Employee Welfare

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Employee welfare is a comprehensive term including various services, benefits and facilities offered to employees by the employer. Through such generous fringe benefits the employer makes the life worth living for employees. The welfare amenities are extended in addition to normal wages and other economic rewards available to employees as per the legal provisions. Welfare measures may also be provided by the government, trade unions and non-government agencies in addition to the employer. The basic purpose of employee welfare is to enrich the life of the employees and keep them happy and contended. Mysore Sales International Limited, popularly known as MSIL, is a marketing organization established in March 1966 to meet the marketing needs of Karnataka. Since then it has grown in strength, to emerge as a dynamic marketing force with a national presence and international reach. It is today, a vibrant, multi-product, multi-dimensional marketing and export organization, reflecting the changing consumer profile of the country. The project was basically done to find out the present satisfaction level of the employees regarding the welfare measures provided to them, with this also to make the company aware about the employee’s dissatisfaction with certain welfare measures and give them appropriate suggestions to it. I got to learn the new welfare measures which are in the corporate field and the way employees performance are affected by the welfare measures and also the way the government firm works.

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
Employee Welfare is an important facet of industrial relations, the extra dimension, giving satisfaction to the worker in a way which evens a good wage cannot. With the growth of industrialization and mechanization, it has acquired added importance. The workers in industry cannot cope with the pace of modern life with minimum sustenance amenities. He needs an added stimulus to keep body and soul together. Employers have also realized the importance of their role in providing these extra amenities. And yet, they are not always able to fulfill workers demands however reasonable they might be. They are primarily concerned with the viability of the enterprise. Employee welfare, though it has been proved to contribute to efficiency in production, is expensive. Each employer depending on his priorities gives varying degrees of importance to labour welfare. It is because the government is not sure that all employers are progressive minded and will provide basic welfare measures that it introduces statutory legislation from time to time to bring about some measures of uniformity in the basic amenities available to industrial workers. After employees have been hired, trained and remunerated, they need to be retained and maintained to serve the organisation better. Welfare facilities are designed to take care of the wellbeing of the employees, they do not generally result in any monetary benefit to the employees. Nor are these facilities provided by employers alone. Governmental and non-governmental agencies and trade unions too, contribute towards employee welfare. Employee welfare is a comprehensive term including various services, benefits and facilities offered to employees by the employer. Through such generous fringe benefits the employer makes the life worth living for employees. The welfare amenities are extended in addition to normal wages and other economic rewards available to employees as per the legal provisions. Welfare measures may also be provided by the government, trade unions and non-government agencies in addition to the employer. The basic purpose of employee welfare is to enrich the life of the employees and keep them happy and contended.

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MEANING AND DEFINITION
Welfare means faring or doing well. It refers to the physical, mental, moral and emotional well-being of an individual. Further, the term welfare is a relative concept, relative in time and space. It, therefore, varies from time to time, from region to region and from country to country. Employee welfare, also referred to as betterment work for employees, relates to taking care of the well-being of workers by employers, trade unions and government and non-governmental agencies. It is rather difficult to define the term labour welfare precisely because of the relatively of the concept. The Oxford dictionary defines employee welfare as “efforts to make life worth living for workmen”. It is however, difficult to precisely define the scope of these efforts. Different writers have defined it in different ways. Some writers say that only voluntary efforts on the part of employers to improve the conditions of employment in their factories from the scope of employee welfare efforts. Some others say that it includes not only voluntary efforts of the employer but also the minimum standards of hygiene and safely laid down in general legislation. Here are some of the definitions given by some of the experts. “Employee welfare is a term which must necessarily be elastic, bearing a somewhat different interpretation in one country from another, according to the different social customs, the degree of industrialization and educational level of the workers”. According to Dr Parandikar, “Employee welfare work is work for improving the health, safety and general well being and the industrial efficiency of the workers beyond the minimum standard lay down by labour organisation”. Employee welfare refers to all those efforts of employers, trade unions, voluntary organizations and governmental agencies which help employees feel better and perform better. Employee welfare has 2 aspects—negative and positive. On the negative side, employee welfare is concerned with counteracting the baneful effects of the large-scale industrial system of production especially capitalistic, so far as India is concerned on the personal/family, and social life of the worker. On its positive side, it deals with the provision of opportunities for the worker and his/her family for a good life as understood in its most comprehensive sense.

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Employee welfare operates to neutralize the harmful effects of large scale industrialization and urbanization. Provision of welfare amenities enables the workers to live a richer and more satisfactory life and contributes to their efficiency and productivity. It helps in maintaining industrial peace. Some important objectives which actuate an employer to take up voluntary employee welfare services are as follows:          To give expression to philanthropic and paternalistic feelings. To win over employees loyalty and increase their morale. To combat trade unionism and socialist ideas. To build up stable labour force, to reduce labour turnover and absenteeism. To develop efficiency and productivity among workers. To save oneself from heavy taxes on surplus profits. To earn goodwill and enhance public image. To reduce the threat of further government intervention. To make recruitment more effective (because these benefits add to job appeal).

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EMPLOYEE PROTECTION AND WELFARE
STATUTORY WELFARE MEASURES: The preamble to our Indian Constitution promises justice - social, economic and political. It also stresses Equality of status and of opportunity. Article 23 of the Constitution prohibits traffic in human beings and forced labour. Article 24 prohibits employment of children in factories. The article 38 and 39 spelt under Directive Principles of State Policy are now enforceable as per the dictums laid by our Supreme Court. Constitution of India, Article 38: State to secure a social order for the promotion of welfare of the people:  The State shall strive to promote the welfare of the people by securing and protecting as effectively as it may a social order in which justice, social, economic and political, shall inform all the institutions of the national life.  The State shall, in particular, strive to minimize the inequalities in income, and endeavor to eliminate inequalities in status, facilities and opportunities, not only amongst individuals but also amongst groups of people residing in different areas or engaged in different vocations. Constitution of India, Article 39: Certain principles of policy to be followed by the State. The State shall, in particular, direct its policy towards securing  That the citizens, men and women equally, have the right to an adequate means to livelihood;  That the ownership and control of the material resources of the community are so distributed as best to sub serve the common good;  That the operation of the economic system does not result in the concentration of wealth and means of production to the common detriment ;   That there is equal pay for equal work for both men and women; That the health and strength of workers, men and women, and the tender age of children are not abused and that citizens are not forced by economic necessity to enter avocations unsuited to their age or strength  That children are given opportunities and facilities to develop in a healthy manner

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and in conditions of freedom and dignity and that childhood and youth are protected against exploitation and against moral and material abandonment. Through social security and social justice are spelt in our Constitution, they are never put into practice thanks to our Executives who only pretend to implement the programmes of the State. Some of the important Statutory Welfare measures given by the government are as follows: (i) The Factories Act of 1948 (ii) The Employees State Insurance Act 1948 (iii) The payment of Wages Act 1936 (iv) The Workmen's Compensation Act 1923 (v) The Employees' Provident Funds and Miscellaneous Provisions Act 1952. (vi) The Payment of Gratuity Act, 1962 (vii) The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961

FACTORIES ACT OF 1948
Purpose of this Act: An act to consolidate and amend the law regulating labour in factories. The Factories Act is meant to provide protection to the workers from being exploited by the greedy business employments and provides for the improvement of working conditions within the factory premises. The main function of this act is to look after the welfare of the workers, to protect the workers from exploitations and unhygienic working conditions, to provide safety measurers and to ensure social justice. Sections 11 to 20 of the Factories Act deal about Health. HEALTH Section 11: Cleanliness Section 12: Disposal of wastes and effluents Section 13: Providing proper ventilation and maintaining proper temperature Section 14: Removal of Dust and fume Section 15: Providing artificial humidification Section 16: No Overcrowding Section 17: Proper Lighting Section 18: Providing pure Drinking water Section 19: Providing Latrines and urinals

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Section 20: Providing Spittoons SAFETY Section 21: Proper Fencing of machinery Section 22: Precautions - Work on or near machinery in motion Section 23: No Employment of young persons on dangerous machines Section 24: Providing Striking gear and devices for cutting off power Section 25: Precautions near Self-acting machines Section 26: Casing of new machinery Section 27: Prohibition of employment of women and children near cotton openers Section 28: Providing Hoists and lifts Section 29: Provision for Lifting machines, chains, ropes and lifting tackles Section 30: Protection near revolving machinery Section 31: Protection near Pressure plant Section 32: Provision for Floors, stairs and means of access Section 33: Providing and precautions near Pits, sumps openings in floors, etc. Section 34: No Excessive weights Section 35: Protection of eyes Section 36: Precautions against dangerous fumes, gases, etc Section 36A: Precautions regarding the use of portable electric light Section 37: Explosive or inflammable dust, gas etc. Section 38: Precautions in case of fire Section 39: Power to require specifications of defective parts or tests of stability Section 40: Safety of buildings and machinery. Section 40A: Maintenance of buildings Section 40B: Appointment of Safety Officers WELFARE Section 42: Providing Washing facilities Section 43: Providing Facilities for storing and drying clothing Section 44: Providing Facilities for sitting

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Section 45: First-aid appliances to be kept. Section 46: Canteens at subsidized rates. Section 47: Shelters, rest rooms and lunch rooms for workmen. Section 48: Crèches for babies of working women. Section 49: Appointment of Welfare officers. It is the duty of the Chief Inspector of Factories to ensure enforcement of all the above provisions of the Factories Act in respect of safety, health and welfare of employees.

THE WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT 1923
Purpose of the Act: An Act to provide for the payment of certain classes of employers to their workmen of compensation for injury by accident. The workmen's compensation Act 1923 is one of the earliest pieces of labour legislation. This act encompasses all cases of accidents arising out of and in course of employment. The rate of Compensation to be paid in a lump sum is determined by a schedule provided in the act proportionate to the extent of injury and the loss of earning capacity. The younger the age of he worker and higher the wage the greater is the compensation. The Act provides the formula for calculating the compensation. The injured person can claim compensation and in the case of death, the compensation is claimed by dependents of the deceased. This law applies to the organized as well as unorganized sectors that are not covered by the E.S.I. scheme. The following definitions and the sections of law are presented for the students to take note of them. Administration: The act is administered by the State Governments which appoint Commissioners for this purpose under Sec.20 of the Act. Benefits: Under the Act, compensation is payable by the employer to workman for all personal injuries caused to him by accident arising out of and in the course of his employment which disable him for more than 3 days. If the workman dies, the compensation is to be paid to his dependants. The Act distinguishes among three types of injuries: permanent total disablement, permanent partial disablement and temporary disablement. The amount of compensation to be paid on the death or disablement of workman is given in Fourth Schedule of the Act and varies according to his wages, the type of injury and age. It is an obligation upon the employer to make the payment of compensation within one month from the date on which it falls due. Sources of Funds: All compensation under the act is payable by the employer.

