBAL ENGINEERING


MSC QS

TAGCC

SENIOR Q S

HILLS & FORT

35

CHELLAM MATHIARASAN

ICIOB, MSC(CPM)

FONDA GLOBAL ENGG, SINGAPORE

SR CONTRACTS MANAGER

36

CICINMOL CELINE

B.TECH CIVIL, M.SC. Q S, MRICS

DEWAN ARCHITECTS & ENGINEERS

SPECS. COORDINATOR

37

D. SUNDARAM

B.E. (CIVIL)

EMIRATED CODE CONTRACTING

CONTRACTS MANAGER

38

DEEPAK MEHTA

B.E. CIVIL

AECOM MIDDLE EAST

QS

39

DHARMABALAN
JEYAVEERAPANDIAN

B.E. CIVIL, MBA

DAMAC

QS

40

DHARMENDAR PARDASANI

MSC (QS), FRICS, FAIQS,


MCIARB, MCIOB

PARSONS OVERSEAS LTD.

CONTRACTS MANAGER

41

DHEEBAK GUNASEKERAN

BS ENGINEERING

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

PROJECT QS

42

DHINAKARAN. P. K

DIP.(CIVIL), CEM

CBE

QS

43

DILLESH REDDY REVADA

B. TECH

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

QS

44

DINESH V. P.

B.E. CIVIL, AACEI, MRICS

HILL INTERNATIONAL INC.

CONTRACT ADMINISTRATOR

45

E V JOHNSON NEIL

MRICS, MIS, MCIARB

EBEN JOHNSON QS & CONTRACT


MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS

DIRECTOR

46

ELSADAT MOHAMMED YOUSIF

M.SC (QS)

DIWI CONSULT

QS

47

FLAMY VINIL

BTECH CIVIL

KLING

QS

BE (CIVIL), MRICS, MIS

FRANKLIN JOSEPH
PROJECT CONSULTANT

MANAGING DIRECTOR

48

FRANKLIN G JOSEPH

85/ IIQS
Book.indd 85

4/21/13 9:24 PM

Member's Directory

S.NO.
49

NAME OF THE CANDIDATE

QUALIFICATIONS

NAME OF THE COMPANY

DESIGNATION

GANESAN GOTHANDAN

DCE, BE (CIVIL), M SC (QS),


MRICS, MIIQS

ENGINEERS OFFICE

QUANTITY SURVEYOR

50

GANESH KUMAR GANGADHARAN

M.SC. (QS) / LLM

M/S. PARSONS

CONTRACTS ADMINISTRATOR

51

GANESH MANICKAM

B. TECH CIVIL

DUTCO

SR. QS

52

GEORGE ALEX THAYYIL

B.TECH (CIVIL)

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

QUANTITY SURVEYOR

53

GEORGE SAM

B.E., MBA

DAMAC

AST. COM. MANAGER

54

GOKUL RAJ

B.E. CIVIL, CCE MRICS

GTGCE

ESTIMATION MANAGER

55

GOPIKRISHNAN

DCE, M.SC. Q S

AL REYAMI

SENIOR Q S

56

GOPINATHAN

B.E. CIVIL, M.SC. QS

EVAN LIM

SENIOR Q S

57

GOPU JEGADEESAN

B.E. CIVIL

ASGC

SENIOR Q S

58

GOVINDA RAJU NARAYANAN

DIP CIVIL ENG

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

SENIOR Q S

59

GOVINDARAJU RATHOD

M.TECH., MRICS, MBA

ARCHGROUP

HEAD OF CONTRACTS & QS

60

GOWRIPATHI M V S S

DIP CIVIL ENG

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

QS

61

HABEEB MOHAMED

B.E. (CIVIL)

NEA

SR COST CONSULTANT

62

HARI PRAKASH. G

M.TECH

LARSON & TOUBRO

ASST. MANAGER ESTIMATION

63

HARISH BHATIA

B.E.(CIVIL), QS DIP

NEAL PARTNERS

SENIOR Q S

64

IDRIS WAHEED

B.E. (CIVIL)

CHIRAG CONT CO

Q S (CIVIL)

65

IRSHAD ZAFAR MALIK

B.E. (CIVIL), M.SC.

