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Pulse 3.

51
SCADA/HMI
Getting Started Guide

December 2015

Copyright
The information in this document is subject to change without prior notice and does
not represent a commitment on the part of AFCON Control and Automation Ltd.,
AFCON Software and Electronics Division.
No part of this document may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever
without written permission from AFCON Control and Automation Ltd., AFCON
Software and Electronics Division.
The software described in this document is furnished under a license agreement or
a non-disclosure agreement.
The software may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of the
agreement. It is against the law to copy this software on any other medium for any
purpose other than the purchaser's personal use.
Copyright 2015 AFCON Control and Automation Ltd., AFCON Software and
Electronics Division.
All rights reserved.

Pulse logos are registered trademarks of AFCON Control and Automation Ltd.,
AFCON Software and Electronics Division.
Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States
and other countries.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

Table of Contents
About this Document .............................................................................. 1
About the Pulse Software ...................................................................... 1
System Requirements............................................................................. 2
Hardware Requirements ........................................................................ 2
Software Requirements ......................................................................... 4
Installing Pulse ...................................................................................... 6
Installing Communication Drivers ......................................................... 11
Communication Setup ................................................................... 15
Running the Pulse Server .................................................................... 16
Pulse Server Group Modules ........................................................... 16
The Pulse Client Workstation................................................................ 20
The Developer Workstation .................................................................. 22
Creating Displays ............................................................................... 22
Inserting and Defining Graphic Objects ................................................. 23
Resizing an object......................................................................... 24
Formatting Objects ....................................................................... 25
Aligning Objects ........................................................................... 25
Grouping and Ungrouping Objects ................................................... 27
Assigning Graphics Properties .............................................................. 28
Accessing the Graphics Properties ................................................... 28
Assigning an Object Fill.................................................................. 28
Assigning Animation Properties to Graphic Objects.................................. 31
Creating a Text Graphic Object ....................................................... 31
Inserting and Manipulating Instruments ................................................ 33
Resizing an Instrument.................................................................. 34
Defining Instrument Settings ............................................................... 34
Creating an On/Off Button and Stop Light Object .............................. 34
The Operator Workstation .................................................................... 37
Switching to the Operator Workstation .................................................. 38
Switching to the Developer Workstation ................................................ 38
The Database Explorer ......................................................................... 39
Data Blocks ....................................................................................... 40
Types of Database Blocks .............................................................. 40
Creating a Digital Value Block......................................................... 42
Appendix A - Installing IIS and MSMQ Service ..................................... 47
Installing IIS and MSMQ on Windows 7 ................................................. 48
Installing IIS on Windows 7............................................................ 48
Installing MSMQ on Windows 7 ....................................................... 48
Installing .NET Framework, IIS and MSMQ on Windows 8 ........................ 49
Installing .NET Framework on Windows 8 ......................................... 49
Installing IIS and MSMQ Framework on Windows 8 ........................... 50
Installing IIS and MSMQ on the Windows Server 2008............................. 52
Installing IIS on the Windows Server 2008....................................... 52
Installing MSMQ on Windows Server 2008........................................ 53
Installing .NET Framework, IIS and MSMQ on Windows Server 2012 ......... 53
Installing .NET Framework on Windows Server 2012.......................... 53
Installing IIS and MSMQ on Windows Server 2012 ............................ 54

Pulse Getting Started Guide

About this Document


The Pulse Getting Started Guide provides you with the basic information you need
to start working with Pulse. This guide describes how to:
Install, set up, and run the Pulse Server
Install a communication driver
Set up a project
Download the Pulse Client
Create displays in the Developer Workstation
Add and modify graphic objects and define their properties
Add and modify instruments and define their settings
Work in the Operator Workstation
Create and modify blocks and define alarms

About the Pulse Software


Pulse is an advanced SCADA/HMI environment for the integration of monitoring
and control of multiple types of applications in industrial, building, and security
sectors. It incorporates technology such as .NET Application Framework and Client/
Server architecture to bring increased efficiency, superior visualization capabilities,
and a highly reliable platform for supervisory control to manufacturing
environments and organizations. The Pulse model makes SCADA/HMI simpler,
more scalable, and more cost-effective than ever before.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

System Requirements
Hardware Requirements
Pulse Standalone Configuration

3 GHz Core i7 or faster

Minimum 8 GB RAM (16 GB recommended)

NOTE

The RAM size has to be increased as the database size increases, to ensure optimal
performance.
320 GB of free hard disk space

NOTE The size of the free hard disk space has to be increased as the size of the
database increases, ensure optimal performance.

Super VGA 3D display card with a minimum of 512 MB DDR3 memory

Keyboard and mouse or compatible pointing device

Network adaptor 100/1000 MB

USB

SEK (supplied with Pulse package); without the SEK, Pulse runs in Demo mode.

Pulse Server

2.4 GHz Xeon Quad Core processor 2.4 or faster

Minimum 16 GB RAM (32 GB recommended)

NOTE

NOTE

The RAM size has to be increased as the database size increases, to ensure optimal
performance.
Minimum 150 GB free SAS hard disk space

The size of the free SAS hard disk space has to be increased as the size of
the database increases, ensure optimal performance.

Keyboard and mouse or compatible pointing device

Network adaptor 100/1000 MB

USB (for Virtual Machine: USB over TCP adaptor)

SEK (supplied with Pulse package); without the SEK, Pulse runs in Demo mode.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

Pulse Client

3 GHz i5 or faster (i7 recommended)

Minimum 3 GB RAM (4 GB RAM recommended)

60 GB free hard disk space

Super VGA 3D display card with a minimum of 512 MB DDR3 memory

Keyboard and mouse or compatible pointing device

Network adaptor 100/1000 MB

Pulse Client Running from a USB Flash Drive

1 GB free disk space

USB2 or faster port

Pulse Getting Started Guide

Software Requirements
The table below details the operating systems that you can use to run both Pulse server
and client components.
Pulse Components
Operating Systems

Pulse
Server

Pulse
Client

Standalone

Windows 7 Home

No

Yes

No

Windows 7 Professional 32-Bit

No

Yes

Yes*

Windows 7 Professional 64-Bit

No

Yes

Yes

Windows 7 Enterprise 32-Bit

No

Yes

Yes*

Windows 7 Enterprise 64-Bit

No

Yes

Yes

Windows 7 Ultimate 32-Bit

No

Yes

Yes*

Windows 7 Ultimate 64-Bit

No

Yes

Yes

Windows 8.1 32-Bit

No

Yes

No

Windows 8.1 64-Bit

No

Yes

No

Windows 8.1 Professional 32-Bit

No

Yes

Yes*

Windows 8.1 Professional 64-Bit

No

Yes

Yes

Windows Server 2012 Standard

Yes

Yes

Yes

Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard

Yes

Yes

Yes

Windows Server 2008 Standard 64-Bit

Yes

Yes

Yes

Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard

Yes

Yes

Yes

Windows 10 Pro

No

Yes

No

* - Installing Pulse Server/Standalone successfully on a 32-Bit operating


system depends on the application size.
NOTE

Windows 2003 and Windows XP are not supported in Pulse 3.