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THE PAYMENT OF WAGES ACT:
The Payment of Wages Act was enacted as early as 1936 during the colonial rule. The purpose of this act is to regulate payment of wages. This insists on the payment of wages by the seventh day or the tenth day of the succeeding month and in case of weekly payment the last day of the week. Section 3: Responsibility for payment of wages. - Every employer shall be responsible for the payment to person employed by him of all wages required to be paid under this Act. Provided that, in the case of persons employed (otherwise than by a contractor)  In factories, if a person has been named as the manager of the factory under clause of sub-section (1) of section 7 of the Factories Act, 1948 (63 of 1948)  In industrial or other establishments, if there is a person responsible to the employer for the supervision and control of the industrial or other establishments  Upon railways (otherwise that in factories), if the employer is the railway administration and the railway administration has nominated a person in this behalf for the local area concerned, the person so named, the person so responsible to the employer, or the person so nominated, as the case may be (shall also be responsible) for such payment. Section 4: Fixation of wage-periods:  Every person responsible for the payment of wages under section 3 shall fix periods (in this Act referred to as wage-periods) in respect of which such wages shall be payable.  No wage-period shall exceed one month. Section 5: Time of payment of wages. – (1) The wages of every person employed upon or in  Any railway, factory or {industrial or other establishment} upon or in which less than one thousand persons are employed, shall be paid before the expiry of the seventh day.  Any other railway, factory or {industrial or other establishment}, shall be paid before the expiry of the tenth day, after the last day of the wage-period in respect of which the wages are payable:

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(2) Where the employment of any person is terminated by or on behalf of the employer, the wages, earned by him shall be paid before the expiry of the second working day from the day on which his employment is terminated. (3) The State Government may, by general or special order, exempt, to such extent and subject to such conditions as may be specified in the order, the person responsible for the payment of wages to persons employed upon any railway (otherwise than in a factory) from the operation of this section in respect of the wages of any such persons or class of such persons. (4) Save as otherwise provided in sub-section (2), all payments of wages shall be made on a working day. THE EMPLOYEES’ PROVIDENT FUND ACT 1952 The purpose of this Act: An Act to provide for the institution of Provident Funds, pension funds and deposit linked fund for employees in factories and other establishments. Contributions of 10% of the wages are paid by the employer and another 10% by the employees. This amount is deposited with the government which pays an interest. This Act also now has provisions for pension scheme. Administration: The employees Provident Funds, Pension and Insurance Schemes framed under the Act are administered by a tripartite Central Board of trustee, consisting of representatives of employers and employees and persons nominated by the Central and State Governments. Benefits: The act has made schemes for 3 types of benefits, provident fund, family pension and deposit linked insurance. Family pension is payable to the widow or widower up to the date of death or re-marriage whichever is earlier. In the absence of the widow or the widower it is payable to the eldest surviving unmarried daughter until she attains the age of 21 years or marries whichever is earlier. The dependents of the employee also receive an additional amount known as the deposit linked insurance which is equivalent to the average balance lying to the credit of the employee on his provident fund during the preceding 3 years, subject to a maximum of Rs 10000 provided that such employee has kept a minimum average balance of Rs. 1000 in the provident fund. Source of Funds: Here both the employer and the employee are required to contribute the provident fund every month at 8.33% of the basic wages, dearness allowance and retaining allowance. An employee can make a larger contribution up to 10% but there is no compulsion for the employer to make a matching contribution.

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THE PAYMENT OF GRATUITY ACT, 1972 Purpose of the Act: An act to provide for scheme for the payment of gratuity to employees engaged in factories, mines, oil fields, plantations, ports, railway companies, shops or other establishments and matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. Gratuity shall be payable to an employee on the termination of his employment after he has rendered continuous service for not less than five years. (a) On his superannuation (b) On his retirement or resignation (c) On his death or disablement For every completed year of service or part thereof in excess of six months the employer shall pay gratuity to an employee at the rate of 15 days’ wages based on the rate of wages last drawn by the employee concerned. Section 4: Payment of gratuity. – (1) Gratuity shall be payable to an employee on the termination of his employment after he has rendered continuous service for not less than five years: (a) On his superannuation, or (b) On his retirement or resignation, or (c) On his death or disablement due to accident or disease; Provided that the completion of continuous service of five years shall not be necessary where the termination of the employment of any employee is due to death or disablement; provided further that in the case of death of the employee, gratuity payable to him shall be paid to his nominee or, if no nomination has been made, to his heirs, and where any such nominees or heirs is a minor, the share of such minor, shall be deposited with the controlling authority who shall invest the same for the benefit of such minor in such bank or other financial institution, as may be prescribed, until such minor attains majority. (2) For every completed year of service or part thereof in excess of six months, the employer shall pay gratuity to an employee at the rate of fifteen days' wages based on the rate of wages last drawn by the employee concerned; provided that in the case of a piece-rated employee, daily wages shall be computed on the average of the total wages received by him for a period of three months immediately preceding the termination of his employment, and, for the purpose, the wages paid for any overtime work shall not be taken into account; provided further that that in the case of {an

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employee who is employed in a seasonal establishment and who is not so employed throughout the year} the employer shall pay the gratuity at the rate of seven days' wages for each season. (3) The amount of gratuity payable to an employee shall not exceed {three lakhs and fifty thousand} rupees. (4) For he purpose of computing the gratuity payable to an employee who is employed, after his disablement, on reduced wages, his wages for the period preceding his disablement shall be taken to be the wages received by him during that period, and his wages for the period subsequent to his disablement shall be taken to be the wages as so reduced. (5) Nothing in this section shall affect the right of an employee to receive better terms of gratuity under any award or agreement or contract with the employer. (6) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-section (a) The gratuity of an employee, whose services have been terminated for any act, willful omission or negligence causing any damage or loss to, or destruction of, property belonging to the employer' shall be forfeited to the extent of the damage or loss so caused. (b) The gratuity payable to an employee {may be wholly or partially forfeited} (i) If the services of such employee have been terminated for his riotous or disorderly conduct or any other act of violence on his part, or (ii) If the services of such employee have been terminated for any act which constitutes an offence involving moral turpitude, provided that such offence is committed by him in the course of his employment. THE MATERNITY BENEFIT ACT, 1961 Purpose of the Act: An Act to regulate the employment of women in certain establishments for certain period before and after child-birth and to provide for maternity benefit and certain other benefits. Section 4: Employment of or work by, women, prohibited during certain periods (1) No employer shall knowingly employ a woman in any establishment during the six weeks immediately following the day of her delivery, (miscarriage or medical termination of pregnancy). (2) No women shall work in any establishment during the six weeks immediately following the day of her delivery (miscarriage or medical termination of pregnancy).

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(3) Without prejudice to the provisions of section 6, no pregnant women hall, on a request being made by her in his behalf, is required by her employer to do during the period specified in subsection (4) Any work which is of an arduous nature or which involves long hours of standing, or which in any way is likely to interfere with her pregnancy or the normal development of the foetus, or is likely to cause her miscarriage or otherwise to adversely after her health. (4) The period referred to in sub-section (3) shall be (a) The period of one month immediately proceeding the period of six weeks, before the date of her expected delivery; (b) Any period during the said period of six weeks for which the pregnant woman does not avail of leave of absence under section 6. Section 5: Right to payment of maternity benefits: (1) Subject to the provisions of this Act, every woman shall be entitled to, and her employer shall be liable for, the payment of maternity benefit at the rate of the average daily wage for the period of her actual absence, that is to say, the period immediately preceding the day of her delivery, the actual day of her delivery and any period immediately following that day. (2) No woman shall be entitled to maternity benefit unless she has actually worked in an establishment of the employer from whom she claims maternity benefit, for a period of not less than {eighty days} in the twelve months immediately preceding the date of her expected delivery. Provided that the qualifying period of {eighty days} aforesaid shall not apply to a woman who has immigrated into the State of Assam and was pregnant at the time of the immigration. (3) The maximum period for which any woman shall be entitled to maternity benefit shall be twelve weeks of which not more than six weeks shall precede the date of her expected delivery. Provided that where a woman dies during this period, the maternity benefit shall be payable only for the days up to and including the day of her death ; Provided further that where a woman, having been delivered of a child, dies during her delivery or during the period immediately following the date of her delivery for which she is entitled for the maternity benefit, leaving behind in either case the child, the employer shall be liable for the maternity benefit for that entire period but if the child also dies during the said period, then, for the days up to and including the date of the death of the child.

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EMPLOYEES STATE INSURANCE ACT 1948
Purpose of the Act: This Act covers all workers whose wages do not exceed Rs 1600 per month and who are working in factories, other than seasonal factories, run with power and employing 20 or more workers. The coverage can be extended by the State Government with the approval of the Central Government. Administration: The Act is administered by the E.S.I Corporation, an autonomous body consisting of representatives of the Central and State Governments, employers, employees, medical profession and Parliament. Benefits: The Act, which provides for a system of compulsory insurance, is a landmark in the history of social security legislation in India. An insured person is entitled to receive the following types of benefits:       Medical Benefit Sickness Benefit Maternity Benefit Disablement benefit Dependant’s Benefit Funeral benefit

Sources of Funds: the Act provides for the setting up of the Employees State Insurance fund from the contributors received from employers and employees and various grants, donations and gifts received from Central or State Governments, local authorities and individuals. The rate of employer’s contribution is 5% of the wage bill and that of the employee’s contribution is 2.25%. VOLUNTARY WELFARE MEASURES: These are some of the voluntary welfare measures given by the employer to the employees. They are as follows:   Housing facilities Transportation facilities

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             

Medical facilities Cultural facilities Recreation facilities Consumers co-operative society Loans and various advances Leave travel concession Workers education Schools for the employee’s children Gifts to the employees holiday games Labour welfare fund Vehicle stand for parking Libraries Gym and health club Cafeterias

Welfares provided by MSIL MSIL is a people oriented company. They are very liberal to the employees and try to keep then satisfied that is the reason there is very low attrition rate in the organisation. MSIL trains there employees as well as assign the right job for which they are best suited according to their qualification. MSIL has maintained cordial relations with the employees. MSIL has most of the employee welfares mentioned above:   Statutory welfare measures Non-statutory welfare measures

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CHAPTER 2 RESEARCH DESIGN INTRODUCTION
Welfare of the employee is the welfare of the industry. They rise or sink together; the country’s progress is bound up with the progress of industry and of employee. A worker’s wellbeing inside as well as outside the factory is mainly out of employer’s concern, because it has a direct bearing on the efficiency of his work and job satisfaction. It is the right of the worker as a human being to get the minimum amenities, which in turn contributes to a very large extent towards production efficiency. Employee Welfare is a comprehensive term including various services, benefits and facilities offered to employees by the employer. Welfare measures may also be provided by the government, trade unions and non-government agencies in addition to the employer. The welfare amenities are extended in addition to normal wages and other economic rewards available to employees as per the legal provisions. The basic purpose of employee welfare is to enrich the life of employees and keep them happy and contented. A study of employee welfare would benefit an organisation to improve its productivity. They are also the best kind of investment for employees as they promote industrial efficiency and provide the workers facilities and amenities, which enable the workers employed to perform their work in healthy and congenial climate.