AL GURG CONSULTANTS

CONTRACTS & QS MANAGER

66

IRUDHAYARAJPRABHU

M TECH - Stractural

HEPHER QUANTITY SURVEYING

SENIOR Q S

67

JABINA RIYAS

B.E. CIVIL

ASFARAA GEN CONT

SENIOR Q S

68

JACOB JOBY

UNITED ESTATES GROUP

VICE PRESIDENT
REAL ESTATE

69

JACOB VARGHESE

M.SC, B.TECH CIVIL

AECOM

SENIOR Q S

70

JAGADEESH. M

B.E. (CIVIL)

DLME

SENIOR Q S

71

JAHAN A. BAWA

B.E. (CIVIL)

PROJACS INTL

SENIOR Q S

72

JAI PRAKASH REDDY PITTA

DAR AL HANDASAH CONSULTANTS, KUWAIT

73

JAYADEVAN P K NAIR

B.SC.

DUTCO

SENIOR Q S

74

JAYAKISHAN. G

MSC QS

KHANSAHEB

QS

75

JAYANTKUMAR SADASHIV SAPRE

M.SC. Q S

PARSONS

QS

76

JAYASUDHA. K

BTECH CIVIL

AFGCO

COST CONTROL ENGR

77

JENSON MATHEW

B.E. CIVIL, CCE, PMP, MRICS

TURNER

CONTRACTS MANAGER

78

JIJAY MATHEW

BTECH CIVIL

A.C.C

ESTIMATOR

79

JOSE JOSEPH

M.SC. (QS)

PARSONS INTERNATIONAL

QS

80

JOSEPH SEBASTIAN

B.SC. QS, ACIARB, MRICS

CORE NINE

DIRECTOR

81

KALPESH SANGANI

M.SC.

PARSONS

CONT. ADMINISTRATOR

82

KARTHIKEYAN RAMASAMY

BTECH, PGDACM

VALENTINE MARITIME (GULF) LLC

MANAGER CONTRACTS

B.E. (CIVIL), MIE, MRICS,


MIS, MCIARB

NAKHEEL PJSC

83

KARTHIKEYAN SAKKAPPAN

84

KASI VISWANATHAN SUNDARAM

AL HUSAM GENERAL CONTRACTING EST


CONTRACTS MANAGER

85

KATHIRAVAN JAYAKUMAR

BE (CIVIL), CCE

DAAP

PROCUREMENT OFFICER

86

KHALID MAHMOOD DAR

B.TECH, M.SC.

WADE ADAMS

SENIOR Q S

87

KUMARESHAN S

M.SC.

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

SENIOR Q S

88

KUNTAL SHARMA

B.E.

E C HARRIS

COST CONSULTANT

89

L. V. VIJAYA KUMAR

M.TECH

ARABTEC

COMM. MGR

90

LEE BARWICK

BSC (HONS)

TYCO

COMMERCIAL MANAGER

91

LIJO. K. ANTONY

B.E CIVIL, MBA

92

M. GANESH NARAYANAN

WADE ADAMS

QS

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

QS

93

M. PALANIVEL

B.E.

SHANKLAND COX LTD.

QS

94

M.GLADSTAN VIMAL

B.E. CIVIL

NBHH

SENIOR Q S

95

M.R. HIREKAR

96

MAHALINGAM SARAVANAN

M.SC (QS)

CHINA STATE CONSTRUCTION

SENIOR Q S

97

MAHESH BUTANI

MSC Q S

IDRIESSE

CONT MGR

98

MANOJ K V

B. TECH CIVIL

ERC

CHIEF ESTIMATOR

IIQS / 86
Book.indd 86

4/21/13 9:24 PM

Member's Directory

S.NO.

NAME OF THE CANDIDATE

QUALIFICATIONS

NAME OF THE COMPANY

DESIGNATION

99

MANOJ. C. GEORGE

BTECH

KHANSAHEB

SENIOR Q S

100

MARZOOCK MOIDEEN

B.E.

TAKREER

CONT. ENG.