NOTE

Microsoft SQL Server Native Client 12.0, which is installed with Supreme Report is
not compatible with Windows 2008 SP1. For compatibility, use Windows Server
2008 SP2 or a higher version.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

Additional Software Requirements


The following list describes other third-party software requirements to run the Pulse
Server:

Microsoft .NET Framework


Internet Information Service (IIS) installed on server computer.
Microsoft Message Queuing Service (MSMQ) installed on server computer.
NOTE

For IIS and MSMQ installation instructions, see Appendix A - Installing IIS and
MSMQ Service on page 47.

NOTE

When installing Pulse 3.5 on Microsoft Windows 8 or Microsoft Windows 2012


Server, it is strongly recommended to follow the .NET, IIS and MSMQ
instructions in this document, see Appendix A - Installing IIS and MSMQ Service
on page 47.

Internet Explorer 7 or higher


User Accounts Control (UAC) disabled
For more information, refer to the relevant procedures.

The following software is installed by the Pulse Setup:

Aladdin HASP Device Driver 6.60


Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 SP1 Redistributable Package
Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 SP1
Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0
OPC Core Components 3.0
Windows Installer 4.5
NOTE

If you are using ESET NOD 32 Antivirus, use version 3 or higher.

Mandatory Services
The following services must be in the Started state on the Pulse Servers host computer
while the Pulse Server is running. Before starting up Pulse, ensure that the services are
started.

World Wide Web Publishing Service (IIS)


Net. TCP Port Sharing Service (SMSSVCHost)
Microsoft SQL Server services have to be running if the Microsoft SQL database is used
in a Pulse project.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

Installing Pulse
NOTE Before installing the Pulse Server, verify that your computer and network
meets the requirements described in the System Requirements chapter.
NOTE

Pulse 3.5 supports upgrade and full installation. Pulse 3.5 does not support
upgrade installation only from Pulse 1.52 or lower versions.

If a previous version is already installed, do the following:


1

Back up all projects (using Backup and Restore Wizard)

Uninstall any previous version of Pulse.

Install Pulse 3.5.

Restore the backed-up projects.

==================================================
Follow these steps to install the Pulse server.
1

Close all open programs.

Insert the AFCON DVD to the DVD drive. The installation process starts automatically
and you can proceed to the next step. If the installation does not automatically start,
go to your DVD drive and double-click the Setup.exe file.
Alternatively, if youre installing Pulse from a network location, select Run from the
Start menu and then browse to locate and run the Setup.exe file.
The Pulse - InstallShield Wizard window is displayed.

3 Select the language for installation from one of the following drop-down list
options:

English (United States)

German

Spanish

4 Click OK.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

NOTE The Pulse - InstallShield Wizard window may be displayed if one or


more software pre-requisites are not installed. See Additional Software
Requirements on page 5 to install the required software components
before installing Pulse.
The Welcome to the InstallShield Wizard for Pulse window is displayed.

Click Next; the License Agreement window is displayed.

Read the license and click on the I accept the terms in the license agreement
option then click Next.
The Destination Folder window is displayed.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

By default, Pulse is installed in the C:\AFCON\Pulse\ folder. Click Change to change


the path of the destination folder, otherwise click Next.
The Custom Setup window is displayed.

Select the program features you prefer to install. To install any of the additional
features, click on the feature name to select and install it.
The installation script only installs two features, Program Files and Demo Project.
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Express, Supreme Report and Samples components are not
installed by default.

NOTE
9

If the Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Express feature is not installed, the Pulse Server
will utilize the MDB database by default.

Click Next.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

The Pulse Server Settings window is displayed.


In the Pulse Server Settings window, the servers external (public) and internal
(private) IP addresses, TCP port and the virtual directory name are defined (the virtual
directory holds the Pulse clients files). Use the default settings or define other
addresses or names.

10 Click Next to continue.


The Ready to Install the Program window is displayed and the wizard is ready to
begin installation.

11 Click Install to start the installation process.


The Installing Pulse window is displayed. The installation progress is shown in the
Status progress bar.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

When the InstallShield Wizard Completed window is displayed, the installation


process is complete.

12 Click Finish and restart the computer.


NOTE

If upgrading from Pulse 1.10


If SQL Server 2005 Express was previously used as your project database, the
Setup program will upgrade it to Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Express. The
installation may pause and display the following message:
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 SP1 Installation Failure. To solve this
problem, complete the current Pulse installation and restart your
computer. Run the Pulse installation again and select the Repair option.
Follow the instructions to complete the installation successfully.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

10

Installing Communication Drivers


Drivers are the communication protocols used in the application. After installing a
driver it can be assigned to a virtual port in the Communications Setup dialog box.
There are two main types of communication sources:
Pulse drivers
OPC clients (outside the scope of this guide)
In Pulse 3, the Pulse Driver Setup Wizard simplifies the process of installing drivers.
Drivers can be installed either from your AFCON Pulse DVD or downloaded from the
AFCON Web site (www.afcon-inc.com). Click the Products link, and then click
Drivers 32 bit to locate and download the relevant driver zip file to your computer.
Additionally, the Install Driver option in the Communications Setup dialog box
enables assigning an installed driver to a Pulse project. From all of these entry
points, the Driver Setup Wizard will execute the installation.
To install drivers from the AFCON Pulse DVD
1 Before installing a driver, shut down Pulse.
2 Insert the AFCON DVD into the DVD drive on your computer. Wait for it to
display its contents on your screen.
3 Select Pulse and then select Communication Drivers to open the
Communication Drivers dialog box.

