You are on page 1of 24
DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB DATEBOOK PAGE 15 BIOTECH CAMPUS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION

DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB

DATEBOOK PAGE 15

DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB DATEBOOK PAGE 15 BIOTECH CAMPUS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION

BIOTECH CAMPUS

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION ON HOLD

LOCAL PAGE 5

DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB DATEBOOK PAGE 15 BIOTECH CAMPUS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION

LIGGETT TAKES HIS FINAL BOW

SPORTS PAGE 9

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Monday May 30, 2016 XVI, Edition 246

HAVE A SAFE MEMORIAL DAY

www.smdailyjournal.com

Building codes getting green

San Mateo considers solar, EV requirements for new construction

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo is moving to step up its efforts to combat climate change by going beyond state building codes and mandating many new properties incorporate green technologies. Assuming the state approves, those who build new residential and non-residential properties

DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB DATEBOOK PAGE 15 BIOTECH CAMPUS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION

Joe Goethals

Council

could

be

required

to

incorporate

a

range

of

fea-

tures

such

as

solar

panels,

cool roofs and

electric vehicle

charging infra-

structure.

 

The

City

 

its

approved updating

building code earlier this month and the proposed changes must undergo an extensive review and approval from the California Energy Commission before going into effect as early as Jan. 1, 2017, according to a city staff report.

The requirements go above state

mandates known as the Green Building Code and Energy Code sections of the California

Building Code, which is currently being updated and expected to also go into effect in 2017, according to the report. Mayor Joe Goethals and the council supported going beyond state minimums to combat climate change during the May 16 meet- ing. “It shows leadership by the city on a county level. I really think this is a tremendous move for us,”

Goethals said, according to a video of the meeting. If approved, San Mateo could be the second in the state to require all new buildings be equipped with solar panels, according to Kathy Kleinbaum, interim economic development manager. The requirements must be cost effective and not present an unrea-

See GREEN, Page 16

FLAGS FOR THE FALLEN

DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB DATEBOOK PAGE 15 BIOTECH CAMPUS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION

TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL

Scouts from across the Bay Area came to the Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno on Saturday, May 28 to place flags to remember veterans from the armed services for Memorial Day. The flags will remain in place until June 4. From left to right are Zachary Smentek, Raj Sidhu and Nicholas Yi from Troop 75, Los Altos.

New school site talks continuing

Charter Square remains focus of negotiations in Foster City

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Though an exclusive negotiat- ing agreement dissolved months ago, discussions continue over the San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District acquiring the Charter Square Shopping Center to build a new Foster City elementary school, according to the property owner. School officials are still inter- ested in purchasing the shopping center, potentially opening a door for the district to build a fourth ele- mentary school in Foster City and addressing campus overcrowding which officials claim has plagued the district for years, said Sunny Tong, managing director of

Westlake Realty and owner of the

commercial center along Shell

Boulevard. The two sides had entered into an exclusive negotiating agreement last October, and though the 120- day window passed without a sale, Tong said he remains optimistic a deal could ultimately be reached. “We are making progress, and both sides are very hopeful we will conclude something in the very near term,” said Tong. “Maybe as soon as June.” School officials have said pur- chasing the site is n ecessary to build additional classrooms accommoda ting enrollment growth, which has squeezed the

See SQUARE, Page 16

Photo project enlivens downtown

Redwood City construction site home to student artwork

By Renee Abu-Zaghibra

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

The new addition of an art project in downtown Redwood City has taken a dull brown construction fence and revived it with photos snapped by local high school students. The idea to beautify the fence was submitted by a restaurant owner who felt it needed some deco- rating. The idea was picked up by the Redwood City Improvement Association and it proposed the plan to ask two high schools, Sequoia and Woodside high schools, to participate in taking

photos of downtown. Students in the photo class-

es were asked to go downtown and take photos of

what they felt encompassed Redwood City. “We wanted students to capture the best of Redwood City,” said Eric Lochtehfeld, president of RCIA, and owner of the Fox Theatre. “The board gathered words they felt best represented the city to go along with the photos.” Aaron Campbell, a digital photography instruc- tor at Woodside High School, found the idea fan- tastic and helped the students work with their pho-

See ART, Page 16

RENEE ABU- ZAGHIBRA/DAI LY JOURNAL People gather to see the new tempo- rary wall art project
RENEE ABU-
ZAGHIBRA/DAI
LY JOURNAL
People gather
to
see
the
new tempo-
rary wall art
project
cre-
ated
by the
Redwood
City Improve-
ment
Association
and
high
school
stu-
dents
in
downtown
Redwood
City.
DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB DATEBOOK PAGE 15 BIOTECH CAMPUS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION
DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB DATEBOOK PAGE 15 BIOTECH CAMPUS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION
DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB DATEBOOK PAGE 15 BIOTECH CAMPUS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION
DEPP’S ‘ALICE’ A BIG BOMB DATEBOOK PAGE 15 BIOTECH CAMPUS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS PUT DECISION
  • 2 Monday May 30, 2016

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“There are two statements about human beings that are true: that all human beings are alike, and that all are different. On those two facts all human wisdom is founded.”

— Mark Van Doren, American poet (1894-1972).

This Day in History

  • 1966 NASA launched Surveyor 1, a probe that made a soft landing on the moon three days later. The Beatles single “Paperback Writer” was released in the United States by Capitol Records.

n 1431 , Joan of Arc, condemned as a heretic, was burned at the stake in Rouen (roo-AHN’), France.

In 1883 , 12 people were trampled to death in a stampede sparked by a rumor that the recently opened Brooklyn Bridge was in danger of collapsing.

In 1911 , the first Indy 500 took pl ace at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway; the winner was Ray Harroun, who drove a Marmon Wasp for more than 6 1/2 hours at an average speed of 74.6 mph and collected a prize of $10,000.

In 1943 , during World War II, American troops secured the Aleutian island of Attu from Japanese forces.

In 1958 , unidentified American service members killed in World War II and the Korean War were interred in the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery.

In

1996 , Britain’s Prince Andrew and the former Sarah

Ferguson were granted an uncontested decree ending their

10-year marriage.

Ten y ears ag o : Gen. Michael Hayden was sworn in as CIA director. President George W. Bush tapped Goldman Sachs chief Henry Paulson to be Treasury secretary. A jury in Rockville, Maryland, convicted John Allen Muhammad of six of the 10 Washington-area sniper killings. (Muhammad was executed in Nov. 2009 for a slaying in Virginia).

Monday • May 30, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Actor Ted McGinley is 58.

Birthdays

Monday • May 30, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Musician Tom Morello is 52.

Monday • May 30, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Actress Idina Menzel is 45.

Actor Clint Walker is 89. Actress Ruta Lee is 81. Actor Keir Dullea is 80. Actor Michael J. Pollard is 77. Pro and College Football Hall of Famer Gale Sayers is 73. Rock musician Lenny Davidson (The Dave Clark Five) is 72. Actor Stephen Tobolowsky is 65. Actor Colm Meaney is 63. Actor Ralph Carter is 55. Actress Tonya Pinkins is 54. Country singer Wynonna J udd is 52. Actor Mark Sheppard is 52. Movie direc- tor Antoine Fuqua is 51. Rock musician Patrick Dahlheimer (Live) is 45. Actor Trey Parker is 44. Rapper Cee Lo Green is 41. Rapper Remy Ma is 36. Actor Blake Bashoff is 35. Christian rock musician James Smith (Underoath) is 34.

Monday • May 30, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

KAHYS
KAHYS

©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

 

NORDF

 
   
NORDF DEDARM CRONEE
   
NORDF DEDARM CRONEE

DEDARM

 
NORDF DEDARM CRONEE
       
NORDF DEDARM CRONEE
 

CRONEE

 
NORDF DEDARM CRONEE
   
NORDF DEDARM CRONEE
   
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as

suggested by the above cartoon.

“ ” (Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: ABATE SCOUT SQUARE INTENT Saturday’s Answer: When the comic strip creators
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: ABATE
SCOUT
SQUARE
INTENT
Saturday’s
Answer: When the comic strip creators sang on the way to their
Monday • May 30, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

REUTERS

Pupils present scrolls of traditional Chinese calligraphy at a school to increase awareness and respect to traditional Chinese culture in Yiwu, Zhejiang Province, China, Friday.

Gunman among at least 2 dead in Houston shooting

HOUSTON — A gunman and at least

one other person were killed Sunday,

authorities said, as many shots were fired in a Houston neighborhood where police had urged people to remain in

their homes.

Police spokesman John Cannon says there were two armed suspects involved, one of whom was killed and one who was wounded and taken to a hospital. Acting Police Chief Martha Montalvo said police believe one sus- pect was shot by the other and the sec-

ond was shot by a SWAT officer.

Cannon says the second person killed was found inside a vehicle, though the circumstances were not immediately available. Montalvo said two officers and three citizens were also shot, and a police helicopter was shot at with a “high-powered” weapon.

She said police were working

to

piece together what had spurred the shootings. Houston Police Union President Ray Hunt says an officer who was hit sever- al times in the chest was wearing both a metal breastplate and a bulletproof vest. The second officer was shot in the hand. Hunt says both officers hurt should be OK.

At least two drivers told KHOU their vehicles were shot at, and a

police SUV could be seen with a shat- tered windshield and the back window

In other news ...

broken out.

Stephen Dittoe, 55, lives in the house right behind the shooting scene, separated by a fence and tall shrubbery at the end of cul-de-sac. He said when he first heard the noise Sunday he thought it was a trans- former. His wife, Ha, 41, said it went

on too long for that and described the series of staccato sounds.

She took their two children into the bathroom, told them to eat breakfast in there, and called 911. She said police came to the door about two hours later and asked if anyone in the house was being held captive, and if

they could walk around the backyard.

The streets were still blocked off late Sunday afternoon with many police cars and fire trucks on the scene.

  • 5 dead, at least 2 missing

after floods in Texas, Kansas

HOUSTON — Central Texas authori- ties spotted a body during an aerial search Sunday, bringing the death toll from flooding the state to five.

It’s unclear whether the body found in Travis County near Austin is one of the two still missing in Texas. An 11- year-old boy is still missing in central Kansas, too.

Torrential rains caused heavy flash flooding in some parts of the U.S. over the last few days, and led to numerous evacuations in southeast Texas, including two prisons. But the threat

of severe weather has lessened over the long Memorial Day holiday for many places, though Tropical Depression Bonnie continued to bring rain and wind to North and South Carolina.

Parishioners to leave closed church after 11-year protest

SCITUATE, Mass. — For more than 11 years, a core group of about 100 die-hard parishioners of St. Frances X. Cabrini Church have kept their beloved parish open by maintaining an around-the-clock vigil in a p eaceful protest of a decision by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston to close it.

On Sunday, the parishioners’ efforts will end and they will v acate the Scituate church many of them have

attended for decades. Earlier this month, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear their final appeal, leaving them no choice but to end their fight.

The group plans to hold a final serv- ice Sunday, a “celebration of faith and transition,” the parishioners said, before leaving the church.

The case was heard in civil courts and went all the way to the Vatican, but they were unsuccessful in persuading church officials to keep St. Frances open. A Superior Court judge ruled that the archdiocese is the legal owner of the church property and has the right to evict the parishioners occupying the church building.

Lotto

May 28 Powerball 6 33 34 58 59 12 Powerball May 27 Mega Millions 18 41
May 28 Powerball
6
33
34 58 59 12
Powerball
May 27 Mega Millions
18
41 50
68 70
9
Mega number
May 28 Super Lotto Plus
4
10
11 32 33
23
Mega number

Fantasy Five

 
2
2
7
7
11
11
21
21
26
26

Daily Four

 
 
9
9
4
4
7
7
0
0

Daily three midday

 
3
3
2
2
5
5

Daily three evening

 
5
5
9
9
8
8
Monday • May 30, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

The Daily Derby race winners are Hot Shot No. 3, in first place; Big Ben, No. 4, in second place;

and Eureka No. 7, in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:44.94.

Local Weather Forecast

Memo ri al Day : Mostly cloudy in the

Memo ri al Day : Mostly cloudy in the

morning then becoming sunny. Patchy

fog in the morning. Highs in the mid 60s.

South winds 5 to 15 mph. Mo nday ni g ht: Mostly clear in the

evening then becoming mostly cloudy.

Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10

mph.

Tues day : Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 60s. Southwest

winds 5 to 10 mph.

Tues day ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the evening then becom-

ing mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Wednes day : Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 60s. Wednes day ni g ht and Thurs day : Mostly cloudy.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

1900 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 112, San Mateo, CA 94403

Publisher: Jerry Lee

jerry@smdailyjournal.com

smdailyjournal.com

twitter.com/smdailyjournal

Editor in Chief: Jon Mays

jon@smdailyjournal.com

scribd.com/smdailyjournal

facebook.com/smdailyjournal

To Advertise:

(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290 ads@smdailyjournal.com

Events:

calendar@smdailyjournal.com

news@smdailyjournal.com

Delivery:

distribution@smdailyjournal.com

Career:

info@smdailyjournal.com

As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email

information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed

more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday May 30, 2016

3

A bike ‘freeway?’ Don’t laugh

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • May 30, 2016 3 A bike ‘freeway?’ Don’t laugh B

B ike lanes are becoming permanent fixtures on Peninsula roads, but a bike freeway to San Francisco? A

similar stretch of highway was attempted in Southern California in the 1890s. It didn’t get very far, but the fact that it got anywhere is surprising. Maybe not so surprising when one considers how popular bicycles were shortly before the automobile debuted and took over the roads. The League of American Wheelman, estab- lished in 1880, had 100,000 members by 1898. The league’s members included the Wright brothers, John D. Rockefeller and “Diamond” Jim Brady. Ten years later, the number grew to 150,000, but the figure soon dropped with the coming of the auto. The number of bike manufacturers plunged from around 300 to 100 between 1900 and 1905. League historians don’t blame the car for all of the decline. The coming of the electric streetcar also played a part. In 1897, the future of the bicycle looked so bright Hor ace Dobbins of Pasadena incorporated the California Cycleway Company which called for building a 10- mile, elevated wooden bike tollway from his city to Los Angeles. Construction start- ed two years later and about a mile and a half

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • May 30, 2016 3 A bike ‘freeway?’ Don’t laugh B

Cycleway in Pasadena in 1890s. Note toll booth at bottom.

was completed when the cycleway opened on New Year’s Day 1900. The completed portion was almost entire- ly of pine and was wide enough for four cyclists to ride side by side. According to a 1901 account in Good Roads magazine, the structure was brightly lit with incandescent lights. There was a toll booth at one end and riders were charged 10 cents for one way and 15 cents roundtrip. The elevation at the highest point was 50 feet. The full route would have had a maximum grade of 3 per- cent and an average grade of approximately 1 percent, according to Good Roads. Dobbins’ venture never made a profit. In a

few years, the cycleway was dismantled and the wood sold for lumber. The right-of-way eventually became part of the Pasadena Freeway, which opened dates in 1940 and is billed as the nation’s first freeway. A bike path about two miles long runs parallel to the freeway. The Peninsula also b ecame swept up in the bike graze of the 1890s. There were several “wheelmen clubs,” including those in San Mateo and Redwood City. The Redwood City Times-Gazette covered the “great relay” race of June 1895 that started at the Millbrae Hotel and finished two miles south of Mountain View. Several clubs entered teams of five riders who competed for a gold cup. In another story, the paper reported that J.E. Edwards set a record for the San Mateo-San Carlos run with a time of 12 minutes and 13 seconds. The Times-Gazette also covered a five-mile race that drew “everybody” in town. The race was won by Carl Allen, who

won in 15 minutes, 20 seconds.