101

MATHEW THOMAS KANJICKAL

BTECH CIVIL

OGER ABUDHABI

COST CONTROL MGR

102

MIR MUZAFFAR ALI

B.E (CIVIL); M.SC (Q S)

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

MANAGING QS

103

MIRZA HYDER ALI BAIG

B.E.CIVIL

KHATIB & ALAMI

SENIOR Q S

104

MOHAMED AHMED SAAD

BSCE

SNC LAVALIN

CONTRACTS MANAGER

105

MOHAMMAD ASGHAR

M.SC. CONSTRUCTION
AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT

MOTT MAC DONALD

SENIOR Q S

106

MOHAMMAD MASROOR ALAM KHAN

B.SC ENG (CIVIL)

AFC

ASST. COMM. MGR.

107

MOHAMMAD NAJEEBULLA KHAN

B.E.

AL REYAMI INTERIORS & EXTERIORS

SENIOR Q S

108

MOHAMMAD SARFARAZ ALAM

M.SC. Q S, B.TECH (CIVIL)

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

PROJECT Q S

BTECH CIVIL

KHATIB & ALAMI

QS

109

MOHAMMED ABUBACKER

110

MOHAMMED FARHAN

111

MOHAMMED
MUZAFFER FAROOQUI

B.E. (CIVIL)

NPC

SENIOR Q S

112

MOHAMMED OSMAN ALI KHAN

B.E.

DAR

CONT. ADMIN

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

113

MOHAMMED SHAKEEL

B.E. CIVIL, M.SC., MRICS

D P WORLD

SENIOR Q S

114

MUTHUKUMAR

M.SC.

DEC

QS

115

N. RAMAIAH

B.TECH, M.SC., MRICS

PARSONS

SENIOR Q S

116

NAGALINGAM BAGAVATHI

B.E ( CIVIL)

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

SENIOR PROJECT QS

117

NANDITA

MRICS

HALCROW

QUANTITY SURVEYOR

118

NAVEEN KUMAR

DIP. IN CIVIL, CCE (AACEI),


MRICS, ACI(ARB)

LEIGHTON WALSPUN
INDIA PVT. LIMITED

COMMERCIAL MANAGER

119

NIAS ABDUL SATHAR

BTECH

ASGC

Q S MANAGER

120

NILAY JITENDRA GAJIWALA

CIVIL ENGINEER

TARGET ENGINEERING COMPANY

CONTRACTS ENGINEER

121

NILESH TULSIDAS KADAM

B.E. CIVIL

SHAPOORJI

QS

122

NISHATH AHSAN

BE, MCM

BCG

CONTRACTS MANAGER

123

P. PRABURAJA

B.E. CIVIL

AFC

SENIOR Q S

124

PALANIVEL V

DIP. CIVIL

CONVERGNT VALUE ENGINEERING LLC

PROJECT Q S

125

PARAG DHADPHALE

M.SC. Q S, PGDQS, BE CIVIL

PARSONS

QS

126

PARTHARAJAN NATARAJAN

B.E., M.SC. Q S, CCE, MRICS

HYDER CONSULTING MEL

SENIOR Q S

127

PAUL BANKALA

B.E.(CIVIL), M.SC.(CM), ICIOB

DUBAI AVIATION ENGINEERING PROJECTS

CONTRACTS ADMINISTRATOR

128

PAVAN KUMAR MAMIDI

B.E.(CIVIL)

EMIRATES CONTRACTING LLC

SENIOR QS

129

PRABHA SELVARAJU

130

PRADEEP FRANKLIN WILSON

B.E (ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONICS)

DJW BEN CONSULTANCY, SAUDI ARABIA

KELLOGG BROWN & ROOT


MEP QUANTITY SURVEYOR

131

PRASHANT SUKENKAR

M.SC Q S, B.E. CIVIL

SWEET GROUP

SENIOR Q S

132

PRAVEEN KUMAR. P. PAI

BTECH

NPC

SENIOR Q S

133

PRAVEEN SASIDHARAN

BTECH CIVIL

TYCO

QS

134

PREETHA T R

BTECH CIVIL

THYSSEN

QS

135

PREMINI THOMAS

BTECH CIVIL

KHATIB & ALAMI

QS

136

PROMOTH. V. ABRAHAM

B.E. (CIVIL)

NPC

SENIOR Q S

SHAPOORJI PALLONJI MIDEAST (L.L.C)

ASS GENERAL
MANAGER CONTRACTS,

137

R. MURALIDHARAN

DIP. CIVIL, M.SC. PROJECT MANAGEMENT

138

R. NARAYANAN

B.TECH (CIVIL), MBA, CCE

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

SENIOR Q S

139

RAJAGANESH RAMANATHAN

BE, MRICS, CCE

AIROLINK

COMMERCIAL MANAGER

140

RAJANI RAJENDRAN

141

RAJEEVA T

BE (CIVIL)

SOBHA CONTG.

