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From: bbsadmin@tngenweb.org
Subject: [Forum:] Re: John Cunningham + Rachel (Rogers) Hayes
Date: Sat, 15 Jul 2006 01:09:38 -0500 (CDT)

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MESSAGE: (#2009) Re: John Cunningham + Rachel (Rogers) Hayes


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AUTHOR: jean cunningham
DATE: Saturday, 15 July 2006, at 1:03 a.m.

Reply To: (#1491) John Cunningham + Rachel (Rogers) Hayes


Author: Harold Cunningh
Date: Saturday, 1 October 2005, at 10:12 a.m.

I think the Thomas Cunningham and Matilda Hayes you are referring to are my
GGG grandparents. I have hand written notes given by emma cunningham Rice
(1901)when she was 75 yrs old. She says that Jesse Cunningham (parents were
John Thomas Cunningham and Mary LOwe)1868-1933 married Ellen Mayo. Two of
their children married a Rogers. Claude cunningham married Hollie Rogers,
Maggie cunningham married John rogers. She says that Hollie and John Rogers
were cousins. Also Lila Cunningham 1898-1979 married a Jim Rogers. Lila
Cunningham is my Grandpa Arcie's sister. I dont know about the John B
Cunningham. From the research I have done on my Cunningham relatives from
McMinnville and Viola Tn, John B is not of this clan. There are so many of
them and the name John is very common in all of the generations so I know how
hard it is to get it all nailed down. My G grandpa John Thomas born 1848 and
married to Julia Vicars and Mary Lowe is hard to find listed as John Thomas or
even JT in the right location. I am in Mn so the search is even tougher. If
you have any info on Thomas, Elisha and Jesse I would be interested in where
you are finding it. Thanks, Jean

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1

An
Addendum
Of
Articles & Photos
Related To Our
Love Family History

Collected
By
Harold Cunningham

1
2
Letter from General Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love,
of Haywood County, North Carolina.

Henry County, Paris, Tennessee.


My Dear Nephew: 10 March 1843
I received your kind letter of the 23rd, Jan. 1843, which gave me much satisfaction to
learn that my old and much beloved brother was still in the land of the living, and all
friends in that County generally enjoying health.
My family at present is in the enjoyment of reasonable health ever since you left
me with the exception, of myself and Albert, who has not altogether recovered his health,
but so much so that he attends to all his business. As to myself, I have been sorely
afflicted with the Rheumatism pains in my neck for the last sixteen months, but for the
last two or three weeks, I think, I have mended considerably, and if it should be the will
of the Giver of all Good to continue His kind mercies towards me, and should my neck
continue to improve, as it has done for the last two or three weeks, my intention is that, I
think, sometime by the month of May, I will be able to ride in a carriage. My intention is
at that time, or thereabouts, to set out for my old native country to see all my friends and
relatives one more time.
My son, Thomas Bell Love, left here, bag and baggage, for Missouri last October
was a year, and settled in Wright County, Missouri, if you wish to write to him, address
him thus; towit; Greene County, Walnut Forest Post Office, State of Missouri. There is
where I address my letters to him. I have received several letters from him and wife since
they moved to that country. They are both highly pleased with their move; lands lie well
for farming, and scarcely could be surpassed for furtility by any in the
world*****Health, equal to old Buncombe. He says he was scarcely seen a Doctor for
the last twelve months, and not one cent has he paid to them. Steam boat navigation will
be within fifty miles of where he lives. If I could call back twenty years, I certainly would
go to that country******** This letter is quite long already, I will write you shortly
again. I have never had any account about my Holland suit, only a word or two dropped
by you to me last Spring.
I have written lately to my old friend, Wm. Welch, and likewise Mr. Francis to let
me know what the result has been. Tell Andy I want to see him very much, and to do the
best he can until I get in, and by all means, not to idle away his time.
As respects the cure of the cancer on Stiles' wife's neck, the cure proved effectual, and
her nose was very bad. You will take (towit) a smart quantity of the root of Sour Dock,
put it into a pot and boil it down until you are sure the whole of the strength is out of it.
The root will become quite soft when boiled. Then take them in you hands, mash and
squeeze them well, will have the whole of the strength in the water, then throw the roots
out, then put the ______ with the water on the fire, and simmer until it becomes about as
thick as honey, then agreeable to the quantity of juice, add one third of strong French
brandy, mix them well together, then spread it on a rag as a plaster, and put as plaster to
the place effected, night and morning, etc.

Please give my best respects in particular to my old brother, likewise to all


friends, whilst you will please to accept the same yourself.
Yours farewell,
Thomas Love (Copy)

2
3
Letter from General Thomas Love to his brother Robert Love
of Haywood County, North Carolina

Henry Co., Paris, Tennessee.


Dear Brother: 16th, May 1844
You, no doubt, have understood how I have been afflicted for the last 2 or 3 years with
Rheumatic pains in my neck. My suffering has been great since the warm weather set in.
I think the pain in my neck has a little abated, but my left knee and right elbow and wrist
are in such a situation that I can scarcely walk about yard. I did think in the Winter that
after warm weather set in, I would be able to go to Carolina and see you once more in this
life, but at this time, my dear brother, it is utterly impossible with me. I received a letter
from your grandson, Robert Love, of Carter County, some time in Feb. last, stating that
he was authorized by you to receive from the Gambles, the balance of what was coming
to you from the estate of our uncle, Joseph Bell, deceased, of August County, Va., which
is about, or near, two hundred dollars. I have no doubt but what your grandson's
statements was correct, but still I would prefer an order from under your had to show as a
voucher by what authority I paid over the money. I have been trying for some several
years past to collect the money without making a journey particularly for it, but I never
could until sometime last Spring, or Summer, when I met with a young man living in the
adjoining county, who informed me that he was going to the lower part of Virginia, and I
contracted with him to go by the way of Staunton and collect the money, which he did.
He has not paid to over to me as yet, but is to do so in the course of two or three weeks
from this time. I consider the money entirely sage. If you still intend your Grandson to
have said money, you will write to me immediately on the subject, etc. I received a letter
from my Nephew, Jas. B. Love, dated 5th, of April last, who stated your health was good
as usual, which I was truly glad to hear. Our friends in this country, so far as I have any
knowledge, are enjoying reasonable good health, et., I am,
Affectionately and truly your brother until death,
Thomas Love
(Copy).

3
4
Copy of letter from John P. Arthur to me.
John P. Arthur Asheville, N.C. April 17th, 1903.
Attorney at Law.

Franklin D. Love, Esqr.,


Georgetown, Texas.

Dear Sir:
Yours of the 14th, inst., to hand. I spoke to Mrs. Hilliard this morning about writing
a sketch of the life of her Grandfather, Robert Love, but she says that she is not in a
position to give you as much information as I have already furnished, as she was but nine
or ten years old when he died, and she has but a faint recollection of him.
I suggest that before you have your account of his life printed, you send it to me
here, or to Miss Mary Love Stringfield, at Waynesville for such suggestions, corrections
and alterations as they may devise. In this way nothing will be omitted; nothing be
included that should not be, and if there are any errors, they should be corrected. At any
rate, this is the best means of securing fullness and accuracy. I will make it my business
to submit it to all who are in a position to revise it, and return it to you, if you adopt this
suggestion. No one seems willing to undertake the task of writing out a full account of his
life, for various reasons; but if the first draft or framework is read to them, each would be
willing to make any recommendations that may occur to them. And, then, no blame could
attach to you for errors or omissions. As what you propose to print is the only enduring
monument Robert Love will ever have, in all probability, no pains should be spared to
have it as full and as accurate as possible.
The Thomas Love mentioned in Wheeler's History (of N.C.) was a brother of Col.
Robert Love, and not his son. He was several years younger than Robert Love. He was
known as General Thomas Love, and after 1828 removed to Forked Deer, Henry
County, Tennessee; was elected to State Senate and became its Speaker or President. He
was far more distinguished in this State as a public man and politician than Robert Love.
His wife is buried in the Grave Yard of the Methodist Church at Franklin, Macon County,
North Carolina, and a handsome tombstone has been erected to her memory. He was a
great campaigner, and did his most effective work among the women, taking to the first
house on his campaigns a batch of garden or flower seed, telling the mistress that his wife
had sent them with the special request for some of her own; taking what she gave, and
presenting them to the woman of the next house as a gift from his wife, with the same
request for some of hers, and so on around the circuit. He was a man with blue eyes, of a
large and commanding personality, and every influential in the legislatures, not only on
account of his long service there, but because of this great ability as a diplomatist and
manager and leader or men. Col. Allen T. Davidson has told me that he was a "born
leader of men".
Yours very truly,
John P. Arthur, (Signed)

-----------------o-------------------o-------------------o--------------------o---------------o-------

http://www.dillardfamilyassociation.com/dannuals/da2000/da00all.htm

4
5
1835 Letter from Elizabeth Barnard Love to her sister, Peggy Young in Burnsville,
Yancey County, North Carolina.

Thomas Love, the husband of Elizabeth Barnard Love, was a son of General Thomas Love
and Martha Dillard Love. Martha Dillard Love was a daughter of Thomas Dillard, Jr. of
Pittsylvania County, Virginia who moved to and died in Washington County, North Carolina
later Tennessee. This letter gives us a glimpe of how and to what extent our early migrating
ancestors kept up with each other (and they did have letters and a post office!), and their pain
in leaving and not hearing from loved ones left behind..

Henry County, West Tennessee June 19, 1835

Dear Sister:

After an absence of nearly two years I avail myself of the present opportunity of writing you a
few lines to let you know I am still in the land of the living though many miles from the land of
my youthful pleasure but I think I am placed in a situation far superior to many things I could
have promised myself in that country. I have nothing very particular to write there has been so
much said already about this country that I think it would ---- to say any more. Our family are
all well and all the rest of the friends in this country. Hoping these few lines may find all
enjoying the same blessings. Brother John and the doctor are very well pleased with their move
to this country. John was married on the 20th of May to Miss Eleander Sisson and I think there
is no doubt but she will make him a good wife and an agreeable companion. Mr. Love has
purchased land in this country 6 miles from Parris. I feel entirely satisfied and think we are
settled for life. I have understood that father and mother intends visiting you this summer. I
feel for you my dear Sister for I know there is no person but one who have parted with a dear
old father and mother thinking it to be the last time they are ever to see them that can conceive
what I felt when I left mine for I had no idea I ever should see them any more in this life but I
now have the pleasing prospect of meeting with them again if we should all be spared a few
months longer. I wrote to you shortly after our arrival in this country and have been anxiously
expecting a letter from you ever since but I have not received the first line from none of my
relatives since I left that country only from my two brothers. I think I must complain of you
and Sally Dillard for it seems as though you have forgotten that you have a sister by the name
of Love. We have never enjoyed better health in our family in our lives than we have since we
came to this country. I expect to be confined by 20 of September. We have had a very wet
season and the prospects of crops are not so good at this time. We all join in love to you and all
your family and all inquiring friends. So no more but remains your affectionate sister.
Elizabeth Love"

5
6

1841 Letter from Elizabeth Barnard Love (Living in Henry County, West Tennessee) to
her sister, Margaret Barnard Young (living in then Burnsville, Yancey County, NC) now,
Madison county, NC

Elizabeth is the daughter-in-law of General Thomas Love.

Date Written: August 1st 1841


----------------------------------

Dear Sister
I once more take my pen in hand to write to you to let you know we are all well at present
hoping these lines may find you all enjoying the sa blessing I have no news of importance I
must confess I feel some what ashamed of not writing to you before allthough I think I can
with justi complain of your not writing to me since I saw you I have had three daughters
Dorcas, Dicia and Lettishia they are all fine little girls Lettishia is five months old I expect you
have no doubt heard of the death of our little Polly it will be three years this fall since she died
it was a severe trial to give her up but oh Sister, if I could have her back for asking for worlds I
would not ask it if I had of died at her age how much sin and hardship would I have escaped
you will probably be surprised when I tell you we are making preparations to leave Tennessee
we are going to move to Missouri between four and five hundred miles from where we now
live. Mr. Love has been and looked at the country he likes the appearance of the country much
better than he ever did this country the land is very rich and fertile but scarce of timber in
places the water is plenty and very good but limestone he is going to settle on the Ozark
Mountain he says the range is as good as it ever was in Buncombe He was at William Dillards
he has been living in that country four years and is very well pleas says he believes it to be
equally as healthy as Buncombe is at this time Mr. Love sold his land here for thirty six
hundred dollars he says for half the money he can settle himself much more to his notion in
Missouri and be where his children can settle to advantage you may think strange of my being
willing to go so far from all my connection but I am very willing to go as I hope it will be to
the advantage and satisfaction of my own family but it would far exceed the bounds of a letter
to say all I would wish to say I must therefore conclude after begging of you not to forget me
when I am allmost a thousand miles from you do write to me as soon as you receive this letter
if you should not receive it in time to give me an answer by the middle of October write to
Missouri Green County Springfield. Mr. Love joins me in sending our best love and respects to
you and Josh in particular give my love to all the children and all inquiring friends

I am my Dear Sister
Yours most affectionately

Elizabeth Love

NB: I heard from John and Nancy a few days ago them and their familys
was all well John's wife has no child nor no prospect of having any

6
7

Printed below is a May 5, 1848 letter from Elizabeth Barnard Love to this same sister
(Margaret Banard Young).
By 1848 Elizabeth Barnard Love and her husband, Thomas Love, had migrated from Henry
County, West Tennessee to Wright County, Missouri. This letter has also been provided by
Belinda Bettis of Hayesville, North Carolina. The two letters are helpful in proving the names
of the children of Luke Barnard and wife whose name at this time is unknown. Spelling has
been left as in the original letter to the extent possible. Paragraphing and punctuation has been
supplied for readability.

"Wright County, Mo May 5, 1848

Dear Sister

I have once more set down to write you A few lines with painful emotions my dear sister. I
have to communicate to you than in less than one short year we have been deprived by death of
our two oldest children. Robert died last September in Santafee. He turned out volunteer and
was elected first lieu in his captains company. They belonged to the 3 regiment of mounted
men from this state. He was taken sick about the 3rd of July and was never able to set up
another day. He was hauld in a small waggon across the sandy desert between Missouri and
New Mexico to the city of Stantafee where his poor body lies far away from his home.

Oh, sister you may better conceive than I describe my feelings. While I am writing on the
subject the tears allmost blinds me. I can scarcely write legible. We have never learned the
particulars of his sickness nor death.

Patsey was married two years ago to a Mr. Lea from east Tennessee. She died on the 27 of
March past. She left a little daughter five days old. She was perfectly willing to die. She kept
her sences to the last. I weaned my baby and am suckling hers. Its a very pretty healthy child.
She named it her self. She called it Mary Elizabeth.

The rest of our family is all well. I have had 5 children since I saw you 4 daughters and one
son, Dorcas, Diannah, Letitia, Thomas and Ellen. My youngest is about 16 months old.

Margaret was married a year ago. She has a fine daughter about a month old. She married a
Tennsyeean by the name of Burnnett. They live about 15 miles from us. She calls her baby
Martha. We have a good country notwithstanding our misfortune. I am entirely satisfied to live
here. We have a beautiful farm. Mr. Love raised between 3 and 4 thousand bushels of corn last
season, something over 3 hundred bushels wheat and a large crop of oats.

I feel so anxious to hear from you all its renders me very unhappy at times but I am compelled
to think as little as possible about my own connection as it appears they have allmost all
forgotten me. I have not received but two letters from any of my own connection. Since the
death of our poor brother John, I own I have been a little neglectful about writing but I have
written to that country so often and received no answer that I am more excusable.

I do hope you will not fail to write to me as soon as you receive this. Do write all about all your

7
8
own family and all the connection and friends. If old uncle and aunt McElroy is living do
remember me to them. Tell them I hope they have not forgotten me. Tell all our cousins I want
them to write to me and let me know all about their families. Now sister do write as soon as
you receive this letter and let me know all about your family as I don’t know how many
children you have or whether they are all living with you or not.

I received a letter from sister Dillard a few weeks since. It give me a great deal of satisfaction
indeed. She stated she would have wrote before is she had known what P. O. to direct a letter
to. If that is the reason you don’t write I hope you will see from this letter direct to Wright
County, Mo. Hazelwood P. O.

Mr. Love had placed (?) himself that he could arrange his business so that we would have been
able to have went to North Carolina this spring but we have entirely abandoned the idea. I shall
write to Father in a short time. It has been almost three years since I received a line from him. I
don’t know what can be the cause. I do believe I have an adversary in the family. I may be
wrong but I do think I have good reason to believe it but I know that if I have given any cause
to be treated the way I have been I was ignorant of it but I submit to may fate as I know this
world is but a dream. Mr. Love joins me in love to you and Joshua and all the friends.

Elizabeth Love"

The envelope is addressed in handwriting to "Joshua Young, Burnsville, Yancy County, North
Carolina." The return address on the envelope is marked "Hazelwood, Mo. May 9th" and
further marked "fowd from Barnardsville, N. C. June 21st ."
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--

[NI3973] That Peggy Barnard and Sarah Barnard were twin sisters is recorded in the
family data of the late Mary Ritchie Dillard, wife of Zach Dillard

8
9

The following info is provided by Love descendant, Don Collins. The Thomas Love
he refers to is not our General Thomas Love, but they are related. Note the excerpt
from the journal of William Calhoun Love, son of Col. Robert Love, and nephew of
General Thomas Love, from whom I am descended. It is recorded in the text box.
~Harold Cunningham

The Love family was possibly the largest of the mixed-blood families in the Chickasaw
Nation and second only to the Colbert family in service to the Chickasaw Nation.

Thomas Love was my ggggg grandfather. He was a refugee Tory from Virginia who
settled among the Chickasaw in 1782. After his father William Love ("English Bill")
had been killed, Thomas said that he took off through a briarpatch and made his
lifesaving escape.

He led a quiet existance. He was described in July, 1875 as "a person of high esteem". He
assisted in marking the Creek-Chickasaw boundary in 1796. Another countryman, John
McIntosh, appointed him administrator of his estate in 1803. He was still living in 1818
and apparently died about 1830.

Thomas had two wives; his first wife, was Sally Colbert, half breed Chickasaw, daughter
of James Logan Colbert. His second wife was a full-blood Chickasaw woman named
Emahota. Following the Chickasaw tradition of the husband becoming a member of the
wife's family, he became a member of the house of In-cun-no-mar. Thomas fathered eight
sons and five daughters. Descendant Chart -[PDF Format]

Emahota was born in 1791. She sold land in Marshall County, Mississippi on April 8,
1836. She was listed on the 1840 LaFayette County census. She removed to Indian
Territory in November, 1844. The 1847 census lists her as half white, head of household,
consisting of one male over 18 and 2 females over 16. She died at Burneyville on
September 25, 1873.

Sons: Henry, Isaac, Benjamin, Slone, Robert Howard, Samuel, William, and Thomas
Daughters: Delilah (married a Mitchell, then John B. Moore), Betsy(married James
Allen), Sally (married James T. Gaines), Nancy Mahota (married James M. Boyd), and
Lucinda (married Samuel A. Colbert)

By the 1820's, most of the Love family were living in a prosperous farming community
located about six miles southwest of the present town of Holly Springs, MS. In 1826, a
Presbyterian missionary located a station they called Martyn Station near Henry Love's
home which stood at the crossing of two Indian trails near Pigeon Roost Creek. Many of
the family's children attended school there.

Thomas died in 1830. Seven of his sons became Chickasaw leaders, particularly during
and after the removal to Indian Territory. There is a journal excerpt mentioning Henry
and Slone by William Calhoun Love, grandson of Robert Love of Pennsylvania.

