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UNIVERSITY PRESS of MISSISSIPPI

The Land of Rowan Oak, page 1

Books for Fall–Winter 2016–2017

CONTENTS

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Postmaster: University Press of
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distributed free of charge to customers and
prospective customers: Issue number: 2

Credits: (front) Rowan Oak in snow,
photograph by Ed Croom; (back) Lonnie
Holley with his sandstone sculptures in
his yard, Birmingham, Alabama, c. 1988,
photograph: Ted Degener

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

12 Ain’t There No More  Brasseaux / Davis
9 Alexander Payne: Interviews  Levinson
28 American Indians and the Rhetoric of Removal and Allotment  Black
10 Assassins, Eccentrics, Politicians, and Other Persons of Interest  Wilkie
31 The Black Carib Wars  Taylor
7 Brian De Palma’s Split-Screen  Keesey
18 The British Superhero  Murray
15 Captain Marvel and the Art of Nostalgia  Cremins
14 Chris Ware: Conversations  Braithwaite
32 Clockwork Rhetoric  Brummett
19 The Comic Book Film Adaptation  Burke
30 Consuming Identity  Stokes / Atkins-Sayre
20 Conversations with Maurice Sendak  Kunze
22 Conversations with Michael Chabon  Costello
20 Conversations with Robert Stone  Heath
21 Conversations with Ron Rash  Claxton / Newcomb
21 Conversations with Stanley Kunitz  Ljungquist
22 Conversations with William Gibson  Smith
4 Dan Duryea  Peros
3 Expressions of Place  Kemp
33 Faulkner and History  Watson / Thomas
24 Full Court Press  Peterson
24 The Good Doctors  Dittmer
13 Hardscrabble to Hallelujah, Volume 1 Bayou Terrebonne  Cenac
36 Inventing George Whitefield  Parr
31 Island at War  Beruff / Fresneda
26 Joe T. Patterson and the White South’s Dilemma  Luckett
1 The Land of Rowan Oak  Croom
26 The Last Lawyer  Temple
11 Lucky Dogs  Strahan
6 Madeline Kahn  Madison
8 Martin Scorsese: Interviews, Revised and Updated  Ribera
18 Medievalist Comics and the American Century  Bishop
28 Minority Relations  Robinson / Chang
25 Mississippi: The Long, Hot Summer  McCord
27 The Mississippi Secession Convention  Smith
33 More than Cricket and Football  Rosen / Smith
35 Musical Life in Guyana  Cambridge
34 The Original Blues  Abbott / Seroff
2 Outsider Art  Wojcik
16 Panel to the Screen  Morton
8 Paul Verhoeven: Interviews  Barton-Fumo
11 Pelican Road  Bahr
15 Peter Bagge: Conversations  Worcester
9 Peter Bogdanovich: Interviews  Tonguette
14 Peter Kuper: Conversations  Worcester
36 The Pinkster King and the King of Kongo  Dewulf
30 The Port Royal Experiment  Dougherty
29 Prison Power  Corrigan
17 Reading Lessons in Seeing  Chaney
29 Red Scare Racism and Cold War Black Radicalism  Zeigler
23 Rough South, Rural South  Cash / Perry
5 She Could Be Chaplin!  Slide
37 Spiritualism in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans  Daggett
7 Stephen Sondheim and the Reinvention of the American Musical  McLaughlin
19 Superheroes on World Screens  Denison / Mizsei-Ward
6 Susan Sontag  Rollyson / Paddock
10 Teacher  Copperman
13 Teche  Bernard
17 The 10 Cent War  Goodnow / Kimble
4 A Thousand Cuts  Bartok / Joseph
25 To Write in the Light of Freedom  Sturkey / Hale
27 Trouble in Goshen  Smith
32 War Noir  Trott
5 Winnie Lightner  Lightner
16 The Woman Fantastic in Contemporary American Media Culture  Helford / Carroll /

Gray / Howard
35 Yodeling and Meaning in American Music  Wise
23 Yo’ Mama, Mary Mack, and Boudreaux and Thibodeaux  Soileau

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The Land of Rowan Oak

PHOTOGRAPHY  LITERATURE  BOTANY

An Exploration of Faulkner’s Natural World
Ed Croom
Afterword by Donald M. Kartiganer

T

he plants and landscape at Rowan Oak are
the “little postage stamp of soil” that William
Faulkner owned, walked, and tended for over
thirty years during the writing of many of his short
stories and novels. Faulkner saw and smelled the earth
and listened to sounds from the cultivated grounds and
the surrounding woods. This is the place that offered
him refuge for writing and provided him food from its
garden, fruit and nut trees, and pasture for his horses
and a milk cow. Rowan Oak boasts a diverse landscape,
encompassing an aristocratic eastern redcedar–lined
AN EXTRAORDINARY
drive and walk as well as hardy ornamental shrubs, trees,
PHOTOGRAPHIC
pastures, and a hardwood forest with virgin timber.
DOCUMENTARY OF THE
More than fifty years after Faulkner’s death, Rowan
Oak remains a sanctuary and a place of mystery and
WILD AND CULTIVATED
PLANTS AND LANDSCAPE OF beauty nestled in the midst of Oxford, Mississippi. The
photographs in The Land of Rowan Oak are botanist Ed
FAULKNER’S INSPIRATIONAL
Croom’s exploration and documentation of the changes
WRITING SANCTUARY
in the plants and landscape over more than a decade.
Croom encountered early morning mists, the summer
heat and haze, and even rare snowfalls in his near-daily walks on the grounds. His
photographs record a decaying fence line, trees and plants that have since disappeared,
and the newly restored sunken garden.
This book honors the land Faulkner loved. While Faulkner’s novels have left an
indelible legacy in southern and American letters, the landscape of his beloved home also
serves as a record of the botanical history of this most storied corner of the American
literary South.
ED CROOM, Oxford, Mississippi, is president of Croomia Botanical Scientific
and Regulatory Consulting, and he previously was a full-time faculty member at the
University of Mississippi. His work has appeared in the books Herbal and Magical Medicine;
Taxol: Science and Application; and Encyclopedia of Dietary Supplements as well as other plant
science and chemical journals. His photography has been exhibited at the University of
Mississippi and appeared in USA Today, the Scientist, and the Saturday Evening Post.

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

OCTOBER, 160 pages (approx.), 11 x 11
inches, 130 color illustrations, afterword,
bibliography, index
Cloth $35.00T 978-1-4968-0901-8
Ebook available

Credit: Photographs by Ed Croom

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MI S S ISSIPPI

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FOLK ART  TRAUMA STUDIES

Outsider Art

Visionary Worlds and Trauma
Daniel Wojcik

OCTOBER, 304 pages (approx.),
9 x 12 inches, 174 color illustrations,
bibliography, index
Printed Casebinding $45.00S
978-1-4968-0806-6
Ebook available

Credit, clockwise from left: Pierrot
Barra with his altars, photograph by
Donald Cosentino; Tyree Guyton,
Heidelberg Project, Detroit,
photograph by Ted Degener; Emery
Blagdon, Healing Machine (untitled
individual component), John Michael
Kohler Arts Center Collection

O

utsider art has exploded onto the international art
scene, gaining widespread attention for its startling
originality and visual power. As an expression of raw
creativity, outsider art remains associated with self-taught
visionaries, psychiatric patients, trance mediums, eccentric
outcasts, and unschooled artistic geniuses who create things
outside of mainstream artistic trends and styles. Outsider Art:
Visionary Worlds and Trauma provides a comprehensive guide
through the contested terrain of outsider art and the related
domains of art brut, visionary art, “art of the insane,” and
folk art. The book examines the history and primary issues of
the field as well as explores the intersection between culture
and individual creativity that is at the very heart of outsider art
AN UNPARALLELED
definitions and debates.
EXPLORATION OF THE
Daniel Wojcik’s interdisciplinary study challenges prevailing
assumptions about the idiosyncratic status of outsider artists.
POWER OF ART AND THE
This wide-ranging investigation of the art and lives of those
IMPULSE OF CREATION
labeled outsiders focuses on the ways that personal tragedies
and suffering have inspired the art-making process. In some cases, trauma has triggered a
creative transformation that has helped artists confront otherwise overwhelming life events.
Additionally, Wojcik’s study illustrates how vernacular traditions, religious worldviews, ethnic
heritage, and popular culture have influenced such art. With its detailed consideration of
personal motivations, cultural milieu, and the potentially therapeutic aspects of art making,
this volume provides a deeper understanding of the artistic impulse and human creativity.
DANIEL WOJCIK is professor of English and folklore studies at the University of Oregon.
His books include Punk and Neo-Tribal Body Art (published by University Press of Mississippi)
and The End of the World as We Know It: Faith, Fatalism, and Apocalypse in America.

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UNIVER S IT Y PRE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

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ART  LOUISIANA

Expressions of Place

The Contemporary Louisiana Landscape
John R. Kemp

E

xpressions of Place embarks on a journey across the
rural and urban landscapes of Louisiana via the
talents of thirty-seven artists located all around the
state. Many are acclaimed professionals whose paintings are
included in major private and public collections regionally
and nationally. Others have found their followings closer
to home. All, however, strive to express impressions of
the land with artistic styles that range from traditional to
the symbolic and almost totally abstract. Such a variety of
interpretation becomes possible in a landscape that changes
from dark cypress-shrouded bayous, trembling earth, grassy
CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS
prairies, the gritty streets of inner city New Orleans to vast
REVEALING THE STATE’S
wind-swept coastal marshes and the piney hills of north and
URBAN LANDSCAPES,
central Louisiana.
Rather than stand as an encyclopedia, catalog, or
SOUTHWESTERN SWAMPS,
history
of the visual arts in Louisiana, Kemp’s book is
CENTRAL PRAIRIES, VERDANT
instead
a celebration of the state’s evocative landscape
FORESTS, AND NORTHERN
in the work of accomplished contemporary artists. It
FIELDS
includes an introductory essay, which places these creators
and their works in historical context. Expressions of Place
provides readers with individual essays and biographical sketches in which the artists, in their
own words, give insight as to what they paint, how they paint, where they paint, and why
they are drawn to the Louisiana landscape. Particularly inspiring, the artists discuss their
interpretations of that landscape directly with the viewing audience.

Expressions of Place remains as much about the landscape of the artists’ imaginations as
it is about the land itself. With each painting, they have created visual poetry of a land and
environment that has become a defining part of their lives.
JOHN R. KEMP, Diamondhead, Mississippi, writes about southern artists for numerous
regional, national, and international magazines and covers the New Orleans art scene for the
New Orleans public television show Steppin’ Out. The New Orleans native and former deputy
director of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities has written and contributed to
more than a dozen books about Louisiana artists and history, including A Unique Slant of Light:
The Bicentennial History of Art in Louisiana, available from University Press of Mississippi.

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

NOVEMBER, 128 pages (approx.),
10 x 10 inches, 207 color illustrations
Cloth $40.00T 978-1-4968-0825-7
Ebook available

Credit, clockwise from right:
Thunderheads, Francis X. Pavy,
private collection; Queen Bess Island
(also known as Pelican Island) after
the 2010 BP oil spill, Jacqueline
Bishop, Arthur Roger Gallery, New
Orleans; Forest Curtain,Bill Iles

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MI S S ISSIPPI

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FILM STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE

BIOGRAPHY  FILM STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE

A Thousand Cuts

Dan Duryea

The Bizarre Underground World of Collectors
and Dealers Who Saved the Movies
Dennis Bartok and Jeff Joseph

A

Thousand Cuts is a candid
exploration of one of
America’s strangest and
most quickly vanishing subcultures.
It is about the death of physical
film in the digital era and about a
paranoid, secretive, eccentric, and
sometimes obsessive group of filmmad collectors who made movies
and their projection a private
religion in the time before DVDs
and Blu-rays.

The book includes the stories
of film historian/critic Leonard
Maltin, TCM host Robert Osborne
THE COLORFUL,
discussing Rock Hudson’s secret
COMPULSIVE,
1970s film vault, RoboCop producer
Jon Davison dropping acid and
SECRETIVE HISTORY
screening King Kong with Jefferson
OF FAMOUS AND
Airplane at the Fillmore East,
INFAMOUS FILM
and Academy Award–winning
film historian Kevin Brownlow
FIENDS
recounting his decades-long quest
to restore the 1927 Napoleon. Other
lesser-known but equally fascinating subjects include onelegged former Broadway dancer Tony Turano, who lives in a
Norma Desmond–like world of decaying movie memories, and
notorious film pirate Al Beardsley, one of the men responsible
for putting O. J. Simpson behind bars. 

Authors Dennis Bartok and Jeff Joseph examine one of
the least-known episodes in modern legal history: the FBI’s
and Justice Department’s campaign to harass, intimidate, and
arrest film dealers and collectors in the early 1970s. Many of
those persecuted were gay men. Victims included Planet of the
Apes star Roddy McDowall, who was arrested in 1974 for film
collecting and forced to name names of fellow collectors,
including Rock Hudson and Mel Tormé.

A Thousand Cuts explores the obsessions of the colorful
individuals who created their own screening rooms, spent vast
sums, negotiated underground networks, and even risked legal
jeopardy to pursue their passion for real, physical film.
DENNIS BARTOK, Burbank, California, is a filmmaker
and screenwriter, and currently head of distribution for
art-house distributor Cinelicious Pics. He was formerly
head of programming for the American Cinematheque’s
Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood. JEFF JOSEPH, Littlerock,
California, is a motion picture archivist and formerly one
of the best-known film dealers in the United States. Jeff and
his wife Lauren were the owners of SabuCat Productions. He
is currently working with the UCLA Film and TV Archive in
restoring the Hal Roach/Laurel and Hardy library.

Heel with a Heart
Mike Peros

D

an Duryea (1907–1968)
made a vivid impression
on moviegoers with his
first major screen appearance as the
conniving Leo Hubbard in 1941’s
classic melodrama The Little Foxes.
His subsequent film and television
career would span from 1941 until
his death. Duryea remains best
known for the nasty, scheming
villains he portrayed in such noir
masterpieces as Scarlet Street, Criss
Cross, and The Woman in the Window.
In each of these, he wielded a blend
of menace, sleaze, confidence,
THE BIOGRAPHY OF
and surface charm. This winning
A DEVOTED FAMILY
combination led him to stardom
MAN BEST KNOWN
and garnered him the adoration
of female fans, even though
FOR HIS ROLES AS
Duryea’s onscreen brutality so often
ABUSIVE VILLAINS
targeted female characters. Yet
this biography’s close examination
of Duryea’s oeuvre finds him excelling in various roles in
many genres—war films, westerns, crime dramas, and even the
occasional comedy.
Dan Duryea: Heel with a Heart is a full-scale, comprehensive

biography that examines the tension between Duryea’s villainous
screen image and his Samaritan personal life. At home, he
proved one of Hollywood’s most honorable and decent men.
Duryea remained married to the former Helen Bryan from
1931 until her death in 1967. A dedicated family man, he and
Helen took an active role in raising their children and in the
community.

In his career, Duryea knew villainous roles were what
the public wanted—there would be a public backlash if fans
read an article depicting what a decent guy he was. Frustrated
that he couldn’t completely shake his screen image and public
persona, he wrestled with this restriction throughout his
career. Producers and the public did not care to follow any new
directions he hoped to pursue. This book, written with Duryea’s
surviving son Richard’s cooperation, fully explores the life and
legacy of a Hollywood icon ready for rediscovery.
MIKE PEROS, New York, New York, teaches English at Bishop
Loughlin High School, including courses on mystery and
horror, as well as literature and film. He also reviews films for
NoHoartsdistrict.com.
OCTOBER, 240 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 63 b&w illustrations,
filmography, bibliography, index
Cloth $35.00T 978-1-62846-232-6
Ebook available
Hollywood Legends Series

SEPTEMBER, 240 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 47 b&w illustrations,
glossary, bibliography, index
Cloth $28.00T 978-1-4968-0773-1
Ebook available

4

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

BIOGRAPHY  FILM STUDIES  WOMEN’S STUDIES

BIOGRAPHY  FILM STUDIES  WOMEN’S STUDIES

Winnie Lightner

She Could Be Chaplin!

David L. Lightner

Anthony Slide
Foreword by George Stevens Jr.

Tomboy of the Talkies

W

innie Lightner (1899–
1971) stood out as the first
great female comedian
of the talkies. Blessed with a superb
singing voice and a gift for making
wisecracks and rubber faces, she
rose to stardom in vaudeville and
on Broadway. Then, at the dawn of
the sound era, she became the first
person in motion picture history to
have her spoken words, the lyrics to
a song, censored.

In Winnie Lightner: Tomboy of
the Talkies, David L. Lightner shows
how Winnie Lightner’s hilarious
THE BIOGRAPHY OF
performance in the 1929 musical
THE SPUNKY “SONG
comedy Gold Diggers of Broadway
A MINUTE GIRL,” THE
made her an overnight sensation.
She went on to star in seven other
FIRST ACTRESS TO
Warner Bros. features. In the best
HAVE HER SPOKEN
of them, she was the comic epitome
WORDS CENSORED
of a strident feminist, dominating
men and gleefully spurning
conventional gender norms and
moral values. So tough was she, the studio billed her as “the
tomboy of the talkies.”

When the Great Depression rendered moviegoers
hostile toward feminism, Warner Bros. tried to craft a new
image of her as glamorous and sexy. Executives assigned
her contradictory roles in which she was empowered in the
workplace but submissive to her male partner at home. The
new persona flopped at the box office, and Lightner’s stardom
ended. In four final movies, she played supporting roles as the
loudmouthed roommate and best friend of actresses Loretta
Young, Joan Crawford, and Mona Barrie.

Following her retirement in 1934, Lightner faded into
obscurity. Many of her films were damaged or even lost
entirely. At long last, this biography gives Winnie Lightner the
recognition she deserves as a notable figure in film history, in
women’s history, and in the history of show business.
DAVID L. LIGHTNER, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, is
professor emeritus of history at the University of Alberta. He
is the author of Slavery and the Commerce Power: How the Struggle
against the Interstate Slave Trade Led to the Civil War; Asylum, Prison,
and Poorhouse: The Writings and Reform Work of Dorothea Dix in
Illinois; and Labor on the Illinois Central Railroad, 1852–1900:
The Evolution of an Industrial Environment. He became interested
in Winnie Lightner because of their shared surname but is not
related to her.

The Comedic Brilliance of Alice Howell

A

lice Howell (1886–1961) is
slowly gaining recognition
and regard as arguably
the most important slapstick
comedienne of the silent era. This
new study, the first book-length
appreciation, identifies her place in
the comedy hierarchy alongside the
best-known of silent comediennes,
Mabel Normand. Like Normand,
Howell learned her craft with Mack
Sennett and Charlie Chaplin.
Beginning her screen career in
1914, Howell quickly developed
a distinctive style and eccentric
THE FIRST
attire and mannerisms, successfully
BOOK-LENGTH
hiding her good looks, and was
APPRECIATION OF THE
soon identified as the “Female
Charlie Chaplin.”
MOST IMPORTANT

Howell became a star of
COMEDIENNE OF THE
comedy shorts in 1915 and
SILENT ERA
continued her career through
1928 and the advent of sound
in film. While she is today recognized as a pioneering female
filmmaker, during her career she never expressed much interest
in her work, seeing it only as a means to an end, with her
income carefully invested in real estate. It has taken many years
for her to gain her rightful place in film history, not only as a
comedienne, but also as matriarch of a prominent American
family that includes son-in-law and director George Stevens
and grandson George Stevens Jr., founder of the American
Film Institute and the Kennedy Center Honors, who provides a
foreword.
Over the past forty-five years, ANTHONY SLIDE, Studio
City, California, has written and edited more than two hundred
books on the history of popular entertainment. He is a pioneer
in the documentation of women in silent film, writing the
first biography of Lois Weber, editing the memoirs of Alice
Guy Blaché, and authoring the first study of women silent
film directors. Lillian Gish called him “our preeminent film
historian of the silent era.” This is his seventh book published
with UPM.
SEPTEMBER, 144 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 43 b&w illustrations,
foreword, appendices, filmography, bibliography, index
Cloth $26.00T 978-1-4968-0632-1
Ebook available
Hollywood Legends Series

DECEMBER, 288 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 43 b&w illustrations,
filmography, index
Cloth $35.00T 978-1-4968-0983-4
Ebook available
Hollywood Legends Series

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MIS SISSIPPI

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BIOGRAPHY  FILM STUDIES  PERFORMING ARTS

BIOGRAPHY  WOMEN’S STUDIES  QUEER STUDIES

Madeline Kahn

Susan Sontag

Being the Music, A Life
William V. Madison

NEW IN

Paperback

B

The Making of an Icon, Revised and Updated
Carl Rollyson and Lisa Paddock

T

est known for her Oscarnominated roles in the
smash hits Paper Moon
and Blazing Saddles, Madeline Kahn
(1942–1999) was one of the most
popular comedians of her time—
and one of the least understood.
In private, she was as reserved and
refined as her characters were bold
and bawdy. Almost a Method actor
in her approach, she took her work
seriously. When crew members and
audiences laughed, she asked why—
as if they were laughing at her—and
THE FIRST BIOGRAPHY
all her life she remained unsure of
OF THE GREAT
her gifts.
William V. Madison examines
COMEDIC ACTRESS
Kahn’s film career, including not
AND STAR OF STAGE
only her triumphs with Mel Brooks
AND SCREEN
and Peter Bogdanovich, but also
her overlooked performances in The
Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter
Brother and Judy Berlin, her final film. Her work in television—
notably her sitcoms—also comes into focus. New York theater
showered her with accolades, but also with remarkably bad luck,
culminating in a disastrous outing in On the Twentieth Century that
wrecked her reputation on Broadway. Only with her Tonywinning performance in The Sisters Rosensweig, fifteen years later,
did Kahn regain her standing.
Drawing on new interviews with family, friends, and such
colleagues as Lily Tomlin, Carol Burnett, Gene Wilder, Harold
Prince, and Eileen Brennan, as well as archival press and private
writings, Madison uncovers Kahn’s lonely childhood and her
struggles as a single woman working to provide for her erratic
mother. Above all, Madison reveals the paramount importance
of music in Kahn’s life. A talented singer, she entertained
offers for operatic engagements long after she was an established
Hollywood star, and she treated each script as a score. As Kahn
told one friend, her ambition was “to be the music.”

his first biography of Susan
Sontag (1933–2004)
is now fully revised and
updated, providing an even more
intimate portrayal of the influential
writer’s life and career. The authors
base this revision on Sontag’s newly
released private correspondence—
including emails—and the letters
and memoirs of those who knew her
best. The authors reveal as never
before her early years in Tucson
and Los Angeles, her conflicted
relationship with her mother, her
longing for her absent father, and
AN INTIMATE
her precocious achievements at the
PORTRAIT OF THE
University of California, Berkeley,
FAMED WRITER,
and the University of Chicago.
Papers, diaries, and lecture notes,
DIRECTOR, AND
many accessible for the first time,
ACTIVIST
spark a passionate fire in this
biography.
The authors follow Sontag as she abruptly ends an early
first marriage, establishes herself in Paris, and embraces the
open lifestyle she began as a teenager in Berkeley. As a single
mother she struggled with teaching at Columbia University
and other colleges while aiming for a career as a novelist and
essayist. Eventually she made her own way in New York City after
acquiring her one and only publisher, Farrar, Straus & Giroux.
In her later years Sontag became a world figure, a
tastemaker, dramatist, and political activist who risked her life
in besieged Sarajevo. Love affairs with men and women troubled
her. Diagnosed with cancer, she responded with determination,
and her experience with illness inspired some of her best
writing. This biography shows Sontag always craving “more life”
at whatever cost and depicts her harrowing final decline even as
she resisted terminal cancer. Susan Sontag: The Making of an Icon
presents in candid and stark relief a new assessment of a heroic
and controversial figure.

