Number

Numbers
JKP

Central
idea:
Lines of
Inquiry:

JK

Central
idea:

Lines of
Inquiry:

G1

• One to one
correspondence.
• The language of
mathematics.

other through a
variety of
relationships
• The relevant
magnitude of
whole numbers.
• Combining and
partitioning.
• Quantity.
Making
connections
between our
experiences with
number can help to
develop number
sense.
• Conservation of
number.
• Whole-part
relationships
• Estimating
quantities to 100 or
beyond.

Central
idea:

Lines of • Strategies for

Data Handling
Chance
Data
Data explored
through emergent
experiences and
units of inquiry.

• Language used to describe position
and direction.

Shapes can be described and
organized.

Language of
chance explored
through emergent
experiences and
units of inquiry.

• The characteristics of 2D and 3D
shapes.

Explore fractions
through emergent
experiences (built
through all strands)

to represent
numbers and
number
relationships.
• The base-10
number system to
100s.
• Addition and
subtraction of
whole numbers.
• The language of
addition and
subtraction.

The four operations
are used to process
information and
solve problems.

Shape and Space
Shape
Space
Objects in our environment have a
position that can be described.

Central The base-10 place
value system is used
idea:

Lines of
Inquiry:

G2

Numbers are a
naming system.

Numbers are
Central
connected
to each
idea:

Lines of
Inquiry:

SK

Fractions

Fractions represent
whole-part
relationships.

• Fraction

Organizing objects
and events helps us
to solve problems.
• Sorting and
classifying
objects.

We collect
information to
make sense of the
world around us.

Shapes are made up of parts that repeat
in some way.

Events in daily life
involve chance.

• The relationships between and among
2D and 3D shapes.
• Constructing and deconstructing 2D
and 3D shapes.
• Symmetry, tessellation and
transformation.

• The language of
probability (never,
sometimes,
always).

• The attributes
used to organize
sets.
• Questioning and
interpreting data.

Shapes are
classified according
to their properties.

Language can be
used to describe
an object’s
position in space.

Some events in daily
life are more likely to
happen than others.

Data can be
organized in
different ways.

• Sorting,
describing and
classifying shapes.
• Real world
representation of
shapes.

• The language of
direction.
• How direction
and position are
used to find
locations and
objects.

• Chance in daily
life (impossible, less
likely, maybe,
more likely,
certain).
• Manipulatives that
help to explore
chance.

Shapes can be manipulated in different
ways.

• Reflective and rotational symmetry.

Probability can be
based on
experimental
events.
• Experimental

• Ways of
representing
data.
• How data is
collected.

Data can be
collected,
organized,
displayed and
analyzed in
different ways.
• Ways of

Measurement
Measurement
Time
Objects have
attributes that can
be compared.
• Language used
to describe
objects.
• Attributes of
objects.

Language of time
explored through
emergent
experiences and
units of inquiry.

Measurement involves comparing and
ordering objects and events.

• Language used to describe events.
• The comparison and ordering of objects
from daily life (e.g. long/short;
heavy/light; empty/full; hot/cold).

Objects have
attributes that can
be measured.

• Measurement
using standard
and nonstandard units.
• Tools used to
measure length.

Events can be
ordered and
sequenced.

• Describing and
sequencing
events in daily
life.
• Calendars as a
tool to identify
and sequence
time.

We use tools to measure the attributes of
objects and events.

• Tools that can be used to measure
objects and events.
• The standard units used to measure
time, money, length, capacity, mass
and temperature.
• Recording and describing
measurement.

Estimation allows us
to measure with
different levels of
accuracy.

Standard units
allow us to
compare, order
and sequence
objects and events.

• Uses and

• Standard units

Pattern and Function
Patterns and sequences occur in
everyday situations.
• Patterns in nature and the learning
environment.

Patterns repeat and grow.

• The recording of patterns.
• How and why patterns grow.

Patterns can be represented using
numbers and other symbols.

• Patterns in numbers.
• The use of symbols to create and
represent patterns.

Number patterns can be observed and
described.

• Relationships between addition and
subtraction.
• Associative and commutative
properties of addition.

Functions are useful for examining
relationships between sets of data.

• Different ways of representing functions.

Inquiry:

G3

Central
idea:

memorizing
number facts.
• Estimating sums
and differences.

relationships.
• Addition and
subtraction of
fractions.

Number operations
can be modeled in
a variety of ways.

Fractions and
decimals represent
whole-part
relationships.