All of the stories weren’t positive. One complained that “people are beginning to complain, and they have good cause to,

See HISTORY, Page 6

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • May 30, 2016 3 A bike ‘freeway?’ Don’t laugh B

Police reports

Need that vodka

Someone stole a bottle of vodka and fled on a bicycle on Plaza Lane in Burlingame before 12:20 a.m. Wednesday, May 25.

BURLINGAME

Di s turbance. A person was seen collapsed in front of a store on El Camino Real before

2:30 p.m. Thursday, May 26. Reckl es s dri v er. A driver was seen run- ning multiple stop signs near Howard Avenue and El Camino Real before 6:17 p.m. Wednesday, May 25. Ho mel es s . A homeless woman was seen acting strangely and yelling profanities near El Camino Real and Burlingame Avenue before 5:26 p.m. Wednesday, May 25. Threats . Someone was getting threatening calls from an ex-employee’s son on Lorton Avenue before 3:19 p.m. Wednesday, May

25.

Burg l ary. A person broke into a home

under construction and stole tools on

Capuchino Avenue before 8:45 a.m.

Tuesday, May 24.

Looking for World Class SMILE DESIGN Braces Porcelain crowns & Veneers White fillings Dental Implants Brighten
Looking for
World Class
SMILE DESIGN
Braces
Porcelain crowns & Veneers
White fillings
Dental
Implants
Brighten your Smile
Call now for your Free Consultation
& Full mouth digital survey ($250 value)
650-583-2273
Russo Dental Care
1101 El Camino Real
San Bruno Ca 94066
Dr. John J. Russo DDS
Expires 05 -31-2016

4

Monday May 30, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light Trucks. 2000 & Newer Models. Others slightly more.
SMOG
Plus Cert. Fee.
Most Cars &
Light Trucks.
2000 & Newer
Models. Others
slightly more.
$ 29 75
With or w/o
Appointment
Complete
Repair
& Service
AA SMOG
20% OFF LABOR
with ad
El Camino Real
Official
Brake & Lamp
869 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650) 340-0492
California Dr
Mon–Fri 8:30–5:30 PM
101
Station
Sat 8:30–3:00 PM
Burlingame Ave
Palm Dr
Broadway

Turning 65 this year?

Medicare Supplement Insurance

Low cost-guaranteed coverage

Let us help you quickly navigate the process of Medicare enrollment

Turning 65 this year? Medicare Supplement Insurance Low cost-guaranteed coverage Let us help you quickly navigate

Contact Ron Collins

650-701-9700

www.collinscoversyou.com

Proudly helping Peninsula residents with their health insurance since 1981

Turning 65 this year? Medicare Supplement Insurance Low cost-guaranteed coverage Let us help you quickly navigate
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light
Monday • May 30, 2016 THE DAILY JOURNAL SMOG Plus Cert. Fee. Most Cars & Light

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday May 30, 2016

5

Officials delay biotech development decision

Citing insufficient proposal details, council requests issue return later

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Due to claims the builder and city staff offered insufficient information regarding a proposal to construct a massive biotech- nology office project in South San Francisco, officials delayed mak- ing a decision on the development targeting east of Highway 101. The South San Francisco City Council agreed during a meeting Wednesday, May 25, to postpone considering approval of a propos- al by BioMed Realty to develop 262,000 square feet of office space split between two buildings at 475 Eccles Ave., according to video of the meeting. Officials agreed they wanted to see a more detailed analysis of the building design and potential effects of the project which could bring as many as 900 new jobs to the area near Gateway and Oyster Point boulevards. Councilwoman Karyl Matsumoto expressed discomfort when being asked to consider the project, without being offered a report addressing specifics such as traffic mitigations, building mate- rials and more. Adjacent to the Eccles site, BioMed Realty is also developing the Gateway to the Pacific project, which is slated to bring an addi- tional 500,000 square feet of accommodations to the city’s life sciences industry. In the application for the Gateway project, Matsumoto said a much more thorough and com-

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • May 30, 2016 5 Officials delay biotech development decision Citing

A proposal by BioMed Realty to develop 262,000 square feet of office space split between two buildings at 475 Eccles Ave. in South San Franciso has been put on hold.

prehensive vision of the develop- ment was offered to officials, and expressed a desire for BioMed Realty and city staff to take a sim- ilar approach with the Eccles proj- ect. “When BioMed came to us with the other site, it was very inten- sive. We got to see things. It was very engaging. We were part of the discussion, we weren’t just given these little renderings,” she said. “We were bypassed this time.” Vice Mayor Pradeep Gupta agreed with Matsumoto’s concerns and directed the applicants and staff to return at a later date with more information.

“The council would like to look at this project closer than we are able to do at this time,” he said. “In our eyes this is not a small project, it is a significant project. “

City Manager Mike Futrell said officials would be willing to come back to the council with a more detailed analysis of the project. “I don’t believe there is an urgency to get this done tonight,” he said. He said he would like to see the item brought before the council by the end of July to allow BioMed Realty to begin searching for ten- ants to occupy the project.

“We’ll come back with a way to move this forward,” he said. Beyond the two buildings pro- posed to provide sp ace for offices, along with research and develop- ment, in the Eccles development, BioMed Realty also expressed interest to build a parking struc- ture with 551 sp aces. An addition- al 104 sp aces would be offered in an at-grade lot, with the opportu- nity to build 50 more, according to a city report. With as many as 900 workers potentially visiting the site, Councilwoman Liza Normandy expressed concerns regarding the adequacy of the parking plan to

accommodate the demand. “I don’t want to assume 400 people are taking public trans- portation,” said Normandy also shared reservations regarding the traffic flow patterns throughout the corridor east of Highway 101 which houses a majority of the city’s biotechnology companies. Caltrans and a nearby company wrote letters to city officials as well expressing concerns about potential traffic congestion potentially brought by the Eccles project. Matsumoto also identified some of the issues regarding the poten- tial for traffic congestion on and around the site. “This becomes very important to us on how we look at future mit- igations,” she said. Improvements should also be made to surrounding amenities such as the Bay Trail, added Matsumoto, to make the area more easily access ible by bicycles and walkers. With the variety of issues need- ing to be addressed, Gupta encour- aged city staff and developers to return with a more vibrant and expansive proposal for the proj- ect. “It is an important project for the council to look at, and a very important part of the future direc- tion of Oyster Point,” he said. “I’m looking forward to dis- cussing this item with better data and better information, so the council can feel more comfort- able.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • May 30, 2016 5 Officials delay biotech development decision Citing
     
 

Obituary

 
Keith Cameron Green

Keith Cameron Green

1988 – 2016

Keith Cameron Green was born and raised in San Mateo, California to Brian Keith Green and Colleen Kay Cudd on July 19 th , 1988.

Keith attended Baywood Elementary School, Borel Middle School and graduated from Aragon High School.

Keith was an avid athlete and enjoyed participating in

baseball, basketball, football, tennis and many other sports. He most recently fell in love with the game of golf.

Besides “styling footwear” and spending time with his “Boi’s”, his new passion was for the culinary arts where he attended Le Cordon Bleu with plans to graduate in September.

The gift of Keith was that of a loving son, brother, grandson, cousin and friend but his

greatest gift was becoming a loving father to his beautiful daughters, Vivi and Nia . He loved

them with all of his being.

This beautiful man was taken from this earth much too soon and will be missed by all

who knew him.

Keith is survived by his daughters Vivienne Li and Nia of Hillsborough, his mother Colleen Cudd of Vancouver Washington, brother Julian R. Green-Williams of Sacramento, sister

Mariah Green of Florida, grandmother Anthelena James Green of Ohio, his large extended family and his many friends that loved him immensely.

Keith is preceded in death by his father, Brian, grandfather Joe “Buddy” Green and

grandparents Douglas and Carole Cudd.

 

A memorial service will be held June lO th , 2016 at 1:00 p.m. at the Central Peninsula Church

1005 Shell Boulevard Foster City 94404

 
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • May 30, 2016 5 Officials delay biotech development decision Citing
  • 6 Monday May 30, 2016

STATE/LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Public schools see enrollment drop as charters keep growing

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Standing before the Los Angeles Unified School Board, Susan Zoller deliv- ered a startling assessment: More than 100,000 students in the nation’s second-largest district were now enrolled in charters, draining more than $500 million from the budget in a single aca- demic year. “The financial future of Los Angeles is difficult,” said Zoller, a consultant hired by the district’s union. Board member Richard Vladovic leaned anxiously toward his mic. “We are bleeding,” he said. If current trends continue, the district could be significantly diminished in another 10 years — at least a third smaller than at the

start of the century.

In financially struggling urban districts from LA to Philadelphia — and most notoriously, Detroit — the increasing popularity of charter schools, combined with family flight to the suburbs and declining birth rates, have caused enrollment to plummet. The changes have unfolded slowly for years and recently accelerated in some places.

“It’s come to a tipping point for many of these districts like Detroit,” said Ron Zimmer, an edu- cation professor at Vanderbilt University. “They just can’t finance their school district that was meant for a much bigger enrollment than they currently have.” Charter schools arrived in the 1990s and began attracting par- ents

ance among minority and low- income students and those who are learning English. More than two decades later, charter enrollment continues to climb. Nationwide, more than 2.6 million students attended charter schools in 2014, according to the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. In districts with growing student populations, such as Las Vegas and Orlando, Florida, that growth helps ease potential overcrowd- ing. But in cities like Los Angeles, where the school-age population has been shrinking, the continued flight from tradi- tional public schools has become a mounting concern. In most states, schools receive funding on a per-pupil basis, and the majority of those dollars follow students when they leave for a charter. Charter school advocates say

Monday • May 30, 2016 STATE/LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Public schools see enrollment drop as

search-

it’s only fair for local and state

ing for an

property tax dollars to follow

alterna-

children to the new schools, and

tive

to

that parents aren’t to blame for a

big-city

district’s failing finances.

districts

“To the extent the district is not

that had

serving the needs of their stu-

strained

dents, this has been a trend line for

for years

some time,” said Nina Rees, presi-

to raise

dent of the National Alliance for

  • perform- Public Charter Schools.

Local briefs

Man arrested after homeowner detains him

A man was arrested in Pacifica Saturday morning after a home- owner caught the suspect breaking into his home, according to police. Police said officers responded at 4:48 a.m. to the 700 block of Arleen Way on reports of a possi- ble home invasion involving a firearm. The suspect, 29-year-old Trevor Jodsaas, allegedly kicked down the front door and entered the resi- dence. According to police, the home- owner was home and after a brief altercation was able to forcibly remove Jodsaas from his home and detain him on the porch until offi- cers arrived. Officers arrived and arrested Jodsaas on suspicion of burglary, battery with serious injury, vandalism, being under the influence of a controlled substance

and possession of drug parapher- nalia. The homeowner was taken

to the hospital after the incident

for injuries that were not consid- ered life threatening.

Three arrested for

discharging firearm

Three people, including two

from Southern California, have

been arrested on suspicion of dis-

charging a firearm in a city for

allegedly firing a rifle in Pacifica early Friday morning, police said. Officers who heard someone dis- charging a firearm in the area of the Shelldance Orchard Gardens at 2000 Coast Highway at about 2:20 a.m. on Friday found and detained three people who were hiding on the nursery’s property, according to police. A rifle was located near the spot where they were detained, said. The three people admitted that they had been drinking and firing the rifle into the hillside, police said. The suspects were identified as 24-year-old Cosmos Rothenberg of Pacifica, 22-year- old Julia Barcia of Santa Barbara and 28-year-old Iain Bartolomei of Huntington Beach.

Sheriff’s Office has new inmate locator tool

The San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office on Friday announced a new inmate locator tool available to the public. The tool will give the public the ability to get real-time informa- tion on people who are in custody, according to the sheriff’s office. The tool will provide informa- tion such as facility location, pending charges, custody status, next court date and bail amount and will be available at www.smcsher- iff.com.

HISTORY

Continued from page 3

about the reckless manner in which

wheelmen ride through town.” Sound

familiar? There will probably be more such

stories in the future. Hardly a week

passes without some story involving

bike traffic. In Redwood City alone, there are currently 29 transportation

projects that include studies to

“address and balance the needs of driv- ers, pedestrians, bicyclists and those

taking public transit,” said city

spokesman Jon Lanthier.

Earlier this month, the Menlo Park City Council voted to postpone adding bike lanes along El Camino Real to allow for more study.