KEO INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANTS


QS

142

RAJENDIRAN ADIKESAVAN

MRICS

NAKHEEL PJSC

SENIOR Q S

143

RAJESH NAIK

B.E. (CIVIL)

KQS

QS - MANAGER

144

RAJESH.K

BTECH CIVIL

BUNYA

SENIOR Q S

145

RAJESHKUMAR. R

PG DIPLOMA CONST. LAW,


MCIARB, MRICS

ROYAL GROUP

CONTRACTS MANAGER

146

RAJIV. N. LAL

B.E. (CIVIL)

PARSONS

SQS

147

RAJNEESH KUMAR

GRAD. IOS IND.

L&T

SR. QS

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Member's Directory

S.NO.

NAME OF THE CANDIDATE

QUALIFICATIONS

NAME OF THE COMPANY

DESIGNATION

148

RAKESH PANICKER

BTECH CIVIL

NAKHEEL

QS

149

RAM KUMAR U

B.E. CIVIL, MRICS

PROSCAPE LLC

Q S & PLANNING MANAGER

150

RAMADAS P R

B.TECH

ARCHGROUP

SR. QS

151

RAMARAO KILARI

LCE, AMIE, MRICS

ANC CONTRACTING LLC

SENIOR QUANTITY SURVEYOR

152

RAMASWAMY S S

BE, MBA, PG DIP (CONST. LAW & ARB)

AL ABBAS GROUP

CONTRACTS MGR.

153

RAMESH KUMAR. T. N

FIS, MRICS, CCE

ADAC

SR. CONTR. MGR.

154

RAMESH PALIKILA

BTECH, MRICS, ACIARB, MIS

DAR-AL-HANDASAH

SR. CONTRACTS ADMINISTRATOR

155

RANI CHACKO

BTECH CIVIL

AFC

SENIOR Q S

156

REKHA RAMAKRISHNAN NAIR

B.TECH CIVIL, M.SC. Q S, MRICS

ERC

QUANTITY SURVEYOR

157

RENJINI ANDREWS

BTECH

KY1

SENIOR Q S

158

RISHANA AKBARSHA

B.TECH CIVIL, MRICS

AL FUTTAIM CARILLION

LEAD MEASUREMENT SURVEYOR

159

RITU DAS

B.TECH CIVIL, PG DIP. MGMT.

NAKHEEL

CONTRACTS MANAGER

160

RUPESH KRISHNAN

BTECH

N W S INTERNATIONAL

ASSOCIATE

161

SAI PRASAD

BTECH, MBA(FIN)

TROJAN

COMMERCIAL MANAGER

162

SAJEETH SIDHARTHAN

BE MRICS ACIARB MSOE

MANAGING PARTNER

WINFIELD ASSOCIATES

163

SAJEEV ZACHARIAH

CEM, MRICS

KHANSAHEB LLC.

SR. QS.

164

SAJINA ZUBAIDA

BTECH CIVIL

DEWA

QS

165

SAJOR VENUGOPALAN

B.TECH CIVIL

DAMAC PROPERTIES

QS

166

SAMAGATA CHAKRAVORTY

B.E.(CIVIL), PG DIP.CONST. MANAGEMENT

DAMAC

ASST. CONTRACTS MANAGER

167

SAMIR PAGNIS

B.E. CIVIL, MRICS

DAR AL HANDASAH

CONTRACT ADMINISTRATOR

168

SANKAR PETCHIMUTHU

BE

CHINA STATE

SENIOR Q S

169

SANKARA SUBRAMANIAN

B .E

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

QS

170

SANTHOSHKUMAR
THARAYIL AUGUSTINE

B.SC. QS, MRICS

MOTT. MC. DONALD

CONTRACTS MANAGER

171

SARAVANAN.J

MRICS, M.SC(CPM),BE

AL NABOODAH

SENIOR ESTIMATOR

172

SARAVANAN.VK.