9
10
A Resource for Chickasaw Native American History and Genealogy
Contributed by Don Collins <dcollins@execpc.com>

Robert Love, who married three times and supposedly died in PA about 1741. By third
marriage had, among others:

1. Samuel Love who married Dorcas Bell on 3 Sep 1759.


They had the following known children:

1. Robert Love, b. 1760 who married Mary Ann Dillard, dau. of Gen. Thomas
Dillard and Mary Webb who is believed to have been a daughter of John Webb
and his wife who was a Love.
2. James Love, b. 1762, who married Winnesophilia Dillard, another sister.
3. Thomas Love, b. 1766, who married Martha Dillard, Mary's sister.
4. William Love
5. Sarah Love

2. Joseph Love, b. 1728 who married Mary Teas about 1758. Joseph died in Knox Co.,?
Tennessee about 1806 and Mary Teas Love died July 1815 in TN

1. Robert Love
2. William Love, b. 1761, killed by Harp Brothers in Kentucky in Aug 1799;
married Esther Calhoun

Last night I was reading the most interesting journal of William Calhoun Love, a son of
William Love and Esther Calhoun above. Here is a brief quote from his journal which
speaks of your Love ancestor. William C. Love calls him "James", but from looking at
your home page, I gather his name was Thomas. I'm wondering if he could be the
Thomas above (born 1766) who was a son of Samuel Love and Dorcal Bell. In any case
his two sons, Henry and Slone Love, are mention on your page, so it has to be the same
family. Here is the excerpt:

"I bought a few horses and took them by land to Mississippi. Traveled through the Indian
nation called on two of my relations, half breeds by the name of Love, Henry and Slone,
they treated me friendly as other travellers, but did not care to claim kin as the Indians only
claim kin by the Mother's side. I learned that a good many years ago a man by the name of
James Love* and from what I could learn a cousin to my Father was returning home
through the nation and a company of Choctowas came across him, robbed him and took
his horse. He wandered on into the Chickisaws was taken sick and lay sometime and when
he got well he took a young squaw to wife and remained in the Nation. Henry had married
a white woman and his children look as well as common children with the exception of the
one who has an Indian Eye. Slone Love had a full blood Indian to wife and looked very
Indianfied himself."

* NOTE BY HAROLD CUNNINGHAM: The “James Love” in this excerpt is


apparently a reference to the brother of General Thomas Love.

10
11
General Biography Info on General Thomas Love

General Thomas Love, who represented Buncombe County from 1800 to 1808 (the
sessions of the Legislature were then annual) afterwards served from Haywood form
1808 to 1828, perhaps, the longest service of any one man in the State continuously. He
afterwards moved to Macon District of Tennessee; was elected to the Legislature from
that State, and was mad Presiding Officer of the Senate. He was a man of very fine
appearance. More that six feet tall, very popular, and a fine electioneer. Many amusing
stories are told of him, such as carrying garden seeds in his pockets, and distributing
them, always with the assurance that his wife had remembered the voters wife and sent
them with her regards. The old gentlemen was fond of a good toddy, but did no resort to
the mean subterfuge of electioneering with liquor. On one occasion, however, it is said of
him that he signed a pledge of the temperance society which was then very unpopular. So
at his first speaking he found there was a clamor raised against him on that account.
While he would not notice it publicly, he told his friends that he would be glad to have
some hard cider to drink while he was speaking which was procured for him. Some
mischievous boys, however, concluded that they would play a trick on him, and began to
add to a mug of cider a little corn whiskey. It was soon seen that the effects began to
excite the old gentleman. He became animated and eloquent, when kind friends told him
that the boys were pouring whiskey into his cider. The Rubicon was passed, and with
great force, he said he didn't care if it was all whisky.

I have a vivid recollection of the beginning of all his speeches. It was thusly: "Gentlemen
and Fellow-Citizens: I have had the honor of representing you in the lower branch of the
General Assembly of North Carolina for the last two and thirty years, and I have no
doubt. My friends, if I should again be elected, I shall be able to do you abundance of
good, etc." Sufficient to say of this man that he made his mark on society, and retained
the public confidence until he left the State.

The Thomas Love mentioned in Wheeler's History (of N.C.) was a brother of Col.
Robert Love, and not his son. He was several years younger than Robert Love. He was
known as General Thomas Love, and after 1828 removed to Forked Deer, Henry County,
Tennessee; was elected to State Senate and became its Speaker or President. He was far
more distinguished in this State as a public man and politician than Robert Love. His wife
is buried in the Grave Yard of the Methodist Church at Franklin, Macon County, North
Carolina, and a handsome tombstone has been erected to her memory. He was a great
campaigner, and did his most effective work among the women, taking to the first house
on his campaigns a batch of garden or flower seed, telling the mistress that his wife had
sent them with the special request for some of her own; taking what she gave, and
presenting them to the woman of the next house as a gift from his wife, with the same
request for some of hers, and so on around the circuit. He was a man with blue eyes, of a
large and commanding personality, and every influential in the legislatures, not only on
account of his long service there, but because of this great ability as a diplomatist and
manager and leader or men. Col. Allen T. Davidson has told me that he was a "born
leader of men".

11
12
Copied from an article in the Asheville Daily Citizen of 1898, the same
being excerpts from an article by Foster Sondley in the same issue, headed "Asheville's
Centenary" to which reference is hereby made-F.D. Love,

--------o-----------o---------

In speaking of the Court House, he says "On January 23rd, 1807 deeds were made to
the Commissioners, Samuel Murry senr., Thomas Foster, Thomas Love, etc., appointed
by the General Assembly of the State (North Carolina) to purchase or receive by donation
land sufficient for a Public Square in the Town of Asheville in the County of Buncombe
and State aforesaid". This Thomas Love and Thomas Foster were members of the Love
and Alexander families. Thomas Love was the brother of, Robert Love

From the entry of the County Court Records we find in the year 1805 (April) the
following order, towit: "Ordered by the Court, Thomas Love, etc., be appointed
commissioners for the purpose of procuring a public Square, from the lot, or land holders,
in the town of Asheville, most suitable, convenient and interesting to the public, and least
injurious to individuals, that the nature of the case will admit of,"

Robert Love of Haywood County, the father of the large family now there, was a man of
remarkable powers; stood high in the estimation of the public, and died at a good old age.
He has a Revolutionary history which is very frequently mentioned in "Ramsey's Annas
of Tennessee", in his service with John Sevier in their frequent encounters with the
Chickamauga Indians. He was an elector for the State on the Jackson Ticket. He acquired
great wealth, and died respected, leaving a large fortune to his children. He was a brother
of General Thomas Love heretofore mentioned. These two men were certainly far above
the average of men, and did much to plant civilization in the County where they lived,
and would have been men of mark in any community."

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A letter from Mrs. E. L. Connally to me-F.D. Love, #53 Ashby Street, Atlanta, GA
NOTE the reference to Ephraim Love, grandfather of General Thomas Love .

Dear Mr. Love: May 25th, 1903.


I am glad to hear from you again after so long a time. My sister, Miss Sallie E.
Brown, and myself are the persons interesting ourselves about the Love ancestry. I
suppose the clerk of Augusta County, VA, Mr. Harry Burnett, refers to us, as we have
been getting papers from him, as well as from H. Argenbright, a genealogist in Staunton,
VA. You are looking for Love & Bell and we for Love & Teas. Miss Mary Love
Stringfield has some deeds of the Bells-they are not my line. She had some trouble about
the price and a threatened lawsuit. We find it best to get a copy of will or deed for regular
clerk's fee-$2 or $3 each. Argenbright, the genealogist, who owns old papers not
belonging to the State, is very high in the charges. He has sent us papers in regard to our
Teas ancestry. Jos. Love, (brother of Samuel) my g-g-grandfather, married Mary Teas, D.
of Jos. and Jane Teas. They resided in Augusta County, VA in 1741; had three children-
Charles, William and Mary. Joseph Teas was appointed Commissioner of Roads for
Augusta County, VA, May 22nd, 1749. He was also on Committee (in 1741) to build a
Meeting House at Tinkling Springs, and contributed to its support until his death, and his
wife, Jane, contributed to same after his death. Other items about the Teas children: -
Argenbright also says "Joseph Love and Ephraim Love came to Augusta County from
PA, in 1745 as shown by the records of Augusta County Court. The indications are that
Ephraim was the father of Joseph. There was also Samuel and Robert; the latter served
with the Colonial forces of Augusta County. It appears that Ephraim and Joseph Love
came to Augusta County together. I could not learn the name of Ephraim's wife -
mentioned a number of times as Ephraim's wife. Joseph Love left Augusta County in
1776, moved to Montgomery County, Virginia. In 1754 Ephraim Love took the oath
appointed to be taken by act of parliament instead of the oath of allegiance and
supremacy, and subscribed the oath of abjuration and also the test, which on his motion is
ordered to be certified on his Commission to be Captain of a Company of Foot. Ephraim
Love was one of seven captains who tried Capt. Abraham Smith in 1758 for a charge of
cowardice. At a court martial of Enquiry held at Augusta Court House the 10th, day of
May 1758 by the Officers of the Militia of said County on the conduct and behavior of
Capt. Abraham Smith, who was out with part of his Company on South Branch after
Sybert's Fort was burned by the enemy, which inquiry was held on complaint of Edward
Magary, - President, Co. James Buchanan, Col. David Stewart, Maj. John Smith, and
Captains James Lockhart, Israel Christian, Thomas Armstrong, Ephraim Love, M. Syers,
Robert Bratton and Robert Hooke. Will of Jos. teas recorded in Will Book 2, p.143. gave
Mary 400 acres land-this land conveyed to her husband Jos. Love 16th, Aug. 1762-Book
10, page 395. Joseph and Mary afterwards conveyed name to other parties. Jos. Teas
appointed County Surveyor by President of William & Mary College May 22nd, 1749-
order Book 3, page 149. It appears from records order Book 4, page 107 Ephriam Love
was appointed Capt. of Foot on Mach 20th, 1754.
Our effort must be to establish the apparent fact the Ephriam was father of Joseph
and Samuel. Please read again carefully my paper, where I had thought from dates that
this was so or could be so, and please send me any thing you have about the Love family,
besides the names or your own family that were sent in your first letter. You said you had
a great deal about the Alabama and Tennessee Loves. I send you all I had and will gladly
give you the benefit of any deeds or records that my sister and I may get. We are still at

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work on it and so is Argenbright. I trust you have some things that I have not. "On 27th
Feb., 1749 Ephriam Vance sold 200 acres of land in Augusta County, Virginia to Joseph
Love on Goose Creek. Deed witnessed by Frances Beaton, Wm. Dunlap and George
Anderson. 5 Shillings the price. On 19th May 1765 John Cloud and his wife, Margaret;
Nimen Cloud, and his wife, Mary, for 5 shillings sold to Joseph Love 260 acres of land in
Augusta County, VA, in Beverly Manor on a branch of Christian's Creek called Black
Run, lines touching John Henderson, Rutledge, and Armstrong and Samuel Love;
witnessed by John Poage, John Dally and Gilbert Christian. Aug. 15th, 1772 Jane Teas
for 5 shillings sold to Joseph Love 400 acres of land in Augusta County, VA, on the
South River of Shannandoah, in a line with Beverly Manor-witnessed by Wm. Dean and
Samuel Love. May 22nd, 1765 Samuel Love and his wife, Dorcas Love, for 5 shillings
sold to Joseph Love a certain lot of land on Black Run, a branch of Christian's Creek,
being a part of 300 acres sold to Samuel Love by Thomas Black in Beverly Manor.-
Witnessed by John Daily, Wm. Teas and George Francisco. Augusta County, Virginia.
Sincerely,
(Mrs. E.L.) Mary B. Connally,

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Joseph Bell's Will. (Copy)


Joseph Bell was the older brother of Dorcas Bell.
Dorcas Bell was the wife of Samuel Love and the mother of General Thomas Love.
General Thomas love recieved inheritance from his uncle, as noted in this will:

In the name of God. Amen!


I, Joseph Bell, of the County of Augusta, and state of Virginia, being of sound and
disposing mind and memory do make my last Will and Testament in manner following,
towit:
I give my soul to Almighty God who gave it, and my body to the Earth, all my just debts
and funeral expenses to be paid first, etc. Impremises, I give, demise and bequeath to my
Brother, William Bell's two oldest children, James Bell and Elizabeth Bell, two hundred
acres of land on both sides of the South River adjoining the line that William once
owned; the division line to run nearly North and South crossing the South River to the
Patent line, so as to include my two dwelling houses; also one hundred acres of pine land
adjoining Alexander Long's line; also each of them a good feather bed and furniture, and
to be their heirs and assigns forever.
Secondly, I demise to my Nephew, John Gamble's heirs, one hundred acres of land
adjoining the above land, the line to run nearly North and South, crossing the South River
to the Patent line of Beverly Manor; also, one hundred acres of pine land on the South
end of the old tract adjoining Bell line, to them, their heirs and assigns forever.

Thirdly, I demise to my three Nephews, Robert Love, James Love and Thomas Love,
and my two grand Nephews, John Gamble and Robert Gamble, now of the Florida's, and
grand Nephew, James Coleman Pendleton, all the remainder of my land on both sides of
the South River adjoining Alexander's land, including the Green Pond Entry; land in the
state of Ohio, or elsewhere that I may have at my deceased, to be equally divided among
them six demises, and to be theirs, their heirs or assigns forever.
I give to my grand niece, Rebecca Gamble, daughter of John Gamble, deceased, fifty
dollars. To Sarah Bell McCamble, also to Sarah McCune and Esther Linn each of them
fifty dollars, and Miss Catherine Brown fifty dollars for the attention paid to my sister,
Sarah Bell in her last illness.
These Legacies to be paid out of my moneys or bonds that I may have in the House, I
leave to James R. Love, my grand nephew, my best suit of clothes, two shirts, and my
silver shoe buckles.
All the remainder of my personal estate of every description, cows, household and
kitchen furniture, and farming utensils, shall be sold by my executors, and the money
arising from the sale, one-half to go to the heirs of my sister, Nancy Gamble, the other
half to the heirs of my sister, Dorcas Love, and to them, their heirs and assigns forever.
I allow the Brown families that are tenants on the land to occupy and work the same
fields that they now do for the term of two years after my decease, and to pay the same
rent in grain and hay that they now do to my executors. Old Mrs. Brown and her three
children that now live with her to have the use of my two dwelling houses, orchard and
garden, until Bells come in from Tennessee. In case it should happen that none of the
heirs incline to come and live on the land, after the two years expire, then my executors
may either sell or rent the land as they may think most advisable for the benefit of the
heirs, and in case of sale the money to be paid to each claimant, etc. etc.

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And I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint William Gamble, my two grand
nephews, and Dr. Robert Gamble, (both Gambles are his nephews-F.D. Love), and my
worthy friend, William Davis Sen. Esqr., Executors of this, my last Will and Testament
revoking all others.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this nineteenth
day of August in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty three.

Test Joseph Bell (Seal)


Jacob Vanlear
John S. Black,
Washington M. Austin,
Samuel Black Jr.,

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Miscellaneous References

Ref: Unicoi County Tennessee: Colonel Robert Love was a revolutionary soldier, from
Virginia, and in his old age drew a pension as such. He was born near Tinkling Spring
Meeting House, Augusta County, Virginia, 11 May 1760. His father was Samuel Love,
son of Ephraim Love, Captain. Of the Colonial Horse, and his mother was Dorcas Bell,
second daughter of James Bell, to whom had been issued a Commission of the Peace in
1745.
_______________________________________________________________

Thomas Love, a member of the House of Commons in that State from 1797-1808 (See
Wheeler History of N.C. pages 53-54)
Haywood County was formed in 1808 from Buncombe County N.C., and named for
Judge John Haywood, State Treasurer, 1787-1827. Thomas Love continued in the House
of Commons as a representative from Haywood County until 1813, and again from 1814-
1815. For four consecutive years 1817-18-19-20. He was succeeded by his nephew,
James Robert Love -1821-1830. Thomas Love elected to the Senate 1823-1829.

Thomas Love was in the Senate from Haywood County in 1823 to 1828 continuously.
That Thomas Love was in the House of Commons from Buncombe County in 1800 to
1808 continuously and from Haywood from 1809 to 1811 continuously, and again from
1814 to 1820 continuously.

History of First Baptist Church, Waynesville, NC.

On December 23, 1808 a bill was passed which created Haywood County from the western part of
Buncombe County; this bill was introduced by General Thomas Love (the then Buncombe
representative). In 1809 the name of the new county seat was changed to Waynesville, honoring
General Anthony Wayne, under whom Robert Love served in the American Revolution. Haywood
County and its new county seat grew slowly. The census of 1810 was 2780 families. Waynesville
was the only town in the county and was not incorporated until 1871. Before the creation of
Haywood County, Baptists in the area had already begun to establish churches. In 1803 the Locust
Old Field Baptist Church was organized and served Haywood County and the western part of
Buncombe County for eleven years. As population increased and travel became more difficult
(especially during the winters), members of Locust Old Field asked for letters of dismissal to form
churches near their homes. One of these new churches was the First Baptist Church in
Waynesville. The date was August 1, 1823. Twenty-seven persons came together to establish a
church in Waynesville. Three persons, all ordained ministers, examined these twenty-seven as to
soundness of faith and orthodoxy. Sanction was then given for the constitution of a new church.

_______________________________________________________________________

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History of Western North Carolina - Chapter 1-2

COMMISSIONERS APPOINTED IN 1814. Pursuant to the above provisional


articles of agreement North Carolina in 1814 appointed General Thomas
Love, General Montfort Stokes and Col. John Patton commissioners to
meetother commissioners from South Carolina to run and mark the
boundary line between the two States in accordance with the
recommendation of the commissioners who had met and agreed, "at
McKinney's, on Toxaway river, on the 4th of September, 1813." (Rev.
Stat. 1837, Vol. ii, p. 87).

History of Western North Carolina - Chapter 8-A


CHAPTER VIII.
COUNTY HISTORY

HAYWOOD COUNTY.(17) "In the legislature of 1808, General Thomas Love,


whose home was near where the 'Brown' house now stands back of the
McAfee cottage in Waynesville, and who was that year representative
from Buncombe county in the General Assembly, introduced a bill having
forits purpose to organize a county out of that portion of Buncombe
west of its present western and southwestern boundary and extending to
the Tennessee line, including all the territory in the present counties
of Haywood, Macon, Jackson, Swain, Graham, Clay, and Cherokee. The bill
met with favor, was passed, ratified and became a law December 23,
1808.

"On Richland creek, about the year 1800, the neucleus of a village had
been formed on the beautiful ridge between its limpid waters and those
of Raccoon creek. The ride is less than a mile wide and attracted
settlers on account of the picturesque mountains on either side and the
delightfulness of the climate. At that early time a considerable
population was already there. Several men, who were well known in the
State and who afterwards became prominent in public affairs, had built
homes upon that nature favored spot and were living there. Such men as
General Thomas Love, Colonel Robert Love, Colonel William Allen, John
Welch, and others of Revolutionary fame were leaders in that community.
Without changing his residence General Thomas Love was a member of the
State Legislature, with two or three years intermission, from 1797 to
1828, for nine years as a member from Buncombe county and the remainder
of the time from Haywood. Most of the time he was in the House of
Commons but for six years he was also in the Senate. Colonel Robert
Love served three years in the senate from Buncombe county, from 1793
to 1795. William Allen and John Welch were veterans of the Revolution
and men of considerable influence in that
community.

"As already stated that law was ratified on December 23, 1808, but it
did not become operative until early in the year 1809. On the fourth
Monday in March of that year the justices of the peace in the territory
defined by the act erecting the county met at Mount Prospect in the
first court of pleas and quarter sessions ever held in the limits of
Haywood county. The following justices were present at that meeting:
Thomas Love, John Fergus, John Dobson, Robert Phillips, Abraham Eaton,
Hugh Davidson, Holliman Battle, John McFarland, Phillip T. Burfoot,
William Deaver, Archibald McHenry, and Benjamin Odell.

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"One of the first things the court thus constituted did was to elect
officers for the new county. There were several candidates for the
different positions, but after several ballots were taken the following
were declared duly elected: Clerk of the court, Robert Love; Sheriff,
William Allen; register of deeds, Phillip T. Burfoot; constable of the
county, Samuel Hollingsworth; entry taker, Thomas St. Clair; treasurer,
Robert Phillips; stray master, Adam Killian; comptroller, Abraham
Eaton; coroner, Nathan Thompson; solicitor, Archibald Ruffin; standard
keeper, David McFarland.

"Thus officered the county of Haywood began its career. The officers
entered at once upon their respective duties, and the county became a
reality. The first entry in the register's book bears date of March
29th, 1809, signed by Philip T. Burfoot, and the first in the clerk's
book is the same date by Robert Love.

"Until the court house and jail could be built the county officials met
at private residences at Mount Prospect and prisoners were carried to
jail in Asheville. Such proceedings were inconvenient and the
commissioners appointed by the legislature, therefore, made haste to
locate and erect the public buildings. It was expected that they would
be ready to make their report to the court of pleas and quarter
sessions as to the location of the county seat at the March session.
Instead, however, they asked at that session to be indulged until the
June term, and that request was
granted.