The Rear View Mirror by history columnist Jim Clifford appears in the Daily Journal every other Monday. Objects in The Mirror are closer than they appear.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Monday • May 30, 2016 STATE/LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Public schools see enrollment drop as

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Monday May 30, 2016

7

Trump seeks more diverse voters

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TAMPA, Fla. — Donald Trump calls his presidential campaign a mass movement, but he must show he can coax enough support from voters who twice delivered the White House to Barack Obama. The billionaire businessman depended almost exclusively on conservative and GOP-leaning whites — a majority of them men — to secure the Republican nomi- nation. Now he must look ahead to a wider, more diverse voting pop- ulation in his likely general elec- tion matchup with Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton. His ability to seize on marginal shifts in the electorate may deter- mine whether he can pull off a vic- tory once unthinkable. Trump’s task is critical to flipping back into the GOP column some of the most contested states that Obama won twice. This challenge is perhaps best evident in Florida, a culturally, racially and ideologically varied state where Obama defeated Republican Mitt Romney four

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • May 30, 2016 7 Trump seeks more diverse voters THE

Donald Trump

years ago by

fewer than 75,000 votes out of more than 8.4 million cast. That means small shifts

anywhere in the

electorate could

make a differ- ence — from turnout changes among white small-town and rural Republicans or urban, nonwhite Democrats to partisans, embit- tered by contentious nominating bouts, choosing third-party candi- dates or declining to vote at all;

and if Trump can’t close the gaps in Florida, he has little shot of winning key Rust Belt and Great Lakes states where Obama’s advantages were greater. “We still elect presidents using

the Electoral College

depend-

... ing on states that are made up of diverse electorates,” cautions GOP pollster Whit Ayres. “There aren’t enough angry white people to cre- ate a majority in the new America of 2016, (and) running up your

numbers with white males in Mississippi doesn’t get you one more electoral vote than Mitt Romney.” One of Trump’s vanquished pri- mary rivals, Sen. Marco Rubio, told reporters this week Trump can win Florida, which has gone with

the winner in every presidential

contest since 1996, as long as he can “continue to be Donald.” That brash outsider pitch has sewn up support from white men like Jack Oliver, a 66-year-old construction worker from West Palm Beach, Florida, and 84-year-old Frank Papa, a retired grocery manager from Clearwater, Florida. Oliver cites Trump’s hard line on immigration and calls him a leader “who will finally give a damn about people like me.” Papa, a New Jersey native, says Trump “speaks my language, talks and thinks like me.” But Trump must expand his reach. “If he can’t unify Republicans, there really isn’t enough votes for him to make up elsewhere,” said Steve Schale, who ran Obama’s 2008 campaign

in Florida. He said Florida elec- tions have been close for decades, noting 41 million combined pres- idential votes have been cast since 1992, with fewer than 131,000 votes separating the combined totals of Democratic and Republican nominees. Trump gives lip service to the electorate’s diversity, suggesting “the Mexican people” will “vote for me like crazy” and that he can win 25 percent of African- Americans. The highest won by any GOP nominee since 1980 is about 12 percent. He said recently he could lure “40 percent” of vot- ers backing Clinton’s primary opponent, Bernie Sanders. Some nonwhite Floridians mock Trump’s claims about his own appeal. “I haven’t heard any of my (black) friends say they’ll vote for Trump,” said Tanisha Winns, 39, a black Democrat in Lakeland, located along central Florida’s Interstate 4 corridor that twice helped give Republican George W. Bush the statewide victory before swinging in Obama’s favor. “If

anything, I’m hearing my white friends say they won’t,” Winns added. For now, Florida polls suggest Trump and Clinton are running about even, with about 15 percent undecided. But there are variables that should give Trump pause. In 2012, nonwhites accounted for almost a third of all votes cast in Florida, compared to 28 percent nationwide. But population growth, driven by Hispanics, sug- gests both numbers could be high- er come November. Obama beat Romney with Florida’s black vote with 95 per- cent. The president won Hispanics by a 60-40 margin, closer than his 71-27 advantage nationally, with many of Florida’s conservative Cuban-American voters account- ing for the difference. Those numbers still left Romney too reliant on whites. He managed 61 percent of Florida’s white vote — better than his 59 percent nationally — but he need- ed to get closer to 63 percent to win the Sunshine State’s 29 elec- toral votes.

Students seeking sugar daddies

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Candice Kashani graduated from law school debt-free this spring, thanks to a modern twist on an age-old arrangement. During her first year, she faced tuition and expenses that ran near- ly $50,000, even after a scholar- ship. So she decided to check out a dating website that connected women looking for financial help with men willing to provide it, in exchange for companionship and sex — a “sugar daddy” relation- ship as they are known. Now, almost three years and sev- eral sugar daddies later, Kashani is set to graduate from Villanova University free and clear, while some of her peers are burdened with six-digit debts. As the cost of tuition and rent rises, so does the apparent popu- larity of such sites among stu- dents. But are they really provid- ing financial relief, or signing women up for something more

exploitative and dangerous than

debt? Kashani believes such sites are a “great resource” for young women, but others say these arrangements smack of prostitution and take advantage of women in a vulnera- ble situation. Lynn Comella, an associate pro- fessor of gender and sexuality studies at University of Nevada Las Vegas, said that it is not unusu- al for students to turn to sex work such as stripping, prostitution or webcam work to pay for school. But the sugar daddy sites are rela- tively new, and she says not entirely upfront about what they are really about. These arrangements are more vague than prostitution— there is an expectation of material benefit but it is not always specified and sex is not guaranteed. Ron Weitzer, a professor of soci- ology at George Washington University and criminologist with an expertise in the sex industry

describes it as “prostitution light.” “Sugar Daddy” arrangements have existed for ages, and it’s unclear if they are becoming more common because the phe- nomenon is not well studied. But experts say at the very least the internet has made these transac- tions far easier to arrange and negotiate. “It allows you to hone in on what you want,” said Kevin Lewis, an assistant professor of sociology at University of California San Diego who studies online dating. “You could argue it is just making the market more efficient.” Kashani says she sifted through many potential suitors before finding one she clicked with. She says she considers her sugar daddy one of her best friends and that they care deeply for each other. “The people who have a stigma, or associate a negative connota- tion with it, don’t understand how it works,” she says.

Libertarians pick ex-New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson for president

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — The Libertarian Party again nomi- nated former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson as its presidential candidate Sunday, believing he can challenge presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton b ecause of their poor showing in popularity polls. Johnson, 63, won the nomina- tion on the second ballot at the party’s convention in Orlando, Florida, defeating Austin Petersen, the founder of The Libertarian Republic magazine; and anti-com- puter virus company founder John McAfee. The delegates selected former Massachusetts Gov. William Weld to be his vice presi- dential running mate. Johnson, the party’s nominee in 2012, told the delegates during his acceptance speech that his job

will be to get the Libertarian plat-

form before the voters at a level the party has not seen. “I am fiscally conservative in spades and I am socially liberal in spades,” Johnson told The Associated Press. “I would cut back on military interventions that have the unintended conse- quence of making us less safe in the world.” On fiscal matters, Libertarians push for reduced spending and taxes, saying the federal govern- ment has gotten too big across the board. Johnson proposes elimi- nating federal income and corpo- rate taxes and replacing those with a national sales tax. He would reduce domestic spend- ing by eliminating the Internal Revenue Service, the Commerce and Education departments, the Food and Drug Administration and the Drug Enforcement Administration.

HELP WANTED

The Daily Journal seeks

SALES

two sales professionals for the following positions:

EVENT MARKETING SALES

TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES

Join the Daily Journal Event marketing team as a Sales and Business Development Specialist. Duties include sales and customer service of event sponsorships, partners, exhibitors and more. Interface and interact with local businesses to enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s ever expanding inventory of community

We are looking for a telemarketing whiz, who can cold call without hesitation and close sales over the phone. Experience preferred. Must have superior verbal, phone and written communication skills. Computer proficiency is also required. Self-management and strong business intelligence also a must.

events such as the Senior Showcase, Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and more. You will also be part of the project management process. But first and foremost, we will rely on you for sales

To apply for either position, please send info to

and business development.

jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call

This is one of the fastest areas of the

650-344-5200.

Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow the team. Must have a successful track record of sales and business development.

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • May 30, 2016 7 Trump seeks more diverse voters THE
THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • May 30, 2016 7 Trump seeks more diverse voters THE
  • 8 Monday May 30, 2016

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Syria’s cease-fire strengthens al-Qaida branch

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Al-Qaida’s branch in Syria has recruited thousands of fighters, including teenagers, and taken territory from government forces in a successful offensive in the north, illustrating how the cease-fire put in place by Russia and the United States to weaken the militants has in many ways backfired. The branch, known as the Nusra Front, has churned out a flood of videos — slickly produced in the style of its rival, the Islamic State group — that show off its recruit- ment drive. In one, young men line up for combat training. In another, a bearded al-Qaida fighter in a mosque urges a crowd of men to join jihad. A third shows an al- Qaida-linked cleric leading a grad- uation ceremony, handing out weapons to young men. Since March, the group recruited 3,000 new fighters, including teenagers, in comparison to an

8 Monday • May 30, 2016 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Syria’s cease-fire strengthens al-Qaida branch THE

REUTERS

Rebel fighters from the First Regiment, part of the Free Syrian Army, carry a Grad rocket in Aleppo’s Al-Haidariya neighborhood.

average of 200 to 300 a month before, according to Rami Abdurrahman, head of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, an activist group monitoring the conflict. He cited contacts within

the Nusra Front. Other activists said hundreds living in camps for displaced people in the north have joined the al-Qaida branch. But battlefield success and the push for new recruits have brought

to the surface tens ions within the Nusra Front over the group’s future path, observers say. A hard-line faction within the group wants to emulate al-Qaida’s chief rival, the Islamic State group, and declare an Islamic caliphate in the areas under its control, a step al-Qaida has long rejected because it does not want to alienate its allies in the Syrian opposition. On the other end of the spectrum, a Syria-minded camp within the Nusra Front wants to focus entirely on the campaign to oust Syrian President Bashar Assad and to break ties with al- Qaida. “There are leaders in Nusra who are saying we are strongest, why are we not ruling and why don’t we declare a caliphat e?” said Radwan Mortada, an expert on jihadi groups who writes for Lebanon’s Al-Akhbar newspaper. “There are others who say the world will not leave us alone so long as we are related to al-Qaida. So the least we

can do

is declare our dissocia-

... tion with al-Qaida.” The Nusra Front has long been one of the strongest factions in Syria’s opposition. It and other Syrian rebels, including some allied to it, hold most of the northwestern province of Idlib and parts of neighboring Aleppo province. When Russia and the United States brokered a cease-fire between Assad and opposition forces in February, the Nusra Front

and IS were excluded, allowing Assad’s troops and Russian and American airstrikes to continue to hit them. The hope in Washington and Moscow was that other rebel factions would shun both extrem- ist groups. Instead, the cease-fire faltered within weeks as Assad’s forces fought rebels around the opposi- tion-held part of Aleppo, and peace talks in Geneva stalemated. That boosted the Nusra Front’s credibility as the force that kept up the fight against Assad.

More than are 700 feared dead in recent Mediterranean crossings

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

POZZALLO, Sicily — Survivor accounts have pushed to more than 700 the number of migrants feared dead in Mediterranean Sea shipwrecks over three days in the past week, even as European ships saved thou- sands of others in daring rescue operations. The shipwrecks appear to account for the largest loss of life reported in the Mediterranean since April 2015, when a single ship sank with an estimated 800 peo- ple trapped inside. Humanitarian organiza- tions say that many migrant boats sink without a trace, with the dead never found, and their fates only recounted by family members who report their failure to arrive in Europe. “It really looks like that in the last period the situation is really worsening in the last week, if the news is confirmed,” said

Giovanna Di Benedetto, a Save the Children

spokeswoman in Italy. Warmer waters and calmer weather of late have only increased the migrants’ attempts to reach Europe. The largest number of missing and pre- sumed dead was aboard a wooden fishing boat being towed by another smugglers’ boat from the Libyan port of Sabratha that sank Thursday. Estimates by police and humanitarian organizations range from around 400 to about 550 missing in that sinking alone. One survivor from Eritrea, 21-year-old Filmon Selomon, told The Associated Press that water started seeping into the second boat after three hours of navigation, and that the migrants tried vainly to get the water out of the sinking boat. “It was very hard because the water was coming from everywhere,” he said.

8 Monday • May 30, 2016 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Syria’s cease-fire strengthens al-Qaida branch THE

Finally allowed 2nd child, older Chinese parents turning to fertility treatments

By Louise Watt

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIJING — China’s decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driv- ing a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pres- sure on clinics and breaking down past sen- sitivities, and even shame, about the issue. The rise in in vitro fertilization points to the deferred dreams of many parents who long wanted a second child, but were pre- vented by a strict population control policy in place for more than 30 years. That, in turn, is shifting prevailing atti- tudes in China regarding fertility treatments — formerly a matter of such sensitivity that couples were reluctant to tell even their par- ents or other family members that they were having trouble conceiving. “More and more women are coming to ask to have their second child,” said Dr. Liu Jiaen, who runs a private hospital in Beijing treating infertility through IVF, in

which an egg and sperm are combined in a

laboratory dish and the resulting embryo

transferred to a woman’s uterus. Liu estimated that the numbers of women coming to him for IVF had risen by 20 per- cent since the relaxation of the policy, which came into effect at the start of the year. Before, the average age of his patients was about 35. Now most of them are older than 40 and some of the women are fast approaching 50. “They have a very low chance to get pregnant so they are in a hurry. They really want to have a child as soon as possible,” he said. Chen Yun is 39 and was in the hospital waiting to have the procedure for the first time. She and her husband already have a 7- year-old son. “We are coming to the end of our child- bearing years. It may be difficult for me to get pregnant naturally because my hus- band’s sperm may have a problem, so we want to resolve this problem through IVF,” she said.

8 Monday • May 30, 2016 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Syria’s cease-fire strengthens al-Qaida branch THE
rescriptions & Home Medical Supplies Delivered (650) 349-1373 29 West 25TH Ave. (Near El Camino)
rescriptions & Home
Medical Supplies Delivered
(650) 349-1373
29 West 25TH Ave.
(Near El Camino)
San Mateo
8 Monday • May 30, 2016 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Syria’s cease-fire strengthens al-Qaida branch THE
DOUBLING DOWN: GIANTS TIE S.F. MARK WITH EIGHT DOUBLES TO TAKE SERIES FINALE FROM ROCKIES >>
DOUBLING DOWN: GIANTS TIE S.F. MARK WITH EIGHT DOUBLES TO TAKE SERIES FINALE FROM ROCKIES >> PAGE 11
<<< Page 10, Warriors ready for battle
with trip to NBA Finals on the line
Monday • May 30, 2016

Liggett takes final bow

Carlmont coach ends 41-year career with loss in CCS title game

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

SAN JOSE — It didn’t end in fairytale fashion. Nonetheless, Carlmont playing in the Central Coast Section Division I championship game was a fitting end to Jim Liggett’s legend. Saturday’s 11-6 loss to No. 1 seeded San Benito at PAL Stadium marked the final game of Liggett’s historic 41-year career as Carlmont’s head coach. Having won eight CCS title all time — the last coming in 2014 — Liggett accrued a career record of 1,009 wins, 216 losses and four ties. His wins total, which reached the 1, 000-wins plateau April 12 against Capuchino, is a California state

record. And the Scots qualified for the

playoffs in each of his 41 seasons.

For Liggett, his suffering from an undisclosed ailment has made his final season a difficult one. For decades, the legendary coach brought a boyish vigor to the diamond day-in and day-out. It was a persona he carried even into this year, but his mobility was rapidly hindered as the farewell season progressed. “It’s been difficult because I didn’t think I would be at this stage in my con- dition,” Liggett said. “It’s been tough that way when I can’t get on the field like I usually do. So, that’s been difficult. But we had a good group of girls and overall they performed very well.” The 2016 season was the first in which

Liggett wasn’t a fixture in the third-base coach’s box. He was reserved to coaching from a canvas chair, usually affixed at the front of the dugout. It was from this vantage point he observed the season end Saturday as freshman Kate Berce grounded out to San Benito shortstop Callee Heen, giving the Haybalers their eighth all-time CCS crown, all coming in the past nine years. The only year San Benito didn’t win the title during that time was in falling in the 2014 cham- pionship game to Carlmont. In a way, it was appropriate Liggett’s career ended with a freshman at the plate. One of the keys to his success has been in integrating the best available players

See SCOTS, Page 14

DOUBLING DOWN: GIANTS TIE S.F. MARK WITH EIGHT DOUBLES TO TAKE SERIES FINALE FROM ROCKIES >>

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Carlmont head coach Jim Liggett, left, steps onto the diamond with assistance from freshman Ashley

Trierweiler following the final game of his 41-year career in the Scots’ 11-6 loss in the CCS title game.

DOUBLING DOWN: GIANTS TIE S.F. MARK WITH EIGHT DOUBLES TO TAKE SERIES FINALE FROM ROCKIES >>

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Half Moon Bay’s Angela Brazil hoists the CCS Division II championship trophy Saturday after the Cougars’ 9-2 win over Notre Dame-Salinas.