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
The liberalization, privatization and globalization of Indian economy in the last few years have presented unprecedented challenges to the decision makers in government, industry and service sectors to compete in the global market with competitive edge necessitates the industry to improve its productivity and quality of products.

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This objective cannot be achieved unless and until the workers are highly satisfied with the working environment and welfare facilities, which have an important impact in industrial relations. MSIL is very eager to find out whether the present welfare facilities given to the employee is satisfactory and is it affecting their performance in the organisation. The study will help them to find out if they are fulfilling the needs of employees and if they are following the legal provisions. Hence, this project is undertaken to know the present welfare facilities at MSIL and an assessment on their performance with reference to the welfare measures adopted and to suggest suitable measures to further enhance them. Unfortunately workers needs are high but employer’s will and capabilities are low. There should be a balance between the two. In this aspect, not only the statutory provision should be compiled with but the employers must also strive to provide certain voluntary and mutual welfare measures to ensure employee satisfaction. Therefore a study of the statutory, non-statutory and mutual measures provided by the organisation and the satisfaction level of employees towards these welfare measures and its impact on job satisfaction, but also to draw suggestions and conclusions which would enable the organisation to make improvements in its welfare measure if necessary.

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
In this study an attempt has been made to examine the welfare measures offered by MSIL to its employees and its impact on job satisfaction. The specific objectives of the study are: 1. To assess the welfare measures adopted by MSIL 2. To analyze the effect of welfare on employee performance 3. To assess the employee satisfaction with regard to welfare facilities 4. To make suitable suggestions and recommendations with a view to improve the existing welfare measures.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY
The scope of the study is to understand the present welfare measures adopted in the organisation and how MSIL can enhance the performance of employees by adopting better welfare measures.

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The study is extended only to the respondents working in the MSIL, head office at Cunningham road, Bangalore. It does not cover all the employees working in MSIL. The study covers only some of the levels in the organisation. The welfare measures studied includes both statutory, non-statutory measures and mutual welfare measures.

REVIEW OF LITREATURE
I. Using employee volunteering programs to develop leadership skills Author(s): Christine Bell Journal: Development and Learning in Organizations The purpose of the paper was to examine the use of employee volunteering programs to develop leadership skills. During the study it was found that employee volunteering programs provide a potentially rich source of learning for team leaders and other volunteers. Such a strategy can encourage employees to recognize learning opportunities for their own leadership skills. II. Moving towards a “learning-based organisation” Journal: Development and Learning in Organizations The purpose of the paper was to explore employee perceptions of the development of a learning culture in a medium-sized manufacturing company aspiring to become a learning organization. The company was using learning to develop its competitive edge, and employees were at various stages of understanding and accepting the need for learning and competence development on the job to sustain and develop the company. During the study a tension was detected between the company's objectives and the aspirations of some employees, but the majority appeared to accept the overt learning policy as good for them and the company. This study contributes towards a better understanding of the perceptions of employees in the development of a learning organization, rather than from the organizational or management perspectives that tend to dominate the literature.

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III. The impact of downsizing on employees' affective commitment Author(s): Jaewon Lee, J. Martin Corbett Journal: Journal of Managerial Psychology To examine the mechanisms through which downsizing affects employees' affective commitment to the organization The results show that the more severe the extent of downsizing, the lower employees' affective commitment to the organization. Moreover, downsizing has an impact on employees' affective commitment to the organization through several of the daily work experiences of employees. Thus, downsizing affects employees' affective commitment to the organization both directly and indirectly. However, its indirect impact is much stronger. Sympathetic management of downsizing can minimize the negative impact on the affective commitment of surviving employees. IV. How employers can ease pain of job losses Journal: Development and Learning in Organizations The purpose of this paper is to examine how employers can ease the job loss situation for employees. The paper finds that job counseling and training programs may influence different levels in the labor market. At the macro level, such programs can be vehicles shifting human resources to where they are needed in the labor market. On the organizational level, they can enhance human resource utilization, decrease perception of psychological contract breach, and minimize internal strains and organizational conflict. On the individual level, they appear to be an efficient way for dealing with the dismissed or remaining workers and helping them in their quest for a new job or retraining. Consequently, many of the psychological, familial, and social disturbances brought on by the dismissals, or the organizational crisis, may be avoided.

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Methodology
a) Database: This study is based on both primary and secondary data. A structured interview schedule would be used to collect the primary data from the employees of MSIL. The secondary data for the study would be collected from annual reports and records of MSIL including published material on the topic. b) Sample design: Stratified random sampling procedure would be followed to select the respondents. A required data would be collected through a schedule. The sample size is 50 and the schedules had been given to the employees in Bangalore branch. c) Data Analysis: Appropriate but simple analytical methods like cross tabulation, pie-charts, bar charts, chi-square tests, etc would be employed to analyze and interpret the data collected

Limitations
The limitations in this study are: 1. The research cannot be generalized because findings are relevant to MSIL 2. Details regarding monetary remuneration by the respondents may not be accurate. 3. The respondents were not very interested in filling the schedules

Expectations from the study
 To study and learn more about the welfare measures and how they are utilized in the organisation  To know and understand to what level the performance is affected by the welfare measures

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To gain an insight into the legal provisions for welfare measures and how well they have been followed by MSIL.

Chapter Scheme
1. Introduction 2. Research design 3. Company profile 4. Analysis and Interpretation 5. Findings, Conclusion and suggestions

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CHAPTER 3 Company Profile
INTRODUCTION Keeping pace with the winds of rapid industrialization that are sweeping Karnataka, MSIL is today resting on a strong footing of excellent performance coupled with deep rooted trust and confidence amongst its clientele. Mysore Sales International Limited, popularly known as MSIL, is a marketing organization established in March 1966 to meet the marketing needs of Karnataka. Since then it has grown in strength, to emerge as a dynamic marketing force with a national presence and international reach. It is today, a vibrant, multi-product, multi-dimensional marketing and export organization, reflecting the changing consumer profile of the country. A keen sense of business acumen, trade experience, managerial effectiveness and credibility are a few of the hallmarks of this marketing giant; and its ability to manage a diverse range of products and services through innovative marketing strategies is the secret of its success. In a business where the prime motivator is people, MSIL has developed flexibility in its thinking and management, enabling it to tackle every fresh challenge with an innovative approach. From a modest turnover of just Rs.1.5 Crores in 1966, MSIL has today achieved a turnover of Rs.1910.32 Crores. And, is one of the very few Public Sector undertakings to earn substantial profits continuously.

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HISTORY ABOUT MSIL
MSIL was established as a novel concept in the public sector – a centralized marketing unit for various products of the state. With its subsidiary company Marketing Consultants and Agencies Ltd; MSIL provides a comprehensive range of marketing and advertising services. In the late 60’s, MSIL was merely a centralized marketing unit for the numerous state owned industries but by the late 70’s, the company had long got over teething problems and proved its capabilities. MSIL’s flexibility and adaptability helped it develop the necessary expertise and infrastructure for different projects. During the late 1970’s having established capabilities, MSIL began to extend its operations beyond marketing in managing special projects for the government, like the distribution of imported cement during a nation wide shortage and export of surplus white rice. The company was also entrusted with the responsibility of manufacture and distribution of quality notebooks to students, at reasonable prices. What resulted was the Vidya and Lekhak Notebooks, brand names in their own right and popular not only in Karnataka but also in the neighboring states. The company was also asked by the Indian Customs to manage the Bangalore Air Cargo complex, functioning as custodians for air cargo. Each one of the activities required a new kind of expertise as well as infrastructure and MSIL managed each activity with dedication. In the 1980’s MSIL entered the consumer durables market through its hire purchase scheme, MSIL Homaker which was basically intended to facilitate the government salaried class. MSIL then ventured into the travel sector with the MSIL Tours and Travels, to help meet the growing travel requirements of officials.

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The early 90’s saw MSIL streamline the distribution of Indian Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL) in the state. The company’s wide and well entrenched network took over the distribution effortlessly and effectively. MSIL is presently handling a very wide range of products and services catering to the needs of the consumer on one hand and meeting the demands of principles / manufacturers on the other. The company is involved deeply with its principles right from product planning to production, packaging, advertising and marketing. In early 2005, MSIL entered the Chit Funds arena to help the public have ready access to money invested. The schemes introduced under the brand name MSIL Moneytree Chits are in answer to a growing demand and have received a huge response. They cater to all income groups and help channel money towards targeted needs. MSIL also operates Karnataka State Lottery, introducing attractive new schemes and ticket designs, for an ever growing consumer profile. At the Bangalore Air Cargo Complex, a 50,000 sq. ft. state-of-the-art warehouse exclusively for imports was inaugurated in July 2005 to ensure damage free imports for the people of Karnataka. The joint Air Cargo Complex is a new joint venture which MSIL has entered into with HAL and Concord.