WILLIAM V. MADISON, New York, New York, is a former

CARL ROLLYSON, Cape May County, New Jersey, is professor
of journalism at Baruch College, CUNY. His books include
American Isis: The Life of Sylvia Plath; Amy Lowell: A New Biography;
Confessions of a Serial Biographer; A Real American Character: The
Life of Walter Brennan; Hollywood Enigma: Dana Andrews; and
Marilyn Monroe: A Life of the Actress (the latter three published by
University Press of Mississippi). LISA PADDOCK, Cape May
County, New Jersey, is a freelance writer and editor.

producer at CBS News and a former associate editor of Opera
News; he was the lone production assistant on the Broadway
musical Rags in 1986. A graduate of Brown University and of
Columbia’s School of Creative Writing, he is a native Texan.
SEPTEMBER, 372 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 49 b&w photographs, filmography,
index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0959-9
Ebook available
Hollywood Legends Series

6

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

SEPTEMBER, 368 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 13 b&w illustrations,
bibliography, index
Paper $30.00T 978-1-62846-237-1
Ebook available

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

PERFORMING ARTS  MUSIC

FILM STUDIES  BIOGRAPHY

Stephen Sondheim and
the Reinvention of the
American Musical

Brian De Palma’s
Split-Screen

Robert L. McLaughlin

Douglas Keesey

F

rom West Side Story in
1957 to Road Show in
2008, the musicals
of Stephen Sondheim and his
collaborators have challenged
the conventions of American
musical theater and expanded the
possibilities of what musical plays
can do, how they work, and what
they mean. Sondheim’s brilliant
array of work, including such
musicals as Company, Follies, Sweeney
Todd, Sunday in the Park with George, and
Into the Woods, has established him as
HOW THE PREEMINENT
the preeminent composer/lyricist of
BROADWAY
his, if not all, time.
Stephen Sondheim and the

COMPOSER BRIDGED
Reinvention
of the American Musical
THE GAP BETWEEN
places Sondheim’s work in
RODGERS AND
two contexts: the exhaustion
HAMMERSTEIN AND
of the musical play and the
postmodernism that, by the 1960s,
POSTMODERNISM
deeply influenced all the American
arts. Sondheim’s musicals are
central to the transition from the Rodgers and Hammerstein–
style musical that had dominated Broadway stages for twenty
years to a new postmodern musical. This new style reclaimed
many of the self-aware, performative techniques of the 1930s
musical comedy to develop its themes of the breakdown of
narrative knowledge and the fragmentation of identity. In his
most recent work, Sondheim, who was famously mentored by
Oscar Hammerstein II, stretches toward a twenty-first-century
musical that seeks to break out of the self-referring web of
language.
Stephen Sondheim and the Reinvention of the American Musical

offers close readings of all of Sondheim’s musicals and finds
in them critiques of the operation of power, questioning
of conventional systems of knowledge, and explorations of
contemporary identity.
ROBERT L. McLAUGHLIN, Bloomington, Illinois, is professor

of English at Illinois State University. With Sally E. Parry, he is
the author of We’ll Always Have the Movies: American Cinema during
World War II and editor of Innovations: An Anthology of Modern and
Contemporary Fiction.
SEPTEMBER, 312 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 10 b&w illustrations,
bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0855-4
Ebook available

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

A Life in Film

NEW IN

Paperback

O

ver the last five decades, the
films of director Brian De
Palma (b. 1940) have been
among the biggest successes (The
Untouchables, Mission: Impossible) and
the most high-profile failures (The
Bonfire of the Vanities) in Hollywood
history. De Palma helped launch
the careers of such prominent
actors as Robert De Niro, John
Travolta, and Sissy Spacek (who was
nominated for an Academy Award
as Best Actress in Carrie). Indeed
Quentin Tarantino named Blow
A BIOGRAPHICAL
Out as one of his top three favorite
APPROACH TO
films, praising De Palma as the best
living American director.
THE FILMS OF A
Picketed by feminists protesting
CONTROVERSIAL
its depictions of violence against
AND PROVOCATIVE
women, Dressed to Kill helped to
create the erotic thriller genre.
DIRECTOR
Scarface, with its over-the-top
performance by Al Pacino,
remains a cult favorite. In the twenty-first century, De Palma
has continued to experiment, incorporating elements from
videogames (Femme Fatale), tabloid journalism (The Black Dahlia),
YouTube, and Skype (Redacted and Passion) into his latest works.

What makes De Palma such a maverick even when he is
making Hollywood genre films? Why do his movies often
feature megalomaniacs and failed heroes? Is he merely a
misogynist and an imitator of Alfred Hitchcock? To answer
these questions, author Douglas Keesey takes a biographical
approach to De Palma’s cinema, showing how De Palma reworks
events from his own life into his films. Written in an accessible
style and including a chapter on every one of his films to date,
this book is for anyone who wants to know more about De
Palma’s controversial films or who wants to better understand
the man who made them.
DOUGLAS KEESEY, Cayucos, California, has published
books on Catherine Breillat, Don DeLillo, Clint Eastwood,
Peter Greenaway, the Marx Brothers, Jack Nicholson, and Paul
Verhoeven as well as erotic cinema and film noir. He teaches
film at California Polytechnic State University.
FEBRUARY, 364 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 20 b&w illustrations, bibliography,
index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0972-8
Ebook available

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MIS SISSIPPI

7

FILM STUDIES  BIOGRAPHY

FILM STUDIES  BIOGRAPHY

Martin Scorsese

Paul Verhoeven

Edited by Robert Ribera

Edited by Margaret Barton-Fumo

Interviews, Revised and Updated

M

artin Scorsese (b.
1942) has long been
considered one of
America’s greatest cinematic
storytellers. Over the last fifty
years he has created some of the
most iconic moments in American
film, never afraid to confront
controversial issues with passion.
While few of his films are directly
autobiographical, his upbringing
in New York’s Little Italy, the
childhood asthma that kept him
from playing sports, and his early
“I DON’T KNOW IF I
desire to enter the priesthood
ANY LONGER ACCEPT
all helped form his sensibilities
and later shaped his distinct style.
THE IDEA OF AN
Community, religion, violence—
INHERENT SINFULNESS
these themes drive a Scorsese
IN HUMAN NATURE. I
picture, and whether he examines
THINK IN THE PROCESS the violence that bursts forth in the
hand of Travis Bickle or the passion
OF LIVING, WE MAY
of Jesus Christ, Scorsese’s mastery
NEED REDEMPTION
of the history, art, and craft of
JUST FROM BEING
filmmaking is undeniable.
This collection was originally
WHO WE ARE.”
edited by the late Peter Brunette
in 1999 and is now revised and
extensively updated by Robert Ribera. It traces Scorsese’s
evolution from the earliest days of the New American Cinema,
his work with Roger Corman, and his days at New York
University’s film program to his efforts to preserve the legacy
of cinema, his documentary work, and his recent string of
successes. Among new movies discussed are The Departed, Hugo,
and The Wolf of Wall Street, and the documentaries No Direction
Home, The Blues, and Shine a Light. Scorsese stands out as a
director, producer, scholar, preservationist, and icon. His
work both behind the camera and in the service of its history
are a cornerstone of American and world cinemas. In these
interviews, Scorsese takes us from Elizabeth Street to the heights
of Hollywood and all the journeys in between.
ROBERT RIBERA, Boston, Massachusetts, holds a PhD from
Boston University and was the associate producer on For the Love
of Movies: The Story of American Film Criticism. He has published
short takes in Cineaste.
FEBRUARY, 320 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology,
filmography, index
Printed casebinding $85.00S 978-1-4968-0923-0
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0947-6
Ebook available
Conversations with Filmmakers Series

8

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Interviews

A

“THERE IS MORE TO BE
SAID ABOUT DESPAIR
THAN THERE IS ABOUT
HAPPINESS. AND I’M
NOT TALKING ABOUT
WHAT I’D PREFER
IN REAL LIFE BUT
WHEN IT COMES TO
DRAMATURGY.”

fter a robust career in the
Netherlands as the country’s
most successful director,
Paul Verhoeven (b. 1938) built an
impressive career in the United
States with such controversial
blockbusters as RoboCop, Total
Recall, Basic Instinct, Starship Troopers,
and Showgirls before returning
home to direct 2006’s Black Book.
After a recent stint as a reality
television judge in the Netherlands,
Verhoeven returned to the big
screen with his first feature film
in a decade, a highly anticipated
French-language production, Elle,
starring Isabelle Huppert.

Verhoeven, who
holds a PhD in mathematics with
a concentration on the theory
of relativity, boasts a fascinating
background. Traversing Hollywood,
the Dutch film industry, and now
French filmmaking, the interviews
in this volume reveal a complex,
often ambiguous figure, as well as a

director of immense talent.
Paul Verhoeven: Interviews covers every phase of the director’s

career, beginning with six newly translated Dutch newspaper
interviews dating back to 1968 and ending with a set of
previously unpublished interviews dedicated to his most recent
work. He experimented with crowd-sourced filmmaking for the
television show The Entertainment Experience, which resulted in
the film Tricked, as well as his latest feature Elle. Editor Margaret
Barton-Fumo includes “Sex, Cinema and Showgirls,” a long
out-of-print essay by Verhoeven on his most controversial film,
accompanied by pages of original storyboards from this and
some of Verhoeven’s other films. Finally, Barton-Fumo allots
due attention to the director’s little-known lifelong fascination
with the historical Jesus Christ. Verhoeven is the only nontheologian member of the exclusive Westar Institute and author
of the book Jesus of Nazareth.
MARGARET BARTON-FUMO, Brooklyn, New York, has

contributed to Film Comment since 2006. She has interviewed
such directors, actors, and musicians as Brian De Palma,
Alejandro Jodorowsky, James Gray, Andrzej Zulawski, Harry
Dean Stanton, and Paul Williams.
JANUARY, 256 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology,
filmography, 32 b&w illustrations, index
Printed casebinding $55.00S 978-1-4968-1015-1
Ebook available
Conversations with Filmmakers Series

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

FILM STUDIES  BIOGRAPHY

FILM STUDIES  BIOGRAPHY

Peter Bogdanovich
Interviews

NEW IN

Paperback

Alexander Payne
Interviews

NEW IN

Paperback

Edited by Peter Tonguette

Edited by Julie Levinson

efore he was the Academy
Award–nominated
director of The Last Picture
Show, Peter Bogdanovich (b. 1939)
interviewed some of cinema’s great
masters: Orson Welles, Alfred
Hitchcock, John Ford, and others.
Since becoming an acclaimed
filmmaker himself, he has given
countless interviews to the press
about his own career.
This volume collects thirteen of
his best, most comprehensive, and
most insightful interviews, many
“A MOVIE SHOULD
long out of print and several never
BE LIKE A DREAM. IT
before published in their entirety.
WASHES OVER YOU,
They cover more than forty years of
directing, with Bogdanovich talking
YOU DON’T KNOW
candidly about such great triumphs
WHAT’S AFFECTING
as The Last Picture Show and What’s
YOU, YOU CAN’T DO
Up, Doc?, and such overlooked
ANYTHING ABOUT IT;
gems as Daisy Miller and They All
Laughed.
YOU’RE TAKEN AWAY.”
Assembled by acclaimed critic
Peter Tonguette, also author of
a new critical biography of Bogdanovich, these interviews
demonstrate that Bogdanovich is not only one of America’s
finest filmmakers, but also one of its most eloquent when
discussing film and his own remarkable movies.

ince 1996, Alexander
Payne (b. 1961) has made
six feature films and
a short segment of an omnibus
movie. Although his body of
work is quantitatively small, it is
qualitatively impressive. His movies
have garnered numerous accolades
and awards, including two Academy
Awards for Best Adapted Screenplay.
As more than one interviewer in this
volume points out, he maintains an
impressive and unbroken winning
streak. Payne’s stories of human
“INDEPENDENT
strivings and follies, alongside his
MEANS ONE THING
mastery of the craft of filmmaking,
mark him as a contemporary auteur
TO ME: IT MEANS
of uncommon accomplishment.
THAT REGARDLESS
In this first compilation of his
OF THE SOURCE OF
interviews, Payne reveals himself as a
FINANCING, THE
captivating conversationalist as well.
The discussions collected here range
DIRECTOR’S VOICE IS
from 1996, shortly after the release
EXTREMELY PRESENT.
of his first film, Citizen Ruth, to the
. . . IT’S WHERE YOU
2013 debut of his film Nebraska.
FEEL THE DIRECTOR,
Over his career, he muses on many
subjects including his own creative
NOT A MACHINE, AT
processes, his commitment to
WORK.”
telling character-centered stories,
and his abiding admiration for
movies and directors from across decades of film history.

Critics describe Payne as one of the few contemporary
filmmakers who consistently manages to buck the current trend
toward bombastic blockbusters. Like the 1970s director-driven
cinema that he cherishes, his films are small-scale character
studies that manage to maintain a delicate balance between
sharp satire and genuine poignancy.

B

PETER TONGUETTE, New Albany, Ohio, is a freelance
writer whose work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall
Street Journal, Christian Science Monitor, Weekly Standard, Sight
& Sound, Film Comment, and many other publications. Also
the author of Orson Welles Remembered and The Films of James Bridges,
he is author of a forthcoming critical biography of Peter
Bogdanovich.
FEBRUARY, 216 pages, 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology,
filmography, index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0964-3
Ebook available
Conversations with Filmmakers Series

S

JULIE LEVINSON, Newton, Massachusetts, is professor of film

at Babson College and has been the film curator for several
arts organizations and film festivals. She is the author of The
American Success Myth on Film as well as book chapters and articles
on a wide range of topics including screen acting, genre and
gender, documentary film, and metafiction.
FEBRUARY, 264 pages, 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology,
filmography, index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-1051-9
Ebook available
Conversations with Filmmakers Series

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MIS SISSIPPI

9

MEMOIR  EDUCATION  SOUTHERN STATES

JOURNALISM  POLITICS  SOUTHERN STATES

Teacher

Assassins, Eccentrics,
Politicians, and Other
Persons of Interest

Two Years in the Mississippi Delta
Michael Copperman

W

hen Michael
Copperman left
Stanford University
for the Mississippi Delta in
2002, he imagined he would lift
underprivileged children from the
narrow horizons of rural poverty.
Well-meaning but naïve, the Asian
American from the West Coast
soon lost his bearings in a world
divided between black and white.
He had no idea how to manage a
classroom or help children navigate
the considerable challenges they
A MESMERIZING
faced. In trying to help students, he
often found he couldn’t afford to
ACCOUNT OF THE
give what they required—sometimes,
REALITIES OF WORKwith heartbreaking consequences.
ING WITH TEACH FOR
His desperate efforts to save child
AMERICA IN ONE
after child were misguided but
sincere. He offered children the
OF THE COUNTRY’S
best invitations to success he could
POOREST AND MOST
manage. But he still felt like an
CHALLENGED REGIONS outsider who was failing the children
and himself.

Teach For America has for a decade been the nation’s
largest employer of recent college graduates but has come
under increasing criticism in recent years even as it has grown
exponentially. This memoir considers the distance between the
idealism of the organization’s creed that “One day, all children
will have the opportunity to attain an excellent education” and
what it actually means to teach in America’s poorest and most
troubled public schools.

Copperman’s memoir vividly captures his disorientation
in the divided world of the Delta, even as the author marvels at
the wit and resilience of the children in his classroom. To them,
he is at once an authority figure and a stranger minority than
even they are—a lone Asian, an outsider among outsiders. His
journey is of great relevance to teachers, administrators, and
parents longing for quality education in America. His frank
story shows that the solutions for impoverished schools are far
from simple.

NEW IN

Paperback

Fifty Pieces from the Road

Curtis Wilkie
Foreword by Hank Klibanoff

W

riting as a newspaper
reporter for nearly
forty years, Curtis
Wilkie covered eight presidential
campaigns, spent years in the Middle
East, and traveled to a number
of conflicts abroad. However, his
memory kept turning home and
many of his most treasured stories
transpire in the Deep South. He
called his native Mississippi “the gift
that keeps on giving.” For Wilkie, it
represented a trove of rogues and
racists, colorful personalities, and
A COMPILATION FROM
outlandish politicians who managed
THE INCOMPARABLE
to thrive among people otherwise
kind and generous.
CAREER OF ONE OF
Assassins, Eccentrics, Politicians, and

THE ORIGINAL “BOYS
Other Persons of Interest collects news
ON THE BUS”
dispatches and feature stories from
the author during a journalism career
that began in 1963 and lasted until 2000. As a young reporter for
the Clarksdale Press Register, he wrote many articles that dealt with the
civil rights movement, which dominated the news in the Mississippi
Delta during the 1960s.Wilkie spent twenty-six years as a national
and foreign correspondent for the Boston Globe. One of the original
“Boys on the Bus” (the title of a best-selling book about journalists
covering the 1972 presidential campaign), he later wrote extensively
about the winning races of two southern presidents, Jimmy Carter
and Bill Clinton.

Wilkie is known for stories reported deeply, rife with
anecdotes, physical descriptions, and important background
details. He writes about the notorious, such as the late Hunter S.
Thompson, as well as more anonymous subjects whose stories,
in his hands, have enduring interest. The anthology collects
pieces about several notable southerners: Ross Barnett; Byron
De La Beckwith and Sam Bowers; Billy Carter; Edwin Edwards
and David Duke; Trent Lott; and Charles Evers. Wilkie brings a
perceptive eye to people and events, and his eloquent storytelling
represents some of the best journalistic writing.

From 2002 to 2004, MICHAEL COPPERMAN, Eugene,
Oregon, taught fourth grade in the rural black public schools of
the Mississippi Delta with Teach For America. Now, he teaches
writing to low-income, first-generation college students of
diverse backgrounds at the University of Oregon. His work
has appeared in the Sun, the Oxford-American, Guernica, Creative
Nonfiction, and Copper Nickel, and has garnered fellowships and
awards from the Munster Literature Center, the Oregon Arts
Commission, Literary Arts, and Bread Loaf Writers Conference.

national and foreign correspondent for the Boston Globe. After his
retirement, he joined the faculty at the University of Mississippi,
where he teaches journalism and serves as a fellow at the Overby
Center for Southern Journalism and Politics. He is the author of
three earlier books, including The Fall of the House of Zeus.

SEPTEMBER, 220 pages, 6 x 9 inches
Cloth $25.00T 978-1-4968-0585-0
Ebook available

SEPTEMBER, 304 pages, 6 x 9 inches, foreword, index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0960-5
Ebook available

10

UNIVER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

CURTIS WILKIE, Oxford, Mississippi, spent most of his career as a

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

FICTION

MEMOIR  BUSINESS  LOUISIANA

Pelican Road
Howard Bahr

BACK IN

Print

E

arly on the morning of
Christmas Eve, 1940,
Artemus Kane leaves his
sweetheart’s New Orleans flat to
catch the northbound Silver Star,
a first-class passenger train on
the Southern Railway. Artemus,
a brakeman, will help bring the
train to Meridian, Mississippi, a
180-mile journey along what the
railroad men call “Pelican Road.”
Meanwhile, in the Meridian yard,
conductor Frank Smith awakes
in his caboose. A few hours later,
THE RIVETING STORY
Smith will take charge of a fast
OF A LOST WAY OF
freight train southbound for the
Crescent City.
LIFE ALONG A GREAT
Smith and Kane, who served
SOUTHERN RAILROAD
together in the Marine Corps
during World War I, are old
comrades. Their friendship flourishes amid the community
of railroad men who work along Pelican Road—a brotherhood
whose lives are spent among the lights and shadows, the danger
and humor and violence, and the loneliness and camaraderie
of railroad work. On this Christmas Eve, however, Smith and
Kane are each bound on a journey that will alter their lives
forever.
Pelican Road is a novel played out against the landscape of a

vanished way of life. Howard Bahr, who worked as a brakeman
and yard clerk in the twilight years of old-time railroading,
brings the authenticity of experience to his narrative. Pelican
Road, however, seems more than a railroad adventure story. At
its heart, the novel is about friendship and love, about men and
women who persevere in the face of hardship and danger and
who, in the end, find redemption in each other.
HOWARD BAHR, Jackson, Mississippi, is a native of Meridian,

Mississippi, a Vietnam veteran, a former railroader, and the
author of four novels. He received his bachelor’s and master’s
degrees in English from the University of Mississippi, then
worked as a professor of English. He is currently writer-inresidence at Belhaven University.
SEPTEMBER, 308 pages, 6 x 9 inches
Paper $25.00R 978-1-4968-1050-2
Ebook available
Banner Books

Lucky Dogs

From Bourbon Street to Beijing and Beyond
Jerry E. Strahan

W

hen walking the
French Quarter and
watching a Lucky Dog
salesman set up that colorful cart
and call out to entice customers,
don’t you wonder how such a
business works? As a knowing
review in Rolling Stone stated,
“People have always loved the
cart and harbored a mysterious
need to ride it. Revelers have
been known to climb on top of
the rolling wienies, screaming
‘Yippee kaya!’ as vendors stoically
THE FOUNDER’S
push them back to the barn at
ACCOUNT OF THE
4 a.m.” Since 1947 the red and
yellow carts have trumpeted good
ICONIC HOTDOG CART
fortune and sustenance.
BUSINESS AND ITS

Jerry E. Strahan recounts the
ROLE IN THE FRENCH
wild adventures of the Bourbon
Street wienie salesmen but also
QUARTER AND THE
takes readers well beyond New
WORLD
Orleans. In fact, he takes them
halfway around the world, where
this unique pushcart business maneuvered its way through the
bureaucratic red tape of a communist country to become a
licensed corporation in the People’s Republic of China.