B.SC. CIVIL, M.SC. QS, MRICS

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

DIV. EST. MGR.

173

SATEESH BABU

B.TECH

ENGINEER'S OFFICE

QS

174

SATHEESH KUMAR R

B.TECH CIVIL

DUTCO

SENIOR Q S

175

SEKAR DURAISAMY

M.SC., ICIOB, MRICS

AABAR PROPERTIES

SENIOR Q S

176

SENTHIL PRABHU

ME

AL FUTTAIM

SENIOR Q S

177

SHAMEERA MAHUTHY

DIP. CIVIL

KHATIB & ALAMI

QS

178

SHAMSUNDAR M KEMBHAVI

B.E. CIVIL, ACIARB

BUNYA ENTERPRISES LLC

COST ENGINEER

179

SHANAVAS A

BTECH CIVIL

DAMAC

QS

180

SHIHABUDHEEN KAPPUMUKATH

BE (CIVIL)

WADE ADAMS

QS

181

SHIJI JACOB

DIP. CIVIL

TRANSEMIRATES

QS

182

SIJI JOHN

B.E. (CIVIL)

CONSOLIDATED CONTRACTORS
INTERNATIONAL COMPANY, QATAR

CONTRACTS ADMINISTRATOR

183

SINESH PETER

CIVIL DIPLOMA

KHANSAHEB

QS

184

SINIMOL NOUSHAD

B.TECH, MBA, MRICS, MIS

ARKIPLAN CONSULTANT

CONTRACTS MANAGER

185

SIVA BALAN

B.E. CIVIL

AL FARAA GEN CON

QS

186

SIVAKUMAR KANDASAMY

DIP CIVIL ENG

ARABTEC

SENIOR Q S

187

SRINIVAS YARAMADA

B.TECH. CIVIL

NAKHEEL

COMMERCIAL MANAGER

188

SRINIVASA RAO

M.SC. CONSTRUCTION
PROJECT MANAGEMENT

GOC

PM

189

SRIVALSAN SUNDARAM

B.TECH CIVIL

HYDER

QS

190

SUBBARAMAN SUDHAKAR

B.E.

NAKHEEL

SENIOR Q S

191

SUDHEER EDAMANA

B.TECH. CIVIL, ACIARB, MRICS

DAMAC PROPERTIES

SENIOR Q S

192

SUJATHA KIRUPANANDAN

DCE

AL REYAMI

SENIOR Q S

193

SUNDAR RAMAN

B.E (CIVIL), AACEI, CCE, ACIARB

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY L.L.C

QS

194

SURESH KUMAR A C

B.TECH (CIVIL), CCE

ERC

CONTRACTS ENGINEER

195

SURESH SUBRAMANI

B.E., CCE, M.SC.

NATIONAL WHEEL J&P LLC

PQS

196

SYED ASLAM

BE CIVIL, MICES

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY LLC

COMMERCIAL MANAGER

197

SYED HABEEB ASHRAF ALI

B.E. (ELECT)

KHATIB & ALAMI

SITE QS

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Member's Directory

S.NO.

NAME OF THE CANDIDATE

QUALIFICATIONS

NAME OF THE COMPANY

DESIGNATION

198

THIAGU. K

B.E. CIVIL

WAC

QS

199

TITTY JACOB

B.TECH

DUTCO BALFOUR BEATTY LLC

PQS

200

U.S. JOHN RUSSEL

B.E. (CIVIL)

AL FARIDA INVESTMENTS CO.

COMMERCIAL MANAGER

201

V. B. MADHU BABU

B.SC. (HON)

ACC

SENIOR Q S

202

V. HARILAL

DIP.(CIVIL)

ARABTEC

SENIOR Q S

203

VARUGHESE MATHEW

FRICS, FCIOB, MCIARB

AL FARAA GROUP

COMMERCIAL HEAD

204

VENKATA RAGHAVAN RAMADURAI

B.E. (CIVIL), LLM

VOLTAS LIMITED

COMMERCIAL MANAGER

205

VENKATESAN
SANTHANAKRISHNAN

B.E.