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7’s of MSIL
1) STRUCTURE

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Managing Director

Director Marketing

GM Industrial Product

GM Chit Fund

GM Finance

GM HRD

GM Lottery

GM Tours & Travels

GM Air Cargo

GM Consumer Products

Deputy GM Deputy Manager Assistant Manager Supervisor

Representative

Assistants

Clerks

2) SYSTEM Quality Policy System:

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MSIL strives for customer delight by:  Honoring every commitment made  Providing prompt and proactive customer service  Ensuring high quality in all its products and services  Motivating and involving everyone in the organization for active participation towards continuous improvement in its activities. 3) STYLE In MSIL positive leadership style is followed and a democratic group effort. Here all employees play an active part in giving suggestions for decision making. All major decisions are taken in the branch concerned. Managing Director and Assistant Managing Director of the concerned department take the major decisions. 4) STAFF The main strength of MSIL company; being a trading service organisation is its man power. In order to train and motivate the employees; the company has planned a continuous services of training programs to equip the employees for higher responsibilities and to secure higher levels of participation from them to strengthen the company operations. The company has engaged National Product Council (NPC) for organizational analysis and manpower assessment of the company. 5) SHARED VALUES Values of the company uphold the most, they are as follows:  Customer Satisfaction  Quality Products and services  Provide every facility to its employees  Cost and time consciousness
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 Innovation and creativity  Respect for the individuals  Integrity 6) SKILLS In MSIL there are employees who are having different skills and their skills are used in their jobs. Company also gives job according to their skills which gives company to attain its objectives and goals. 7) STRATEGY In MSIL different strategy are used to make employees their jobs interesting and different strategies are implied at different levels of management. Strategies are applied to attain employees and companies objectives and goals.

Mission of the company
To look forward and adapt to the times, to offer every consumer the best quality at the most affordable price.

Vision of the company
To be a global leader in the marketing industry

Future plans of the company
The future plans of the company are to diversify the organisation into various fields like renovation of the head office. Improvement in the performance and cutting down unnecessary branches.

Objectives of MSIL
1. To carry all kinds of Agency business
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2. To carry on guarantee and indemnity business relating to any products/manufacturing. 3. To buy, sell, import, manipulate, prepare for market and deal in merchandise of all kinds and generally factories, manufacturing and carry on business as merchants for imports and exports. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. To establish offices, godowns, showrooms, exhibitions, art galleries, factories, manufacturing and trading centers in any part of the world. To act as agents, brokers and trustees for any person or company. To promote commerce in relation to industrial undertakings in India and abroad. To carry on the business of manufacturers and of dealers in leather dresses, counters, tanners, makers of leather goods. To carry on the business of leasing and the hire purchase financing. To carry on the business of agents / dealers in stores of exporters and importers of all kinds of perishable items. 10. To carry on the business of dealers importers of all kinds of: a. Agricultural and processed food products. b. Spices and dry fruits and plantation products like coffee, tea, tobacco and allied products. c. Textile items. DIVISIONS: MSIL’s operations are divided into distinct divisions – each self sustained but working towards and in harmony with a corporate philosophy. There are 10 divisions: 1. Lottery 2. Bangalore Air Cargo 3. Paper 4. Exports 5. Chit Funds 6. Hire Purchase 7. Tours and travels

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8. Consumer Products 9. Industrial Products 10. Silk Showrooms 1. LOTTERY: MSIL was appointed the sole selling agent of Karnataka State Lottery (KSL) by the state Government. KSL, marketed by MSIL’s Lottery division, has the distinct identity of being the most trusted lottery in the country. Having been associated with the marketing of lottery tickets right from inception, the division has over 30 years of experience in a highly competitive market and has held the lead among a host of private and public sector players. Regular innovative draws held with public participation, immediate announcement of result and prompt disbursement of prize money are what have contributed towards KSL’s popularity. KSL is recognized as the best managed lottery in India. The division has 4000 accredited dealers, sub-dealers and sellers and gives direct employment to more than 45,000 people. More than two lakhs people depend on KSL for their livelihood. Mobile sales units are provided for handicapped people. Over the years, the lottery division has introduced several novel schemes catering to all income groups with tickets ranging from Rs 5 to Rs 100. In May 2003, the Lottery Division totally revamped KSL schemes to withstand increasingly stiff competition from other States. The changes effected have proved successful resulting in a record turnover and high dividends to the Government.

2. BANGALORE AIR CARGO:

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In 1977, MSIL was appointed as custodians of air cargo under section 45 of the Customs Act 1922 by the Customs Department and has since been serving the needs of exporters and importers. MSIL through its Bangalore Air Cargo Complex today handles over 45,000 tones of import and export cargo annually and has all the facilities required for customs examination and clearance. An X-ray machine has also been installed for screening of export cargo. With APEDA’s (Agriculture and Processed Food products export development Authority) help, a 4,200 sq. ft. (20 tonnes capacity) cold room has been set up for storing perishables. In 2004, MSIL constructed a state-of-the-art export warehouse of 80,000 sq. ft. The company has over 2,60,000 sq. ft. of warehouse land near the airport, sufficient for the growing needs of the cargo industry. In July, 2005, MSIL began operations from a newly constructed and modern 50,000 sq. ft. warehouse space adjoining the Bangalore Airport. This is used exclusively for the safe storage of valuable import cargo. 3. PAPER DIVISION MSIL’s association with the student’s community dates back to 1977 when the company was entrusted with the responsibility of distributing subsidized notebooks. A special marketing programmer was conceptualized and the brand “Lekhak” was born subsequently. Lekhak became the brand name for notebooks in Karnataka. The Vidhya notebooks have carried on this tradition of quality at reasonable prices and have also emerged as the brand leader in the current scenario. Apart from notebooks, Vidya caters to other student requirements like drawing books, graph books, geometry boxes, color pencil sets, crayons and a range of colorful school bags in various sizes, with attractive designs. The school bags are manufactured by over 100 small scale industries which has created employment to a large number of skilled laborers. Under the Lekhak brand name also comes a complete range of school and office stationary, now extended to cover computer stationary as well.

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The company encourages the supply of notebooks directly to schools / colleges and cooperative societies. These notebooks have not only made deep into the roads of Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Maharashtra but are also exported to several countries in South Africa countries. 4. EXPORTS: Karnataka’s exports have increased over the years, and MSIL has been exploring new global trade markets. For many years now MSIL has been successfully selling sandalwood oil, soaps, spices, coffee, rice, garments and other commodities to overseas buyers. The company also acts as the local agent for international business buyers who wish to enter the Indian market and for foreign buyers to source products to India. In response to the market demand from China for iron ore today, MSIL is now diversifying into iron-ore exports and has already exported 41,000 MTs of calibrated iron ore worth 2.48 million US $ to China. Currently, the company is engaged in finalizing long term contracts with reputed iron ore mines in Karnataka, including the state owned Mysore Minerals Limited, for procuring and exporting necessary quantities at required standards to buyers in China. 5. CHIT FUNDS: Recognizing the growing need of consumers for safe investment and easy access to their money, MSIL has set up the Chit funds Division and launched its own Chit Funds under the brand name MSIL Moneytree. The scheme blends to both saving and borrowing and is targeted at mobilizing the household savings of lower and middle-income groups and channelising the money for their own welfare. The MSIL Moneytree Chits has therefore received an enthusiastic response from the public, especially as it offers schemes for every income bracket.

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6. HIRE PURCHASE: Today, when acquisition of consumer durables has become an essential part of life, MSIL enables employees of Public Sector Undertakings and the Government to buy consumer durables of renowned brands through the MSIL Homaker scheme. This easy and reliable hire purchase scheme offers consumer durables like television sets, washing machines, refrigerators, audio systems, VCR’s, computers, mixers, stoves, gas lamps, two wheelers, cars, etc., of renowned brands and at reasonable interest rates. Purchases can be made in easy installments at nominal rates of interest. The MSIL Homaker Scheme centers are at Mysore, Hubli, Gulbarga and Mangalore. 7. TOURS AND TRAVELS: The MSIL tours and Travels was set up to look after the travel needs of officials of the Government, State Boards and Corporations. It is recognized by IATA and in association with Orbit Tours and Trade Fair Private Limited of Mumbai, MSIL has been promoting package tours to various trade fairs abroad. The division also acts as an agent for Karnataka Tourism by taking on the bookings of ITDC, KSTDC and Jungle Lodges and Resorts. The Information Centre run by MSIL’s Tours and Travels Division at Mumbai and New Delhi is a single point for travel arrangements within Karnataka, for hotel bookings and tour guides. 8. CONSUMER PRODUCTS: Focusing on marketing of consumer essentials, the division has been responsible for the launch of a wide spectrum of products from detergents, bath soaps, talcum powder and shampoos to breakfast foods, edible oils and fruit juices. The nation-wide distribution network has helped MSIL to cater to the needs of the most demanding consumers. Currently, MSIL is producing and marketing “Total Detergent Bar” in Tamil Nadu and Pondicherry. Elephant brand mustard oil, “Goldcrunch” cornflakes and Lumbini Dhoops and agarbathis are marketed in the Northern and Western regions of the country.

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It is now marketing Cool, packaged drinking water. Plans are afoot to extend Cool to include Mineral Water Soda, Herbal water and flavored soft drinks. 9. INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS: HOTSPRING SOLAR WATER HEATER: The division provides technical and marketing support to its principals and product applications guidance to its consumers. The division is marketing MSIL Hot Spring Solar Water Heaters to encourage and facilitate the use of renewable sources of energy. By tapping the available solar energy, Hot Spring solar water heater provides hot water free of cost, thereby helping consumers to save substantially on power bills. Today MSIL Hot Spring is much in demand with hospitals, industries, hostels, high-rise buildings and individual houses. One of the reasons why the brand is popular is the technical advice available from the division’s team of engineers and the prompt after sales service. Along with marketing support, the Industrial Products Division also provides technical support to the manufacturers and keeps them informed of the requirements of customers.

SOLAR LIGHTING: The use of solar energy has been extended to include solar home lighting and solar street lighting under the brand name Sunergy. Sunergy Solar Lighting systems are environment friendly, with minimum maintenance and maximum reliability.