In China, two points quickly became apparent to Strahan.
First, 99 percent of the Chinese population had no idea what a
Lucky Dog cart represented. One elderly passerby declared it to
be a missile. Second, the success or failure of any joint venture
in the Asian nation is directly proportional to the political
clout of that company’s local partner.
Lucky Dogs also recounts how the business and its vendors

survived Hurricane Katrina. Miraculously, it reopened only six
months after the storm in a city where more than 80 percent of
the landmass had been flooded and where less than 40 percent
of the population had returned. To reestablish itself in what
many described as Third World conditions, the company had
to transform its operation.

This work mixes business history, autobiography, survival
story, and an insider’s look at the bizarre lives of some of
Bourbon Street’s most quirky characters—the dauntless Lucky
Dog vendors. Both humorous and tragic, though it may read
like fiction, it is, for better or worse, all fact.
JERRY E. STRAHAN, New Orleans, Louisiana, has been

general manager of Lucky Dogs, Inc. since 1976. He is the
author of Andrew Jackson Higgins and the Boats That Won World War
II and Managing Ignatius: The Lunacy of Lucky Dogs and Life in the
Quarter.
OCTOBER, 272 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 20 b&w illustrations
Cloth $28.00T 978-1-4968-0832-5
Ebook available

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MIS S ISSIPPI

11

LOUISIANA  ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES  HISTORY

Ain’t There No More

Louisiana’s Disappearing Coastal Plain

Announcing
America’s Third Coast Series

Carl A. Brasseaux and Donald W. Davis
Foreword by Robert Twilley

F

or centuries, outlanders have
openly denigrated Louisiana’s
coastal wetlands residents and
their stubborn refusal to abandon the
region’s fragile prairies tremblants despite
repeated natural and, more recently,
man-made disasters. Yet, the cumulative
environmental knowledge these wetlands
survivors have gained through painful
experiences over the course of two centuries
holds invaluable keys to the successful
adaptation of modern coastal communities
throughout the globe. As Hurricane Sandy
A HARROWING
recently demonstrated, coastal peoples
ACCOUNT OF COASTAL
everywhere face rising sea levels, disastrous
EROSION, LONG
coastal erosion, and, inevitably, difficult
lifestyle choices.
NEGLECT, AND A MAN
Along the Bayou State’s coast the most
MADE DISASTER IN THE
insidious challenges are man-made. Since
BAYOU STATE
channelization of the Mississippi River in
the wake of the 1927 flood, which diverted
sediments and nutrients from the wetlands, coastal Louisiana has lost to
erosion, subsidence, and rising sea levels a land mass roughly twice the size
of Connecticut. State and national policymakers were unable to reverse
this environmental catastrophe until Hurricane Katrina focused a harsh
spotlight on the human consequences of eight decades of neglect. Yet, even
today, the welfare of Louisiana’s coastal plain residents remains, at best, an
afterthought in state and national policy discussions.

For coastal families, the Gulf water lapping at the doorstep makes
this morass by no means a scholarly debate over abstract problems. Ain’t
There No More renders an easily read history filled with new insights
and possibilities. Rare, previously unpublished images documenting
a disappearing way of life accompany the narrative. The authors bring
nearly a century of combined experience to distilling research and telling
this story in a way invaluable to Louisianans, to policymakers, and to all
those concerned with rising sea levels and seeking a long-term solution.
South Louisiana native CARL A. BRASSEAUX, Lafayette, Louisiana,
former director of the Center for Louisiana Studies, has spent a lifetime
studying the peoples and cultures of the Louisiana coastal plain. He is
the author of more than three dozen books and more than one hundred
scholarly articles, including Acadian to Cajun: Transformation of a People,
1803–1877 and Creoles of Color in the Bayou Country, both published by
University Press of Mississippi. He is a former Louisiana Writer of the
Year. DONALD W. DAVIS, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has been involved
in coastal-related research for more than forty years on the wide array of
renewable and non-renewable resources vital to the use of the wetlands.
His work has appeared in numerous journals including Annals of the
American Association of American Geographers, Shore and Beach, Journal of Soil
and Water Conservation, Louisiana Conservationists, and Louisiana History.

CARL A. BRASSEAUX AND
DONALD W. DAVIS, SERIES EDITORS

A

lthough disasters of the past decade—from
Hurricanes Lili, Katrina, Rita, Humberto,
Gustav, Ike, and Isaac to the massive BP oil
spill—have drawn international attention to the
fragility, vulnerability, and consequence of the
Louisiana Gulf Coast, the scholarly scrutiny given to
this area has failed to reflect its significance. Series
editors Carl A. Brasseaux and Donald W. Davis
aim to fill this noticeable void with publications on
Gulf Coast history, life, and culture. In particular,
this series will highlight the economic activities and
environmental stewardship of the inhabitants of this
diverse region.

From eyewitness accounts of the coastal plain
throughout history, to examinations of the region’s
industries, to books on the coast’s historic hurricanes,
material culture, and foodways, books in the series will
explore the Gulf Coast in a format accessible to policy
makers, residents of the coast, and the general public
alike.

Written by leading scholars in the field, this
series offers readers important insights into a timely
discussion on restoring and rehabilitating the coast
with the coastal population, for the first time, at the
forefront of the nation’s consciousness.
This contribution has been
supported with funding provided
by the Louisiana Sea Grant College
Program (LSG) under NOAA Award
# NA14OAR4170099. Additional
support is from the Louisiana Sea
Grant Foundation. The funding
support of LSG and NOAA is
gratefully acknowledged, along with
the matching support by LSU.

FEBRUARY, 256 pages (approx.), 8 x 10 inches, 165 b&w illustrations, 130 color
illustrations, 2 tables, foreword, appendix, bibliography, index
Cloth $30.00T 978-1-4968-0948-3
Ebook available
America’s Third Coast Series

12

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

LOUISIANA HISTORY  ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES  MEMOIR

LOUISIANA  ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

Teche

Hardscrabble to Hallelujah,
Volume 1 Bayou Terrebonne

A History of Louisiana’s Most Famous Bayou
Shane K. Bernard

S

hane K. Bernard’s Teche
examines this legendary
waterway of the American
Deep South. Bernard delves into
the bayou’s geologic formation
as a vestige of the Mississippi and
Red Rivers, its prehistoric Native
American occupation, and its
colonial settlement by French,
Spanish, and, eventually, AngloAmerican pioneers. He surveys
the coming of indigo, cotton, and
sugar; steam-powered sugar mills
and riverboats; and the brutal
institution of slavery. He also
AN EXTRAORDINARY
examines the impact of the Civil
ENGAGEMENT WITH
War on the Teche, depicting the
THE COLORFUL
running battles up and down the
HISTORY OF A STORIED bayou and the sporadic gunboat
duels, when ironclads clashed in
INLAND WATERWAY
the narrow confines of the dark,
sluggish river.

Describing the misery of the postbellum era, Bernard
reveals how epic floods, yellow fever, racial violence, and
widespread poverty disrupted the lives of those who resided
under the sprawling, moss-draped live oaks lining the Teche’s
banks. Further, he chronicles the slow decline of the bayou, as
the coming of the railroad, automobiles, and highways reduced
its value as a means of travel. Finally, he considers modern
efforts to redesign the Teche using dams, locks, levees, and
other water-control measures. He examines the recent push
to clean and revitalize the bayou after years of desecration by
litter, pollutants, and invasive species. Illustrated with historic
images and numerous maps, this book will be required reading
for anyone seeking the colorful history of Louisiana and the
Gulf Coast.

As a bonus, the second part of the book describes
Bernard’s own canoe journey down the Teche’s 125-mile
course. This modern personal account from the field reveals the
current state of the bayou and the remarkable people who still
live along its banks.
SHANE K. BERNARD, New Iberia, Louisiana, is the author of

several books on south Louisiana history and culture including
Cajuns and Their Acadian Ancestors: A Young Reader’s History; The
Cajuns: Americanization of a People; Swamp Pop: Cajun and Creole
Rhythm and Blues, all published by University Press of Mississippi;
and TABASCO®: An Illustrated History, distributed by University
Press of Mississippi. Bernard lives a short distance from Bayou
Teche.

Legacies of Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

Christopher Everette Cenac, Sr., M.D., F.A.C.S.
with Claire Domangue Joller
Foreword by Carl A. Brasseaux and Donald W. Davis

T

his book represents the
first time that the known
history and a significant
amount of new information
has been compiled into a single
written record about one of the
most important eras in the south
central coastal bayou parish of
Terrebonne. The book makes
clear the unique geographical,
topographical, and sociological
conditions that beckoned the
first settlers who developed
the large estates that became
AN INCOMPARABLE
sugar plantations. This first of
HISTORICAL RECORD
a planned four-volume series
OF A BAYOU’S MANY
chronicles details about founders
and their estates along Bayou
PLANTATIONS, FARMS,
Terrebonne from its headwaters
AND HOMESTEADS
in the northern civil parish to
its most southerly reaches near
the Gulf of Mexico. Those and other parish plantations along
important waterways contributed significantly to the dominance
of King Sugar in Louisiana.

The rich soils and opportunities of the area became the
overriding reason many well-heeled Anglo-Americans moved
there to join Francophone locals in cultivating the crop. From
that nineteenth century period up to the twentieth century’s
side effects of World Wars I and II, Hardscrabble to Hallelujah,
Volume I describes important yet widely unrecognized geography
and history. Today, cultural and physical legacies such as exslave founded communities and place names endure from the
time that the planter society was the driving economic force of
this fascinating region.
CHRISTOPHER EVERETTE CENAC, SR., M.D., F.A.C.S.,
Houma, Louisiana, is a practicing orthopedic surgeon and
has served a term as Terrebonne parish coroner. He and his
wife, Cindy, reside at Winter Quarters on Bayou Black. He
is the author of Eyes of an Eagle: Jean-Pierre Cenac, Patriarch: An
Illustrated History of Early Houma-Terrebonne (selected book of the
Louisiana Bicentennial Commission) and Livestock Brands and
Marks: An Unexpected Bayou Country History 1822-1946, Pioneer
Families Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana (a Louisiana Endowment
for the Humanities Book of the Year), both distributed by
University Press of Mississippi.

NOVEMBER, 272 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 43 b&w illustrations,
8 maps, index
Cloth $25.00T 978-1-4968-0941-4
Ebook available
America’s Third Coast Series

SEPTEMBER, 300 pages (approx.), 9 x 12 inches, 210 b&w/color
illustrations (approx.), 40 maps, 15 tables, introduction, foreword,
appendices, bibliography, index
Cloth $80.00T 978-0-9897594-1-0
Ebook available
Distributed for J.P.C., L.L.C.

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

UN I V E R S IT Y P R E S S O F MI S S I SSIPPI

13

COMIC STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE  BIOGRAPHY

COMICS STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE  BIOGRAPHY

Chris Ware

Peter Kuper

Edited by Jean Braithwaite

Edited by Kent Worcester

Conversations

Conversations

V

irtuoso Chris Ware (b.
1967) has achieved some
noteworthy firsts for
comics. The Guardian First Book
Award for Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest
Kid on Earth was the first major UK
literary prize awarded for a graphic
novel. In 2002 Ware was the first
cartoonist included in the Whitney
“[COMICS] WAS A
Biennial.
MEDIUM THAT TRIED

Like Art Spiegelman or Alison
TO PUT BITS OF
Bechdel, Ware thus stands out as
THE PAST, PRESENT,
an important crossover artist who
has made the wider public aware
AND FUTURE ALL
of comics as literature. His regular
TOGETHER ON A PAGE
New Yorker covers give him a central
SO THEY COULD BE
place in our national cultural
conversation. Since the earliest issues
APPREHENDED BOTH
of ACME Novelty Library in the 1990s,
AS A MASS AND AS A
cartoonist peers have acclaimed
FLOW, OR, IN MORE
Ware’s distinctive, meticulous visual
HIGH-FALUTING
style and technical innovations to
the medium. Ware also remains
WORDS, AS A WAVE
a literary author of the highest
AND AS A PARTICLE.”
caliber, spending many years to
create thematically complex graphic
masterworks such as Building Stories and the ongoing Rusty Brown.

Editor Jean Braithwaite compiles interviews displaying
both Ware’s erudition and his quirky self-deprecation. They
span Ware’s career from 1993 to 2015, creating a time-lapse
portrait of the artist as he matures. Several of the earliest talks
are reprinted from zines now extremely difficult to locate.
Braithwaite has selected the best broadcasts and podcasts
featuring the interview-shy Ware for this volume, including
new transcriptions. An interview with Marnie Ware from 2000
makes for a delightful change of pace, as she offers a generous,
supremely lucid attitude toward her husband and his work.
Candidly and humorously, she considers married life with a
genius in the house. Brand-new interviews with both Chris and
Marnie Ware conclude the volume.
JEAN BRAITHWAITE, Edinburg, Texas, is associate professor

of English at the University of Texas–Rio Grande Valley, where
she teaches comics among other courses. Braithwaite is comics
editor at riverSedge: A Journal of Art and Literature. Her previous
book was a literary memoir, FAT: The Story of My Life with My
Body, and she has published in periodicals including the Sun, the
New York Times, North American Review, and the Henry James Review.
JANUARY, 272 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 29 b&w illustrations,
11 color illustrations, introduction, chronology, index
Printed casebinding $40.00S 978-1-4968-0929-2
Ebook available
Conversations with Comic Artists Series
Credit: Self-portrait © Chris Ware

14

UNIVER S IT Y PRE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

 

P

eter Kuper (b. 1958),
one of America’s leading
cartoonists, has created
work recognized around the world.
His art has graced the pages and
covers of numerous magazines and
newspapers,
including Time, Newsweek, the New
Yorker, Harper’s, Mother Jones,
the Progressive, the Nation, and the New
York Times. He is also a longtime
contributor to Mad magazine, where
he has been writing and drawing Spy
“THROUGHOUT MY
vs. Spy for nearly two decades. He is
CAREER I’VE TRIED TO the cofounder and coeditor of World
DEFY WHAT PEOPLE— War 3 Illustrated, the cutting-edge
magazine devoted to political graphic
ESPECIALLY NONart. His graphic novels have explored
COMIC READERS—
the medium from comics journalism
PRESUME ABOUT THE and autobiography to fiction and
literary adaptations. Among the
FORM.”
works examined herein are his
books The System, Sticks and Stones,
Stop Forgetting to Remember, Diario de Oaxaca, and adaptations of
Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis and Upton Sinclair’s The
Jungle. Kuper also discusses his recently published opus, the
328-page Ruins, inspired by his experiences in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Along with two dozen black-and-white images, this
volume features ten lively, informative interviews with Kuper,
including a career-spanning lengthy new interview. The
book also includes a quartet of revealing interviews with underground comix legends R. Crumb and Vaugh Bodē, Mad
magazine publisher William Gaines, and Jack Kirby, cocreator
of mainstream superheroes from the Avengers to the Fantastic
Four. These interviews were conducted by Kuper and fellow
artist Seth Tobocman in the early 1970s, when they were
teenagers. Most of the interviews collected in this book
are either previously unpublished or long out of print, and they
address such varied topics as the nuts and bolts of creating
graphic novels, world travels, teaching at Harvard University,
Hollywood dealmaking, climate change, Spy vs. Spy, New York
City in the 1970s and 1980s, Mad magazine, and World War 3
Illustrated.
 
KENT WORCESTER, Bronx, New York, is a professor of
political science at Marymount Manhattan College. His most
recent books are Peter Bagge: Conversations; The Superhero Reader
(coedited with Charles Hatfield and Jeet Heer); A Comics
Studies Reader (coedited with Jeet Heer); and Arguing Comics:
Literary Masters on a Popular Medium (coedited with Jeet Heer), all
published by University Press of Mississippi.
OCTOBER, 240 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 24 b&w illustrations,
introduction, chronology, index
Printed casebinding $40.00S 978-1-4968-0837-0
Ebook available
Conversations with Comic Artists Series

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

COMICS STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE  BIOGRAPHY

Peter Bagge

COMICS STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE

NEW IN

Conversations

Paperback

Edited by Kent Worcester

F

or fans of Peter Bagge
(b. 1957) and his bracing
satirical writing and
drawing, this collection offers
a perfect means to track how
he describes his career choices,
work habits, preoccupations,
and comedic sensibility since the
1980s. Featuring a new interview
and much previously unavailable
material, this book delivers
insightful, occasionally gossipy,
sometimes funny, and often tart
conversations.
Bagge’s detailed, garrulous,
“WHAT COMICS HAVE
and often grotesquely funny (and
ALL OVER ELECTRONIC discomfiting) work harks back
to the underground generation,
MEDIA IS THAT IT’S
recalling R. Crumb and Gilbert
TOTALLY POSSIBLE TO
Shelton, while also pointing
GET ONE PERSON’S
forward to the emergence of
alternative comics as a distinct
VISION IN COMICS.
genre. His signature series,
FOR TV, YOU HAVE TO
the rawly humorous Hate and
COLLABORATE WITH
his editorship of the often
outrageous Weirdo magazine,
DOZENS IF NOT HUNfounded
by Crumb, established
DREDS OF PEOPLE.”
Bagge as a leading voice in
alternative comics, and his rude,
wildly expressive cartooning makes him a counterpoint to the
still introspection of recent literary graphic novels.

In his career over three decades, Bagge has left his mark as a
prolific cartoonist, an accomplished musician, and a sometime
essayist, editor, and animator. While his creative output
encompasses autobiographical comics, graphic nonfiction,
magazine illustrations, gag cartoons, minicomics, political
commentary, superhero parodies, comic strips, animated
videos, and one-page humor pieces, Bagge stands out for
creating continuity-based graphic stories that revolve around
sharply defined, over-the-top fictional characters. Libertarians
know him for his comics journalism, as his graphic biography
of Margaret Sanger in 2013 reaches new audiences. While
some have lazily branded Bagge as a grunge-era visual satirist,
his creative restlessness and expanding body of work make it
difficult to confine him.
KENT WORCESTER, Bronx, New York, is professor of

political science at Marymount Manhattan College. His
most recent books are Peter Kuper: Conversations, The Superhero
Reader (coedited with Charles Hatfield and Jeet Heer), A Comics
Studies Reader (coedited with Jeet Heer), and Arguing Comics:
Literary Masters on a Popular Medium (coedited with Jeet Heer), all
published by University Press of Mississippi.
DECEMBER, 220 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 10 b&w illustrations, introduction,
chronology, index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0974-2
Ebook available
Conversations with Comic Artists Series

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

Captain Marvel and
the Art of Nostalgia
Brian Cremins

B

illy Batson discovers a
secret in a forgotten
subway tunnel. There
the young man meets a wizard who
offers a precious gift: a magic word
that will transform the newsboy into
a hero. When Billy says, “Shazam!,”
he becomes Captain Marvel, the
World’s Mightiest Mortal, one
of the most popular comic book
characters of the 1940s. This book
tells the story of that hero and the
writers and artists who created his
magical adventures.
THE MARVELOUS
The saga of Captain Marvel is
also that of artist C. C. Beck and
STORY OF INNOVAwriter Otto Binder, one of the most
TORS C. C. BECK AND
innovative and prolific creative
OTTO BINDER AND
teams working during the Golden
THEIR MIGHTY
Age of comics in the United States.
While Beck was the technician and
AMERICAN HERO
meticulous craftsman, Binder
contributed the still, human
voice at the heart of Billy’s adventures. Later in his career,
Beck, like his friend and colleague Will Eisner, developed a
theory of comic art expressed in numerous articles, essays,
and interviews. A decade after Fawcett Publications settled a
copyright infringement lawsuit with Superman’s publisher, Beck
and Binder became legendary, celebrated figures in comic book
fandom of the 1960s.