AL FARAA

SR. ESTIMATION ENG

206

VENKATESH BABU BHATHE

MSC (CPM)

SNC LAVALIN

DY. MGR PCC

207

VIJAY SINGH

B.E. CIVIL

ARABTEC

SENIOR Q S

208

VIJAYA KUMAR
MADHAVAN GOPALAN

B.TECH CIVIL, CCE

ABU DHABI, SEWERAGE


SERVICES COMPANY

SENIOR
CONTRACTS ENGINEER

209

VILAS CHANDRAN

B. TECH CIVIL

ERC

ESTIMATOR

210

VILAS. A. DESHMUKH

M.SC.

PARSONS

PROJECT Q S

211

VINOD MAMMEN

B.E. (CIVIL), MBA

ARABIAN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

PROJECT Q S

212

VINOD VASUDEVAN PILLAI

B.E.(CIVIL)

EMIRATES ROADS CONTRACTING

ESTIMATION ENGINEER

213

VINU BABU

BTECH CIVIL

DECO EMIRATES

ESTIMATOR

214

VIPIN KOYOTHIPOOROLIL

B.SC. QS, MRICS

AECOM

SENIOR Q S

Rekha Swathi IIQS Membership Development


Manager and Pavan Mamidi IIQS Treasurer

89/ IIQS
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Global Composites , Ras al Khaimah An organization which ensures


Product offerings with Right Value Proposition
Trend setter and specialized fabricator, supplier and installer of the GRP and GRC products.
GRP Cladding , Shelter , Kiosks, Swimming Pools , Sectional Water Tanks ,Shower Trays
Cabinets , Enclosures , Poles , Cable Trays, Cable Ladders, Canopies , Shower Trays , Gratings
Cooling Tower Profiles , GRC - Claddings, Dome, Cornice, Screens, Panels, Handrails, Balustrade, Planter Box, Pergola

Competent technical team


Well trained installation team
Optimized product offerings for complex design requirements
Tel: +971 7 2435237; Fax: +971 7 2435239 E-Mail: info@global-composite.com;Web: www.global-composite.com

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

Global Recognition
International

IIQS members have achieved various International awards from the reputable organizations for their commitment
and their outstanding contribution towards the society and Quantity Surveying Profession. IIQS is proud to share
our pleasure and congratulating all the members, who have devoted so much of their personal and professional
time towards the success of IIQS.

Ramesh Palikila - Best Counsellor Award (2012)

Dharmendar Paradasani - Best Assessor Award (2012)

Sinimol Noushad - Young Assessor Award (2012)

Sajeeth Sidharthan Best Mentor Award (2011)

IIQS / 92
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

Members Achievements
Vaibhav Satpute with
Certificate in Mentoring
accredited by BYST City & Guilds, London.

Binu Varghese has been recently awarded as Doctorate in


Business Administration (DBA)
from Liverpool John Moores University, for the Subject of
Implementing Effective Strategic
Management in the Construction Industry in Qatar.

During the CPD events, IIQS recognizes the dedication and the hard work of members who upgrade their
professional qualifications or achieve membership of prestigious global bodies

93 / IIQS
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The Australian Institute of


Quantity Surveyors (AIQS) is
the largest dedicated
Professional
body for QS and your link to
the Industry. Through its
leadership, standards and
code of ethics, it ensures
that practicing Quantity
Surveyors are dedicated to
maintaining the highest
standards
of professional excellence

For Membership Queries please contact:


SANGEETA LUTHRIA, MEMBERSHIP AND EVENTS MANAGER
M : + 97150 7580 221
E: sluthira@aiqs.com.au, W: www.aiqs.com.au