GLOBAL ENERGY SAVER:

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The Industrial Products Division has also taken up the marketing of ‘Global Energy Savers’, a Korean brand of CPL, PL, HID, LED lamps and fixtures with superior technology. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: The division has diversified its activities and is in partnership with WIPRO to include IT, hardware products and IT solutions. The WIPRO range includes the Super Genius desktops, Netpower services, Little Genius notebooks and a range of peripherals. 10. SILK SHOWROOMS: Of late, MSIL has entered the shimmering world of silks with showrooms at Bangalore and Mumbai. Mandaras, the recently opened elite showroom in a central location in Bangalore has a vibrant collection of silk from across the country. The MSIL silk emporium at Mumbai promotes pure Mysore silks, georgette’s, crepes and handloom silks from Karnataka

SOCIAL OBLIGATION
MSIL as an organisation has grown considerably. It has fulfilled its social obligations by ploughing back into society some of its profits, through contributions to hospitals, educational and cultural organizations. This has made MSIL a caring corporate. They also try to give a boost to the traditions of the state by organizing cultural events. With this aspect in mind MSIL has instituted annual state level light music competition for students titled “MSIL NITYOTHSAVAM”. They are planning to organize many such events in the future. As a part of MSIL’s initiative in spreading peace education, the firm has printed and published a book called PEACE+ CHILDREN= PEACEFUL CHILDREN. On October 15th, 2003 MSIL has set up an art gallery of rare paintings by renowned artists from all over the country.

DEPARTMENTS

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Departments refer to the normal structure of the organisation, composed of various departments, managerial positions and the relationship to each other. It is an efficient and effective grouping job into meaningful work units to cooperate numerous jobs all for accomplishment of the organisation objectives. MSIL has adopted various departments: 1. Administration Department 2. Human Resource Department 3. Finance and Accounts Department 4. Estate Department 5. Security Department 6. Marketing Department 7. EDP Department 1) Administration Department:  The department is concerned with the administrative functions like data capture, information, retrieval, processing and recording data.   Payment of telephone bills. Maintenance and upkeep of office equipments like air-conditioners, telephones and computers  This department also gives importance to the cleanliness of the entire office premises by keeping it neat and clean.

2) Human Resource Department:  MSIL always ensure that the people looking for the company are always physically and mentally fit and competent.   It develops policies and procedures for its employees. It takes care of recruitment, training, salary, benefits, planning and motivation of the staff members, it also takes care of salary/wages preparation, maintenance of attendance, leave and personnel records.  This department ensures the security and safety of its employees

3) Finance and Accounts Department:

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 

This department manages the finance of the company like raising capital, loans etc. The main functions are recording all the financial transactions and maintain proper accounts of income and expenses. It also takes care of the payroll preparation and processing of the same for the employees of the organisation every month. This department provides the relevant information to the auditors, in preparation of annual balance sheet, P/L account etc. It provides the organisation with statistical data by calculation of various financial ratios.

4) Estate Department: The estate department of MSIL is responsible for overall maintenance of the organisation, building it, supervises and oversees the use of space so that maximization of productivity and effectiveness may be achieved at minimum cost. It also sees to the payment of the office premises with good interior decoration and lighting, comforts….etc. 5) Security Department: Security department of MSIL ensures the physical security of the organisation assets also seek to the safe custody of goods at various godowns and depots located at different places. This department ensures the observance of safety precautions to avoid accidents. Shift timings for the security personnel is planned and organized by this department. If required, round the clock security is also arranged by this department. 6) Marketing Department: This department of MSIL caters to the need of customers functions such as market research, advertisements, sales promotion and corporate communications are part of the department. This department is the core department of entire organisation. 7) EDP Department: This department deals with computerization operation of the task in some fields like finance and accounts functions.

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PRODUCTS PROFILE
 Sale of lottery tickets  Handling the export and import of various items such as tea, coffee, iron-ore, cement, rice etc.  The sale of solar water heaters-MSIL ‘HOT SPRINGS’.  Sale of agricultural products.  Sale of student notebooks under the brand name “VIDYA” and “LEKHAK” and other stationary items.  Distribution of Indian made foreign liquor.  Marketing of bottled mineral water-‘COOL’.  Sale of school and college bags.  Chit fund services.  Arranging tours and travels.  Offering hire purchase services to customer products.  Sale of silk sarees and different sarees-‘MANDARA’ INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS  Desktops  Laptops  Servers  Peripherals

SERVICES PROFILE
 Brokerages  Agency  Imports and exports  Manufacturing  Trustees  Leasing/ hire purchasing  Trade dealers
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 Handling international cargo

Classification of employees at MSIL:
1. Permanent 2. Temporary 3. Probationary 4. Contract 5. Casual 6. Trainee 1. Performance Employees: A permanent employee is an employee who has been engaged on a permanent basis and includes any person who has been duly confirmed in his appointments after he has satisfactorily completed the probationary period in the same or another occupation in service of the company including breaks due to sickness, accident, authorized leave, lock out, strike or voluntary closure of establishment. 2. Temporary Employees: A temporary employee is an employee who has been engaged for work which is essentially of a temporary nature likely to be finished within a limited period or in a temporary post or in connection with a temporary increase in work for a limited period. 3. Probationary Employees: A probationary employee is an employee who is provisionally employed to fill a permanent vacancy in a post and has not completed the probationary period. 4. Contract Employees:

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A contract employee is an employee who is appointed for a specified period. 5. Casual Employees: A casual employee is an employee who is engaged on work which is of a casual nature or which is of non-recurring or intermittent nature. 6. Trainees: A trainee is a person who may or may not be paid salary or stipend during the period of his training and who is not an apprentice or under Apprentism (i.e. Apprentice Act).

CATEGORY OF EMPLOYEE: Staff category: 1. In category 1: Sweepers, Cleaners, Watchman, Mali, Loader Helper. 2. In Category 2: Life Operators, Drivers, Security Guards, Electricians. 3. In Category 3: Non-graduate Clerks, Typists, Steno, Lift Operators, Punch Operators, Head Guards, Junior Programmers, Junior Stenos. 4. In Category 4: Graduate Clerks, Typists, Junior Stenos, Punch operators, Junior Programmers.

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5.

In Category 5: Godown Assistant, Sales Assistant, Accounts Assistant, Sales Representatives, Telephone Operators, Security in charge, Receptionists, Security Inspector.

6.

In Category 6: Sales Supervisor, Store Supervisor, PA, Account and Sales Engineer. Management category: Cadre 01- All Assistant Managers Cadre 02- All Deputy Managers Cadre E1- All Managers Cadre E2- All Deputy Managers Cadre E3- General Managers Cadre E4- Contractor, Director, Managing Director. Cadre E5- Marketing Director

Terms Regarding Employees:
The category of posts, the method of recruitment, promotion and the minimum qualification for recruitment/promotion in the company is as specified in the company schedule manual. Appointment: The posts in the company are filled up by any of the following methods: 1. Promotion of the existing employees from the immediate lower category who meet the prescribed standards. 2. Direct recruitment through employment exchange if applicable. 3. Recruitment through newspaper advertisement.

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4. Campus recruitment from professional institutions. Confirmation: Employees are confirmed in accordance with the term of appointment only if the performance during the probationary period is found satisfactory. Promotion: Employees of the company are considered for promotion after the completion of 5 years of service from one promotion to another and strictly on merit basis depending on the assessment made by the departmental head of their potential who will take up the new responsibility and the cases of promotion are considered whenever any vacancy arises in the organization. If internal candidate at the post is offered the job as a case of promotion and if the candidate is not found suitable as per cadre and recruitment rule, then the same will be considered for external candidates. Resignation: The resignation letter must be sent by the employee of any department or division to the M.D. and he will record his comments on it and send it to the personnel department for necessary action. Employees who are in the regular cadre, who has not yet being confirmed, should give a notice in 7 days. Employee in the regular cadre, who is permanent, should give a notice before 1 month. If the employee desires to be relived before the completion of prescribed notice, company may release him at his discretion. In case of difference in the notice period, it is made good by recovery from the employee’s salary for the said period. The relieved letter is handed over to the employee on obtaining necessary clearance certificate from each department or division.

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SWOT ANALYSIS
Strengths:  The organisation is quite extended with more branches having national and international reach.  MSIL has 28 sales units spread all over India and 4 main branches in all metro cities having strong potential in the market to promote with best results.  Highly Specialized products and services are provided to all the customers.  One of the strongest government companies in Karnataka. Weaknesses:  Disproportionate composition of personnel in relation to functional areas.  Limited exposure to computer environment.  The company does not have an accurate profile about their end customers.  Inefficient utilization of human resources.  Resistance to change.  Fewer advertisements.  Government policies are very rigid. Opportunities:  Entering the business of manufacturing and dealership in the leather dresses, leather goods.  There are wide ranges of products which can capture a huge market.  The company can take up projects by dealing with private companies.  The company has its own customer’s chain which has been established since many years. Threats:  The very first threat of the company is budget because the government may ban lotteries at any point of time, from which company will have to lose a major part of its company as well as profits.  Availability of other duplicate products.
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 Manufacturing firms generally withdraw the marketing of the products after the products have been well positioned in the market.

Chapter 4 Analysis and Interpretation
Table 4.1: The profile of the respondents: a) Table showing the ‘Age of the respondents’ Age Below 25 25 to 35 35 to 45 45 & above Total Source —Primary data Analysis: This table shows that 56%of the respondents are of the age 35 to 45 and 28% of the respondents are of the age 45 & above. The percentage of the respondents below 25 and 25 to 35 are very low. Inference: The analysis shows that MSIL is recruiting fewer youngsters and recruiting more of the adults. In fact less number of youngsters is joining the government firms and all the youngsters prefer private companies. Number of respondents 5 3 28 14 50 Percentage 10% 6% 56% 28% 100%

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b) Table showing the ‘Income of the respondents’ Income Below 60000 60000 to 120000 120000 to 180000 180000 to 240000 240000 & above Total Source —Primary data Analysis: The table shows that 58%of the respondents get their salary between 120000 and 180000 and 20%of the respondents get their salary between 180000 and 240000. Inference: Respondents who get below 60000 are mainly the peons and junior securities. Respondents who get between 120000 and 180000 that is the major part of the respondents are assistants, stenographers. The next part of the respondents who receive salary between 180000 and 240000 are mainly the supervisors, sales assistant and the assistant managers. c) Table showing the ‘Gender of the respondents’ Gender Male Female Total Source —Primary data Analysis: This table shows that 70% of the respondents are male and 30% of the respondents are female. Inference: From this analysis it is shown that most of the employees working in MSIL are men. In this scenario most of the women are not joining government firms and the women are basically not Number of respondents 35 15 50 Percentage 70% 30% 100% Number of respondents 3 5 29 10 3 50 Percentage 6% 10% 58% 20% 6% 100%

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looking for job security instead they are also joining private firms and they are ready to compete really hard d) Table showing the ‘Qualification of the respondents’ Qualification Below Matriculation Matriculation Under graduate Graduate P.G Diploma Others Total Source —Primary data Analysis: The table shows that the major part of the respondents is under graduates and 36% of the respondents are graduates and only 10% of the respondents are post graduates. Inference: As the most of the respondents are in the age of 35 to 45 and 45 & above, most of those respondents are under graduates and when they have joined MSIL they were just under graduates and till now they have not done there graduation and these employees have basically come up by their performance and the seniority base. Number of respondents -2 20 18 5 5 -50 Percentage -4% 40% 36% 10% 10% -100%

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Table 4.2 Table showing the ‘type of rewards possessed by the respondents’ Rewards Membership &Seniority Job Status Competency based Performance based Source —Primary data Number of respondents 3 6 -41 Percentage 6% 12% -82%

Analysis: The table shows that 82%of the respondents are promoted based on performance based and only 6% of the respondents are promoted on the seniority base.

