ELECTION RESULTS:Purchase a copy of the May 26 edition of The Champion

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the DeKalb

FRIDAY, MAY 27, 2016 • VOL. 19, NO. 7 • FREE

Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Tucker and Stone Mountain.

• A PUBLICATION OF ACE III COMMUNICATIONS •

Horsing around at Little Creek Horse Farm

Little Creek Farm: A treasure that
should be enjoyed by more residents
by Gale Horton Gay

D

anielle Warren has a special relationship
with a horse named Scout.
She rides him regularly, getting guidance from a team of instructors and when she’s
not taking lessons she likes to volunteer and help
those younger than her 25 years learn about being
around horses.

See Little Creek on Page 5A

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CHAMPIONNEWS

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local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 2A

Solemn remembrances and festive celebrations fill
Memorial Day, the
unofficial start of summer,
is here, and there’s plenty
of festivals and other
special events and activities
planned throughout metro
Atlanta.
While many of the
scheduled events over
the three-day weekend
are festive and fun, some
are solemn events that
recognize the men and
women that the holiday was
created to honor—those
who died serving in the U.S.
military. Originally known
as Decoration Day, what
we now know as Memorial
Day originated in the years
following the Civil War and
became an official federal
holiday in 1971.
Some families and
groups hold special
commemorative events at
cemeteries, churches and
other venues.
The 14th DeKalb County
Memorial Day Program will
be held from 11 a.m. to 1

p.m. on May 27, 2016 at the
Maloof Auditorium, 1300
Commerce Drive in Decatur. The DeKalb County
Veterans Affairs Advisory
Board has secured a keynote speaker and honorees
and the Columbia High
School JROTC honor guard
will handle flag duty. A postevent buffet will be served.
Other activities taking place
on Memorial Day weekend
include:
Decatur Arts Festival
May 28 – 29
Downtown Decatur
will be one busy place
throughout the weekend
as the 2016 Decatur Arts
Festival gets underway.
Musical performances,
improv and stand-up
comedy, a children’s
festival and parade, dance
performances, artists
market and more at various
sites throughout Decatur
including the Decatur
Recreation Center, the
downtown square and
Agnes Scott College. For

the Fallen, a Memorial
Day concert, will be held
at 5 p.m. at Decatur First
United Methodist Church,
300 W. Ponce de Leon. It
will feature the Callanwolde
concert band and the
church’s chancel choir. Go
to www.decaturarsfestival.
com for details.
Memorial Weekend at
Stone Mountain Park
May 27 - 30
Stone Mountain Park
has a four-day salute to the
troops planned that includes
extended fireworks finale,
lasershow with fire effects.
Active and retired military
personnel receive one
free Adventure Pass with
valid ID and are eligible for
additional discounts. Go to
www.stonemountainpark.
com for more information.

and costumes at 3952
Covington Highway,
Decatur. Go to www.
atlantacarnivalbc.com.
Atlanta Jazz Festival
May 27 - 29
One of the country’s
largest free music festivals,
the Atlanta Jazz Festival
in Atlanta’s Piedmont
Park features local and
national jazz greats on
three stages, a youth jazzband competition, arts and
crafts, food vendors, and

Take advantage of our May Move-In offer!
Call (844) 557-7362

His generation put a
man on the moon.

Caribbean Carnival
Village
May 28
The Atlanta/DeKalb
Caribbean Carnival Village
celebrates Caribbean
culture, music, food

You know he has
ideas worth hearing.

A Celebration
of Life!
National Cancer
Survivors Day

Block Party

At Brookdale, we’re looking for interesting
seniors — people who’ve lived life to the
fullest and are hungry for more. Call us,
and find out how we’re
Bringing New Life to Senior Living .
TM

June 4, 2016 | 2pm-6pm

Come out and fellowship with the DeKalb Medical’s Cancer Center
as we celebrate life at our First Annual Cancer Survivors Block Party!
Admission is free and open to the community! There will be food,
music, and fun memorable experiences.

Brookdale Stone Mountain
A Brookdale Managed Community
Personal Care
Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care
1745 Parke Plaza Circle
Stone Mountain, Georgia 30087

2665 North Decatur Rd.
Decatur, Ga 30033

brookdale.com
YCORP-P22-0516-ROP SC

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL 404-501-EASY (9355)

more. Among the featured
performers scheduled:
Etienne Charles, Alex
Lattimore, Next Collective,
Joi, Assaf Kehati
Trio, Gregory Porter,
Anonymous DaBand and
Chandra Currelley and
others. A late-night jazz
jam starts at 11 p.m. on
May 28 at Park Tavern in
Atlanta with the Russell
Gunn Quartet and Lil
John Roberts. Go to www.
atlantafestivals.com.

©2016 Brookdale Senior Living Inc. All rights reserved.
BROOKDALE SENIOR LIVING and BRINGING NEW LIFE TO SENIOR LIVING are the registered trademarks of Brookdale Senior Living Inc.

local

aRounDDEKALB

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 3A

counTYWiDE

bRooKHaVEn

County parks and rec swim season schedule
announced

City to host water safety day

Brookhaven will host Water Safety Day June 4 at Lynwood Park
Pool, 1-3 p.m. The event will feature music, food and fun in the sun, with
a focus on water safety. Lynwood Park Pool is located at 3360 Osborne
Road. For more information, visit www.brookhavenga.gov.

The 2016 swim
season for DeKalb
County Parks and
Recreation facilities
is scheduled to open
Memorial Day weekend,
Saturday, May 28, and
run through Friday,
Aug. 5. Select pools will
remain open on weekends through Labor Day weekend, Sept. 5.
The following pools and spray park are scheduled to be opened
for the 2016 swim season: Exchange, Gresham, Kittredge, Lithonia,
Medlock, Midway, Tobie Grant and Kelly Cofer.
For more information, contact Justin Blanton, parks program
coordinator, at (404) 371-6270.

claRKsTon

City joins crime tracking website
The city of Clarkston recently launched a website through
CrimeMapping.com giving the public easier access to crime data.
The public can now view 180 days of tracked crime on an online
map of Clarkston, including such violations as assault, fraud, theft,
larceny, and vehicle breakins. Data can be reshuffled for specific dates,
crimes and addresses.
Residents can receive crime alerts through CrimeMapping.com by
registering online. Registered users can select their preferred distance
from crimes as well as specific crimes they wish to be alerted of.
Updates occur every 24 hours.
A CrimeMapping application is also available for iPhone users.
In a recent press release, the Clarkston Police Department stated
it hoped the “the easier access to crime data will lead to proactive
preventative measures that can reduce crime.”
For more information visit www.clarkstonga.gov/crime-mapping/
crime-mapping.html.

aVonDalE EsTaTEs
City to celebrate National Garden Week

Avondale Estates will celebrate National Garden Week June 5-11.
In honor of the commemorative week the city will recognize members
of the Avondale Estates Garden Club and the Avon Garden Club for
helping to make the city a greener, more beautiful place. The National
Garden Club asks gardeners across the country to spread the word and
encourage others to develop green thumbs. For more information, visit
www.avondaleestates.org.

NOTICE
The City of Brookhaven City Council does hereby announce that the millage rate will be set at a meeting to be
held at the Brookhaven City Hall on on June 7, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. and pursuant to the requirements of O.C.G.A. Section
48-5-32 does hereby publish the following presentation of the current year's tax digest and levy, along with the history of the tax
digest and levy for the past five years.

CURRENT 2016 TAX DIGEST AND 5 YEAR HISTORY OF LEVY
Brookhaven City

2011

2012

2013

Real & Personal

2014

2,261,071,691

2015

2016

2,691,060,034

3,163,935,872

3,494,756,627

82,633,320

67,891,300

47,578,450

2,261,071,691

2,773,693,354

3,231,827,172

3,542,335,077

254,997,596

437,879,638

646,602,506

668,938,974

Motor Vehicles
Mobile Homes
Timber - 100%
Heavy Duty Equipment
Gross Digest

0

0

Less M& O Exemptions
Net M & O Digest
State Forest Land Assistance
Grant Value

0

0

2,006,074,095

2,335,813,716

2,585,224,666

2,873,396,103

Adjusted Net M&O Digest

0

0

2,006,074,095

2,335,813,716

2,585,224,666

2,873,396,103

2.850

2.850

2.795

2.740

0.055

0.055

0.000

Gross M&O Millage
Less Rollbacks
Net M&O Millage

0.000

0.000

2.850

2.795

2.740

2.740

Net Taxes Levied

$0

$0

$5,717,311

$6,528,599

$7,083,516

$7,873,105

$811,288.00

$554,916.00

$789,590.00

14.19%

8.50%

11.15%

Net Taxes $ Increase
Net Taxes % Increase

#REF!

#REF!
#REF!

#REF!

 

 

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 4A

Parkview on Peachtree brings mixed-use to Chamblee
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com

K

eswick Park in
Chamblee may not
what the average
DeKalb County resident
would call a destination.
While the 45-acre
park and neighborhood
offers such amenities as
a full baseball or softball
field, a playground, trails
throughout the surrounding
neighborhood, a tennis
court and Rail Trail access,
Keswick seems to have
remained under the radar.
However, on May 19,
more than 50 visitors,
stakeholders and local
officials made their way to
Keswick Park to celebrate
the official groundbreaking
of Parkview on Peachtree,
a mixed-use development
set to open in Chamblee in
2017.
Originally approved
in 2007, Parkview on
Peachtree will offer 40,000
square feet of retail space,
14,000 square feet of
loft office space, and
503 “luxury” multi-family
apartments. A bridge for
pedestrians will link Phase
I and II of the development
with the latter scheduled to
open December 2017.

Chamblee Mayor
Eric Clarkson, a former
Keswick Park resident,
cited the development as a
great example of the city’s
ambition.
“It’s a testament to a
community and a council to
have a long-term vision and
not just settle for something
better than what’s there
now,” Clarkson said. “The
community went through a
lot for a vertical mixed-use
project. This is what we’re
all looking for in terms of
development: places where
people want to congregate.”
“We’re excited to
have another first-class
development,” said Broc
Fischer, president of the
Chamblee Chamber of
Commerce. “The elevation
of our overall community
is always welcome. We’re
looking forward to carrying
forward.”
Fischer said
development of the
northeastern corridor of
DeKalb County – made up
of Chamblee, Doraville and
Brookhaven – has been
successful despite economic
downturns and overall,
natural and organic.
According to J.R.
Connolly, president of
the development firm

behind the Parkview on
Peachtree project, said the
development will offer prime
retail, restaurant, office and
residential space at the
intersection of Peachtree
Boulevard and Clairmont
Road.