With Best Compliments

THE
MIDDLE EAST
FACTORY

With Best Compliments


from
SIGMA ENGINEERING

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Van Oord is a leading international contractor specialising in dredging, marine engineering and offshore projects (oil, gas and wind).
We are an innovative partner for our clients and, for over than one hundred years, have been helping to create the infrastructure for the
world of tomorrow.
Van Oord is a Dutch-based, independent family business which is characterized by visible leadership, long-term vision and a sound
financial position.
Marine ingenuity is what sets Van Oord apart. In just two words, we show in the clearest possible terms what we do, how we do it, and
what makes us different. A passionate, smart, shrewd, international marine contractor that is how we see ourselves. We find innovative
solutions designed to meet our clients and business partners challenges.
The growing world population needs more space and the demand for energy is rising constantly Increasing world trade requires more
and better port facilities and climate change is threatening coastal areas. Van Oord provides innovative solutions for worldwide maritime challenges, both now and in the future.
MARITIME ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Today, Van Oord is one of the largest dredging and marine contractors in the world but our origins lie in the maritime tradition of the
Netherlands and its struggle against the water. We encourage all our employees to adopt an entrepreneurial attitude. In this way, we
achieve our shared ambition to meet the needs of our clients all over the world.
PROFESSIONALISM AND INGENUITY
Marine engineering is a high-tech industry. Substantial investments in people and equipment are made with great care to ensure the
continuity of our business. Our staff, approximately 4,500 in total, are committed, entrepreneurial professionals who are passionate
about water and technology. They know the importance of cooperation in achieving the best possible result. By being open and honest, they build on mutual trust and respect. Their professionalism and dedication give our company the firm foundations it requires for
steady growth. Teamwork is the key.
VAN OORD IN THE MIDDLE EAST
Van Oord is a well-known name in the Middle East. Its first project was the construction of the Mina Saqr Port at Ras Al Khaimah, UAE
in 1976. Since then, Van Oord has established offices
in almost all countries around the Gulf (Qatar, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Jordan, Abu Dhabi and Dubai) and has been
awarded numerous dredging and marine projects throughout
the Middle East. The company has been working virtually non-stop in Dubai since 2001. Projects such as the construction of the islands
Palm Jumeirah and The World Islands, the harbour development in Mina Zeyahi, the land reclamation for Dubai Maritime City and the
reclamation of various beaches were realised by Van Oord.
VAN OORDS NEW PROJECT IN DUBAI
With the client Meraas Development LLC, Van Oord is engaged in the construction of the artificial Island Jumana Island. The Island is
located 500 metres off the coast and will be used for urban development. A bridge will connect the island to the coast. Project execution
has already commenced and a new landmark will be completed by end of 2013.

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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

IIQS
Testimonials
2013 IIQS

Guidance, platform and


opportunity are essentials for any
professional to enhance their knowledgeand develop their career. We find these pre
requisites in IIQS. IIQS engages in the philosophy
of sharing knowledge, and today it embarks a
new journey of starting a magazine for the benefit
ofmembers, another platform and another opportunity
!my best wishes for the IIQS Committee for taking
forward their vision into a new dimension
Sai Prasad, Commercial Manager, NPCArabtec JV

My association with IIQS has


been more than 3 years . After
having attended several CPDs of IIQS in
Dubai and India ,I am of the opinion that the
vision of IIQS is very farfetched and is focusing on
the overall professional growth of individuals associated in the fields of Cost/Contracts/Quantity surveying
and Project Management. It was a welcome surprise by
me to see that their focus is also on personality development and confidence building sessions which provides
an edge in todays competitive world.
Saleem Z Merchant, Sr.Manager (OperationsProcurement), Mumbai International
Airport Pvt Ltd
Mumbai Chapter

Despite tremendous growth in Indian


construction sector, there is a lack of skills development
and trainings avenues for fresh and mid level professionals in commercial management of projects. Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors,
a non for profit organization, definitely stands out in this domain. Apart from
being lead by industry veterans who have decades of experience in delivering
world class infrastructure projects, it encourages and implements structured learning through their regular CPD events.
Vishal Shaha Mumbai Chapter

Time well spent is of great value, and the way we spend it defines
who we are. My membership with IIQS allows the perfect balance. IIQS is
very fertile ground with an invaluable source of information and conduit for
discussion. IIQS encourages professionals learning through its conferences,
workshops, and publications.Imran Gadiman, MEP QS, Samko International Co.W.L.L.
Qatar Chapter

One who
has walked the path and
is now sharing the journey, eases the
path that individuals walk is one of the definitions of the word Guru has given in our scriptures.
IIQS is truly The Guru to the Indian professionals who are
practicing in the field of Quantity Surveying. It is the mentor
for the Surveyors to achieve the professional competency as
well as a good platform for sharing their hand on experiences and
knowledge. Here we grow together as a Team. Thanking IIQS for
the immense support and motivation you are imparting to us. Also
thanking to all the key personnel in IIQS for their well dedicated
and untiring efforts which keeps the IIQS flag fly high. Im proud
to be part of this wonderful team of professionals and wish
all the very best for its future endeavors.
Manju Sreenath, Quantity Surveyor, KEO International Consultants.
Kuwait Chapter