"On Monday, June 26, 1809, the court met at the home of John Howell.
The old record names the following justices as being present: Thomas
Love, Philip Burfoot, Hugh Davidson, John McFarland, Abraham Eaton,
John Dobson, William Deaver, Archibald McHenry, and John Fergus. At
this meeting the commissioners named in the act of the legislature
erecting the county made their report, in which they declared that it
was unanimously agreed to locate the public buildings somewhere on the
ridge between Richland and Raccoon creeks at or near the point then
called Mount Prospect. As the commissioners were clothed with full
power to act, it required no vote of the justices, but it is more than
probable that the report was cheerfully endorsed by a majority of the
justices present.

"At this June term of the court, the first for the trial of causes, the
following composed the grand jury: John Welch foreman, William Welch,
John Fullbright, John Robinson, Edward Sharteer, Isaac Wilkins, Elijah
Deaver, David McFarland, William Burns, Joseph Chambers, Thomas St.
Clair, John Shook, William Cathey, Jacob Shock, and John St. Clair. The
following grand jurors for the next term of the Superior court that was
to be held in Asheville in September: Holliman Battle, Hugh Davidson,
Abraham Eaton, Thomas Lenoir, William Deaver, John McFarland, John
McClure, Felix Walker, Jacob McFarland, Robert Love, Edward Hyatt and
Daniel Fleming. This was done because of the fact that no Superior
court was held in Haywood for several years after the formation of the
county; but all cases that were appealed from the court of pleas and
quarter sessions came up by law in the Superior court of Buncombe
county at Asheville. For this court Haywood county was bound by law to
send to Asheville six grand jurors and as many more as desired.

"At the June term inspectors of election, that was to take place in

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August, were also selected. There were then two voting precincts, and
this election was the first ever held in the county. For the precinct
of Mount Prospect the following inspectors were appointed: George
Cathey, William Deaver, John Fergus, and Hugh Davidson. For the
precinct of Soco, Benjamin Parks, Robert Reed, and Robert Turner were
appointed.

"In the location of the public buildings at Mount Prospect, there was
laid the foundation of the present little city of Waynesville.
radition says and truthfully, no doubt, that the name was suggested by
Colonel Robert Love in honor of General Anthony Wayne, under whom
Colonel Love served in the Revolutionary War. The name suited the
community and people, and the village soon came to be known by it. In
the record of the court of pleas and quarter sessions the name of
Waynesville occurs first in 1811.

"Some unexpected condition prevented the immediate erection of the


public buildings. The plans were all laid in 1809, but sufficient money
from taxation as provided for in the act establishing the county had
not been secured by the end of that year. It was, therefore, late in
the year 1811 before sufficient funds were in hand to begin the
erection of the courthouse. During the year 1812 the work began and was
completed by the end of the year. Mark Colman is said to have been the
first man to dig up a stump in laying the foundation for that building.
On December 21, 1812, the first court was held in this first court
house."

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This is an extract from “Western North Carolina, A History From 1730 to 1913” by
John Preston Arthur, published in 1914 by the Edward Buncombe Chapter of the
Daughters of the American Revolution, of Asheville, NC. The book was given to me
as a gift by Mr. Archer Blevins of The Overmountain Press, Johnson City, TN. In
chapter VII, “Grants and Litigations”. pages 133-134, the following entries should
settle the question of how large George Jr. Silver’s land grant was from his
Revolutionary War service.

OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE CONTINENTAL LINE. In 1782 (ch. 173),


each soldier and officer of the Continental line, then in service and who continued to the
end of the war; or who had been disabled in the service and subsequently all who had
served two years honorably and had not re-enlisted or had been dropped on reducing the
forces, were given lands as follows:

Privates 640 acres each; Non-commissioned officers 1000 acres each; Subalterns 2560
acres each; Captains 3840 acres each; Majors 4800 acres each; Lieut.-Colonels 7200
acres each; Lieut.-Colonel Commanders 7200 each; Colonels 7200 each; Brigadiers
12000 each; Chaplains 7200 each; Surgeons 4800 each; and Surgeons Mates 2560 each.
Three commissioners and a guard of 100 men were authorized to lay off these lands
without expense to the soldiers.

LAND FOR SOLDIERS OF THE CONTINENTAL LINE. In 1783 (ch. 186), the
following land was reserved for the soldiers and officers of the Continental Line for three
years: Beginning on the Virginia line where Cumberland river intersects the same; thence
south fifty five miles; thence west to the Tennessee river; thence down the Tennessee
river to the Virginia line; thence with the Virginia east to the beginning. This was a
lordly domain, embracing Nashville and the Duck river country which was largely settled
up by people from Buncombe County, including some of the Davidsons and General
Thomas Love, who moved there about 1830. For it will be remembered in the act of
cession of the Tennessee territory it was expressly provided that in the case the lands laid
off for “the officers and soldiers of the Continental Line” shall not “contain a sufficient
quantity of lands for cultivation to make good the quota intended by law for each, such
officer or soldier who shall fall short of his proportion shall make up the deficiency out of
the lands of the ceded territory.” But, while preference was given to soldiers in these
lands, they were not restricted to them, but could enter and get grants for any other land
that was open for such purposes.

Provided that George Jr. did not purchase additional land, which sold for about 5 to 10
cents per acre, we can assume that his total acreage was 640 acres, quite a sizable farm in
that day.

James D. “John” Silver

Dover, DE 19901-5723

19 June 1997

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LOVE'S IN AMERICA

Several Loves appeared early in the history of America. The first mention of a Love was
that of John Love in Boston in 1635, and then a Richard Love in Virginia in 1642,
although no records exist which tie these Loves to our family history.

Records also tell of one Ephraim Love who emigrated from the Ulster area of Ireland
about 1740 and after living in Pennsylvania, settled in Orange County (later Augusta
County), Virginia. There he was a Captain in the militia (Captain of Foot and Horse), and
was prominent in affairs of the community. Some researchers claim he is the father of
Samuel6 Love, who begins our Love ancestry, and his brother Joseph. Other researchers
claim that is not necessarily so and believe that our Love line may have originated from
an even earlier immigrant to the New World.

Although it cannot be said with any certainty that Ephraim was the father of Samuel and
his brother, Joseph, it is generally accepted by researchers that Samuel and Joseph were
born in America and were of Ulster Scot ancestry.

Samuel Love and Dorcas (Bell) Love on May 22nd, 1766, conveyed to Joseph Love,
Samuel's brother, (44 acres, part of) 300 acres on Black Run of Christian's Creek in
Augusta County. Joseph already owned land adjoining this. On Feb 6th 1775, Samuel
Love and Rachel, his wife, conveyed, by deed, to John Jasper, 265 acres in Augusta
County, Joseph being a witness the execution of the deed. Later, and on the same date,
appears that Rachel, Samuel's wife, was privily examined before Thomas Douglass, et al,
in North Carolina. This was about the time that Samuel was in what is now Hawkins
County, Tennessee, then Carter's Valley in North Carolina. Joseph left Augusta County in
1775, and settled in what was afterwards Montgomery County, then Fincastle County,
Virginia. After Samuel left Augusta County and located in Fincastle, later Montgomery
County, he married this Rachel, whose maiden name is unknown, and by whom it is not
recorded or known that he had any children. What became of this Rachel is also
unknown. This second marriage will, perhaps, be news to many of his present
descendants, although the writer has a very indistinct recollection of having heard
something of the kind many years ago. Dorcas (Bell) Love, wife of Samuel, died before
he left Augusta County, and William, the youngest child, was taken into the family of the
Bells, "South River Bells", and reared. These Bells lived on South Shenandoah, not far
from Tinkling Spring Meeting House, and about 10 or 12 miles (east) from Staunton.
SOURCE: "Loves of the Valley of Virginia", 1930, by Franklin D. Love.

Both Samuel and Joseph Love were in Montgomery County as late as 1782. That year
Samuel died, and his son, Robert, then twenty-two years old, on June 4th 1782, appeared
before the County Court of Montgomery County, made bond and qualified as guardian of
Samuel's children: James, Thomas, Sarah and Mary, William being with the Bells.
Beginning with the early part 1776, at the age of sixteen down to and including 1782,
Robert Love, son of Samuel. Was a volunteer soldier in the Revolutionary Was, and, as
he states, each time enlisting from Montgomery County, Virginia. In the winter of 1775,
and spring of 1776, Samuel and his sons, Robert, James and Thomas, left Montgomery
County with the intention of exploring the country southwest, and finding some desirable
lands upon which to locate and settle. They settled and planted crops (corn) that Spring at

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the forks of the Holston, in Carter's Valley, near (Long Island and ) Fort Patrick Henry, in
what is now Hawkins (Sullivan) County, Tennessee. They were driven out shortly by the
Indians, who raided the settlement, and inflicted injuries to some of the settlers: they later
returned and again were driven out by the Indians. This time they returned to their farm
in Montgomery County, now Wythe County, and remained, and there Samuel died. On
May 8th 1782, Joseph Love, brother of Samuel, with others appeared in open court of
Montgomery County, and asked for reimbursement for provisions and equipment
furnished himself while on duty in North Carolina to Join Greene (Gen. Nathaniel
Greene), which was allowed upon the proof offered the court. On the 15th Nov. 1799,
Joseph Love, now of Wythe County, gave a bill of sale to Robert Sayers to a negro man.
This is the last record of Joseph Love, brother of Samuel, in Virginia. SOURCE: "Loves
of the Valley of Virginia", 1930, by Franklin D. Love.

Samuel Love (ca 1739 Ireland - 1781 Virginia USA): Samuel married Dorcas Bell (ca
1740 Virginia - 1774 Virginia), daughter of James "South River" Bell, in 1759 and
shortly after purchased 300 acres on Christian’s Creek, near Tinkling Springs, Virginia.
Then, in 1774-5, Samuel and his brother Joseph relocated their families to a plantation in
Wythe County, Virginia. It is believed Dorcas died shortly before this relocation.

Later Samuel made two attempts (1775-1777) to relocate his family to Carter’s Valley,
Tennessee, but fled both times because of Indian attacks. He returned with his family to
his home in Virginia, where he died in 1781.

Samuel and Dorcas had seven children, including Robert and Thomas, both of who were
prominent in the early history of Waynesville, North Carolina.

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The Thomas C. Love House


Son of Thomas B. Love
Grandson of General Thomas Love

A "massive body of plain folk who were neither rich nor poor," is the way Frank L.
Owsley characterized an important segment of southern society in his influential book,
Plain Folk of the Old South (1949). These "plain folk" engaged in semi- subsistence open
range agriculture with a few of the more adventurous pursuing commercial farming. If
some of the plain folk owned slaves, the numbers were never large.

A high level of plain folk achievement in a region where most people accumulated little
wealth is found in Webster County (Missouri), in the accomplishments of the Love
family. Missouri historian James Denny recounted the Love history when he successfully
nominated the fine Col.Thomas C. Love house to the National Register of Historic
Places.

Although not stylistically a southern house, the Thomas C. Love house is still the
expression of a distinctively southern success story that took shape over three
generations. The Love's lifestyle and achievements, while typical of those of the better
class of Southern plain folk throughout the upper South, were distinctive within the
southwest Missouri region to which they brought their southern folkways. Upon a
moderately fertile upland section of the Ozarks highland, the Loves established an
outpost of southern culture.

Thomas B. Love, the father of Thomas C., came to the Ozarks from Tennessee in 1842.
Middle aged and prosperous, he moved his family to Hazelwood Township, a mile east of
Mountain Dale in Webster County. This locale was a major settlement enclave for
transplanted Tennesseeans. The Loves located on 600 acres among neighbors who were
typically slaveless semi-subsistence farmers with modest [and holdings and valuations.
By 1850 few farms in the area had the affluence of the Loves -- 225 improved acres, two
dozen each of oxen and horses, four dozen mules, large numbers of other stock,
substantial agriculture products -- and some twenty slaves.

[16]

The booming 1850s bolstered the Loves' fortunes. The regional market, Springfield, only
thirty five miles away, was visited often. Following Thomas B.'s death in 1852, his
widow, Elizabeth, continued to direct the management of the farm. By 1860 the improved
acreage had doubled, the farm valuation had tripled to over $9,300, and their livestock
was valued at almost $15,000. The Love farm was clearly the largest and most affluent in
Hazelwood township and one of the largest in Webster county.

Honor and valor in military service has consistently been admired by southerners. Three
generations of Love men actively sought military experience in national conflicts -- the

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Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Civil War. Grandfather
General Thomas Love, the father of Thomas B., emigrated from Ireland to North
Carolina and became a Colonel in the American Revolution and, later, a general in the
Tennessee state militia. The General's eldest son was a colonel in the War of 1812, and a
grandson became a lieutenant in the Mexican War. Thomas C. Love and his brother
Joseph both joined the Confederacy in defense of their southern homeland.

The defeat of the Confederacy did not stem Thomas C. Love's passion for support of the
old southern order. He actively sought monies to improve the Confederate cemetery in
Springfield; served as camp commander in his chapter of the United Confederate
Veterans; and was elected brigadier-general of the Western Brigade, Missouri Division of
Mounted Confederate Veterans.

The Loves' status as veterans improved their opportunities to serve in local and regional
political offices in the nineteenth century. The family possessed as a totem a lock of
Andrew Jackson's hair, and championed Jacksonian democracy both in Tennessee and in
Missouri. General Thomas Love had spent thirty consecutive years in the Tennessee
Legislature, including terms as speaker of the house. In the Ozarks, grandson Thomas C.
served as Webster County sheriff, circuit clerk and recorder, and, in 1882, was elected
state representative. Later, after he moved to Springfield, he received political
appointments as deputy collector of internal revenue and as postmaster.

In 1848, when Thomas C. was four years old, his father drafted a will that insured the
young son would some day be the master of Love Ridge Farm. Most property was placed
under the stewardship of Thomas B.'s wife Elizabeth until Thomas C. could come of age.
Following the Civil War, young Thomas C. spent three years in Texas raising cotton, and,
while there, married the daughter of another (exiled) southern Missouri family. Elizabeth
Love died about 1869, and Thomas C. returned to inherit the Webster County farm and
build a new house for his bride. Tradition relates that freed slaves, who stayed with the
Loves following the war, provided much of the labor for the expensive new $4,000
house, which was completed in 1869.

Two story brick houses were not common in mid-nineteenth century southwest Missouri.
Thomas C. Love chose to build the first consciously stylistic house in Webster County, in
a vernacular version of the Italiante style. In the national context, the Love house may not
have been in the cultural vanguard, but within its region it was a symbol of innovation
and progress.

The house included spare decoration, but has graceful Victorian bracketing, elongated
windows with segmental arched heads, interior door and window architraves of built-up
half-round moldings, and a straight run main stairs with an octagonal newel post -- all
signs of national fashion. Love Ridge House stood in a very real sense as a latter day "big
house" in an unlikely place -- Webster County in the rural Ozarks.

By 1870, at age 26, Thomas C. had consolidated his inheritance into a solid diversified
farm. His 250 improved acres in a township that averaged thirty acres, and his valuation
of $10,000 where the average was less than $900 indicate that the Loves had not suffered
crippling losses during the war. During the next decade he added a sizable orchard to his

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crop and livestock operation. By the 1890s he had turned his entire farm into an apple
orchard.

Thomas C. served in the legislature in the 1880s and moved his family to Springfield. His
five children all became successful in their professions --medicine, veterinary medicine,
law, banking, and manufacturing. In 1899 Thomas returned to the farm for a dozen years
before moving back to Springfield to live out the rest of his life. In the 1920s Love Ridge
Farm passed into another ownership, and became known as the Vollenweider Fruit Farm.

For over seventy years Love Ridge Farm provided another example of that great
middling class of southerners, the plain folk, who migrated westward, creating landscapes
and founding families upon receding frontiers --frontiers that by the twentieth century
were no more.

The Colonel Thomas Love house, Webster County, Missouri, 1869. A fine vernacular
house for the time and place, it well expressed the progressive tastes of its owner. It was
reputedly the first brick house in the county, and not unlikely the most innovative design:
asymmetrical facade and plan, decorative jig-sawn eve brackets, and segmental arches
over doors and windows, all somewhat in the fashionable Italianate Style. Yet it was
conservative of tradition, too. The gable cornice returns, transom and side lights at the
doors, and "carpenter classic" porch columns bespeak connection with the Georgian and
Greek Revival Styles, by 1869 old fashioned in the centers of fashion, but still current in
the Ozarks.

Lynn Morrow is a public historian who lives in Taney County, and is Consulting Editor
for OzarksWatch.

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Jonathan Fairbanks and Clyde Edwin Tuck

Past and Present of Greene County, Missouri

Early and Recent History and Genealogical Records


of Many of the Representative Citizens

COL. THOMAS CALVIN LOVE. (Grandson of General Thomas Love) A cheerful


and hopeful disposition is a trait of character much to be admired, much to be desired,
and one that with most men needs to be cultivated and enlarged. It is absolutely necessary
to success in any pursuit in life for man to be hopeful and resourceful. He must not only
believe that "all things work together for good," but also have confidence in himself, that
he has the ability to bring things to pass. It is easy to be good and cheerful when
everything is, running smoothly, when everything seems to be prosperous, when a man is
flourishing and spreading himself like a green bay tree. How easy it is then to appear
cheerful and happy, but it is often quite another story when the day of adversity comes,
the hour of difficulty, failure and disappointed hopes. A man who has endeavored to
remain cheerful, optimistic and courageous in both sunshine and storm as he has
traversed the winding path of life during his three score and ten years is Thomas. Calvin
Love, during his active life a gallant soldier, successful farmer and stock raiser and
faithful public servant now living retired in Springfield.

Mr. Love has descended from a fine ancestry of military men and people of the right
quality. He was born in what is now Webster county, Missouri, near the town of
Seymour, May 17, 1844, and is a son of Thomas Bell and Elizabeth (Barnard) Love. The
father was born in Hayward county, North Carolina, on December 27, 1798, and was a
son of Gen. Thomas and Martha (Dillard) Love. The mother was born September 27,
1774. Gen. Thomas Love, born November 16, 1776, was a native of Ireland from which
country he emigrated to America when a young man and located in North Carolina, and
while living there the Revolutionary war began. He unhesitatingly joined in the struggle
of the colonists for independence. He was a brave and efficient soldier and for
meritorious conduct was promoted until he received a colonel's commission and was
given command of a North part of the Carolina regiment. After the war he moved to what
is now a part of the state of Tennessee, where he became an officer of the state of
Franklin, which was created by an act of the Legislature of the state of North Carolina,
and later repealed and made Tennessee. But the governor of the former state refused to
obey the ruling of the Legislature of North Carolina, and Gen. Thomas Love, then a
general of militia, commanded the troops that captured the obstinate governor of
Franklin. General Love served thirty consecutive years in the Legislature of Tennessee.
He was speaker of the house during a number of terms. He was during that long period
one of the best known and most influential men of Tennessee, and was admired as an
army officer a statesman and broad-minded citizen. Perhaps no man did more for the
early development of the state in general than he. His long life was spent f or the most
part in the service f or others, and he passed away at an advanced age about the year that

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the subject of this sketch was born. He married a Miss Dillard in Tennessee, and to them
nine children were born. His eldest son Robert, born December 31, 1789, was a colonel
during the war of 1812 and fought under Gen. Andrew Jackson at the great battle of New
Orleans. Thomas B. Love, father of our subject, grew up on the General's plantation in
Tennessee and there received such educational advantages as the early-day schools
afforded, and he remained in his native state until 1842, when he came to what is now
Webster county, Missouri, where he entered six hundred acres of land from the
government, which he cleared, improved and on which he established the permanent
home of the family, and this land was retained by his children until 1910, when it was
sold by our subject. When he was a lad, Thomas B. Love went with a party to assist in
provisioning General Jackson's troops on their march back from New Orleans after the
close of the war of 1812, and Robert Love, who was a colonel in that army, gave his
sword to his younger brother, Thomas B. This highly prized heirloom was stolen from the
Love home during the Civil war. Mr. Love did not live to enjoy his new home in the
Ozarks long—ten years—dying in 1852. Politically, he was a Democrat and while he was
active in party affairs would never accept public office. He owned a lock of General
Jackson's hair, which his son, our subject, has sent back to Tennessee, to form a part of
the collection of the Historical Society, of that state. Thomas B. Love was an extensive
farmer and he owned about twenty-five slaves at the time of his death. He always saw
that they had comfortable quarters, were well cared for and was considerate of their every
welfare. His wife, Elizabeth Barnard, was born in Buncombe county, North Carolina in
the year 1800. To these parents nine children were born. Their oldest son died of measles
while on the march to Mexico with the army back in the forties, he having been first
lieutenant in a company organized in Springfield, Missouri. The mother was left with a
family of small children, which she reared in comfort and respectability. She reached the
age of sixty-nine years, dying in 1869.