What Beck, Binder, and their readers share in common
is a fascination with nostalgia, which has shaped the history
of comics and comics scholarship in the United States. Billy
Batson’s America, with its cartoon villains and talking tigers,
remains a living archive of childhood memories, so precious but
elusive, as strange and mysterious as the boy’s first visit to the
subway tunnel. Taking cues from Beck’s theories of art and from
the growing field of memory studies, Captain Marvel and the Art
of Nostalgia explains why we read comics and, more significantly,
how we remember them and the America that dreamed them up
in the first place.
BRIAN CREMINS, Chicago, Illinois, is an associate professor

of English at Harper College. His essays have appeared in the
International Journal of Comic Art, Studies in American Humor, the
Los Angeles Review of Books, Alter Ego, and in the edited collection
Comics and the U.S. South, published by University Press of
Mississippi.
DECEMBER, 256 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 54 b&w illustrations
(approx.), bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0876-9
Ebook available

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MI S S I SSIPPI

15

WOMEN’S STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE  MEDIA STUDIES

FILM STUDIES  COMICS STUDIES  MEDIA STUDIES

The Woman Fantastic in
Contemporary American
Media Culture

Panel to the Screen

Edited by Elyce Rae Helford, Shiloh Carroll, Sarah
Gray, and Michael R. Howard II
Contributions by Marleen S. Barr, Elyce
Rae Helford, Ewan Kirkland, Nicola Mann,
Megan McDonough, Alex Naylor, Rhonda
Nicol, Joan Ormrod, J. Richard Stevens,
Tosha Taylor, Katherine A. Wagner, and
Rhonda V. Wilcox

A

lthough the last three decades
have offered a growing body
of scholarship on images of
fantastic women in popular culture,
these studies either tend to focus on
one particular variety of fantastic
female (the action or sci-fi heroine),
HOW THE INCREDIBLE
or on her role in a specific genre
(villain, hero, temptress). This
HEROINE HAS
edited collection strives to define the
EVOLVED AND
“Woman Fantastic” more fully.
SHAPED TELEVISION,
The Woman Fantastic may appear
in speculative or realist settings, but
FILM, COMIC BOOKS,
her presence is always recognizable.
AND LITERATURE
Through futuristic contexts, fantasy
worlds, alternate histories, or the
display of superpowers, these insuperable women challenge the
laws of physics, chemistry, and/or biology.

In chapters devoted to certain television programs, adult
and young adult literature, and comics, contributors discuss
feminist negotiation of today’s economic and social realities.
Senior scholars and rising academic stars offer compelling
analyses of fantastic women from Wonder Woman and She-Hulk
to Talia Al Ghul and Martha Washington; from Carrie Vaughn’s
Kitty Norville series to Cinda Williams Chima’s The Seven
Realms series; and from Battlestar Gallactica’s female Starbuck
to Game of Thrones’ Sansa and even Elaine Barrish Hammond
of USA’s Political Animals. This volume furnishes an important
contribution to ongoing discussions of gender and feminism in
popular culture.
ELYCE RAE HELFORD, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, is

professor of English and faculty in women’s and gender
studies at Middle Tennessee State University. SHILOH
CARROLL, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, is instructor in the
writing center at Middle Tennessee State University. SARAH
GRAY, Nashville, Tennessee, and MICHAEL R. HOWARD II,
Edmond, Oklahoma, are graduate students in English at Middle
Tennessee State University. Howard is also assistant professor
and Writing Center Director at Langston College. Carroll,
Gray, and Howard organized the conference “Catwoman to
Katniss: Villainesses and Heroines in Science Fiction.”

Style, American Film, and Comic Books
during the Blockbuster Era
Drew Morton

O

ver the past forty years,
American film has entered
into a formal interaction
with the comic book. Such comic
book adaptations as Sin City, 300,
and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World have
adopted components of their source
materials’ visual style. The screen
has been fractured into panels, the
photographic has given way to the
graphic, and the steady rhythm of
cinematic time has evolved into a far
more malleable element. In other
words,
films have begun to look like
A UNIQUE
comics.
EXPLORATION OF

Yet, this interplay also occurs
ADAPTATION THEORY
in the other direction. In order
to retain cultural relevancy, comic
AND HOW ONE
books have begun to look like
DRAMATIC VISUAL
films. Frank Miller’s original Sin
STYLE AFFECTS
City comics are indebted to film
ANOTHER
noir while Stephen King’s The Dark
Tower series could be a Sergio Leone
spaghetti western translated onto paper. Film and comic books
continuously lean on one another to reimagine their formal
attributes and stylistic possibilities.

In Panel to the Screen, Drew Morton examines this dialogue
in its intersecting and rapidly changing cultural, technological,
and industrial contexts. Early on, many questioned the prospect
of a “low” art form suited for children translating into “high”
art material capable of drawing colossal box office takes. Now
the naysayers are as quiet as the queued crowds at ComicCons are massive. Morton provides a nuanced account of this
phenomenon by using formal analysis of the texts in a real world
context of studio budgets, grosses, and audience reception.
DREW MORTON, Los Angeles, California, is an assistant
professor of mass communication at Texas A&M University–
Texarkana. His publications have appeared in Animation: An
Interdisciplinary Journal, Cinema Journal, [in]Transition, Journal
of Graphic Novels and Comics, and Studies in Comics. He is the
co-founder and coeditor of [in]Transition, the award-winning
journal devoted to videographic criticism.
DECEMBER, 208 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 51 b&w illustrations,
bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0978-0
Ebook available

NOVEMBER, 256 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 11 b&w illustrations,
introduction, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0871-4
Ebook available

16

UNIVER S IT Y PRE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

COMICS STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE

COMICS STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE  WORLD WAR II

Reading Lessons in Seeing

The 10 Cent War

Mirrors, Masks, and Mazes in the
Autobiographical Graphic Novel

Comic Books, Propaganda, and World War II
Edited by Trischa Goodnow and James J. Kimble

Michael A. Chaney

L

iterary scholar Michael A. Chaney examines graphic
novels to illustrate that in form and function they
inform readers on how they ought to be read.
His arguments result in an innovative analysis of the various
knowledges that comics produce and the methods artists and
writers employ to convey them. Theoretically eclectic, this study
attends to the lessons taught by both the form and content of
today’s most celebrated graphic novels.

Chaney analyzes the embedded
HOW EMBEDDED
lessons in comics and graphic novels
through the form’s central tropes: the
METHODS OF
iconic child storyteller and the inherent
CREATION
childishness of comics in American
DYNAMICALLY
culture; the use of mirrors and masks as
ciphers of the unconscious; embedded
AFFECT MEANING
puzzles and games in otherwise storyIN COMICS
driven comic narratives; and the form’s
self-reflexive propensity for showing its
work. Comics reveal the labor that goes into producing them,
embedding lessons on how to read the “work” as a whole.

Throughout, Chaney draws from a range of theoretical
insights from psychoanalysis and semiotics to theories of
reception and production from film studies, art history, and
media studies. Some of the major texts examined include
Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis; Chris Ware’s Jimmy Corrigan: The
Smartest Kid on Earth; Joe Sacco’s Palestine; David B.’s Epileptic;
Kyle Baker’s Nat Turner; and many more. As Chaney’s examples
show, graphic novels teach us even as they create meaning in
their infinite relay between words and pictures.
MICHAEL A. CHANEY, White River Junction, Vermont, is

associate professor of English at Dartmouth College and chair
of the African and African American studies program. He
is the author of Fugitive Vision: Slave Image and Black Identity in
Antebellum Narrative and editor of Graphic Subjects: Critical Essays
on Autobiography and Graphic Novels.
FEBRUARY, 192 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 35 b&w illustrations,
bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-1025-0
Ebook available

Contributions by Derek Buescher,
Travis Cox, Trischa Goodnow, Jon Judy,
John Katsion, James J. Kimble, Christina
Knopf, Steve E. Martin, Brad Palmer,
Elliott Sawyer, Deborah Clark Vance,
David Wilt, and Zou Yizheng

T

he Allied victory in World
War II relied on far more
than courageous soldiers.
Americans on the home front
constantly supported the war effort
in the form of factory work, war
bond purchases, salvage drives, and
morale-rallying efforts. Motivating
THE STORY OF
these men, women, and children
HOW THE COMIC
to keep doing their bit during the
BOOK INDUSTRY
war was among the conflict’s most
ANTICIPATED THE
urgent tasks.
FIGHT AGAINST
One of the most overlooked
aspects of these efforts involved a
FASCISM AND HELPED
surprising initiative—comic book
SUSTAIN AMERICA’S
propaganda. Even before Pearl
Harbor, the comic book industry
WAR EFFORT
enlisted its formidable army of artists, writers, and editors to dramatize the conflict for readers
of every age and interest. Comic book superheroes and everyday characters modeled positive behaviors and encouraged
readers to keep scrapping. Ultimately those characters proved
to be persuasive icons in the war’s most colorful and indelible
propaganda campaign.
The 10 Cent War presents a riveting analysis of how differ
ent types of comic books and comic book characters supplied
reasons and means to support the war effort. The contributors
demonstrate that, free of government control, these appeals
produced this overall imperative. The book discusses the role
of such major characters as Superman, Wonder Woman, and
Uncle Sam along with a host of such minor characters as kid
gangs and superhero sidekicks. It even considers novelty and
small presses, providing a well-rounded look at the many ways
that comic books served as popular propaganda.
TRISCHA GOODNOW, Monroe, Oregon, is a professor of

speech communication in the School of Arts and Communication at Oregon State University and has published books
on parliamentary debate and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.
JAMES J. KIMBLE, East Hanover, New Jersey, associate professor of communication and the arts at Seton Hall University, is the author of Mobilizing the Home Front: War Bonds and
Domestic Propaganda and Prairie Forge: The Extraordinary Story of the
Nebraska Scrap Metal Drive of World War II, as well as the writer
and co-producer of the feature documentary Scrappers: How the
Heartland Won World War II.
JANUARY, 240 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 20 b&w illustrations,
2 tables, introduction, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-1030-4
Ebook available

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

UN I V E R S IT Y P R E S S O F MI S S I SSIPPI

17

COMICS STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE  MEDIEVALIST STUDIES

COMICS STUDIES  POPULAR CULTURE  BRITISH STUDIES

Medievalist Comics and
the American Century

The British Superhero

Chris Bishop

hris Murray reveals the
largely unknown and
rather surprising history
of the British superhero. It is often
thought that Britain did not have
its own superheroes, yet Murray
demonstrates that there were a great
many in Britain and that they were
often used as a way to comment on
the relationship between Britain and
America. Sometimes they emulated
the style of American comics, but
they also frequently became sites of
resistance to perceived American
TRACKING THE
political and cultural hegemony,
SURPRISING RISE
drawing upon satire and parody as a
means of critique.
OF THE BRITISH
Murray illustrates that the
SUPERHERO
superhero genre is a blend of several
influences and that in British
comics, these influences are quite different from those in
America, resulting in some contrasting approaches to the figure
of the superhero. He identifies the origins of the superhero
and supervillain in nineteenth-century popular culture such
as the penny dreadfuls and boy’s weeklies and in science fiction
writing of the 1920s and 1930s. From the emergence of British
superheroes in the 1940s, the advent of “fake” American
comics, and the reformatting of reprinted material to the
British Invasion of the 1980s, and the pivotal roles in American
superhero comics and film production held by British artists
today, this book will challenge views about British superheroes
and the comics’ creators who fashioned them.

Murray brings to light a gallery of such comics heroes as
the Amazing Mr X, Powerman, Streamline, Captain Zenith,
Electroman, Mr Apollo, Masterman, Captain Universe,
Marvelman, Kelly’s Eye, Steel Claw, the Purple Hood, Captain
Britain, Supercats, Bananaman, Paradax, Jack Staff, and
SuperBob. He reminds us of the significance of many such
creators and artists as Len Fullerton, Jock McCail, Jack Glass,
Denis Gifford, Bob Monkhouse, Dennis M. Reader, Mick
Anglo, Brendan McCarthy, Alan Moore, Grant Morrison, Dave
Gibbons, and Mark Millar.

T

he comic book has become an essential icon of the
American Century, an era defined by optimism in
the face of change and by recognition of the intrinsic
value of democracy and modernization. For many, the Middle
Ages stand as an antithesis to these ideals, and yet medievalist
comics have emerged and endured, even thrived alongside their
superhero counterparts. Chris Bishop presents a reception
history of medievalist comics, setting them against a greater
backdrop of modern American history.

From its genesis in the 1930s to the present, Bishop
surveys the medievalist comic, its stories, characters, settings,
and themes drawn from the European Middle Ages. Hal
Foster’s Prince Valiant emerged from an America at odds with
monarchy, but still in love with King
Arthur. Green Arrow remains the
WHY SO MANY
continuation of a long fascination
AMERICAN COMICS
with Robin Hood that has become
FANS AVIDLY FOLLOW
as central to the American identity
as it was to the British. The Mighty
MEDIEVAL HEROES
Thor reflects the legacy of Germanic
migration into the United States.
The rugged individualism of Conan the Barbarian owes more
to the western cowboy than it does to the continental knighterrant. In the narrative of Red Sonja, we can trace a parallel
history of feminism. Bishop regards these comics as not merely
happenchance, but each success (Prince Valiant and The Mighty
Thor) or failure (Beowulf: Dragon Slayer) as a result and an
indicator of certain American preoccupations amid a larger
cultural context.

Intrinsically modernist paragons of pop-culture ephemera,
American comics have ironically continued to engage with the
European Middle Ages. Bishop illuminates some of the ways in
which we use an imagined past to navigate the present and plots
some possible futures as we valiantly shape a new century.
CHRIS BISHOP, Canberra, Australia, teaches classics at the

Australian National University. He has published widely on
the history of late antiquity and the early Middle Ages, as well
as comic book studies. In 2012 Bishop was awarded a Kluge
Fellowship at the Library of Congress for his research.
OCTOBER, 224 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0850-9
Ebook available

Chris Murray

C

CHRIS MURRAY, Dundee, Scotland, is senior lecturer in

comics studies at the University of Dundee and director of the
Scottish Centre for Comics Studies. Murray is the author of
Champions of the Oppressed: Superhero Comics, Popular Culture, and
Propaganda in America during World War II. He is also editor of
UniVerse Comics, coeditor of Studies in Comics (Intellect), and
co-organizer of the International Comics and Graphic Novel
conference.
FEBRUARY, 240 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 40 b&w illustrations,
bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0737-3
Ebook available

18

UNIVER S IT Y PRE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

FILM STUDIES  COMICS STUDIES  MEDIA STUDIES

The Comic Book
Film Adaptation

FILM STUDIES  COMICS STUDIES  MEDIA STUDIES

NEW IN

Paperback

Exploring Modern Hollywood’s
Leading Genre

Superheroes on
World Screens

I

LIAM BURKE, Melbourne, Australia, is a media studies lecturer

at Swinburne University of Technology. His publications
include the Pocket Essential Superhero Movies and the edited
collection Fan Phenomena: Batman.
JANUARY, 384 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 262 b&w illustrations, appendix,
bibliography, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0970-4
Ebook available

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

Paperback

Edited by Rayna Denison and
Rachel Mizsei-Ward

Liam Burke
n the summer of 2000 
X-Men surpassed all box
office expectations and
ushered in an era of unprecedented
production of comic book film
adaptations. This trend, now in
its second decade, has blossomed
into Hollywood’s leading genre.
From superheroes to Spartan
warriors, The Comic Book Film
Adaptation offers the first dedicated
study to examine how comic books
moved from the fringes of popular
culture to the center of mainstream
THE FIRST STUDY OF
film production.
HOW THE COMIC
Through in-depth analysis,
industry interviews, and audience
BOOK MOVED TO
research, this book charts the causeTHE CENTER OF
and-effect of this influential trend.
HOLLYWOOD FILM
It considers the cultural traumas,
PRODUCTION IN
business demands, and digital
possibilities that Hollywood faced at
THE TWENTY-FIRST
the dawn of the twenty-first century.
CENTURY
The industry managed to meet these
challenges by exploiting comics and
their existing audiences. However, studios were caught offguard when these comic book fans, empowered by digital media,
began to influence the success of these adaptations. Nonetheless,
filmmakers soon developed strategies to take advantage of this
intense fanbase, while codifying the trend into a more lucrative
genre, the comic book movie, which appealed to an even wider
audience. Central to this vibrant trend is a comic aesthetic in
which filmmakers utilize digital filmmaking technologies to
engage with the language and conventions of comics like never
before.
The Comic Book Film Adaptation explores this unique moment

in which cinema is stimulated, challenged, and enriched by the
once-dismissed medium of comics.

NEW IN

Contributions by Mary J. Ainslie, Rayna
Denison, Jochen Ecke, Vincent M. Gaine,
Lincoln Geraghty, Patrick Gill, Derek
Johnston, Daniel Martin, Rachel MizseiWard, Kevin Patrick, and Iain Robert Smith

S

uch superheroes as
Superman and SpiderMan have spread all over
the world. As this edited volume
shows, many national cultures have
created or reimagined the idea of
the superhero, while the realm of
superheroes now contains many
ESSAYS EXPLORING
icons whose histories borrow
THE MANY WAYS IN
from local folklore and legends.
Consequently, the superhero needs
WHICH SUPERHEROES
reconsideration, to be regarded as
NO LONGER BELONG
part of both local and global culture
SOLELY TO AMERICA
as well as examined for the rich
meanings that such broad origins
and re-workings create.

This collection stands out as the first concentrated
attempt to think through the meanings and significance of the
superhero, not only as a product of culture in the United States,
but as a series of local, transnational, and global exchanges in
popular media. Through analysis of mainly film, television, and
computer screens, contributors offer three challenges to the
idea of the American superhero: transnational reimagining of
superhero culture, emerging local superheroes, and the use of
local superheroes to undermine dominant political ideologies.
The essays explore the shifting transnational meanings of
Doctor Who, Thor, and the Phantom, as reimagined in world
culture. Other chapters chart the rise of local superheroes from
India, the Middle East, Thailand, and South Korea. These
explorations demonstrate how far superheroes have traveled to
inspire audiences worldwide.
RAYNA DENISON, Norwich, United Kingdom, is a lecturer

and researcher specializing in Asian media cultures at the
University of East Anglia. Her work has been published in
the International Journal of Cultural Studies, Mechademia, Japan
Forum, and Animation: An Interdisciplinary Journal. RACHEL
MIZSEI-WARD, Norwich, United Kingdom, graduated with her
PhD from the University of East Anglia in 2013. Her work has
appeared in 21st Century Gothic and Comparative American Studies.
NOVEMBER, 224 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 11 b&w illustrations, introduction,
bibliography, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0969-8
Ebook available

UN I V E R S IT Y P R E S S O F MIS S ISSIPPI

19

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE  BIOGRAPHY

LITERATURE  BIOGRAPHY

Conversations with
Maurice Sendak

Conversations with
Robert Stone

Edited by Peter C. Kunze

Edited by William Heath

aurice Sendak (1928–
2012) stands out as one
of the most respected,
influential authors of the twentieth
century. Though primarily known
as a children’s book writer and
illustrator, he did not limit himself
to these areas. He saw himself first
and foremost as an artist. In this
collection of interviews—the first of
its kind—Sendak presents himself
as a writer, illustrator, set designer,
and librettist. From his early work
with Randall Jarrell and Ruth Krauss
through his later work with Tony
“YOU CANNOT WRITE
Kushner and Spike Jonze, Sendak
FOR CHILDREN.
worked as a collaborator with a
THEY’RE MUCH TOO
passion for the arts.
COMPLICATED. YOU

The interviews here, many
of
which
are hard to find or
CAN ONLY WRITE
previously
unpublished, span from
BOOKS THAT ARE OF
1966 through 2011. They show
INTEREST TO THEM.”
not only Sendak’s shifting artistic
interests, but also changes in how he
understood himself and his craft. What emerges is a portrait of
an author and an artist who was alternately solemn and playful,
congenial and irascible, sophisticated and populist. The man
who showed millions of children and adults alike what’s cooking
in the night kitchen and where the wild things are, Sendak
remains an American original who redefined the picture book
and changed children’s literature—and its readers—forever.

ver since A Hall of Mirrors
depicted the wild side of New
Orleans in the 1960s, Robert
Stone (1937–2015) has situated
novels where America has shattered
and the action is at a pitch. In Dog
Soldiers, he covered the Vietnam
War and drug smuggling. A Flag
for Sunrise captured revolutionary
discontent in Central America.
Children of Light exposed the crass
values of Hollywood. Outerbridge
Reach depicted how existential
angst can lead to a longing for
“MY MESSAGE IS
heroic transcendence. The clash
NOT DESPAIR; MY
of religions in Jerusalem drove
Damascus
Gate. Traditional townMESSAGE IS, FIND
gown tensions amid twenty-firstOUT HOW BAD IT
century culture wars propelled Death
GETS AND BEGIN
of the Black-Haired Girl.
Stone’s reputation rests on
FROM THERE. . . . THE
his
mastery
of the craft of fiction.
VERY ACT OF WRITING
These interviews are replete with
IS A POSITIVE ACT.”
insights about the creative process
as he responds with disarming
honesty to probing questions about his major works. Stone
also has fascinating things to say about his remarkable life—a
schizophrenic mother, a stint in the navy, his involvement with
Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters, and his presence at the creation
of the counterculture. From the publication of A Hall of Mirrors
until his death in 2015, Stone was a major figure in American
literature.