“As someone who lives
in the Brookhaven area,
there’s a need and desire
for more restaurants and
lifestyle retail,” Connolly
said. “We want to be that
neighborhood village
with some fun places to

eat with a broad range of
experiences and regular
business.”
Connolly said Chamblee
has a lot to offer the
development with arterial

See Parkview on Page 9A

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Mayor and City Council of the City of Chamblee, Georgia will hold a public hearing on Thursday, June 16, 2016, at the Chamblee Civic Center, 3540 Broad Street, Chamblee, GA
30341 at 6:00 p.m. to receive public comments regarding the following matters:
•The City of Chamblee, Georgia is applying for a stream buffer variance in accordance with Section 310-19 of the Unified Development Ordinance for property at 3770
Longview Drive, being DeKalb County Tax Parcel #18-324-03-012 in order to facilitate the construction of a picnic shelter.
•Wakefield Beasley and Associates requests approval of a Development of Community Impact (DCI) for a mixed-use development consisting of 297 apartments, 2,382 sq. ft.
of professional offices, 4,303 sq. ft. of restaurant, and 6,371 sq. ft. of other retail space. The request concerns property at 5211 Peachtree Boulevard, being DeKalb County
Tax Parcel #18-299-13-005 consisting of 3.86 acres.
•Inline Communities requests approval of a Planned Unit Development (PUD) for development of a subdivision consisting of 39 single-family attached dwellings on private
streets at 1965, 1973, 1981, and 1989 Dering Circle being Tax Parcels #18-235-02-029, 18-235-02-028, 18-235-02-027, 18-235-02-026, consisting of a total of 3.689 acres.
•Stein Investment Co., LLC requests approval of an amendment of the City of Chamblee Official Zoning Map to change the designation of three parcels at 3693 Clairmont
Rd., 1959 and 1969 Bragg St. from Neighborhood Commercial-2 (NC-2) to Corridor Commercial (CC), being DeKalb County Tax Parcels #18-244-04-004, 18-244-04-005, and
18-244-04-006 for the purpose of developing a Climate-Controlled Self-Storage Facility.
•Andrew Blakey, representing Broward PIB, LLC requests approval of a Development of Community Impact in accordance with City of Chamblee Ordinances, Appendix A,
Unified Development Ordinance, Section 280-6 for the purpose of constructing a climate-controlled self-storage facility consisting of 600 units and 3,599 sq. ft. of other
commercial space and parking for 35 cars on 1.28 acres of property located at 5208 Peachtree Boulevard, Chamblee, GA, being DeKalb County Tax parcel 18-300-08-002.
•Hennessey Cadillac, Inc. requests approval of an Amendment to the Official Zoning Map to rezone 79 tax parcels from Village Commercial (conditional) to Industrial
Transitional (IT) including the following addresses: 0, 3413, 3436, 3408, 3360, 3401, 3390, 3326, 3294, 3316, 3412, 3380, 3424, 3345, 3419, 3396, 3418, 3351, 3310, 3430,
3356, 3332, 3339, 3322, 3446, 3437, 3384, 3344, 3304, 3431, 3424, 3443, 3407, 3425, 3402, 3298, 3370, 3338, and 3350 Catalina Drive; 3341, 3355, 3345, 3289, 3309,
3299, 3315, 3305, 3351, 3295, 3283, 3361, & 3319 Burk Dr.; 3388, 3382, 3394, & 3398 Chamblee-Dunwoody Rd.; 0, 2208, & 2214 Chamblee-Tucker Rd.; 0, 2220, 2226,
2214, 2231, 2225, & 2232 Coronado Pl.; 3434 & 3428 Blackburn Way.
•Hennessey Cadillac, Inc. requests approval of variances from the Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) for 79 tax parcels including the following addresses: 0, 3413,
3436, 3408, 3360, 3401, 3390, 3326, 3294, 3316, 3412, 3380, 3424, 3345, 3419, 3396, 3418, 3351, 3310, 3430, 3356, 3332, 3339, 3322, 3446, 3437, 3384, 3344, 3304,
3431, 3424, 3443, 3407, 3425, 3402, 3298, 3370, 3338, and 3350 Catalina Drive; 3341, 3355, 3345, 3289, 3309, 3299, 3315, 3305, 3351, 3295, 3283, 3361, & 3319
Burk Dr.; 3388, 3382, 3394, & 3398 Chamblee-Dunwoody Rd.; 0, 2208, & 2214 Chamblee-Tucker Rd.; 0, 2220, 2226, 2214, 2231, 2225, & 2232 Coronado Pl.; 3434 & 3428
Blackburn Way. Variances are requested from the following provisions of the UDO:
•Sec. 250-2(a)(4)b. All surface parking in excess of 100 percent of the minimum number of off-street parking spaces required by type of permitted use shall be
“Grasscrete” or “Grasspave” or other pervious paving or grass paving systems and as approved by he Development Director.
•Sec. 250-7(a)(4)a. Developments where 30 or more parking spaces are provided shall be required to provide compact parking spaces.
•Sec. 300-17(c) Nonresidential and mixed-use developments with more than 600 feet of frontage along a single street shall be divided by streets into blocks having
a maximum length of 400 feet measured from street curb to street curb.
•Sec. 320-21(a) Interior landscaping for off-street parking areas shall be required for all surface parking lots designed for 20 or more spaces.
•Sec. 350-25. Utilities, including telephone, electric power and cable television in both public and private rights-of-way, shall be placed underground for all new
developments with total floor areas of 20,000 sq. ft. are feet or over.
•Sec. 250-7(a)(1) Off-street surface parking shall not be located between a building and the street without an intervening building except where otherwise
permitted by Section 230-6 and Section 240-13(d)(1).
•Sec, 350-2(c) To the maximum extent possible, sidewalks and parking lots serving adjacent lots shall be interconnected to provide continuous driveway
connections and pedestrian connections between adjoining lots and streets, except that this requirement shall not apply to lots zoned for single family residential
units. Where necessary, the City may require access easements be provided to ensure continuous access and egress routes connecting commercial, office, and
multifamily lots.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016

local

Page 5A

Little Creek Continued From Page 1A
Warren is just one of the many adults
and children who come to Little Creek
Horse Farm in Decatur to participate in
programs offered by Stride Ahead and
the Little Creek Horse Farm Conservancy.
The 40-acre farm is actually a DeKalb
County park. The county owns the land
and maintains the property and the Little
Creek Farm Conservancy, a nonprofit,
works in partnership with the county, running programs, enhancing the arenas
and assisting with landscaping.
According to Jane Donofrio, president of the conservancy, the group’s 100
members have poured money and sweat
into the farm to keep it as a unique recreation space that she considers one of the
county’s little-known treasures.
“This is something I don’t think very
many places in the country have as a
county park,” said Donofrio. “It’s a unique
situation.”
She calls the $50,000 riding base
that was installed in the arena in 2011
“state of the art.” And the conservancy
launched a $40,000 fundraising effort to
redo an outdoor arena in 2013.
The farm has 46 stalls, and about 45
horses are currently boarded there. The
horses’ owners pay lease fees for the
space.
Among the equines are retired racehorses, rescue horses and thoroughbreds. Arabians, percherons and mustangs are among the breeds.
Donofrio’s horse Gracie is an Arabian/
percheron mix.
“Most people who board here also let
their horses be used for our programs,”
she said.
Two trainers provide riding instruction
at the farm and home to Stride Ahead,
an equine assisted therapy program.
“We really consider the trainers the
backbone of the farm,” said Donofrio.
Anne Preston, chairwoman of Stride
Ahead’s Board of Directors, said the
therapy programs that are in their seventh years are going “great.”
Preston, who’s also a therapeutic
riding instructor, said persons with dis-

abilities gain strength, independence
and confidence from being on a horse.
Another program that Preston said she’s
most excited about involves working with
veterans and their families as well as atrisk youth in middle school and elementary school.
“We can change that trajectory using
the horses and resources,” Preston said.
She said that horses are extremely
sensitive and responsive to people, picking up on their moods.
“The horse is reflecting to them how
they are being in the world, who they are
being in the world.
“The horse is sorta like a biofeedback
on four hooves.”
Riders are taught how changes in
their mood, facial expressions, mannerisms and body language affect the
horse and also other individuals and how
changes can bring about positive results,
she said.
“We show them how changes in
their manner—a sigh, drop of head and
shoulders. It’s so powerful when you see
it happening. It’s like a big light bulb,”
Preston said.
Donofrio said annual events are held
such as a neighbor appreciation picnic
in July, pony rides in the spring and a fall
horse fest to draw the public to the Little
Creek Farm.
“We are trying to explore ways to extend our reach,” she said, mentioning
interest in partnering with juvenile justice
programs, children shelters and disabled
veterans. It has partnered with Emory
School of Nursing, Agnes Scott College
and Decatur High School.
She added that the conservancy
would like to see other enhancements to
the farm that would benefit more people
such as walking trails, exercise stations,
etc. The group applied for Park Pride
funds recently but didn’t receive anything.
“It’s really important to recognize
it’s a county park not just for us [horse
owners] but for everyone in the county,”
Donofrio said.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016

opinion

Page 6A

This isn’t goodbye
by Andrew Cauthen
OK, DeKalb County, I
will get to the
point quickly
as I usually do:
this is my final
column for The
Champion Free
Press and my final issue with the
paper.
Incidentally,
this is the second
“final column” I
Cauthen
have written for
a newspaper. The first time
was in 1990, weeks before
graduating from Clemson

University. At the time I was
the editor in chief of The Tiger, Clemson’s Newspaper.
I was done with
my four years at
The Tiger and was
ready to make my
way in the world.
Now, a quarter
of a century has
passed, and I have
decided to leave
The Champion,
where I have spent
the past five and a
half years reporting
the truth as best as I could.
I have covered neighborhood meetings, high profile

trials, school programs,
county corruption allegations, community garden
plantings, building fires,
government ribbon-cuttings,
police funerals, school
graduations, and too many
other topics to recall.
I have had the privilege
of telling the stories of innumerable DeKalb residents
and helping them with their
concerns and documenting
their celebrations.
It’s been a great run
that I will never forget.
Thanks for reading
my stories and columns.
Thanks for giving me ideas

FREEPreSS
the DeKalb

let Us Know What You Think!

THE CHAMPION FREE PRESS encourages opinions
from its readers. Please write to us and express your
views. Letters should be brief, typewritten and contain
the writer’s name, address and telephone number for
verification. All letters will be considered for publication.

SEnD lETTERS To EDiToR,
The DeKalb Free Press,
P. O. Box 1347, Decatur, GA 30031-1347;
Send email to Johnh@dekalbchamp.com
FAX To: (404) 370-3903; Phone: (404) 373-7779.
Deadline for news releases and advertising:
Thursday, one week prior to publication date.