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11

4 Locate and select the required driver. Click the Install button to run its setup.
The Pulse Driver Setup wizard is displayed.

5 Click Next. Select a project or install the driver into multiple projects using the
standard Windows selection key combinations (<SHIFT>+click,
<CTRL>+click, <CTRL>+A [for all]).

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12

6 Click Next. Review the summary information. You may expand the driver table
to see which files the driver setup will install and their destination folder.

7 Click Install.
The Install Progress page shows you the progress and status of the driver
installation. When the Current Task and Setup Status bars display 100%, the
installation is done.
As an option, you can generate, store, and print installation reports:
Report All

Generate a report detailing the installation of the driver


files.

Report Errors

Generate a report detailing any errors which may have


occurred during the driver installation.

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13

8 Click Next. If successful, the wizard notifies that the driver was successfully
installed. If you want to install another driver, click Install Another Driver to
start the process again. Otherwise, click Finish to close the wizard.

Start Pulse
Server

Pulse Getting Started Guide

The Pulse Server will start up after you click Finish.


After the Server completes startup, the Driver Setup
wizard closes.

14

Communication Setup
Communication settings for the driver are defined in the Pulse Communication
dialog box, which is accessed through the Pulse Setup group.
Each driver has different configuration settings - therefore, the Pulse
Communication dialog box varies for each driver.
For detailed information about a specific drivers setup, refer to the drivers User
Guide.
To access the Communication Setup
1 In the Pulse Setup group, double-click the Communication icon.
The Project Communication Setup dialog box is displayed.
2 Click New to open the Port Properties dialog box.

3 Define the following properties:


Port Name

This is a virtual port. A virtual port number can be any


number between 1 and 255 and can be used only once.

Driver Name

Select the driver. This list holds the names of all the
drivers installed in the current project. A driver can be
used any number of times.

Bit numbering
system

Define the read bit access used. For example, if Octal is


used the digits 8, 9 are not available. Our recommendation
is to leave the default setting (10 decimal).

Lowest bit
number

Select 1 to define that the bit numbering for this driver is


1-16 (if 0 is selected, it defines that the bit numbering for
this driver is 0-15).

Emulation Mode

Select this option to allow the driver to run in emulation


mode. In emulation mode, the driver does not
communicate with field devices, but reads/writes
internally. This mode is generally used during
development.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

15

Running the Pulse Server


The Pulse Server and kernel modules run as Windows services, and may start
automatically when the PC starts up or reboots (administrators may change this
setting). The services run in the background with no need for user interaction.

Pulse Server Group Modules


Server side interactive modules are accessible from the Windows Desktop Start
Menu, via the following menus:

AFCON Pulse (main menu)

Administrative Tools

Development

Pulse Setup

Runtime

Tools

Icon

Module Name

Description

Main AFCON Pulse Group


Launch
Workstation

Open the Pulse web portal, from where users can


access a workstation.

Pulse Help

Open the Pulse Help utility.

Restart

This module restarts Pulse.

Server
Manager

Use this module to manage both local and remote Pulse


servers, manage users accounts, project configuration
and more.

Shutdown

This module stops Pulse and its running services.

Startup

This module starts Pulse and the applicable services.

Uninstall Pulse

Use this module to uninstall Pulse.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

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Administrative Tools
Deploy to Flash
Disk

A utility used to download the Pulse application to a


USB Flash drive.

HASP Install

A utility used to install the HASP protection key driver.

HASP Remove

A utility used to uninstall the HASP protection key


driver.

Registration
and License

Use this utility to register your copy of Pulse.

Security
Manager

Use this program to set and manage the Pulse security


policy.

Development
Datasheet Tags
Manager

The Datasheet Tags Manager provides facilities to


obtain and/or modify data from a variety of external
data sources (XML, OLEDB, TEXT, etc.). Use this
program to add or edit Datasheet tags from these data
files.

Email
Dispatcher
Configuration

Use this module to define the message format for


automatically sending email messages containing
information about alarms according to predefined
definitions.

Ini File Editor

Use this utility to edit Windows INI-type files.

Maintenance
Manager
Configurator

Use this module to measure and record the activityrelated information of the monitored devices or areas.

OPC Browser

The OPC Browser is used for bidirectional


communications between a Pulse project and an OPC
server. It can also be used to check communications
and to check an items value.

OPC Gateway
Editor

The OPC Gateway module provides data exchange


between OPC clients and the Pulse OPC server. Use this
utility to add, edit, and delete OPC Gateway tags.

Progate Editor

ProGate (Protocol Gateway) is a gateway protocol that


enables data exchange between PLCs and other devices
according to triggered events and user-defined filtering
conditions. Use this utility to configure and set up the
various Progate settings.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

17

Redundancy
Editor

This module defines the systems hot backup system,


which runs during network and/or computer failures.

Report Editor

Use this program to create and edit templates of plain


text (TXT) reports and dBASE (DBF) files.

Supreme
Report Studio

Use this program to design the templates and layouts


for the reports that the Supreme Report Runtime
module later generates.

Pulse Setup
Communication

Use this program to install, configure and uninstall


Pulse communication drivers.

Network

Use this module to set up the connections between the


Pulse Server nodes in the network.

Project

Use the Project Configuration to setup and configure


the Pulse projects settings.

Alarm Handler

This module displays system and alarm messages. It


has two windows: Current Alarm and Alarm Summary.

Email
Dispatcher

Use this module to define the message format for


automatically sending email messages containing
information about alarms according to predefined
definitions.

Maintenance
Manager

This module acts as a follow-up database for the plants


equipment.

OPC Gateway

This module provides data exchange between OPC


clients and the Pulse OPC server. The OPC Gateway
receives data from Pulse OPC server, and then using
OPC protocol, translates the data and sends it to the
OPC client, which then sends it to an external device.

Runtime

Pulse Getting Started Guide

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Tools
Audit Trail
Viewer

This utility displays changes that were made to various


modules, as well as actions done by Pulse users.

Backup or
Restore Wizard

Run this wizard to back up and restore Pulse projects.

DRC Settings
Wizard

The Pulse DRC configuration wizard is used for Disaster


Recovery Control (DRC). The wizard helps you
configure the DRC of Pulse servers.