M

PETER C. KUNZE, Austin, Texas, is a doctoral student in the

Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of
Texas. His work has appeared in Children’s Literature Association
Quarterly and The Lion and the Unicorn.
OCTOBER, 240 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology,
index
Printed casebinding $55.00S 978-1-4968-0870-7
Ebook available
Literary Conversations Series

20

UNIVER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

E

WILLIAM HEATH, Frederick, Maryland, is professor emeritus
of English at Mount Saint Mary’s University. He is author of a
book of poems, The Walking Man; three novels, The Children Bob
Moses Led; Blacksnake’s Path: The True Adventures of William Wells;
and Devil Dancer; and a work of history, William Wells and the
Struggle for the Old Northwest.
DECEMBER, 208 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology,
index
Printed casebinding $55.00S 978-1-4968-0891-2
Ebook available
Literary Conversations Series

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

SOUTHERN LITERATURE  POETRY  BIOGRAPHY

POETRY  LITERATURE  BIOGRAPHY

Conversations with
Ron Rash

Conversations with
Stanley Kunitz

Edited by Mae Miller Claxton and Rain Newcomb

Edited by Kent P. Ljungquist

ince the publication of
Serena in 2008 earned him
a nomination for the PEN/
Faulkner fiction prize, Ron Rash (b.
1953) has gained attention as one
of the South’s finest writers. Rash
draws upon his family’s history in
Appalachia, where most members
have worked with their hands as
farmers or millworkers. In the Grit
Lit or Rough South genre, Rash
maintains a prominent place as a
skilled craftsman and triple threat,
publishing four collections of
“LANDSCAPE IS
poetry, six short story collections,
and six novels. Though best known
DESTINY.”
as an Appalachian writer, Rash’s
reach has grown to extend well
beyond Appalachia and the American South, spreading to an
international audience.
Conversations with Ron Rash collects twenty-two interviews

with the award-winning author and provides a look into Rash’s
writing career from his first collection of short stories, The Night
the New Jesus Fell to Earth in 1994 through his 2015 novel, Above
the Waterfall. The collection includes four interviews from outside
the United States, two of which appear in English for the first
time. Spanning sixteen years, these interviews demonstrate the
disciplined writing process of an expert writer, Rash’s views of
literature on a local and a global scale, his profound respect for
the craft of the written word, and his ongoing goal to connect
with his readers.

obert Lowell said of
the poetry of Stanley
Kunitz (1905–2006)
and his evolving artistry, “He
again tops the crowd—he surpasses
himself, the old iron brought
to the white heat of simplicity.”
The interviews and conversations
contained in this volume derive
from four decades of Kunitz’s
distinguished career. They touch on
aesthetic motifs in his poetry, the
roots of his work, his friendships
in the sister arts of painting and
“POETRY, I HAVE
sculpture, his interactions with
Lowell and Theodore Roethke, and
INSISTED, IS
his comments on a host of poets:
ULTIMATELY
John Keats, Walt Whitman, Randall
MYTHOLOGY, THE
Jarrell, Wallace Stevens, and Anna
Akhmatova.
TELLING OF THE

Kunitz emerged from a midSOUL’S ADVENTURE IN
sized industrial town in central
TIME AND HISTORY.”
Massachusetts, surviving family
tragedy and a sense of personal
isolation and loneliness, to become an eloquent spokesman for
poetry and for the power of the human imagination. Kunitz has
commented, “If we want to know what it felt like to be alive at any
given moment in the long odyssey of the race, it is to poetry we
must turn.” His own odyssey from “metaphysical loneliness” to
a sense of community with fellow writers and artists—by building
institutions like Poets House and the Fine Arts Work Center in
Provincetown, Massachusetts—is ever present in these interviews.

S

NEW IN

Paperback

R

MAE MILLER CLAXTON, Cullowhee, North Carolina, is an

associate professor at Western Carolina University. She teaches
Appalachian, Southern, and American literature. She is the
editor of Conversations with Dorothy Allison (published by University
Press of Mississippi). RAIN NEWCOMB, Asheville, North
Carolina, is a lecturer at Western Carolina University.
DECEMBER, 212 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology,
index
Printed casebinding $55.00S 978-1-4968-0896-7
Ebook available
Literary Conversations Series

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

KENT P. LJUNGQUIST, Jefferson, Massachusetts, is a professor
of English at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He is the editor
of Antebellum Authors in New York and the author of The Grand and
the Fair: Poe’s Landscape Aesthetics and Pictorial Techniques.
DECEMBER, 234 pages, 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology, index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0961-2
Ebook available
Literary Conversations Series

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MIS S ISSIPPI

21

SCIENCE FICTION  LITERATURE  BIOGRAPHY

Conversations with
William Gibson

LITERATURE  BIOGRAPHY

NEW IN

Paperback

Conversations with
Michael Chabon

NEW IN

Paperback

Edited by Patrick A. Smith

Edited by Brannon Costello

iterary scholar Larry
McCaffery wrote,
“After reading
Neuromancer for the first time,
I knew I had seen the future of
[science fiction] (and maybe of
literature in general), and its name
was William Gibson.” McCaffery
was right. Gibson’s 1984 debut is
one of the most celebrated SF novels
of the last half century, and in a
career spanning more than three
decades, the American Canadian
science fiction writer and reluctant
“IT’S NOT REALLY
futurist responsible for introducing
ABOUT AN IMAGINED
“cyberspace” into the lexicon has
FUTURE. IT’S A WAY
published nine other novels.
Editor Patrick A. Smith draws
OF TRYING TO COME
the twenty-three interviews in
TO TERMS WITH THE
this collection from a variety of
AWE AND TERROR
media and sources—print and
INSPIRED IN ME BY
online journals and fanzines,
THE WORLD IN WHICH academic journals, newspapers,
blogs, and podcasts. Myriad topics
WE LIVE.”
include Gibson’s childhood in
the American South and his early
adulthood in Canada, with travel in Europe; his chafing
against the traditional SF mold, the origins of “cyberspace,”
and the unintended consequences (for both the author and
society) of changing the way we think about technology; and the
writing process and the reader’s role in a new kind of fiction.
Gibson (b. 1948) takes on branding and fashion, celebrity
culture, social networking, the post-9/11 world, future uses of
technology, and the isolation and alienation engendered by new
ways of solving old problems. The conversations also provide
overviews of his novels, short fiction, and nonfiction.

ince the publication of his
first novel, The Mysteries of
Pittsburgh, launched him
to fame, Michael Chabon (b. 1963)
has become one of contemporary
literature’s most acclaimed novelists
by pursuing his singular vision
across all boundaries of genre
and medium. A firm believer that
reading even the most challenging
literature should be a fundamentally
pleasurable experience, Chabon
has produced an astonishingly
diverse body of work that includes
detective novels, weird tales of
“MY ONLY GOAL,
horror, alternate history science
EVER, REALLY, IS TO
fiction, and rollicking chronicles
TRY TO WRITE THE
of swashbuckling adventure
KIND OF BOOK THAT
alongside tender coming-of-age
stories, sprawling social novels, and
I THINK I WOULD
narratives of intense introspection.
LIKE TO READ—AND I
Uniting them all is Chabon’s utterly
READ FOR PLEASURE.” distinct prose style—exuberant and
graceful, sometimes ironic but
never cynical. His work has earned accolades ranging from the
Pulitzer Prize to science fiction’s Hugo and Nebula Awards.

Conversations with Michael Chabon collects eighteen revealing
interviews with the renowned author of The Amazing Adventures of
Kavalier & Clay, The Yiddish Policemen’s Union, and other muchadmired works. Spanning nearly twenty years and drawn from
science fiction fan magazines and literary journals alike, these
interviews shed new light on the central concerns of Chabon’s
fiction, including the importance of dismantling the false
divide between literary and lowbrow, his evolving relationship
with Jewish culture and literature, the unique properties of
male friendship, and the complexities of race in contemporary
America. These interviews are essential reading for anyone
seeking a better understanding of the life and work of an
author who has been instrumental in defining the landscape of
contemporary American fiction.

L

PATRICK A. SMITH, Havana, Florida, is professor of English

at Bainbridge State College in Bainbridge, Georgia. His
previous books and edited collections include“The true bones of
my life”: Essays on the Fiction of Jim Harrison; Tim O’Brien: A Critical
Companion; and Conversations with Tim O’Brien (published by
University Press of Mississippi), among others.
OCTOBER, 296 pages, 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology, index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0968-1
Ebook available
Literary Conversations Series

S

BRANNON COSTELLO, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is associate

professor of English and director of the Master of Arts in
Liberal Arts program at Louisiana State University. He is the
editor of Howard Chaykin: Conversations and coeditor of Comics
and the U.S. South, both published by University Press of
Mississippi.
OCTOBER, 204 pages, 6 x 9 inches, introduction, chronology, index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0962-9
Ebook available
Literary Conversations Series

22

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

FOLKLORE  LOUISIANA  AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

LITERATURE  SOUTHERN LITERATURE

Rough South,
Rural South

NEW IN

Paperback

Region and Class in Recent
Southern Literature
Edited by Jean W. Cash and Keith Perry
Contributions by Barbara Bennett,
Thomas Ærvold Bjerre, Erik Bledsoe,
Jean W. Cash, Linda Byrd Cook, Thomas
E. Dasher, Robert Donahoo, Peter Farris,
Richard Gaughran, William Giraldi,
Rebecca Godwin, Joan Wylie Hall, Marcus
Hamilton, Gary Hawkins, David K. Jeffrey,
Emily Langhorne, Shawn E. Miller, Wade
Newhouse, L. Lamar Nisly, bes Stark
Spangler, Joe Samuel Starnes, and Scott
Hamilton Suter

E

ssays in Rough South, Rural
South describe and discuss
the work of southern writers
A CRITICAL COMPANwho began their careers in the
ION TO THE STRIKING
late twentieth and early twentyfirst centuries. They fall into two
VARIETY OF CONTEMcategories. Some, born into the
PORARY SOUTHERN
working class, strove to become
LITERATURE
writers and learned without the
benefit of higher education, such
writers as Larry Brown and William Gay. Others came from
lower- or middle-class backgrounds and became writers
through practice and education: Dorothy Allison, Tom
Franklin, Tim Gautreaux, Clyde Edgerton, Kaye Gibbons,
Silas House, Jill McCorkle, Chris Offutt, Ron Rash, Lee
Smith, Brad Watson, Daniel Woodrell, and Steve Yarbrough.
Their twenty-first-century colleagues are Wiley Cash, Peter
Farris, Skip Horack, Michael Farris Smith, Barb Johnson, and
Jesmyn Ward.

In his seminal article, Erik Bledsoe distinguishes Rough
South writers from such writers as William Faulkner and Erskine
Caldwell. These writers undercut stereotypes, forcing readers to
see the working poor differently.

The next pieces begin with those on Harry Crews and
Cormac McCarthy, major influences on an entire generation.
Nearly all of the writers hold a reverence for the South’s
landscape and its inhabitants as well as an affinity for realistic
depictions of setting and characters.
JEAN W. CASH, Broadway, Virginia, is professor emerita
of English at James Madison University. She is the author of
Flannery O’Connor: A Life; coeditor (with Keith Perry) of Larry
Brown and the Blue Collar South: A Collection of Critical Essays; and
author of Larry Brown: A Writer’s Life, which won the Eudora
Welty Prize and the C. Hugh Holman Award. KEITH PERRY,
Ringgold, Georgia, is associate professor of English at Dalton
State College. He is the author of The Kingfish in Fiction: Huey P.
Long and the Modern American Novel.
OCTOBER, 264 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 26 b&w illustrations, introduction,

Yo’ Mama, Mary Mack, and
Boudreaux and Thibodeaux
Louisiana Children’s Folklore and Play
Jeanne Pitre Soileau

J

eanne Soileau, a teacher in New Orleans and south
Louisiana for more than forty years, examines how
children’s folklore, especially among African

Americans, has changed. From the tumult of

integration to the present, her experience afforded
unique opportunities to observe children as they played.
With integration in New Orleans during the 1960s, Soileau
notes how children began to play with one another almost
immediately. Children taught each other play routines, chants,
jokes, jump-rope rhymes, cheers, taunts, and teases—all the
folk games that happen in normal play
on the street and playground. When
HOW CHILDREN
adults—the judges and attorneys, the
HAVE USED
parents, and the politicians—haggled
STORY AND PLAY
and shouted, children began to hold
hands in a circle, fall down together
TO NAVIGATE
to “Ring around the Rosie,” and tease
PROBLEMS AND
each other in new and creative ways.
DELINEATE ETHNIC

Children’s ability to adapt can
be seen not only in their response to
BOUNDARIES
social change, but in how they adopt
and utilize pop culture and technology. Vast technological
changes in the last third of the twentieth century influenced
the way children sang, danced, played, and interacted. Soileau
catalogs these changes and studies how games evolve and
transform as much as they are preserved. She includes several
topics of study: oral narratives and songs, jokes and tales,
and teasing formulae gleaned from mostly African American
sources. Because much of the field work took place on public
school playgrounds, this body of oral narratives remains of
particular interest to teachers, folklorists, linguists, and those
who study play.

In the end, Soileau shows that despite the restrictions of
air-conditioning, shorter recess periods, ever-increasing hours
of television watching, the growing popularity of video games,
and carefully scripted after-school activities, many children in
south Louisiana sustain traditional games. At the same time,
they invent varied and clever new ones. As Soileau observes,
children strive through their folk play to learn how to fit into a
rapidly changing society.
JEANNE PITRE SOILEAU, New Iberia, Louisiana, was born

in New Orleans and taught in Louisiana for forty-seven years.
Though retired, she is still actively collecting folklore. Her work
has appeared in Louisiana Folklore Miscellany and Western Folklore.
JANUARY, 192 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 18 b&w illustrations, 1 map,
appendices, bibliography, index
Printed Casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-1040-3
Ebook available
Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World

index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-1052-6
Ebook available

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MI S S I SSIPPI

23

SPORTS  MEDIA STUDIES  RACE RELATIONS

CIVIL RIGHTS  HEALTH AND SICKNESS  AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

Full Court Press

The Good Doctors

Mississippi State University, the Press, and the
Battle to Integrate College Basketball
Jason A. Peterson

D

uring the civil rights era,
Mississippi was caught in
the hateful embrace of
a white caste system that enforced
segregation. Rather than troubling
the Closed Society, state news
media, on the whole, marched in
lockstep or, worse, promoted the
continued subservience of blacks.
Surprisingly, challenges from
Mississippi’s college basketball courts
questioned segregation’s validity
and its gentleman’s agreement that
prevented college teams in the
HOW BASKETBALL
Magnolia State from playing against
LOOSENED THE GRIP
integrated foes.
OF SEGREGATION
Mississippi State University
AND ITS PROPONENTS stood at the forefront of this battle
for equality in the state with the
IN THE MEDIA
school’s successful college basketball
program. From 1959 through 1963,
the Maroons won four Southeastern Conference basketball
championships and created a dynasty in the South’s preeminent
college athletic conference. However, in all four title-winning
seasons, the press feverishly debated the merits of a National
Collegiate Athletic Association appearance for the Maroons,
culminating in Mississippi State University’s participation in the
integrated 1963 NCAA Championship.
Full Court Press examines news articles, editorials, and

columns published in Mississippi’s newspapers during the
eight-year existence of the gentleman’s agreement that barred
black participation, the challenges posed by Mississippi
State University, and the subsequent integration of college
basketball. While the majority of reporters opposed any effort to
integrate, a segment of sports journalists, led by the charismatic
Jimmie McDowell of the Jackson State Times, emerged as bold
advocates for equality. Full Court Press highlights an ideological
metamorphosis within the press during the civil rights
movement. The media, which had long minimized the struggle
of blacks, slowly transformed into an industry that considered
the plight of black Mississippians on equal footing with whites.
JASON A. PETERSON, Summerville, South Carolina,
is assistant professor of communication at Charleston
Southern University. A former journalist and public relations
practitioner, Peterson has published in American Journalism and in
the book, From Jack Johnson to LeBron James: Essays on Sports, Race,
and the Media.

The Medical Committee for
Human Rights and the Struggle
for Social Justice in Health Care

BACK IN

Print

John Dittmer

I

n the summer of 1964
medical professionals,
mostly white and northern,
organized the Medical Committee
for Human Rights (MCHR) to
provide care and support for civil
rights activists organizing black
voters in Mississippi. They left
their lives and lucrative private
practices to march beside and tend
the wounds of demonstrators from
Freedom Summer, the March on
Selma, and the Chicago Democratic
Convention of 1968. Galvanized
THE EXTRAORDINARY
and sometimes radicalized by their
TALE OF HEALTH
firsthand view of disenfranchised
CARE PROFESSIONALS communities, the MCHR soon
WHO FOUGHT THE
expanded its mission to encompass
a range of causes from poverty to
CRIPPLING EFFECTS
the war in Vietnam. They later took
OF SEGREGATION
on the whole of the United States
AND CHALLENGED
healthcare system. MCHR doctors
soon realized fighting segregation
THE MEDICAL
would mean not just caring for white
ESTABLISHMENT
volunteers, but also exposing and
correcting shocking inequalities in
segregated health care. They pioneered community health plans
and brought medical care to underserved or unserved areas.

Though education was the most famous battleground for
integration, the appalling injustice of segregated health care
levelled equally devastating consequences. Award-winning
historian John Dittmer, author of the classic civil rights history
Local People, has written an insightful and moving account of a
group of idealists who put their careers in the service of the
motto “Health Care Is a Human Right.”
JOHN DITTMER, Fillmore, Indiana, is the author of Black

Georgia in the Progressive Era and Local People: The Struggle for Civil
Rights in Mississippi, which was awarded the Bancroft Prize. He has
taught in the history departments at Tougaloo College, Brown
University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and
DePauw University, where he is professor emeritus.
FEBRUARY, 344 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 34 b&w illustrations, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-1035-9
Ebook available

SEPTEMBER, 272 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 13 b&w illustrations,
bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0820-2
Ebook available
Race, Rhetoric, and Media Series

24

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

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CIVIL RIGHTS  AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES  MEDIA STUDIES

To Write in the
Light of Freedom
The Newspapers of the 1964
Mississippi Freedom Schools

NEW IN

Paperback

Edited by William Sturkey and Jon N. Hale

M

ore than fifty years after
Freedom Summer, To
Write in the Light of
Freedom offers a glimpse into the
hearts of the African American
youths who attended the Mississippi
Freedom Schools in 1964. One of
the most successful initiatives of
Freedom Summer, more than forty
Freedom Schools opened doors
to thousands of young African
American students. Here they
learned civics, politics, and history,
curriculum that helped them instead
A COLLECTION AND
of the degrading lessons supporting
EXAMINATION OF THE
segregation and Jim Crow and
CREATIVE LITERARY
sanctioned by White Citizen’s
WORK OF FREEDOM
Councils. Young people enhanced
their self-esteem and gained a new
SCHOOL STUDENTS
outlook on the future. At more
DISCOVERING
than a dozen of these schools,
PATHWAYS TO RACIAL
students wrote, edited, printed, and
published their own newspapers.
JUSTICE
For more than five decades, the
Mississippi Freedom Schools have served as powerful models of
educational activism. Little has been published that documents
black Mississippi youths’ responses to this profound experience
until now.
WILLIAM STURKEY, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is a
postdoctoral fellow in the Department of History at the
University of North Carolina. His work has appeared in
the Journal of Mississippi History and the Journal of African American
History. JON N. HALE, Charleston, South Carolina, is an
assistant professor at the College of Charleston. His work has
appeared in the Journal of African American History, History of
Education Quarterly, South Carolina Historical Magazine, and Journal
of Social Studies Research.
SEPTEMBER, 232 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 25 b&w illustrations, index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0965-0
Ebook available
Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies

CIVIL RIGHTS  MISSISSIPPI HISTORY

Mississippi

The Long, Hot Summer

BACK IN

Print

William McCord
Introduction by Françoise N. Hamlin

I

n 1964, sociologist
William McCord, long
interested in movements
for social change in the United
States, began a study of Mississippi’s
Freedom Summer. Stanford
University, where McCord taught,
had been the site of recruiting
efforts for student volunteers for
the Freedom Summer project by
such activists as Robert Moses and
Allard Lowenstein. Described by his
wife as “an old-fashioned liberal,”
McCord believed that he should both
THE ORIGINAL
examine and participate in events in
SOCIOLOGICAL
Mississippi. He accompanied student
workers and black Mississippians to
ENCOUNTER
courthouses and Freedom Houses,
WITH THE RIVEN
and he attracted police attention as
DEMOGRAPHICS OF
he studied the mechanisms of white
supremacy and the black nonviolent
THE CLOSED SOCIETY
campaign against racial segregation.

Published in 1965 by W. W. Norton, his book, Mississippi:
The Long, Hot Summer, is one of the first examinations of the events
of 1964 by a scholar. It provides a compelling, detailed account
of Mississippi people and places, including the thousands of
student workers who found in the state both opportunities and
severe challenges. McCord’s work sought to communicate to
a broad audience the depth of repression in Mississippi. Here
was evidence of the need for federal action to address what he
recognized as both national and southern failures to secure
civil rights for black Americans. His field work and activism in
Mississippi offered a perspective that few other academics or
other white Americans had shared.

Historian Françoise N. Hamlin provides a substantial
introduction that sets McCord’s work within the context of
other narratives of Freedom Summer and explores McCord’s
broader career that combined distinguished scholarship with
social activism.
WILLIAM McCORD (1930–1992), a sociologist with interests

that ranged from American urban and social conditions
to international economic development, was the author of
seventeen books and scores of essays and articles. He was both
an observer and participant in Mississippi during the events
of Freedom Summer. FRANÇOISE N. HAMLIN, Providence,
Rhode Island, is an associate professor in the departments of
history and Africana studies at Brown University. She is the
author of Crossroads at Clarksdale: The Black Freedom Struggle in the
Mississippi Delta after World War II and coeditor of These Truly Are the
Brave: An Anthology of African American Writings on War and Citizenship.
NOVEMBER, 232 pages, 5½ x 8¼ inches, introduction, index
Printed casebinding $85.00S 978-1-4968-0935-3
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0936-0
Ebook available
Civil Rights in Mississippi Series

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

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25

TRUE CRIME  LAW  BIOGRAPHY

The Last Lawyer
The Fight to Save Death
Row Inmates

AMERICAN HISTORY  MISSISSIPPI  RACE RELATIONS

NEW IN

Paperback

John Temple

T

he Last Lawyer is the true,
inside story of how an
idealistic legal genius and
his diverse band of investigators and
fellow attorneys fought to overturn a
client’s final sentence.