EDiToR’S noTE: The opinions written by columnists and contributing editors do not necessarily reflect the opinions
of the editor or publishers. The Publisher reserves the right to reject or cancel any advertisement at any time. The
Publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts.

for stories. Thanks for inviting me into your homes and
neighborhoods and churches and lives.
I would like to thank my
coworkers at The Champion for welcoming me, putting up with me, teaching
me, encouraging me, criticizing me, listening to me,
sharing my grief, and laughing with me and at me.
I will always cherish the
memories.
I also am very grateful to my wife Deanna for
always being there and always supporting me.
Although we in DeKalb

Publisher:
John Hewitt

Photographer:
Travis Hudgons

Chief Financial Officer:
Dr. Earl D. Glenn

Staff Reporters:
carla parker
R. Scott Belzer

Production Manager:
Kemesha Hunt

The Champion Free Press is published each Friday
by ACE III Communications, Inc.,
114 New Street, Suite E, Decatur, GA. 30030
Phone (404) 373-7779.
www.championnewspaper.com
DISPLAY ADVERTISING (404) 373-7779 x 110

have some challenges to
address, I am proud to live,
play and worship in DeKalb
County, where I have been
for most of my 21 years in
Georgia. And I have been
blessed to be able to work
in this county for much of
that time, as well.
Now I will be embarking on a new phase of my
career–this time working for
the county as a public information officer, still telling
stories, still telling the truth.
So this is not really a
goodbye, DeKalb. It’s a
“see ya soon.”

STATEMENT FROM THE
PUBLISHER
We sincerely appreciate the
discussion surrounding this and any
issue of interest to DeKalb County.
The Champion was founded in 1991
expressly to provide a forum for
discourse for all community residents
on all sides of an issue. We have no
desire to make the news only to
report news and opinions to effect
a more educated citizenry that will
ultimately move our community
forward. We are happy to present
ideas for discussion; however,
we make every effort to avoid
printing information submitted to
us that is known to be false and/or
assumptions penned as fact.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016

opinion

Page 7A

One Man’s Opinion

First our vets!...nyet
“Our vets are being
mistreated.  And it’s not
going to happen anymore.” –Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump
during a Jan. 28 fundraiser, just ahead of the Iowa
Caucus, and concurrently
scheduled with a televised presidential debate
that Trump chose not to
attend.
As the Memorial
Day holiday weekend
looms ahead, millions of
Americans are planning
a weekend of barbecue
and leisure activities, essentially the official kickoff of American summertime. But for the families
and survivors of our men
and women in uniform,
Memorial Day has a
much deeper meeting.
Two major talking
points of presidential
front-runner Trump are
rebuilding our nation’s
military, and honoring
our promise to take better care of American
veterans. I have always
believed, and our military
have long demonstrated,
that actions speak louder
than words—and actions
tend to leave a more lasting mark as well.
On the eve of the Iowa
Caucus, the Trump campaign held a fundraiser
in support of a wide array
of veterans groups and
causes.  By that evening,
Trump had repeatedly
stated that the concert

Bill Crane
bill.csicrane@gmail.com

Columnist

and event had raised
$6 million in a single
day. Shortly after the rally
in Des Moines, the Trump
campaign stated that $5
million had been raised or
pledged, and that Trump
himself would contribute
an additional $1 million.
It is worth noting that
at the time, all contributions and checks were
made payable to the
Trump Foundation, and
not directly to any benefiting veteran cause or
entity.
As contributions/donations began to be made,
an analysis and report
by CNN received a list
from the Trump campaign
of gifts from the Trump
Foundation to 27 different
veteran organization, totaling $2.9 million. Nearly
three months later, less
than half of the stated
total has been dispersed,
according to the campaign.

Of the benefiting charities, which CNN was able
to reach for confirmation of the donations,
only nine groups confirmed payments totaling
$800,000. One group on
the list of those already
having received funding shared that as yet
no payment had actually
been made.
The $2.9 million in
gifts so far identified
came either from the
Trump Foundation, or
the foundations of two
of his friends, businessman Carl Icahn and
pharmaceutical executive
Stewart J. Rahr. As was
broadly reported by several news organizations
in early 2016, Trump’s
prior giving from his foundation to veteran causes
for the prior decade,
as noted in the foundation’s tax returns, totaled
$71,000.
“If the media spent half
as much time highlighting
the work of these groups
and how our veterans
have been so mistreated,
rather than trying to disparage Mr. Trump’s generosity for a totally unsolicited gesture for which
he had no obligation, we
would all be better for it,”
Trump campaign spokesperson Hope Hicks said.
Donald Trump is
certainly not the first
presidential candidate to
exaggerate, puff up his

chest with bombast and
hot air, or even to use the
bully pulpit to garner attention. Yet when Teddy
Roosevelt coined the
phrase, “bully pulpit” he
was using the office of
the presidency to raise
issues of great challenge
and importance to the
American people, not to
garner attention for himself. T.R. often spoke of
American foreign policy
as “speaking softly, while
carrying a big stick.”
Trump is less familiar
with doing anything softly;
and though many of his
admirers may point out
that $71,000 more than
a decade, or $2.9 million
(if entirely distributed)
is generous by any estimate, and represents
well more than $3 million
in funding that dozens of
resource starved veteran
nonprofits otherwise did
not have.
Veterans and senior
citizens are two of America’s largest and most
loyal voting blocks. In
Georgia alone there are
more than 750,000 living
and mostly voting veterans. It is not being too
cynical to note that Trump
picked a group worthy
of support and positive
attention, which fit well
into the populist narrative
of his campaign, and for
which the federal government also already spends
billions, perhaps ineffi-

ciently, offering services
and support for.
Some have compared
Trump to Ronald Reagan, another populist,
with basic precepts about
what America is and
returning our nation to
its glory days. But one
of my favorite Reagan
quotes also demonstrated
Dutch’s favored way of
getting results.
“There is no limit to the
amount of good you can
do if you don’t care who
gets the credit,” Reagan
once said.
Trump cares a lot
about credit and who
gets it. One wonders if he
cares more about getting
credit or veteran votes,
than he actually cares
for veterans and their
causes. 
Something else to
pause and ponder this
Memorial Day.

Bill Crane also serves
as a political analyst and
commentator for Channel
2’s Action News, WSB-AM
News/Talk 750 and now
95.5 FM, as well as a columnist for The Champion,
Champion Free Press and
Georgia Trend. Crane is
a DeKalb native and business owner, living in Scottdale. You can reach him or
comment on a column at
bill.csicrane@gmail.com. 

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 8A

Lithonia
living

Wendover Housing Partners has broken ground to prepare for the construction of the Granite Crossing community. Photo by Carla Parker

New apartments on the way
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Half of the big blue plaza
in Lithonia is gone and a new
apartment development will
soon be in its place.
Wendover Housing
Partners announced May
16 the ground breaking of a
75-unit apartment complex
named Granite Crossing
in downtown Lithonia. The
complex will be built where
the city-owned portion of
Lithonia Plaza sat.
The city began
demolishing the plaza on
March 14. Wendover will
develop the $14.7 million
apartment complex, which
will include 24 one-bedroom
units, 45 two-bedroom units
and six three-bedroom
apartments for residents
with annual incomes of up to
$40,000.
The development will
include a pool, gazebo,
computer room, community
room and other amenities.
Wendover received lowincome housing tax credits
from the Department of
Community Affairs for the
development. Construction

is scheduled to begin in
August, and residents are
expected to move in during
summer 2017.
“The addition of housing
in the Lithonia Plaza will
bring new families as well
as complement the existing
retail and help to foster
new business growth and
development in the city,”
Lithonia Mayor Deborah
Jackson said in a released
statement. “After years
of planning, Wendover’s
Granite Crossing project is
the first major step towards
the city’s goal of transforming
the downtown area.”
President and founder of
Wendover Housing Partners
Jonathan Wolf said he was
drawn to the property after
viewing the city’s blueprints
from 2012, which details
long-term plans to redevelop
the plaza.
“Granite Crossing will
bring to life a vision shared
by countless government
officials and Lithonia
community members,” Wolf
said.
Monthly rents for the
apartments will range from
$750 to $1,000.

CITY OF DORAVILLE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fiscal Year 2017 Budget
Notice is hereby given that the proposed budget for the City of Doraville shall be
available for public inspection beginning Friday, June 3, 2016, in the City Clerk’s
office from 8:30 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at City Hall, 3725 Park Avenue,
Doraville, GA.
A Public Hearing shall be held on the 13th day of June at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 3725
Park Avenue, Doraville, GA before the Mayor and Council of the City of Doraville at
which time public comment pertaining to the Fiscal Year 2017 (July 1, 2016 through
June 30, 2017) budget shall be sounded. All citizens of Doraville are invited to attend.
A Public Hearing shall be held on the 20th day of June at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 3725
Park Avenue, Doraville, GA before the Mayor and Council of the City of Doraville at
which time public comment pertaining to the Fiscal Year 2017 (July 1, 2016 through
June 30, 2017) budget shall be sounded. All citizens of Doraville are invited to attend.

NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX INCREASE
The DeKalb County School District has tentatively adopted a millage rate which
will require an increase in property taxes by 8.71 percent.
All concerned citizens are invited to the public hearing on this tax increase
to be held at 6:15 p.m. June 6, 2016, DeKalb County School District J. David
Williamson Board Room, 1701 Mountain Industrial Blvd., Stone Mountain,
Georgia
Times and places of additional public hearings on this tax increase are at:
11:30 a.m. June 21, 2016, DeKalb County School District J. David
Williamson Board Room, 1701 Mountain Industrial Blvd., Stone
Mountain, Georgia
6:15 p.m. June 21, 2016, DeKalb County School District J. David
Williamson Board Room, 1701 Mountain Industrial Blvd., Stone
Mountain, Georgia
This tentative increase will result in a millage rate of 23.73 mills, an increase
of 1.901 mills. Without this tentative tax increase, the millage rate will be
no more than 21.829 mills. The proposed tax increase for a home with a fair
market value of $200,000 is approximately $128.32 and the proposed tax
increase for non-homestead property with a fair market value of $325,000 is
approximately $247.13.

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 9A

NOTICE OF
PROPERTY TAX INCREASE
The Decatur City Commission has tentatively adopted a combined
millage rate of 10.68 mills for maintenance and operations which will
require an increase in property taxes of 2.91% for fiscal year 20162017. This is a reduction from the millage rate of 11.08 mills that
was adopted for the current fiscal year 2015-2016 which generates
revenue necessary to fund the City of Decatur’s general operations,
downtown development authority and capital improvements.
Parkview on Peachtree’s groundbreaking ceremony took place at
Keswick Park on May 19. Photo by R. Scott Belzer

Parkview on Peachtree is a multi-use development project set to
bring a urban and village-like lifestyle to Chamblee.

Parkview Continued From Page 4A
roads and access to
Atlanta’s heavy rail transit
system.
“There aren’t many cities
in the country with heavy
rail subway systems and
Atlanta is one,” Connolly
said. “When you look at the
path of growth from where
Buckhead is … with Atlanta
growing, traffic patterns
changing and transit
becoming more important, I
think [Atlanta’s surrounding
suburbs] are urbanizing.”
Connolly said this
urbanization calls for greater
density in urban cores.
Chamblee’s access to
MARTA and Rail Trail makes
it an ideal environment for
commuters who no longer
want to use their car.
“We’re going to have
a network of trails where
people aren’t just using
trails for recreation but for
commuting,” Connolly said.
“It’s a different quality of
life that will appeal to some
people.”