Thomas C. Love, of this review, grew to manhood on the home farm in Webster county
and there received a very meager education in the district schools, but he was preparing
to enter college at Columbia, Missouri, when the Civil war began and interfered with his
plans. He at once cast his services with the Confederacy, enlisting in July, 1862, in
Company F, Third Missouri Cavalry, under General Marmaduke. He was in Arkansas
during the early part of the war, and before his enlistment was captured by the Federals
and held in jail at Batesville, that state, for five weeks. He proved to be a faithful and
brave soldier and saw considerable hard service. On September 10, 1863, while in an
engagement near Little Rock, Arkansas, he was shot through the lung and he still carries
the bullet in his body. While in the hospital from this wound he was captured by the
enemy, but later exchanged and rejoined his command at Camden, that state. He was in
engagements at Poison Springs, Jenkins' Ferry, Leg Village, Pine Bluff, all in Arkansas,
and the Big Blue in Missouri, and was on the retreat with General Marmaduke when, the
latter was captured, but our subject escaped by swimming Mines creek in Kansas, and
rejoined his regiment and after a few skirmishes, surrendered with the entire army of the
Trans-Mississippi department, at Shreveport, Louisiana, June 8, 1865.

After his discharge from the army Mr. Love went to Texas, where he rented a plantation
and devoted his attention to raising cotton for three years, returning to his home in
Webster county, Missouri, in 1869, and began farming on the home place, carrying on
general farming and stock raising, in fact, traded extensively in live stock, and prospered

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with advancing years until he became one of the leading farmers of that county. He
continued general farming and dealing in live stock until 1892, when he turned his farm
into an apple orchard which was fairly successful. He moved to Springfield in 1883 in
order to give his children proper educational advantages, but in 1899 moved back to the
farm and lived there twelve years, then sold out and returned to Springfield, purchased a
good home in which he now lives retired.

Politically, Mr. Love is a Democrat and had been a leader in his party in his earlier years,
and he served as representative from Webster county in the state Legislature from 1882 to
1884, in a manner that was highly creditable to himself and to the satisfaction of his
constituents. Among the notable things which he did while in that office was his
assistance in securing the passing of a bill appropriating twelve thousand and five
hundred dollars to rebuild the court house and jail at Marshfield, which were destroyed
by the cyclone of 1880. From 1885 to 1899 he was deputy collector of internal revenue in
Springfield, giving the government satisfaction in every respect. In 1893 he was
appointed postmaster at Springfield, and served four years with his usual fidelity to duty,
which elicited the hearty commendation of the people and the post office department at
Washington.

Mr. Love in his fraternal relations is a member of the Masonic order and the Grange,
being for some time quite active in the work of the latter. He is a member of Campbell
Camp No. 488, United Confederate Veterans. He is active in the affairs of the same and
has been commander of the local camp twice, being the only man ever re-elected to the
place, and on September 17, 1914, Mr. Love was elected brigadier-general of the
Western Brigade, Missouri Division of Mounted Confederate Veterans.

Mr. Love was married, November 5, 1865, to Sallie J. Rogers, who was born in Texas
county, Missouri, November 26, 1846. Her people were refugees to Texas during the
Civil war. The death of Mrs. Love occurred May 20, 1912, at Mt. Pleasant, Texas, but
was brought to Springfield, where he rests in the beautiful Maple Park cemetery. She was
a faithful life companion, devoted to her home and family and was beloved by her many
friends for her numerous excellent traits of character.

Seven children, all sons, were born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Love, five of whom are
living at this writing, namely: Dr. Joseph W. Love, a specialist of the eye, ear, nose and
throat, of Springfield, was for some time in the medical department of the United States
army in the Philippine islands; Dr. Robert B. of Springfield, is one of the leading
veterinary physicians of southern Missouri; Thomas B. is a prominent attorney of Dallas,
Texas; Ralph M. is a successful banker at Mt. Pleasant, Texas; Edgar P. has built up a
large business as a manufacturer in Dallas, Texas.

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ROBERT B. LOVE, D. V. S. Greene county has never had a more efficient, progressive
and popular veterinary physician and surgeon than Dr. Robert B. Love, a man of
statewide reputation, who seemed to have a natural aptitude and liking for this calling
when a mere boy, and from that time to the present he has left no stone unturned whereby
he could advance himself in the same, remaining a close student of everything pertaining
to this science, observing, investigating and experimenting. His counsel has been
frequently sought by his professional brethren and invariably followed with gratifying
results, his advice in any phase of the profession being accepted as unqualified authority.
His modernly equipped hospital in Springfield is known to all horsemen in southwest
Missouri and he has built up an extensive and lucrative patronage during his long years of
residence here. An admirer and expert judge of horses of superior breed he always keeps
a number of animals, owning three stallions at this writing which have few peers in the
country.

Dr. Love was born in Webster county, Missouri, February 5, 1873. He is a scion of a
sterling ancestry, some of the Loves having been distinguished military men in the early
wars of the nation and influential citizens of Virginia and Tennessee. He is a son of
Thomas C. and Sallie Jane (Rodgers) Love. The father is a retired resident of Springfield,
having been a successful farmer in Webster county during the active years of his life, and
in that county his birth occurred in 1844, soon after his parents, Thomas B. and Elizabeth
(Barnard) Love settled there, having emigrated from Tennessee Thomas B. Love was
born in North Carolina and was a son of Gen. Thomas Love, who was a native of Ireland,
from which country he emigrated to the United States in old Colonial days and he
became a soldier in the Revolutionary war, finally become coroner of a North Carolina
regiment. Later he moved into Tennessee and became a general of Militia and a great
man there, serving thirty years consecutively in the state legislature. His oldest son,
Robert, was a colonel in the War of 1812 and fought under Jackson at New Orleans. The
family has always been lovers of liberty and have unhesitatingly taken an active part in
the wars in which this country has been involved at various times. Thomas B. Love,
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, entered six hundred acres of land upon his
arrival in Webster county, and this he cleared and developed and thereon established the
permanent home of the family. His son, Thomas C. Love, father of our subject, became
owner of the homestead, which he retained up to a few years ago, when he sold it, retiring
from active life as a farmer and moving to Springfield, as before indicated. Thomas B.
Love owned about two dozen slaves at the time of his death, which occurred in 1852,
after a residence of only a decade in the Ozarks. He was a man of humanitarian impulses
and was also very considerate in his treatment of his slaves. His family consisted of nine
children. The oldest son joined a company for the Mexican war, became a first lieutenant,
but died on the march to Mexico. The widow of Thomas B. Love died in 1869. Thomas
C. Love, mentioned above, grew to manhood on the home farm in Webster county, and
when the Civil war came on he enlisted in the Confederate army, a Missouri cavalry
regiment, under General Marmaduke and proved to be a gallant soldier. He still carries a
pistol ball received in a battle in Arkansas. He was also in prison on two different
occasions for some time. When his brigade was defeated in battle at Mines Creek,
Kansas, where General Marmaduke and Cabell and a large number of the men were
captured, he made a sensational escape by swimming a dangerous stream, and later
joined a reorganized body of the same troops in Texas and served until the close of the
war, surrendering at Shreveport, Louisiana, in June, 1865. After the war he devoted three

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years to the management of a plantation in Texas, raising cotton, then returned to
Webster county, Missouri, and carried on general farming and live stock raising until
1892, when he turned his farm into an apple orchard. He first moved to Springfield in
1883 to educate his children, moving back to the farm in 1899, and in 1911 again took up
his residence in the Queen City. He was formerly active in the Democratic party and
served one term in the state legislature in 1882. In 1893 he was appointed postmaster at
Springfield, which office he held four years.

The mother of Dr. Robert B. Love was a daughter of R. W. Rodgers and wife, of Texas
county, Missouri. This family is of Scotch-Irish descent and became known in the New
World at an early day. The grandfather of Mrs. Love took up his residence in Texas
county long before the opening of the Civil war and became an extensive lumberman and
well known to the early pioneers of that section. Mrs. Love grew to womanhood in her
native locality and received her education in the early schools there. Her death occurred
May 20, 1912.

Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Love, namely: Dr. Joseph W., of
Springfield; Dr. Robert B., of this sketch; Thomas B., an attorney of Dallas, Texas; Ralph
M., a banker, of Mt. Pleasant, Texas; Edgar P., a manufacturer, of Dallas, Texas; two
sons died in early life.

Dr. Robert B. Love grew to manhood on the homestead in Webster county and there did
his share of the general work when he was a boy. He received his early education in the
district schools. He came to Springfield in 1881 and served as money-order clerk at the
post office for three and a half years. Prior to that time he spent a term in Drury College,
after which he entered the Western Veterinary College at Kansas City, where he made
rapid progress and from which institution he was graduated in 1898-1899. He was
valedictorian of his class. Returning to Springfield he opened an office and has been
engaged in the practice of his profession here ever since, each year showing a further
advancement than the preceding. He has maintained the same office all the while, his
hospital on Convention Hall avenue is equipped with all up-to-date appliances and
apparatus to insure prompt and high-grade service. He has kept fully abreast of the times
in his chosen line of endeavor and has long ranked among the leading veterinary
physicians and surgeons of the state, and for many years has held the office of deputy
state veterinarian of Missouri, having served in this capacity under the past five
governors of the state. His long retention is evidence of his ability and satisfaction. In
1899 he took a post-graduate course in the Western Veterinary College. He has had a
large practice here from the first, and is often called to various parts of the state on
consultation. He was placed in charge of all the territory south of the Frisco lines on the
tick-eradication work several years ago.

During the Boer war, Doctor Love was hired by the British government as chief
veterinarian in charge of steamship Kelvingrove, which carried a load of mules from New
Orleans to Cape Town, South Africa, for the army. He did his work so thoroughly and
ably that the English officials complimented him highly, reporting that he had made the
best record in transporting animals from New Orleans to South Africa ever made for the
British government up to that date. He lost but two mules out of nine hundred and ninety-
nine on the entire voyage. While in South Africa Doctor Love was offered a position as

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chief of veterinary hospital and outfitting army station at Queenstown. After traveling
over the southern portion .of the Dark Continent he visited the important cities of
England, visiting Paris during the World's Fair in 1900.

Doctor Love was married, July 11, 1894, to Mable M. Williams, who was born in
Springfield, December 19, 1873. She is a daughter of John and Julia (Vinton) Williams, a
prominent family of this city, the father having been a leading hardware merchant here
for many years, but is now living in retirement. A complete sketch of this family appears
on another page of this volume to which the reader is respectful referred. Mrs. Love grew
to womanhood in this city and received a good education in the local schools. The union
of the Doctor and wife has resulted in the birth of three children, namely: Robert W.,
born July 2, 1896, is attending high school; George McDaniel, born October 18, 1901, is
in school; and John Thomas, born March 17, 1905, is also a student.

Politically, Doctor Love is a Democrat, but professional duties have prevented him from
taking a very active part in political affairs. Fraternally, he belongs to the Loyal Order of
Moose, having passed all the chairs in the local lodge up to dictator. He was brought up
in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, the family attending the Christ
Episcopal church. For recreation the Doctor formerly devoted considerable time to rod
and gun, and is an expert shot, but of late years he has had little time to devote to
sportsmanship owing to his extensive practice.

Our subject is an ardent lover of good horses and is an enthusiastic breeder of


thoroughbred and saddle horses, and has sold more of them than, perhaps, any other
breeder in Missouri. He has often acted as judge at various county fairs within a radius of
two hundred miles of Springfield. He is at this writing owner of three of the finest and
most valuable stallions in the state, namely: "P. J." 0167, is one of the fastest and best
breeding combination stallions, and one that has sired more high-class, level-headed
family horses than any other horse in this section, a horse that has shown two-minute
speed and possesses unquestionable disposition for which his gets, are also noted. The
year book shows that "P. J." was one of the gamest and most successful race horses in his
day. He has been shown in almost all the street fairs and show rings in the vicinity of
Springfield and has never met defeat. His last appearance was at the Springfield show,
October 9, 1909 for combination stallion with five of his gets, competition advertised
open to the world. "Peacock Chief" 1585, is the durable saddle stallion that has been
advertised without successful contradiction, to show more gaits both under the saddle and
in his gets than all the rest of the saddle stallions in Greene county combined. Chief has
sired more high-priced saddle colts than any other saddle stallion ever having made a
season in Greene county, many of his colts having sold from one thousand to eighteen
hundred dollars. "Ilot" 70649 (79746) Percheron stallion, was imported from France for
the Charles Holland stock farm, and purchased by Doctor Love in January, 1914, whose
pedigree shows him to be one of the richest bred Percheron stallions in the United States,
and unquestionably the best stallion for this section ever imported by the Holland stock
farm, one of the most noted farms of its kind in the state

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The Love Family (1739 - 1865)

wolf to Love
The name Love originated from the word for wolf, which was “Lupsus” in Latin,
“Luefs” in French, and became “Lufe” or “Luiff” in old Scottish dialects.
In the middle ages the wolf was held in mystical awe, and the name Lupus was a
name occasionally given to a warrior to honor his brave deeds. It appears
occasionally throughout early history.
It was used as a surname in Normandy in the 11th century, and several of that
name accompanied William the Conqueror when he invaded England from
Normandy in 1066, including a nephew of William’s who was rewarded with an
English earldom. After that the name appeared occasionally throughout England,
and then Scotland. There is a common thread that seems to tie all together – the
coat of arms. Most of those bearing the name Lupus, Lufe, Love, or some similar
variation, have had a coat of arms bearing three wolves heads, which would lead
one to suspect a common origin for all.
A community of Loves had been established in the Glasgow, Scotland area prior
to the 1600’s, many of which then emigrated to the Ulster area of Northern
Ireland.

Loves in America
Several Loves appeared early in the history of America. The first mention of a
Love was that of John Love in Boston in 1635, and then a Richard Love in
Virginia in 1642, although no records exist which tie these Loves to our family
history.
Records also tell of one Ephraim Love who emigrated from the Ulster area of
Ireland about 1740 and after living in Pennsylvania, settled in Orange County
(later Augusta County), Virginia. There he was a Captain in the militia (Captain of
Foot and Horse), and was prominent in affairs of the community. Some
researchers claim he is the father of Samuel6 Love, who begins our Love
ancestry, and his brother Joseph. Other researchers claim that is not necessarily
so and believe that our Love line may have originated from an even earlier
immigrant to the New World.
Although it cannot be said with any certainty that Ephraim was the father of
Samuel6 and his brother, Joseph, it is generally accepted by researchers that
Samuel and Joseph were born in America and were of Ulster Scot ancestry.
Samuel5 Love (ca 1739 – 1781): Samuel married Dorcas6 Bell, daughter of
James7 “South River” Bell, in 1759 and shortly after purchased 300 acres on
Christian’s Creek, near Tinkling Springs, Virginia. Then, in 1774-5, Samuel and
his brother Joseph relocated their families to a plantation in Wythe County,
Virginia. It is believed Dorcas died shortly before this relocation.

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Later Samuel made two attempts (1775-1777) to relocate his family to Carter’s
Valley, Tennessee, but fled both times because of Indian attacks. He returned
with his family to his home in Virginia, where he died in 1781.
Samuel and Dorcas had seven children, including Robert5 and Thomas, both of
who were prominent in the early history of Waynesville, North Carolina.

Robert5 Love (1760 – 1845): Robert was the first child of Samuel6 Love and
Dorcas6 Bell, born in Augusta County, Virginia.
His mother died when he a was teenager, and after that his father attempted to
relocate his family, consisting of seven children, to the frontier of what is now
Tennessee. There they experienced Indian attacks, and had to flee to safety.
This is when Robert’s military career began.
Robert had a long military career, as follows:
1776-1777: at age 16-17, Wagoner in expeditions against the Cherokees
in Tennessee, where his family was attempting to settle.
1778: Sergeant stationed at Fort Robertson, Virginia, in expeditions
against the Shawnee Indians.
1780: Lieutenant in actions against the Tories, western Virginia and near
the Yadkin River, North Carolina.
1781: Lieutenant under General Nathaniel Greene in actions against the
British General Cornwallis at Whitsell’s Mill, Haw River, North Carolina.
1782: Lieutenant and Acting Company Officer stationed on the frontier at
Fort Robertson, Tennessee.
1788: Colonel in command of North Carolina militia forces in actions
against Colonel Sevier and the rebellious State of Franklin.
1788: Colonel in command of a regiment of Washington County men
against the Chickamauga Indians.

Late in 1782 Robert moved to the Greasy Cove area in what is now Tennessee.
There, in 1783, he married Mary5 Ann Dillard, daughter of Colonel Thomas6
Dillard and Martha6 Webb. He was twenty-three years of age at the time; she
was sixteen. The Dillard family was from the same area of Virginia as was the
Love family, and it is very possible that the marriage was arranged there by
Robert’s father before he died. This was a common practice among prominent
families.
Shortly before his death in 1784, Col. Thomas Dillard named Robert as the
guardian of his younger children. Robert later arranged the marriage of two of his
Dillard wards to his own younger brothers. As such, there was quite a melding of
the Love and Dillard families.
In 1784 Robert was selected to be a representative in the formation of a new
State called Franklin and was instrumental in its initial organization efforts. Later,
as a member of the North Carolina militia, he was required to lead troops to
defeat the rebellious new state.

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The Rebellious State of Franklin


The State of North Carolina at one time encompassed a large area,
extending west of the Blue Ridge Mountains all the way to the
Mississippi River. The inhabitants west of the mountains felt they had no
support from the State in the form of a court system or a militia, and in
fact they did not, and North Carolina even tried at one time to cede these
lands back to the U.S. Government so it would not be troubled with
them.
In 1784 residents of four counties began a movement to establish their
own state, to be called Franklin (named in honor of Benjamin Franklin),
and to separate from North Carolina. Robert Love was selected as one
of the organizational representatives to meet in Jonesborough. A state
constitution was adopted and a Governor chosen, the successful Indian
fighter, Colonel John Sevier.
North Carolina refused to honor the separation and for several years the
area found itself ruled by two Governors, with two sets of laws and two
taxes. The situation became very testy and the people of Franklin
formed their own militia for protection. They even considered seceding
from the U.S. and joining with Texas.
The North Carolina militia was called out to quell the disturbance. Robert
Love was an officer in the militia, and he felt he owed duty to it, even
though he was part of the organizational effort to form Franklin, and was
sympathetic to its cause.
There were battles, but casualties were light on both sides. For his
rebellious actions Colonel Sevier was charged with high treason and the
State of North Carolina imposed a death by hanging sentence.
When the Sevier government collapsed, and Colonel Sevier was about
to be captured, he stated that he would surrender only to Colonel Robert
Love (despite the fact that Robert Love was not the senior officer in the
campaign). He did this knowing that Robert Love was an influential man
of much integrity who would act in Sevier’s best interests. And he did.
Robert Love was able to save Sevier’s life. After that Sevier raised
another small army and this time devoted himself to eliminating Indians
from the frontier, to considerable success.