I attended first IIQS CPD Event


in December 2012; the event was all about
FIDIC and comparison with Local Practice & contractual disputes. Essentially support me in my current role as
well as helping with career progression.
SAQIB ZAFAR, MANAGER Q.S, SYSTRA CONSULTING INDIA
PVT LTD.
DELHI Chapter

IIQS / 96
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By
joining the IIQS, we get
to meet other colleagues to share
our ideas and improve our knowledge,
making and amending its way to finally
meet up in mighty ocean of knowledge. IIQS
continuous efforts for our development in the field
of quantity surveying by mentoring the making opportunity to learn through CPDs are commendable.
These CPDs help us to sharpen our skills and provide
us the motivation to make an effort to achieve
milestones in our career.
Jyostna Polisetty, Quantity Surveyor,
Langdon-Seah Cost Consultants
Hyderabad Chapter

Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS
We in
our culture have always been
told our beliefs as stories of experiences
faced by our eldest ancestors and the same has
been penned down to be read today as scriptures, which
explains to us the importance of experience, and what better
a way towards achieving theprime motto ofContinuous Professional Development than having the best and most experienced in the
industry coming forward to share their experience, so as such to alert us
on avoiding the same mistakes which they might have made or come
across during the beginning of their respective careers and on what
best methods can be adopted towards proper control of a project
from a Quantity Surveyors point of view.
Rohit Kamaraju,
Hyderabad, Chapter

I
started my career plan
of becoming member of RICS from
UK, however it was tough to work towards
it. In 2010 I got to know about IIQS and especially
Ramesh in Dubai where he was conducting training
seminars for APC aspirants like me. The trainings were
conducted in veryprofessional manner and it resulted in
successful passing of APC by not only me but also for other
dozen of candidates who got trained in IIQS. I am really
grateful to IIQS which is still helping the other candidates
in this profession.
Avinash Gaikwad, HEAD OF CONTRACTS MANAGEMENT, THALES SECURITY SYSTEMS.
Qatar Chapter OK

I would
like to express my sincere
gratitude to IIQSfor giving me a lot of
opportunity tobe in contact with professionals working in the same field after being
associated since 2010. The wonderful seminars and
workshops provided me with the confidence and savvy
to utilize it inmycareer.

Nias Abdul Sathar, QS Manager, Al
ShafarGeneral Contracting Co. LLC
UAE Chapter.

It gives me
immense pleasure to be part
of Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors in
Bangalore to contribute to the growth of IIQS mission. I
have been impressed by IIQS team trying to spread awareness
and importance of quantity surveying profession in - India. The
motto of IIQS lighted to learn removes the darkness by creating a
platform for knowledge exchange and continuous professional lifelong
learning where the construction industry professionals benefit out of it and
give their contribution to the rising India. I would like to thank to allIIQS
members for their dedicated support & motivation for the QS professionals in - India
Anand Kumar, Senior Commercial Manager, United Estates
Group,
Bangalore Chapter

I have
been associated with the
Indian Institute -of Quantity Surveyors
since the past 6 years and have seen it grow in
strength and activities since then.
It has spread its wings into various cities in the motherland and
other areas in the GCC, and I hope to see it grow into an internationally recognized organization with members from all corners of the
globe. I also wish to see it bring some of the international best practices
of construction economics to the Indian construction scene.
I salute the tireless efforts of members devoting their personal time
to bring the organization to its current position, and cannot help
mentioning the energy and zeal of Ramesh Pallikalla, who is a major
contributor to the current success of the organization.
Mr.Mahesh Butani. MSc (QS) Contracts Manager, Idroesse
Infrastructure LLC.
Abu Dhabi Chapter

97 / IIQS
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Indian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

2013 IIQS

Magazine and Event Team


Wow! the magazine and event team has
finally made it! A nostalgic memory of the team working their way
forward to ensure that the magazine
IIQS Annual Insight 2013 and the event IIQS Regale
are unfolded on 26th April 2013 in a grand way.
Thanks to all supporters and sponsors.

Magazine Team

Event Team

IIQS / 98
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