HMB claims 2nd all-time softball title

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

SAN JOSE — The Half Moon Bay Cougars have one more fireworks show to look for- ward to. After an explosive display of offense while sweeping through the Central Coast Section Division II softball bracket, the Cougars (24-4) received a deserved honor following Saturday’s 9-2 win over No. 5- seed Notre Dame-Salinas (19-9-1) in the CCS championship game at PAL Stadium. HMB’s first-year head coach Claire Rietmann-Grout said she was informed after the game the Cougars will be the grand mar- shals of the Fourth of July parade in Half Moon Bay. And for a core group that has been playing softball together for over half their lives, the honor is a long time coming. “This is a really special group,” Rietmann-Grout said. “They’ve been play- ing together since they were 7. To inherit talent — they love each other; they work hard — is very cool.” The title marks the second in program

See HMB, Page 12

Champs Knighted

DOUBLING DOWN: GIANTS TIE S.F. MARK WITH EIGHT DOUBLES TO TAKE SERIES FINALE FROM ROCKIES >>

DAVE BOUVIER

The Menlo Knights rush the field at San Jose’s Municipal Stadium after capturing the Central Coast Section Division II championship Saturday with a 9-4 win over top-seed Carmel.

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

SAN JOSE — Menlo School baseball man- ager Ryan Cavan, who won a Central Coast Section title with the Knights as a player in 2004, told his team before Saturday's Division II championship game that if they beat top-seeded Carmel, he was joining the celebratory dog pile. Cavan must really have wanted to relive his youth as he pulled out all the stops to try and help Menlo to its first section title since 2011. He put forth an aggressive game plan and the third-seeded Knights went out and execut- ed it to near perfection in a dominant 9-4 win over the Padres. “There's no tomorrow,” Cavan said of his approach Saturday at Municipal Stadium. “I told them if we won, I'd be there (for the dog pile).” Cavan was super aggressive on the base paths as the Knights swiped seven bases. He also got the running game going when the Knights executed a pair of hit-and-runs. He was having the Knights take bases whenever and wherever they could. Menlo (24-7) scored early and often, stak- ing surprise starting pitcher Chandler Yu to a three-run lead before he threw his first pitch. The Knights continued to add on all game, giving Yu — who was making his second start of the week — some room for error. Not that he needed it. Yu, who pitched five innings and picked up the win in the Knights' 10-7 win over Capuchino in the semifinals, was masterful Saturday. With five innings left

See MENLO, Page 11

Nor Cal’s Rossi pulls off Indy 500 upset

DOUBLING DOWN: GIANTS TIE S.F. MARK WITH EIGHT DOUBLES TO TAKE SERIES FINALE FROM ROCKIES >>

USA TODAY SPORTS

Alexander Rossi shows off the

winners ring at

the 100th

running of the Indy 500.

By Jenna Fryer

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

INDIANAPOLIS — A new era for the Indianapolis 500 arrived in the form of a most unfamiliar driver. An American, no less. Alexander Rossi outlasted his faster rivals — and his fuel tank — for a stunning victory Sunday in the historic 100th running of

“The Greatest Spectacle In

Racing.” The unlikely win allowed the long-suffering Andretti family to celebrate in the biggest race of their storied

careers and it left the top drivers

in the field fuming over Rossi’s

good fortune. Rossi was a 66-to-1 long shot and certainly not the driver any- one would have picked to win. But the 24-year-old Californian used fuel strategy to outsmart a handful of drivers who had the most dominant cars in the race. Rossi stretched his final tank of gas 90 miles to cycle into the lead as others had to duck into the pits for a splash of fuel in the waning laps. He was sputtering on the final lap, working his clutch and getting screamed at by

team co-owner Bryan Herta to conserve fuel, and he ultimately ran out of gas after taking the checkered flag. His victory celebration came only after his Honda was towed to the party. He sat in the car for some time before climbing out to take that sweet sip of milk. “I have no idea how we pulled that off,” he declared. “I really was focused on taking it one lap at a time,” Rossi said. “The emotional roller-coaster of this race is ridiculous. There were

See INDY 500, Page 13

  • 10 Monday May 30, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

10 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL KEVIN JAIRAJ/USA TODAY SPORTS Steph Curry

KEVIN JAIRAJ/USA TODAY SPORTS

Steph Curry is fouled by Thunder center Enes Kanter in Game 6 of the Western finals.

Warriors ready for Game 7 battle

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — After a record 73 wins and a memorable Game 6 comeback on the road, the Golden State Warriors’ goal of getting back to the NBA Finals and defending their title comes down to Game 7 at home against the powerful Oklahoma City Thunder. All along, the Warriors have said the numer- ous team milestones and personal accom- plishments they set during this special sea- son won’t matter a bit unless they repeat as champions. They need one more victory to become the 10th team to rally from a 3-1 postseason deficit. “I’ve learned that our players are tough, they’re mentally tough,” Coach of the Year Steve Kerr said Sunday, when his team took a day off from film and practice. “I don’t know

if I really learned that. I already knew that. But

they’ve firmly confirmed that. It’s been a great comeback. Now we still have to play. We still have another game.”

Game 7: Thunder at Warriors, TNT, 6 p.m.

Kerr just wanted his Warriors to grab back some momentum from Kevin Durant and the Thunder. Now, they have it, all right, heading into the decisive game of the Western Conference finals Monday night after win- ning two straight. When his team won Game 5 on Thursday night, MVP Stephen Curry hollered “We ain’t going home!” — and Golden State wants no part of the Thunder having the last say in the Warriors’ summer plans. “We got a big one last night to stay alive, and now we’ve got some momentum. But it can work in reverse,” Kerr said. “One game changes everything, and we’ve got to come out and play our game and play well to finish the series out.” Golden State hardly considers this a gim- mee just because the team is playing at deaf- ening Oracle Arena, where the Warriors have lost just three times this season. They have had their problems against Durant, Russell Westbrook and the towering Thunder.

Oklahoma City is fueled by trying to reach its first NBA Finals since losing to LeBron James and the Miami Heat in 2012. James and Cleveland are waiting on Monday’s winner. “It’s going to be a hard game. If we thought tonight was hard, Game 7’s going to be even tougher,” Curry said. “Everybody on both sides of the ball is going to leave it all out on the floor. It’s win or go home. So we can’t expect just because we’re at home that we can just show up and win.” As has been the case all playoffs with Curry ailing, Golden State got a huge performance from Klay Thompson. He made a playoff- record 11 3-pointers and scored 41 points in a 108-101 win at Oklahoma City on Saturday night, and will need an encore Monday. “Lot of people probably counted us out,” Thompson said. Kerr said last week that his group might be different than the all the other teams that have

See DUBS, Page 13

10 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL KEVIN JAIRAJ/USA TODAY SPORTS Steph Curry

Long road to Cup Final ends for rebuilt Sharks

By Will Graves

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PITTSBURGH — It wasn’t supposed to take the San Jose Sharks this long to reach their first Stanley Cup Final. A near quarter-century wait to play on the NHL’s biggest stage for the Sharks will finally end Monday night when the puck drops for Game 1 against the Pittsburgh Penguins. The Sharks became one of the NHL’s

most consistent winners shortly after

coming into the league in 1991. Yet spring after spring, optimism would morph into disappointment. The nadir came in 2014, when a 3-0 lead over

Game 1: Sharks at Penguins, NBC, 5 p.m.

Los Angeles in the first round some- how turned into a 4- 3 loss. The collapse
Los Angeles in the
first round some-
how turned into a 4-
3 loss. The collapse
sent the Sharks
into a spiral that
took a full year to
recover from, one
that in some ways
sowed the seeds for
Patrick Marleau

a breakthrough more than two decades in the making. General manager Doug Wilson tweaked the roster around fixtures Patrick Marleau and Joe Thornton,

who remained hopeful San Jose’s win- dow for success hadn’t shut complete- ly even as the postseason meltdowns piled up. “I always believed that next year was going to be the year, I really did,” Thornton said. “I always thought we were a couple pieces away. Even last

year not making the playoffs, I hon-

estly thought we were a couple pi eces away, and here we are.” The Penguins, like the Sharks, are a study in near instant alchemy. General

See SHARKS, Page 13

10 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL KEVIN JAIRAJ/USA TODAY SPORTS Steph Curry
10 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL KEVIN JAIRAJ/USA TODAY SPORTS Steph Curry

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday May 30, 2016

11

Red-hot Butler sparks A’s win over Tigers

By Rick Eymer

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Rich Hill put a little fear into the A’s bullpen when they saw the left-hander walk off the field in the middle of the seventh. Hill says there’s nothing

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • May 30, 2016 11 Red-hot Butler sparks A’s win over

Billy Butler

wrong. Billy Butler delivered a pinch hit, two-run

A’s 4, Tigers 2

single in the sixth and Oakland rallied for a 4-2 victory over the Detroit Tigers Sunday. Hill, who left the game with a slight groin strain, went 6 1/3 innings to win his fifth straight start. Hill (8-3) gave up two runs on five hits, walking three and striking out nine.

A’s manager Bob Melvin said Hill didn’t

want to leave the game, so he made the deci- sion to repl ace him out of caution. Hill said he started feeling it in the fourth

and never went away. He expressed confi-

dence he would make his next start.

“I don’t think it’s anything significant,” he said. Victor Martinez, who had three hits, and James McCann drove in runs for the Tigers, who lost for the second straight day, their first losing streak in two weeks. Mike Pelfrey (0-5) remained winless despite not allowing an earned run. An Ian Kinsler fielding error produced a run and prolonged the inning for Butler.

MENLO

Continued from page 9

to play with — CCS rules allow a pitcher to throw a maximum of 10 innings in a given week — Yu dominated Carmel (22-8), throw- ing just 66 pitches in five innings of work, scattering four hits and giving up a pair of runs. “That (Carmel) offense right there is a much better offense than two runs,” Cavan said. “Yu is an absolute beast. He's our Madison Bumgarner.” Yu — who finished the season with an 11- 2 record — turned the ball over to reliever RJ Babiera for the final two innings with a 9-2 lead. “I wanted to take control of the game, but I didn't have my (best) stuff,” Yu said. “(Scoring those early runs) definitely helped. I knew with a lead early in the game … I didn't have to worry about making the perfect pitch (every time).” With Yu locking down the Padres, the Knights' batting order came out focused and disciplined. When the Carmel starting pitch- er struggled to find the strike zone, the Knights remained patient and took advan- tage when he did make mistakes over the plate. The Knights banged out 12 hits against four Carmel pitchers and also took advantage of two Padres errors.

“All week long we've been working on balls in the strikes zone,” Babiera said, who tormented the Padres from his leadoff spot all game long. “We're looking for that one (pitch) right there. Our eye was insanely

good.”

Babiera set the tone for the game. He was on base in four of his five plate appearances, scored three runs and stole three bases.

But Babiera was hardly alone in having a big day. Senior shortstop Jared Lucian, the Knights' No. 3 hitter, went 3 for 4 with two RBIs and two runs scored. In the No. 2 hole, Rylan Pade drove in a pair of runs with a sec- ond-inning single. David Farnham, the No. 6 hitter, drove in a pair of runs, while Carson Gampell, Griff McGarry and Ben Somorjai had an RBI apiece.

“That was the best game I've played in in my four years,” Lucian said.

It all started with Babiera at the top of the order. His leadoff walk to start the game jump-started a three-run first inning for the Knights. After Babiera stole the first of his three bases, Pade was hit by a pitch to put runners on first and second. Lucian followed and dumped the first of many balls to right field for an RBI single. Gampell followed with an opposite-field sacrifice fly to right. Yu walked and Farnham blooped an oppo- site-field single to right to drive in Lucian.

The Knights added two more in the second. Davis Rich, the No. 9 hitter, drew a leadoff walk and moved to third when the Padres threw away Babiera's grounder to shortstop.

Babiera then stole second to get into scor- ing position and Pade drove them both in with a sharp single to left.

In the third and fourth innings, Menlo scored single runs. In the third, Farnham took a pitch in the head but stayed in the game and came around to score on a Somorjai single to left. The fourth saw Babiera single, then was safe at second when the Carmel second baseman dropped the ball on a force out on a Pade grounder and scored his third run of the game on Lucian's second RBI on the day.

Menlo was finally shut out in the fifth, but came back with a two-spot in the sixth on RBI singles from Farnham and McGarry.

The Knights were retired in order for the

only

time in

the game in the seventh

inning.

Carmel had Yu on the ropes in the bottom of the first, getting runners to second and third with two outs. But Yu got a groundout to end the inning and he settled in after that. In the second inning, a base-running mis- take cost the Padres a chance to get on the board. Yu got through the third and fourth unscathed before Carmel finally broke through in the fifth with a pair of runs. A one-out walk, a groundout and back-to-back singles brought home the first runs of the game for the Padres. They added two more against Babiera in the seventh.

“This is the best team I've ever coached,” Cavan said. “These guys will battle with anyone.”

Giants 8, Rockies 3

S.F. doubles down for win in Denver

By Pat Graham

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER — The Giants were certainly see- ing double. Quite a few of them, too. Hunter Pence had three of a record-tying eight doubles for San Francisco, and the Giants beat the Colorado Rockies 8-3 Sunday. Pence’s double in the eighth helped the

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • May 30, 2016 11 Red-hot Butler sparks A’s win over

Hunter Pence

Giants equal a mark accomplished four times since the team moved to San Francisco after the 1957 season. Denard Span’s solo shot into the second deck for his first homer since April 4. The ball came off his bat

at 102 mph, one of Span’s

harder hits, and would have traveled 441 feet had it landed unimped- ed, according to MLB’s Statcast program. Not bad for playing with a bruised hip, an injury that sidelined him Saturday. Johnny Cueto (8-1) dealt with a sore back that surfaced after the first inning. He kept retreating to the clubhouse to get stretched out and yet turned in a gutty six-inning per- formance in which he allowed two runs — one earned — and six hits. Rockies starter Chris Rusin (1-3) allowed six runs and 11 hits in five innings. Handed a lead after Cueto’s solid perform- ance, the Giants bullpen made it hold up. The only run allowed was a homer by Carlos Gonzalez in the eighth estimated to have gone 456 feet had it landed unimpeded. The day before, San Francisco’s bullpen squan- dered a late lead before the team rallied. Bochy hasn’t said who will start Wednesday after RHP Matt Cain went on the 15-day dis- abled list with a strained right hamstring. The top candidate is righty Albert Suarez.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • May 30, 2016 11 Red-hot Butler sparks A’s win over
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • May 30, 2016 11 Red-hot Butler sparks A’s win over
  • 12 Monday May 30, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

French Open

Rogers into her first Slam QF in Paris

PARIS — When Shelby Rogers finished last season at No. 146, she set a rather mod- est goal for 2016: boosting her ranking enough to gain direct entry into Grand Slam tournaments so she wouldn’t need to go through qualifying rounds. She managed to accomplish that for the French Open — but barely. At No. 108, the 23-year-old American was the last player admitted to the field at the time of the rank- ings cutoff last month. Maybe it’s time to aim higher. By beating a seeded player at Roland Garros for the third time in a week, Rogers reached the first major quarterfinal of her nascent career with a 6-3, 6-4 victory over No. 25 Irina-Camelia Begu of Romania on Sunday. In the last 30 years, only five women ranked lower than Rogers have made it to the quarterfinals at the French Open. She pushed Begu around the court, produc- ing a 9-3 edge in forehand winners while using the same deep, flat groundstrokes that dictated points against her previous oppo- nents, including No. 10 Petra Kvitova, a two-time Wimbledon champion, and No. 17 Karolina Pliskova.