Lines of • Multiplication and
Inquiry: division of whole

• Decimal fractions.
• Equivalent
fractions.
• Addition and
subtraction of
fractions and
decimals.

Central
idea:

Fractions, decimals
and percentages
are ways of
representing
whole-part
relationships.
• The relationship
between
fractions,
decimals and
percentages.
• Improper
fractions and
mixed numbers.

numbers.
• Numbers to 1000s
and beyond.
• The language of
multiplication and
division.

G4

The base-10 place
value system
extends infinitely in
two directions.

Lines of • Numbers to
Inquiry: millions or beyond.
• Operations
involving all
integers.

G5

Central
idea:

Ratios are an
effective way of
conveying
information.

Lines of • Number ratios
Inquiry: used in daily life.

• The use of ratios to
solve real life
problems.

For fractional and
decimal
computation, the
ideas developed
for whole-number
computation can
apply.
• Addition,
subtraction,
multiplication and
division of
fractions and
decimals.
• Simplifying
fractions.

• Congruency.
• The relationship between coordinates,
direction and location.

Changing the position of a shape does
not alter its properties.

• Sorting and classifying angles.
• The properties of regular and irregular
polygons (including circles, triangles
and quadrilaterals).

events involving
chance.
• Fair and unfair
situations.
• Recording and
predicting
experimental trials.
Probability can be
expressed in
numbers.
• Expressing
probability using
fractions.
• Representing
probability
graphically.
• Probability as a tool
to explain possible
outcomes.

Geometric tools and methods can be
used to solve problems relating to shape
and space.

Probability can be
predicted
theoretically.

• The properties of regular and irregular
polyhedral.
• Systems for describing position and
direction.
• How to use geometric tools (protractor,
compass, ruler).

• The differences
between
experimental and
theoretical
probability.
• Dependent and
independent
probability.

Geometric concepts allow us to make
sense of and interact with our world.

• How we use geometric ideas and
relationships to solve problems.
• How scale is used to enlarge and
reduce shapes.

collecting and
recording data.
• Ways to display
data.
• How to use data
to make
predictions.
Different graph
forms highlight
different aspects of
data more
efficiently.
• How scale is used
in graphs.
• Different types of
graphs.
• Selecting
appropriate
graphs for given
data.
Data can be
presented
effectively for valid
interpretation and
communication.
• The role and
purpose that
different graphs
have.
• Factors that affect
data quality.
• Evaluation of the
effectiveness of
data.

Representing
probability on a
scale helps to solve
problems.

Range, mode,
median and mean
can be used to
analyze statistical
data.

• Ways of expressing
the likelihood of
events (e.g. scale,
percentage and
ratio).
• Calculating,
comparing and
using probability in
operations.

• Summarizing data
using mean,
mode, median
and range.
• How databases
are used to
answer questions
and solve
problems.

purposes of
estimation in
measurement.
• Estimation as a
problem-solving
tool.

used to measure
time.
• The relationship
between units of
time.

• Functions as a tool to describe rules.

Objects and events have attributes that
can be measured using appropriate tools.

Identifying rules for patterns allows us to
make predictions.

• Measures that fall between numbers on
a scale.
• Angles as a measure of rotation.
• Comparing and converting AM/PM and
24 hour time systems.

• Relationships between multiplication
and division.
• How rules are used to make predictions.
• Associative and commutative properties
of multiplication.

Relationships exist
between standard
units that measure
the same attributes.

Time provides a
way of ordering
and organizing
past, present and
future.

• Relationships
between
area/perimeter;
area/volume;
volume/capacity.
• Relationships
between metric
units.

• Patterns found in
time.
• Ways to represent
time.
• How timelines
allow us to order
and arrange
events.

Accuracy of
measurement
depends on the
situation and the
precision of the
tool.
• Procedures for
finding area,
perimeter and
volume.
• Unit conversions
within and
between
measurement
systems.
• Justification of the
level of accuracy
required to solve
problems.

A range of
procedures exist to
measure events.

• Calculating
elapsed time.
• Determining time
worldwide.

Patterns can be generalized using
algebraic expressions, equations or
functions.

• Methods used to analyze patterns and
identify rules.
• How rules are represented using
algebraic expressions.
• The use of rules to solve problems and
make predictions.

Exponential notation is a powerful way to
express repeated products of the same
number.

• Exponents as repeated multiplication.
• The inverse relationship between
exponents and roots.