E-mail Sender

Use this module to send email messages.

FTP Utility

Use this utility to transfer files between the Pulse web


client to Pulse web server.

History Viewer

This module displays history files in list format. The


History Viewer can also convert history files into CSV
format. These files can be opened and modified in
Microsoft Excel.

Log Window

Use this utility to view the Pulse log files.

OPC Browser

The OPC Browser is used for bidirectional


communications between a Pulse project and an OPC
server. It can also be used to check communications
and to check an items value.

Project
Migration
Wizard

Run this wizard to convert an existing P-CIM 7.70


project into a Pulse project.

Report A
Problem

The Pulse Project Report a Problem wizard enables the


user to report a problem. The wizard then collects and
packages the Pulse project log files.

Supreme
Report
Generator

Run this program to produce graphically rich,


analytical, and secure reports from real-time data and
collected historical data.

UAG Migration
Wizard

Run this tool to back up projects by saving a copy of the


project in its current version.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

19

The Pulse Client Workstation


The Pulse Client workstations (Operator, Developer and Monitor) are the main
interfaces with your Pulse projects. Through the Client computers web browser,
you log into the default project over an Internet or Intranet connection.
Operator Workstation - In the Operator Workstation, users receive
information from the data sources, as well as input information and commands
to Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), other field devices, or to third-party
databases. The data exchange is based on the engineering performed in the
Developer Workstation.
Monitor Workstation - In Monitor mode, users can only view project data, but
cannot write input data or change the value or status of any object.
Developer Workstation - The process of creating project components
(displays, inserting graphic objects, instruments and controls), creating and
configuring database blocks, alarms and more, is done in the Developer
Workstation.
Furthermore, you can customize the Developer Workstation interface by
showing or hiding the docking panels, selecting a skin or localizing the
workstation.
To run a client workstation
1 Open an Internet browser and type in the Pulse servers host name or IP
address and the virtual directory name you provided in the installation
process. For example, http://pulseserver/pulseclient. The Pulse Web Portal
opens.
NOTE To open a client workstation on the same computer as the Pulse Server,
open the Windows Desktops Start menu, point to the Programs > AFCON
Pulse menu and click Launch Workstation.

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20

2 Click the relevant link to download the Pulse Client workstation.


If this is the first time you are opening Pulse on your computer, or you have
removed a previous version of the Pulse Client, you are prompted whether to
download the program.
3 Click Yes to continue downloading the workstation.
The login dialog box appears when the download finishes, prompting you for a
user name and password.
Default User
Name

pulse

Default
Password

pulse
(all lower case letters)

4 Type the user name and password and click Login to open the Pulse
workstation that you selected in step 2.

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21

The Developer Workstation


The process of designing project components (creating displays inserting and
defining graphic objects, instruments and controls), creating and configuring
database blocks, alarms and more, is done in the Developer Workstation.

Creating Displays
Much of the development work takes place in displays. A display is a work area that
functions as an interactive model of a factorys or organizationss facilities (such as
a production floor, warehouse, or building lobby). In the Developer Workstation,
you can create a collection of dynamic and/or static objects that represent devices
or other equipment. The objects have defined properties, which affect how the
objects appear and behave according to the data received from the various data
sources.
Pulse provides many versatile tools for representing objects in the display:

Graphic objects

Instruments

ClipArt

.NET components

ActiveX controls

Cells

In this Getting Started Guide, we will demonstrate the definition of graphic objects
and instruments. For additional information, please refer to the Pulse Online Help
or User Guide.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

22

Inserting and Defining Graphic Objects


A graphic object is a shape that you insert into the display, which will represent an
indicator or a control. You can create graphic objects that use animation to supply
information to the operator or as a means of executing commands from the
operator workstation.
To Insert graphic objects (such as rectangles, ellipses, polyline and spline, text
objects and more) into a display, cell or a template, you can use any of the
following methods:
Select the object from the Graphic Objects area of the Insert ribbon.
Select the object from the Toolbox docking panel, if open in the workstation.
After inserting the graphic objects, you may reshape, reposition, resize and rotate
them. Additionally, you can define physical properties (fill and line) for the objects
and text content.
You also need to define each graphic objects animation properties, which include
the communication address (Item) from which it receives data, and other
parameters which affect the objects appearances and behavior.
After you have created and edited the object, you can group several objects
together and assign them with identical animation properties, order the objects,
duplicate them, assign a theme and style, associate objects to layers, and more.

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23

For more details about manipulating graphic objects, refer to the Pulse User Guide
or Online Help.
To insert a graphic object into a display, cell or template
1 Select the object from either the Graphic Objects area in the Insert ribbon,
the Insert button in the Home ribbon, or from the Toolbox docking panel by
clicking on the object you wish to insert, for example, a rectangle.
2 In the display, notice that the mouse pointer changes to indicate that the
object is selected. Hold down the left mouse button and drag the pointer until
you release it. The object is inserted over the area you dragged.
3 Continue to insert as many objects as you need. When finished, either hit the
ESC (Escape) key or, click on the mouse pointer icon.

Resizing an object
To resize an object
1 Click the object once. The selected object is clearly marked.

Resizing rectangle

2 To resize the object, position the mouse pointer on any of the object's resizing
rectangles and hold down the left mouse button. Drag to change the objects
size. Release the mouse button when finished.

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24

Formatting Objects
To format an object, to set the order of the object relative to other object in the
display, group and up group the object with other objects and more, use the
Format menu from the Edit tab. The Edit tab contains object specific options to
help you edit the object's graphics and animation properties, use clipboard tools
and format the object.

Center, align and


spacing options

Set the objects


order
Group and
ungroup
objects

Aligning Objects
You align objects relatively to other objects in the display. You do so by first
selecting the object you wish to align and than select the aligning object. Once the
two objects are selected, you can select the aligning options you wish to apply to
the object. Of course, you may select more than two objects to apply the alignment
options to them.
To align objects
1 Clicking on the object.
2 Hold down the CTRL key and select the other object(s) to align with the first
object.
NOTE Although it is possible to resize and reposition the two objects, the objects
are not grouped. When grouping objects, the objects' properties are
removed and assigned with common properties, whereas in this case, each
object retains it own properties.