When it comes to
retail, Connolly said the
largest space scheduled is
approximately 4,000 square
feet with no anchor stores
planned.
“It’s a village feel with
a heavy emphasis on
restaurants,” Connolly said.
“These will be smaller, more
local. Not Applebee’s or
Outback but more of what
you would see in [places
like] Inman Park. We still
have a ways until opening
and we’re trying to get it
right.”
The developer said
progress is being made
in leasing but no official
tenants have been unveiled
to the public. Connolly said
an official announcement
can be expected later this
summer.
To keep up with
Parkview on Peachtree’s
progress, follow them via
Facebook at Parkview on
Peachtree and via Twitter @
MyParkview.

CORRECTION
An article in the May 19 edition on The Champion and the
May 20 edition of The Champion Free Press mistakenly stated
that Nicole Marchand Golden and Donna Coleman-Stribling,
both candidates for the position of DeKalb County Solicitor
General, currently work in the office of the solicitor general.
Both candidates currently work in the office of the DeKalb
County District Attorney.

All concerned citizens are invited to the public hearing on this tax
increase to be held at the City Commission Meeting Room, Decatur
City Hall, 509 N. McDonough Street, Decatur, on Monday, June 6,
2016 at 7:30 p.m. Times and places of additional public hearings
on this tax increase are at Decatur City Hall on June 13, 2016 at
6:00 p.m. and June 20, 2016 at 7:30 p.m. This tentative increase
will result in a millage rate of 10.68 mills, an increase of 0.302 mills
over the rollback millage rate. Without this tentative tax increase,
the millage rate will be no more than 10.378 mills. The proposed
tax increase for a home with a fair market value of $400,000 is approximately $54.36 and the proposed tax increase for a nonhomestead property with a fair market value of $475,000 is approximately
$65.68.
REPORT OF EAST METRO DEKALB COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT 
DISTRICT OF PROPOSED MILLAGE RATE 

In compliance with O.C.G.A. §48‐5, the East Metro DeKalb Community 
Improvement District (“CID”) reports that at its meeting on June 6, 2016, 
beginning  at  9:00  A.M.  at  The  Omega  World  Headquarters,  3951 
Snapfinger Parkway, Suite 440, Decatur, Georgia 30035., the East Metro 
DeKalb CID Board of Directors will vote upon a proposal to levy an ad 
valorem taxation rate of 3 mills, and will set its millage rate for the lawful 
purposes of the District for the current calendar year.  Set forth below 
are the assessed taxable values of the properties subject to taxes for the 
current year and the total dollar amount of ad valorem taxes proposed to 
be levied for the current year.  All property levied upon is real property.   
Because this CID was created this year, there are no preceding years of 
assessed taxable values, taxes, and changes to report.    
Assessed Value 

2014  $58,682,641   
 
2015  $142, 004, 872 

Taxes Levied 

% Change   

$ Change 

$176,047 

 

00%   

            $0.00  

 $426,015   

00%   

 

$246,968 

Did you know?

Marijuana is one of the most often used drugs in the U.S. It
is a product of the hemp plant, Cannabis sativa. Marijuana itself
is a green or gray mixture of dried, shredded flowers and leaves
of the hemp plant.
Marijuana is often one of the first drugs a teen is offered. Although marijuana
is very popular today, it does not change the fact that all mind-altering
substances including marijuana are harmful to the still-developing teen brain.
The part of the brain which controls reasoning and impulses known as the
prefrontal cortex does not fully develop and mature until at least age 25.
Be Safe DeKalb!

For more information
Call (770) 285-6037 or
E-mail: beyondthebell@comcast.net

local

Trust carries
E-SPLOST
renewal
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
On May 19, SPLOST
for Schools, a group of
DeKalb County parents
encouraging the renewal
of the education specific
specia purpose local option
sales tax (E-SPLOST), held
an exclusive question and
answer with The Champion
in downtown Decatur.
For more than half an
hour last week, the group
met on the old DeKalb
Courthouse’s steps to
advocate public school
funding.
The message from
SPLOST for Schools,
made up of stakeholders
Allyson Gervertz, Nwandi
Lawson, Philip Polk, Britt
Else, Jeff DiSantis and
Elena Parent, was clear:
trust current leadership and
renew E-SPLOST for a fifth
consecutive term.
“We want to ensure that
DeKalb County students
all have access to facilities
that are safe, have correct
technology and correct
for the student body size,”
said Lawson. “We [were]
very hopeful this measure
passed.”
Lawson said E-SPLOST
helps deal with specific,
hot-button issues such as
overcrowding by ridding
campuses of portable
classrooms and upgrading
security systems.
Gervertz voiced her
opinions during DeKalb
County School District’s
public input session May
9, stating it was time to
place trust in the district’s
leadership for capital
improvements.
“I acknowledge voting
‘yes’ for E-SPLOST boils
down to trust in Dr. Green’s
leadership,” Gervertz
said at the meeting. “The
determination of new school
locations has all happened
with community input along
the way. This is totally
unprecedented in Dekalb
County.”
E-SPLOST is a one
penny sales tax on goods
bought in DeKalb County.

Since 1997, the tax has
helped fund 22 new
schools in the DeKalb
County School District
(DCSD), modifications and
renovations throughout
schools and school
replacements.
The fifth E-SPLOST,
a.k.a. E-SPLOST V, went
to vote and was renewed
on May 24 during DeKalb
County’s election. The tax
will last for five years, like its
predecessors, from 2017 to
2022. If the vote had failed,
E-SPLOST IV would have
expired June 2017.
According to DCSD,
$500 million in capital
projects are in the works
for E-SPLOST V, including
$15 million for safety and
security improvements,
$230 million in new facilities
and additions, $100
million in facility condition

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 10A

From left to right: Jeff DiSantis, Britt Else, Elena Parent, Nwandi Lawson and Philip Polk came
together May 19 to speak publicly about renewing SPLOST for schools.

improvements, $65 in
technology improvements,
$40 million in transportation
improvements and $50
million in management
support and program
contingency.
Since the referendum is
countywide, the E-SPLOST
also helps fund capital outlay

in City Schools of Decatur
as well as Atlanta Public
Schools.
Lawson said residents’
hesitation in renewing the
E-SPLOST has boiled down
to mistrust in government.
“Some of that [mistrust]
is not without consideration
given what has happened

in the past few years,” said
Lawson. “But we’re looking
at new leadership teams in
the superintendents’ offices.”
Gervertz said more
hesitation stemmed from an
incomplete or inaccessible
project list for E-SPLOST V.

See E-SPLOST on Page 11A

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 11A

CID or TAD?
Doraville creates
improvement
district to fund
Assembly project
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
A month’s worth of discussion is
what it has taken for Doraville to come
up with an alternative to funding a controversial capital project.
On May 9, Doraville’s city council
unanimously approved the creation of a
community improvement district (CID)
with the sole purpose of funding the
redevelopment of the former General
Motors assembly plant.
“This is very, very important to our
city,” said Mayor Donna Pittman at the
meeting.
CIDs are self-taxing districts outlined by municipalities and counties to
help fund infrastructure. Property owners in any CID agree to pay extra taxes
for capital improvements. The Doraville
resolution states 75 percent (the majority) of all real estate property within the
CID will fall into this category.
According to city manager Shawn
Gillen, this means the former GM site’s
redevelopment would be completely
funded by property owners within the
district.
Approval of the CID will make property owners within the district subject to
“taxes, fees and assessments” levied
by a governing board yet to be appointed under Georgia HB 658 and the

DeKalb County Tax Digest.
Funds collected will go toward
street construction and maintenance,
parks and recreational areas, sewage
and stormwater systems, public transportation, parking and “other services
and facilities as may be provided for by
general law,” the resolution states.
The same document says a “caucus of electors” will select eight board
members to serve on the CID’s governing board. Doraville’s city council and
DeKalb County will each appoint one
additional member. The caucus is set
to convene within 90 days of the May 9
meeting at Doraville City Hall.
As the board has yet to be selected, the exact amount expected from
property owners remains uncertain.
Discussions between the CID board
and property owners are expected to
take place before an exact amount is
arrived upon.
The former GM site, now known as
The Assembly, has been a controversial topic over the past few months.
Doraville proposed creating a tax
allocation district (TAD) to fund The
Assembly’s development and received
unanimous support from DeKalb
County’s board of commissioners and
Doraville’s city council.
A TAD would see The Assembly
gather money from taxes for 25 years.
The money is used for specified improvements in the area for the same
amount of time, and as property values
increase through improvements, so
does the TAD’s account.
The CID approved May 9 acts as
the framework for an alternative to a
TAD.
One necessary agency is a reluctant DeKalb County School District
(DCSD). Board of education chairman

E-SPLOST Continued From Page 10A
“The main hesitation is
the project list, there’s buzz
out there that there is no
project list when there is, in
fact, a project list,” Gervertz
said. “Our list is a general
list where areas, amounts
and priorities are outlined.
I expect this to be the best
project list DCSD has ever
had.”
Gervertz also said a
general lack of knowledge
about a E-SPLOST’s overall
duration taints its capability
and potential in the minds of
some voters.
“People don’t realize
[E-SPLOST IV] is still going
– E-SPLOST III ended about
nine months ago,” Gervertz
said.
Gervertz’s support of
DCSD’s list stems from
her belief that it will be an
improvement on previous
E-SPLOST lists. Rather
than being based on politics,
she said, it would instead

be based on an “objective
process” based on facility
assessment, adequacy and
capacity data.
“[Green] is also looking
at projections,” Gervertz
said. “Instead of putting
together something that’s
not comprehensive, he’s
doing a series of public input
sessions. He’s not looking at
2016, he’s looking at 2022.
There are major changes in
store.”
Lawson and Gervertz
said DCSD Superintendent
Stephen Green has been
transparent in telling parents
and students what capital
projects will take place with
approximate dates. The
pair cited Green’s Cross
Keys Cluster redistrict plan
as evidence, stating Green
combined submitted plans
from students and Parent
Teacher Association (PTA)
representatives.

Melvin Johnson stressed concerns in
collecting a fixed amount of money for
such an extended period of time.
“The school district would be
capped at collecting $954,000 annually for 25 years,” Johnson said. “With
the construction and improvements, it
is estimated that $235 million will go to
the TAD. Assuming successful development, after 25 years, the school district
will receive about $25 million annually;
it will take nine years to break even.”
Johnson went on to say DCSD was
placed on probation from the Georgia
Department of Education due to financial mismanagement and hinted the
current leadership does not wish to
travel down the same road. The board
chairman also echoed sentiments

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voiced by Superintendent Stephen
Green in stating tax dollars should be
used for education, not “private projects.”
Pittman has said DCSD is missing
out on future funds by skipping out on
the TAD. At the annual Doraville State
of the City address on April 21, Pittman
said DCSD is poised to receive $135
million in additional tax revenues if the
TAD is in effect with $17 million in property taxes each year.
“Can you imagine what that can do
for our kids and our schools?” Pittman
said. “This is an opportunity to transform our city, the region and our surrounding cities. This is an opportunity
for a divided DeKalb to unite and move
beyond the past.”