Inference: The analysis shows that MSIL mainly promotes their employees only in their performance, this helps the competition to stay alive in the organisation and it motivates the employees to attain their promotion.

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Chart 4.2 Chart showing the type of rewards possessed by the respondents

Number of respondents

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0
ni or ity , St at us ed ba se d ba s

Series1

&S e

pe te nc y

be rs hi p

M em

Type of rewards

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Table 4.3 Table showing the ‘Rest room facilities given to the respondent’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data Number of respondents 2 16 6 21 5 50 Percentage 4% 32% 12% 42% 10% 100%

Analysis: The table shows that 42% of the respondents are not satisfied with the rest room facility given to them. And 12% of the respondents are not aware about the rest room facility given to them.

Inference: The analysis shows that the respondents are not at all satisfied with the rest room facility provided to them. As rest room is one of the main and important facilities in an organisation.

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Chapter 4.3 Chart showing the satisfaction level of the respondents about the rest room facility provided to them

Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory

Table 4.4

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Table showing ‘Opinion about the drinking water facility’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data Number of respondents 1 48 --1 50 Percentage 2% 96% --2% 100%

Analysis: The table shows that 96% of the respondents are very much satisfied with the drinking water facility provided to the respondents.

Inference: Drinking water facility provided by MSIL is mostly satisfied by the respondents.

Chart 4.4 Chart shows the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding the drinking water facility.
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Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory

Table 4.5 Table showing ‘Opinion about Medical and first aid facilities provided to the respondents’

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Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

Number of respondents -46 -4 -50

Percentage -92% -8% -100%

Analysis: The table shows that 92% if the respondents are satisfied with the medical and first aid facilities provided by the company but there are 8 % of the respondents who are not satisfied with the medical facilities given to them.

Inference: The analysis shows that most of the respondents are satisfied with the medical facilities provided by the company but the company also has to verify why the other 8% of the respondents are not satisfied and verify them.

Chart 4.5 Chart shows the satisfaction level of the respondents about the medical and first aid facilities provided to them.

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Number of respondents

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0
Sa tis fa c Sa tory tis fa cto No r y ta No wa Hi ts re gh at is f ly ac no to ts ry at isf ac to ry

Series1

Hi g

hly

Sa tisfa ction le ve l

Table 4.6 Table showing ‘The opinion regarding the canteen facilities provided to the respondents’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Number of respondents -Percentage --

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Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

-29 20 1 50

-58% 40% 2% 100%

Analysis: The table shows that 58% of the respondents are not aware about the canteen facility in the organisation and 40% of the respondents are not satisfied with the canteen facility. This shows none of the respondents are satisfied with the canteen facility.

Inference: As I have been a part of the organisation for a month during the project I found out that there is no canteen in the organisation and they don’t have any snack shops in the organisation. So MSIL have to start the canteen as fast as possible, this can be one of the motivating factor for the employees.

Chart 4.6 Chart shows the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding the canteen facility.

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Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory

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Table 4.7 Table showing ‘Opinion about the crèche facility provided to the respondents’

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

Number of respondents --44 5 1 50

Percentage --88% 10% 2% 100%

Analysis: The table shows that 88% of the respondents are not aware of the crèche facility and 10% of the respondents are not satisfied with the facility.

Inference: MSIL do not provide crèche facility to the respondents and if they provide it would be of great help to the female employees in the organisation.

Chart 4.7

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Employee Welfare

Chart showing the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding the crèche facility.

45 40 35 30 Number of 25 respondent 20 s 15 10 5 0

Series1

Highly Satisfactory

Not satisfactory

Satisfactory level

Table 4.8

Kristu Jayanti college

58

Employee Welfare

Table showing ‘Opinion about the occupational safety provided to the respondent’

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

Number of respondents -46 -3 1 50

Percentage -92% -6% 2% 100%

Analysis: The table shows that 92% of the respondents are satisfied with the occupational safety provided by MSIL. Only 4 respondents are not satisfied with the occupational safety.

Inference: In the analysis it is shown that most of the employees except a few are satisfied with the occupational safety. So it means most of the employees are very secure about their job and very comfortable with that.

Chart 4.8 Chart shows the respondents satisfaction level in occupational safety.

Kristu Jayanti college

59

Employee Welfare

Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory

Table 4.9 Table showing ‘Opinion about earned leave given to respondents’

Kristu Jayanti college

60

Employee Welfare

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

Number of respondents 11 39 ---50

Percentage 22% 78% ---100%

Analysis: The table shows that 78% of the respondents are satisfied with the earned leave provided to them and 22% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the earned leave.

Inference: There are no respondent who is not satisfied with the earned leave. Every employee is very much satisfied with the earned leave provided to them.

Chart 4.9 Chart shows the satisfaction level of the respondents towards the earned leave.

Kristu Jayanti college

61

Employee Welfare

Number of respondents

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0
Sa tis fa c Sa tory tis fa cto No ry ta No wa Hi ts re gh at is f ly ac no to ts ry at isf ac to ry

S eries 1

Hi g

hly

S a tisfa ction le ve l

Table 4.10 Table showing ‘Opinion about Sick leave given to the respondents’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory
Kristu Jayanti college

Number of respondents 6 44 62

Percentage 12% 88%

Employee Welfare

Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

---50

---100%

Analysis: The table shows that 88% of the respondents are satisfied with the sick leave provided by the company. And none of the respondents are not satisfied with the facility. It shows that most of the respondents are satisfied with the sick leave.

Inference: Most of the respondents are satisfied with the sick leave, so it shows that MSIL is very liberal in giving the sick leaves and they just have to inform the company with the leave notice.

Chart 4.10 Chart shows that the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding sick leave.

Kristu Jayanti college

63

Employee Welfare

0%

12%

H ig h ly S a t is fa c t o ry S a t is fa c t o ry N o t a w a re N o t s a t is fa c t o ry H ig h ly n o t s a t is fa c t o ry

88%

Table 4.11 Table showing ‘Opinion about the maternity leave provided to the female respondents’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory
Kristu Jayanti college

Number of respondents 2

Percentage 4%

64

Employee Welfare

Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

13 35 --50

26% 70% --100%

Analysis: The table shows that 26% of the respondents are satisfied with the maternity leave provided by the company. And 70% of the respondents are unaware about the facility that is mostly male.

Inference: The female respondents are satisfied with the maternity leave provided to them.

Chart 4.11 Chart shows the satisfaction level regarding the maternity benefit given to respondents.

Kristu Jayanti college

65

Employee Welfare

0% 4%

26%

Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory

70%

Table 4.12 Table showing ‘Opinion about the casual leave provided to the respondents’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware
Kristu Jayanti college

Number of respondents 6 44 -66

Percentage 12% 88% --

Employee Welfare

Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

--50

--100%

Analysis: In the table it is shown that 88% of the respondents are satisfied with the casual leave provided to them and 12% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the casual leave provided to them.

Inference: None of the respondents are dissatisfied with the leave; it is a great achievement for any organisation.

Chart 4.12 Chart showing the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding casual leave.

Kristu Jayanti college

67

Employee Welfare

0%

12%

H ighly S atis fac tory S atis fac tory N ot aw are N ot s atis fac tory H ighly not s atis fac tory

88%

Table 4.13 Table showing ‘Opinion about the medical benefits given to the respondents’

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory

Number of respondents 9 38

Percentage 18% 76%

Kristu Jayanti college

68

Employee Welfare

Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

-3 -50

-6% -100%

Analysis: In the table 76% of the respondents are satisfied with the medical benefits provided to them. And 6% of the respondents are not satisfied with the medical benefits given to them.

Inference: As medical benefits are very important to any employee in the organisation, the employer has to give any medical benefits, which is required to be given to them. The company has to just verify the dissatisfied employees with the medical benefits.

Chart 4.13 Chart showing the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding medical benefits.

Kristu Jayanti college

69

Employee Welfare

6% 0%

0%

18%

H ig h ly S a tis fa c to ry S a tis fac to ry N o t a w a re N o t s a tis fa c to ry H ig h ly n o t s atis fa c tory

76 %

Table 4.14 Table showing ‘Opinion regarding snack allowance’

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory
Kristu Jayanti college

Number of respondents 6 43 70

Percentage 12% 86%

Employee Welfare

Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

1 --50

2% --100%

Analysis: In the table, 86% of the respondents are satisfied with the snack allowance provided to them and just 2% of the respondents are not aware about the snack allowance provided to them.

Inference: As in the analysis it is shown that only one person is not aware of the snack allowance given to the employees, that employee should be newly joined in the company.

Chart 4.14 Chart showing the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding snack allowance.

Kristu Jayanti college

71

Employee Welfare

2%

0%

12%

H ig h ly S a tis fa c to ry S a tis fa c t o ry N o t a w a re N o t s a tis fa c to ry H ig h ly n o t s a tis fa c t o ry

86%

Table 4.15 Table showing ‘Opinion about leave travel allowance provided to the respondents’

Kristu Jayanti college

72

Employee Welfare

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

Number of respondents 1 28 3 18 -50

Percentage 2% 56% 6% 36% -100%

Analysis: In the table it is shown that 56% of the respondents are satisfied with the leave travel allowance provided to them, but 36% of the respondents are not satisfied with the allowance provided to them and 6% of the respondents are not aware of this allowance. Inference: The analysis shows that most of the respondents are really satisfied with the allowance and this is a very good allowance and it motivates the employees to go out of station and take a break from the work pressure and can work better in the future.

Chart 4.15 Chart showing the satisfaction level of the employees regarding the leave travel allowance.