HMB

Continued from page 9

history. The last time the Cougars brought home the coveted CCS trophy was in 1988, a generation before anyone on the 2016 roster was born. In fact, it was the first championship of any kind the Cougars enjoyed this season, after settling for second pl ace in the power-packed Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division, one game behind league-champion Hillsdale. The CCS Division II bracket initially looked ticketed as a showdown finale between PAL Bay Division powerhouses. But No. 1 seeded Hillsdale fell to 15-time CCS champion Notre Dame-Salinas in the semifinals, leaving HMB as the last PAL team standing in the bracket. No. 2 HMB came back in each of its three victories in the CCS playoffs, falling behind NDS 2-0 after one half inning of play Saturday. But the Cougars responded by scor- ing three in the bottom of the inning, then went on to blow the game open with four runs in the second and two more in the third. “We know how to come back,” Rietmann- Grout said. “It’s normal. We knew we had

bats. They were confident. Our energy made the difference too.” Junior first baseman Ally Sarabia was the catalyst in all three of the run-scoring innings. HMB’s No. 3 hitter finished the day

3 for 4 with four RBIs and two runs scored. “When we’re down 2-0, we’re very comfort- able,” Sarabia said. “If anything, I would say it brings us up a little bit b ecause we know we need to get it back. We just bring our bats and bring it out there. We leave it all on the field.” But the at-bat that turned the tide in the first inning was that of senior Olivia Hedding. After the Cougars got on the board on an RBI infield single by Marissa Terra, Hedding came to the plate with the bases loaded and two outs. She quickly fell behind in the count 0-2, but went on to foul off tough pitch after tough pitch. Finally, on the ninth pitch of the at-bat, Hedding got a fastball right down Broadway from NDS starting pitcher Vanessa Gonzalez and lined a two-run single to left field to give the Cougars the lead. “I saw my team was struggling with the out- side pitch and I just decided I was going to hit every outside pitch she threw until I found one I liked,” Hedding said. “And that’s what I did.” After sending nine batters to the plate in the first, HMB saw the first four batters of the sec- ond inning reach base. Abby Donovan opened the frame with a loud triple to center. Then after

Lily Moffitt got hit by a pitch, Sarabia pro- duced a two-run single. Terra and Hedding added RBIs later in the inning to up the lead to 7-2. Sarabia went on to cushion the lead with a two-run triple in the third, scoring Mailiie Bowers and Moffitt. HMB starting pitcher Grace Garcia did the rest, going the distance for her 20th win of the season. During the regular season, Garcia and Sarabia shared pitching duties. In the postseason, however, Garcia threw every pitch of HMB’s three victories. “I think Grace did an amazing job,” Sarabia said. “Me and Grace have pitched side by side for years, since we’ve been about 7-years old. I have complete faith in her. I know she leaves it all on the mound. She loves this game and she works her butt off. So, I knew she had what it takes to do this.” Garcia retired the side in order in the sev- enth on three groundouts, with two sweep scoops at first base by Sarabia. The game’s final out came on a chopper to Brazil at third base, with a throw in the dirt that Sarabia picked clean to incite the celebration in the middle of the diamond. “It was the moment we all built up and have been waiting for,” Brazil said. “I know that [Rietmann-Grout] ran to me first and jumped in. And next thing you know we’re all in the h uddle jumping around. It was just so exciting.”

Accepting New Clients
Accepting New Clients
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first
12 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL French Open Rogers into her first

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday May 30, 2016

13

INDY 500

Continued from page 9

moments I was really stoked, really heartbroken, really stoked. I was like, ‘Wow, I’ll need to see a psychiatrist after this.”’ Rossi didn’t have the speed of Carlos Munoz, who was charging hard over the final 50 miles. But Munoz also had to stop for gas and didn’t have a chance to race his teammate for the victory, even though Rossi was running on fumes and completed the final lap at a snail’s pace of 179.784 mph. The Colombian settled for second in a 1-2 finish for Andretti Autosport. He seemed devastated after his second runner-up finish in four years. Rossi is an IndyCar rookie who has chased a ride in Formula One since he was 10. He left for Europe when he was 16 and never pursued a career in American open-wheel rac- ing. But stuck without a ride this year, he made the decision to return to the United States to race and became the ninth rookie to win the 500 and the first since Helio Castroneves in 2001. Rossi understood full well that it was strategy that got him this win, and he knows what an Indy 500 victory means. “I have no doubt it’s going to change my life,” he said. Although he’s a relief driver for Manor Racing in F1, Rossi has no scheduled F1 races and IndyCar right now is his top commitment. He was lured back to America this year to drive for Herta in a partnership with Andretti Autosport. Herta was the winning car owner in 2011 with Dan Wheldon, the actual 100th anniversary of the first race in 1911, and now can claim a win in the 100th actual race. This Herta effort relied heavily on its alliance with Andretti, and the family was hoping Marco Andretti would give them their first Indy 500 title since patriarch Mario Andretti won in 1969.

Music Lessons for All Ages 25 Professional Teachers making learning fun! Drum oice Since 1946 B

Music Lessons for All Ages

25 Professional Teachers making learning fun!

Drum oice

Since 1946
Since 1946

B ronstein M usic

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco 650-588-2502 bronsteinmusic.com

650-489-9523

DUBS

Continued from page 10

tried to come back from 3-1 down:

because the Warriors won it all last year.

The Thunder certainly would have pre- ferred to close out the series at home over traveling back across the country to the Bay Area for the deciding game.

Yet they never expected it to be easy against the 2015 champs.

“This is what you dream about, get-

ting this opportuni- ty. We’ve got to take advantage of it,” Durant said Sunday. “Go up
ting this opportuni-
ty. We’ve got to
take advantage of
it,” Durant said
Sunday. “Go up into
their building, and
it’s going to be
great atmosphere.
No matter where
you play, you’ve
Kevin Durant

still got to play.” That’s partly b ecause first-year Thunder coach Billy Donovan has talked to his team about the mentality it takes to win in a hostile venue like raucous, sold-out Oracle Arena, and Oklahoma

City came in and did it in Game 1. Curry and the Warriors expect another entertaining, great game. From an ankle injury that sidelined him in the first round against Houston to a sprained right knee and puffy elbow, Curry has dealt with his share of pain this postseason. He has to push that aside for

what he hopes is one more game this

series and then a second straight trip to the Finals and another championship. “I actually kind of like it, b ecause you understand the moment of the playoffs and just kind of gets you going,” he said. “I’ll be ready to go and give it every- thing I’ve got for Game 7.”

SHARKS

Continued from page 10

manager Jim Rutherford rebuilt the team on the fly after taking over in June, 2014 and with the team sleep- walking last December, fired respect-

ed-but-hardly-charismatic Mike Johnston and repl aced him with the decidedly harder-edged Mike Sullivan. The results were nearly instantaneous.

Freed to play to its strengths instead of guarding against its weaknesses, Pittsburgh rocketed through the sec- ond half of the season and showed the resilience it has sometimes lacked dur- ing Crosby’s tenure by rallying from a

3-2 deficit against Tampa Bay in the Eastern Conference finals, dominating Games 6 and 7 to finally earn a shot at bookending the Cup that was supposed to give birth to a dynasty but instead led to years of frustration.

True catharsis for one side is four wins away. Some things to look for over the next two weeks of what prom- ises to be an entertaining final.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • May 30, 2016 13 INDY 500 Continued from page 9
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • May 30, 2016 13 INDY 500 Continued from page 9
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • May 30, 2016 13 INDY 500 Continued from page 9
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • May 30, 2016 13 INDY 500 Continued from page 9
  • 14 Monday May 30, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SCOTS

Continued from page 9

onto his varsity rosters, even if those play- ers were underclassmen. Team captain Jacey Phipps was such a player. A freshman standout in 2013, Phipps went on to a four-year varsity career. And amid the honoring of Liggett this sea- son, somewhat lost in the fanfare was the fact it was the final season of Phipps’ fine varsity career. “It’s been an honor just getting to be a part of his legacy,” Phipps said. “To get him his 1,000th win and just to be able to play for him four years, it’s been such a great experience. And I’m really glad I had the opportunity to. “It’s kind of like pressure to come into such a [prestigious] school. It has such a good name for it for softball and so you know if you make that team, and you make varsity, you have to keep up with them. You have to play up to their ability.” Phipps — set to play Division I softball next season at San Jose State — agreed that she was just a baby when her career started. “I was,” Phipps said. “I was terrified and I did not talk my freshman year. But to get [Liggett] at least one CCS championship … was very meaningful. That was a very emo- tional time.” This year, Carlmont carried just three sen- iors on roster — Phipps, Kelsey Ching and Emily Shipley — while seven players, including four of Saturday’s starters, were underclassmen. “We always look for kids that can play well defensively and mentally not make

14 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL SCOTS Continued from page 9 onto

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Carlmont senior Jacey Phipps runs up to slap a ball to left field Saturday in the final at-bat of her four-year varsity career.

mistakes,” Liggett said. “I think I can see talent … and find a place for them. And not be afraid to play young kids.” The kids came out swing Saturday, but an early 5-1 lead was not enough to hold off mighty San Benito (26-3), which posted a .410 team batting average this season. No. 3 seeded Carlmont (24-5) scored twice in the first inning. Freshman leadoff hitter Ashley Trierweiler opened the game with an infield single and Phipps reached on an infield error. Then Ching doubled home Trierweiler to get the Scots on the board. Mailey McLemore followed with a sacrifice fly to give Carlmont a 2-0 lead.

After San Benito cut the lead in half with a run in the bottom of the first — spurred by an infield error allowing leadoff hitter Brittnee Rossi to reach — the Scots scored three more in the second. Berce worked a one-out walk and moved to third before Trierweiler got hit by a pitch. Then Phipps produced an RBI single, with two runs scor- ing on the play as Trierweiler plated on an error. Ching followed with her second RBI double of the day to make it 5-1.

But the lead would not last as San Benito chipped away with individual runs in the second and third, and went on to score in every inning.

“They’re definitely really good hitters,” Carlmont starting pitcher Abygail Lan said. “I felt like … if I had gotten the outside cor- ner I could have done a lot better. I mean, I was hitting the corner consistently. I just wasn’t getting the calls. But the batters were definitely very good.”

Lan was at odds with the home plate

umpire throughout, but the sophomore showed a different kind of composure by continuing to bounce back when things did- n’t go her way. The Carlmont defense com- mitted four errors behind her.

“I really wanted to just pitch the game,” Lan said. “And I pitched it. And I really wanted to win so I just kept bouncing back. I’m a very greedy person, when it comes down to it, in certain situations.”

After the Haybalers took a 6-5 lead in the fourth, the Scots bounced back to tie it in the top of the fifth on a double steal, with McLemore swiping home. But San Benito knocked Lan out of the game with a two-run rally in the bottom of the frame, with Carlmont turning to freshman right-hander Sanni Karhiaho to finish the game.

The depth of Carlmont’s pitching took a

hit earlier in the season when McLemore, the Scots’ opening-day starting pitcher, injured a quad muscle during a game in March and was unable to pitch for the rest of the year. As a freshman in 2015, McLemore posted a 10-3 record with a 2.22 ERA in part-time duty. After the injury this season, however, the bulk of the pitching fell to Lan. “It was definitely something I didn’t expect going into the season,” McLemore said. “How to deal with it? I tried to con- tribute as much as I could without being able to throw.” As a right fielder, McLemore went 2 for 4 Saturday. Trierweiler, Ching and Berce added two hits api ece. With the emotional loss, the showing of tears of many of the players following the game had as much to do Liggett’s final cur- tain — along with the retirement of long- time assistant coaches Ron Perris (1986- 2016) and Walt McElroy (1990-2016) — as it did the end of the team’s season. “It was a big deal,” McLemore said. “Everybody wanted to go out there and make a statement, show him we could do it. Leave a positive last memory for him out there.” Even in losing, the team did just that. Liggett was assisted to the field by his play- ers for the postgame ceremony, walking with a cane and leaning on Scots Trierweiler and Jamie Madigan, just as four decades of players leaned on the beloved coach time and again. “We of course wanted to get this one,” Phipps said. “But you can’t win them all and we gave it our all.” Yet one more resounding lesson learned

from

the

greatest

softball

coach

in

California history.

 

Godspeed, Ligg.

14 Monday • May 30, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL SCOTS Continued from page 9 onto

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DATEBOOK

Monday May 30, 2016

15

Depp’s ‘Alice’ bombs, ‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ on top with $65M

By Jake Coyle

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Johnny Depp’s “Alice Through the Looking Glass” bombed over the Memorial Day weekend with just $28.1 mil- lion through Sunday in North American theaters, while “X-Men:

Apocalypse” debuted on top with an estimated $65 million. The anticipated showdown of the two big-budget films turned out to be little contest for 20th Century Fox’s latest “X-Men” installment. Both films were lam- basted by critics, and neither drew the audience many expected over the holiday weekend. Disney’s “Alice Through the Looking Glass” had more than bad reviews to deal with. On Friday, as the film was hitting theaters, Amber Heard, Depp’s wife, was

granted a restraining order after

alleging the actor previously

assaulted her. She appeared in Los Angeles Superior Court on Friday with a bruise on her right cheek. Some fans called for a boycott of “Alice Through the Looking Glass.” Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore, said it was difficult to quantify how much the fortunes of Disney’s “Alice Through the Looking Glass” turned Friday afternoon when news of Heard’s allegations spread. “I think the reviews had more to do with the film’s performance than any personal drama for Depp,” Dergarabedian said. Before Heard’s court appearance on Friday, Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland” sequel had been expected to open above $60 mil-

lion. Disney estimates that the film, which cost $170 million to produce, will gross $35.6 million over the four-day weekend. It’s a staggering fall for a sequel that returned Depp — one of Hollywood’s biggest stars, albeit with a recently checkered box- office history — as the Mad Hatter. “Alice in Wonderland,” fea- turing then-novel 3-D, made more than $1 billion worldwide in 2010 after opening with $116 million domestically. “It’s a disappointing result,” said Dave Hollis, distribution chief for Disney. “We have embarked on a branded tent-pole strategy that makes big bets. But when you make big bets, there are times when you have results that are disappointing.” Hollis declined to speculate on the impact the allegations against

Depp had on the film’s opening. It’s a rare blip for Disney, which is already crossing $4 billion in ticket sales in 2016 — a record pace buoyed by hits like “Zootopia,” “The Jungle Book” and “Captain America: Civil War.” The flop of “Ali ce” made “X- Men: Apocalypse” look compara- tively steady. But the seventh “X- Men” installment opened well below the $90.8 million debut of 2014’s “X-Men: Days of Future Past” or the $132.4 million bow of February’s “X-Men” spinoff “Deadpool.” Still, the film, made for $178 million, has already made $185.8 million internationally. Fox had looked to keep expectations in check for the film, directed by Bryan Singer. It stars “X-Men” regulars Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence and others.