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The Great Greasy Cove Horse Race


In 1788 Robert Love and Andrew Jackson first crossed paths to near
unfortunate consequence. Both were proud young men, to which honor,
integrity, pride, and fast horses meant everything.
Robert Love was a young man of twenty-eight years. He was a
prosperous, politically prominent military man who had recently received
much honor when Colonel Sevier surrendered to him to end the war over
the rebellious State of Franklin.
Andrew Jackson was twenty-one years of age, recently qualified as a
lawyer, who had been assigned as Attorney General and Public
Prosecutor for the Western District of North Carolina (an area west of the
Blue Ridge Mountains, which now includes all of Tennessee, and other
areas to the Mississippi River). This post had been created largely to
placate the inhabitants of the Western District by providing them
increased services after their aborted attempt at secession. On his way
to Nashville, Andrew Jackson tarried at Jonesborough to take care of
some legal work, and there encountered Robert Love.
Both men were known to own fine thoroughbred horses – each reputed
to be the fastest in the territory. Naturally, pride and youthful
competitiveness compelled them to challenge each other to a race.
A race date was set and broadly advertised, and people came from
miles around to participate in the excitement. The night before much
partying and drinking took place. Robert Love found a way to smuggle a
bottle of whisky to Jackson’s Negro jockey, while he locked his own in an
apple house, away from temptation and distractions, with a guard
posted. In the morning, Jackson found that his jockey was in no
condition to ride, so Jackson said that he would ride his own horse in the
race (although he was not in much better condition than his jockey).
A huge crowd was in attendance, there was much betting, and much
moonshine consumed. The race was close, but in the end, Robert
Love’s horse won.
Later, Jackson learned how his jockey got the bottle of whisky. He
became incensed and confronted Love and accused him of cheating.
Love responded by calling Jackson “a long gangling sorrel topped soap
stick” and challenged him to a duel if he did not retract the charge of
cheating.
Fortunately, wiser and saner minds prevailed. It was apparent that Love
was more proficient in the dueling arts than was the youthful Jackson
and because of that it would not have been a fair fight. The fight was
called off and the two – Robert Love and Andrew Jackson – went on to
become lifelong friends.

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37
Robert was Justice of the Peace for Washington County, North Carolina, and also
served as a member of the North Carolina Convention of 1788 which ratified the
Constitution of the United States.
He was elected to represent Washington County in the North Carolina
Legislature in November, 1789.
When the area in which he lived was separated from North Carolina and became
a territory of the United States in 1790, he became a Justice of the Peace of the
territory, called the Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio.
In 1792 he moved east of the Great Smoky mountains to the Mount Prospect
area, Buncombe County, North Carolina.
There he represented Buncombe/Haywood County, North Carolina, as a member
of the Electoral College that selected the President and Vice-President of the
United States in the years 1800 (election of Thomas Jefferson) through 1828
(election of Andrew Jackson).
He was elected to represent Buncombe County in the North Carolina State
Senate for the years 1793, 1794, and 1795. When Haywood County was formed
from Buncombe County in 1808, Robert Love suggested the county seat be built
on land he owned. His suggestion was approved. He laid out the town, and
named it Waynesville, in honor of General Mad Anthony Wayne of Revolutionary
War fame.
Robert became a qualified land surveyor, which in those days was an honorable
and lucrative profession (another surveyor of his time who amassed considerable
wealth and fame was George Washington). Through his surveying activities he
became aware of land speculation opportunities, and he was also sometimes
compensated for his surveying services with the payment of land. From these
activities he became one of the wealthiest men in North Carolina.
In 1830, he was one of two commissioners responsible for establishing the
boundary line between Louisiana, Arkansas, Mexico, and Texas.
In 1832 he was appointed by Andrew Jackson as a surveyor for establishing the
boundary line between the United States and Mexico, but he declined as he was
past his seventy-second birthday and did not feel his health would permit him to
undertake the project.
Late in his life, in 1839 when he was 79 years of age, Robert was having difficulty
receiving the pension due him for his Revolutionary War services. He appealed
to his friend, the former President of the United States, Andrew Jackson, to assist
him. Andrew Jackson wrote the following letter on Robert’s behalf:

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Hermitage
October 12th, 1839
Dear Sir:
Your letter of the 26th ultimo has just been received, its contents being duly
noted, I hasten to reply to it. I sincerely regret to find from the contents of
your letter the treatment which that worthy man & patriot, Col. Robert Love,
has received at the hands of the pension office - that a man who thro life has
sustained such an exemplary character, his honesty, & probity should be
suspected, in his decline of life, must be truly mortifying to him, as well as to
the people of North Carolina who have shown by their repeated acts of
confidence in him, their high estimation of his moral worth.
As you have requested, it gives me pleasure to state my knowledge of Col.
Robert Love. I became acquainted with him in North Carolina. I think in the
fall of 1784, and have known him ever since and hazzard nothing in saying
that no man in this union has sustained a higher reputation for integrity, than
Col. Robert Love, with all men and with all parties. Altho himself a uniform
Democratic-Republican, and no man stands diservidly higher, as a man of
great moral worth, than Col. Love's has always stood, in the estimation of all
who know him - that his integrity should, in his old age, be doubted must be
a source of mortification, not only to himself, but to every man in No.
Carolina, where he has been so often honored by this confidence, as a
public character.
I am with great respect yr. mo. obediant servant.

Andrew Jackson

When seventy-four years of age he was kicked in the hip by a horse and so
crippled that he had to use a crutch the rest of his life. Before this accident he
had ridden a horse or traveled about in a gig, which was a light, two-wheeled one
horse carriage designed for speed. After he became crippled, he used a more
sedate barouche, which was a four-wheeled carriage with a coachman and
drawn by two horses. As a very wealthy and influential man he had worn a
powdered wig on formal occasions in his earlier years, and he maintained his
old-fashioned attire, except for the wig, after fashions changed, wearing a blue
swallow-tail and knee britches with silver knee buckles and silk stockings.
His wife, Mary Ann Dillard, died in 1842. Robert died three years later, at age
eighty-four. Largely because of his landholdings, his estate was one of the
largest ever probated in North Carolina. Shortly before his death or in his will he
gave each of ten children at least 500 acres of land, in addition to slaves.
Twenty-six of his slaves were auctioned off after his death.

Mary4 Ann Love (1805 - 1865): Mary Ann was the eleventh child of Robert5 Love and Mary5 Ann
Dillard. In 1820, when she was not yet fifteen years of age, she married twenty-four year old
William4 Welch. Two years prior to his marriage to Mary Ann, William had married her older
sister, Martha, but Martha died one year later.

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39

ROBERT LOVE. He was born near the Tinkling Spring Meeting house, Augusta county, Va., May
11, 1760. His father was Samuel, on of Epbraim Love, captain of the Colonial Horse; and his
mother Dorcas, second daughter of James Bell, to whom had been issued on the formation of
Augusta county, October 30, 1745, a "commission of the Peace."[9] Samuel Love and Dorcas
Bell were married July 3, 1759. Robert Love was christened by Rev. John Craig, who was pastor
of the Tinkling Spring church from 1740 to 1764.[10] It was at this old church that the eloquent
James Waddell, afterwards immortalized by Wm. Wirt, was pastor for several years, though he
did not become "The Blind Preacher" till after the Revolutionary War and he had removed to
Gordonsville, his blindness having been caused by cataract. Robert Love's pension papers
show11 that he was on the expedition under Col. Christie in 1776 against the Cherokees; that he
was at Fort Henry on Long Island of the Holston in 1777; that he was stationed in 1778 at the
head of the Clinch and Sandy rivers (Fort Robertson), and operated against the Shawnees from
April to October; that from 1779 to 1780 he was engaged against the Tories on Tom's creek, New
River, and Cripple creek, at Moravian Old Town, and at the Shallow ford of the Yadkin, under Col.
Wm. Campbell; that in 1781 he was engaged in Guilford county "and the adjoining county"
against Cornwallis, and "was in a severe battle with his army at Whitesell mill and the Rudy ford
of the Haw river, under Gen. Pickens; that from this place, with Capt. Wm. Doach, he was sent
back "from the rendezvous at the Lead Mines to collect and bring more men;" that in 1782 he
"was again stationed out on the frontiers of the Clinch, at Fort Robertson...from June to October."
He was living in Montgomery, now Wythe county, Va., when he entered the service in 1776, and
after the Revolutionary War, his parents being dead, he moved with Wm. Gregory and his family
to Washington county, N. C. (now Tennessee), in the fall of 1782. Having moved to Greasy Cove,
now Erwin Tenn., he married Mary Ann Dillard, daughter of Col. Thomas Dillard of Pittsylvania
county, Va., on the 11th day of September, 1783; and on the 5th of April, 1833, he made
application for a pension under the act of Congress of June 7, 1832, attaching his commission
signed by Ben. Harrison, governor of Virginia; but, a question having arisen as to the date of this
commission Andrew Jackson wrote from The Hermitage on October 12,1837, to the effect that he
had known Col. Love since the fall of 1784, and that there "is no man in this Union who has
sustained a higher reputation for integrity than Col. Robert Love, with all men and with all parties,
although himself a uniform democratic Republican, and that no man stands deservedly higher as
a man of great moral worth than Col. Love has always stood in the estimation of all who knew
him." Even this endorsement, however, did not serve to secure the pension; but when E. H.
McClure of Haywood filed an affidavit to the effect that the date of the commission was 1781 or
1782, official red-tape had no other refuge, and granted the pension. He was a delegate to the
Greenville convention of the State of Franklin, December 14, 1784, and voted to adopt the
constitution of North Carolina instead of that proposed by Sam Houston.[12] In 1778 he was
engaged against the Chickamauga Indians as colonel of a regiment operating near White's
fort.[11]

He also drew a pension from the State Colonial Records, Vol. xxii, p.74). He and John Blair
represented Washington county (formerly the State of Franklin) in the. North Carolina legislature
in November, 1889 (Ibid., Vol. xxi, p. 194). Later in the same session John Sevier appeared and
was sworn in as an additional representative from the same county (Ibid., pp. 58~85). Love was
also a justice of peace for Washington county in October, 1788. (Ibid., Vol. xxii, p. 702); and the
journal of the North Carolina State convention for the ratification of the constitution of the United
States shows that Robert Love, Landon Carter, John Blair, Wm. Houston and Andrew Green
were delegates, and that Robert Love voted for its adoption. (Ibid., Vol. xxii, pp. 36, 39, 47, 48).

He moved to Buncombe county, N. C., as early as 1792, and represented that county in 1793,
1794, 1795 14 in the State Senate. According to the affidavit of his brother, Gen. Thos. Love,
Robert Love "was an elector for president and vice-president when Thomas Jefferson was
elected, and has been successively elected ever since, down to (and including) the election of the
present chief magistrate, Andrew Jackson."[15] This affidavit is dated April 6, 1833. In a letter
from Robert Love to William Welch, dated at Raleigh, December 4, 1828, he says that all the
electors were present on the 3d "and gave their votes in a very dignified manner and before a
very large concourse of people," the State House being crowded.[16] Fifteen cannon were fired

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"for the number of electoral votes and one for the county of Haywood, and for the zeal she
appeared to have had from the number of votes for the Old Hero's Ticket. It was submitted to me
to bring forward a motion to proceed to ballot for a president of the United States ...and of course
you may be well assured that I cheerfully nominated Andrew Jackson.... I was much gratified to
have that honor and respect paid me. From the most authentic accounts..... Adams will not get a
vote south of the Potomac or west of the mountains. Wonderful what a majority! For Jackson 178
and Adams only 83, leaving Jackson a majority of 95 votes. So much for a bargain and
intrigue."[17] The reason for firing an extra gun for Haywood county was because that county had
cast a solid vote for Robert Love as elector for Andrew Jackson, such staunch Whigs as William
Mitchell Davidson and Joseph Cathey having induced their fellow Whigs to refrain from voting out
of regard for their democratic friend and neighbor, Robert Love. He carried the vote to
Washington in a gig that year. He named the town of Waynesville for his friend "Mad" Anthony
Wayne, with whom he had served at Long Island during the Revolution.

In 1821 he was one of the commissioners who ran the boundary line between North Carolina and
Tennessee from Pigeon river south. On the 14th day of July, 1834, he was kicked on the hip by a
horse while in Green county, Tenn., and so crippled that he had to use a crutch till his death.[18]
The gig, too had to be given up for a barouche, drawn by two horses and driven by a coachman.
His cue, his blue swallow-tailed coat, and knee breeches with silver knee-buckles and silk
stockings are remembered yet by a few of the older people. He died at Waynesville, July 17,
1845," loved by his friends and feared by his enemies."[19] He was largely instrumental in having
Haywood county established, became its first clerk, defeating Felix Walker for the position; and in
1828, he wrote to Wm. Welch (December 4) from Raleigh: "The bill for erecting a new county out
of the western part of Burke and northeastern part of Buncombe after severe debate fell in the
house of commons, on its second reading by a majority against it of three only. The bill for the
division of Haywood county was passed the senate the third and last reading by a majority of
seven; and, I suppose, tomorrow it will be taken up in the house of commons and in a few days
we will know its fate. I do not like the division line, but delicacy closes my mouth for fear its being
construed that interest was my motive." [20]

He left an estate which "at one time was one of the largest estates in North Carolina." 21 "He
acquired great wealth and died respected, leaving a large fortune to his children." He was the
founder of Waynesville. "Besides the sites for the public square, court-house and jail, land for the
cemetery and several churches was also the gift of Col. Love." Of him and his brother Thomas,
Col. Allen T. Davidson said:[22] "These two men were certainly above the average of men, and
did much to plant civilization in the county where they, lived, and would have been men of mark in
any community

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41

GENERAL THOMAS LOVE. He was a brother of Robert Love, and was born in A[u]gusta county,
Va., November 15, 1765. The date of his death is not accurately known, as he removed to Maury
county, Tenn., about 1833.22 Prof. W. C. Allen, in his "Centennial of Haywood County", says
(p.55) that he was a soldier of the Revolution, and served under Washington," but this must have
been towards the close of that struggle, as he could not have been quite eleven years of age on
the 4th of July, 1776.24 At the close of that war, however, "he went to East Tennessee and was
in the Sevier-Tipton war when the abortive State of Franklin was attempted." [25]

Ramsey's "Annals of Tennessee" (p. 410) records the fact that on one occasion one of Tipton's
men had captured two of Sevier's sons, and would have hanged them if Thomas Love had not
argued him out of his purpose. He was one of Tipton's follow'ers, but he showed Tipton the
unworthiness of such an act. "He came to what is now Haywood county about the year 1790.
When Buncombe was formed in 1791 he became active in the affairs of the new county,"
continues Prof. Allen. In 1797 he was elected to the house of commons from Buncombe, and was
re-elected till 1808, when Haywood was formed, largely through his efforts. There is a
tradition[26] that in 1796 he had been candidate against Philip Hoodenpile who represented
Buncombe in the commons that year, but was defeated. For Hoodenpile could play the violin, and
all of Love's wiles were powerless to keep the political Eurydices from following after this fiddling
Orpheus. But Love bided his time, and when the campaign of 1797 began he charged
Hoodenpile with showing contempt for the common herd by playing the violin before them with his
left hand; whereas, when he played before "the quality," as Love declared, Hoodenpile always
performed with his right hand. This charge was repeated at all the voting places of the county,
which bore such significant names as Upper and Lower Hog Thief, Hardscrabble, Pinch Stomach,
etc. Hoodenpile who, of course, could play only with his left hand, protested and denied; but the
virus of class-feeling had been aroused, and Hoodenpile went down in defeat, never to rise again,
while Love remained in Buncombe. "From the new county of Haywood General Love was one of
the first representatives, the other having been Thomas Lenoir. Love was continuously re-elected
from Haywood till 1829, with the exception of the year 1816. Who it was that defeated him that
year does not appear, though John Stevenson and Wm. Welch were elected to the house and
Hodge Raborne to the senate. This Hodge Raborne was a man of influence and standing in
Haywood county, he having been elected to the senate not only in 1816, but also from 1817 to
1823, inclusive, and again in 1838; but whether it was he or John Stevenson who defeated
Thomas Love, or whether he ran that year or no, cannot now be determined. [27] William Welch
was a nephew by marriage of Thomas Love, and it is not likely that he opposed him. Gen. Love
moved to Macon county in 1830, where his wife died and is buried in the Methodist church yard of
the town of Franklin. He was one of the commissioners for North Carolina who ran the line
between this State and South Carolina in 1814.28 "He resided in Macon for several years, and
then removed to the Western District of Tennessee; was elected to the legislature from that State,
and was made presiding officer of the senate. He was a man of very fine appearance, more than
six feet high, very popular, and a fine electioneer. Many amusing stories are told of him, such as
carrying garden seeds in his pocket, and distributing them" with his wife's special regards to the
voter's wife. 29 His service in the legislature for such an unprecedented length of time was due
more to his genial manner and electioneering methods, perhaps, than to his statesmanship;
though, unless he secured what the voters most desired he would most probably have been
retired from public life. He never was so retired

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42

Organization of Cherokee Lands, 1820

On February 27, 1819, chiefs of the Cherokee Nation signed a treaty ceding a portion of their
remaining eastern lands. The new North Carolina territory stretched from the former treaty line
(the old Meigs-Freeman line) to the ridge of the Nantahala Mountains, and from the Georgia &
South Carolina borders on the south to the Tennessee line on the north.

The State of North Carolina appointed James Meabin and Jesse Franklin as Commissioners in
charge of organizing the large territory. They hired Captain Robert Love of Waynesville to head
the survey party.

Chief of the Surveyors

Captain Robert Love of Waynesville is said to have been a hero of the War of 1812. His father,
Gen. Thomas Love, was a vigorous frontiersman who served 20 years in the North Carolina
legislature.

The Love family played a colorful and controversial role in the settling of the frontier. They also
figured prominently in the first N.C. novel, Eoneguski, or the Cherokee Chief, set partly in Macon
County.

Work of the Love Survey Party

The work began with the division of the huge area into 18 districts. Each was assigned to one of
five or six survey crews for mapping. The districts were further divided into tracts or sections,
which were offered to the public through land grants.

Each section offered for sale contained 50 to 300 acres. Each included some good farm land and
timber land.

The survey party produced a huge map, one copy of which was posted in the Haywood County
courthouse prior to the first land sale. The sale began Sept. 20, 1820 and continued for several
weeks. Other sales were held in Franklin in 1822 and 1823.

The survey party chose the site of Franklin, which was destined to become the county seat. The
town site occupied 400 acres in sections 24 and 32 of district 16. It was named for Commissioner
Jesse Franklin, a prominent statesman who became governor of North Carolina in 1820.

Because of high demand for land, prices were set to bring in a good profit. No land could be sold
for less than 50 cents per acre. Grade 1, the best, sold for $4 per acre; grade 2 for $2 and grade
3 for $1. Buyers could pay one-eighth down and the rest in four annual payments, with a discount
offered for early payment. Grants were to be issued after the state received the full purchase
price.

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The following images tell the story of the Robert Love Survey of 1820. A reproduction of the map
produced during the survey is on permanent display at the Macon County Historical Museum, in
Franklin, NC.The Robert Love Survey covered parts of what are today Macon, Jackson, Swain and
Transylvania Counties, in Western North Carolina. The lands covered by the survey were
obtained from the Cherokee Indians by the Treaty of 1819.

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44

2) The Robert Love Survey was a very important event in the history of Macon County. Many current
residents of the county live on land that was covered by the survey or have ancestors who first settled in
the area at the time of the survey.

3) The survey took place between April and June 1820. The surveyed lands were divided into 18
districts. A total of 656 individual tracts were laid out during the survey, with the tracts ranging in
size from 50 to 300 acres. The surveyors rated each tract according to its perceived quality. First
quality lands were subsequently sold at auction for a minimum of $4 per acre, second quality
lands were sold for a minimum of $3 per acre and third quality lands were sold for a minimum of
$2 per acre.

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4) The surveyors kept notes describing each property that they laid out. In these notes, they described
the boundaries of each property and in some cases noted the presence of springs, potential mill sites, or
other natural features of the property. Distances in the Robert Love Survey were measured in “poles.”
One pole equaled 16.5 feet, and 320 poles equaled one mile. The surveyors also recorded the names of
any person who was occupying the land. More than 150 settlers had already moved into the region by
the time of the survey.

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The Treaty of 1819 allowed those Cherokee heads of households who wished to remain on
the ceded lands to take individual 640 acre personal reservations. Fifty-one reservations
were laid out. Most of the Cherokee reservees were only able to retain their reservations a
short time before they were displaced by encroaching settlers. However, many of the
former reservees remained in the area and formed the core of what became the Eastern
Band of Cherokee.

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6) The surveyors produced three copies of a map showing the locations of the tracts that
were laid out during the survey, but only two of these maps are known to survive. The
original maps measured approximately 11 feet long and 8.5 feet high. A copy of a small
portion of one of the original maps is shown to the right. All of the original documents
associated with the Robert Love Survey are housed in the North Carolina State Archives
in Raleigh.

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LITTLE ABOUT THE LOVE NAME:

WOLF TO LOVE

The name Love originated from the word for wolf, which was "Lupsus" in
Latin, "Luefs" in French, and became "Lufe" or "Luiff" in old Scottish dialects.