Kristu Jayanti college

73

Employee Welfare

0% 2%

36%

H ig h ly S a tis fa c t o ry S a tis fa c to ry N o t a w a re 56% N o t s a tis fa c to ry H ig h ly n o t s a t is fa c t o ry

6%

Table 4.16 Table showing ‘The opinion regarding the facilities provided to the physically handicapped respondent’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory
Kristu Jayanti college

Number of respondents -74

Percentage --

Employee Welfare

Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

1 49 --50

2% 98% --100%

Analysis: In the table it is shown that 98% of the respondents are not aware of the facilities provided to physically handicapped, only 2% of the respondents are satisfied with the facilities given to them. Inference: As there is only one person who has agreed that they are satisfied, may be they are physically handicapped and they are satisfied with the facilities provided to them. There are no charts shown for this data as it is understood from the above table.

Table 4.17 Table showing ‘Opinion about the personal accident scheme’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Number of respondents 7 37 1 5 -50 Percentage 14% 74% 2% 10% -100%

Kristu Jayanti college

75

Employee Welfare

Source —Primary data

Analysis: In the table it is shown that 74% of the respondents are satisfied with the accident scheme given to them and 10% of the respondents are not satisfied with the scheme provided to them.

Inference: As the analysis shows that nearly 88% of the respondents are very much satisfied with the personal accident scheme, which is really good to the organisation as it helps the employees during their bad times.

Chart 4.17 Chart showing the satisfaction level regarding the personal accident scheme.

Kristu Jayanti college

76

Employee Welfare

10% 0% 2%

14%

H ig h ly S a t is fa c t o ry S a t is fa c t o ry N o t a w a re N o t s a t is fa c t o ry H ig h ly n o t s a t is fa c t o ry

74%

Table 4.18 Table showing ‘opinion regarding the conveyance allowance given to the respondents’

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory

Number of respondents 3 47

Percentage 6% 94%

Kristu Jayanti college

77

Employee Welfare

Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

---50

---100%

Analysis: In the table it is shown that 94% of the respondents are satisfied with the conveyance allowance given to them and 6% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the allowance given to them.

Inference: The analysis shows that full 100% of the respondents are satisfied with conveyance allowance to the employees.

Chart 4.18 Chart showing the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding conveyance allowance.

Kristu Jayanti college

78

Employee Welfare

0% 6%

H ighly S atis fac tory S atis fac tory N ot aw are N ot s atis fac tory H ighly not s atis fac tory

94%

Table 4.19 Table showing ‘opinion regarding the recreation facilities’

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory

Number of respondents -34

Percentage -68%

Kristu Jayanti college

79

Employee Welfare

Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

9 6 1 50

18% 12% 2% 100%

Analysis: In the table, it shows that 68% of the respondents are satisfied with the recreation facility provided to the employees and 12% of the respondents are not satisfied with the recreation facility given to them.

Inference: The analysis shows that more than 80% of the workers are satisfied with the recreation facility provided to them.

Chart 4.19 Chart showing the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding the recreation facility provided to them.

Kristu Jayanti college

80

Employee Welfare

2% 12%

0%

H ig hly S atis fac to ry 18% S atis fac to ry N ot aw are N ot s atis fac to ry 68% H ig hly n ot s atis fac tory

Table 4.20

Table showing ‘opinion regarding the vocational training provided to respondents’

Kristu Jayanti college

81

Employee Welfare

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

Number of respondents -47 1 2 -50

Percentage -94% 2% 4% -100%

Analysis: In the table it shows that 94% of the respondents are satisfied with training given to them in the organisation, and only 4% of the respondents are not satisfied with the training given to them.

Inference: Most of the respondents are satisfied with the training program given to them and they should have more effective programs for better performance and better profits.

Chart 4.20

Chart showing the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding training.

Kristu Jayanti college

82

Employee Welfare

4% 2%

0% 0%

H ighly S atis fac tory S atis fac tory N ot aw are N ot s atis fac tory H ighly not s atis fac tory

94%

Table 4.21 Table showing ‘the opinion regarding the distress and relief funds provided to the employees’

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory

Number of respondents 1

Percentage 2%

Kristu Jayanti college

83

Employee Welfare

Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

34 10 4 1 50

68% 20% 8% 2% 100%

Analysis: In the table it is shown that 68% of the respondents are satisfied with the relief funds provided by the company.

Inference: Most of the respondents are satisfied with the fund provided but some of them are not aware about the fund given, so the company has to make sure inform the employees about the facilities given to them.

Chart 4.21 Chart showing ‘death and relief fund’

Kristu Jayanti college

84

Employee Welfare

2% 8% 2%

20%

H ig h ly S a t is fa c t o ry S a t is fa c t o ry N o t a w a re N o t s a t is fa c t o ry H ig h ly n o t s a t is fa c t o ry 68%

Table 4.22 Table showing ‘opinion regarding the education facilities provided to the respondents’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Number of respondents -Percentage --

Kristu Jayanti college

85

Employee Welfare

Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

30 4 16 -50

60% 8% 32% -100%

Analysis In the table it shows 60% of the respondents are satisfied with the education facilities to the respondent’s children

Inference: From the analysis it shows that most of the employees are satisfied with the education facilities provided to the respondents. It will be of great help for the respondents but the company will give only the standard allowance for education facilities that is the reason 32% of the employees are not satisfied.

Chart 4.22 Chart showing ‘the satisfaction level of respondents regarding the education facilities provided to them’

Kristu Jayanti college

86

Employee Welfare

0% 0% 32% Highly S atis fac tory S atis fac tory Not aware 60% 8% Not s atis fac tory Highly not s atis fac tory

Table 4.23 Table showing ‘opinion regarding the comfort and convenience at work place’

Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory
Kristu Jayanti college

Number of respondents 1

Percentage 2%

87

Employee Welfare

Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data

47 -2 -50

94% -4% -100%

Analysis: In the table shown above 94% of the respondents are satisfied with the comfort and convenience provided to the employees. Inference: Most of the respondents are very much satisfied with the comfort and convenience provided to them, they have a spacious office and not at all over crowded.

Chart 4.23 Chart showing ‘the comfort and convenience in the company’

Kristu Jayanti college

88

Employee Welfare

4% 0%

0% 2%

H ig hly S atis fa c tory S a tis fac to ry N o t a w are N o t s atis fa c tory H ig hly n o t s a tis fa c tory

94 %

Table 4.24 Table showing ‘Absenteeism and turn over’

Satisfaction level

Number of respondents

Percentage

Kristu Jayanti college

89

Employee Welfare

Strongly agree Agree Undecided Disagree Strongly disagree Total Source —Primary data

-33 16 1 -50

-66% 32% 2% -100%

Analysis: The table shows that 66% of the respondents agree that if better employee welfare is given then absenteeism and labour turnover can be reduced.

Inference: The analysis shows that most of the respondents agree that if better welfare is given then absenteeism and turnover will be reduced.

Chart 4.24 Chart showing ‘the agreement of the respondents when more welfare measures are given the absenteeism and labour turn over reduce’

Kristu Jayanti college

90

Employee Welfare

0% 2% 0%

32%

H ighly S atis fac tory S atis fac tory N ot aw are N ot s atis fac tory 66% H ighly not s atis fac tory

Table 4.25 Table showing ‘the relationship between the employees and the supervisor’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Number of respondents 20 30 ---Percentage 40% 60% ----

Kristu Jayanti college

91

Employee Welfare

Total Source —Primary data

50

100%

Analysis: The table shows that 60% of the respondents are satisfied with the relationship between their employees and supervisors, and 40% of the respondents are highly satisfied.

Inference: This analysis shows that all the employees in the organisation are satisfied with their employees as well as their supervisors. There are no charts shown for these data as it is very much understood from the above table.

Table 4.26 Table showing ‘the overall satisfaction level of the welfare facilities provided to the respondents’ Satisfaction level Highly Satisfactory Satisfactory Not aware Not satisfactory Highly not satisfactory Total Source —Primary data Number of respondents -48 -2 -50 Percentage -96% -4% -100%

Kristu Jayanti college

92

Employee Welfare

Analysis: In the table it is shown that 96% of the respondents are satisfied with the over all employee welfare in the company.

Inference: Out of 50 respondents only 2 respondents are not completely satisfied with welfare measures provided to them.

Chart 4.26 Chart showing ‘the satisfaction level of the respondents regarding the over all welfare measures’.

Kristu Jayanti college

93

Employee Welfare

4% 0%

0% 0%

H ig h ly S a t is fa c t o ry S a t is fa c t o ry N o t a w a re N o t s a t is fa c t o ry H ig h ly n o t s a t is fa c t o ry

96%

Table 4.27 Table showing the age of the respondents with respect to the years of the service in the company.

Kristu Jayanti college

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Employee Welfare

Age of the respondents Less 10yrs Below 25 5 25 to 35 0 35 to 45 0 45 &above 0 Total 5 % within 10% the age of respondents Source —Primary data Analysis:

Years service 11 to 15 yrs 0 3 0 0 3 6%

of

16 to 20yrs 0 0 28 0 28 56%

21 & above 0 0 0 14 14 28%

Total 5 3 28 14 50 100%

In the table it is shown that 28 respondents in the age of 35 to 45 have a service of 16 to 20 years. And 14 respondents are having an experience 21 years and above at the age of 45 and above. Inference: The analysis shows that more number of respondents is having an experience of 16 to 20 years at the age of 35 to 45. This shows that the respondents working there are having so much of experience but there is no such growth in there carrier. They must have got at the most of 2 promotions which is very less compared to the present world scenario.

Table 4.28 Table showing the qualification of the respondents with the years of service in MSIL. Qualification Years service
Kristu Jayanti college

of

95

Employee Welfare

Less >Matriculation Matriculation Under graduate Graduation PG Diploma Total % within the age 10yrs 0 1 (50%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 2 (40%) 2 (40%) 5 10%

11 to 15 yrs 0 0 (0%) 1(5%) 2 (11%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 3 6%

16 to 20yrs 0 0 (0%) 14 (70%) 9 (50%) 2 (40%) 3 (60%) 28 56%

21 & above Total 0 1 (50%) 5 (25%) 7 (39%) 1 (20%) 0 (0%) 14 28% 0 2 (100%) 20 (100%) 18 (100%) 5 (100%) 5 (100%) 50 100%

of respondents Source —Primary data Analysis: In the analysis it is shown that 70% of the respondents are under graduates and they are having an experience of 16 to 20 yrs of service. And 39% of the respondents are graduates and they are having an experience of 21 and above years. Inference: The analysis shows that though employees with not even a graduation are still staying in the company, so it shows that when they were appointed they were not appointed on the basis of their qualification and they should have been appointed through recommendation.