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25

3 In the Edit ribbons Format area, click the


option.

Align button to select an

Check the result.

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26

Grouping and Ungrouping Objects


Use the Group menu to create a new object from more than one individual objects.
The objects included in the group all share the same graphics and animation
properties - individual objects graphics and animation properties are removed.
When breaking a group of objects, the group's properties are removed and each
object can be attributed with individual properties.

Creating a group
1 Hold down the CTRL key and select the object(s).
2 In the Edit ribbons Format area, click the
then click Create Group.

Grouping button and

Grouped objects are marked by a single line the way single objects are marked.

Breaking a group
1 Click on the group.
2 In the Edit ribbons Format area, click the
then click Break Group.

Grouping button and

The objects return to single mode and can now be selected individually but not
as a group.

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27

Assigning Graphics Properties


Use the Graphics Properties panel to define the physical appearance of a graphic
object. You can set a graphic or text object's fill and line colors as well as the text's
appearance, or you can assign the object with a style.
The graphics properties panel is a WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) tool.
This means that the same graphics properties assigned to an object during the
development stage of the project, are the ones you will see in the Operator
Workstation.

Accessing the Graphics Properties


Select the object and open the Graphics Properties using one of the following
methods:
From the Developer Workstation Personalize ribbon, select the Graphics icon.
If not already open, the graphics properties panel appears on the right side of
the work space.
From the Developer Workstation Edit ribbons Graphics area, select a graphics
property.

Assigning an Object Fill


Use the object's Fill properties option to set the object's interior appearance, such
as color, opacity as well as advanced color options.
To assign a solid fill color to an object
1 Select a graphic object from the display and from the Graphics Properties
panel or the Graphics area in the Edit ribbon, select the
button.

Pulse Getting Started Guide

Object Fill

28

2 Select a fill color by selecting it from the panels spectrum, entering its RGB or
HSB numbers, or by typing in the color's hexadecimal code.
3 Set the following properties:
Fill Type

Solid - Object is filled consistently with the selected


color.

Opacity

Choose the level of opacity and transparency for the


object. At 100% opacity, the objects background color
hides anything residing under the object. At 0% opacity,
the object is transparent, with anything residing under
the object remaining visible.

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4 Check the result in the display:

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30

Assigning Animation Properties to Graphic


Objects
Adding Animation Properties to an object defines how the object appears and
behaves in the Operator Workstation. An objects look and actions may convey
information statically or dynamically as the data values change.
The objects properties are linked to the devices item, which may represent a block
name, communication address, or expression. In the Operator Workstation, the
object is displayed according to the assigned properties and to the devices status.
For example, an object can have properties that cause it to change color when a
specified event occurs.
To define the animation properties, you double-click the graphic object, open the
relevant animation properties, and enable features and set values as required.
The types of properties are:
Indicator

Defining an objects appearance. Use Indicators to


create textual, color, and graphic presentations of data
via the Operator Workstation. Specify presentation
formats that change textual content, position, color,
and size according to data values.

Control

Defining how an object behaves in the Operator


Workstation. Use Controls to specify every aspect of
input via the Operator Workstation: data input formats,
accelerator keys, and actions. By choosing among
various Controls, you can specify graphic objects to be
either boxes for data input, buttons which initiate
actions such as opening or closing a window, or sliders
which allow the setting of input values by moving
graphic objects vertically and horizontally.

The available Animation Properties are:

Appearance

Position

Size

Text

Visibility

Slider

Orientation

Context Menu

Fluid Fill

Action Button

Fluid Flow

Creating a Text Graphic Object


A text object displays the current data input or variable value. Text can be
displayed in several different formats, such as numerical, date/time, regular
expressions, ON/OFF digital values, and more.
In this exercise, create an object that displays any number from 0 to 10.

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31

To insert and define a Text graphic object


1 From the Insert ribbons Graphic Objects group, select the
Text icon and
then click and drag in the display to create a new object displaying the string,
PointText.
2 In the Edit ribbons Animations area, click on the Text icon to open the Text
Animation properties.
3 In the Item box, enter the name of the item which controls this propertys
values. In this exercise, we will use the a:1 dummy variable to represent the
text data.
Type |!a:1 manually
-orClick
to open the Item Manager. In the Links tree on the left, expand Hosts
> Masterhost > P-CIM Kernel > Local Node > Dummy. From the Items
Names list, double-click A:1.
4 In the Use Format list, choose DecimalValue.

NOTE In the Developer Workstation, this object still displays the string,
PointText, although in the Operator Workstation, the actual value will
appear.

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Inserting and Manipulating Instruments


Pulse instruments are pre-designed objects, which may be assigned with dynamic
properties, that you insert into a display or a template. The various types of
instruments display information, carry out functions, or run applications in
accordance to the data they receive from their respective advised items.
For example, trend graphs can display real-time or historical data from numerous
advised items, an embedded Alarm Explorer can display alarm information, a data
sheet instrument can display data from various data sources (such as XML files,
OLEDB databases, text and INI files), as well as numerous other functions. Other
examples of Pulse instruments are buttons, sliders, gauges and meters to control
production floor equipment, or to display information coming from the field.
To Insert instruments into a display or a template, you can use any of the following
methods:
Select the instrument from the Instruments area of the Insert ribbon
Select the instrument from the Toolbox docking panel, if open in the
workstation.
After inserting the instruments, you may manipulate their size and position, and
define their settings.
NOTE Repositioning and resizing instruments is done using the same methods as
for graphic objects (except for the Text instrument which you can only
resize horizontally), refer to Inserting and Defining Graphic Objects on
page 23 and apply the instructions.
To insert an instrument into a display or template
1 Select the object from either the Instruments area in the Insert ribbon, the
Insert button in the Home ribbon, or from the Toolbox docking panel by
clicking on the instrument you wish to insert.
2 In the display, notice that the mouse pointer changes to indicate that the
instrument is selected. Hold down the left mouse button and drag the pointer
until you release it. The instrument is inserted over the area you dragged.
3 Continue to insert as many instruments as you need. When finished, either hit
the ESC (Escape) key or, click on the mouse pointer icon.

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Resizing an Instrument
To resize an instrument
1 Click the instrument once. The selected instrument is clearly marked.