In the middle ages the wolf was held in mystical awe, and the name Lupus
was a name occasionally given to a warrior to honor his brave deeds. It
appears occasionally throughout early history.

It was used as a surname in Normandy in the 11th century, and several of


that name accompanied William the Conqueror when he invaded England
from Normandy in 1066, including a nephew of William's who was rewarded
with an English earldom. After that the name appeared occasionally
throughout England, and then Scotland. There is a common thread that
seems to tie all together - the coat of arms. Most of those bearing the name
Lupus, Lufe, Love, or some similar variation, have had a coat of arms bearing
three wolves heads, which would lead one to suspect a common origin for all.

A community of Loves had been established in the Glasgow, Scotland area


prior to the 1600's, many of which then emigrated to the Ulster area of
Northern Ireland.

LOVE'S IN AMERICA

Several Loves appeared early in the history of America. The first mention of a
Love was that of John Love in Boston in 1635, and then a Richard Love in
Virginia in 1642, although no records exist which tie these Loves to our
family history.

Records also tell of one Ephraim Love who emigrated from the Ulster area of
Ireland about 1740 and after living in Pennsylvania, settled in Orange County
(later Augusta County), Virginia. There he was a Captain in the militia
(Captain of Foot and Horse), and was prominent in affairs of the community.
Some researchers claim he is the father of Samuel Love, who begins our
Love ancestry, and his brother Joseph. Other researchers claim that is not
necessarily so and believe that our Love line may have originated from an
even earlier immigrant to the New World.

Although it cannot be said with any certainty that Ephraim was the father of
Samuel and his brother, Joseph, it is generally accepted by researchers that
Samuel and Joseph were born in America and were of Ulster Scot ancestry.

SOURCE: "Family Love"

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Genealogical Connection of Our Cunningham Clan
As Descendants of Nigelli Luf

Generation No. 1

1. Nigelli Luf was born 1420 in possibly SCOTLAND, and died 1492 in
Paisley, County Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND. His spouse is unknown at
this time.
In American his name would be NEIL or NIGEL LOVE. At this time, it
seems that we can learn nothing further about Nigelli Luf's parentage.
Since these people were mostly common folk, their ancestry is
probably lost to history. Also, please remember that most of these
dates are approximate and some are unproven. Please do your own
researching if there is doubt.

Children of Nigelli Luf are:


+ 2 i. Johanni (John Love) Luf, born 1440 in Paisley, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND; died 1520 in Lochwinnoch Parish, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND. *Our Direct Lineage*
3 ii. Thome (Thomas Love) Luf, born 1442 in Paisley, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND; died Unknown in Glasgow, County
Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND.
4 iii. Allane (Allan Love) Luf, born 1448 in Paisley, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND; died Unknown.
5 iv. Simoni (Simon Love) Luf, born 1450 in Paisley, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND; died Unknown in Auchinames, Kilbarchan
Parish, County Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND.
6 v. Patricium (Patrick Love) Luf, born 1452 in Paisley, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND; died Unknown in Overtoun, Kilbarchan
Parish, County Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND.
7 vi. Wilelmo (William Love) Luf, born 1454 in Paisley, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND; died Unknown in Auchinames, Kilbarchan
Parish, County Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND.

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Generation No. 2

2. Johanni Luf (John Love) (Nigelli (Neil or Nigel Love)1) was born
1440 in Paisley, County Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND, and died 1520 in
Lochwinnoch Parish, County Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND. His spouse is
unknown at this time. The name JOHANNI LUF or LUIFF in our
language translates to JOHN LOVE.

There is no written proof that JOHANNI LUF (1st generation JOHN


LOVE) is the father of JOHANNIS LUIFE (2nd generation). In this time
frame there are NO church registers for baptisms or marriages. There
are NO town council minutes that have survived. There are NO
testaments (wills) for the common people. So the following has to be
based on "probabilities " and "possibilities" with considerable
circumstantial evidence. Every mention of LUF discussed below is
found in Court Records, Charters, Rental Rolls of the Monastery of
Paisley, Chartulary of Paisley or in the books by 18th and 19th century
historians who must have found their information in these same
sources.

JOHANNI LUF (1st generation) was leasing land in 1460 from the
Monastery of Paisley. It was on the outskirts of Paisley in Snawdoun
which they called the "outfields". It appears he was the son of NIGELLI
LUF who was leasing land at the same time in the same place. The
reason for assuming NIGELLI was the father is because they were both
still in Paisley in 1488 but by 1500 JOHANNI had gone down to
Moniabroch in Lochwinnoch Parish. But there is no further mention of
NIGELLI so I am assuming he had died and had been older than
JOHANNI. Paisley was granted the status of a Burgh in 1488 and both
JOHANNI and NIGELLI are shown as a Burgess. The granting of a
Burgh status was extemely important to a town and it is thoroughly
explained in the biographical notes for JHONE LUIFE (3 generation) in
connection with Glasgow.

Children of Johanni (John Love) Luf are:


+ 8 i. Johannis (John Love) Luiff, born 1492 in Lochwinnoch Parish,
County Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND; died 1564 in Govan, County
Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND. *Our Direct Lineage*
9 ii. Walter Luiff, born 1494 in Lochwinnoch Parish, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND; died in Govan, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND.
10 iii. Alexander Luiff, born 1496 in Lochwinnoch Parish, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND; died in Govan, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND.

50
51
Generation No. 3

8. Johannis Luiff (John Love) (Johanni (John Love)2 Luf, Nigelli


(Neil or Nigel Love)1) was born 1492 in Lochwinnoch Parish, County
Renfrewshire, SCOTLAND, and died 1564 in Govan, County
Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND. His spouse is unknown.

This JOHANNIS LUIFE is a particularly mysterious supposed ancestor.


We only have one specific mention of him. He is shown as being a
tenant in Govan in the Barony of Glasgow in 1527. Govan is on the
south side of the River Clyde at Glasgow. Of course it long since has
been swallowed up by Glasgow and is now shown as one of their
suburbs. The population of Glasgow at this time was only about 4500
men, women and children.

It appears JOHANNIS LUIFE arrived in Govan from Lochwinnoch Parish


and his supposed father was JOHANNI LUF who had been leasing land
from the Monastery in several locations in Lochwinnoch Parish since
circa 1500. There is one other tiny bit of evidence which connects this
JOHANNIS LUIFE to that area. In 1586 in a "Security Paper" it shows
that ROBERT LUFE, the younger of Corselet, Kilbarchan Parish, was
married to MARGARET LUIFE, daughter of ROBERT LUIFE, of Govan.
This ROBERT LUIFE was the son of this JOHANNIS LUIFE of Govan.

Children of Johannis Luiff and unknown are:


+ 11 i. Jhone Luiff, (John Love) "The Elder", born 1540 in Govan,
County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND; died August 1595 in Glasgow, County
Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND.
12 ii. James Luiff, born 1556 in Govan, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND; died in SCOTLAND.
+ 13 iii. Robert Luiff, born 1550 in Govan, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND; died in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND.
*Our Direct Lineage*

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52
Generation No. 4

13. Robert Luiff (Johannis (John Love)3, Johanni (John Love)2 Luf,
Nigelli (Neil or Nigel Love)1) was born 1550 in Govan, County
Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND, and died in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND. He married Margaret Luife 1576 in Glasgow Cathedral,
Glasgow, Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND, daughter of Robert Luf. She was
born in SCOTLAND, and died in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND. NOTE: Margaret was a cousin.

Children of Robert Luiff and Margaret Luife are:


+ 19 i. William Luiff, born 1580 in Govan, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND; died 1645 in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND.
*Our Direct Lineage*
20 ii. Elizabeth Luiff, born 1581 in Govan, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND; died 1614 in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND.
She married William Rodger Bet. 1594 - 1614 in SCOTLAND; born
Bet. 1530 - 1590 in possibly SCOTLAND; died Unknown in Glasgow,
County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND.
21 iii. John Luiff, born 1582 in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND; died in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND.
22 iv. James Luiff, born 1583 in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND; died Abt. 1607 in Threipwood, County Ayrshire,
SCOTLAND. He married Barbara Stewart Abt. 1605 in County
Ayrshire, SCOTLAND; born 1587 in Threipwood, County Ayrshire,
SCOTLAND; died Abt. 1607 in Threipwood, County Ayrshire,
SCOTLAND.

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53
Generation No. 5

19. William Luiff (Robert (Love)4, Johannis (John Love)3, Johanni


(John Love)2 Luf, Nigelli (Neil or Nigel Love)1) was born 1580 in
Govan, County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND, and died 1645 in Glasgow,
County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND. He married Janet Walker 1600 in
Glasgow Cathedral, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND. She was born
1581 in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND, and died 1656 in
Glasgow, County Lanarkshire, SCOTLAND.

We have a firm starting base with proof that WILLIAM LOVE arrived in
County Tyrone at the beginning of the "Plantation of Ulster" by King
James I. He is shown in the Patent Rolls as receiving his Denization
(Citizenship) from King James I on 9 July 1616. Anyone who had been
born before 1603 when King James became King of England as well as
Scotland, did not receive automatic citizenship in Ireland. Rev. David
Stewart in an article in Familia Magazine Volume 11 states WILLIAM
LOVE settled in County Tyrone even though the Denization lists do not
show an actual place of settlement. Even more helpful are the lists
made by Sir William Betham. In his list for 1615 he shows WILLIAM
LOVE with 18 other men arriving in County Tyrone. Two of the other
men are WILLIAM and JAMES CUNNINGHAM who we know ended up in
Donaghedy Parish. Two of the other men on the list are MATTHEW
CRAWFORD and JAMES HAMILTON who are shown as servants of
JAMES HAMILTON, EARL of ABERCORN. The original reference to the
Patent Rolls is in PRONI file T 808/9445.

Before he left Scotland WILLIAM LOVE was Deacon of the Skinners


Guild in 1605 when he attended a meeting of the Burgh Council. He
was representing the Skinners Guild. This is shown in a book by John
McUre published in 1736 called "A View Of The City Of Glasgow". This
rare book is in my library.

JOHN LOVE died in Strabane, County Tyrone on 14 May 1629. In the


will Index by Phillimore it states this is the death date and not the date
the will was probated. My WILLIAM LOVE was a witness to the will.
JOHN LOVE may have been a younger brother of WILLIAM LOVE but I
don't think so for the reasons given below. I believe he was a son of
WILLIAM LOVE. WILLIAM was the son of JHONE LUIFE the elder, of
Glasgow. His mother was MARGARET PUDZEANE. The father died
before 1611 and the mother before 1613. These details are shown in
the testament filed for MARGARET PUDZEANE in the Commissariat of
Glasgow dated 8 May 1613. Also shown in LDS film # 046892. Copy is
in my files.

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54
WILLIAM LOVE was married in Scotland to JANET WALKER (reference:
WILLIAM DELOSS LOVE Manuscript). There is no way to check this
marriage as the marriage register for the Cathedral of Glasgow did not
start until 1609. I think they had a son, JOHN, born in Scotland before
they left for Ireland with the Plantation in 1616. If he was born after
1603 he would not need a Denization certificate. If JOHN was born
1604-1608 it would make him a correct age for the fact he had no
other children except the unborn child mentioned in the will when he
died in 1629.

The last argument to support the theory that JOHN LOVE was the son
and not the brother of WILLIAM LOVE is the information now located
that WILLIAM LOVE already had a step-brother named JOHN who lived
and married in Glasgow. This relationship is discussed below in the
information that is now available about WILLIAM LOVE's father. A final
argument that JOHN LOVE, of Strabane, was a son and not a brother
to WILLIAM LOVE is his name. It was the custom to name the first son
after the grandfather on the father's side of the family. We know now
that WILLIAM LOVE's father was JHONE LUIFE so that fits the pattern
perfectly.

In the William DeLoss Love manuscript it states WILLIAM LOVE


returned to Scotland and died in Glasgow in 1645 and his wife JANET
WALKER was still living in 1656. I have found his Administration
Papers dated 17 December 1656 although a testament (will) was
never filed. The notation on the Commissariat Record of Glasgow
Index is "WILLIAM LUIF, sometime in Strayband (which must mean
Strabane), indweller in Glasgow ". The latter means he was living in
Glasgow but was not a Burgess. To be a Burgess at that time he had
to lease or own "1 ruid of land and live on it". (A ruid of land was 1/4
acre). So we know for sure we have the right WILLIAM LOVE who
received his Denization in Strabane in 1616 with the Plantation of
Ulster.

WILLIAM LOVE returned to Glasgow but we don't know exactly when.


We know he was still in Strabane in 1629 when he witnessed his son's
will. In 1630 a Muster of Arms was taken which shows they were
worried about attacks from the Irish Earls who were resisting the
Plantation of Scottish and English settlers. In 1641 this attack came
when Phelim O'Neill and Rory O'Moor invaded Strabane and burned the
town completely. Of course the houses were all wooden and there
were only about 208 men with arms who could defend. Most of the
inhabitants fled across the River Foyle to Lifford. However some may
have decided they had enough and headed back to Scotland. I believe
this is when WILLIAM LOVE (1) left and we know he was in Glasgow by

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55
1645 where he died. He evidently never owned any property when he
got back to Glasgow and he never became a Burgess again as the
Administration Papers just show him as Indweller. These
Administration Papers are actually a Creditors Inventory. They were
filed in the Commissariat of Glasgow on 17 December 1656. Shown on
LDS film # 0231161.

River Foyle at Donnalong in Donaghedy Parish, County Tyrone,


Ireland. This is where our William Luife landed on his arrival from
Scotland in 1615. At that time there was a fort here but no signs of it
remain. County Donegal is across the river.

Children of William Luiff and Janet Walker are:


23 i. William Love, born 1601 in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND; died Unknown.
24 ii. John Love, born 1603 in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND; died May 14, 1629 in Strabane, County Tyrone, IRELAND.
25 iii. Matthew Love, born 1605 in Glasgow, County Lanarkshire,
SCOTLAND; died Unknown.
+ 26 iv. Robert Love, born 1630 in Cooly, County Tyrone, IRELAND;
died 1684 in Strabane, County Tyrone, IRELAND.

*Our Direct Lineage*

55
56

Generation No. 6

26. Robert Love(William (Love)5 Luiff, Robert (Love)4, Johannis


(John Love)3, Johanni (John Love)2 Luf, Nigelli (Neil or Nigel Love)1)
was born 1630 in Cooly, County Tyrone, IRELAND, and died 1684 in
Strabane, County Tyrone, IRELAND. He met Agnes Matthews Abt.
1650 in never married -- IRELAND. She was born 1631 in Cooly,
County Tyrone, IRELAND, and probably died in Strabane, County
Tyrone, IRELAND.

ROBERT LOVE was a merchant in Strabane in 1655. It is not known


whether this meant having a shop on Main or Market Streets. There
were only about 500 people in Strabane at that time which would
include men, women and children. In my files are photographs of both
these streets as they appear in 1999 when my daughter Carole and I
visited Strabane. Also a map of Strabane from 1909 and it indicates
the areas where his shop was probably located.

ROBERT LOVE had a son baptized in Derry Cathedral on 24 December


1655. He named the son ROBERT but the baby was illegitimate and
the mother was shown as AGNES MATHEWS. This ROBERT baptized in
1655 could be the same ROBERT LOVE who appeared in the
Administrative Papers in 1684 when his wife CATHERINE GRANGER
applied to represent their 5 minor children when ROBERT died. The
fact the children were all minors would tie in with the father dying so
young. However there is no proof to this connection.

Children of Robert Love and Agnes Matthews are:


+ 27 i. Robert Love, born December 1655 in Strabane, County
Tyrone, IRELAND; died August 03, 1722 in Strabane, County Tyrone,
IRELAND. *Our Direct Lineage*
28 ii. Alexander Love, born 1663 in Strabane, County Tyrone,
IRELAND.
+ 29 iii. John Love, born 1670 in Strabane, County Tyrone, IRELAND;
died December 10, 1724 in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina
Colony (now USA).

56
57

Generation No. 7

27. Robert Love (Robert6, William (Love)5 Luiff, Robert (Love)4,


Johannis (John Love)3, Johanni (John Love)2 Luf, Nigelli (Neil or Nigel
Love)1) was born December 1655 in Strabane, County Tyrone,
IRELAND, and died August 03, 1722 in Strabane, County Tyrone,
IRELAND. He married Catherine Granger Abt. 1680 in Coolmaghery
Townland, County Tyrone, IRELAND. She was born Abt. 1655 in
IRELAND, and died in Strabane, County Tyrone, IRELAND.

Children of Robert Love and Catherine Granger are:


+ 30 i. Robert Love, born 1683 in Strabane, County Tyrone,
IRELAND; died 1758 in Ballyfoliard Townland, Ardstraw Parish,
Strabane, County Tyrone, IRELAND.
+ 31 ii. Matthew Love, born 1695 in Strabane, County Tyrone,
IRELAND; died in possibly IRELAND.
+ 32 iii. Ephraim Love, born 1695 in Strabane, County Tyrone,
IRELAND; died 1798 in Rockingham County, Virginia USA.
*Our Direct Lineage*

57
58

Generation No. 8

32. Ephraim Love (Robert7, Robert6, William (Love)5 Luiff, Robert


(Love)4, Johannis (John Love)3, Johanni (John Love)2 Luf, Nigelli (Neil
or Nigel Love)1) was born 1695 in Strabane, County Tyrone, IRELAND,
and died 1798 in Rockingham County, Virginia USA. He married Mary
Donovan April 07, 1720 in Dublin, County Dublin, IRELAND; daughter
of Pierce Donovan and Jane unknown. She was born March 19,
1699 in Dublin, County Dublin, IRELAND, and died Bet. 1738 - 1799 in
County Antrim, IRELAND or Virginia USA.

Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, June 1990, vol vii, p. 252;
"Ephriam Love came from Lancaster County, PA to Augusta County
prior to 1750 and settled at the head of Muddy Creek in the present
county of Rockingham about 8 miles NW of Harrisonburg. During the
French and Indian War he commanded a company of Augusta county
militia and on Sept. 2 1760, Daniel Calhoun and Major Calhoun were
members of his company."

AUGUSTA MEN IN THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR

Beginning in 1753 war raged along the frontier of VA, for more than 10
years. War in its most horrible form, for it was war waged with a
savage people of the most cruel nature, encouraged and aided by one
of the most civilized nations of Europe. This was the French and Indian
War; the traditions of whose ambuscades, butcheries and scalpings
are yet repeated by the descendents of those Scotch-Irish pioneers of
Augusta, which at that time extended from the Great Lakes on the
north of Tennessee on the south and the Mississippi on the west. It is
seen that the present state of West Virginia was therefore a part of
that county. A large part of West Virginia was peopled by growth
westward of the Augusta settlements, and so it may be of interest to
West Virginians to learn something of their warrior ancestors.

The battles, if they may be called such, and the isolated murders of
this war with its other horrors have been so well written up by Hon.
Jos. A. Waddell in his Annuals of Augusta County, that I shall not
attempt to touch upon that part of the war. Some one probably asks,
what then is left to tell. It may be answered, the names of those who
had part in the war. In this day of patriotic societies, such as Sons of
Colonial Wars, sons of the Revolution, etc. and ancestor hunting, a list
of soldiers of those early days is welcomed warmly by a great many
people who have not the opportunity themselves of searching original
records or rare old books for the military record of some ancestor.

58
59

In Richmond is a great mass of certificates of soldiers who proved their


services in the French and Indian War, and received grants of land
from Virginia inn payment thereof.

Volume Seven of Huming's Statutes at Large of Virginia, which has


been out of print since 1820, from the so called Preston Register, a
part of the Draper historical collection belonging to the Wisconsin
Historical Society. This list was printed in the VA Historical Magazine in
1894, and in the Annals of Augusta Co in 1902. The Loves are included
in the list.

In Sept 1758, the House of Burgesses appropriated L20,000 to settle


the arrears in the pay of militia, that had been engaged in the French
and Indian War previous to that date, together with the accounts due
for furnishing provisions, etch to the troops, and for work on the forts.
Of this amount the Augusta people received L3,866-3s-5d or nearly
three times the sum received by any other county.

