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STATISTICS 101

Fourth Exam

PROBLEM SOLVING. Answer the following problems. Show your complete solutions. For all testing procedures,
provide the following: (1) Null and alternative hypothesis, (2) level of significance, (3) test statistic, (4) critical
value, and (5) decision rule and decision.
1.

A random sample of n = 35 observations from a quantitative population produced a mean X = 2.4 and
a standard deviation s = 0.2. Suppose your research objective is to show that the population mean, , is
greater than 2.3.
a. Give the null and alternative hypothesis for the test.
b. Conduct the test. Is there sufficient evidence to say that, at 5% level of significance, that the
true mean is, indeed, greater than 2.3?

2.

An experiment was planned to compare the mean time (in days) required to recover from a common
cold for persons given a daily dose of 4 milligrams (mg) of vitamin C versus those who were not given a
vitamin supplement. Suppose that 35 adults were randomly selected for each treatment category and
that the mean recovery times and standard deviations for the two groups were as follows:

a.

b.

Suppose your research objective is to show that the use of vitamin C reduces the mean time
required to recover from a common cold and its complications. Give the null and alternative
hypotheses for the test. Is this a one- or a two-tailed test?
Conduct the statistical test of the null hypothesis in part a, and state your conclusion. Test
using = 0.05.

3.

An experiment was conducted to test the effect of a new drug on a viral infection. The infection was
induced in 100 mice, and the mice were randomly split into two groups of 50. The first group, the control
group, received no treatment for the infection. The second group received the drug. After a 30-day
period, the proportions of survivors, p1 and p2, in the two groups were found to be 0.36 and 0.60,
respectively.
a. Is there sufficient evidence to indicate that the drug is effective in treating the viral infection?
Use = 0.05.
b. Use a 95% confidence interval to estimate the actual difference in the cure rates for the treated
versus the control groups.

4.

Many companies are becoming involved in flextime, in which a worker schedules his or her own work
hours or compresses work weeks. A company that was contemplating the installation of a flextime
schedule estimated that it needed a minimum mean of 7 hours per day per assembly worker in order to
operate effectively. Each of a random sample of 80 of the companys assemblers was asked to submit
a tentative flextime schedule. If the mean number of hours per day for Monday was 6.7 hours and the
standard deviation was 2.7 hours, do the data provide sufficient evidence to indicate that the mean
number of hours worked per day on Mondays, for all of the companys assemblers, will be less than 7
hours? Test using = 0.05.

5.

In an attempt to compare the starting salaries for college graduates who majored in chemical
engineering and computer science, random samples of 50 recent college graduates in each major were

1|Statistics 101, Fourth Exam

selected and the following information obtained. Do the data provide sufficient evidence to indicate a
difference in average starting salaries for college graduates who majored in chemical engineering and
computer science? Test using = 0.05.

6.

An article in the Washington Post stated that nearly 45% of the U.S. population is born with brown eyes,
although they dont necessarily stay that way. To test the newspapers claim, a random sample of 80
people was selected, and 32 had brown eyes. Is there sufficient evidence to dispute the newspapers
claim regarding the proportion of brown-eyed people in the United States? Use = 0.01.

CONCEPTS. Identify the following.


1.
2.
3.

Contradiction of the null hypothesis.


A measure of linear relationship between two variables.
A statistic whose value is calculated from sample measurements and on which the statistical decision
will be based.
4. The proportion of variability in the observed values of Y that can be explained by X.
5. The maximum probability of Type I error the researcher is willing to commit.
6. Value that separates the critical region and the acceptance region.
7. The smallest value of for which Ho will be rejected based on sample information.
8. An assertion or conjecture concerning one or more populations.
9. A test where the alternative hypothesis specifies a one-directional difference for the parameter of
interest.
10. The set of values of the test statistic for which the null hypothesis will be rejected.

End of Exam 04

2|Statistics 101, Fourth Exam