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local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 12A

‘Leave our county or suffer the consequences’

DeKalb County District Attorney Robert James announced the indictment of Georgia Sex Money Murder Bloods leader Kenneth Eric Jackson and other gang members.
Photos by Carla Parker

Gang leader indicted for
ordering hit that killed
9-month-old
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com

T

he leader of
the Sex Money
Murder Bloods
gang in Georgia
was charged May 17 with
ordering an inner-gang
retaliation hit from prison
that killed a 9-month-old boy
in 2014.
Kenneth Eric Jackson,
AKA “KG the God,” was
indicted on murder and
gang charges for his part
in the May 2014 shooting
death of 9-month-old
KenDarious Edwards Jr.
DeKalb County District
Attorney Robert James
said during a May 17 press
conference that Jackson—
who is Georgia’s highest
ranking member of the
Bloods’ set Sex Money
Murder—was incarcerated
at Autry State Prison
when he used an illegal
cell phone to order the
assassination hit of a fellow
gang member.
Jackson was
communicating at the time
of the shooting with Sex
Money Murder’s secondin-command, Robinson
Lazala. Lazala was
incarcerated with the head

of the set, Peter Rollock in
federal prison in Colorado,
according to James.
On May 10, 2014, on
Jackson’s orders Devin
Thomas, Marco Watson
and Christopher Florence
forced their way into the
child’s home on Lani Farm
Road in Stone Mountain
where Edwards was with his
mother, grandmother and a
family friend.
The three women heard
the intruders kicking in the
back door and called 911
and barricaded themselves
in a bathroom. The door
was broken down by
Thomas and Watson and
then shooting began.
Edwards, who was
being held by his mother,
was shot five times,
including in his head, chest
and back.
The shooting was
retaliation for the death
of another gang member,
Alexis Malone, who was
killed by Cutrez Johnson,
Kemontay Cullins and
Oslushsla Smith, Edwards’
uncle.
Jackson, Florence,
Watson and Eunice
English are named in
the indictment. Jackson,
Florence and Watson are

Several gang members were
connected to the shooting
death of 9-month-old
KenDarious Edwards Jr

charged with malice murder,
felony murder, multiple
counts of aggravated
assault and violation of
Georgia’s Street Gang and
Terrorism Act.
Florence and Watson
also were charged with
possession of a gun by a
felon. Watson and nongang-member English also
were charged with one
count each of kidnapping
and aggravated assault
for intimidating a witness
cooperating with police on
May 28, 2014.
Thomas pleaded guilty
to seven of eight charges,
including malice murder, in
November and is serving
life plus 20 years in prison.
James acknowledged
that there are “significant
gang issues” in metro
Atlanta.
“The message is leave
our county or suffer the

KenDarious Edwards was shot to death in his home by gang
members.

consequences,” James said
James said his office,
as well as the police
department are actively
trying to remove all street
gangs from the county.
“We approach gang
activity as organized crime,”
James said. “The strategy
and philosophy when we
work together—both the

DA’s office and the police
department—is not just
to arrest foot soldiers and
low-ranking individuals
that are committing
burglaries, armed robberies,
kidnapping and things of
that nature. But the strategy
and philosophy is to go after
the leader of the gang—to
cut the head off the snake.”

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 13A

WEEKinPICTURES

Parkview on Peachtree, a mixed-use development in
Chamblee, celebrated its groundbreaking on May 19
with a ceremony, lunch and guided hardhat tour.

From left to right: Amy Wells, JR Connolly, Eric Clarkson, Leslie Robson, John Mesa, Darron Kusman, Brian Mock,
Tom Hogan, Alan Dean, Randy Rinderknecht, Greg Power and Brett Fortune broke ground May 19 on Parkview on
Peachtree, a mixed-use development scheduled to open in Chamblee in 2017.

Cedar Grove head football coach Jermaine Smith speaks with his players after their ‘Blue vs White’ spring game May 20. Photo by Travis Hudgons

PHOTOS BROUGHT TO YOU BY DCTV
DeKalb County implements changes to garbage and recycling container requirements and collection
procedures April 18, 2016.
Only county-provided garbage and recycling containers are approved for sanitation collection service.
For more info, call or visit:

(404) 294-2900
www.rollingforwardtoone.com

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 14A

Photo by Travis Hudgons

Decatur residents could see a property tax increase
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
A tentative millage rate
was adopted by the Decatur
Commission at its May 16 regular
meeting which could result in a
property tax increase for residents.
The tentative rate of 10.68
mills will cover general operations,
capital improvements and
downtown development authority
operations, according to the city.

The tentative rate represents a
decrease from last year’s rate
of 11.08 mills. However, the
city said because of property
reassessments, the rate will
represent an average increase of
2.91 percent in property taxes.
“This increase is consistent
with new development and home
sale data tracked by the city,”
Decatur communication specialist
Renae Madison said in a released
statement. “For property that was

DEKALB COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION
1st PUBLIC
MILLAGE RATE HEARING
Monday, June 6, 2016

TIME
6:15 p.m.

LOCATION
J. David Williamson Board Room
Administrative & Instructional Complex
1701 Mountain Industrial Blvd.
Stone Mountain, GA 30083

Citizens interested in reviewing a detailed copy of the program
based budget may do so by visiting the DeKalb County School
District website at www.dekalb.k12.ga.us.
FOR INFORMATION, CALL THE OFFICE OF THE
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER AT 678-676-0069.

DEKALB COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION
2nd PUBLIC BUDGET HEARING
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2017
Monday, June 6, 2016
TIME

5:45 p.m.

LOCATION

J. David Williamson Board Room
Administrative & Instructional Complex
1701 Mountain Industrial Blvd.
Stone Mountain, GA 30083

The DeKalb County Board of Education will hold a public budget
hearing to solicit feedback from the public regarding the 20162017 school system’s budget.
FOR INFORMATION, CALL THE OFFICE OF THE
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER AT 678-676-0069.

not reassessed, there should be a
decrease in property taxes.”
The proposed budget has
a general fund of $24.2 million,
a 4.4 percent increase from the
2015-2016 proposed general fund
budget. The debt service millage
remains at .92 mills for the 2007
general obligation debt and 1.57
mills for the 2015 school general
obligation debt.
In the proposed budget,
$658,140 will be used in the

general fund balance in order
to stay within financial policy
guidelines. The property digest
increases will be approximately 7.5
percent.
The commission will hold public
hearings on the millage rate on
June 6, 13 and 20. The final millage
will be set at the commission
meeting on June 20.
All meetings are scheduled
to be held in the city commission
meeting room in Decatur City Hall.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS ON THE 2016‐2017 PROPOSED BUDGET  
FOR THE CITY OF DECATUR, GEORGIA 

    There will be public hearings on the proposed 2016‐2017 budget for the City of Decatur at 7:30 p.m. on June 6, 

2016; at 6:00 p.m. on June 13, 2016; and, at 7:30 p.m. on June 20, 2016 in the City Commission Meeting Room at City 
Hall, 509 N. McDonough Street, Decatur.  The proposed budget is summarized below and is available in its entirety for 
th
public inspection at Decatur City Hall and at the Decatur Library on Sycamore Street.  After May 18 , the budget will 
be available on the City’s website at www.decaturga.com/budget.  All citizens are invited to attend the public 
hearings, to provide written and oral comments, and ask questions concerning the entire budget. 
FY 2016‐2017 PROPOSED GENERAL FUND REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 
REVENUES 
 
Taxes 
18,846,500 
 
Licenses, Permits & Inspections 
1,031,250 
 
Penalties, Fines & Forfeitures 
1,110,000 
 
Interest 

 
Charges for Current Services 
1,854,250 
 
Intergovernmental Revenues 
432,700 
 
Miscellaneous Revenue 
122,000 
 
Sale of Fixed Assets 
25,000 
 
Operating Transfers 
169,000 
 
Appropriation From (To) Fund Balance 
658,140 
 
TOTAL REVENUES 
$24,248,840 
EXPENDITURES 
 
Governmental Control Department 
180,600 
 
General Government Department 
1,874,440 
 
Community & Economic Development Department 
2,013,620 
 
Administrative Services Department 
3,674,700 
 
Police Department 
5,739,870 
 
Fire & Rescue Department 
3,630,150 
 
Public Works Department  
3,103,960 
 
Design, Environment & Construction Division 
1,936,130 
 
Active Living Division 
2,095,370 
 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 
$24,248,840 

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 15A

Over the hump
Doraville proposes
$68K speed humps

the humps’ success or failure, the city may take
different traffic calming techniques into consideration
throughout other neighborhoods, including areas
along Oak Cliff, Chestnut and Winters Chapel roads.
“We’re seeing [more] complaints and traffic has
increased in those areas,” Gillen said. “They are not
arterial but main streets that connect neighborhoods
and I-285.”
Gillen said a $28,000 traffic study will take into
account the number of cars as well as average
speeds in each neighborhood.
Councilman M.D. Naser suggested completing
the traffic study before installing the speed humps to
demonstrate their worth to the public, especially in
outlined neighborhoods.
Councilman Robert Patrick shared Naser’s
opinion but also stressed the need to have some
sort of speed reduction in the area.
“As the economy improves, as [developments]
come in, we are going to see different traffic
pressures,” Patrick said.
The agenda outlined the council approving the
speed humps’ installation outright with a study soon
following to map further development.
“We’ve discussed this a couple of times, and I
tell you, something has to happen on these streets
because it is very dangerous,” said Mayor Donna
Pittman.
Pittman said meetings will take place in
neighborhoods along the proposed streets long
before speed humps are installed.
“If residents do not want them, they will not have
them,” she said. “But people are using these as cutthroughs and racetracks.”
Councilwoman Pam Fleming said the council

by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
Doraville’s drivers and residents should see
traffic moving a little slower in the near future if the
approval of 12 speed humps throughout the city
passes council.
On May 16, the city council discussed the
purchase and installation of four speed hump
locations along Windsor Oak Drive, two along
Homeland Drive, and six along Addison Drive and
Raymond Drive, with the latter including a crosswalk
section near Tapestry Public Charter School.
The humps are expected to be approved
following a three-day traffic study and three
meetings held with nearby residents.
The city expects to pay $5,000 per hump, $200
per warning sign and $1,700 for the crosswalk for
a total of $68,100 according to a memo sent to city
manager Shawn Gillen by Keck & Wood, Inc., who
will be installing the humps.
The humps will be maintained by nearby
residents for an estimated $12 per year each.
“The first hump in a series is located near
a controlled intersection to prevent a motorist
approaching a speed control district at excessive
speeds,” reads the study.
Gillen said Homeland, Windsor Oak and
Addison roads will serve as tests for a beforeand-after traffic study in Doraville. Depending on

Doraville has already mapped areas in need of speed
reduction along three neighborhood streets with speed
humps being a prime option.

should move forward with the three outlined streets
for the public to witness and test the humps’
effectiveness.
“I’ve lived in that area and it has gotten worse,”
Fleming said. “We have to do something.”
Councilwoman Dawn O’Connor said she
hoped the traffic study would be complete by the
time school lets out (May 26).
No specific dates were announced at the
meeting, but invitations to neighborhood residents
were planned to be sent out by its conclusion.
The item is expected to be on Doraville’s consent
agenda within the month.