Resizing
rectangle

2 To resize the instrument, position the mouse pointer on any of the instruments
resizing rectangles and hold down the left mouse button. Drag to change the
instruments size. Release the mouse button when finished.

Defining Instrument Settings


Each instrument has a Settings dialog box for defining its type-specific
parameters.
To define instrument settings
1 Right-click the instrument and select Settings from the menu.
The specific instruments Settings dialog box is displayed.
2 Define the relevant parameters and click OK.

Creating an On/Off Button and Stop Light Object


To illustrate how item values can affect behavior and indications, create a simple
on/off button instrument and a stop light graphic object whose color animation
changes every time someone presses the button.
To create and define an on/off button
1 From the Insert ribbons Instruments area, click the
2

Pulse Button object.

Drag along an area in the display to create the object.

3 Right-click the object and click Settings.


The Pulse Button Settings dialog box is displayed.
4 In the Text line, type On/Off. If you want to write a Tool tip, type a string in
the ToolTip box.

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5 Go to the Actions Workflow tab.


6 For one of the mouse actions, click the button to type an action command
or to browse for an existing workflow.
Mouse Down

Type Inv |!D:1 so that pressing the object switches its


state between ON and OFF.

7 Click OK.
An on/off button appears on the display.

Now, create and define a stop light graphic object whose color switches between
green and red whenever you press the on/off button.

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To create and define a stop light graphic object


1 From the Insert ribbons Graphic Objects area, click the

Ellipse icon.

2 Drag along an area in the display to create the object.


3 From the Edit ribbons Animations area, click Appearance.
The Animation Appearance dialog box is displayed.
4 Enter a Name for the object, or keep the default name already provided.
5 In the Fill tab, define the following:
Type

Choose Digital Value.

Item 1

Type |!D:1 (this variable links the object with the


action defined in the on/off button).

6 In the table at the bottom of the Fill tab, define Visibility mode and Color for
the 0 (off) and 1 (on) states.

To check if your on/off button works successfully, right-click on an unoccupied area


of the display and from the menu, click Preview. A Preview window simulates the
Operator Workstation mode. Press the on/off button a few times. Notice that the
stop light changes color whenever you press the button.

On/Off Button at 1

On/Off Button at 0

NOTE You can also save the display and then open it in the Operator Workstation
(if its already open, enter the File ribbon and click Revert To Saved) and
see what happens when you press down on the button and then release it.

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The Operator Workstation


The Operator Workstation is the environment in which operators view and interact
with objects created in the Developer Workstation, in order to monitor and control
actual real-time processes and/or equipment operation to which the objects
correspond.
Operators can interact by pressing on objects with the mouse pointer, or by typing
on the keyboard. Real-time data can be displayed in text objects and counters,
while historical trends can also be shown in graphs.

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Switching to the Operator Workstation


You can switch to the Operating Workstation any time during the development
process.
NOTE In the Developer Workstation, you can use the Preview option to get an
idea of how the objects will work in an actual operation mode.
1 To switch to the Operator Workstation, click on the Operating button in
the Home ribbon or the Switch to Operating button in the Quick Access
toolbar.
2 Select a display to open by either double-clicking a Graphics display from the
project navigator panel or by selecting the Open option from the File menu.

In the Window tab, choose the appropriate option to navigate, tile or


cascade the open windows to make it easy to find your way when you work
on the project.

The Window ribbons Windows area displays all the currently open windows on
your works space, including the Data Scope window. Hovering the mouse over a
window icon in the Windows area automatically pops up that window and brings it
to the front of other open windows. Note that each window is displayed with its title
in order to differentiate between them. To select a window from the Windows area,
click its icon.
The Windows menu is expandable, meaning that it can accommodate dozens of
concurrently open windows. To navigate among numerous concurrently open
windows, click on the down pointing arrow of the areas scroll bar to expand the
Windows area.

Switching to the Developer Workstation

To switch back to the Developer Workstation, click on the Development


button in the Home ribbon or the Switch to Development button in the
Quick Access toolbar.

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The Database Explorer


The Database Explorer is used to define database blocks. Data blocks are generally
defined for generating alarms and history collection. Real-time and historical data
can be retrieved and processed in the database.
Pulse is installed with SQL Server 2008 as the default database.
To access the Database Explorer, click the Database tab in the Project Navigator
or in the Home ribbon, click the Navigate icon and choose Database.

Database
Navigator
Manage
blocks and
alarms

Pulse Getting Started Guide

Database
Tree
Manage
database
blocks and
alarms

39

Data Blocks
A data block is a database element used for processing data. It has the following
functionality:
Provides an operator interface
Generates alarms
Collects history
Exchanges data with external devices and internal variables
Exchanges data between blocks
Converts raw data

Types of Database Blocks


You may create and configure the following types of database blocks:
Analog Value

This block is used for analog variables. Analog values are


constantly scanned. Alarms can be generated and
history collected.

Analog Pointer

This block is used for analog variables, mainly for data


conversion. An analog pointer type of block is scanned
upon request.

Digital Value

This block is used for digital variables. Digital values are


constantly scanned. Alarms can be generated and
history collected.

Digital Pointer

This block is used for digital variables and is scanned


only upon request.

Calculation

This block can perform calculations on analog and digital


block values. These blocks are constantly scanned.
Alarms can be generated and history collected.

Boolean

This block is used for boolean algebraic calculations,


which are constantly scanned. Alarms can be generated
and history collected.

String Pointer

This block receives up to twenty 16 bit word values from


registers in a PLC or other devices and converts them
into a text string of up to 40 characters.

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Alarm

This block enables definition of up to 80 digital alarms.


Each alarm block reads 5 registers of 16 bits, each from
up to five different PLCs, and relates to each bit as a
separate alarm. A different alarm status can be defined
for each different bit. Alarm status can be: On, Off,
Change Of State.
Each Alarm block reads 5 addresses (registers) of 16 bits
each (up to eighty digital alarms), from up to five
different PLCs, and relates to each bit as a separate
alarm. For each bit, a different alarm status can be
defined: ON, OFF, or COS.

String Pointer

String Pointer blocks are used to convert numerical data


into text. They can receive up to twenty 16-bit word
values from registers in a PLC or other peripheral device
and convert them into a text string of up to 40
characters. They can also convert a text string input by
the operator into register values to be sent to the PLC or
other device. String Pointer blocks are only processed
when used somewhere in the Pulse system.
Part or all the message sent or retrieved by the block can
be defined as a constant. The constant can be used to
identify the device in the operator display. Different
conversions can be specified in the block, according to
the way the device generates and reads characters.