Top 10 movies

1.

“X-Men: Apocalypse,” $65 mil-

lion ($55.3 million international).

2.

“Alice Through the Looking

Glass,” $28.1 million ($65 million

international).

3.

“The Angry Birds Movie,” $18.7

million ($31.8 million interna-

 

tional).

4.

“Captain America: Civil War,”

$15.1 million.

5.

“Neighbors: Sorority Rising,”

$9.1 million.

6.

“The Jungle Book,” $7 million

($5.3 million international).

7.

“The Nice Guys,” $6.4 million

($2.8 million international).

8.

“Money Monster,” $4.3 million.

9.

“Love & Friendship,” $2.5 mil-

lion. 10. “Zootopia,” $831,000.

W e’re beginning to see real estate companies’ “For Sale” and “Sale Pending” signs popping up

W e’re beginning to see real estate

companies’ “For Sale” and

“Sale Pending” signs popping

up on properties throughout the

Peninsula. Late spring generally kicks off the busy season for moving, given fami- lies try to time their moves with the school year. If you are planning a move and have pets, you might take these tips into consideration. First, be extra careful the day of your move. Your pet is likely going to be a little freaked out by the car ride and new surroundings (and may even sense something’s up well before your actual moving day). If you have a dog, keep him leashed coming and going from your car to the house; if you have a cat, a secure carrier is a must. And, once you begin loading boxes into your new home, make sure your pet is secure somewhere

inside the house so they don’t sneak out while the door is open. The last thing you want is your pet to go missing in unfamil- iar surroundings. Next, check to see that your new home is pet-proofed inside and out. Check for loose fence boards and gates that are in need of repair. Make sure your pet’s ID tag reflects their new address and your current phone number. Most peo- ple don’t remember this until well after they move. You should find the name, address and phone number of the nearest pet emergency clinic in your area and add it to your phone contacts and put it on your fridge or bulletin board at home. If you and your dog like dog parks, you may

want to visit the parks in your new area first without your dog to check the scene out. And, when you bring your dog for the first time, try to visit during off hours, as an initial trip to a new park at peak hours could be a little much for your dog.

Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer Service, Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach, Field Services, Humane Investigation, Volunteer, and Media/PR program areas and staff.

THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • May 30, 2016 15 Depp’s ‘Alice’ bombs, ‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ on
THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • May 30, 2016 15 Depp’s ‘Alice’ bombs, ‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ on

COYOTE POINT

ARMORY

Monday - Friday: 9:30 am to 6:30 pm

Saturday & Sunday: 9:30 am to 4 pm

Specializing in

new firearms ammo scopes accessories hunting accessories, knives. We also buy and consign firearms.

C OYOTE P OINT ARMORY Monday - Friday: 9:30 am to 6:30 pm Saturday & Sunday:
C OYOTE P OINT ARMORY Monday - Friday: 9:30 am to 6:30 pm Saturday & Sunday:

341 Beach Road, burlingame

650-315-2210

Servicing the Bay Area for 30 years. I’d like to be the resource professional in all
Servicing the Bay Area for 30 years. I’d like to be
the resource professional in all
your real estate needs.
Seniors, you have many options!
How may I help you?
Call or text Ronnie Espiritu at
(650) 235-6965
THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • May 30, 2016 15 Depp’s ‘Alice’ bombs, ‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ on

Ronnie Espiritu

CalBre# 00888265

(650) 235-6965 1116 So. El Camino Real, San Mateo, CA 94402

THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • May 30, 2016 15 Depp’s ‘Alice’ bombs, ‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ on
THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • May 30, 2016 15 Depp’s ‘Alice’ bombs, ‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ on
THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • May 30, 2016 15 Depp’s ‘Alice’ bombs, ‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ on
  • 16 Monday May 30, 2016

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

GREEN

Continued from page 1

sonable burden to builders — incorporating these technologies has become increasing- ly easier as infrastructure like solar panels have decreased in price.

What’s on the roof?

If the new amendments are approved, all new construction would be required to have at least a modicum of solar panels. New single-family homes must install a minimum of a 1-kilowatt solar photovolta- ic system; multi-family buildings with between three and 16 units must have a min- imum 2-kilowatt system; multi-family buildings with 17 or more units must have a minimum 3 kilowatt system. For construction of new non-residential buildings, those less than 10,000 square feet must have at least a 3-kilowatt system and larger structures must include at least a 5-kilowatt system.

While the low kilowatt requirements may not produce a substantial amount of energy, staff noted it could incentivize owners to custom fit their properties with more panels

to maximize the cost effectiveness of the

system. As an alternative, any new construction could skip solar panel installation if they instead provide a solar hot water system that can collect at least 40 square feet, according to the report. Cool roofs, which are lighter in color to reflect sun resulting in less energy needed to cool buildings, are required on all new multi-family and commercial developments with low-sloped roofs. Single-family homes are not included, according to the report.

If you build it, they will park

The city seeks for new commercial and multi-family buildings to support the increasingly popular gas-free vehicles by incorporating electrical grids that could support charging infrastructure, as well as install a higher percentage of stations.

San Mateo’s proposal is to have 10 per- cent of the total parking sp aces EV ready and at least 3 percent of them installed with chargers. This is above the state’s minimum of 3 percent for multi-family and 6 percent for commercial projects, according to the report. Staff noted a large barrier to installing EV chargers in existing developments occurs when adequate electrical capacity isn’t built into the project from the onset. Kleinbaum noted the proposed amend- ments were a follow-up to the adoption of the city’s Climate Action Plan and worked on by consultants as well as the city’s Sustainability Commission. “We did not develop these policies in a vacuum. We worked really closely with the Sustainability Commission,” Kleinbaum said, adding the goals were to develop clear policies that would not have too much of an impact on development. Kleinbaum said staff met with stakehold- ers and several developers, such as Bay Meadows master developer Wilson Meany, that shared concerns about the EV portion of the code. In a letter to the city, Wilson Meany expressed significant support for

sustainability measures, but noted the financial impacts and questioned whether there was an existing market demand for the high number of EV sp aces. They suggested incentivizing, instead of mandating, and noted transit-oriented projects that incor- porate other sustainability measures should be considered. Some of the issues revolved around Pacific Gas and Electric’s policies concern- ing installing oversized equipment for expected, but not yet used, energy capacity — EV readiness but not actual installation. Kleinbaum said the city is continuing to work with PG&E, and noted the new state requirement could also have an effect. Prior to anything becoming a require- ment, the California Energy Commission has a 60-day public comment period after which it will issue a ruling on San Mateo’s proposed amendments. If approved, the ordinance could go into effect Jan. 1, 2017. Councilman Rick Bonilla, a strong pro- ponent of sustainable building design, said “I support everything we can do to make the housing of the future in San Mateo as effi- cient as possible.”

SQUARE

Continued from page 1

existing facilities to capacity with students. The San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District is one of the few along the Peninsula experienc- ing enrollment growth, according to a recent demographer’s report which found the escalating cost of living throughout San Mateo County has caused many families to pull their chil- dren from school in favor of relocating to a more affordable area. San Mateo, Foster City, Belmont and San Carlos are among the only cities locally where student enroll- ment is increasing, according to demographer Tom Williams, though growth rates are less rapid than they have been in the past. Interest in purchasing Charter Square was included in the district’s campaign to pass Measure X, the $148 million bond approved by voters in the fall election to build new class- rooms and school facilities. Weeks prior to Election Day, school

officials announced they had engaged in an exclusive negotiating agreement with Westlake Realty regarding talks to acquire the site.

Assistant Superintendent Molly

Barton said at the time the exclusive discussions marked the most progress the district had made toward purchas- ing the site, and expressed cautious optimism regarding the opportunity to finalize a sale. District officials have pursued buy- ing the shopping center for years, spanning back to the campaign for Measure P in 2013, when voters shot down the initial bond measure designed to paid toward addressing campus overcrowding. Amidst the pursuit of Measure P, Tong had expressed a disinterest in selling the shopping center to the school district but, in the years since, his position has changed. He said he currently remains open to the opportunity to sell the site to the district, citing the need to address the cramped classrooms and campuses. “It addresses a needed scenario by the district in the long run,” he said. “It is beneficial to the community to enhance the district and address over- crowding. It is long-term planning. In

my mind it is a fitting use.” Tong declined to comment regarding the potential acquisition price of the property. Should the district ultimately be unsuccessful in the quest to purchase the site, officials have said they would use the Measure X money to build addi- tional classrooms on existing Foster City campuses. Despite the willingness to consider selling the shopping center, in the absence of a deal guaranteeing exclu- sive negotiations, Tong said the prop- erty will remain on the market and is subject to the focus of talks with other interested buyers as well. “As owners, we always keep that option open,” Tong said, of the poten- tial to sell the site to a buyer other than the district. Tong admitted, in his opinion, the ideal use for the site would to be to build housing, but acknowledged that may not be a likely outcome. “Residential is the highest and best use. It is right in the middle of a resi- dential area,” he said. “But sometimes it is not always the highest and best use, sometimes it is the most likely and most probable use that dictates the direction.”

ART

Continued from page 1

tos. Campbell was very proud of the work his students produced and that they got to be part of such a project. “I got here a little early so as they [the students] showed up, I got to see

them be excited trying to find their photos among the others and pointing it out to their family,” Campbell said. One of the young photographers,

Sequoia High School junior Jacob

Pederson, was surprised to see not one but six of his photos chosen to be a part of the project. “I really like the way they displayed it,” Pederson said. “It really helps beautify the construction site with the

use of art and including the schools was a nice touch.” The art project will remain up until the end of the construction of the new building downtown. “For the students to have their art- work up for over a year around town is just a once in a lifetime opportunity,” Campbell said. The art project can be found at 815 Hamilton St., Redwood City.

Monday • May 30, 2016 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL GREEN Continued from page 1 sonable
Monday • May 30, 2016 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL GREEN Continued from page 1 sonable

Calendar

MONDAY, MAY 30

Memorial Day Tribute. 11 a.m. State Route 92 and Skyline Blvd. 5070, San Mateo. Come to pay tribute to the men and women who served and sacrificed for our country. For more information call 437-1977.

Heroes Forever. 11 a.m. 1300 Sneath Lane, San Bruno. Honor our fallen heroes and observe Memorial Day with Golden Gate National Cemetery. For more information call 355-5533.

20th Annual Memorial Day Service.

1 p.m. Cypress Lawn Cemetery, 1370 El Camino Real, Colma. An annual event to salute those fallen heroes who sacrificed their life defending our freedom. For more information email speterson@cypresslawn.com.

TUESDAY, MAY 31 Menlo Park Kiwanis Club Speaker.

Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor Road, Menlo Park. Marc Berman serves as the development director for the Silicon Valley Education Foundation. He will discuss ‘Challenges Facing the California Legislature’ and will field questions about issues confronting Palo Alto and the district he hopes to represent. For more information, visit menloparkkiwanisclub.org.

Teen Study Night. 2:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For more information email belmont@smcl.org.

Healthy Food, Healthy You. 6 p.m. 840 W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco. This is a five-part series on healthy eating. Each class will focus on a different aspect of choosing or preparing foods that are affordable, fresh, and delicious. For more infor- mation email valle@plsinfo.org.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1 Downtown San Mateo Tween

Scavenger Hunt. 10 a.m. San Mateo Public Library, 55 West 3rd Ave., San Mateo. Tweens can pick up their Downtown San Mateo Scavenger Hunt packet. For more information, contact aday@cityofsanmateo.org.

ESL Conversation Club. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Drop into this relaxed setting to practice speaking and reading English. For more infor- mation email belmont@smcl.org.

Asian Senior Club. 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Martin Luther King Center, 725 Monte Diablo Ave., San Mateo. Light refreshments served. Caregivers for members also welcome. $20 annual membership. For more infor- mation call 522-7470.

LGBTQ History Month: Transgender

Awareness. 6 p.m. South San Francisco Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco. In celebra- tion of LGBTQ Pride Month, learn more about what it means to identify as transgender, and how to be a good ally. A transgender identified librarian will be present to answers questions and provide referrals. For more infor- mation email valle@plsinfo.org.

MyLiberty San Mateo Meeting. 6:30 p.m. 1304 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Carlos. In preparation for the June 7 elections we need to get the word out supporting the conservatives running for office. For more informa-

tion

email

mylibertysanmateo@gmail.com.

Finding Your Why Business Vision. 6:30

-

Building

a

p.m.

1044

Middlefield Road, Redwood City. For

more information, contact rkutler@redwoodcity.org.

24th Assembly District Candidates

Forum on Education. 6:30 p.m. St. Francis of Assisi Church, 1425 Bay Road, East Palo Alto. Free, open to the public, non-partisan. Text VOTE to 209-6143 to get an event reminder. For more information email info@innovateschools.org.

Mind & Meditation. 7 p.m. Burlingame Library, 480 Primrose Road, Burlingame. For more informa- tion email rider@plsinfo.org.

Movies

on

the Square. 8:45 p.m.

Computer Class: Facebook. 10:30

2200

Broadway,

Redwood

City.

a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For more infor- mation email belmont@smcl.org.

Experience Redwood City’s high defi- nition surround sound 25-foot out- door theater. Movies are shown in

Teen Gaming. 3:30 p.m. Belmont

high definition Blu-Ray and Surround Sound when available. For more infor-

Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,

mation

go

to

Belmont. For more information email belmont@smcl.org.

redwoodcity.org/movies.

Synthetic Turf Alternatives Discussion. 6:30 p.m. 620 Foster City

FRIDAY, JUNE 3 Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center’s 2nd Annual Passion to

Blvd., Foster City. PhD David Teter will present about synthetic turf alterna- tives. For more information call 286-

Profit. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 350 Twin Dolphin Drive, Redwood City. $25. Lunch and refreshments provided.

3395.

For more information or to register visit rencenter.org or call 321-2193

Needles and Hooks: Knitting and

ext. 1103.

 

Crocheting Club. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Knit, socialize and share techniques with others. Welcoming knitters of all skills. For more information email belmont@smcl.org.

Coloring and Coffee for Adults. 10 a.m. to noon. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Color a page or two and enjoy some refreshments and conversation. Coloring sheets and colored pencils

Free First Friday. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Peninsula Clean Energy Program Workshop. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,

will be provided. For more informa- tion email belmont@smcl.org.

Millbrae. Learn about energy options

2200

Broadway, Redwood City.

with higher renewable content at

Admission is free to the San Mateo

competitive rates for residential and

County History Museum.

 

commercial customers. Free. For more information, visit peninsulacleanen-

Music on the Square. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

ergy.com.