The DeKalb County Board of Education does hereby announce that the millage rate will be set at a meeting to be held at the
DeKalb County School District Administrative & Instructional Complex, 1701 Mountain Industrial Boulevard, Stone Mountain, Georgia
on Tuesday, June 21, 2016 at 7:00 p.m., and pursuant to the requirements of O.C.G.A. 48-5-32, does hereby publish
the following presentation of the current year's tax digest and levy, along with the history of the tax digest and levy
for the past five years.

CURRENT 2016 TAX DIGEST AND 5 YEAR HISTORY OF LEVY
DEKALB COUNTY SCHOOL
Real & Personal

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

19,310,211,337

17,578,034,324

17,512,942,085

18,945,661,424

21,114,929,747

22,405,233,421

Motor Vehicles

1,225,978,410

1,265,293,750

1,359,311,440

1,135,212,830

781,124,040

568,562,240

Mobile Homes

510,171

440,056

396,572

355,333

358,733

769,100

Timber - 100%

0

0

0

0

0

0

82,712

77,829

34,308

57,864

2,208

76,000

20,536,782,630

18,843,845,959

18,872,684,405

20,081,287,451

21,896,414,728

22,974,640,761

2,913,503,127

2,847,239,428

2,826,254,552

2,923,178,437

3,144,309,260

3,201,972,267

Net M & O Digest
State Forest Land Assistance
Grant Value

17,623,279,503

15,996,606,531

16,046,429,853

17,158,109,014

18,752,105,468

19,772,668,494

0

0

0

0

0

0

Adjusted Net M&O Digest

17,623,279,503

15,996,606,531

16,046,429,853

17,158,109,014

18,752,105,468

19,772,668,494

Heavy Duty Equipment
Gross Digest
Less M& O Exemptions

Gross M&O Millage
Less Rollbacks
Net M&O Millage

22.98

23.98

23.98

23.98

23.98

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

-0.25

0.00

22.98

23.98

23.98

23.98

23.73

23.73

Total School Taxes Levied

$404,982,963

$383,598,625

Net Taxes $ Increase

($63,803,371)

($21,384,338)

-13.61%

-5.28%

Net Taxes % Increase

23.73

$384,793,388

$411,451,454

$444,987,463

$469,205,423

$1,194,763

$26,658,066

$33,536,009

$24,217,961

0.31%

6.93%

8.15%

5.44%

NOTES:
1. THE NET LEVY DOES NOT REFLECT ACTUAL REVENUE RECEIVED OR AVAILABLE DUE TO VALUE ADJUSTMENTS RESULTING FROM APPEALS, DELINQUENT TAXES,
COLLECTIONS FROM PRIOR YEARS, AND A FEE OF 1.25% PAID TO THE COUNTY FOR BILLING AND COLLECTIONS.
2. THE 2016 MILLAGE RATE IS THE PROPOSED RATE. THE PROPOSED SCHOOL OPERATIONS MILLAGE IS 23.73 MILLS.
3. 2016 DIGEST FIGURES ARE AN ESTIMATE.

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 16A

NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX INCREASE
The City of Brookhaven has
tentatively adopted a millage rate for
the General Fund which will require
an increase in property taxes by 13.64
percent over the Rollback Millage
rate. This increase is due solely to
the revaluation of real property tax
assessments.
All concerned citizens are invited
to the public hearings on this tax
increase to be held at Brookhaven
City Hall at 4362 Peachtree Road,
Brookhaven, GA 30319. The first
public hearing will be held at 7:00
p.m. on June 7, 2016.
The second public hearing will be
at special called meeting on June 21,
2016 at 10:30 a.m. and 6:01 p.m.
After the final public hearing, the
millage rate will be formally adopted.
The tentative increase will result in
a millage rate of 2.74 mills, a millage
rate equivalent increase of .329 mills.
Without this tentative tax increase,
the millage rate will be no more
than 2.411 mills. The proposed tax
increase for a home with a fair market
value of $410,915 is approximately
$44.20 and the proposed tax increase
for non-homestead property with
a fair market value of $1,097,088 is
approximately $144.38.

Free smoothies
Atlanta Smoothie King stores will be offering free 12 oz. Caribbean Way smoothie to
all guests from 10 - 2 p.m., June 8. Open to the public; first come, first serve. Limit one
smoothie per customer, while supplies last.

Dunwoody hosts violation amnesty
Those with traffic and active bench warrants through the municipal court of
Dunwoody will have two months to settle their issues worry-free.
Through June and July 2016, Dunwoody will grant amnesty to individuals with past
traffic citations and active bench warrants for failing to appear in court. During this
time, violators have the chance to pay their fines and contempt fees without fearing
repercussions.
“The incentive of the program is to promote lawful driving privileges, settle
outstanding violations and reduce arrests,” reads a statement about the event. “If the
individual’s offense(s) require a mandatory court appearance, the individual will be
granted a future court date to appear before a Judge and all warrants will be cleared and
warrant fees forgiven.”
Dunwoody Municipal Court is located at 41 Perimeter Center East, Suite 103, and
is open Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. For
more information, contact the court office at (678) 382-6973.

City to host
music event
The Liz Brasher Band
will perform June 3 at
Stone Mountain’s Tunes
By The Tracks event in the
municipal parking lot, next
to the Gazebo. Attendees
may bring lawn chairs. The
two-hour concert begins
at 7 p.m. Tunes By The
Tracks will be held every
Friday until June 24. For
more information, visit
www.stonemountaincity.
org.

City of Decatur Georgia Ad Valorem Tax Digest History
Decatur - Digest

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016 (est)

Assessment Ratio

50%

50%

50%

50%

50%

50%

Real Property
Personal Property
Public Utilities
Motor Vehicle

$ 1,149,844,600
$
21,146,700
$
18,933,750
$
46,119,000

$ 1,137,427,809
$
22,174,136
$
14,297,200
$
49,311,000

$ 1,168,516,500
$
23,211,680
$
14,639,953
$
52,979,900

$ 1,326,596,200
$
22,248,300
$
15,152,700
$
47,331,600

$ 1,594,612,800
$
22,322,600
$
17,209,600
$
35,521,587

$ 1,719,221,200
$
22,062,700
$
15,658,700
$
26,623,700

$1,236,044,050

$1,223,210,145

$1,259,348,033

$1,411,328,800

$1,669,666,587

$1,783,566,300

Total Digest
City Operations
General Fund Exemptions
Net City Operations Digest
City Operations Millage
City Operations Levy
Percent Change
Dollar Amount Change

$

125,075,000

$1,110,969,050
11.595
$12,881,686
-0.20
($25,488)

$

126,914,000

$1,096,296,145
11.680
$12,804,739
-0.60
($76,947)

$

126,332,000

$1,133,016,033
11.580

$

125,393,000

$1,285,935,800
11.580

$

130,639,000

$1,539,027,587
11.080

$

128,646,080

$1,654,920,220
10.680

$13,120,326

$14,891,137

$17,052,426

$17,674,548

2.46
$315,587

13.50
$1,770,811

14.51
$2,161,289

3.65
$622,122

The Decatur City Commission announces that the 2016 tentative millage rate was adopted at their meeting on Monday, May 16, 2016. Hearings on
the budget and millage rate will be held on:
Monday, June 6, 2016 at 7:30 p.m.
Monday, June 13, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
Monday, June 20, 2016 at 7:30 p.m.
The hearings will be held at Decatur City Hall, 509 N. McDonough Street, Decatur, GA. Final adoption of the 2016 millage rate and fiscal year 20162017 budget is scheduled for consideration at the Decatur City Commission meeting on Monday, June 20, 2016. The above table is presented
pursuant to O.C.G.A. 48-5-32 showing the estimated current year's digest and proposed millage rates along with a five-year history of the tax digest

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27,june
2016 • Page
17A
2016

News and events of the

DeKalb Chamber of CommerCe
Two Decatur Town Center, 125 Clairemont Ave. Suite 235, Decatur, GA 30030 • (404) 378-8000 • www.DeKalbChamber.org

DeKalb Chamber celebrates local
businesses at 2016 APEX Business Awards
On Wednesday, May 25, the DeKalb
Chamber of Commerce hosted its 2016
APEX Business Awards at the Atlanta
Marriott Century Center with Emcee
Condace Pressley, Manager, Program
Operations and Community Affairs of
Cox Media Group Atlanta and Keynote
Speaker Robert Blazer, Founder and
Owner of Your DeKalb Farmers Market.
With nearly 175 guests in attendance,
DeKalb Chamber recognized local
businesses for their exemplary standards
in business development, employee
programs, business innovation and
contribution to DeKalb County and the
metro Atlanta region. Winners included:

Miguel Southwell will serve as the guest speaker for the July Membership Meeting.

Miguel Southwell, Aviation General
Manager of Hartsfield-Jackson
Atlanta International Airport,
scheduled to speak with Chamber
members and guests
Miguel Southwell, Aviation General Manager of The HartsfieldJackson Atlanta International Airport will give a special presentation
to DeKalb Chamber of Commerce members and guests on Thursday,
July 14. He will discuss the $6 billion Master Plan aimed to maintain
Hartsfield-Jackson’s status as a leading airport. The Master Plan will
provide visitors an even greater guest experience with modernized
parking structures and passenger terminal facilities, additional
concourses, a potential new runway and expanded cargo facilities.
As the leader of the world’s busiest airport, Miguel Southwell brings
over 30 years of aviation expertise to oversee Hartsfield-Jackson’s
operations and capital development program with combined annual
budgets nearly $1 billion. He began his career with various airlines
on the Caribbean island of Antigua and since then has held senior
management positions in banking and at airports, Hartsfield-Jackson
and Miami International Airport.
The event will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Hyatt
Regency Atlanta Perimeter at Villa Christina, 4000 Summit Boulevard
Atlanta, GA 30319. For more information and to register, please visit
www.bit.ly/DC-HJAIA.

Quick Facts on The Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta
International Airport:
• Hartsfield-Jackson contributes to a direct economic
impact of $34.8 billion in metro Atlanta and a direct
economic impact of $70.9 billion in the state of
Georgia.
• Hartsfield-Jackson is the largest employer in the
state of Georgia with more than 63,000 employees
on-site.
• Hartsfield-Jackson served more than 100 million
passengers in 2015.
• Atlanta is within a two-hour flight of 80 percent of the
United States population.