Ken Rose has handled more
capital appeals cases than almost
any other attorney in the United
States. The Last Lawyer chronicles
Rose’s decade-long defense of Bo
Jones, a North Carolina farmhand
convicted of a 1987 murder. Rose
called this his most frustrating case in
THE STORY OF A
twenty-five years, and it was one that
TIRELESS LEGAL
received scant attention from judges
or journalists. The Jones case bares
SAMARITAN AND HIS
the thorniest issues surrounding
WARFARE ON THE
capital punishment. Inadequate legal
INJUSTICE OF CAPITAL counsel, mental retardation, mental
illness, and sketchy witness testimony
PUNISHMENT
stymied Jones’s original defense. Yet
for many years, Rose’s advocacy gained no traction, and Bo Jones
came within three days of his execution.
JOHN TEMPLE, Morgantown, West Virginia, is the author

of Deadhouse: Life in a Coroner’s Office, published by University
Press of Mississippi. His most recent book, American Pain, was
named a “Best Book of 2015” in the True Crime category
by Suspense Magazine. Temple is an associate professor of
journalism at the Reed College of Media at West Virginia
University. Prior to teaching, Temple was a newspaper reporter
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Greensboro, North Carolina; and
Tampa, Florida. More information about Temple and his books
can be found at www.johntemplebooks.com.
AVAILABLE, 240 pages, 6 x 9 inches
Paper $25.00S 978-1-4968-0913-1
Ebook available
Winner of the 2010 Scribes Book Award from the
American Society of Legal Writers

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

NEW IN

Paperback

Evolving Resistance to Black Advancement
Robert E. Luckett Jr.

“For years, lawyer Ken Rose has fought to save wronglycondemned prisoners; chronicling the story of Rose and death
row inmate Bo Jones, author Temple (Deadhouse: Life in a Coroner’s
Office) finds high drama in Raleigh penitentiaries, North Carolina
backroads, cramped law offices, and sweltering courtrooms.
Reviewing the original 1987 murder, the consequent trials and
endless hearings, Temple creates an intimate portrait of Rose and
his Center for Death Penalty Litigation as they trudge through a
decade of work on this case, a typical example that pits the odds
and public opinion against them: ‘To question capital punishment
was to appear soft on crime. . . . In court, one well-known district
attorney sported a golden lapel pin shaped like a hangman’s
noose.’ Ultimately, Temple’s account is a stand-up-and-cheer
account of one man standing up for justice.”
—Publishers Weekly, starred review

26

Joe T. Patterson and the
White South’s Dilemma

A

s Mississippi’s attorney general
from 1956 to 1969, Joe T.
Patterson led the legal defense
for Jim Crow in the state. He was
inaugurated for his first term two
months before the launch of the
Sovereignty Commission—charged “to
protect the sovereignty of Mississippi
from encroachment thereon by the
federal government”—which made
manifest a century-old states’ rights
ideology couched in the rhetoric of
massive resistance. Despite the dubious
legal foundations of that agenda,
HOW WHITE
Patterson supported the organization’s
mission from the start and served as an
RESISTANCE
ex-officio leader on its board for the
OPERATED AND
rest of his life.
ADAPTED TO THE

Patterson was also a card-carrying
SWEEPING FORCES OF member of the segregationist Citizens’
Council and, in his own words, had
RACIAL CHANGE
“spent many hours and driven many
miles advocating the basic principles
for which the Citizens’ Councils were originally organized.” Few
ever doubted his Jim Crow credentials. That is until September
1962 and the integration of the University of Mississippi by James
Meredith.

That fall Patterson stepped out of his entrenchment by
defying a circle of white power brokers, but only to a point.
His seeming acquiescence came at the height of the biggest
crisis for Mississippi’s racist order. Yet even after the Supreme
Court decreed that Meredith must enter the university,
Patterson opposed any further desegregation and despised the
federal intervention at Ole Miss. Still he faced a dilemma that
confronted all white southerners: how to maintain an artificially
elevated position for whites in southern society without resorting
to violence or intimidation. Once the Supreme Court handed
down its decision in Meredith v. Fair, the state attorney general
walked a strategic tightrope, looking to temper the ruling’s impact
without inciting the mob and without retreating any further.
Patterson and others sought pragmatic answers to the dilemma
of white southerners, not in the name of civil rights but to offer
a more durable version of white power. His finesse paved the way
for future tactics employing duplicity and barely yielding social
change while deferring many dreams.
ROBERT E. LUCKETT JR., Madison, Mississippi, is assistant
professor of history and director of the Margaret Walker Center
for the Study of the African-American Experience at Jackson
State University. His research has appeared in The Civil Rights
Movement in Mississippi (University Press of Mississippi), as well as
in numerous journal articles.
NOVEMBER, 312 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 11 b&w illustrations, introduction,
bibliography, endnotes, index
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0955-1
Ebook available

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

CIVIL WAR  SOUTHERN HISTORY  MISSISSIPPI

HISTORY  SOUTHERN STATES  AGRICULTURAL HISTORY

The Mississippi
Secession Convention

Trouble in Goshen

Delegates and Deliberations in
Politics and War, 1861-1865
Timothy B. Smith

NEW IN

Paperback

T

he Mississippi Secession
Convention is the first full
treatment of any secession
convention to date. Studying the
Mississippi convention of 1861 offers
insight into how and why southern
states seceded and the effects of such
a breech. Based largely on primary
sources, this book provides a unique
insight into the broader secession
movement.

There was more to the
secession convention than the mere
act of leaving the Union, which
THE FIRST EXAMINAwas done only three days into the
TION OF THE ENTIRE
deliberations. The rest of the threeCONVENTION AND
week January 1861 meeting as well as
THE MEN WHO
an additional week in March saw the
delegates debate and pass a number
DELIBERATED THERE
of important ordinances that for
a time governed the state. As seen
through the eyes of the delegates themselves, with rich research
into each member, this book provides a compelling overview of
the entire proceeding.

The effects of the convention gain the most analysis in
this study, including the political processes that, after the
momentous vote, morphed into unlikely alliances. Those on
opposite ends of the secession question quickly formed new
political allegiances in a predominantly Confederate-minded
convention. These new political factions formed largely over
the issues of central versus local authority, which quickly played
into Confederate versus state issues during the Civil War.
In addition, author Timothy B. Smith considers the lasting
consequences of defeat, looking into the effect secession
and war had on the delegates themselves and, by extension,
Mississippi.
TIMOTHY B. SMITH, Adamsville, Tennessee, teaches history at
the University of Tennessee at Martin. He is the author, editor,
or coeditor of twelve books, including Mississippi in the Civil War:
The Home Front; and James Z. George: Mississippi’s Great Commoner
(both published by University Press of Mississippi).
OCTOBER, 312 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 13 b&w illustrations, 5 maps,
appendices, bibliography, index
Paper $25.00S 978-1-4968-0957-5
Ebook available

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

Plain Folk, Roosevelt, Jesus, and
Marx in the Great Depression South
Fred C. Smith

NEW IN

Paperback

T

he Great Depression
emboldened Americans
to tolerate radical
experimentation in search of
solutions to seemingly overwhelming
economic problems. Among the
thorniest of those was rural southern
poverty. In Trouble in Goshen, Fred C.
Smith focuses on three communities
designed and implemented to meet
that challenge. This book examines
the economic and social theories—
and their histories—that resulted
in the creation and operation of
the most aggressive and radical
THE UNTOLD STORY
experiments in the United States.
OF THREE NEW

Trouble in Goshen chronicles
three communitarian experiments,
DEAL COOPERATIVE
both the administrative details and
FARMS IN THE MOST
the struggles and reactions of the
ECONOMICALLY
clients. Smith covers the Tupelo
Homesteads in Mississippi, the
CHALLENGED PLACES
Dyess Colony in Arkansas, and the
IN THE SOUTH
Delta Cooperative Farm, also in
Mississippi. The Tupelo Homesteads
were created under the aegis of the tiny Division of Subsistence
Homesteads, a short-lived, “first New Deal” agency. Dyess
Colony was the largest of the Resettlement Administration’s
efforts to transform failed farmers into Jeffersonian yeoman
farmers. The third community, the Delta Cooperative Farm,
a product of the active cooperation between the Socialist Party
of America and a cadre of liberal churchmen led by Reinhold
Niebuhr, attempted to meld the pieties, passions, propaganda,
and theories of Jesus and Marx.

The equipment, facilities, and management styles of
the projects reveal a clearly delineated class order among the
poor. Trouble in Goshen demonstrates the class-conscious angst
that enveloped three distinct levels of poverty and the struggles
of plain folk to preserve their tenuous status and avoid overt
peasantry.
FRED C. SMITH,Tupelo, Mississippi, is visiting assistant

professor of history at the University of Southern Mississippi.
He is a contributor to Justice and Violence: Political Violence,
Pacifism, and Cultural Transformation, and his work has appeared
in the Journal of Mississippi History, Agricultural History, Florida
Historical Quarterly, Southern Historian, and Mississippi History Now.
NOVEMBER, 228 pages, 6 x 9 inches, bibliography, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0967-4
Ebook available

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MIS S ISSIPPI

27

ETHNIC STUDIES  ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES 

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES  AMERICAN HISTORY  RHETORIC

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

Minority Relations

Intergroup Conflict and Cooperation
Edited by Greg Robinson and Robert S. Chang
Contributions by Taunya Lovell Banks,
Devon W. Carbado, Robert S. Chang,
Cheryl Greenberg, Tanya Katerí
Hernández, Amanda O. Jenssen, Scott
Kurashige, Greg Robinson, Stephen
Steinberg, Clarence Walker, and Eric K.
Yamamoto

T

he question of how
relations between
marginalized groups
are impacted by their common
and sometimes competing search
for equal rights has become
HOW MINORITY
acutely important. Demographic
GROUPS NEGOTIATE
projections make it easy now
THORNY BUT CRITICAL to imagine a future majority
population of color in the United
PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES
States. Minority Relations sets forth
IN AMERICA
some of the issues involved in
the interplay among members of
various racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities.

Robert S. Chang initiated the Intergroup Conflict and
Cooperation Project and invited historian Greg Robinson to
collaborate. The two brought together scholars from different
backgrounds and disciplines to engage a set of interrelated
questions confronting groups generally considered minorities.

This collection strives to stimulate further thinking and
writing by social scientists, legal scholars, and policymakers
on interminority connections. Particularly, scholars test the
limits of intergroup cooperation and coalition building. For
marginalized groups, coalition building seems to offer a pathway
to addressing economic discrimination and reaching some
measure of justice with regard to opportunities. The need for
coalitions also acknowledges a democratic process in which
racialized groups face significant difficulty gaining real political
power, despite such legislation as the Voting Rights Act.
GREG ROBINSON, Montreal, Canada, a native of New York

City, is professor of history at the Université du Québec à
Montréal. His books include the award-winning After Camp,
A Tragedy of Democracy, and By Order of the President. ROBERT S.
CHANG, Mercer Island, Washington, is professor of law and
executive director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law
and Equality at Seattle University School of Law. He is the
author of Disoriented: Asian Americans, Law, and the Nation-State
and coeditor of Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders and the Law.
JANUARY, 272 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 5 b&w illustrations,
introduction, bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-1045-8
Ebook available

American Indians and
the Rhetoric of
Removal and Allotment
Jason Edward Black

NEW IN

Paperback

J

ason Edward Black examines
the ways the US government’s
rhetoric and American Indian
responses contributed to
the policies of Native-US relations
throughout the nineteenth century’s
removal and allotment eras. Black
shows how these discourses together
constructed the perception of the US
government and of American Indian
communities. Such interactions—
though certainly not equal—illustrated
the hybrid nature of Native-US rhetoric in the nineteenth century. Both
A STUDY OF HOW THE governmental, colonizing discourse
UNITED STATES GOVand indigenous, decolonizing disERNMENT ATTEMPTED course shaped arguments, constructions of identity, and rhetoric in the
TO DEFINE, DISPLACE, colonial relationship.
AND CONTROL

American Indians and the Rhetoric
of
Removal
and Allotment demonstrates
INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
how American Indians decolonized
WHILE AMERICAN
dominant rhetoric through impeding
INDIANS REFUSED TO
removal and allotment policies. By
turning around the US government’s
SURRENDER THEIR
narrative and inventing their own
VOICES
tactics, American Indian communities
helped restyle their own identities as
well as the government’s. During the first third of the twentieth
century, American Indians lobbied for the successful passage of
the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 and the Indian New Deal of
1934, changing the relationship once again.

In the end, Native communities were granted increased
rhetorical power through decolonization, though the US
government retained an undeniable colonial influence through
its territorial management of Natives. The Indian Citizenship
Act and the Indian New Deal—as the conclusion of this book
indicates—are emblematic of the prevalence of the duality of
US citizenship that fused American Indians to the nation, yet
segregated them on reservations. This duality of inclusion and
exclusion grew incrementally and persists now, as a lasting effect of
nineteenth-century Native-US rhetorical relations.
JASON EDWARD BLACK, Northport, Alabama, is an associate
professor in rhetoric and public discourse and an affiliate
professor in gender and race studies at the University of Alabama
at Tuscaloosa. He is the coeditor of An Archive of Hope: Harvey Milk’s
Speeches and Writings and Arguments about Animal Ethics. His work has
appeared in such journals as Quarterly Journal of Speech, Rhetoric and
Public Affairs, American Indian Quarterly, and American Indian Culture
and Research Journal.
NOVEMBER, 228 pages, 6 x 9 inches, bibliography, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0973-5
Ebook available
Race, Rhetoric, and Media Series

28

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ETHNIC STUDIES  CIVIL RIGHTS  COMMUNICATIONS

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES  LITERATURE  COMMUNICATIONS

Prison Power

Red Scare Racism
and Cold War
Black Radicalism

How Prison Influenced the Movement
for Black Liberation
Lisa M. Corrigan

I

n the black liberation
movement, imprisonment
emerged as a key rhetorical,
theoretical, and media resource.
Imprisoned activists developed
tactics and ideology to counter white
supremacy. Lisa M. Corrigan underscores how imprisonment—a site for
both political and personal transformation—shaped movement leaders
by influencing their political analysis
and organizational strategies. Prison
became the critical space for the
transformation from civil rights to
HOW ICONIC AUTOBlack Power, especially as southern
BIOGRAPHIES FOUND
civil rights activists faced setbacks.
INCARCERATION

Black Power activists produced
PIVOTAL TO THE
autobiographical writings, essays,
and letters about and from prisTRANSITION
on beginning with the early sit-in
BETWEEN CIVIL
movement. Examining the iconic
RIGHTS AND BLACK
prison autobiographies of H. Rap
Brown, Mumia Abu-Jamal, and
POWER
Assata Shakur, Corrigan conducts
rhetorical analyses of these extremely popular though understudied accounts of the Black Power movement. She introduces
the notion of the “Black Power vernacular” as a term for the
prison memoirists’ rhetorical innovations, to explain how the
movement adapted to an increasingly hostile environment in
both the Johnson and Nixon administrations.

Through prison writings, these activists deployed
narrative features supporting certain tenets of Black Power,
pride in blackness, disavowal of nonviolence, identification
with the Third World, and identity strategies focused on
black masculinity. Corrigan fills gaps between Black Power
historiography and prison studies by scrutinizing the rhetorical
forms and strategies of the Black Power ideology that arose from
prison politics. These discourses demonstrate how Black Power
activism shifted its tactics to regenerate, even after the FBI
sought to disrupt, discredit, and destroy the movement.
LISA M. CORRIGAN, Fayetteville, Arkansas, is an associate
professor of communication, director of the gender studies
program, and affiliate faculty in African and African American
studies and Latin American studies at the University of
Arkansas.

James Zeigler

NEW IN

Paperback

D

uring the early years
of the Cold War,
racial segregation in
the American South became
an embarrassing liability to the
international reputation of the
United States. For America
to present itself as a model of
democracy in contrast to the Soviet
Union’s totalitarianism, Jim Crow
needed to end. While the discourse
of anticommunism added the
leverage of national security to
the moral claims of the civil rights
A HISTORY OF
movement, the proliferation of Red
ANTICOMMUNIST
Scare rhetoric also imposed limits on
RHETORIC AND ITS
the socioeconomic changes necessary
for real equality.
IMPACT ON THE

Describing the ways
BLACK FREEDOM
anticommunism impaired the
STRUGGLE IN
struggle for civil rights, James Zeigler
AMERICA
reconstructs how Red Scare rhetoric
during the Cold War assisted the
black freedom struggle’s demands for equal rights but labeled
“un-American” calls for reparations. To track the power of this
volatile discourse, Zeigler investigates how radical black artists
and intellectuals managed to answer anticommunism with
critiques of Cold War culture. Stubbornly addressed to an
American public schooled in Red Scare hyperbole, black
radicalism insisted that antiracist politics require a leftist
critique of capitalism.

Zeigler examines publicity campaigns against Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr.’s alleged Communist Party loyalties and the
import of the Cold War in his oratory. He documents a Central
Intelligence Agency–sponsored anthology of ex-Communist
testimonials. He takes on the protest essays of Richard Wright
and C. L. R. James, as well as Frank Marshall Davis’s leftist
journalism. The uncanny return of Red Scare invective in
reaction to President Obama’s election further substantiates
anticommunism’s lasting rhetorical power as Zeigler discusses
conspiracy theories that claim Davis groomed President Obama
to become a secret Communist. Long after playing a role in the
demise of Jim Crow, the Cold War Red Scare still contributes to
the persistence of racism in America.
JAMES ZEIGLER, Norman, Oklahoma, is an assistant professor

NOVEMBER, 208 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0907-0
Ebook available
Race, Rhetoric, and Media Series

of English at the University of Oklahoma.
OCTOBER, 252 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 8 b&w illustrations, bibliography,
index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0971-1
Ebook available
Race, Rhetoric, and Media Series

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MIS S ISSIPPI

29

FOOD  SOUTHERN STATES  RHETORIC

AMERICAN HISTORY  WORLD HISTORY

Consuming Identity

The Port Royal
Experiment

The Role of Food in Redefining the South

NEW IN

Ashli Quesinberry Stokes and Wendy Atkins-Sayre

A Case Study in Development

outherners love to talk
food, quickly revealing
likes and dislikes, regional
preferences, and their own delicious
stories. Because the topic often
crosses lines of race, class, gender,
and region, food supplies a common
fuel to launch discussion. Consuming
Identity sifts through the selfdefinitions, allegiances, and bonds
made possible and strengthened
through the theme of southern
foodways. The book focuses on
the role food plays in building
HOW FOOD SERVES
identities, accounting for the
AS A RHETORICAL
messages food sends about who we
CATALYST FOR
are, how we see ourselves, and how
we see others. While many volumes
DISCUSSION IN A
examine southern food, this one is
CULTURE THAT LOVES
the first to focus on food’s rhetorical
TO EAT, SHARE, AND
qualities and the effect that it can
TALK
have on culture.

The volume examines southern
food stories that speak to the identity of the region, explain
how food helps to build identities, and explore how it enables
cultural exchange. Food acts rhetorically, with what we choose
to eat and serve sending distinct messages. It also serves a
vital identity-building function, factoring heavily into our
memories, narratives, and understanding of who we are. Finally,
because food and the tales surrounding it are so important
to southerners, the rhetoric of food offers a significant and
meaningful way to open up dialogue in the region. By sharing
and celebrating both foodways and the food itself, southerners
are able to revel in shared histories and traditions. In this
way individuals find a common language despite the divisions
of race and class that continue to plague the south. The rich
subject of southern fare serves up a significant starting point for
understanding the powerful rhetorical potential of all food.

Kevin Dougherty

S

ASHLI QUESINBERRY STOKES, Charlotte, North Carolina,

is an associate professor in communication studies and
the director of the Center for the Study of the New South
at University of North Carolina–Charlotte. She is the coauthor of Global Public Relations: Spanning Borders, Spanning
Cultures. WENDY ATKINS-SAYRE, Hattiesburg, Mississippi,
is an associate professor in communication studies and the
director of the Speaking Center at the University of Southern
Mississippi. She is coeditor of Communicating Advice: Peer Tutoring
and Communication Practice.
NOVEMBER, 236 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 15 b&w illustrations,
bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0918-6
Ebook available

30

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Paperback

T

he Port Royal Experiment builds
on classic scholarship to
present not a historical
narrative but a study of what is
now called development and
nation building. The Port
Royal Experiment was a joint
governmental and private effort
begun during the Civil War to
transition former slaves to freedom
and self-sufficiency. Port Royal
Harbor and the Sea Islands off
the coast of South Carolina were
liberated by Union Troops in
AN EXAMINATION OF
1861. As the Federal advance
THE EMANCIPATED
began, the white plantation owners
ISLANDS OF THE
and residents fled, abandoning
approximately 10,000 black slaves.
CAROLINA COAST
Several private northern charity
AND HOW THEIR
organizations stepped in to help
HISTORY SHEDS LIGHT
the former slaves become selfON THE DIFFICULTIES
sufficient. Nonetheless, the Port
Royal Experiment was only a mixed
OF NATION BUILDING
success and was contested by efforts
to restore the status quo of white
dominance. Return to home rule then undid much of what the
experiment accomplished.
The Port Royal Experiment divides into ten chapters, each of

which is designed to treat a particular aspect of the experience.
Topics include planning considerations, philanthropic
society activity, civil society, economic development, political
development, and resistance. Each chapter presents the case
study in the context of more recent developmental and nationbuilding efforts in such places as Bosnia, Somalia, Kosovo,
Iraq, and Afghanistan and incorporates recent scholarship
in the field. Modern readers will see that the challenges that
faced the Port Royal Experiment remain relevant even as their
solutions remain elusive.
KEVIN DOUGHERTY, Charleston, South Carolina, is a tactical
officer and adjunct professor at The Citadel. He is the author
of thirteen books, including The Peninsula Campaign of 1862: A
Military Analysis, Civil War Leadership and Mexican War Experience,
and Weapons of Mississippi, all published by University Press of
Mississippi.
NOVEMBER, 224 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 8 b&w illustrations, 1 map,
bibliography, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0966-7
Ebook available

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

HISTORY  CARIBBEAN STUDIES

CARIBBEAN STUDIES  WORLD WAR II  HISTORY

The Black
Carib Wars

Island at War

NEW IN

Freedom, Survival, and the
Making of the Garifuna

Paperback

Puerto Rico in the Crucible
of the Second World War
Edited by Jorge Rodríguez Beruff
and José L. Bolívar Fresneda

Christopher Taylor

Contributions by Luis Rosario Albert, Fitzroy
André Baptiste, Jorge Rodríguez Beruff,
César Ayala Casás, Rafael Chabrán, Ligia
T. Domenech, José L. Bolívar Fresneda,
Michael Janeway, and Mayra Rosario Urrutia

I

n The Black Carib Wars,
Christopher Taylor offers
the most thoroughly
researched history of the struggle
of the Garifuna people to preserve
their freedom on the island of St.
Vincent.