2200

Broadway, Redwood City. Free

live concerts each week. For more

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

information

go

to

Mobile Spay/Neuter Clinic. 8 a.m. to

redwoodcity.org/musiconthesquare.

9 a.m. 1150 El Camino Real, San Bruno. Pet owners with limited financial means can bring their pets and help eliminate the possibility of accidental litters. For more information call 340-

Creative Arts Workshop. 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. For more information email patt@bondmarcom.com.

7022.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

COMICS/GAMES

Monday • May 30, 2016

17

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL COMICS/GAMES Monday • May 30, 2016 HOLY MOLE® PEARLS BEFORE SWINE® GET FUZZY®

HOLY MOLE®

THE DAILY JOURNAL COMICS/GAMES Monday • May 30, 2016 HOLY MOLE® PEARLS BEFORE SWINE® GET FUZZY®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

THE DAILY JOURNAL COMICS/GAMES Monday • May 30, 2016 HOLY MOLE® PEARLS BEFORE SWINE® GET FUZZY®

GET FUZZY®

THE DAILY JOURNAL COMICS/GAMES Monday • May 30, 2016 HOLY MOLE® PEARLS BEFORE SWINE® GET FUZZY®

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ACROSS 43 Categorizes 22 Two, in Baja 1 Leafy algae 46 Helium or hydrogen 23 Nightfall
ACROSS
43
Categorizes
22
Two, in Baja
1
Leafy algae
46
Helium or hydrogen
23
Nightfall
5
Grocery buy
47
Spiral molecule
24
Pinch off
9
Subzero comment
50
Rumor, perhaps
25
It’s — move!
12
Hound’s track
51
Cheeped
26
Grease job
13
Mouse catcher
54
Pacino and Unser
27
Slant
14
IV x XIII
55
Mezzanine
28
Days before
15
Secret place (hyph.)
56
Famous hotelier
29
Fissure
17
Ballpark fi g
57
Denver hrs.
31
Oz canine
18
Robert E. —
58
Calendar span
33
— — standstill
19
Swell, in space (hyph.)
59
Basilica area
36
Fleur-de- —
20
From Oslo
38
Oz. or lb.
22
Rx givers
DOWN
39
High-priced
23
Banned bug spray
1
Eye shadow
40
Waistcoat
24
Drip-dry fabric
2
Actress McClurg
42
Delayer’s motto
27
Keaton or Crabbe
3
Pay dirt
43
Smash
30
Chits
4
Game or season opener
44
Paintings
31
Frank McCourt memoir
5
Social mores
45
Pause
32
Travel word
6
Empathize with
46
Billion, in combos
34
Dartboard locale
7
Pump abbr.
47
Trickle
35
Acorn bearer
8
Shells out
48
Ensnares
36
Took off
9
Smudge
49
Woodworking tool
37
Shows surprise
10
Tire supports
52
— is me!
40
Panoramic view
11
Mellow
53
Geologic division
41
Cattle call
16
Sea dog’s tale
42
Brown of renown
21
Hall-of-Famer Mel —
THE DAILY JOURNAL COMICS/GAMES Monday • May 30, 2016 HOLY MOLE® PEARLS BEFORE SWINE® GET FUZZY®
THE DAILY JOURNAL COMICS/GAMES Monday • May 30, 2016 HOLY MOLE® PEARLS BEFORE SWINE® GET FUZZY®
● Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 6 without repeating. ●
Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
● The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
5-30-16
KenKen ® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2016 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

WEEKEND’S PUZZLE SOLVED

THE DAILY JOURNAL COMICS/GAMES Monday • May 30, 2016 HOLY MOLE® PEARLS BEFORE SWINE® GET FUZZY®

5-30-16

Want More Fun

and Games?

Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifi eds

Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifi eds

Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

being put in a vulnerable position. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Adjust your resume to suit the current job market. A business opportunity will have negatives and positives attached to it. Don’t settle for anything less than fair. Romance is highlighted. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Keep your intentions a secret. Use the information you gather from colleagues to your advantage in order to profi t from an unusual opportunity.

COPYRIGHT 2016 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL COMICS/GAMES Monday • May 30, 2016 HOLY MOLE® PEARLS BEFORE SWINE® GET FUZZY®
PREVIOUS SUDOKU ANSWERS
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS

MONDAY, MAY 30, 2016

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Problems will arise if you donate too freely to individuals, organizations or causes. You are best off taking care of yourself, your family and your fi nancial future. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Share your ideas and feelings, and make unusual changes to the way you live or make your money. Don’t be afraid to do things differently. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Put a little adventure in your life. A change to your status or position will inspire you to try something new. Discipline will help you fend off bad infl uences.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Don’t expect things to go according to plan. If you are ready for the unexpected, you will be able to deal with life’s slings and arrows quickly and effi ciently. Don’t let love lead you to make bad choices. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You are either a doer or a spectator. Make up your mind instead of sitting on the fence. Don’t wait for someone else to take charge. Make a difference by making a move. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Personal matters will take an unusual but benefi cial turn that will allow you the freedom to live the way you want. An emotional matter can be put to rest. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Use your emotional energy to make adjustments to the way

or where you live. A change at home will prompt you to strive for more independence. Don’t let friends limit or pressure you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Observe other people’s mistakes and learn from them. Protect your home, assets and possessions. Walk away from unstable people and products that promise the impossible. Use brainpower to advance. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Someone from your past will offer you sound advice. Your heart will tell you one thing, but your head something else. Concentrate on personal improvement, home and family. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Being attentive will pay off and keep you out of trouble. Show an interest and listen to complaints. What you learn will help you avoid

18

Monday May 30, 2016

THEDAILY JOURNAL

Monday • May 30, 2016 THEDAILY JOURNAL 104 Training TERMS & CONDITIONS The San Mateo Daily
104 Training
104 Training

TERMS & CONDITIONS

The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi- fieds will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, and its lia- bility shall be limited to the price of one insertion. No allowance will be made for errors not materially affecting the value of the ad. All error claims must be sub- mitted within 30 days. For full advertis- ing conditions, please ask for a Rate Card.

110 Employment
110 Employment

DUMP TRUCK DRIVER, SM, good pay, benefits. Must have a Class A License. (650)343-5946 M-F, 8-5.

WINDY CITY PIZZA

seeks Bus Person, Counter Person, and Salad Maker. Will train. Competi- tive Pay. Flexible hours. Apply in per- son 35 Bovet Rd, San Mateo (Borel Square Center, El Camino, 1 block north of Hwy 92.)

AMERICA'S BEST VALUE INN & SUITES

Housekeeping Positions Open

Located at 3020 N. Cabrillo Hwy, Half Moon Bay

Now hiring for housekeeping ASAP Starting at $11.00

Please stop by or call Suni 650-726-9700 / 650-560-9323

GOT JOBS?

The best career seekers read the Daily Journal.

We will help you recruit qualified, talented individuals to join your company or organization.

The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide range of qualifications for all types of positions.

For the best value and the best results, recruit from the Daily Journal ...

Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

2 years experience required.

Immediate placement

on all assignments.

Call

(650)777-9000

110 Employment

CRYSTAL CLEANING CENTER San Mateo, CA

• Customer Service

Are you…

Dependable,

friendly,

Do you have….Good communi- cation skills, a desire for steady employment and employment benefits?

Please call for an

 

Appointment: 650-342-6978

Monday • May 30, 2016 THEDAILY JOURNAL 104 Training TERMS & CONDITIONS The San Mateo Daily

DRIVERS

WANTED

San Mateo Daily Journal

Newspaper Delivery Routes to businesses and newsracks, and some apartment buildings. (No residential houses.)

Early mornings, six days per week, Monday through Saturday. 2 to 4 hour routes. Must have own vehicle, valid license and insurance.

Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m.

Pay dependent on route size.

Call 650-344-5200 or email resume to info@smdailyjournal.com

110 Employment

HIRING NOW

for Caregivers!

Newly opening RCFE in

San Mateo. Full time and part time shifts and schedules available.

Send resume to:

kimochikai@kimochi-inc.org

HOME CARE AIDES

Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great

pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp required. Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273, (408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED

Up to $15 per hour. Company Car.

Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788. 1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.

Monday • May 30, 2016 THEDAILY JOURNAL 104 Training TERMS & CONDITIONS The San Mateo Daily
Monday • May 30, 2016 THEDAILY JOURNAL 104 Training TERMS & CONDITIONS The San Mateo Daily
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
 

Exciting Opportunities at

 
 
Exciting Opportunities at Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply. Candy Maker
 
 

Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply.

 

Candy Maker Training Program

 

Wrap Machine Operator

 

 

 

Requirements for all positions include:

 

 

 

Both are Union positions. If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at (650)827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE

 

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons, Notice of Public Sales and More.

Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290 Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

Monday • May 30, 2016 THEDAILY JOURNAL 104 Training TERMS & CONDITIONS The San Mateo Daily

110 Employment

LOOKING FOR REWARDING SUMMER JOB?

Weekend/Evening

Caregivers

Guaranteed hours Paid Training provided

Sign on

bonus $100

Driving

required

Call…ASAP! Ask for Carol

650-458-2200

Homebridge

NEWSPAPER INTERNS JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for

in-

terns to do entry level reporting, re- search, updates of our ongoing fea-

tures and interviews. Photo interns al- so welcome.

We expect a commitment of four to eight hours a week for at least four months. The internship is unpaid, but intelligent, aggressive and talented in- terns have progressed in time into paid correspondents and full-time re- porters.

College students or recent graduates are encouraged to apply. Newspaper experience is preferred but not neces- sarily required.

Please send a cover letter describing your interest in newspapers, a resume and three recent clips. Before you ap- ply, you should familiarize yourself with our publication. Our Web site:

www.smdailyjournal.com.

Send your information via e-mail to news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg- ular mail to 1900 Alameda de las Pul- gas #112, San Mateo CA 94403

RETAIL -

JEWELRY SALES + DIAMOND SALES + STORE MANAGER

Entry up to $13. Diamond Exp up to $20 Mgr. $DOE$ (Please include salary history) Benefits-Bonus-No Nights

650-367-6500

FX: 367-6400

jobs@jewelryexchange.com

SALES - Telemarketing and Inside Sales Representative needed to sell newspa- per print and web advertising and event marketing solutions. To apply, pleasecall 650-344-5200 and send resume to info@smdailyjournal.com

SALES/MARKETING

INTERNSHIPS

The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking for ambitious interns who are eager to jump into the business arena with both feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs of the newspaper and media industries. This position will provide valuable experience for your bright future. Email resume info@smdailyjournal.com

SAN CARLOS

RESTAURANT

AM Dishwasher Required, Tuesdays, Saturdays, Sundays. Contact Chef (650) 592-7258 or (541) 848-0038

SOFTWARE DEVELOPER. San Mateo,

CA. MS in CS, CE or rltd + 3 mon exp in

job

offered

or

rltd.

Remotium,

Inc., hr@remotium.com

 
THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -

THEDAILY JOURNAL

THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -

19

Monday May 30, 2016

110 Employment
110 Employment

STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT - EXC. BENEFITS

AA/EOE/ADA/EEOC/TITLE IX

EMPLOYER

*BACKGROUND CHECK

REQUIRED*

Student Union Events Coordinator:

$3,000-$4,300

Operating Systems Analyst:

$3,500-$4,950

Event Services Assistant Manager:

$3,500-$4,800

Student Union Facilities Maintenance

Engineer: $4,500-$6,250

www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/.

203 Public Notices
203 Public Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The South San Francisco

Unified School District will

hold two separate public

hearings on the proposed

Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) and the pro-

posed budget for fiscal year

2016-17 on Thursday, June

9, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at the

City of South San Francisco

Municipal Building located

at 33 Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco, California. A copy of the LCAP and the proposed budget will be available for public exami- nation at the South San Francisco Unified School District Office, 398 B Street, South San Francisco, Cali- fornia from June 6, 2016 through June 9, 2016 be- tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Any stakeholder affected by the LCAP or the South San Francisco Unified School District budget may appear before the South San Fran- cisco Unified School District Board of Trustees and speak to the LCAP or the proposed budget or any item therein.

5/30/16

CNS-2883156#

SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL

CENTRAL COUNTY FIRE

DEPARTMENT

SUMMARY OF

PROPOSED RESOLU-

TION OF

THE CENTRAL COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT AMENDING FEES FOR

THE PROVISION OF

FIRE SERVICES

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIV-

EN that the Board of Direc-

tors of the Central County

Fire Department will consid- er adoption of a proposed

resolution on Thursday,

June 9, 2016 at a public

meeting at 3:00 p.m. in the Town Hall Council Cham-

bers at 1600 Floribunda

Avenue, Hillsborough, CA, that would amend rates and fees for the provision of fire services. The Board of Di- rectors will receive testimo- ny on the proposed resolu- tion from all interested per- sons who appear at the Board of Directors' meeting. To receive additional infor- mation about the proposed resolution and a complete

copy of the resolution, or to provide written comments, interested persons may contact the Fire Board Sec- retary at 1399 Rollins Road, Burlingame, CA 94010, tel- ephone 650-558-7600. A complete copy of the reso- lution is available for review at the Burlingame City Li- brary, 480 Primrose Road, Burlingame, CA. 5/26, 5/30/16

CNS-2885758#

SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL

210 Lost & Found
210 Lost & Found

FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safe-

way

Millbrae

11/10/14

call

Matt,

(415)378-3634

 

FOUND: RING Silver color ring found on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed. Gary @ (650)347-2301

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand, clip lights, and music in black bags were taken from my car in Foster City and may have been thrown out by disappointed thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost 12/18. Broadway, Redwood City. REWARD! (650)339-2410

LOST CAT

Our

Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,

she

has

a

white nose, mouth, chin, all

four

legs,

chest stomach, around her

neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice

REWARD.

Please

email

us

at

joandbill@msn.com

or

call

650-576-

8745. She drinks water out of her paws.

LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot. Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
Tundra
Tundra
Tundra
Over the Hedge
Over the Hedge
Over the Hedge
Books 295 Art 296 Appliances JACK REACHER adventure novels by lee child great read entire collection.
Books
295 Art
296 Appliances
JACK REACHER adventure novels by
lee child great read entire collection. $40
obo (650)591-6842
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Sign-
ed
Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895
TOASTER OVEN, Black & Decker, 4-
Slice, 1200W, Toast, Bake, Broil;
TRO480BS - $12 (650) 952-3500
NICHOLAS SPARKS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861
296 Appliances
UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleaner, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco
QUALITY BOOKS used and rare. World
& US History and classic American nov-
els. $5 each obo (650)345-5502
AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/re-
mote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)235-
297 Bicycles
2 BIKES for kids $60. Will email pictures
0898
upon request (650) 537-1095
STEPHEN KING Hardback Books
  • 2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

294 Baby Stuff
294 Baby Stuff

CHILD CRAFT convertible Crib/ Toddler

Bed. Dark wood, very good condition,

$99/offer 650-218-4254

 

FISHER-PRICE HEALTHY Care booster

seat - $5 (650)592-5864.

 

GRACO DOUBLE Stroll $90 My Cell 650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

SIT AND Stand Stroll $95 My Cell 650- 537-1095. Will email pictures upon re- quest.