Emerging Business:
The PawStand
Community Workforce:
Goodwill of North Georgia
Business Advocacy:
University of Georgia SBDC
Business of the Year
1-5 Million:
Interprint Communications
Business of the Year
$5 to 10 Million:
Reliable Restoration LLC
Business of the Year
$10 to 20 Million:
CATMEDIA

Robert Blazer, Your DeKalb Farmers Market
founder and owner

Since founding Your DeKalb Farmers
Market nearly 40 years ago, Robert has
employed an ethnically diverse staff

representing 50 different countries.
The Farmers Market has become an
integral part of DeKalb County, serving an

average of 100,000 customers per week.
His wife Barbara has worked at the
Farmers Market since 1987. His son

Daniel also joined the business and
supports the “World Direct” business.
Presenting sponsor is ONYX MS
Group. Additional sponsors included
CDC Federal Credit Union, CERM, CH2M
In a rare opportunity, DeKalb
Chamber members and guests also heard Hill, The Champion Newspaper, DeKalb
Chamber of Commerce Foundation,
from Robert Blazer, Founder and Owner
Delta Community Credit Union, Gas
of Your DeKalb Farmers Market.
South, Georgia-Pacific, Peach State FedAt the age of 28, Robert moved to
eral Credit Union, and Reliable RestoraGeorgia and started his fresh produce
business; it was a small greenhouse struc- tion LLC.
For more information about
ture on Medlock Road.
the event, please visit www.bit.
Today, Your DeKalb Farmers Market
ly/2016ApexAwards.
has grown to the 100,000 square foot
location on East Ponce de Leon Road with
future plans to expand.

UPCoMING EvENTS
June 16 – Business After Hours Presented by Smoke Rise Country Club
– 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. - 4900 Chedworth Drive, Stone Mountain
June 20 – Georgia 2030 Tour with the Georgia Chamber of Commerce
– 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. - Hyatt Regency Atlanta Perimeter at Villa
Christina, 4000 Summit Boulevard, Atlanta
July 14 – General Membership Meeting Featuring Miguel Southwell
- 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. - Hyatt Regency Atlanta Perimeter at Villa
Christina, 4000 Summit Boulevard, Atlanta
July 19 – New Members Orientation – 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
August 29 – 12th Annual Golf Tournament – Druid Hills Golf Club,
740 Clifton Road NE Atlanta
August 30 to 31 – Industry Council Training
For more information and to register for any of these events, please
visit www.dekalbchamber.org.

EDucaTion

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 18A

Southwest DeKalb’s Rho Kappa chapter buried a 50-year
time capsule memorializing the graduating class.

Rho Kappa president Jordan Brown and member Cori Bostic seal a school
time capsule on May 17. Photos by R. Scott Belzer

‘See you in
50 years’
Southwest
DeKalb
memorializes
class of 2016
with 50-year
time capsule
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
They sound like items
found in a high school
student’s locker or an old
storage box in the attic.
Textbooks, T-shirts, and
soccer jerseys. An iPhone
case, a sample of sheet
music and a yearbook. A pair
of goalie gloves, a coffee
mug and a student ID card.
On May 17, they became
items associated with
Southwest DeKalb High
School’s history.
Southwest DeKalb’s
2015-2016 Rho Kappa
chapter of the National
Social Studies Honor
Society locked a 50-year
time capsule filled with
items commemorating the
graduating class.
Approximately three
dozen students and

teachers were present at
an afternoon ceremony for
the time capsule’s closure.
A cleaned out and repainted
combination gun safe bolted
to the ground and wall
served as a substitute for a
buried case; it is scheduled
to be opened on until May
17, 2066.
Southwest DeKalb’s
Rho Kappa chapter is one
of eight in Georgia. The
society recognizes students
who excel in social studies
and participate in community
projects.
Chapter president and
outgoing senior Jordan
Brown said the time capsule
was this year’s community
project.
“It’s pretty cool to have
a time capsule; to be able to
memorialize yourself and do
something for the culture of
the school,” she said.
Brown said the capsule’s
overall theme was about
more than school pride, but
relating the overall cultural
climate of 2016.
“In the last couple of
years, students, especially in
[this graduating class], have
been all about promoting
Panther pride and bleeding
blue and gold,” Brown said.
“There’s so much happening
in our world right now; we’re
at a time when life itself is

changing; being a teenager
is changing. Taking a
moment to sit and look at the
world you’re living in is hard
to do – it’s hard for us to do.”
Southwest DeKalb
teacher and Rho Kappa
sponsor, Daniel Sobczak,
said Oglethorpe University
served as the inspiration for
the chapter’s initiative. He
said gathering materials,
transforming the gun safe
into a time capsule, and
deciding what made 2016
special qualified it as an

Southwest DeKalb High School’s Rho Kappa National
Social Studies Honor Society sealed a 50-year time
capsule filled with mementos, letters, sheet music
and other pop culture regalia on May 17.

excellent service project
for the Southwest DeKalb
chapter.
“I graduated from
Oglethorpe and they have
the Crypt of Civilization
there,” Sobczak said. “It’s
been overwhelmingly
positive within the school
in looking forward to
preserve this moment in
time for future generations of
Panthers.”
Sobczak said previous
projects have included a
mural on canvas and future

PET OF THE WEEK

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gets adorably excited when he sees the leash. Looking for a
walking buddy? Come meet Spunk; he wants to walk with
you! Meet Spunk at Dekalb Animal Services.
Spunk qualifies for our May “Pick a May Flower”
promotion. Adoption is only $20 for dogs over 25 lbs. and
for all cats! Adoption includes spay/neuter, vaccinations,
microchip and more! If you would like more information
about Spunk please email adoption@dekalbanimalservices.
com or call (404) 294-2165. All potential adopters will be
screened to ensure Spunk goes to a good home.

projects will include full
history of Southwest DeKalb
High School.
“The history was founded
in 1908,” Sobczak said.
“That’s going to take a little
while. Hopefully that will be a
published book available for
students and alumnae.”
“In 50 years we’ll be able
to compare advancements,”
said Rho Kappa vice
president Addison
Robinson. “Hopefully the
pride will be the same!”

EDucaTion

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 19A

Students at Annunciation Day School demonstrated how the Promethean ActivWall can change
the way classrooms are run through interactive technology. Photos by R. Scott Belzer

Great wall of

learning
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
How important is a blackboard
in the classroom?
Blackboards combine visuals
with lectures to better engage
students. At the same time, they
provide a workspace for teachers
and students in full view of the
classroom, making them one of the
most valuable tools in a classroom.
But what if blackboards could
interact with students, teachers and
other available technology?
Annunciation Day School
(ADS), located at 2500 Clairmont
Road NE in north Decatur seems
to answer that question through
the Promethean ActivWall, a digital
blackboard offering touchscreen
capabilities and student-laptop
connectivity. Each classroom in
ADS, ranging from kindergarten to
sixth grade, utilizes the technology
for a more immersive learning
environment.
Parents and ADS officials were
taken to three classrooms on May
17 to see the ActivWall in action.
The first, headed by teacher
Arielle Kontoes, demonstrated the
wall’s ability to engage students
in digital pictures and maps by
having students place pictures of
animals, plants and landscapes in
appropriate Georgia regions. Every
student in the classroom was able
to use the board at once before
watching a video about state wildlife

on the same screen.
In the same way, the ActivWall
combined all types of media to
pass along knowledge about
former United States president
Jimmy Carter in Alexia Mookas’
classroom. Here, students sat
through a lesson and video before
filling out digital worksheets,
diagrams and Q&A’s on laptops.
Students also approached
the board to write and erase
information with digital pens.
From the laptops, students
submitted information to be
displayed on the ActivWall, allowing
Mookas to discuss, commend and

correct each piece of work.
“This is fun!” exclaimed students
while comparing work.
“This is fun and exciting,”
Mookas said in response.
ADS substitute teacher and
parent Daysi Nicolaides said
the ActivWall provided a much
needed environment for the modern
student. Nicolaides said students
would in all likelihood learn more at
a faster pace due to the ActivWall’s
presence.
“It’s a fun way for kids to learn
things; it’s something new with
a new form of technology, which
they’re all about,” Nicolaides said.
“It will get their attention more.”
Nicolaides said she looks
forward to seeing results from
working with the ActivWall from her
first- and fourth-grade children. The
parent-teacher said she has heard
other teachers talk about sharing
their work.
“It’s something cool and
different,” Nicolaides said. “I sub
here a lot. Teachers who are being
trained on [the ActivWall] come
back from training and tell me ‘Look
what I learned!’ and students will
ask me ‘Can we work on it?’”
According to ADS principal
Peter Epstein, the ActivWall
has been catching the curiosity
of students since the school’s
Spring Break in early April. Epstein
said the board exemplifies the
school’s goals of providing science,
technology, engineering, arts and

mathematics (STEAM) instruction,
building character and projectbased learning.
“We saw one classroom taking
students through the engineering
design process,” Epstein said.
“One of the lessons was based
on Jimmy Carter and the Carter
Center and asking kids about social
responsibility. One class will create
a brochure showcasing different
regions in Georgia.”
Epstein said ActivWall helps
foster ADS’s deeper goal of
fostering leadership, affecting the
community and helping others. The
principal said this will be furthered
in future collaborative projects with
Georgia Tech.
“The ideas teachers are able to
get across through integrating web
links into their lessons and interact
with essential questions allows our
kids and teachers to do a lot of
cool things,” Epstein said. “It allows
them to learn in very different ways
and interact with one another.”
Epstein said Annunciation
Day School is leading the way in
technology by using the ActivWall
and fostering an ideal educational
environment.
“There are so many things we
can do with [the board] to support
the learning taking place,” Epstein
said. “The teacher is the leader in
a classroom but it’s important to
realize technology is supporting
what we do. It can be used in so
many different ways.”

business

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 20A

Business focuses on financial futures

by Kathy Mitchell

Stone Mountain Village is truly a
village in the classical sense of the
word—a small community of people
who know and support one another,
according to Frida Milice, who along
with her husband Jean recently
opened a financial services business
on Stone Mountain’s Main Street.
“The business community here
is friendly, helpful and supportive.
Businesses work with one another
as a network of neighbors supporting
each other’s success,” said Frida,
co-owner of Vim Rise, a financial, tax
and insurance office.
Mechel McKinley of Stone
Mountain’s Downtown Development
Authority commented that with
Vim Rise, as with several other
businesses that have recently
opened in Stone Mountain Village,
the authority has provided “soup
to nuts” assistance in getting the
business started. “It takes a lot of
guts to go out on your own and the
DDA is here as a partner for the
whole process,” she said.
The Malices opened their
business in February and already
have clients among their business
neighbors.
“We provide all types of business
insurance as well as managing
employee benefits packages,” Frida
explained. The support is reciprocal,
she noted, pointing out an interior
sign designed and created by a
Stone Mountain Village artist.
Originally from Haiti, the Malices
have lived in Florida, but say they
feel at home in DeKalb County.
“We had businesses in Florida, but
when we started having children, we
decided this was where we wanted
to raise them.”
Frida first became interested
in financial services when she
was helping her father with taxes,
insurance and other personal
business. “I wasn’t too pleased
with the way things were set up. It
seemed he wasn’t getting everything
he should, but I didn’t know how to
do better. I decided to take some
classes,” she recalled. That was
where she discovered that she had
an aptitude for financial services
to go along with a resolve to help
people.
The name Vim Rise was chosen
to reflect the couple’s vision for the
company, she said. “Our goal is to
approach each customer’s unique
situation with the vim—energetic
spirit—required to help them dash
out into their financial journeys with
great confidence.”
“We always direct people toward
what they need—not just what we
can make money from,” commented
Jean. “We help people have the right
amount and type of insurance for
their situation and put in place what
they need to assure financial stability
in the future. There is a great need

for this today. So many people are
making costly mistakes with their
money.
“With taxes, for example, many
people are overpaying because they
overlook allowable deductions. Tax
laws change all the time; it’s our job

to keep up with the changes,” he
said. “We don’t just tell clients ‘you
can do this; you can’t do that’ we
explain why. Educating the client is
half our job.”
Frida said financial education is
needed now more than ever. “There

are so many consumer products
out there tempting people—young
people especially—to spend their
money unwisely. It’s easy to decide
you must have the latest electronic
devices instead of setting aside
money for savings and investment.
“Also,” she added, “many people
don’t understand how much a bad
credit score affects your life. Those
with poor credit scores play higher
interest rates and higher insurance
rates. A credit score can affect your
ability to get certain jobs or even
personal relationships.”
The Malices partner with other
experts to provide classes on such
subjects as credit building, credit
restoration, money management,
asset protection and wealth building.
This summer they will launch a youth
camp focused on teaching children
ages 5 to 15 about smart finances.
“They’re almost never too young to
learn about making smart money
choices,” Frida said. “A 5-year-old
knows what money is and can be
taught when you spend and when
you save. Each of our five children
has an account. They know money
must be earned, a portion is for
saving and a portion is for charity.”