====

LIST OF MILITIAMEN FROM THE JC SANDERS PAPERS


(the entire list is at the Augusta Men website link above, this is only an
exerpt)
CAPTAINS: LOVE, Ephraim ** Our Direct Linage** (there are
others listed)

====

Rolston 79 -- "Settlers by The Long Grey Trail, pg 209: In 1760,


George III came to the throne of England. This year the Processioners
again Made their rounds in Augusta. In the Cook's Creek neighborhood
the officers appointed were John Hopkins, and David Ralston, of Capt.
Ephraim Love's company, and the lines viewed were those of--
Francis Green, Jeremiah Harrison, Daniel Love, Daniel Callkin, Robert
Cravens, Thomas Harrison, Ephraim Love, Widow Johnson, Alex.
Herring, Edward Shanklin, Widow Logan, William Login, John Cravens,
Widow McDonel (McDonald), Joseph Cravens, William Hopkins, John
Hopkins, Thomas Shanklin, Alex. Miller, Matthew Black, Thomas
Campbell, Daniel Harrison, Daniel Harrison, Jr., Samuel Harrison.
Robert Harrison, Pat Quin (Quinn), Wm. Snoding, John Fowler, David
Nelson, Samuel Bridges, John McGill, Christopher Thompson, Archibald
Hopkins, John Wright, and Thomas Gordon. (Augusta Parish Vestry
Book, p. 295.)

59
60

Love 1 -- "A History of Rockingham County", pp 52 & 53: In a list of


soldiers to whom pay was due from the Colony of Virginia for service
during The French & Indian War (September, 1758) is found the name
of Capt. Ephraim Love. In a footnote: "Capt. Love probably lived near
the site of Singer's Glen. On July 29, 1748, Jacob Dye and Mary his
wife sold to Ephraim Love, late of Lancaster County, PA., 377 acres of
land "on ye head Draughts of Muddy Creek under the North Mountain,"
adjoining Daniel Harrison. Witnesses, William Carroll, William White,
and Peter Scholl.

Children of Ephraim Love and Mary Donovan are:


41 i. Mary Love, born 1725 in Craigatempan, County Antrim,
IRELAND; died Unknown.
42 ii. Janet Love, born 1727 in Craigatempan, County Antrim,
IRELAND; died Unknown in Rockingham County, Virginia USA. She
married Archibald Hopkins Abt. 1743 in Rockingham County, Virginia
USA; died May 08, 1799 in Rockingham County, Virginia USA.
43 iii. Joseph Love, born November 10, 1728 in Craigatempan,
County Antrim, IRELAND; died November 10, 1804 in Knox County,
Tennessee USA. He married Mary Teas 1760 in Augusta County,
Virginia USA; born October 1734 in Pennsylvania USA; died July 07,
1815 in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee USA.
44 iv. Daniel Love, born 1729 in Craigatempan, County Antrim,
IRELAND; died in USA. He married Jane "Jean" Adams March 20,
1764 in Augusta County, Virginia USA; born 1740 in Orange County,
Virginia USA; died in USA.
45 v. David Love, born 1730 in Craigatempan, County Antrim,
IRELAND; died Unknown.
+ 46 vi. Samuel Love, born 1738 in Craigatempan, County Antrim,
IRELAND; died 1781 in Montgomery (now Wythe) County, Virginia
USA. *Our Direct Lineage*

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61
Generation No. 9

46. Samuel Love (Ephraim8, Robert7, Robert6, William (Love)5 Luiff,


Robert (Love)4, Johannis (John Love)3, Johanni (John Love)2 Luf,
Nigelli (Neil or Nigel Love)1) was born 1738 in Craigatempan, County
Antrim, IRELAND, and died 1781 in Montgomery (now Wythe) County,
Virginia USA. He married Dorcas Bell July 03, 1759 in Augusta
County, VA. She was born Abt. 1740 in Augusta County, Virginia USA,
and died 1774 in Fishersville, Augusta County, Virginia USA.

Samuel LOVE and Dorcas BELL were both members of the Tinkling
Spring Presbyterian Church in Virginia.

Montgomery County, VA is now Wythe County, VA.

"Samuel Love and Dorcas Bell Love on May 22nd, 1766, conveyed
to Joseph Love, Samuel's brother, (44 acres, part of) 300 acres on
Black Run of Christian's Creek in Augusta County. Joseph already
owned land adjoining this. On Feb 6th 1775, Samuel Love and Rachel,
his wife, conveyed, by deed, to John Jasper, 265 acres in Augusta
County, Joseph being a witness the execution of the deed. Later, and
on the same date, appears that Rachel, Samuel's wife, was privily
examined before Thomas Douglass, et al, in North Carolina. This was
about the time that Samuel was in what is now Hawkins County,
Tennessee, then Carter's Valley in North Carolina. Joseph left Augusta
County in 1775, and settled in what was afterwards Montgomery
County, then Fincastle County, Virginia. After Samuel left Augusta
County and located in Fincastle, later Montgomery County, he married
this Rachel, whose maiden name is unknown, and by whom it is not
recorded or known that he had any children. What became of this
Rachel is also unknown. This second marriage will, perhaps, be news
to many of his present descendants, although the writer has a very
indistinct recollection of having heard something of the kind many
years ago. Dorcas (Bell) Love, wife of Samuel, died before he left
Augusta County, and William, the youngest child, was taken into the
family of the Bells, "South River Bells", and reared. These Bells lived
on South Shenandoah, not far from Tinkling Spring Meeting House,
and about 10 or 12 miles (east) from Staunton." [from "Loves of the
Valley of Virginia", 1930, by Franklin D. Love.]

Both Samuel and Joseph Love were in Montgomery County as late as


1782. That year Samuel died, and his son, Robert, then twenty-two
years old, on June 4th 1782, appeared before the County Court of
Montgomery County, made bond and qualified as guardian of Samuel's

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children: James, Thomas, Sarah and Mary, William being with the
Bells. Beginning with the early part 1776, at the age of sixteen down
to and including 1782, Robert Love, son of Samuel. Was a volunteer
soldier in the Revolutionary Was, and, as he states, each time enlisting
from Montgomery County, Virginia. In the winter of 1775, and spring
of 1776, Samuel and his sons, Robert, James and Thomas, left
Montgomery County with the intention of exploring the country
southwest, and finding some desirable lands upon which to locate and
settle. They settled and planted crops (corn) that Spring at the forks of
the Holston, in Carter's Valley, near (Long Island and ) Fort Patrick
Henry, in what is now Hawkins (Sullivan) County, Tennessee. They
were driven out shortly by the Indians, who raided the settlement, and
inflicted injuries to some of the settlers: they later returned and again
were driven out by the Indians. This time they returned to their farm
in Montgomery County, now Wythe County, and remained, and there
Samuel died. On May 8th 1782, Joseph Love, brother of Samuel, with
others appeared in open court of Montgomery County, and asked for
reimbursement for provisions and equipment furnished himself while
on duty in North Carolina to Join Greene (Gen. Nathaniel Greene),
which was allowed upon the proof offered the court. On the 15th Nov.
1799, Joseph Love, now of Wythe County, gave a bill of sale to Robert
Sayers to a negro man. This is the last record of Joseph Love, brother
of Samuel, in Virginia. [from "Loves of the Valley of Virginia", 1930, by
Franklin D. Love.]

===

Samuel Love (ca 1739 - 1781): Samuel married Dorcas Bell, daughter
of James "South River" Bell, in 1759 and shortly after purchased 300
acres on Christian's Creek, near Tinkling Springs, Virginia. Then, in
1774-5, Samuel and his brother Joseph relocated their families to a
plantation in Wythe County, Virginia. It is believed Dorcas died shortly
before this relocation.

Later Samuel made two attempts (1775-1777) to relocate his family to


Carter's Valley, Tennessee, but fled both times because of Indian
attacks. He returned with his family to his home in Virginia, where he
died in 1781.

Samuel and Dorcas had seven children, including Robert and Thomas,
both of who were prominent in the early history of Waynesville, North
Carolina. SOURCE: Family Love

62
63
Children of Samuel Love and Dorcas Bell are:
+ 62 i. Robert "R.S." Love, born May 11, 1760 in Augusta County,
Virginia; died July 17, 1845 in Waynesville, Haywood County, North
Carolina.
63 ii. James Love, born March 10, 1762 in Augusta County, VA; died
1844 in Maury County, TN. He married Winnesophia Dillard June
1793 in Washington County, NC (now called Erwin, Unicoi County,
TN); born January 22, 1763 in Culpeper County, VA; died in TN
(probably).
+ 64 iii. Thomas Love, born November 15, 1765 in Augusta County,
Virginia; died 1844 in Macon County, Tennessee.
*Our Direct Lineage*
+ 65 iv. Dorcas "Polly" Love, born Abt. 1773 in Augusta County,
Virginia; died September 23, 1853 in Jackson (fka Haywood / Macon)
County, North Carolina.

Generation No. 10

64. General Thomas Love (Samuel9, Ephraim8, Robert7, Robert6,


William (Love)5 Luiff, Robert (Love)4, Johannis (John Love)3, Johanni
(John Love)2 Luf, Nigelli (Neil or Nigel Love)1) was born November 15,
1765 in Augusta County, Virginia, and died 1844 in Macon County,
Tennessee. He married Martha Patsy Dillard January 12, 1788 in
Washington County, North Carolina (now called Erwin, Unicoi County,
TN), daughter of Col. Thomas Dillard and Martha Webb. She was
born September 27, 1774 in Virginia, and died 1832 in Macon County,
Tennessee. **Our Direct Lineage**

Child of Thomas Love and Martha Dillard is:


+ 79 i. Sarah Love, born December 19, 1800 in Washington County,
North Carolina (now called Erwin, Unicoi County, TN); died September
20, 1851 in Trezevant, Carroll County, Tennessee.
**Our Direct Lineage**

63
64
Generation No. 11

Sarah Love (Thomas10, Samuel9, Ephraim8, Robert7, Robert6, William


(Love)5 Luiff, Robert (Love)4, Johannis (John Love)3, Johanni (John Love)2
Luf, Nigelli (Neil or Nigel Love)1 was born December 19, 1800 in Washington
County, North Carolina (now called Erwin, Unicoi County, TN); died
September 20, 1851 in Trezevant, Carroll County, Tennessee. About. 1819,
in probably NC, Sarah married David Coleman (born January 25, 1798 in
Cabarrus (formerly Mecklenburg) County, North Carolina; died January 23,
1870 in Trezevant, Carroll County, Tennessee. He was the son of Mark
Coleman and Nancy Welch.) **Our Direct Lineage**

The Children of Sarah Love and David Coleman are:


Children of David Coleman and Sarah Love are:
34.i. Martha Louisa Coleman, born February 29, 1820 in Cabarrus County, NC;
died February 15, 1880 in Carroll County, TN. She married James Monroe
McKenzie March 05, 1842 probably in Tennessee; born February 14, 1818 in Carroll
County, TN; died October 09, 1873 in Carroll County, TN. Both are buried in Mount
Olivet Cemetery, McKenzie, Carroll County, TN.
35 ii. Thomas W. Coleman, born Abt. 1822 in Cabarrus County, NC; died 1898 in
Carroll County, TN. He married Louisiana A. Thomas January 19, 1846 in Carroll
County, TN; born 1829 in Carroll County, TN; died 1909 in Carroll County, TN. Both
are buried in Coleman Cemetery, Carroll County, TN. **Our Direct Lineage**
36 iii. Robert L. Coleman, born Abt. 1824 in Cabarrus County, NC; died Abt. 1894
in Unknown. He married Harriet E. Norman December 05, 1851 in NC; born
November 14, 1834 in NC; died 1894 in Unknown.
37 iv. William Albert Coleman, born February 05, 1825 in Cabarrus County, NC;
died January 17, 1910 in Carroll County, TN. He married Margaret Rebecca
Norman January 13, 1847 probably in NC; born July 31, 1828 in NC; died February
28, 1907 in Carroll County, TN. Both are buried in the Coleman Cemetery, Carroll
County, Tennessee.
38 v. John S. Coleman, born February 08, 1826 in Cabarrus County, NC; died July
15, 1861 in Carroll County, TN. Burial: Coleman Cemetery, Carroll County,
Tennessee.
39 vi. Samuel C. Coleman, born January 09, 1829 in Cabarrus County, NC; died
October 08, 1905 in Carroll County, TN. He married Sarah Elizabeth Hughes
January 25, 1860 in TN; born December 11, 1832 in TN; died October 09, 1877 in
Carroll County, TN. Both are buried: Coleman Cemetery, Carroll County, Tennessee.
40 vii. Mary A. "Polly" Coleman, born Abt. 1831 in Cabarrus County, NC. She
married (1) George William F. Boswell, M.D. Abt. 1848 probably in NC or TN;
born Abt. 1821 in Caswell County, NC; died June 1849 in Carroll County, TN. She
married (2) Joel P. King, M.D. Aft. 1849 probably in TN; born Abt. 1828. Both
probably died in Carroll County, TN.
41 viii. Amanda D. Coleman, born March 15, 1834 in Cabarrus County, NC; died
August 30, 1848 in Cabarrus County, NC.
42 ix. Adiliza Coleman, (female) born July 14, 1838 in Cabarrus County, NC; died
April 03, 1861 in Carroll County, TN. Burial: Coleman Cemetery, Carroll County,
Tennessee.
43 x. Green Jackson Coleman, born November 04, 1839 in Cabarrus County, NC;
died December 26, 1917 in Carroll County, TN. He married Catherine "Kate"
Younger November 16, 1865 probably in TN; born November 14, 1846 in TN; died
March 29, 1914 in Carroll County, TN. Both are buried in Union Adademy Cemetery,
Carroll County, TN.

64
65

Generation No. 12

Thomas W. Coleman, born Abt. 1822 in Cabarrus County, NC; died


1898 in Carroll County, TN. He married Louisiana A. Thomas
January 19, 1846 in Carroll County, TN; born 1829 in Carroll County,
TN; died 1909 in Carroll County, TN. Both are buried in Coleman
Cemetery, Carroll County, TN. **Our Direct Lineage**

Children of Thomas Coleman and Louisiana Thomas:


SantaFe Bell Coleman (born 1846 / died 1920) married James G.
Sayles – 1st, then to Samuel Sayles – 2nd (born 1853/died March
16, 1906). We are descended through SantaFe + Samuel Sayles.

Generation No. 13

SantaFe Bell Coleman (born 1846 / died 1920) married James G.


Sayles – 1st, then to Samuel Sayles – 2nd (born 1853/died March
16, 1906). We are descended through SantaFe + Samuel Sayles.
**Our Direct Lineage**

Children of SantaFe (Coleman) Sayles and Samuel A. Sayles:


Ollie Euen Sayles (born December 28, 1887 –Weakley Co. TN. /
died March 28, 1967) married on to William Chester Cunningham
(born August 4, 1877 / died November 16, 1933). Buried Union
Academy Cemetery, Carroll County, TN.

65
66

Generation No. 14

Ollie Euen Sayles (born December 28, 1887 –Weakley Co. TN. /
died March 28, 1967) married on to William Chester Cunningham
(born August 4, 1877 / died November 16, 1933). Buried Union
Academy Cemetery, Carroll County, TN. **Our Direct Lineage**

Children Of William Chester Cunningham + Ollie Euen Sayles:


1. Audie Cunningham (Born November 11, 1911 – carrollCounty,
TN. / died August, 1913)
2. Essie Bell Cunningham (born December 27, 1913 – Carroll Co.,
TN / died March 10, 1980. married to Andy Woodard. Buried in
Camden City Cemetery, Camden, TN.
3. Willa Janett Cunningham (born January 24, 1917 – Carroll Co.,
TN / died___________)/. Married Elmer Crocker, Jr. (born
October 3, 1934)
4. Robert Lee Cunningham (born December 7, 1919 – Carroll Co.,
TN. / died ). Married to Louise Sessions (born _____ / died May
8, 1980)
5. Elizabeth Daphne Cunningham (born May 3, 1922 – Carroll Co.,
TN. / died October 17, 1944). Married to James Clifford Grissom
(born May 17, 1919 / died _________)
6. William Hudkins Cunningham (born June 27, 1927 – Carroll
Co., TN) Married on July 22, 1951 to Dorothy Jean McNeal (born
Dec. 16, 1933 – Jefferson County, GA. / died July 15, 1986 –
Augusta, GA. Buried at Hillcrest Cemetery, Augusta, GA.)

66
67
Generation No. 15

William Hudkins Cunningham (born June 27, 1927 – Carroll Co.,


TN) Married on July 22, 1951 to Dorothy Jean McNeal (born Dec. 16,
1933 – Jefferson County, GA. / died July 15, 1986 – Augusta, GA.
Buried at Hillcrest Cemetery, Augusta, GA.)

Children of William Hudkins Cunningham and Dorothy Jean


McNeal:

1.Thomas Harold Cunningham (b. Mar.22, 1954 in Augusta,


Richmond Co., Ga / d. ) - Married on Dec. 21, 1975 to Dixie Jean
Newgard (b. Oct. 30, 1954)
2. Ellen Lee Cunningham (b. Sept. 13, 1956 in Augusta, Richmond
Co., Ga. / d.) - Married May 21,1978 to Bruce Allen Bergherm, Jr. (b.
6-2-1956 / d.)

Generation No. 16

1.Thomas Harold Cunningham (b. Mar.22, 1954 in Augusta,


Richmond Co., Ga / d. ) - Married on Dec. 21, 1975 to Dixie Jean
Newgard (b. Oct. 30, 1954)
Children of Harold Cunningham and Jeannie Newgard:
1. Stacey Brooke Cunningham (b. Sept. 22, 1981 – Augusta,
GA.)
2. Amy Noelle Cunningham (b. Dec. 1, 1983 – Augusta, GA.)

2. Ellen Lee Cunningham (b. Sept. 13, 1956 in Augusta, Richmond


Co., Ga. / d.) - Married May 21,1978 to Bruce Allen Bergherm, Jr. (b.
6-2-1956 / d.)
Children of Ellen Cunningham and Bruce Bergherm:
1. Bruce Allen Bergherm III (b. May 10, 1980) Married to
Jennifer Herndon.
2. William Garrett Bergherm (b. May 5, 1993)

Generation No. 17

Stacey Brooke Cunningham (b. Sept. 22, 1981 – Augusta, GA.)


Amy Noelle Cunningham (b. Dec. 1, 1983 – Augusta, GA.)
Bruce Allen Bergherm III (b. May 10, 1980)
William Garrett Bergherm (b. May 5, 1993)

67
Ancestry.com - U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865

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U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865

Name:J. J. Cunningham
Side:Confederate
Regiment State/Kentucky
Origin:
Regiment Name:12 Kentucky Cavalry
Regiment Name 12th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry
Expanded:
Company:I
Rank In:Private
Rank In Expanded:Private
Rank Out:Private
Rank Out Expanded:Private
Film Number:M377 roll 3

Source Information:
National Park Service. U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network,
Inc., 2007. Original data: National Park Service, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, online <>, acquired 2007.

Description:
This database contains the names of approximately 6.3 million soldiers who served in the American Civil War. In
addition to their names, information that may be listed for each soldier includes regiment, company, and rank.

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Ancestry.com - Kentucky Death Index, 1911-2000

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Kentucky Death Index, 1911-2000

Name:Jerome C Cunningham
Death Date:24 Nov 1912
Death Place:Crlil
Age:066
Volume:68
Certificate:27179

Source Information:
Commonwealth of Kentucky, Health Data Branch, Divisision of Epidemiology and Health Planning, comp.. Kentucky
Death Index, 1911-2000 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data:
Commonwealth of Kentucky, Health Data Branch, Divisision of Epidemiology and Health Planning. Kentucky Death
Index, 1911-present. Frankfort, KY, USA: Kentucky Department of Information Systems.

Description:
This database contains an index to more than 2.6 million death records of individuals who passed away in the State of
Kentucky, USA, from 1911 on. All records contain the following information: name of the individual, date of death,
county of death, county of residence, age at death, and volume and certificate number.