 

AWARD

WINNING

Painting

$99.

(415)867-6444

BLACK & Decker Car Vac, Gd. Condi- tion $8 650-952-3500

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand

new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable

temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

CIRRUS STEAM mop model SM212B 4

new extra cleaning pads,user manual. $45. 650-5885487

ELEGANT ELECTRIC Fireplace on

wheels in white casing can see flames, like new. $99 (650)771-6324

JACK LALANNE juicer $25 or best offer.

650-593-0893.

PASTA MAKER, brand New From Italy $40 (650)360-8960

RIVAL

11/2

quart

ice

cream

maker

(New) $20.(650)756-9516.

 

SHARK FLOOR steamer,exc condition $45 (650) 756-9516.

ADULT BIKES 1 regular and 2 with bal-

loon tires $30 Each (650) 347-2356

MAGNA-GLACIERPOINT 26" 15 speed. Hardly used . Bluish purple color .$ 59.00

San Mateo 650-255-3514.

298 Collectibles
298 Collectibles

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple

antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

CIGAR BANDS,

(415)867-6444

100 years

old

$99

FROM TV series Vegas, 57T-Bird model

kit, unopened, $10,650-591-9769 San Carlos

THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -
THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -
THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -
THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -
THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -
THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -
THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -
THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -
THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -

HOTEL -

MULTIPLE POSITIONS AVAILABLE

CitiGarden Hotel is now hiring in all departments, starting between $11 - $14 per hour.

Please apply in person, at the front desk:

HOTEL - MULTIPLE POSITIONS AVAILABLE CitiGarden Hotel is now hiring in all departments, starting between $11

245 S. Airport Blvd, South San Francisco

THEDAILY JOURNAL 19 Monday • May 30, 2016 110 Employment STUDENT UNION OF SJSU FT -

20

Monday May 30, 2016

THEDAILY JOURNAL

298 Collectibles
298 Collectibles

GEOFFREY BEENE Jacket, unused, un- worn, tags , pink, small, sleeveless, zip- pers, paid $88, $15, (650) 578-9208

298 Collectibles
298 Collectibles

STAR Wars Hong Kong exclusive, mint Pote Snitkin 4” green card action figure. $20 650-518-6614

300 Toys
300 Toys
302 Antiques
302 Antiques

3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral staircase and elevator. $60. (650)558-

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian Side Sewing Table, All original. Rose-

  • 8142 wood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDI-

TION! $350. (650)815-8999.

303 Electronics
303 Electronics

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready, Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

304 Furniture
304 Furniture

BROWN WOODEN bookshelf H 3'4"X W 3'6"X D 10" with 3 shelves $25.00 call

650-592-2648

LENNOX RED Rose, Unused, hand painted, porcelain, authenticity papers, $12.00. (650) 578 9208.

MILLER LITE Neon sign , work good $59 call 650-218-6528

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four rare memorabilia items, casino key, two coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

SANDY SCOTT Etching. Artists proof. "Opening Day at Cattail Marsh". Retriev- er holding pheasant. $99. 650-654-9252.

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.

(650)701-0276

STAR WARS C-3PO mint pair, green tint (Japan), gold (U.S.) 4” action figures. $89 650-518-6614

STAR WARS Lando Calrissian 4” or- ange card action figure, autographed by Billy Dee Williams. $50 Steve 650-518-

6614

THE

SAN

Francisco

Call

newspaper,11/25/1924

full

edition,

$15,650-591-9769 San Carlos

299 Computers
299 Computers

MONITOR FOR computer. Kogi - 15". Model L5QX. $25. (650)592-5864.

VIEW SONIC Monitor, 17 inch Good Condition $25.00 650-218-4254

Monday • May 30, 2016 THEDAILY JOURNAL 298 Collectibles GEOFFREY BEENE Jacket, unused, un- worn, tags

AMERICAN GIRL 18” doll, “Jessica”,

blond/blue. new in box, $65 (505)-228-

  • 1480 local.

STAR WARS – one 4” orange card ac- tion figure, Momaw Nadon (Hammer- head). $8 Steve 650-518-6614

STAR WARS – one 4” orange card ac- tion figure, Luke Skywalker (Ceremoni- al) $10 Steve 650-518-6614

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper

Commander $29 OBO Dan, 650-303-3568 lv msg

302 Antiques
302 Antiques

ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70

(650)387-4002

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Belmont-Redwood Shores School District Cipriani and Sandpiper Schools: Modular Work

  • 1. Notice is hereby given that the Board of Education of the Belmont-Redwood Shores School District

(“BRSSD”), will receive sealed bids for 2-STORY MODULAR BUILDING WORK at Cipriani Elementary and Sandpiper Elementary schools, at the Belmont-Redwood Shores District Office, 2960 Hallmark Drive, Bel- mont, CA, 94002, until 2:00 PM. on June 7, 2016, at which time such proposals will be opened and publicly read aloud.

  • 2. Blach Construction has been hired by the Belmont-Redwood School District as the Construction Manager to

manage Measure I Projects and applicable Facilities Projects. Blach Construction will prequalify contractors and manage the bid process(es) on behalf of BRSSD. For the purpose of pre-qualification, Pre-Qualification Questionnaires for Measure I Projects and applicable Facilities Projects will be received by Blach Construction on behalf of the Belmont-Redwood Shores School District. To receive questionnaire forms, please contact Rey Flores, Blach Construction, email: rey.flores@blach.com, telephone: (408) 869-8391. In order to bid on this project, the bidder must be prequalified with the District. The District will accept completed Pre- Qualification Questionnaire’s with the bid, but should all requirements not be met, the District reserves the right to disqualify the bidder. Note that the prequalification process does not constitute an agreement, nor is it an obligation to enter any agreements.

  • 3. Each bid shall conform to the requirements of the Bidding Documents, which will be available for download-

ing online at Blach Construction’s Building Connected Site. A link to Building Connected will be provided upon

request. Inquiries for bidding information are to be directed at Rey Flores, Blach Construction, email:

rey.flores@blach.com, telephone: (408) 869-8391.

  • 4. Bidders shall be appropriately licensed at the time of the bid submittal and the duration of the project with

the appropriate license for the scope of work described as required under Public Contract Code section 3300 and the California Business and Professions Code, for work covered in this proposal; this includes a joint ven- ture formed to submit a proposal.

Licenses required for the current project are:

Modular Builder

B license required

Licenses required for work on subsequent projects are:

Asbestos & Selective Demolition Cabinet and Millwork Carpet & Resilient Flooring Concrete Doors and Hardware Drywall Electrical Fencing Fire Protection General Trades Glass & Glazing Paving & Grading HVAC Insulation & Acoustical Landscape Lath & Plaster Low Voltage Systems Masonry Painting Plumbing Roofing Sheetmetal Signage Site Utilities Tile Window Treatments

B or C21, with ASB license required C6 license required C15 license required C8 license required C28 license required C9 license required C10 license required C13 license required C16 license required B license required (must self-perform carpentry) C17 license required A or C12 license required C20 license required C2 license required C27 license required C35 license required C7 license required C29 license required C33 license required C36 license required C39 license required C43 license required C45 & D42 license required A or C34 and C42 license required C54 license required C-61 and D52 license required

  • 5. For all bids of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000) or more, bids shall only be considered if made on a form

provided by Blach Construction and accompanied with a cashier’s check or bid bond for ten percent (10%) of the total aggregate amount of the bid, including any additive alternates, made payable to BRSSD. The above- mentioned check or bid bond shall be given as a guarantee that the Bidder shall, if selected by BRSSD, exe- cute the contract, in conformity with the Bidding Documents.

  • 6. Within ten (10) calendar days after notification of BRSSD’s intent to award the Contract, the successful bid-

der shall be required to furnish a payment and performance bond, and a labor and materials bond in an amount equal to 100% of the contract price, when said price is $30,000.00 or greater. Said bonds shall be se- cured from a surety company satisfactory to BRSSD.

  • 7. In accordance with the provisions of Sections 1770 and 1773 of the Labor Code, the Director of the Depart-

ment of Industrial Relations has determined the general prevailing rate of wages applicable to the work to be done. Pursuant to California law, the successful bidder will be required to pay the prevailing wage rates in ef- fect on the date this Notice to Bidders was first published. These rates are set forth in a schedule on file with the State Department of Industrial Relations and can also be found at: http://www.dir.ca.gov/DLSR/PWD. At- tention is directed to the provisions of Sections 1777.5 and 1777.6 of the Labor Code of the State of California concerning employment of apprentices by the contractor or a subcontractor. Each prime contractor and all subcontractors are responsible for compliance with the requirements of Sections 1777.5 and 1777.6.

Please note the following new requirements for registration with the Department of Industrial Rela- tions. Registration is mandatory for all bidders:

• No contractor or subcontractor may be listed on a bid proposal for a public works project unless regis- tered with the Department of Industrial Relations pursuant to Labor Code section 1725.5 [with limited exceptions from this requirement for bid purposes only under Labor Code section 1771.1(a)]. • No contractor or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations pursuant to Labor Code section 1725.5. • This project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Re- lations.

  • 8. In accordance with Public Contract Code section 22300, substitution of eligible and equivalent securities in

lieu of moneys withheld to ensure performance of the contract will be permitted at the request and expense of

the awarded contractor.

  • 9. The Belmont-Redwood Shores School District seeks to ensure that its contractors and their workers reflect

the diversity of San Mateo County. Toward this goal, the District invites and encourages prequalification appli-

cations from firms that are owned by disadvantaged minorities and women and those firms whose workforce reflects a value on hiring disadvantaged minorities and women

10. The Governing Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids and any or all items or alternates or propo- sitions of such bids, to waive any informality in such bids and to award the contract in the best interest of BRSSD. If the bids are found acceptable to the District, the low bidder will be determined on the basis of the lowest combination of base bid and all alternates listed in the bid documents. This combination will be used for determination of low bidder only. This does not preclude the District from selecting any, all or none of the alternates to include in the contract award after the lowest responsible bidder has been determined. If there are no alternates indicated for the project, the District shall select the low responsible bidder, if it awards the project at all, based on the base bid.

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,

72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-

elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65

(650)591-3313

STORE FRONT display cabinet, From 1930, marble base. 72” long x 40” tallx

21” deep. Asking $500. (650)341-1306

VANITY, ANTIQUE 100 years old 19"x36" Mahogany $200 (650)360-8960

303 Electronics
303 Electronics

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great

condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

AUDIOVOX BOOMBOX Radio, cas- sette & CD player. AC/DC. Brand new - in box. $20. 650-654-9252

BLAUPUNKT AM/FM/CD Radio and Re- ceiver with Detachable Face asking $100. (650)593-4490

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer – Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo tools $50/ 650-921-1996

DECK STEREO receiver with deck CD

player

with

2

spkrs.

Exc/co. $45.

(650)992-4544

 

FIRST ALERT CO600 Carbon Monoxide Plug-In Alarm. Simple to use, New in pkg. $18 (650) 952-3500

LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20

(650)204-0587

MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android 4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD card Belmont (650)595-8855

MULTITESTER KIT, 20.000 OHMS/volt DC. never used in box $20.00

650-9924544

NEW AC/DC adapter, output DC 4.5v, $5, 650-595-3933

OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker 36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324

ORIGINAL AM/FM 1967/68 Honda Ra-

dio for $50. (650)593-4490

PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15

inch

3-way, black with screens. Work

great. $99.(650)243-8198

SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and program-

 

able remote.

Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650-

595-8855

SONY DVD/CD PLAYER Model DVP-

NC665P. Precision drive 2/MP3 Play- back. $20. 650-654-9252

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re- mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

VINTAGE

G.E.

radio,

model

c-430-a

$60. (650)421-5469

 

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-442c $60.

(650)421-5469

 

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c1470 $60.

(650)421-5469

 

VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model L516b

$75. (650)421-5469

 

VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model yrb-79-

  • 1 1948, $ 70. (650)421-5469

304 Furniture
304 Furniture
  • 2 TWIN MAPLE bed frames, Cannon

Ball construction **SOLD **

ANTIQUE DINING table for six people

with chairs $99. (650)580-6324

ANTIQUE MAHOGONY double bed with adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.

(650)592-4529

ANTIQUE MOHAGANY Bookcase. Four feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.

BEIGE CARPET. 12 1/2'x11 1/2'. Good

condition.

Good

for

bedroom.$95.

(650)595-4617

 

BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition (650) 315-2319

BROWN RECLINER, $75 Excellent Con- dition. (650) 315-2319

CHAIR – Designer gray, beige, white.

Excellent condition. $59. 650-573-6895

CHAIRS

2

Blue

Good

Condition

$50

OBO (650)345-5644

 

CHILD’S TABLE (Fisher Price) and Two

Chairs. Like New. **SOLD**

 

COAT/HAT STAND, solid wood, for your mountain cabin/house. $50. (650)520-

7045

COFFEE TABLE – Woven bamboo with glass top. $99. 650-573-6895

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for key- board, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465

COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409

COUCH – Designer gray, beige, white. Excellent condition. $99. 650-573-6895

COUCH, CREAM IKEA, great condition, $89, light-weight, compact, sturdy love-

seat (415)775-0141

 

CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage

cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)483-

1222

DINETTE TABLE 35"x60" with 3 adjust leafs $ 30 (650)756-9516.

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"

x58" (with

one

leaf

11

1/2")

-

$50.

(650)341-5347

 

DINING ROOM table – Good Condition

$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193

 

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-

tion,

nice

design, with storage, $45.,

(650)345-1111

 

END TABLES – Woven bamboo, off- white. $89. 650-573-6895. (650)573-689

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER in roll- er4'wx5'h glass door, shelf /drawers ex/co $45. (650)992-4544

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall, $95 (650)375-8021

FOLDING TABLES (2), 500# capacity.

24"x48 Laminate top. $99. (650)591-

4141

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

ACROSS

DOWN

 
  • 34 Family name of

52

Dunkin’ Donuts

  • 1 Discussion

  • 1 School session

 

three popes

 

emanation

 
  • 5 Untidy situation

  • 9 Zodiac transition

  • 2 noire

Matty of baseball

  • 35 “You’re preaching

53

  • 3 Washer capacity

    • 37 to the

Range above

!”

points

  • 4 Reader with

 

tenor

54

Yiddish “Egad!”

  • 14 “The Time

Paperwhite and

  • 38 Sharp cry

 

57

Barristers’ degs.

Machine” people

Fire models

  • 40 Actor Morales

 

58

Maryland athlete,

  • 15 Fairly large fair

  • 5 Kitty cries

 
  • 45 British peer

 

for short

 
  • 16 Guitarist Eddie

  • 6 Political exile, for

  • 48 Hit high in the air

59

Morse creation

Van __

short

  • 50 Drew out, as

 

60

Ball game delayer

  • 17 Reddish horse

  • 18 Birthstone for

  • 7 Tiny tiff

  • 8 Shoe bottom

latent talent

  • 51 Japanese noodle

61

Nos. requested