Today, thousands of Garifuna
people live in Honduras, Belize,
Guatemala, Nicaragua, and the
United States, preserving their
unique culture and speaking a
language that directly descends from
THE MOST DETAILED
that spoken in the Caribbean at the
time of Columbus. All trace their
HISTORY OF THE
origins back to St. Vincent where
BLACK CARIBS OF
their ancestors were native Carib
ST. VINCENT
Indians and shipwrecked or runaway
West African slaves—hence the name
by which they were known to French and British colonialists:
Black Caribs.

In the 1600s they encountered Europeans as adversaries
and allies. But from the early 1700s, white people, particularly
the French, began to settle on St. Vincent. The treaty of Paris
in 1763 handed the island to the British who wanted the Black
Caribs’ land to grow sugar. Conflict was inevitable, and in a
series of bloody wars punctuated by uneasy peace the Black
Caribs took on the might of the British Empire. Over decades
leaders such as Tourouya, Bigot, and Chatoyer organized the
resistance of a society which had no central authority but united
against the external threat. Finally, abandoned by their French
allies, they were defeated, and the survivors deported to Central
America in 1797.
The Black Carib Wars draws on extensive research in Britain,

France, and St. Vincent to offer a compelling narrative of the
formative years of the Garifuna people.
CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR, London, England, is a journalist
who works for the Guardian (London). He is the author of The
Beautiful Game: A Journey through Latin American Football.
JANUARY, 216 pages, 6 x 9 inches, appendices, bibliography, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0956-8
Ebook available
Caribbean Studies Series

NEW IN

Paperback

D

espite Puerto Rico being
the hub of the United
States’ naval response
to the German blockade of the
Caribbean, there is very little
published scholarship on the island’s
heavy involvement in World War
AN ILLUMINATING
II. Recently, a new generation
of scholars has been compiling
STUDY OF THE
interdisciplinary research with fresh
CARIBBEAN ISLAND’S
insights about the profound wartime
CONTRIBUTIONS TO
changes, which in turn generated
conditions for the rapid economic,
THE AMERICAN WAR
social, and political development of
EFFORT
postwar Puerto Rico.
Island at War brings together

outstanding new research on Puerto Rico and makes it
accessible in English. It covers ten distinct topics written by
nine distinguished scholars from the Caribbean and beyond.
Contributors include experts in the fields of history, political
science, sociology, literature, journalism, communications,
and engineering. Topics include US strategic debate and war
planning for the Caribbean on the eve of World War II, Puerto
Rico as the headquarters of the Caribbean Sea frontier, war and
political transition in Puerto Rico, the war economy of Puerto
Rico, the German blockade of the Caribbean in 1942, and the
story of a Puerto Rican officer in the Second World War and
Korea. With these essays and others, Island at War represents the
cutting edge of scholarship on the role of Puerto Rico and the
Caribbean in World War II and its aftermath.

JORGE RODRÍGUEZ BERUFF, Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, is
professor, former director of the Social Science Department,
and former dean of the Faculty of General Studies of the Río
Piedras campus of the University of Puerto Rico. He is the
author and editor of numerous books on Puerto Rico and the
Caribbean. JOSÉ L. BOLÍVAR FRESNEDA, Guaynabo, Puerto
Rico, has published books, journal articles, and newspaper
columns in both Spanish and English on twentieth-century
Puerto Rican history. They are the coeditors of Puerto Rico en la
Segunda Guerra Mundial: Baluarte del Caribe.
DECEMBER, 300 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 32 b&w illustrations, 8 tables,
introduction, bibliography, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0977-3
Ebook available
Caribbean Studies Series

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MI S S I SSIPPI

31

LITERATURE  MYSTERY

POPULAR CULTURE  SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY  MEDIA STUDIES

War Noir

Clockwork Rhetoric

Raymond Chandler and the Hard-Boiled
Detective as Veteran in American Fiction
Sarah Trott

T

he conflation of the hard-boiled style and war
experience has influenced many contemporary crime
writers, particularly in the traumatic aftermath of
the Vietnam War. Yet, earlier writers in the genre, such as
Raymond Chandler, remain overlooked when it comes to
examining how their war experience affected their writing.
Sarah Trott corrects this oversight by examining Chandler
alongside the World War I writers of the Lost Generation
as well as highlighting a melding of very different styles in
Chandler’s work.

Based on Chandler’s experience in combat, Trott
explains that the writer created detective Philip Marlowe not
as the idealization of heroic individualism, as is commonly
perceived, but instead as an
authentic individual subjected to
A RECOGNITION
very real psychological frailties
OF THE INTENSE
from trauma during the First
ROLE WAR TRAUMA
World War. Inspecting Chandler’s
PLAYED IN THE
work and correspondence indicates
that the characterization of the
GREAT WRITER’S
fictional Marlowe goes beyond
CHARACTERS AND
the traditional chivalric readings
LEGACY
and can instead be interpreted
as a genuine representation of
a traumatized veteran in American society. Substituting the
horror of the trenches for the corruption of the city, Chandler
formed a disillusioned protagonist in an uncaring America.
Chandler did so with the sophistication necessary to straddle
genre fiction and canonical literature.

The sum of this work offers a new understanding of how
Chandler uses his war trauma, how that experience established
the traditional archetype of detective fiction, and how this
reading of his fiction enables Chandler to transcend generic
limitations and be recognized as a key twentieth-century
literary figure.
SARAH TROTT, Brigend, South Wales, United Kingdom,

is a lecturer in American studies at Swansea University. She
has published in the edited collection Men After War and the
journal Comparative American Studies.
NOVEMBER, 272 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0864-6
Ebook available

The Language and Style of
Steampunk

NEW IN

Paperback

Edited by Barry Brummett
Contributions by David Beard, Elizabeth
Birmingham, Joshua Gunn, Mirko M.
Hall, Lisa Horton, Andrew Mara, John M.
McKenzie, Kristin Stimpson, Mary Anne
Taylor, John R. Thompson, and Jaime L.
Wright

T

his unique book explores
how the aesthetic and
cultural movement
“Steampunk” persuades audiences
and wins new acolytes. Steampunk
is a style grounded in the Victorian
era, in clothing and accoutrements
HOW THE
modeled on a heightened and
LANGUAGE OF THE
hyperextended age of steam. In
addition to its modeling of attire
IMAGINATIVELY
and other symbolic trappings, what
STYLED MOVEMENT
is most distinctive is its adherents’
ATTRACTS
use of a machined aesthetic
based on steam engines and early
FOLLOWERS TO
electrical machinery—gears, pistons,
STEAMPUNK
shafts, wheels, induction motors,
AESTHETIC
clockwork, and so forth.

Precursors to steampunk can
be found in the works of Jules Verne and H. G. Wells. The
imagery of the American West contributed to the aesthetic—
revolvers, locomotives, and rifles of the late nineteenth century.
Among young people, steampunk has found common cause
with Goth style. Examples from literature and popular culture
include William Gibson’s fiction, China Miéville’s novels, the
classic film Metropolis, and the BBC series Doctor Who. This
volume recognizes that steampunk, a unique popular culture
phenomenon, presents a prime opportunity for rhetorical
criticism.

Steampunk’s art, style, and narratives convey complex
social and political meanings. Chapters in Clockwork
Rhetoric explore topics ranging from jewelry to Japanese anime
to contemporary imperialism to fashion. Throughout, the book
demonstrates how language influences consumers of steampunk
to hold certain social and political attitudes and commitments.
BARRY BRUMMETT, Austin, Texas, is Charles Sapp Centennial
Professor in Communication and chair of the Department
of Communication Studies at the University of Texas. He is
the author of A Rhetoric of Style and Rhetorical Homologies: Form,
Culture, Experience.
NOVEMBER, 208 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 4 b&w illustrations,
bibliography, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0975-9
Ebook available

32

UNIVER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

SPORTS  POPULAR CULTURE  GLOBAL STUDIES

LITERATURE  FAULKNER  HISTORY

More than Cricket
and Football

Faulkner and History
Edited by Jay Watson and James G. Thomas, Jr.

International Sport and the
Challenge of Celebrity

Contributions by W. Fitzhugh Brundage,
Jordan Burke, Rebecca Clark, James C.
Cobb, Anna Creadick, Colin Dayan, Wai
Chee Dimock, Sarah E. Gardner, Hannah
Godwin, Brooks E. Hefner, Andrew B.
Leiter, Sean McCann, Conor Picken, Natalie

Edited by Joel Nathan Rosen and Maureen M. Smith
Foreword by Roberta J. Park
Afterword by Jack Lule
Contributions by Lisa Doris Alexander,
Sean Bell, Benn L. Bongang, Joel S.
Franks, Silvana Vilodre Goellner, Annette
R. Hofmann, Dong Jinxia, Cláudia Samuel
Kessler, Jack Lule, Li Luyang, Mark Panek,
Roberta J. Park, Gamage Harsha Perera,
Nancy E. Spencer, Tim B. Swartz, Viral
Shah, Dominic Standish, Dan Travis,
Theresa A. Walton-Fisette, and Zhong
Yijing

G

iven the presumed
dominance of American
sport, many fans throughout
A PASSPORT TO THE
the hemisphere find it
MANY NATIONS,
difficult to envision the role of
sport beyond the confines of their
SPORTS STARS, AND
own continent. And yet, world sport
SPORTS ACROSS THE
consists of so much more than the
GLOBE
games Americans play and so much
more than the stereotype of cricket
for the elite and football for the working class. As worldwide
sport continues to gain in popularity, we also see parallels to
many aspects visible in North American sport, particularly
celebrity and all its trappings and pitfalls.

The success of athletes from other countries in basketball
and ice hockey, and the proliferation of stars imported and now
exported to and from North America, provides some better
examples of sport’s international power. It also creates a very
new kind of sport celebrity, albeit one that often shows a rather
limited reach beyond that star’s own country or continent.
Thus, rather than focusing on the Western Hemisphere, this
collection of some of world sport’s most heralded celebrities
(including stars of Motocross, surfing, distance running, and
more) serves as a sort of passport to many places that make up
our global sporting environment.
JOEL NATHAN ROSEN, Allentown, Pennsylvania, is associate

professor of sociology at Moravian College in Bethlehem. He is
coeditor of A Locker Room of Her Own: Celebrity, Sexuality, and
Female Athletes; Fame to Infamy: Race, Sport, and the Fall from Grace;
and Reconstructing Fame: Sport, Race, and Evolving Reputations, all
published by University Press of Mississippi. MAUREEN M.
SMITH, Richmond, California, is a professor in the
Department of Kinesiology and Health Science at Sacramento
State University.
DECEMBER, 368 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 2 b&w illustrations,
introduction, foreword, afterword, bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $75.00S 978-1-4968-0988-9
Ebook available

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

J. Ring, and Calvin Schermerhorn

W

illiam Faulkner remains
a historian’s writer. A
distinguished roster of
historians have referenced Faulkner
A STIMULATING
in their published work. They are
TREATMENT OF
drawn to him as a fellow historian,
THE INTERSECTION
a shaper of narrative reflections
on the meaning of the past; as a
BETWEEN HISTORY
historiographer, a theorist, and
AND LITERATURE
dramatist of the fraught enterprise
IN THE NOBEL
of doing history; and as a historical
figure himself, especially following
LAUREATE’S WORK
his midcentury emergence as a
public intellectual after winning the Nobel Prize for Literature.

This volume brings together historians and literary
scholars to explore the many facets of Faulkner’s relationship
to history: the historical contexts of his novels and stories; his
explorations of the historiographic imagination; his engagement
with historical figures from both the regional and national
past; his influence on professional historians; his pursuit of
alternate modes of temporal awareness; and the histories of print
culture that shaped the production, reception, and criticism of
Faulkner’s work.

Contributors draw on the history of development in the
Mississippi Valley, the construction of Confederate memory, the
history and curriculum of Harvard University, twentieth-century
debates over police brutality and temperance reform, the history
of modern childhood, and the literary histories of antislavery
writing and pulp fiction to illuminate Faulkner’s work. Others
in the collection explore the meaning of Faulkner’s fiction for
such professional historians as C. Vann Woodward and Albert
Bushnell Hart. In these ways and more, Faulkner and History
offers fresh insights into one of the most persistent and longrecognized elements of the Mississippian’s artistic vision.
JAY WATSON, Oxford, Mississippi, is Howry Professor of

Faulkner Studies and professor of English at the University
of Mississippi. He is the editor of Conversations with Larry Brown,
Faulkner and Whiteness, and coeditor of Faulkner’s Geographies
and Fifty Years after Faulkner (published by University Press of
Mississippi). JAMES G. THOMAS, JR., Oxford, Mississippi,
is associate director for publications at the University of
Mississippi’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture.
He is editor of Conversations with Barry Hannah (published by
University Press of Mississippi) and an editor for the twentyfour-volume New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.
FEBRUARY, 264 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 6 b&w illustrations,
introduction, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0997-1
Ebook available
Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Series

UN I V E R S IT Y P R E S S O F MIS S ISSIPPI

33

MUSIC  MUSIC HISTORY  AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

The Original Blues
The Emergence of the Blues in
African American Vaudeville
Lynn Abbott and Doug Seroff

I

n this volume, Lynn Abbott
and Doug Seroff complete their
groundbreaking trilogy on the
development of African American
popular music, authoritatively connecting
the black vaudeville movement with the
explosion of blues that followed. At the end
of the nineteenth century, vaudeville began
to replace minstrelsy as America’s favorite
form of stage entertainment. Segregation
necessitated the creation of discrete African
American vaudeville theaters. When these
AN INVALUABLE
venues first gained popularity, ragtime coon
MUSICAL HISTORY
songs were the standard fare. Black vaudeville
DOCUMENTING THE
theaters provided a safe haven where coon
ADVENT OF THE
songs could be rehabilitated. Dynamic
interaction between the performers and their
BLUES IN BLACK
audience unleashed creative energies that
VAUDEVILLE
accelerated the development of the blues.

The first blues star of black vaudeville
was Butler “String Beans” May, a blackface comedian, pianist, singer,
and dancer from Montgomery, Alabama. Before his senseless death in
1917, he was recognized as the “blues master piano player of the world.”
His legacy, elusive and previously unacknowledged, is preserved in the
repertoire of country blues singer-guitarists and pianists of the Race
recording era.

While male blues singers remained tethered to the role of blackface
comedian, female “coon shouters” acquired a more dignified aura in the
emergent persona of the “blues queen.” Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, and
most of their contemporaries came through this portal; while others,
including forgotten blues heroine Ora Criswell and her protégé Trixie
Smith, reconfigured the use of blackface for their own subversive purposes.

In 1921 black vaudeville was effectively nationalized by the Theater
Owners Booking Association (T.O.B.A.). In collusion with the emergent
Race recording industry, T.O.B.A. theaters featured touring companies
headed by blues queens with records to sell. While the 1920s was the most
celebrated and remunerative period of vaudeville blues, the previous
decade was arguably the most creative, having witnessed the emergence,
popularization, and early development of the original blues in southern
theaters.
LYNN ABBOTT, New Orleans, Louisiana, works at the Hogan Jazz
Archive, Tulane University. DOUG SEROFF, Greenbrier, Tennessee, is
an independent scholar. Together they are the coauthors of Out of Sight:
The Rise of African American Popular Music, 1889-1895; Ragged but Right: Black
Traveling Shows, “Coon Songs,” and the Dark Pathway to Blues and Jazz; and
To Do This, You Must Know How: Music Pedagogy in the Black Gospel Quartet
Tradition, all published by University Press of Mississippi.
FEBRUARY, 480 pages (approx.), 8 x 10 inches, 187 b&w illustrations, index
Cloth $85.00S 978-1-4968-1002-1
Ebook available
American Made Music Series

BOOKS BY

Lynn Abbott and
Doug Seroff
Out of Sight
The Rise of African American
Popular Music, 1889-1895

A CHOICE Outstanding
Academic Title of 2003
“A product of old-fashioned,
back-wearying, foundational
scholarship, yet very readable,
this book is certain to feature
importantly in future studies
of early jazz and its prehistory. Highly recommended.”
—Library Journal
Paper $40.00S 978-1-60473-244-3

Ragged but Right
Black Traveling Shows, “Coon
Songs,” and the Dark Pathway
to Blues and Jazz

A CHOICE Outstanding
Academic Title of 2007
“Drawing from primary
sources—mainly newspapers—
the authors offer a vivid
history (enhanced by many
illuminating illustrations)
of the period…. [F]ascinating to lay readers and scholars
alike, the four appendixes offer specifics about group
membership and tour itineraries…. Summing Up:
Essential.”
—CHOICE, D.R. de Lerma, Lawrence University
Paper $40.00S 978-1-61703-645-3

To Do This, You
Must Know How
Music Pedagogy in the
Black Gospel Quartet Tradition

“To Do This, You Must Know
How is essential reading for
the serious student as well
as the armchair enthusiast
of African American sacred
music. Abbott and Seroff’s
unquestionable streetlevel command of the subject, and their passion for
the music, make the book a pleasure to explore and a
significant contribution to American music scholarship.
FIVE OF FIVE STARS.”
—Bob Marovich, Journal of Gospel Music
Paper $40.00S 978-1-4968-0248-4

Photograph: Bessie Smith and Wayne “Buzzin’” Burton, 1912

34

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

MUSIC  POPULAR CULTURE

CARIBBEAN STUDIES  MUSIC  POLITICAL SCIENCE

Yodeling and Meaning
in American Music

Musical Life
in Guyana

Timothy E. Wise

T

imothy E. Wise presents
the first book to focus
specifically on the musical
content of yodeling in our culture.
He shows that yodeling serves an
aesthetic function in musical texts.
A series of chronological chapters
analyzes this musical tradition from
its earliest appearances in Europe
to its incorporation into a range of
American genres and beyond. Wise
posits the reasons for yodeling’s
changing status in our music. How
THE FIRST
and why was yodeling introduced
into professional music making in
MUSICOLOGICAL
the first place? What purposes has it
AND IDEOLOGICAL
served in musical texts? Why was it
EXAMINATION OF A
expunged from classical music? Why
RICH TRADITION
did it attach to some popular music
genres and not others? Why does
yodeling now appear principally at
the margins of mainstream tastes?

To answer such questions, Wise applies the perspectives
of critical musicology, semiotics, and cultural studies to the
changing semantic associations of yodeling in an unexplored
repertoire stretching from Beethoven to Zappa. This volume
marks the first musicological and ideological analysis of this
prominent but largely ignored feature of American musical life.

Maintaining high scholarly standards but keeping the
general reader in mind, the author examines yodeling in
relation to ongoing cultural debates about singing, music as art,
social class, and gender. Chapters devote attention to yodeling
in nineteenth-century classical music, the nineteenth-century
Alpine-themed song in America, the Americanization of the
yodel, Jimmie Rodgers, and cowboy yodeling, among other
topics.
TIMOTHY E. WISE, Manchester, United Kingdom, was born
and reared in Texas and is a senior lecturer in musicology at the
University of Salford, England. A member of the International
Association for the Study of Popular Music, he has published
work in Radical Musicology, American Music, the Musical Quarterly,
Popular Music, and the Journal of American Folklore.
SEPTEMBER, 272 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 2 b&w illustrations,
48 musical examples, 2 tables, bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0580-5
Ebook available
American Made Music Series

History and Politics of
Controlling Creativity
Vibert C. Cambridge

NEW IN

Paperback

M

usical Life in Guyana is the
first in-depth study of
Guyanese musical life. It
is also a richly detailed description of
the social, economic, and political
conditions that have encouraged and
sometimes discouraged musical and
cultural creativity in Guyana. The
book contributes to the study of the
interactions between the policies and
practices by national governments
and musical communities in the
Caribbean.

Vibert C. Cambridge explores
A STUDY OF HOW
these interactions in Guyana during
CARIBBEAN MUSIC
the three political eras that the
society experienced as it moved
AND IDENTITY
from being a British colony to an
EVOLVE WHEN
independent nation. The first era
THE GOVERNMENT
to be considered is the period of
CONTROLS ALL MEDIA mature colonial governance, guided
by the dictates of “new imperialism,”
which extended from 1900 to
1953. The second era, the period of internal self-government
and the preparation for independence, extends from 1953,
the year of the first general elections under universal adult
suffrage, to 1966, the year when the colony gained its political
independence. The third phase, 1966 to 2000, describes the
early postcolonial era.

Cambridge reveals how the issues of race, class, gender,
and ideology deeply influenced who in Guyanese multicultural
society obtained access to musical instruction and media outlets
and thus who received recognition. He also describes the close
connections between Guyanese musicians and Caribbean
artists from throughout the region and traces the exodus of
Guyanese musicians to the great cities of the world, a theme
often neglected in Caribbean studies. The book concludes
that the practices of governance across the twentieth century
exerted disproportionate influence in the creation, production,
distribution, and consumption of music.
VIBERT C. CAMBRIDGE, Athens, Ohio, is professor emeritus,

School of Media Arts and Studies, Ohio University and
President, Guyana Cultural Association of New York, Inc.
He is the author of Immigration, Diversity, and Broadcasting in
the United States, 1990–2001 and coeditor of International Afro
Mass Media. His work has appeared in such journals as Arts
Journal (Guyana), Caribbean Affairs, and Studies in Latin American
Popular Culture.
SEPTEMBER, 390 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 19 b&w illustrations,
11 tables, bibliography, index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0976-6
Ebook available
Caribbean Studies Series

Order online at www.upress.state.ms.us

UN I V E R S IT Y P R E S S O F MIS S ISSIPPI

35

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES  DIASPORA STUDIES  AFRICAN STUDIES

RELIGION  AMERICAN HISTORY  BRITISH HISTORY

The Pinkster King and
the King of Kongo

Inventing
George Whitefield

Jeroen Dewulf

Jessica M. Parr

The Forgotten History of America’s DutchOwned Slaves

T

he Pinkster King and the King
of Kongo presents the history of the nation’s forgotten Dutch slave community and free
Dutch-speaking African Americans
from seventeenth-century New
Amsterdam to nineteenth-century
New York and New Jersey. It also
develops a provocative new interpretation of one of America’s most
intriguing black folkloric traditions,
Pinkster. Jeroen Dewulf rejects the
usual interpretation of this celebration of a “slave king” as a form of
A RECOVERY OF THE
carnival. Instead, he shows that it is a
TRANSFORMATIVE SIGritual rooted in mutual-aid and slave
NIFICANCE OF PENTEbrotherhood traditions. By placing
COST CELEBRATIONS
these traditions in an Atlantic
context, Dewulf identifies striking
AND FRATERNAL
parallels to royal election rituals in
ORDERS ON AFRICAN
slave communities elsewhere in the
AMERICAN IDENTITY
Americas, and he traces these rituals
to the ancient Kingdom of Kongo
and the impact of Portuguese culture in West-Central Africa.