SER

The Sequence of Events Recorder enables Pulse to


capture and present events at subsecond time resolution
(e.g., 10 milliseconds). You can create up to 32 SER
blocks in your application.

Alarm Bit

Alarm blocks can contain up to five registers, which in


turn can contain up to 16 alarm bits each, for a
maximum capacity of 80 alarm bits per block.
Each alarm bit can hold a unique digital alarm associated
with its registers data source. For each bit, you need to
specify its alarm handling configuration.

Master Blocks

Pulse Getting Started Guide

NOTE This option enables the user to create Master


blocks of Analog Value, Analog Pointer, Digital
Value, Digital Pointer, Calculation, Boolean,
Alarm and String Pointer blocks.

41

Creating a Digital Value Block


Digital Value blocks receive a digital value from a coil, relay, or input, or a bit in a
register from a PLC or other peripheral device. They process logical data whose
values equal 0 (OFF) or 1 (ON).
In this exercise, we will create a block which will display an alarm entry in the Alarm
Explorer whenever the stop light created in a previous exercise changes its color,
see Creating an On/Off Button and Stop Light Object on page 34.
To add a Digital Value block
1 In the Database tree, right-click anywhere in the DigitalValue branch and then
click New Block. A form opens in the workstations window.
2 In the Block Name box, type a unique name for the block (the name should
relate to a function or a location that its advised item is associated with). Block
names may be up to 34 characters long. The first character must be a letter (A
to Z). The following characters may be letters (A to Z), numbers (0-9), or
hyphens (-). Lower case letters are automatically converted to upper case.
For this exercise, type the name SL1 (label for Stop Light 1).
3 In the blocks General tab, define the block parameters.
General
Description

Enter a block description of up to 255 characters.

Node

Node number of the station that handles this alarm or


event point.

Address

Enter the digital-type address of the item to which the


alarm refers. For this exercise, we will use the default
address D:1 (an internal dummy variable).

Security

Security level (0-99) for users authorized to receive and


view the alarm. For this exercise, enter 99.

Maintenance

Select this checkbox option to enable the use of


maintenance counters (.AccumTime, .AccumStart) to
record time elapsed since the blocks value changed.

Timings
Scan Time (sec)

The interval between successive processing of the block,


in the range of 1-255 seconds. The default is 1 second.

Phase Time (sec)

The initial time delay from the loading of the database to


the first processing of the block, in the range 1-255
seconds. The default time unit is one second.

PLC Time Stamp

Select this checkbox option to read the date and time of


the alarm from the PLC.

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Text
Text for 0

Text of up to eight characters and spaces describing the


digital 0 state (for example: OFF, CLOSED, etc.). This
text will appear in displays, data entry, and alarm
messages. For this exercise, enter OFF.

Text for 1

Text of up to eight characters and spaces describing the


digital 1 state (for example: ON, OPEN, etc.). This text
will appear in displays, data entry, and alarm messages.
For this exercise, enter ON.

History
Enabled

Select this History checkbox option to enable recording


the alarm in the history file.

Target
Target Block

Choose a database block which receives the data values


initiated from this block.

Target Logic

Choose the alarm component (such as Output, Alarm


Enable, and so on) whose value is written to the target
block whenever this alarm is initiated.

Output
Invert

Select this checkbox option to enable inverting of the


device value (negative logic).

4 Go to the blocks Alarms tab and check the Enable Alarms checkbox option
to allow Pulse to trigger alarms and generate the listing of alarm data. The
following are the Alarms tabs sub-tabs:

General

Tree Settings

Actions

5 In the General tab, define the Alarms general parameters.


Name

Type a name for the alarm condition. For example,


SL1_State.

Description

Enter an alarm condition description of up to 255


characters. This condition description is displayed in an
alarm message, along with standard alarm information.
For example, SL1 state turned off.

Priority

Assign the level of precedence or importance of this


alarm, between 0 and 99, where 0 is considered the
highest priority.

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Event

Select this option to make this condition an event


message. In this exercise, do not select it.

Condition
Alarm Type

Choose the state of the block value which triggers this


alarm: ON, OFF, COS (value changes in either direction).
For this exercise, choose OFF.

Alarm Wait

The amount of time (seconds) before Pulse generates


the alarm. 0 indicates an immediate generation.
A value higher than 0 provides an interval for the system
to verify if the alarm condition truly exists, or if a
temporary spike occurred in an otherwise normal
condition period.

6 Go to the Tree Settings tab to place the block in an organized context, such
as by function, by location, or by category.
Functional

For this exercise, choose the alarms placement in the


Functional alarm tree (usually associated with factors
such as division, plant, line, and so on).

Location

The alarms or events placement in the Location alarm


tree (associated with the physical location of the
managed area (campus, building, production floor, and
so on).

Category

The alarms or events placement according to a


category attribute. The category ranges between 0 and
999.

7 Go to the Actions tab to define the Actions parameters.


Show

Select this option to display the alarm notification in the


Alarm Explorer.

Print

Select this option to send the alarm message to a printer.

Log

Select this option to display this alarms instances in the


Logger Window.

Sound

Select this option to produce a sound when the alarm is


triggered.

NOTE For details about parameters not defined in this exercise, refer to the Pulse
Online Help or the Pulse User Guide.
8 Click Save to save the block in the project database. In the File ribbon, click
the Activate button to reload the database and update the Alarm Publisher.
9 In the Operator Workstation, open the display that contains the on/off button
and stop light created in a previous exercise.

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10 In the Operator Workstations Tools ribbon, click Alarm Explorer. By default,


the Alarm Explorer is displayed in the Current Alarm view.
NOTE In the Operator Workstations Window ribbon, the Windows area contains
icons for all open displays and the Alarm Explorer. To switch among the
open displays and windows, click their respective icons.

11 Return to the Operator Workstation display and press the on/off button so that
the stop light turns red.

12 In the Alarm Explorer, notice the entry for the Stop Light alarm.

Alarm entries appear in the


Alarm Explorer Log.