classiFiED

The

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 21A

CHAMPION

CLASSIFIEDS

The Champion is not responsible for any damages resulting from advertisements. All sales final.

biDs & pRoposals

readers. Call Bruce Washington at the
Georgia Newspaper Service, 770-454-6776.

LSBE/MBE/WBE Cole Technology Inc is
seeking interested LSBE/MBE/WBE to
participate in an upcoming bid and possible
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can be viewed at www.dekalbcountyga.
gov, purchasing and contracting, bid
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current bids. The bid number is 16-100708
titled Pump Repair Services. Interested
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coleelectricms.com

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Subcontracting opportunity, LSBE/MBE/
WBE Cole Technology Inc is seeking
interested companies to participate in an
upcoming bid and possible contract with
Dekalb County. The bid can be viewed
at www.dekalbcountyga.gov, purchasing
and contracting, bid opportunities, formal
solicitations and current bids. The bid
number is 16-100708 titled Pump Repair
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contact Cole Technology Inc. Tim Wilkie@
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religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status.

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 22A

Marist brings
home fifth
consecutive state
golf title
golf tournament at Bartram
Trail Golf Club in Evans.
Davis Brainerd shot
a 77 to tie for 31st in the
field. Patrick Caiaccio
shot a 78 to tie for 42nd.
Dunwoody’s Lauren
Callahan scored a 90 on
the course at West Lake
Country Club in Augusta
to finish in a tie for 29th in
the girls’ tournament.

Class AAAA

AAAA state tournament at
Waynesboro Golf Club.

St. Pius X boys shot a
team score of 331 to finish
eighth in the tournament.
St. Pius was led by Daniel
McKenzie, who finished tied
for ninth place with a 75.
Chamblee freshman
Tiffany Li shot a round
of 110 to finish 53rd
overall in the girls’ Class

Class AAA
Cedar Grove senior
Noah Kuranga finished
fourth with a 73 score in
the Class AAA boys’ state
golf tournament at Gordon
Lakes Golf Club in Fort
Gordon.


 

Marist boys won their fifth consecutive state golf title. Photo from
marist.com

by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Marist shot a 302 in
the Class AAAA state golf
tournament to win its fifth
consecutive state title on
May 16 at Jones Creek
Golf Club course in Evans,
Ga.
It is the program’s 12th
state title. Four Marist
golfers shot the combined
302 score, edging out
runner-up Woodward
Academy by three strokes.
Senior Will Chandler shot
a 70 to win the individual
title.
Jordan Secret shot a
76; Harry White shot a 78;
and Owen Burden shot a
78 to help win the title for
Marist.
Marist girls finished
second with a team score
of 242 in the Class AAAA
state tournament at the
Waynesboro Country Club
in Waynesboro. Marist
finished seven strokes

behind winner Woodward
Academy.
Marist girls were led
by freshman Woo Wade,
who shot a 78. Freshman
Mimi Taylor (80) and
sophomore Sydney
Morlan (84) rounded out
the scores for Marist.
Class AAAAAA
Lakeside finished tied
for 15th with Newnan in
the Class AAAAAA boys’
state golf tournament at
Spring Hill Country Club
in Tifton. Lakeside shot a
team score of 342 led by
Drew Smith, who an 80
which tied for 42nd overall
in the tournament field.
Zach Garlow shot an 83
(tied for 59th) and Tony
Bryant shot an 89 (tied for
81st).
Class AAAAA
Dunwoody boys had a
team score of 319 to tie for
13th with Creekview in the
Class AAAAA boys’ state

DeKalb County Department of Watershed Management Public Advisory 
Interstate 85 & Oakcliff Industrial Court Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation 
May 6, 2016   
Advisory Issue Date 

 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

June 6, 2016  
Advisory Close Date 

   This advisory is issued to inform the public of a receipt of an application for a variance submitted 
pursuant to a State Environmental Law. The Public is invited to comment during a 30‐day period on the 
proposed activity. Since the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) has no authority to zone 
property or determine land use, only those comments addressing environmental issues related to air, 
water and land protection will be considered in the application review process. Written comments should 
be submitted to: Program Manager, Non‐Point Source Program, Erosion and Sedimentation Control, 4220 
International Parkway, Suite 101, Atlanta, Georgia 30354. 
 
Type of Permit Application: Variance to encroach within the 25‐foot Sate Waters Buffer. 
Applicable Law: Georgia Erosion and Sedimentation Act O.C.G.A. 12‐7‐1 ET seq. 
Applicable Rules: Erosion and Sedimentation Control Chapter 391‐3‐7. 
Basis under which variance shall be considered {391‐3‐7.05(2) (A‐K)}: A 
 
Project Description & Reason for Initiating:  
I‐85 and Oakcliff Industrial Ct. Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation Project is a rehabilitation project of an 
existing sanitary sewer located between the North Fork of Peachtree Creek and just northwest of Oakcliff 
Industrial Ct. in the City of Doraville, GA.  Specifically, the site is located in land lot 314 & 318 of the 18th 
district in DeKalb County, GA. The proposed construction will include the rehabilitation of approximately 
2,275 linear feet of 10", 12", and 15" sewer pipe.  The project is needed due to the numerous sewer spills 
along the existing sewer outfall. 
Project Location: 
This project is located in land lot 314 and 318 of the 18th district of DeKalb County. Beginning at terminus 
of Oak Cliff Industrial Court and running south to Interstate 85 and continuing south to the confluence of 
the North Fork of Peachtree Creek for a total distance of approximately one mile.  
 
The Public can review site plans at 1580 Roadhaven Drive Stone Mountain, Georgia 30083.  Phone: 770‐
724‐1450. 
 
 

SPORTS

Another coach
leaves DeKalb

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 23A

Tucker’s Robin Potter heading to Grayson
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
DeKalb County is losing another winning
coach.
Tucker High School girls’ basketball coach
Robin Potter is leaving the program to be the new
head coach at Grayson High School in Gwinnett
County. Potter is replacing outgoing coach Tony
Watkins.
Potter, who lives in Gwinnett County, said the
proximity of the school to her home was one of the
reasons why she accepted the Grayson job.
“It is a little closer as far as my commute
goes,” she said. “I live off of Hamilton Mill in northern Gwinnett. Professionally, there was room for
growth.”
Potter has been the head coach of the Tucker
Lady Tigers since the 2003-2004 season. In her
first season, she led Tucker to the Elite Eight of
the state playoffs. She accumulated a 226-144
record during her 13 years at Tucker and led
the program to its only state title win, the Class
AAAAA state title, in the 2013-2014 season.
This past season, Potter led Tucker to a 27-5
record and an appearance in the Class AAAAAA
championship game where they fell to McEachern
71-51.
Potter said she feels she has accomplished all
of the goals that she set when she took over the
program.
“We established a tradition of success that
I think changed the mentality around here,” she
said. “I feel like when I came in the community really didn’t think that the girls were capable of winning. There just wasn’t an expectation, and I think

we changed that through the years when
there weren’t expectations.”
Potter said that tradition of success
also included the number of her players that have gone on to play college ball.
“A lot of the alumni come
back, and that’s another very
important goal—to establish
that mentality that they’re going to be successful in life,”
she said. “Not only in basketball, but it life and most
of them have gone on to get
college degrees and are very successful. This past year when we
were in the state finals I looked up in
the stands and there are about 15 of my
former players up there cheering on the
current girls. That’s nice to have that relationship and they continue to come back.”
Potter said she will miss the players the
most.
“That is the hardest part,” she said. “If I
could bring them with me I would but they live
around here.”
Potter said it took a few days for the players to understand her reasoning for the move.
“I think initially they felt betrayed but I tried
to explain to them that it’s not them,” she said.
“I love them; I would bring them with me if I
could. I tried to explain that for me, at this point
in my career, I felt like it was something that
I needed to do. Over a few days they understood. They want what’s best for me just like I
want what’s best for them.”

Robin Potter
Photo by Travis Hudgons

NOTICE
The City of Brookhaven City Council does hereby announce that the millage rate will be set at a meeting to be
held at the Brookhaven City Hall on on June 7, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. and pursuant to the requirements of O.C.G.A. Section
48-5-32 does hereby publish the following presentation of the current year's tax digest and levy, along with the history of the tax
digest and levy for the past five years.

CURRENT 2016 TAX DIGEST AND 5 YEAR HISTORY OF LEVY
Spec Tax Dist #1

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Real & Personal

2016

59,127,532

68,176,991

Motor Vehicles
Mobile Homes
Timber - 100%
Heavy Duty Equipment
Gross Digest

0

0

0

0

59,127,532

68,176,991

Net M & O Digest
State Forest Land Assistance
Grant Value

0

0

0

0

59,127,532

68,176,991

Adjusted Net M&O Digest

0

0

0

0

59,127,532

68,176,991

1.500

6.450

Less M& O Exemptions

Gross M&O Millage
Less Rollbacks
Net M&O Millage
Total County Taxes Levied
Net Taxes $ Increase
Net Taxes % Increase

0.000
0.000

0.000

0.000

0.000

1.500

6.450

$0

$0

$0

$0

$88,691

$439,742

$0

$0

$0

$88,691

$351,050

#DIV/0!

#DIV/0!

#DIV/0!

#DIV/0!

395.81%

 

local

Let’s bring dinner back to the table.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, May 27, 2016 • Page 24A

Let’s leave our devices and distractions behind. Let’s pass food and
share stories. Let’s laugh until it hurts. Let’s smile. And love. Let’s breathe
new life into old traditions. Let’s make dinner on Sunday, Sunday Dinner again.
publix.com/sundaydinners