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Wyn Priscilla Teo

Working with Parents


I have met a few parents and was involved in multiple discussions with 2 of
them.
Tommy (A Pseudonym)
The first child, Tommy, had been very uncooperative in class. He has no learning
disabilities as far we know but his behavioural issues include not following
instructions, not doing his work and leaving the classroom whenever he wishes to.
Some other examples of uncooperative behavior include toppling over waterbottles,
trays, spilling water deliberately and grabbing and throwing other students bags at
the corridor. He refuses to do his spelling, reading and writing or participate in group
activities.
My mentor and I had regular meetings with Tommys mother. We also sat
together with her and the deputy head to work out an IEP for Tommy. The IEP included
a rewards system for cooperation and scenario cards for him to produce and gain
permission to have a timeout in a quiet place or outside the class. The reward was to
spend time with the deputy playing games. We also adjusted the level of his spelling
book (as he did not want to do the lower level). The scenario cards were to be done by
mum. Unfortunately, they contained slightly inappropriate pictures and we had to
redo them.
The IEP was communicated to Tommy and he tried for a few days to work with
the teacher. There was a slight improvement and he participated in some class work.
However, there were still issues of him choosing what classwork to do what not to. He
was also still not following instructions from the teacher 50% of the time. About 2
weeks after the implementation of the IEP, Tommy walked out of class after scoring
badly for a spelling exercise from the book he chose to do. He also refused to
participate in the art lesson and was opening and closing the room door incessantly,
causing disruption. On 10 Mar, his mother spoke to the principal to ask for a change
of class and this was approved. On 14 Mar, Tommy moved on to another Year 5
classroom.
John (A Pseudonym)
John is an intelligent and high-ability student but he has self-harming
tendencies. He also tends to get very disruptive when his mood is negatively affected

Wyn Priscilla Teo

by certain things that happens in school or outside school. I met with his father a few
times together with my mentor.
Though there is no need yet for an IEP for this child, we talked to the father on
our concerns about Johns psychological and emotional well-being. Johns father also
comes regularly after school and chats with myself and my mentor about his behavior
in school for that day. I provide feedback to the father about Johns behavior in my
lessons and in class generally. I also work with my mentor to offer John a supportive
environment and encourage him to be a role-model and to self-manage his thoughts
and behavior in the midst of circumstances that may disturb or annoy him.
Johns behavior and attitude has improved somewhat after some positive
reinforcement. His father also seems to be paying more attention to him after our
talks with him. We are continuing to monitor the progress and keeping in touch with
the father through the regular feedback sessions after school.