13 In the Operator Workstation, press the on/off button so that the stop light
turns green.

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14 In the Alarm Explorer, notice that the Stop Light alarm has been cleared.

Alarm was cleared.

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46

Appendix A - Installing IIS and MSMQ


Service
The Internet Information Service (IIS) is a Web-based platform that is required to
host the Pulse Server.
The Microsoft Message Queuing (MSMQ) service is required for Pulse to route
alarms and messages from the Pulse kernel to their destination users.
NOTE IIS and MSMQ are not included with the Pulse installation DVD, and
therefore, must be installed separately.
NOTE You must be a member of the Administrators group on the local computer
to install IIS and MSMQ.
Installing IIS and MSMQ on Windows 7
Installing .NET Framework, IIS and MSMQ on Windows 8
Installing IIS and MSMQ on the Windows Server 2008
Installing .NET Framework, IIS and MSMQ on Windows Server 2012

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Installing IIS and MSMQ on Windows 7


Installing IIS on Windows 7
1 From the Windows 7 interface, click Start and then click Control Panel.
2 In the Control Panel, click Programs and then click Turn Windows features
on or off.
3 In the Windows Features dialog box, select all the features and then click
OK.

Installing MSMQ on Windows 7


1 Open the Control Panel.
2 Click Programs, and then under Programs and Features, click Turn
Windows features on or off.
3 Expand Microsoft Message Queue (MSMQ) Server, expand Microsoft
Message Queue (MSMQ) Server Core, and then select all the check boxes
for the Message Queuing features.
4 Click OK. If you are prompted to restart the computer, click OK to complete
the installation.

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Installing .NET Framework, IIS and MSMQ on


Windows 8
Installing .NET Framework on Windows 8
To enable the .NET Framework 3.5 feature:
1 Go to the Control Panel and then click Programs.
2 Under Programs and Features, click Turn Windows features on or off.
The Windows Features dialog box opens.

If your computer does not have an internet connection then do the following:

Insert the Windows 8 DVD or mount the ISO image.

Open cmd.exe with Administrative privileges.

Run the following command (E: the Windows installation media drive
letter):
Dism.exe/online/enable-feature/featurenameNetFX3/All/
Source:E:\sources\sxs/LimitAccess.

3 Click OK.

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Installing IIS and MSMQ Framework on Windows 8


If the following message is displayed during the Pulse installation then do the
following steps below:

1 Enable the Internet Information Services (IIS) Windows feature.


2 Enable the Internet Information Services (IIS) > Web Management
Tools > IIS 6 management Compatibility > IIS Metabase and IIS 6.
configuration compatibility.
3 Enable the Internet Information Services (IIS) World Wide Web
Services > Application Development Features > ASP .NET.
4 Check the checkboxes as shown below.

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5 Continue checking the checkboxes as shown below.

6 Click OK.

The Windows Features window is displayed informing you that Windows


completed the requested changes.

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Installing IIS and MSMQ on the Windows Server


2008
Installing IIS on the Windows Server 2008
1 Open the Control Panel, click System and Maintenance, and then click
Administrative Tools.
2 In the right pane, double-click Server Manager. The Windows Features dialog
box opens.
3 In the left pane of Server Manager, select the node that represents the server
that you are currently working on.
4 In the right pane, expand the Roles Summary section and then click Add
Roles. The Add Roles Wizard opens.
5 Click Next. The wizard moves to the Select Server Roles step.
6 Select the Web Server (IIS) check box and then click Next.
7 The next wizard step that appears is information that guides you in the
installation. Click Next.
8 The wizard moves to the Role Services step. A list of available role services
appears. If you click the name of a role, a short description of the role
appears.
Select all of the role services and their options and click Next and verify the role
service selections.
9 Click Install to start the IIS and ASP.NET installation process.
10 When the installation is complete, click Close.
11 Open the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager. From the Start menu,
click All Programs, click Accessories, and then click Run. In the Open box,
type inetmgr and then click OK.
12 In the left pane, expand the Local Computer tree to the Web Service
Extensions folder.
13 Set the status of ASP.NET v2.0xxxx to Allowed.

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Installing MSMQ on Windows Server 2008


1 Click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then
click Server Manager to display the Server Manager.
2 Click Add Features to start the Add Features Wizard.
3 Expand MSMQ, expand MSMQ Services, and then select all the check boxes
for the Message Queuing features.
4 Click Next, and then click Install. If you are prompted to restart the
computer, click OK to complete the installation.

Installing .NET Framework, IIS and MSMQ on


Windows Server 2012
Installing .NET Framework on Windows Server 2012
If the following message is displayed during the Pulse 3.5 installation the follow the
steps below.

1 Go to the Control Panel and then click Programs.


2 Under Programs and Features, click Turn Windows features on or off.
3 Enable the .NET Framework 3.5 feature in the Control Panel > Programs
> Turn Windows features on or off.
If your computer does not have an internet connection then do the following:

Insert the Windows 8 DVD or mount the ISO image.

Open cmd.exe with Administrative privileges.

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53

Run the following command (E: the Windows installation media drive
letter):
Dism.exe/online/enable-feature/featurenameNetFX3/All/
Source:E:\sources\sxs/LimitAccess.

Installing IIS and MSMQ on Windows Server 2012


If the following message is displayed during the Pulse installation the follow the
steps below.

1 Enable the Roles Summary > Add Roles > Web Server (IIS) feature and
click Next.
2 Enable the Application Development feature.
3 Enable the Management Tools > IIS 6 Management Compatibility in the
Control Panel > Programs and Features > Turn Windows features on
or off.
4 For the Microsoft Message Queuing (MSMQ), enable Features Summary >
Add Features > Message Queuing in the Control Panel > Programs and
Features > Turn Windows on or off.
5 In the Add Roles and Features Wizard window, select the Role-based
feature-based installation option.

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6 Click Next.

7 In the Add features that are required for Web Server (IIS) prompt, click
to activate the Include Management tools (if applicable) option and click
the Add Features button.

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8 In the following window, click Add Features to continue.

9 Check to select the checkboxes as shown below and click Add Features to
continue.

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10 Check to select the checkboxes as shown below and click Next to continue.

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11 Check to select the checkboxes as shown below and click Next to continue.

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12 Click Install to complete the IIS and MSMQ components installation.

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