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Four Great Grandfathers
Served in the Armed Forces
of the

Confederate States of America


During the War of Northern
Aggression
Jesse McNeal, Private
Enlisted May 6, 1862, Augusta, Georgia
Company B, 22nd Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Army
Army of Northern Virginia, CSA
Known as the "Glascock Independent Guards"
Killed at Manassas Gap, Virginia, July 23, 1863

J.J.G.W. "Green" McCoy, Private


Enlisted March 4, 1862, Gibson, Georgia
Company A, 48th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry
Army of Northern Virginia, CSA
Known as the "Gibson Guards" or "Gibson Volunteers"
Died in Christian's Hospital, Lynchburg, Virginia, April 14, 1863
Buried in Confederate Cemetery, Lynchburg, Virginia, April 19, 1863
Section No.5, 1st Line, Lot 184

Carter Newsome
Enlisted September, 1863, Gibson Georgia
White's Battalion, Company, E, 3rd South Carolina Light Artillery
Transferred to Captain Starr's Cavalry, May, 1864
Discharged upon the surrender at Appomattox, Virginia, April 9, 1865

Silas Dye, Private


Enlisted May 6, 1862, Augusta, Georgia
Company B, 22nd Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Army
Army of Northern Virginia, CSA
Known as the "Glascock Independent Guards"
Gunshot Wound to Right Knee and Captured at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863
Paroled at Baltimore, Maryland, August 23, 1863
Received at City point, Virginia, for exchange of Union Prisoners, August 24, 1863
Wounded at Wilderness, Virginia, May 6, 1864
Surrendered and Paroled at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia, April 9, 1865
Organizational Assignments of the Forty-eighth Georgia Infantry Regiment

Formed 10 and 11 March 1862 at Camp Davis in Effingham County, Georgia, near
Savannah.

25 May 1862 ordered to Richmond, Virginia. Attached to Major General Daniel


Harvey Hill’s Division, Brigadier General Roswell S. Ripley’s Brigade. Brigaded
with the 44th Georgia Infantry Regiment, 1st North Carolina Infantry Regiment, and
3rd North Carolina Infantry Regiment.

16 August 1862 attached to Lieutenant General James Longstreet’s Corps, Major


General R.H. Anderson’s Division, Brigadier General Augustus R. Wright’s
Brigade. Brigaded with the 3rd Georgia Infantry Regiment, 22nd Georgia Infantry
Regiment, and 44th Alabama Infantry Regiment.

15 November 1862 attached to Lieutenant General James Longstreet’s I Corps,


Major General R. H. Anderson’s Division, Brigadier General A. R. Wright’s
Brigade. Brigaded with 3rd Georgia Infantry Regiment, 22nd Georgia Infantry
Regiment, and 2nd Georgia Infantry Battalion.

June – July, 1863, the Gettysburg Campaign, attached to Lieutenant General


Ambrose Powell (A. P.) Hill’s III Corps, Major General R. H. Anderson’s Division,
Brigadier General A. R. Wright’s Brigade. Brigaded with the 3rd Georgia Infantry
Regiment, 22nd Georgia Infantry Regiment, and 2nd Georgia Infantry Battalion.

1 August 1864 attached to Lieutenant General A. P. Hill’s III Corps, Major General
R. H. Anderson’s Division, Brigadier General A. R. Wright’s Brigade. Brigaded
with the 2nd Georgia Infantry Battalion, 10th Georgia Infantry Battalion, 3rd Georgia
Infantry Regiment, and 64th Georgia Infantry Regiment.

1 October 1864, attached to Lieutenant General A. P. Hill’s III Corps, Major


General William Mahone’s Division, Brigadier General A. R. Wright’s Brigade.
Brigaded with the 2nd Georgia Infantry Battalion, 10th Georgia Infantry Battalion,
3rd Georgia Infantry Regiment, and 64th Georgia Infantry Regiment.

1 January 1865, attached to Lieutenant General A. P. Hill’s III Corps, Major


General William Mahone’s Division, Brigadier General Moxley Sorrel’s Brigade.
Brigaded with the 2nd Georgia Infantry Battalion, 10th Georgia Infantry Battalion,
3rd Georgia Infantry Regiment, and 64th Georgia Infantry Regiment.

2 April 1865, Lt. Gen. A. P. Hill is killed in action near Petersburg, Virginia. The
remnants of III Corps are attached to I Corps for the remaining week of the Army
of Northern Virginia’s existence.
Report of Brigadier General A. R. Wright, C. S. Army, commanding brigade, on
action of Wright's Brigade at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.
HEADQUARTERS WRIGHT'S BRIGADE, September 28, 1863.
MAJOR: I submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade in the
military operations at Gettysburg, Pa. , on July 1, 2, 3, and 4 last: On the morning of
July 1, I moved my brigade from its camp near Fayetteville, Pa. , and, by order of
the major-general commanding the division, marched in the direction of
Gettysburg, passing through the South Mountain at Cashtown Gap. In this march,
my brigade was immediately in rear of Mahone's brigade, and I was instructed to
follow Mahone's command. About 10 a. m. , and when within about 1 mile of
Cashtown (which is at the foot of the eastern slope of South Mountain), my
command was stopped by the halt of Mahone's brigade in the road in my immediate
front. In a few minutes after I had halted, the report of artillery was heard in the
direction of Gettysburg, and seemingly not more than 6 or 8 miles distant. After
remaining about one hour or an hour and a half in the road, the column again
moved forward, my brigade following, as before, Mahone's. On arriving near to
Cashtown, I was directed to file off to the right of the turnpike, and bivouac my men
in a piece of timbered land, in rear of Mahone, who had preceded me in the woods.
At the same time, I was informed that my wagon train would be parked in the open
field in my front. In this position I remained until about 1 p. m. , when we again
took up the line of march along the turnpike in the direction of Gettysburg. When
within about 6 miles of the latter place, I was compelled by severe indisposition to
leave my command, and, consequently, know nothing more of the day's operations
excepting that derived from Colonel Gibson, of the Forty-eighth Georgia Regiment,
who in my absence assumed command of the brigade. By him I was informed that
between 4 and 5 p. m. the brigade reached a position three fourths of a mile to the
right of the turnpike, and about 2 1\2 or 3 miles from Gettysburg, where they
remained until next morning, and where I found them in line of battle on returning
to the command at 7 a. m. on July 2. Just after assuming command, I received
orders to move my brigade by the right flank, following immediately in rear of
Perry's brigade. In this order I was conducted by Major-General Anderson to a
position already occupied by a portion of the troops of the Third Corps, and was
directed to relieve a brigade (Davis', I think, of Heth's division), then in line of battle
about 2 miles south of Gettysburg. About noon, I was informed by Major-General
Anderson that an attack upon the enemy's lines would soon be made by the whole
division, commencing on our right by Wilcox's brigade, and that each brigade of the
division would begin the attack as soon as the brigade on its immediate right
commenced the movement. I was instructed to move simultaneously with Perry's
brigade, which was on my right, and informed that Posey's brigade, on my left,
would move forward upon my advance.
This being the order of battle, I awaited the signal for the general advance, which
was given at about 5 p. m. by the advance of Wilcox's and Perry's brigade, on my
right. I immediately order forward my brigade, and attacked the enemy in his
strong position on a range of hills running south from the town of Gettysburg. In
this advance, I was compelled to pass for more than a mile across an open plain,
intersected by numerous post and rail fences, and swept by the enemy's artillery,
which was posted along the Emmitsburg road and upon the crest of the heights on
McPherson's farm, a little south of Cemetery Hill. In this advance, my brigade was
formed in the following order: The Twenty-second Georgia Regiment on the right,
the Third Georgia in the ; center, and the Forty-eighth Georgia on the left. The
Second Georgia Battalion, which was deployed in front of the whole brigade as
skirmishers, was directed to close intervals on the left as soon as the command
reached the line of skirmishers, and form upon the left of the brigade. Owing to the
impetuosity of the advance and the length of the line occupied by them, the Second
Battalion failed to form all its companies upon the left of the brigade, some of them
falling into line with other regiments of the command. My men moved steadily
forward until reaching within musket range of the Emmitsburg turnpike, when we
encountered a strong body of infantry posted under cover of a fence near to and
parallel with the road. Just in rear of this line of infantry were the advanced
batteries of the enemy, posted along the Emmitsburg turnpike, with a field of fire
raking the whole valley below. Just before reaching this position, I had observed
that Posey's brigade, on my left, had not advanced, and fearing that, if I proceeded
much farther with my left flank entirely unprotected, I might become involved in
serious difficulties, I dispatched my aide-de-camp, Captain R. H. Bell, with a
message to Major-General Anderson, informing him of my own advance and its
extent, and that General Posey had not advanced with his brigade on my left. To
this message I received a reply to press on; that Posey had been ordered in on my
left, and that he (General Anderson) would reiterate the order. I immediately
charged upon the enemy's line, and drove him in great confusion upon his second
line, which was formed behind a stone fence, some 100 or more yards in rear of the
Emmitsburg turnpike. At this point we captured several pieces of artillery, which
the enemy in his haste and confusion was unable to take off the field. Having gained
the Emmitsburg turnpike, we again charged upon the enemy, heavily posted behind
a stone fence which ran along the abrupt slope of the heights some 150 yards in rear
of the pike. Here the enemy made considerable resistance to our farther progress,
but was finally forced to retire by the impetuous charge of my command. We were
now within less than 100 yards of the crest of the heights, which were lined with
artillery, supported by a strong body of infantry, under protection of a stone fence.
My men, by a well directed fire, soon drove the cannoneers from their guns, and,
leaping over the fence, charged up to the top of the crest, and drove the enemy's
infantry into a rocky gorge on the eastern slope of the heights, and some 80 or 100
yards in rear of the enemy's batteries. We were now complete masters of the field,
having gained the key, as it were, of the enemy's whole line. Unfortunately, just as
we had carried the enemy's last and strongest position, it was discovered that the
brigade on our right had not only not advanced across the turnpike, but had
actually given way, and was rapidly falling back to the rear, while on our left we
were entirely unprotected, the brigade ordered to our support having failed to
advance. It was now evident, with my ranks so seriously thinned as they had been by
this terrible charge, I should not be able to hold my position unless speedily and
strongly re-enforced. My advanced position and the unprotected condition of my
flanks invited an attack which the enemy were speedy to discover, and immediately
passed a strong body of infantry under cover of a high ledge of rocks, thickly
covered with stunted undergrowth, which fell away from the gorge in rear of their
batteries before mentioned in a southeasterly direction, and, emerging on the
western slope of the ridge, came upon my right and rear at a point equidistant from
the Emmitsburg turnpike and the stone fence, while a large brigade advanced from
the point of woods on my left, which extended nearly down to the turnpike, and,
gaining the turnpike, moved rapidly to meet the party which had passed round
upon our right. We were now in a critical condition. The enemy's converging line
was rapidly closing upon our rear; a few moments more, and we would be
completely surrounded; still, no support could be seen coming to our assistance, and
with painful hearts we abandoned our captured guns, faced about, and prepared to
cut our way through the closing lines in our rear. This was effected in tolerable
order, but with immense loss. The enemy rushed to his abandoned guns as soon as
we began to retire, and poured a severe fire of grape and canister into our thinned
ranks as we retired slowly down the slope into the valley below. I continued to fall
back until I reached a slight depression a few hundred yards in advance of our
skirmish line of the morning, when I halted, reformed my brigade, and awaited the
further pursuit of the enemy. Finding that the enemy was not disposed to continue
his advance, a line of skirmishers was thrown out in my front, and a little after dark
my command moved to the position which we had occupied before the attack was
made. In this charge, my loss was very severe, amounting to 688 in killed, wounded,
and missing, including many valuable officers. I have not the slightest doubt but
that I should have been able to have maintained my position on the heights, and
secured the captured artillery, if there h; ad been a protecting force on my left, or if
the brigade on my right had not been forced to retire. We captured over twenty
pieces of artillery, all of which we were compelled to abandon. These pieces were
taken by the respective regiments composing this brigade, as follows: The Third
Georgia, 11 pieces; the Twenty-second Georgia, 3 pieces; the Forty-eighth Georgia,
4 pieces, and the Second Battalion several pieces-the exact number not ascertained,
but believed to amount to as many as 5 or 6 pieces. I am gratified to say that all the
officers and men behaved in the most handsome manner; indeed, I have never seen
their conduct excelled on any battle-field of this war. In the list of casualties, A am
pained to find the name of Colonel Joseph Wasden, commanding Twenty-second
Georgia Regiment, who was killed at the head of his command near the Emmitsburg
turnpike. The service contained no better or truer officer, and his death, while
deeply deplored by his friends and associates, will be a serious loss to the
Confederacy. Major Ceorge W. Ross, commanding Second Georgia Battallion, was
seriously wounded, fell into the hands of the enemy, and has since died. This gallant
officer was shot down while in the enemy's works on the crest of the heights,
endeavoring to have removed some of the captured artillery. As a disciplinarian, he
had no superior in the field; an accomplished gentleman and gallant officer, the
country will mourn his loss. Colonel William Gibson, commanding Forty-eighth
Georgia Regiment, was seriously wounded, and left upon the field. I am pleased to
say that recent information received from him gives assurance of his ultimate
recovery. This regiment suffered more severely than any other in the command.
Being on the extreme left, it was exposed to a heavy enfilade as well as direct fire.
The colors were shot down no less than seven times, and were finally lost. During
the morning of Friday (the 3d), my brigade remained quietly in its original line of
battle. Late in the afternoon, it was moved forward 500 or 600 yards, to cover the
retreat of Pickett's division, which had assaulted the enemy's position at the same
point where my brigade had advanced the day before, and had been forced to re
tire. Soon after, I was ordered by General Lee to move my brigade to the right
several hundred yards, and form in rear of Wilcox's brigade, to support the latter in
case the enemy should advance upon it, and which was now threatened. In this
position I remained until after nightfall, when I retired to my original position in
line of battle upon the hill. On Saturday (the 4th), my command remained quietly in
line until about sunset, when I was ordered to take up the line of march for
Fairfield. We reached the latter place about midnight, marching through drenching
rain, and here I received orders to move on to Monterey Gap, in South Mountain,
and support Iverson's brigade, which had been attacked in the mountain while
guarding a large wagon train. About daylight, I came upon the rear of the train
upon the top of the mountain, but found the road so completely blocked up as to
prevent my farther progress. I halted my command, and permitted the men to lie
down and take a little rest, while I rode to the front, to ascertain the exact condition
of affairs. I found General Iverson near Monterey, and not far from the
Waynesborough turnpike, and from his learned that all the danger to the train had
passed, and I directed him to move on in the direction of Waynesborough as rapidly
as possible, so as to enable our troops to get through the mountain pass. Shortly
after this, Major-General Anderson came up, and assumed the further direction of
the day. From this time until we recrossed the Potomac, my brigade lost not a single
man in the very severe and fatiguing march of the night before recrossing the river.
My entire command displayed a patient endurance of physical suffering and heroic
fortitude rarely exhibited by any troops. A detailed list of the casualties of my
command was forwarded to you immediately after the battle, and is, therefore,
omitted in this report. Inclosed I hand you copies of the reports of the officers
commanding the different regiments composing this brigade.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
A. R. WRIGHT,
Brigadier-General,
Commanding Brigade. Major THOMAS S. MILLS,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Anderson's Division.
Ancestry.com - U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946

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U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946

Name:Hurshel L Cunningham
Birth Year:1927
Race:White, citizen (White)
Nativity State or Tennessee
Country:
State:Tennessee
County or City:Carroll

Enlistment Date:22 Mar 1946


Enlistment State:Kentucky
Enlistment City:Fort Knox
Branch:Transportation Corps
Branch Code:Transportation Corps
Grade:Private
Grade Code:Private
Term of Enlistment:Enlistment for Hawaiian Department
Component:Regular Army (including Officers, Nurses, Warrant Officers, and Enlisted Men)
Source:Enlisted Man, Philippine Scout or recall to AD of an enlisted man who had been transferred
to the ERC

Education:Grammar school
Civil Occupation:Laborer
Marital Status:Single, with dependents
Height:05
Weight:213

Source Information:
National Archives and Records Administration. U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 [database on-
line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: Electronic Army Serial Number Merged File,
1938-1946 [Archival Database]; World War II Army Enlistment Records; Records of the National Archives and Records
Administration, Record Group 64; National Archives at College Park, College Park, MD.

Description:
This database contains information on about 8.3 million men and women who enlisted in the U.S. Army during World
War II. Information contained in this database usually includes: name of enlistee, army serial number, residence (county
and state), place of enlistment, enlistment date, grade, army branch, component, term of enlistment, birthplace, year of
birth, race and citizenship, height and weight, education, and marital status.

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Ancestry.com - U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946

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U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946

Name:William H Cunningham
Birth Year:1927
Race:White, citizen (White)
Nativity State or Tennessee
Country:
State:Tennessee
County or City:Carroll

Enlistment Date:25 Aug 1945


Enlistment State:Georgia
Enlistment City:Fort Oglethorpe
Branch:No branch assignment
Branch Code:No branch assignment
Grade:Private
Grade Code:Private
Term of Enlistment:Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the
discretion of the President or otherwise according to law
Component:Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source:Civil Life

Education:Grammar school
Marital Status:Single, without dependents
Height:00
Weight:100

Source Information:
National Archives and Records Administration. U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 [database on-
line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: Electronic Army Serial Number Merged File,
1938-1946 [Archival Database]; World War II Army Enlistment Records; Records of the National Archives and Records
Administration, Record Group 64; National Archives at College Park, College Park, MD.

Description:
This database contains information on about 8.3 million men and women who enlisted in the U.S. Army during World
War II. Information contained in this database usually includes: name of enlistee, army serial number, residence (county
and state), place of enlistment, enlistment date, grade, army branch, component, term of enlistment, birthplace, year of
birth, race and citizenship, height and weight, education, and marital status.

Copyright © 1998-2006, MyFamily.com


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Ancestry.com - U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946

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U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946

Name:Robert L Cunningham
Birth Year:1919
Race:White, citizen (White)
Nativity State or Tennessee
Country:
State:Tennessee
County or City:Carroll

Enlistment Date:23 Jan 1941


Enlistment State:Georgia
Enlistment City:Fort Oglethorpe
Branch:Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Branch Code:Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Grade:Private
Grade Code:Private
Component:Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source:Civil Life

Education:Grammar school
Civil Occupation:Automobile Serviceman
Marital Status:Single, without dependents
Height:70
Weight:157

Source Information:
National Archives and Records Administration. U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 [database on-
line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: Electronic Army Serial Number Merged File,
1938-1946 [Archival Database]; World War II Army Enlistment Records; Records of the National Archives and Records
Administration, Record Group 64; National Archives at College Park, College Park, MD.

Description:
This database contains information on about 8.3 million men and women who enlisted in the U.S. Army during World
War II. Information contained in this database usually includes: name of enlistee, army serial number, residence (county
and state), place of enlistment, enlistment date, grade, army branch, component, term of enlistment, birthplace, year of
birth, race and citizenship, height and weight, education, and marital status.

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Ancestry.com - U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946

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Ancestry.com - U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946

U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946

Name:James C Grissom
Birth Year:1919
Race:White, citizen (White)
Nativity State or Tennessee
Country:
State:Tennessee
County or City:Carroll

Enlistment Date:8 Feb 1945


Enlistment State:Georgia
Enlistment City:Fort Oglethorpe
Branch:No branch assignment
Branch Code:No branch assignment
Grade:Private
Grade Code:Private
Term of Enlistment:Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the
discretion of the President or otherwise according to law
Component:Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source:Civil Life

Education:Grammar school
Civil Occupation:Tracktor Driver* or Truck Driver, Heavy or Chauffeur or Truck Driver, Light An asterisk (*)
appearing after a job title indicates that a trade test for the particular occupation will be
found in the United States Employment Service Manual, Oral Trade Test
Marital Status:Widower or widow, with dependents
Height:00
Weight:100

Source Information:
National Archives and Records Administration. U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 [database on-
line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: Electronic Army Serial Number Merged File,
1938-1946 [Archival Database]; World War II Army Enlistment Records; Records of the National Archives and Records
Administration, Record Group 64; National Archives at College Park, College Park, MD.

Description:
This database contains information on about 8.3 million men and women who enlisted in the U.S. Army during World
War II. Information contained in this database usually includes: name of enlistee, army serial number, residence (county
and state), place of enlistment, enlistment date, grade, army branch, component, term of enlistment, birthplace, year of
birth, race and citizenship, height and weight, education, and marital status.

Copyright © 1998-2006, MyFamily.com


Inc.
<< Return to Results Screen

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank=1&gsf...nlist&indiv=1&pf=1&recid=2832954&h=&fh=&ct=&fsk=&bsk= (2 of 2)5/24/2007 10:53:14 AM

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