Dewulf’s focus on the social capital of slaves follows the
mutual aid to seventeenth-century Manhattan. He suggests a
much stronger impact of Manhattan’s first slave community on
the development of African American identity in New York and
New Jersey than hitherto assumed.

While the earliest works on slave culture in a North
American context concentrated on an assumed process of
assimilation according to European standards, later studies
pointed out the need to look for indigenous African continuities. The Pinkster King and the King of Kongo suggests the necessity
for an increased focus on the substantial contact that many
Africans had with European—primarily Portuguese—cultures
before they were shipped as slaves to the Americas. The book has
already garnered honors as the winner of the Richard O. Collins Award in African Studies, the New Netherland Institute
Hendricks Award, and the Clague and Carol Van Slyke Prize.
JEROEN DEWULF, Berkeley, California, is associate professor
of Dutch studies at the University of California, and director of Berkeley’s Institute of European Studies. He is author
of Spirit of Resistance: Dutch Clandestine Literature during the Nazi
Occupation and coeditor of Shifting the Compass: Pluricontinental
Connections in Dutch Colonial and Postcolonial Literature.

Race, Revivalism, and the
Making of a Religious Icon

NEW IN

Paperback

E

vangelicals and scholars
of religious history have
long recognized George
Whitefield (1714–1770) as a
founding father of American
evangelicalism. But Jessica M.
Parr argues he was much more
than that. He was an enormously
influential figure in AngloAmerican religious culture, and
his expansive missionary career can
be understood in multiple ways.
Whitefield began as an Anglican
clergyman. Many in the Church
A THOROUGH
of England perceived him as a
RECKONING OF THE
radical. In the American South,
EVOLVING IDEAS
Whitefield struggled to reconcile his
AND LEGACY OF A
disdain for the planter class with his
belief that slavery was an economic
FOUNDING FORCE
necessity. Whitefield was drawn to
IN AMERICAN
an idealized Puritan past that was all
EVANGELISM
but gone by the time of his first visit
to New England in 1740.

Parr draws from Whitefield’s writing and sermons and
from newspapers, pamphlets, and other sources to understand
Whitefield’s career and times. She offers new insights into
revivalism, print culture, transatlantic cultural influences,
and the relationship between religious thought and slavery.
Whitefield became a religious icon shaped in the complexities
of revivalism, the contest over religious toleration, and the
conflicting role of Christianity for enslaved people. Proslavery
Christians used Christianity as a form of social control for
slaves, whereas evangelical Christianity’s emphasis on “freedom
in the eyes of God” suggested a path to political freedom. Parr
reveals how Whitefield’s death marked the start of a complex
legacy that in many ways rendered him more powerful and
influential after his death than during his long career.
JESSICA M. PARR, Exeter, New Hampshire, is a historian
specializing in race and religion in the early modern British
Atlantic world. She currently teaches at the University of New
Hampshire at Manchester.
NOVEMBER, 232 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 9 b&w illustrations, bibliography,
index
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0963-6
Ebook available

JANUARY, 320 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 12 b&w illustrations, bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-0881-3
Ebook available

36

UNIV ER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Call: 1.800.737.7788 toll-free

HISTORY  RELIGION  LOUISIANA

RELIGION

Spiritualism in
Nineteenth-Century
New Orleans

The Life and Times of Henry Louis Rey
Melissa Daggett

M

odern American
Spiritualism blossomed
in the 1850s and
continued as a viable faith into
the 1870s. Because of its diversity
and openness to new cultures
and religions, New Orleans
provided fertile ground to nurture
Spiritualism, and many séance
circles flourished in the Creole
Faubourgs of Tremé and Marigny
as well as the American sector of
the city. Melissa Daggett focuses
on Le Cercle Harmonique, the
EXTRAORDINARY
francophone séance circle of Henry
INSIGHT TO CREOLES
Louis Rey (1831–1894), a Creole
OF COLOR AND THEIR of color who was a key civil rights
activist, author, and Civil War
RELIGIOUS CULTURE
and Reconstruction leader. His
life has so far remained largely in
the shadows of New Orleans history, partly due to a language
barrier.
Spiritualism in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans focuses on

the turbulent years between the late antebellum period and the
end of Reconstruction. Translating and interpreting numerous
primary sources and one of the only surviving registers of
séance proceedings, Daggett has opened a window into a
fascinating life as well as a period of tumult and change. She
provides unparalleled insights into the history of the Creoles
of color and renders a better understanding of New Orleans’s
complex history. The author weaves an intriguing tale of the
supernatural, of chaotic postbellum politics, of transatlantic
linkages, and of the personal triumphs and tragedies of Rey
as a notable citizen and medium. Wonderful illustrations,
reproductions of the original spiritual communications, and
photographs, many of which have never before appeared in
published form, accompany this study of Rey and his world.
MELISSA DAGGETT, Houston, Texas, and New Orleans,
Louisiana, is an instructor of United States history at San
Jacinto College in Pasadena, Texas. Her work has appeared in
Louisiana History.

Religion in the South

Botánicas

Sacred Spaces of Healing and
Devotion in Urban America

EDITED BY CHARLES REAGAN WILSON
Paper $25.00D 978-1-60473-410-2

JOSEPH M. MURPHY
Printed casebinding $40.00T
978-1-62846-207-4

Sacred Light

Holy Places in Louisiana

A Charlie Brown Religion

A. J. MEEK
ESSAY BY MARCHITA B. MAUCK
Cloth $35.00T 978-1-60473-741-7

Exploring the Spiritual Life
and Work of Charles M. Schulz

STEPHEN J. LIND
Cloth $25.00T 978-1-4968-0468-6

Santería Garments
and Altars
Speaking without a Voice

YSAMUR FLORES-PEÑA
AND ROBERTA J. EVANCHUK
Paper $30.00S 978-1-61703-067-3

Religion in Mississippi
RANDY J. SPARKS
Paper $30.00R 978-1-61703-316-2

JANUARY, 208 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 25 b&w illustrations,
1 map, chronology, bibliography, index
Printed casebinding $65.00S 978-1-4968-1008-3
Ebook available

Voodoo Queen

The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau
MARTHA WARD
Cloth $30.00T 978-1-57806-629-2

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UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MI S S I SSIPPI

37

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RECENTLY PUBLISHED
Chocolate Surrealism

Faulkner and Film

Music, Movement, Memory, and
History in the Circum-Caribbean

EDITED BY PETER LURIE
AND ANN J. ABADIE
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NJOROGE NJOROGE
Printed casebinding $65.00S
978-1-4968-0689-5
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Faulkner and the Black
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City of Remembering

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A History of Genealogy in
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Bars, Blues, and Booze
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EMILY D. EDWARDS
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Bertrand Tavernier
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SUSAN TUCKER
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The Comics of Hergé
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J. LEE ANNIS JR.
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Cultural Representation and the
Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Black and Brown Planets
The Politics of Race in Science Ficiton

History, Culture, and Community
in Japan
EDITED BY MARK MCLELLAND, KAZUMI
NAGAIKE, KATSUHIKO SUGANUMA,
AND JAMES WELKER
Paper $30.00S 978-1-4968-0776-2
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Called to Heal the
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Stories from Kairos Prison Ministry
International
WILLIAM H. BARNWELL
AFTERWORD BY JED HORNE
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Chenier Plain
RICHARD B. CROWELL
FOREWORD BY JACQUES L. WIENER JR.
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40

Creating Jazz
Counterpoint
VIC HOBSON
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The Godfather of Mississippi

Boys Love Manga
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EDITED BY JOHN ZHENG
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New Orleans, Barbershop
Harmony, and the Blues

Big Jim Eastland

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Confessions of an
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CHARLIE SPILLERS
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The Construction
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The Sacraments of Hunting
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DONALD C. JACKSON
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Delta Rainbow
The Irrepressible Betty Bobo Pearson
SALLY PALMER THOMASON
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Forging the Past
Seth and the Art of Memory
DANIEL MARRONE
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Free Jazz/Black Power
PHILIPPE CARLES AND
JEAN-LOUIS COMOLLI
TRANSLATED BY
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From Daniel Boone
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Playing Indian in American
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CHAD A. BARBOUR
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From Madea to
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EDITED BY M. THOMAS INGE
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EDENFIELD
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RUSSWORM, SAMANTHA N. SHEPPARD,
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FOREWORD BY ERIC PIERSON
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Richard Wright Writing
America at Home and
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The Screen is Red
Hollywood, Communism,
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Mary Wickes
A Girl’s Got To Breathe
The Life of Teresa Wright
DONALD SPOTO
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I Know I’ve Seen That Face Before
STEVE TARAVELLA
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STEFFEN HANTKE
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Mothers in Children’s and
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MAAHEEN AHMED
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R. KIM RUSHING
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VICTOR SVORINICH
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My Triumph over
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Projections of Passing

Little Red Readings

MARTHA WYATT-ROSSIGNOL
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Historical Materialist Perspectives on
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AND DOMINICK GRACE
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Generating Meaning within
Flexible Structures

Populism in the
South Revisited

Listen to This

Conversations

Openness of Comics

From the Eighteenth Century
to Postfeminism

EDITED BY ROBERT MOSES PEASLEE
AND ROBERT G. WEINER
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Seth

EDITED BY MARC C. CONNER
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RICHARD CARLIN
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JAMES F. BARNETT JR.
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Ralph Ellison and the
Twenty-First Century

Morris Levy

John Cassavetes

A History to 1735

The New Territory

Godfather of the
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EDITED BY WENDY C. GRENADE
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The Natchez Indians

BERNARD F. DICK
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A Memoir

Myself and the World

EDITED BY JAMES M. BEEBY
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Postwar Anxieties and Hollywood
Films, 1947-1960
N. MEGAN KELLEY
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Sitting Pretty
The Life and Times of Clifton Webb
CLIFTON WEBB
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So the Heffners
Left McComb
HODDING CARTER II
PREFACE BY OLIVER EMMERICH
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BY TRENT BROWN
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Stanley Kubrick
Adapting the Sublime
ELISA PEZZOTTA
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A Biography of William Faulkner

Reading in the Dark

ROBERT W. HAMBLIN
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Horror in Children’s Literature
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Things like the Truth

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ELLEN GILCHRIST
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Out of My Later Years

UN IV E R S I T Y P R E S S O F MIS S ISSIPPI

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RECENTLY PUBLISHED

MISSISSIPPI
Christmas Memories
from Mississippi

Wednesdays in Mississippi
Proper Ladies Working for Radical
Change, Freedom Summer 1964

EDITED BY CHARLINE R. MCCORD
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DEBBIE Z. HARWELL
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What She Go Do

Christmas Stories
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Women in Afro-Trinidadian Music
HOPE MUNRO
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America’s Great Storm

This Woman’s Work

Leading through Hurricane Katrina

The Writing and Activism of Bebe
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HALEY BARBOUR WITH JERE NASH
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OSIZWE RAENA JAMILA HARWELL
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An Alphabet

Three Years in
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The Disney Brothers, C.V. Wood, and
the Making of the Great American
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TODD JAMES PIERCE
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Todd Haynes

Walter Anderson
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Blues Traveling
Willie
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TERESA NICHOLAS
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The Holy Sites of Delta Blues,
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STEVE CHESEBOROUGH
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Win the Race or Die
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Under Surge, Under Siege

JACK B. MCGUIRE
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ELLIS ANDERSON
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Van Johnson
MGM’s Golden Boy

Writing in the Kitchen

A Voice That Could
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Fannie Lou Hamer and the Rhetoric
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Essays on Southern Literature
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MAEGAN PARKER BROOKS
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A Vulgar Art
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IAN BRODIE
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42

EDITED BY CHARLINE R. MCCORD
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Women Artists of the
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RONALD L. DAVIS
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UNIVER S IT Y P RE SS O F M I SSI SSI P P I

Major Campaigns and Battles

Coming Home to
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Uncle Earl’s Last Hurrah

EDITED BY AMY HELENE KIRSCHKE
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The Civil War in
Mississippi

MICHAEL B. BALLARD
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Interviews

The Odyssey of Bay St. Louis
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EDITED BY JUDY H. TUCKER AND
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Bright Fields
The Mastery of Marie Hull
BRUCE LEVINGSTON
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MICHAELA MERRYDAY
CONTRIBUTIONS BY
JON LEVINGSTON, PHILIP
JACKSON, AND MARY GARRARD
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Delta Dogs
MAUDE SCHUYLER CLAY
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Choctaw Tales
COLLECTED AND ANNOTATED
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FOREWORD BY CHIEF PHILLIP
MARTIN
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Ed King’s Mississippi
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Jack Cristil

One Writer’s Garden

Voice of the MSU Bulldogs,
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Eudora Welty’s Home Place
SUSAN HALTOM
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PHOTOGRAPHS BY LANGDON CLAY
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SID SALTER
FOREWORD BY JOHN GRISHAM
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Juke Joint
PHOTOGRAPHS BY BIRNEY IMES
INTRODUCTORY ESSAY BY
RICHARD FORD
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Fish and Wildlife
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Mississippi Hill
Country Blues 1967

ADAM T. ROHNKE AND
JAMES L. CUMMINS
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True Crime Stories from a Federal
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JOHN HAILMAN
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The Story and Photography of the
Southern Documentary Project
MATT HERRON
FOREWORD BY JOHN DITTMER
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A Handbook for Mississippi
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From Midnight to
Guntown

Mississippi Eyes

GEORGE MITCHELL
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Looking Back
Mississippi
Towns and Places
FORREST LAMAR COOPER
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My Mississippi
WILLIE MORRIS
PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID RAE
MORRIS
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Photographs
EUDORA WELTY
FOREWORD BY REYNOLDS PRICE
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Return to Guntown

Classic Trials of the Outlaws and
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JOHN HAILMAN
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Mississippi
Archaeology Q & A
EVAN PEACOCK
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New Delta Rising
EDITED AND PHOTOGRAPHED
BY MAGDALENA SOLÉ
INTRODUCTION BY RICK BRAGG
TEXT BY BARRY H. SMITH
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Growing Up in
Mississippi
EDITED BY JUDY H. TUCKER AND
CHARLINE R. MCCORD
FOREWORD BY RICHARD FORD
ILLUSTRATED BY WYATT WATERS
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Hurricane Katrina
The Mississippi Story

JAMES PATTERSON SMITH
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The Mississippi
Cookbook
THE MISSISSIPPI COOPERATIVE
EXTENSION SERVICE
FOREWORD BY MARTHA HALL FOOSE
Paper $25.00T 978-0-87805-381-0
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Mississippi
Entrepreneurs
POLLY DEMENT
FOREWORD BY JESSE L. WHITE JR.
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A New History of
Mississippi
DENNIS J. MITCHELL
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Samuel M. Gore

Blessed with Tired Hands
BARBARA GAUNTT
FOREWORD BY WYATT WATERS
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Wilder Ways
DONALD C. JACKSON
ILLUSTRATED BY ROBERT T. JACKSON
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Once in a Lifetime
Reflections of a Mississippi
First Lady
ELISE VARNER WINTER
EDITED BY JOANNE PRICHARD
MORRIS
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LOUISIANA
Chenier Plain

The Gorilla Man and the
Empress of Steak

RICHARD B. CROWELL
FOREWORD BY JACQUES L. WIENER JR.
Cloth $34.95T 978-1-4968-0694-9
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A New Orleans Family Memoir
RANDY FERTEL
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0413-6
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City of Remembering
A History of Genealogy in
New Orleans
SUSAN TUCKER
Cloth $35.00T 978-1-4968-0621-5
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The Amazing
Crawfish Boat

Eyes of an Eagle
Jean-Pierre Cenac, Patriarch
An Illustrated History of Early
Houma-Terrebonne

JOHN LAUDUN
Cloth $30.00T 978-1-4968-0420-4
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CHRISTOPHER E. CENAC SR., M.D.,
F.A.C.S.
WITH CLAIRE DOMANGUE JOLLER
FOREWORD BY CARL A. BRASSEAUX
Cloth $49.95T 978-0-615-47702-2
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Angola to Zydeco
Louisiana Lives
R. REESE FULLER
Cloth $25.00T 978-1-61703-129-8
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Fear and What Follows
Creole Trombone
Kid Ory and the Early Years of Jazz
JOHN MCCUSKER
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The Violent Education of a
Christian Racist, a Memoir
TIM PARRISH
Paper $25.00T 978-1-62846-193-0
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The House That
Sugarcane Built
The Louisiana Burguières
DONNA MCGEE ONEBANE
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Inventing New Orleans
Writings of Lafcadio Hearn
EDITED AND WITH AN INTRODUCTION
BY S. FREDERICK STARR
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Dictionary of
Louisiana French
As Spoken in Cajun, Creole, and
American Indian Communities

Cajun and Creole Folktales
The French Oral Tradition of
South Louisiana

SENIOR EDITOR ALBERT VALDMAN
ASSOCIATE EDITOR KEVIN J. ROTTET
Printed case with jacket $40.00S
978-1-60473-403-4
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COLLECTED AND ANNOTATED BY
BARRY JEAN ANCELET
Paper $25.00R 978-0-87805-709-2
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The French Quarter
of New Orleans
TEXT BY JIM FRAISER
PHOTOGRAPHS BY WEST FREEMAN
Cloth $45.00T 978-1-57806-524-0

The Garden District
of New Orleans

The Cajuns
Americanization of a People

The Lakes of Pontchartrain

SHANE K. BERNARD
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TEXT BY JIM FRAISER
PHOTOGRAPHS BY WEST FREEMAN
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Their History and Environments

Called to Heal the
Brokenhearted

Getting Off at
Elysian Fields

Les Cadiens et leurs
ancêtres acadiens

Stories from Kairos Prison
Ministry International
WILLIAM H. BARNWELL
AFTERWORD BY JED HORNE
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978-1-4968-0525-6
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Down on the Batture
OLIVER A. HOUCK
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Obituaries from the New Orleans
“Times-Picayune”
JOHN POPE
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ROBERT W. HASTINGS
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l’histoire racontée aux jeunes
SHANE K. BERNARD
TRANSLATED BY FAUSTINE HILLARD
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LOUISIANA

Livestock Brands
and Marks
An Unexpected Bayou Country History
1822–1946 Pioneer Families
Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana
CHRISTOPHER E. CENAC SR., M.D.,
F.A.C.S.
WITH CLAIRE DOMANGUE JOLLER
FOREWORD BY CLIFTON THERIOT
Cloth $69.95T 978-0-9897594-0-3
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New Orleans Cuisine
Fourteen Signature Dishes and
Their Histories
EDITED BY SUSAN TUCKER
FOREWORD BY S. FREDERICK STARR
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A Unique Slant of Light

TABASCO®

An Illustrated History
SHANE K. BERNARD
FOREWORD BY
PAUL C. P. MCILHENNY
Cloth $49.95T 978-0-9797808-0-6

The Bicentennial History of Art
in Louisiana
EDITED BY MICHAEL SARTISKY
AND J. RICHARD GRUBER
ASSOCIATE EDITOR JOHN R. KEMP
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Voodoo Queen

New Orleans Memories

The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau

One Writer’s City

MARTHA WARD
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CAROLYN KOLB
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Win the Race or
Die Trying
Uncle Earl’s Last Hurrah

Talking New
Orleans Music

Crescent City Musicians Talk
about Their Lives, Their Music,
and Their City
BURT FEINTUCH
PHOTOGRAPHS BY GARY SAMSON
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Louisiana Rambles
Exploring America’s Cajun and
Creole Heartland
IAN MCNULTY
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Louisiana Voyages
The Travel Writings of Catharine Cole
MARTHA R. FIELD
EDITED BY JOAN B. MCLAUGHLIN
AND JACK MCLAUGHLIN
Paper $22.00T 978-1-57806-826-5
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New Orleans con
Sabor Latino
The History and Passion of
Latino Cooking
ZELLA PALMER CUADRA
PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATALIE ROOT
FOREWORD BY CHEF ADOLFO GARCIA
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JACK B. MCGUIRE
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New Orleans Sketches
WILLIAM FAULKNER
EDITED BY CARVEL COLLINS
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Sacred Light

Holy Places in Louisiana
A.J. MEEK
ESSAY BY MARCHITA B. MAUCK
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Second Line Rescue
Improvised Responses to
Katrina and Rita

EDITED BY BARRY JEAN ANCELET,
MARCIA GAUDET, AND
CARL LINDAHL
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Une Belle Maison

The Lombard Plantation House in
New Orleans’s Bywater
S. FREDERICK STARR
PHOTOGRAPHY AND
ILLUSTRATIONS BY
ROBERT S. BRANTLEY
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Women Pioneers of the
Louisiana Environmental
Movement
PEGGY FRANKLAND
WITH SUSAN TUCKER
Paper $25.00T 978-1-4968-0244-6
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You Are Where You Eat
Stories and Recipes from the
Neighborhoods of New Orleans
ELSA HAHNE
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OUTSIDER ART: Visionary Worlds and Trauma, page 2

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