Table 4.29 Table showing absenteeism & labour turn over and years of service.

Years of service Less than 10 years 11 to 15 years 16 to 20

Absenteeism and labour turn-over Agree 4 80.0% 2 66.7% 19 67.9% Undecided 1 20.0% 1 33.3% 9 32.1% 96 Disagree 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%

Total 5 100.0% 3 100.0% 28 100.0%

Kristu Jayanti college

Employee Welfare

above 20years Total Source —Primary data

8 57.1% 33 66.0%

5 35.7% 16 32.0%

1 7.1% 1 2.0%

14 100.0% 50 100.0%

Analysis: In the table it shows that 67.9% of the respondents who are having an experience of 16 to 20 years agree that if better welfare is given then absenteeism and labour turnover would reduce. Inference: The analysis shows that most of the respondents agree that if better welfare facilities are provided then there will be a reduction in absenteeism and labour turn over.

CHAPTER 5 FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATION
The study was conducted at MSIL to make the analysis of the statutory and non-statutory employee welfare measures provided by the company. A schedule was administered to the respondents comprising of 50 employees of the company. The data collected was tabulated and analyzed. On evaluation of the primary data collected from the respondents the following findings, conclusion and recommendation are recorded.

FINDINGS

Kristu Jayanti college

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Employee Welfare

1. MSIL is a dynamic marketing force and can take up any huge project. 2. MSIL promotes to enrich the heritage and culture through various cultural programs. 3. MSIL is an organisation with national presence and international reach. 4. MSIL has a vast infrastructure to support all needs. 5. MSIL’s main motive is to satisfy their customer needs. 6. Most of the respondents are in the age group of 35-45 and 45 & above. So most of the employees are adults and MSIL should appoint youngsters so there will be some vibrant in the organisation and there will new innovative ideas coming from such youngsters. 7. Most of the respondents are male. 8. Most of the respondents are under-graduates and graduates. So the company has to appoint employees with good education and very fast at there work. 9. Most of the respondents receive there salary of 10000-15000 per month 10. Most of the employees are rewarded or promoted only according to their performance and very few are promoted through seniority based rewards. 11. Nearly 50% of the respondents are not at all satisfied with the rest room facilities provided to them. The company has to provide a better rest room facility. 12. Most of the respondents are satisfied with the drinking water facility provided by the company. 13. The medical and first aid facility provided should also be improved in a great extent. 14. Majority of the respondents are not at all satisfied with the canteen facility, infact there is no canteen provided for the employees in the organisation. So the company MSIL is recommended to start a new canteen provide them with good facilities and it acts as a motivating factor. 15. The respondents are very well satisfied with the casual leave, sick leave and earned leave provided by the organisation. 16. All the women are satisfied with the maternity benefits as well as maternity facilities provided by the organisation. 17. It is found that proper space allocation per worker and seating arrangement. 18. It is found that there is no welfare officer or a councilor for the employees to solve the problem. 19. Workers are satisfied with the vehicle benefits and it should be improved a little.

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Employee Welfare

20. Most of the respondents are satisfied with the leave travel allowance but there are some employees who are not satisfied. 21. Most of the respondents are satisfied with the personal accident scheme provided to them. 22. Most of the respondents are satisfied with the conveyance allowance given to them. Infact all the employees are satisfied with the conveyance allowance. 23. As nearly to 60% of the respondents have agreed that if better welfare measures are given then absenteeism and labour turn over would reduce. 24. Most of the employees are satisfied with the over all employee welfare provided to them. Though they are not satisfied with some of the facilities provided to them but mainly they are looking for job security which they are provided. 25. All the employees are satisfied with the relationship between the employees and their supervisors.

CONCLUSION
Employee welfare refers to taking care of the well-being of the workers by employers, trade unions and by the governmental and non-governmental agencies. Recognizing the unique place of the worker in the society and doing good for him/her retaining and motivating employees, minimizing social evils, and building up the local reputation of the company are the arguments in favor of employee welfare. The project was basically done to find out the present satisfaction level of the employees regarding the welfare measures provided to them, with this also to make the company aware about

Kristu Jayanti college

99

Employee Welfare

the employee’s dissatisfaction with certain welfare measures and give them appropriate suggestions to it. Doing my project with MSIL has been a great experience as I got to learn the new welfare measures which are in the corporate field and also the way the government firm works. Finally I would like to conclude hoping MSIL to excel in the years to come and to reach greater heights and to have an entrenched presence in the global market.

RECOMMENDATION
1. MSIL should provide canteen facility to the employees. 2. The employees should be more sincere to their work.

3. The employees should be more committed to their work as well. 4. MSIL should appoint more young people to their organisation.

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Employee Welfare

5. The company should take some measures like intensive personality and career development, and there should be suggestion boxes which will the management to recognize the new suggestions from the employees. 6. The technology and computers available should be effectively utilized to avoid paperwork. 7. MSIL should promote their company and their services more often. 8. The main office at Cunningham road in Bangalore should be kept clean and the building should be repaired and kept presentable.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
1. Personnel Management & Industrial Relations By Prof. P. C Tripathi Published by Sultan Chand & Sons (1991) 2. Human resource and Personnel Management By K. Aswathappa

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Employee Welfare

Published by Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company limited (2005) 3. Human Resource Management By V S P Rao Published by Excel Books (2000) 4. Industrial Relations By Arun Monappa Published by Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company limited (1985)

Websites
www.msilonline.com www.hrm.com www.google.com

Analysis Of Employee Welfare In MSIL
Dear Sir/Madam, I Ramya Mohandas, pursuing my MBA in Kristu Jayanti College of Management and Technology. I am conducting a study on the Analysis of Employee Welfare at MSIL. Can you please spare few minutes to answer the following questions:

1. Personal Details:
a) Name b) Age : _________________ : Below 25

[ ]
102

25 to 35

[ ]

Kristu Jayanti college

Employee Welfare

35 to 45 c) Gender : Male

[ ] [ ]

45 & above Female

[ ] [ ]

d) Designation while joining MSIL:

____________

e) Designation at present : ___________________ f) Years of Service : Below 10 [ ] 16 to 20 g) Income (Annually): Below 60000 10 to 15

[ ]

[ ] [ ]

20 & above [ ] 60000 to 120000 [ ]

120000 to 180000 [ ] 180000 to 240000 [ ] 240000 & above [ ] h) Number of Promotions: _________________________ i) Qualification : Less than matriculation Under Graduate Diploma Others j) Number of Leaves availed: _______________ k) Type of Rewards received by you:     Membership & Seniority based rewards Job status based rewards Competency based rewards Performance based rewards

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

Matriculation [ ] Graduate

[ ]

Post Graduate [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

l) Have you received any special awards:

YES

[ ]

NO

[ ]

IF YES Specify _________________________________ m) How often do they conduct the Performance Appraisal program? Annually

[ ]

Half Yearly

[ ]

Quarterly

[ ]

n) When was the last Performance Appraisal Program conducted? ________________________________________

Kristu Jayanti college

103

Employee Welfare

2. Statutory Welfare Measures:
a) How would you rate your satisfaction level with regard to the following welfare measures? 1) Highly Satisfied [HS] 2) Satisfied [S] 3) Not Aware [NA] 4) Not Satisfied [NS] 5) Highly Not Satisfied [HNS] HS    Rest rooms Drinking water facility Opinion regarding Medical and First aid facilities  Opinion regarding food and other services provided by canteen   Crèche Occupational Safety S NA NS HNS

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

b) How would you rate your satisfaction level with regard to the following welfare
measures? 1) Highly Satisfied [HS] 2) Satisfied [S] 3) Not Aware [NA] 4) Not Satisfied [NS] 5) Highly Not Satisfied [HNS]

HS        Earned leave Sick leave Maternity leave Casual leave Medical benefits Snack allowance Leave travel allowance

S

NA

NS

HNS

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]
104

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

Kristu Jayanti college

Employee Welfare

   

Physically handicapped Salary allowance/ advance Personal accident scheme Death relief fund scheme

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

c) How would you rate your satisfaction level with regard to the following extra-mural facilities provided by MSIL? 1) Highly Satisfied [HS] 2) Satisfied [S] 3) Not Aware [NA] 4) Not Satisfied [NS] • Social Insurance (Gratuity, Pension, PF etc) • • • • • • • • • • Maternity benefits Old age benefit Invalidity benefit Survivors benefit Conveyance allowance Recreation facilities Vocational training Transportation facilities Allied welfare facilities Distress relief & cash benefits 5) Highly Not Satisfied [HNS] HS S NA NS HNS

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

3. Non-Statutory Welfare Measures:
How would you rate your satisfaction level with regard to the following non-statutory welfare measures provided by MSIL? 1) Highly Satisfied [HS] 2) Satisfied [S] 3) Not Aware [NA] 4) Not Satisfied [NS] 5) Highly Not Satisfied [HNS]

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Employee Welfare

HS      Vehicle benefits House building advance Consumer Co-operative Societies Education allowance Paper allowance

S

NA

NS

HNS

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4. How do you rate the comfort and convenience at the work place? I. Highly Satisfied

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II. Satisfied

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III.

Not Aware V.

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IV. Not Satisfied

Highly Not Satisfied [ ]

5. Please tick the various facilities provided by the company? I. Health club

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II.

Weekend outings

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III. Sports club

IV. Yoga & Meditation

6. Do you think absenteeism and labour turnover could be reduced if better welfare measures are provided by MSIL? I. Strongly Agree Disagree

[ ]
V.

II.

Agree

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III.

Undecided

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IV.

[ ]

Strongly Disagree

[ ]

7. How would you rate the overall employee welfare measures and benefits provided by the company? I. III V. Highly Satisfactory Not Aware

[ ] [ ]

II. Satisfactory

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IV. Not Satisfactory [ ]

Highly Not Satisfactory [ ]

8. How would you rate the relationship with the supervisor and to the other workers?

Kristu Jayanti college

106

Employee Welfare

I.

Highly Satisfied

[ ]

II. Satisfied

[ ] [ ]

III.

Not Aware V.

[ ]

IV. Not Satisfied

Highly Not Satisfied [ ]

9. Can you suggest the other welfare measures that you want your organisation to offer and also state any improvement required in the existing welfare measures? ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

Kristu Jayanti college

107

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